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Sample records for hemorrhagic complications occurred

  1. Symptomatic hemorrhagic complications associated with dural substitutes

    Po-Yuan Chen

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The increased risk of hemorrhagic complications associated with craniotomy is modified by choice of dural replacement. Our results could assist clinicians in their decision-making with respect to the optimal timing for synthetic dural substitutes in patients with tumor infiltration of the patient's dura, severe brain swelling in traumatic brain injury, or a result of shrinkage from exposure and electrocautery.

  2. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy.

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE.

  3. Statins and risk of poststroke hemorrhagic complications

    MacIsaac, Rachael L.; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H.; Siegerink, Bob; Bath, Philip M.; Endres, Matthias; Lees, Kennedy R.; Nolte, Christian H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether statin treatment before or after acute ischemic stroke (AIS) affects the risk of acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), postacute ICH, and mortality within 90 days. Methods: Data were sought from the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive, an international repository of clinical trials data. Using propensity score matching, we retrospectively compared patients with prior statin treatment and newly initiated statin within 3 days after AIS to patients without statin exposure. Outcomes of interest were acute symptomatic ICH (sICH), any acute ICH, postacute ICH, and mortality during follow-up of 3 months. Results: A total of 8,535 patients (mean age 70 years, 54% male, median baseline NIH Stroke Scale score 13) were analyzed. After propensity score matching, prior statin use was not strongly associated with sICH (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.83–2.14) or any ICH (adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.92–1.98). There was no evidence of an interaction between prior statin use and thrombolysis. New initiation of statins was not associated with postacute ICH (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.60, 95% CI 0.70–3.65). There was a signal towards lower 90-day mortality in patients with prior statin use (adjusted HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.70–1.00) and especially early initiation of statins (adjusted HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.46–0.97). Conclusions: Statin use prior to AIS was not associated with early hemorrhagic complications, irrespective of treatment with thrombolysis. New initiation of statin treatment early after AIS did not affect risk of postacute ICH, but might be associated with reduced mortality. PMID:27016519

  4. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  5. Interventional therapy of hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    Liang Songnian; Feng Bo; Su Hongying; Xu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the causes and clinical manifestations of hepatic arterial hemorrhage which occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and to summarize the practical experience in its diagnosis and treatment in order to decrease its incidence and mortality. Methods: During the period from June 2007 to June 2010, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was carried out in 622 cases, of which DSA-proved postoperative hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred in 11, including bile duct hemorrhage (n=6), abdominal cavity bleeding (n=3) and combination of bile duct and abdominal cavity (n=2). Interventional embolization of the bleeding branches of hepatic artery with Gelfoam and coils was carried out in all 11 patients. The clinical data such as clinical manifestations and therapeutic results were retrospectively analyzed. Results: After interventional embolization therapy for postoperative hepatic arterial hemorrhage the bleeding stopped in ten patients, who were discharged from hospital when the clinical conditions were alleviated. The remaining one patient died of sustained deterioration in hepatic and renal functions although the bleeding was ceased. Conclusion: Though hepatic arterial hemorrhage occurred after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a rare complication, it is dangerous and fatal. Hepatic arterial angiography together with interventional embolization is a sate and effective therapy for hepatic arterial hemorrhage. (authors)

  6. Intracerebral hemorrhage complicating viral hepatitis A | Belfquih ...

    HVA IgM. Eight 8 weeks after, she developed hemorrhagic syndrome coupled with fever associated and persistent jaundice. The blood count showed aregenerative pancytopenia secondary to aplastic anemia confirmed by bone marrow biopsy.

  7. Risk factors for medical complications of acute hemorrhagic stroke

    Jangala Mohan Sidhartha

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Our study has assessed that hypertension followed by diabetes mellitus are the major risk factors for medical complications of hemorrhagic stroke. Female mortality rate was more when compared to males.

  8. LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OCCURRING DURING DENTAL IMPLANTATION

    Tihomir Georgiev

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the emergence of new concepts in dental treatment involving placement of dental implants and the significance of therapeutic treatment of the intrusion in their complications. The purpose of the article is to make a review of the problems and to point out options for their treatment.

  9. Pheochromocytoma complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage - a case report

    Nogueira, Aline Silva; Marchiori, Edson; Almeida, Fabiola Assuncao de; Martins, Renata Romano; Sales, Anderson Ribeiro; Santos, Tereza Cristina C.R.S. dos; Reis, Simone Teixeira; Silveira, Sonia Marcelino T. da

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of pheochromocytoma that was complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage in a 17-year-old female patient. Computed tomography showed a solid mass, heterogeneous, on the right adrenal. The patient underwent a right adrenalectomy. She is being observed by our out-patients clinic, presenting normal blood pressure levels and a left hemiparesis. (author)

  10. Auto-immune haematological complications occurring during the ...

    Auto-immune haematological complications occurring during treatment for malignant Iymphoproliferative diseases are described in 5 patients. There appeared to be a temporal relationship between the development of these complications and the administration of chemotherapeutic drugs or extensive radiotherapy.

  11. Pulmonary hemorrhage complicating radiofrequency ablation, from mild hemoptysis to life-threatening pattern

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Naguib, Nagy N.N.; Mack, Martin; Abskharon, John E.; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    To assess risk factors and the extent of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of pulmonary neoplasms. This retrospective study involved 248 ablation sessions for lung tumors (20 primary lesions and 228 metastatic lesions) in 164 patients (mean age 59.7 years, SD: 10.2). Both unipolar and bipolar radiofrequency systems were used under CT fluoroscopic guidance. Extent and underlying factors associated with development of pulmonary hemorrhage were analyzed. Incidence of intra-parenchymal pulmonary hemorrhage, pleural effusion, and hemoptysis were 17.7% (44/248 sessions), 4% (8/248 sessions), and 16.1% (40/248 sessions), respectively. Death because of massive bleeding occurred in one session (0.4%). Significant risk factors associated with intra-parenchymal hemorrhage included: lesions of <1.5 cm diameter (P = 0.007); basal and middle lung zone lesions (P = 0.026); increased needle track distance traversing the lung parenchyma >2.5 cm (P = 0.0017); traversing pulmonary vessels in the track of ablation (P < 0.001); and the use of multi-tined electrodes (P = 0.004). Concomitant incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage and pneumothorax was 29.2% (14/48 sessions). While typically safe, RFA of pulmonary neoplasms can result in pulmonary hemorrhage ranging from mild to life-threatening. Management of this complication is mainly preventive through adequate patient selection for ablation therapy and exclusion of technically avoidable risk factors. (orig.)

  12. Kidney Damage in Hemorrhagic Vasculitis Occurring in Childhood and Adulthood

    O.V. Syniachenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nephropathy is diagnosed in 30–60 % of patients with hemorrhagic vasculitis (HV (Schönlein Henoch puprupa and occurred in each fourth of them in the onset of the disease and with the same incidence at first recurrence of the patho­logical process. In recent years, the relative and absolute number of patients with this form of glomerular disease significantly increased. According to the results of the kidney biopsy in children, Henoch glomerulonephritis (HGN is the most common variant of the secondary immunoglobulin (Ig A nephritis. The nature of the clinical course and morphological manifestations of the HGN in patients with HV, which began in childhood and adulthood, remains unexplored. This was the purpose and objectives of this study. Materials and methods. The study included 174 patients with HV (83 % of men and 47 % of women. In 92 cases, vasculitis debuted in children (on average in 12 years, and in 82 — in the adults (on average in 25 years. I, II and III degree of activity of pathological process are set at a ratio of 1 : 2 : 2. Seropositivity for high levels of IgA occurred in 40 % of cases, by the presence of rheumatoid factor — in 27 %. At the time of the survey, cutaneous syndrome was diagnosed in 68 % of patients in the form of urticarial, hemorrhagic, papule-nodular, papule-necro­tic, pustular-ulcerative, necrotic-ulcerative, nodose-ulcerative and polymorphic forms, and articular syndrome — in 48 %. In 24 cases, kidney biopsy was performed. Results. Renal disease was revealed in 71 % of patients with HV, while on the background of nephropathy the integral index of the severity of extrarenal patho­logy was significantly higher. According to the characteristics of the articular syndrome, patients with nephropathy and without it differed little among themselves. The severity of muscle syndrome has the impact on the development of the HV. In turn, renal pathology significantly influenced the development

  13. Airway complication occurring during radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yoneyama, Tatsuya; Michigishi, Takatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Airway complications rarely occur in 131 I radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. This study presents two cases in which 131 I therapy caused this acute complication. The patients complained of the symptom 6 h and 33 h after administration of 131 I. A histamine H1 receptor antagonist and hydrocortisone rapidly resolved symptoms in both cases. These two cases remind physicians that 131 I therapy for Graves' disease may cause potentially life-threatening complications. (author)

  14. Auto-immune Haematological Complications Occurring during the ...

    1974-10-19

    Oct 19, 1974 ... Immunohaematological disorders may complicate the clini- cal course of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, lymphocytic lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.'" Auto- immune haemolytic anaemia is the most common of these complications, occurring in approximately 10 - 25'% of patients with ...

  15. Hemorrhagic Shock as Complication of Intramural Intestinal Bleeding

    Asma Ben Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mural intestinal hematoma (MIH is an uncommon complication of anticoagulant therapy. Hemorrhagic shock has been rarely reported as a revealing modality. Results. We report two cases of shock induced by mural intestinal hematoma in patients under oral anticoagulant for aortic prosthetic valve and atrial fibrillation. Patients were admitted to the ICU for gastrointestinal tract bleeding associated with hemodynamic instability. After resuscitation, an abdominal CT scan has confirmed the diagnosis showing an extensive hematoma. Medical treatment was sufficient and there was no need for surgery. Conclusion. Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with shock in patients treated by oral anticoagulant should alert physicians to research a probable MIH. Urgent diagnosis and appropriate medical treatment can avoid surgical interventions.

  16. Anterior pituitary lobe atrophy as late complication of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    Jovanović Dragan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is acute infective multisystemic disease followed by febrility, hemorrhages and acute renal insufficiency. Bleeding in the anterior pituitary lobe leading to tissue necrosis occurs in acute stage of severe clinical forms of HFRS, while atrophy of the anterior pituitary lobe with diminution of the gland function occurs after recovery stage. Case report. We presented a patient with the development of chronic renal insufficiency and hypopituitarism as complication that had been diagnosed six years after Hantavirus infection. Magnetic resonance of the pituitary gland revealed atrophy and empty sella turcica. Conclusion. Regarding frequency of this viral infection and its endemic character in some parts of our country partial and/or complete loss of pituitary function should be considered during the late stage of HFRS.

  17. Percutaneous treatment of complications occurring during hemodialysis graft recanalization

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T. E-mail: constant@pol.net; Schur, Israel; Koh, Elsie; Hinrichs, Clay; Cooper, Stanley G.; Welber, Adam; Brountzos, Elias; Kelekis, Dimitris

    2003-09-01

    Introduction/objective: To describe and evaluate percutaneous treatment methods of complications occurring during recanalization of thrombosed hemodialysis access grafts. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of 579 thrombosed hemodialysis access grafts revealed 48 complications occurring during urokinase thrombolysis (512) or mechanical thrombectomy (67). These include 12 venous or venous anastomotic ruptures not controlled by balloon tamponade, eight arterial emboli, 12 graft extravasations, seven small hematomas, four intragraft pseudointimal 'dissections', two incidents of pulmonary edema, one episode of intestinal angina, one procedural death, and one distant hematoma. Results: Twelve cases of post angioplasty ruptures were treated with uncovered stents of which 10 resulted in graft salvage allowing successful hemodialysis. All arterial emboli were retrieved by Fogarty or embolectomy balloons. The 10/12 graft extravasations were successfully treated by digital compression while the procedure was completed and the graft flow was restored. Dissections were treated with prolonged Percutaneous Trasluminal Angioplasty (PTA) balloon inflation. Overall technical success was 39/48 (81%). Kaplan-Meier Primary and secondary patency rates were 72 and 78% at 30, 62 and 73% at 90 and 36 and 67% at 180 days, respectively. Secondary patency rates remained over 50% at 1 year. There were no additional complications caused by these maneuvers. Discussions and conclusion: The majority of complications occurring during percutaneous thrombolysis/thrombectomy of thrombosed access grafts, can be treated at the same sitting allowing completion of the recanalization procedure and usage of the same access for hemodialysis.

  18. Intracranial hemorrhage complicating thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    Uglietta, J.P.; Boyko, O.B.; O'Connor, C.M.; Aldrich, H.; Massey, E.W.; Heinz, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the incidence and types of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in 1,696 patients treated with thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Thirteen of 1,696 patients experienced ICH, and their nonenhanced brain CT scans were reviewed. Their mean age was 62 years (range, 53-74 years), and nine of 13 were male. Six patients received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), four streptokinase, two urokinase, and one tPA and urokinase. The hemorrhages were classified according to CT location: intraparenchymal (IPH), subarachnoid (SAH), subdural (SDH), and intraventricular (IVH). The incidence of ICH was 0.76%. There were 31 hemorrhages in 13 patients. Twelve hemorrhages were IPH, 10 were SDH, seven were SAH, and two were IVH. Excluding IVH, 24 of 29 hemorrhages (83%) were supratentorial

  19. Dasatinib-induced hemorrhagic colitis complicated with cytomegalovirus infection

    Aya Nakaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old man with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia was initially treated with 100 mg dasatinib once a day. Despite a major molecular response within 9 months, he developed hemorrhagic colitis 32 months after starting dasatinib. Colonoscopy identified multiple hemorrhagic ulcers in the transverse colon. The pathological findings indicated cytomegalovirus infection. Dasatinib was stopped and he was started on ganciclovir. Three months later, colonoscopy confirmed the disappearance of the hemorrhagic ulcers. Dasatinib is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia. As a multi-kinase inhibitor that acts on SRC-family kinases, its broader off-target kinase-inhibitory activity may account for the adverse events of dasatinib. Although gastrointestinal bleeding is common in patients taking dasatinib, the combination of cytomegalovirus infection and hemorrhagic colitis in the absence of systemic immunodeficiency is rare. Based on this case of dasatinibinduced hemorrhagic colitis with cytomegalovirus infection, we describe a possible mechanism and effective treatment.

  20. Spontaneous adrenal pheochromocytoma rupture complicated by intraperitoneal hemorrhage and shock

    Kwasnik Edward

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MEN2A is a hereditary syndrome characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, hyperparathyroidism, and pheochromocytoma. Classically patients with a pheochromocytoma initially present with the triad of paroxysmal headaches, palpitations, and diaphoresis accompanied by marked hypertension. However, although reported as a rare presentation, spontaneous hemorrhage within a pheochromocytoma can present as an abdominal catastrophe. Unrecognized, this transformation can rapidly result in death. We report the only documented case of a thirty eight year old gentleman with MEN2A who presented to a community hospital with hemorrhagic shock and peritonitis secondary to an unrecognized hemorrhagic pheochromocytoma. The clinical course is notable for an inability to localize the source of hemorrhage during an initial damage control laparotomy that stabilized the patient sufficiently to allow emergent transfer to our facility, re-exploration for continued hemorrhage and abdominal compartment syndrome, and ultimately angiographic embolization of the left adrenal artery for control of the bleeding. Following recovery from his critical illness and appropriate medical management for pheochromocytoma, he returned for interval bilateral adrenal gland resection, from which his recovery was unremarkable. Our review of the literature highlights the high mortality associated with the undertaking of an operative intervention in the face of an unrecognized functional pheochromocytoma. This reinforces the need for maintaining a high index of suspicion for pheochromocytoma in similar cases. Our case also demonstrates the need for a mutimodal treatment approach that will often be required in these cases.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of arteriobiliary hemorrhage occurring after percutaneous biliary drainage

    Eversman, W.G.; Welch, T.J.; May, G.R.; Bender, C.E.; Williams, H.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Hemorrhage due to arteriobiliary communication occurred in 15 of 500 patients after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD). Hemorrhage produced a distinct clinical syndrome and occurred sooner after PBD in patients with benign disease (eight patients, mean of 1.5 weeks) than in patients with neoplastic obstruction (seven patients, mean of 11.5 weeks). In eight patients the author identified the bleeding vessel by contrast agent injection into the transhepatic tract, and in four we were able to embolize this vessel via the transhepatic tract. Eleven patients underwent hepatic arteriography, which identified contrast agent extravasation or arterial abnormality. Angiographic embolization was possible in eight of the 11. Embolization via the transhepatic tube tract should be attempted first, with angiographic embolization as a backup

  2. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Saif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history.

  3. [Application of antihelicobacter therapy in patients, suffering pyloroduodenal zone ulcers, complicated by hemorrhage].

    Iaroshenko, K O

    2012-02-01

    There were examined 113 patients, suffering pyloroduodenal zone ulcers, complicated by an acute hemorrhage. H. pylori was revealed in 108 (96%) patients. To escape a false-negative results a serological method was applied, which was used to determine a content of IgG antibodies to H. pylori with the help of diagnostic panel GastroPanel (Biohit PLc firm, Finland). The H. pylori presence in patients must be considered as a risk factor for the early recurrent hemorrhage occurrence. A timely conducted examination, determination of H. pylori and timely prescription of antihelicobacter therapy promote the improvement of the treatment results in patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcers, complicated by an acute hemorrhage due to reduction of the occurrence rate of early recurrence of hemorrhage.

  4. Hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications in patients with myeloproliferative diseases

    Carla Valladares Vignal

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To correlate the incidence of hemorrhage and thrombosis to bleeding time (BT and platelet aggregation in 27 consecutive patients with myeloproliferative diseases (MPD. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING: Public tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Eighteen patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, 5 with polycytemia vera (PV, 2 with essential thrombocytemia (ET and 2 with idiopathic myelofibrosis (MF. Duke's BT and epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation were performed on the patients and on 10 healthy individuals. RESULTS: Eleven patients presented symptoms (41 %: 9 with hemorrhage (33% and 5 with thrombosis (19%.There were less symptomatic patients in the CML group (28% than in the other MPD (67%, without statistical significance (Fisher, p=0.06. Duke's BT was longer in symptomatic patients (Mann-Whitney, p<0.05. Platelet aggregation was abnormal in 7 patients (26% and 71% of them were symptomatic (Fisher, p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: The high incidence of bleeding and thrombosis in patients with MPD was related to prolonged BT, but not to platelet aggregation abnormalities.

  5. Hemorrhagic Complications of Percutaneous Cryoablation for Renal Tumors: Results from a 7-year Prospective Study

    Kakarala, Bharat; Frangakis, Constantine E.; Rodriguez, Ron; Georgiades, Christos S.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeCryoablation of renal tumors is assumed to have a higher risk of hemorrhagic complications compared to other ablative modalities. Our purpose was to establish the exact risk and to identify hemorrhagic risk factors.Materials and MethodsThis IRB approved, 7-year prospective study included 261 renal cryoablations. Procedures were under conscious sedation and CT guidance. Pre- and postablation CT was obtained, and hemorrhagic complications were CTCAE tabulated. Age, gender, tumor size, histology, and probes number were tested based on averages or proportions using their exact permutation distribution. “High-risk” subgroups (those exceeding the thresholds of all variables) were tested for each variable alone, and for all combinations of variable threshold values. We compared the subgroup with the best PPV using one variable, with the subgroup with the best PPV using all variables (McNemmar test).ResultsThe hemorrhagic complication rate was 3.5 %. Four patients required transfusions, two required emergent angiograms, one required both a transfusion and angiogram, and two required bladder irrigation for outlet obstruction. Perirenal space hemorrhage was more clinically significant than elsewhere. Univariate risks were tumor size >2 cm, number of probes >2, and malignant histology (P = 0.005, 0.002, and 0.033, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that patients >55 years with malignant tumors >2 cm requiring 2 or more probes yielded the highest PPV (7.5 %).ConclusionsAlthough older patients (>55 years old) with larger (>2 cm), malignant tumors have an increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, the low PPV does not support the routine use of embolization. Percutaneous cryoablation has a 3.5 % risk of significant hemorrhage, similar to that reported for other types of renal ablative modalities.

  6. Hemorrhagic Complications of Percutaneous Cryoablation for Renal Tumors: Results from a 7-year Prospective Study

    Kakarala, Bharat, E-mail: bkakara1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: bharat.kakarala@gmail.com [Johns Hopkins University, Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Frangakis, Constantine E., E-mail: cfrangak@jhsph.edu [Johns Hopkins University, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health (United States); Rodriguez, Ron, E-mail: rodriguezr32@uthscsa.edu [University of Texas Health Science Center, Urologic Surgery (United States); Georgiades, Christos S., E-mail: g-christos@hotmail.com [Johns Hopkins University (United States)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeCryoablation of renal tumors is assumed to have a higher risk of hemorrhagic complications compared to other ablative modalities. Our purpose was to establish the exact risk and to identify hemorrhagic risk factors.Materials and MethodsThis IRB approved, 7-year prospective study included 261 renal cryoablations. Procedures were under conscious sedation and CT guidance. Pre- and postablation CT was obtained, and hemorrhagic complications were CTCAE tabulated. Age, gender, tumor size, histology, and probes number were tested based on averages or proportions using their exact permutation distribution. “High-risk” subgroups (those exceeding the thresholds of all variables) were tested for each variable alone, and for all combinations of variable threshold values. We compared the subgroup with the best PPV using one variable, with the subgroup with the best PPV using all variables (McNemmar test).ResultsThe hemorrhagic complication rate was 3.5 %. Four patients required transfusions, two required emergent angiograms, one required both a transfusion and angiogram, and two required bladder irrigation for outlet obstruction. Perirenal space hemorrhage was more clinically significant than elsewhere. Univariate risks were tumor size >2 cm, number of probes >2, and malignant histology (P = 0.005, 0.002, and 0.033, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that patients >55 years with malignant tumors >2 cm requiring 2 or more probes yielded the highest PPV (7.5 %).ConclusionsAlthough older patients (>55 years old) with larger (>2 cm), malignant tumors have an increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, the low PPV does not support the routine use of embolization. Percutaneous cryoablation has a 3.5 % risk of significant hemorrhage, similar to that reported for other types of renal ablative modalities.

  7. [Clinical observation and related factors analysis of neonatal asphyxia complicated with retinal hemorrhage].

    Pu, Q L; Zhou, Q Y; Liu, J; Li, P; Huang, H F; Jiang, H Q

    2017-05-11

    Objective: To observe and analyze related factors of neonatal asphyxia complicated with retinal hemorrhage. Methods: It was a retrospective case series. Seven hundred and twenty-one cases with neonatal asphyxia after 72 hours of birth were enrolled in this study. Fundus examination was performed on these newborns using the third generation wide-angle digital retina imaging system (RetCamⅢ), and the bleeding level was divided into level I, level Ⅱ and level Ⅲ. The conditions of the newborn and the mother during pregnancy were correlatively analyzed. The other factors were also analyzed including delivery mode, birth weight, gestational age, gender, grade of neonatal asphyxia, scalp hematoma, intracranial hemorrhage, fetal intrauterine distress, mother's age and antenatal complications. Single factor χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to screen and judge risk factors causing retinal hemorrhage related to neonatal asphyxia. Results: In 721 cases of neonatal asphyxia, retinal hemorrhage was found in 204 newborns (28.29%). The hemorrhage was at level Ⅰ in 77 cases (37.75%) , at level Ⅱ in 38 cases (18.63%) and at level Ⅲ in 89 cases (43.63%) . Four cases also had vitreous hemorrhage. Asphyxia was mild in 673 infants (93.34%) and severe in 48 infants (6.66%). The difference in the degree of retinal hemorrhage between the patients with mild and severe asphyxia was significant (χ(2)=22.336, P= 0.000). When asphyxia was aggravated, the degree of retinal hemorrhage increased. Relative factors analysis showed that delivery mode (χ(2)=158.643, Pneonatal asphyxia (χ(2)=19.809, Phemorrhage. Logistic regression analysis indicated that grade of neonatal asphyxia and delivery mode were risk factors of retinal hemorrhage in neonatal asphyxia ( OR= 0.304, 0.085). Conclusion: The incidence of retinal hemorrhage in neonatal asphyxia was 28.29%. The degree of neonatal asphyxia and delivery mode may play roles in the occurrence of retinal

  8. Intraventricular Hemorrhage after Epidural Blood Patching: An Unusual Complication

    Mohammad Sorour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present two cases of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH believed to be a result of epidural blood patching. The first was a 71-year-old woman who had new onset of nontraumatic IVH on computed tomography (CT scan after undergoing an epidural blood patch (EBP. This amount of intraventricular blood was deemed an incidental finding since it was of very small volume to account for her overall symptoms. The second patient, a 29-year-old woman, was found to have nontraumatic IVH three days after undergoing an EBP. This was seen on CT scan of the head for workup of pressure-like headaches, nausea, vomiting, and absence seizures. Conservative management was followed in both instances. Serial CT scan of the head in our first patient displayed complete resolution of her IVH. The second patient did not have follow-up CT scans because her overall clinical picture had improved significantly. This highlights a potential sequel of EBP that may be observed on CT scan of the head. In the event that IVH is detected, signs and symptoms of hydrocephalus should be closely monitored with the consideration for a future workup if warranted by the clinical picture.

  9. Severe bilateral adrenal hemorrhages in a newborn complicated by persistent adrenal insufficiency

    Zessis, Nicholas R; Nicholas, Jennifer L; Stone, Stephen I

    2018-01-01

    Summary Bilateral adrenal hemorrhages rarely occur during the neonatal period and are often associated with traumatic vaginal deliveries. However, the adrenal gland has highly regenerative capabilities and adrenal insufficiency typically resolves over time. We evaluated a newborn female after experiencing fetal macrosomia and a traumatic vaginal delivery. She developed acidosis and acute renal injury. Large adrenal hemorrhages were noted bilaterally on ultrasound, and she was diagnosed with a...

  10. Emergency Peripartum Hysterectomy as Postpartum Hemorrhage Treatment: Incidence, Risk factors, and Complications

    Meena Pradhan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the research was to investigate incidence, risk factors, and complications associated with emergency peripartum hysterectomy, the ultimate treatment method for intractable postpartum hemorrhage. Methods: This is a single center case-control study conducted in Chongqing city in central China from 1st January 2007 to 31st December 2012 for emergency peripartum hysterectomy performed as a treatment of postpartum hemorrhage both in caesarean and vaginal delivery cases. While the study group included emergency peripartum hysterectomy (n=61 due to intractable postpartum hemorrhage, the control group included no hysterectomy (n=333 during the same study period. Results: We found 61 cases recorded for emergency peripartum hysterectomy for intractable postpartum hemorrhage. Incidence of peripartum hysterectomy was 2.2 per 1000 deliveries. Emergency peripartum hysterectomy as treatment of intractable postpartum hemorrhage include the followings: (i blood loss 1000-2000 ml, crude odd ratio (OR =18.48 (95% CI 5.1-65.7, adjusted odd ratio (AOR = 9.1 (95% CI 2.2-37.7; (ii blood loss >2000 ml, OR = 152 (95% CI 43.7-528.4, AOR = 45.3 (95% CI 11.6-176.9; (iii previous caesarean section, OR = 5.5 (95% CI 2.9-9.7, AOR = 3.7(95% CI 1.4-9.9; (iv uterine atony, OR = 11.9 (95% CI 5.8-24.6, AOR = 7.5 (95% CI 1.8-30.2; (v placenta previa, OR = 2.04 (95% CI 1.1-3.5, AOR = none. Conclusions: Emergency peripartum hysterectomy is the last resort as treatment of intractable severe postpartum hemorrhage. Our study depicts that severe post partum hemorrhage, further dreaded complex events for emergency peripartum hysterectomy, has significant association with placental factors, previous caesarean section, and uterine atony. Pathologically, placenta accreta remained the most leading cause of hysterectomy. Keywords: caesarean section; hemorrhage; peripartum hysterectomy; placenta previa.

  11. Severe bilateral adrenal hemorrhages in  a  newborn complicated by persistent adrenal insufficiency

    Nicholas R Zessis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral adrenal hemorrhages rarely occur during the neonatal period and are often associated with traumatic vaginal deliveries. However, the adrenal gland has highly regenerative capabilities and adrenal insufficiency typically resolves over time. We evaluated a newborn female after experiencing fetal macrosomia and a traumatic vaginal delivery. She developed acidosis and acute renal injury. Large adrenal hemorrhages were noted bilaterally on ultrasound, and she was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency based on characteristic electrolyte changes and a low cortisol (4.2 μg/dL. On follow-up testing, this patient was unable to be weaned off of hydrocortisone or fludrocortisone despite resolution of hemorrhages on ultrasound. Providers should consider bilateral adrenal hemorrhage when evaluating critically ill neonates after a traumatic delivery. In extreme cases, this may be a persistent process.

  12. Agitation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Frequent Omen of Hospital Complications Associated with Worse Outcomes.

    Reznik, Michael E; Schmidt, J Michael; Mahta, Ali; Agarwal, Sachin; Roh, David J; Park, Soojin; Frey, Hans Peter; Claassen, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Agitated delirium is frequent following acute brain injury, but data are limited in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We examined incidence, risk factors, and consequences of agitation in these patients in a single-center retrospective study. We identified all patients treated with antipsychotics or dexmedetomidine from a prospective observational cohort of patients with spontaneous SAH. Agitation was confirmed by chart review. Outcomes were assessed at 12 months using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS), and Lawton IADL (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) scores. Independent predictors were identified using logistic regression. From 309 SAH patients admitted between January 2011 and December 2015, 52 (17 %) developed agitation, frequently in the first 72 h (50 %) and in patients with Hunt-Hess grades 3-4 (12 % of grades 1-2, 28 % of grades 3-4, 8 % of grade 5). There was also a significant association between agitation and a history of cocaine use or prior psychiatric diagnosis. Agitated patients were more likely to develop multiple hospital complications; and in half of these patients, complications were diagnosed within 24 h of agitation onset. Agitation was associated with IADL impairment at 12 months (Lawton >8; p = 0.03, OR 2.7, 95 % CI, 1.1-6.8) in non-comatose patients (Hunt-Hess 1-4), but not with functional outcome (mRS >3), cognitive impairment (TICS ≤30), or ICU/hospital length of stay after controlling for other predictors. Agitation occurs frequently after SAH, especially in non-comatose patients with higher clinical grades. It is associated with the development of multiple hospital complications and may have an independent impact on long-term outcomes.

  13. Hemorrhagic Cardiac Tamponade: Rare Complication of Radiofrequency Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Loh, Kok Beng; Bux, Shaik Ismail; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Mokhtar, Raja Amin Raja; Mohamed, Rosmawati [Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    Local treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been widely used in clinical practice due to its minimal invasiveness and high rate of cure. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is widely used because its treatment effectiveness. However, some serious complications can arise from percutaneous RFA. We present here a rare case of hemorrhagic cardiac tamponade secondary to an anterior cardiac vein (right marginal vein) injury during RFA for treatment of HCC.

  14. Delayed treatment with ADAMTS13 ameliorates cerebral ischemic injury without hemorrhagic complication.

    Nakano, Takafumi; Irie, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Sano, Kazunori; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yuta; Satho, Tomomitsu; Fujioka, Masayuki; Muroi, Carl; Matsuo, Koichi; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Futagami, Kojiro; Mishima, Kenichi

    2015-10-22

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, delayed tPA treatment increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage and can result in exacerbation of nerve injury. ADAMTS13, a von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving protease, has a protective effect against ischemic brain injury and may reduce bleeding risk by cleaving VWF. We examined whether ADAMTS13 has a longer therapeutic time window in ischemic stroke than tPA in mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). ADAMTS13 (0.1mg/kg) or tPA (10mg/kg) was administered i.v., immediately after reperfusion of after 2-h or 4-h MCAO for comparison of the therapeutic time windows in ischemic stroke. Infarct volume, hemorrhagic volume, plasma high-mobility group box1 (HMGB1) levels and cerebral blood flow were measured 24h after MCAO. Both ADAMTS13 and tPA improved the infarct volume without hemorrhagic complications in 2-h MCAO mice. On the other hand, ADAMTS13 reduced the infarct volume and plasma HMGB1 levels, and improved cerebral blood flow without hemorrhagic complications in 4-h MCAO mice, but tPA was not effective and these animals showed massive intracerebral hemorrhage. These results indicated that ADAMTS13 has a longer therapeutic time window in ischemic stroke than tPA, and ADAMTS13 may be useful as a new therapeutic agent for ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical Management of Severe Spontaneous Hemorrhage of the Abdominal Wall Complicating Acenocoumarol Treatment

    Orestis Ioannidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acenocoumarol is a vitamin K antagonist that is used for the treatment of acquired and congenital, both arterial and venous, thrombotic diseases. Its use is complicated by the narrow therapeutic range. Bleeding following oral anticoagulation, despite rare, remains the major complication. Most cases of hemorrhagic episodes usually require short hospitalization and transfusion, while surgical drainage of the hematoma is not recommended. However, in cases that conservative treatment isn’t successful, surgical intervention remains an option. We present a case of severe spontaneous bleeding of the rectus abdominis muscle which was successfully managed surgically.

  16. Hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty.

    Park, Kyung Soon; Diwanji, Sanket R; Kim, Hyung Keun; Song, Eun Kyoo; Yoon, Taek Rim

    2009-08-01

    Iliopsoas bursitis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of total hip arthroplasty and is usually associated with polyethylene wear. Here, the authors report a case of hemorrhagic iliopsoas bursitis complicating an otherwise well-functioning ceramic-on-ceramic arthroplasty performed by minimal invasive modified 2-incision technique. The bursitis in turn resulted in femoral nerve palsy and femoral vein compression. In this report, there was no evidence to support that the bursitis was due to an inflammatory response to ceramic wear particles or any other wear particles originating from the total hip arthroplasty.

  17. Severe bleeding complications other than intracranial hemorrhage in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: a case series and review of the literature.

    Winkelhorst, Dian; Kamphuis, Marije M; de Kloet, Liselotte C; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico

    2016-05-01

    The most feared bleeding complication in fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is an intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). However, FNAIT may also lead to other severe bleeding problems. The aim was to analyze this spectrum and evaluate the occurrence of severe hemorrhages other than ICH in fetuses or neonates with FNAIT. A retrospective chart analysis of cases of FNAIT presenting with severe bleeding complications other than ICH at our institution from 1990 to 2015 was conducted. Additionally, a review of the literature was performed to identify case reports and case series on FNAIT presenting with extracranial hemorrhage. Of 25 fetuses or neonates with severe bleeding due to FNAIT, three had isolated severe internal organ hemorrhage other than ICH, two pulmonary hemorrhages and one gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Two of these three neonates died due to this bleeding. Eighteen cases of extracranial bleeding complications as a first presentation of FNAIT were found in the literature, including ocular, gastrointestinal, spinal cord, pulmonary, renal, subgaleal, and genitourinary hemorrhages. Bleeding complications other than ICH may be more extensive, and the presentation of FNAIT may have a greater spectrum than previously described. A high index of suspicion on the possible diagnosis of FNAIT with any bleeding complication in a fetus or neonate may enable adequate diagnostics, adequate treatment, and appropriate follow-up in future pregnancies, as is especially relevant for FNAIT. © 2016 AABB.

  18. Hemorrhagic intra splenic pseudocyst as a complication of chronic pancreatitis in acute phase - a case report

    Almeida, Fabiola Assuncao de; Marchiori, Edson; Mello, Walter de Assis; Nogueira, Aline Silva; Sales, Anderson Ribeiro; Martins, Renata Romano; Santos, Tereza Cristina C.R.S. dos

    1999-01-01

    The authors report a case of hemorrhagic intra splenic pseudocyst as a complication of chronic pancreatitis in acute phase. A 43-year-old woman, chronic alcoholic, who had pancreatitis 5 years ago, with symptoms of strong abdominal pain in the epigastrium, nausea and fever. Abdominal sonography showed a lesion contiguous to the spleen and computed tomography demonstrated an heterogeneous lesion of not well defined limits, in the lateral and posterior parts of the spleen. The patient was submitted to Roux-Y cystojejunostomy, he does not present any symptoms at the moment, and is undergoing clinical control. (author)

  19. Vascular-Rheological Properties of Blood in Hemorrhagic Vasculitis Occurring in Childhood and Adulthood

    V.V. Gerasymenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. As a result of the immune-inflammatory necrotic changes in the walls of arterioles and capillaries in patients with hemorrhagic vasculitis (HV Henoch — Schönlein endothelial dysfunction of vessels occurs, contributing to violations of blood rheological properties and microcirculation. These processes depend on the age of patients, and in cases of onset of the disease in childhood and adulthood are unknown. Objective: to study vascular and rheological properties of blood serum in HV and to compare the indices with different age of the debut of the pathological process in the groups of patients. Material and methods. The study included 174 patients with HV (83 % men and 17 % women. In 92 patients, the disease made its debut in childhood (on average in 12 years old, and in 82 — in the adult (on average in 25 years old. I, II and III degree of activity of pathological process are set at a ratio of 1 : 2 : 2. Indicators of vascular endothelial function were investigated by immune-enzyme analysis and the adsorption-rheological pro­perties of blood were assessed by computer tensiometry. Results. HV is accompanied by severe disorders of the blood vascular and rheological properties which are involved in the pathogenesis of lesions of skin (endothelin-1, surface tension, joints (only surface activity, kidney (prostacyclin, cyclic guanosine monophosphate and heart (endothelin-1, viscoelastic modulus. At that the integrated indicators of vascular endothelial function, viscoelastic, surface-active and relaxation characteristics of serum depend on the age of the patients in the beginning of the disease, the degree of activity of the pathological process, the clinical form of the disease course, necrotic-ulcerative and polymorphic variants of cutaneous vasculitis, and HV, transforming from juvenile, occurs with lower blood levels of endothelin-1, but with a higher concentration of thromboxane A2, cyclic guanosine monophosphate and

  20. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Indications, Technique, Results, and Complications

    Soyer, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.soyer@lrb.aphp.fr; Dohan, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.dohan@lrb.aphp.fr; Dautry, Raphael, E-mail: raphael-dautry@yahoo.fr; Guerrache, Youcef, E-mail: docyoucef05@yahoo.fr [Hôpital Lariboisière-AP-HP, Department of Abdominal and Interventional Imaging (France); Ricbourg, Aude, E-mail: aude.ricbourg@lrb.aphp.fr [Hôpital Lariboisière-AP-HP, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (France); Gayat, Etienne, E-mail: etienne.gayat@lrb.aphp.fr [Diderot-Paris 7, Université-Sorbonne Paris-Cité (France); Boudiaf, Mourad, E-mail: mourad.boudiaf@lrb.aphp.fr; Sirol, Marc, E-mail: marc.sirol@lrb.aphp.fr; Ledref, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.ledref@lrb.aphp.fr [Hôpital Lariboisière-AP-HP, Department of Abdominal and Interventional Imaging (France)

    2015-10-15

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life-threatening condition, which needs multidisciplinary management. Uterine atony represents up to 80 % of all causes of PPH. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has now a well-established role in the management of severe PPH. TAE allows stopping the bleeding in 90 % of women with severe PHH, obviating surgery. Pledgets of gelatin sponge as torpedoes are commonly used for safe TAE, and coils, glue, and microspheres have been primarily used in specific situations such as arterial rupture, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula. TAE is a minimally invasive procedure with a low rate of complications, which preserves future fertility. Knowledge of causes of PPH, potential risks, and limitations of TAE is essential for a timely decision, optimizing TAE, preventing irreversible complications, avoiding hysterectomy, and ultimately preserving fertility.

  1. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Indications, Technique, Results, and Complications

    Soyer, Philippe; Dohan, Anthony; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Ricbourg, Aude; Gayat, Etienne; Boudiaf, Mourad; Sirol, Marc; Ledref, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life-threatening condition, which needs multidisciplinary management. Uterine atony represents up to 80 % of all causes of PPH. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has now a well-established role in the management of severe PPH. TAE allows stopping the bleeding in 90 % of women with severe PHH, obviating surgery. Pledgets of gelatin sponge as torpedoes are commonly used for safe TAE, and coils, glue, and microspheres have been primarily used in specific situations such as arterial rupture, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula. TAE is a minimally invasive procedure with a low rate of complications, which preserves future fertility. Knowledge of causes of PPH, potential risks, and limitations of TAE is essential for a timely decision, optimizing TAE, preventing irreversible complications, avoiding hysterectomy, and ultimately preserving fertility

  2. The observation and nursing of patients receiving interventional management for biliary complications occurred after liver transplantation

    Li Xiaohui; Zhu Kangshun; Lian Xianhui; Qiu Xuanying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the perioperative nursing norm for patients who are suffering from biliary complications occurred after liver transplantation and who will receive interventional management to treat the complications. Methods: Interventional therapies were performed in 20 patients with biliary complications due to liver transplantation. The interventional procedures performed in 20 cases included percutaneous biliary drainage (n = 13), percutaneous biliary balloon dilatation (n = 5) and biliary stent implantation (n = 7). The clinical results were observed and analyzed. Results: Biliary tract complications occurred after liver transplantation were seen frequently. Proper interventional management could markedly improve the successful rate of liver transplantation and increase the survival rate of the patients. In accordance with the individual condition, proper nursing measures should be taken promptly and effectively. Conclusion: Conscientious and effective nursing can contribute to the early detection of biliary complications and, therefore, to improve the survival rate of both the transplanted liver and the patients. (authors)

  3. Impact of Hyponatremia on Morbidity, Mortality, and Complications After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review.

    Mapa, Ben; Taylor, Blake E S; Appelboom, Geoffrey; Bruce, Eliza M; Claassen, Jan; Connolly, E Sander

    2016-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a common metabolic disturbance after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and it may worsen outcomes. This review aims to characterize the effect of hyponatremia on morbidity and mortality after SAH. We sought to determine the prevalence of hyponatremia after SAH, including in subgroups, as well as its effect on mortality and certain outcome measures, including degree of disability and duration of hospitalization. A search of terms "hyponatremia" and "subarachnoid hemorrhage" was performed on PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and EMBASE. Studies were included if they reported prevalence of hyponatremia and if they discussed outcomes such as mortality, duration of stay, functional outcomes (e.g., Glasgow Outcomes Scale), or incidence of complications in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Two independent researchers assessed the titles and abstracts and reviewed articles for inclusion. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of at least mild hyponatremia was 859 of 2387 (36%) of patients. Hyponatremia was associated with vasospasm and duration of hospitalization, but it did not influence mortality. Hyponatremia is common after SAH, and there is evidence that it is associated with certain poorer outcomes. Larger, prospective studies are needed to assess these findings and provide further evidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tonic-clonic activity at subarachnoid hemorrhage onset: impact on complications and outcome.

    Gian Marco De Marchis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Tonic-clonic activity (TCA at onset complicates 3% to 21% of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. The impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, including seizures, remains unclear. One study associated onset TCA with poor clinical outcome at 6 weeks after SAH, but to our knowledge no other studies have confirmed this relationship. This study aims to assess the impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months. METHODS: Analysis of a prospective study cohort of 1479 SAH patients admitted to Columbia University Medical Center between 1996 and 2012. TCA within 6 hours of hemorrhage onset was identified based on accounts of emergency care providers or family witnesses. RESULTS: TCA at onset was described in 170 patients (11%. Patients with onset TCA were younger (P = 0.002, presented more often with poor clinical grade (55% vs. 26%, P<0.001 and had larger amounts of cisternal, intraventricular, and intracerebral blood than those without onset TCA (all, P<0.001. After adjusting for known confounders, onset TCA was significantly associated with in-hospital seizures (OR 3.80, 95%-CI: 2.43-5.96, P<0.001, in-hospital pneumonia (OR 1.56, 95%-CI: 1.06-2.31, p = 0.02, and delayed cerebral ischemia (OR 1.77, 95%-CI: 1.21-2.58, P = 0.003. At 3 months, however, onset TCA was not associated with poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy after adjusting for age, admission clinical grade, and cisternal blood volume. CONCLUSIONS: Onset TCA is not a rare event as it complicates 11% of cases of SAH. New and clinically relevant findings are the association of onset TCA with in-hospital seizures, pneumonia and delayed cerebral ischemia. Despite the increased risk of in-hospital complications, onset TCA is not associated with disability, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months.

  5. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as complication of phenylephrine injection for the treatment of ischemic priapism in a sickle cell disease patient.

    Davila, Hugo H; Parker, Justin; Webster, J Christopher; Lockhart, Jorge L; Carrion, Rafael E

    2008-04-01

    Ischemic priapism (IP) is a urologic condition, which necessitates prompt management. Intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine is a usual treatment modality utilized for the management of these patients. Aim. We present a case of subarachnoid hemorrhage following intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine for IP in a patient with sickle cell disease. We analyzed the degree of subarachnoid hemorrhage in our patient after intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine. The patient had an acute rise in blood pressure during corporal irrigation. This was followed by the onset of severe headache. Computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the diagnosis of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine. Result. A 23-year-old African American male with a history of sickle cell disease presented with a painful penile erection. The patient was started on intravenous fluids, oxygen by nasal canula, and analgesic medication. After this, a blood gas was obtained from his left corpora cavernosa. This was followed by normal saline irrigation and injection of phenylephrine. The patient complained of a sudden, severe "terrible headache" immediately following the last injection, and noncontrast CT scan of the head was obtained and a subarachnoid hemorrhage was noted. The patient was admitted for observation and no significant changes were noted. Intracavernosal injection of phenylephrine for the management of IP can be associated with several possible complications. We present our single case complicated with the formation of a subarachnoid hemorrhage. The patient was treated conservatively and had no long-term neurologic sequelae. Davila HH, Parker J, Webster JC, Lockhart JL, and Carrion RE. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as complication of phenylephrine injection for the treatment of ischemic priapism in a sickle cell disease patient.

  6. Complications from office sclerotherapy for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Osler-Weber-Rendu).

    Hanks, John E; Hunter, David; Goding, George S; Boyer, Holly C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate adverse clinical outcomes following office-based sclerotherapy using sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasias (HHT or Osler-Weber-Rendu). A retrospective chart review of 36 adult patients treated with STS sclerotherapy for severe and/or recurrent epistaxis due to HHT was performed. A total of 153 separate treatment sessions were analyzed. Each patient underwent an average of 4.3 sessions with an average of 7 intralesional injections per session. Bleeding during the procedure was experienced by 8 patients with a maximum reported blood loss of 200 mL in 1 patient, but less than 50 mL in all others. Seven patients reported some postinjection pain, which included nasal, cheek, and eye pain. Nasal congestion, sneezing, and vasovagal responses were each noted to occur 2 times. No complications of postprocedural visual loss, deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolus, transient ischemic attack (TIA)/stroke, or anaphylaxis were encountered. Conventional therapies used in the management of HHT-related epistaxis, such as laser coagulation, septodermoplasty, selective arterial embolization, and Young's occlusion each have specific associated complications, including worsened epistaxis, septal perforation, foul odor, nasal crusting, and compromised nasal breathing. STS is a safe office-based treatment option for HHT-mediated epistaxis that is associated with exceedingly few of the aforementioned serious sequelae. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  7. Pheochromocytoma complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage - a case report; Feocromocitoma complicado com acidente vascular encefalico hemorragico - relato de um caso

    Nogueira, Aline Silva; Marchiori, Edson; Almeida, Fabiola Assuncao de; Martins, Renata Romano; Sales, Anderson Ribeiro; Santos, Tereza Cristina C.R.S. dos; Reis, Simone Teixeira [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Silveira, Sonia Marcelino T. da

    1999-06-01

    The authors report a case of pheochromocytoma that was complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage in a 17-year-old female patient. Computed tomography showed a solid mass, heterogeneous, on the right adrenal. The patient underwent a right adrenalectomy. She is being observed by our out-patients clinic, presenting normal blood pressure levels and a left hemiparesis. (author)

  8. A case of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever complicated with acute pancreatitis.

    Bastug, Aliye; Kayaaslan, Bircan; But, Ayse; Aslaner, Halide; Sertcelik, Ahmet; Akinci, Esragul; Onguru, Pinar; Yetkin, Meltem Arzu; Bodur, Hurrem

    2014-11-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne disease characterized by nonspecific symptoms like fever, myalgia, severe headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. It can result in various complications during the course of the disease due to the diffuse endothelial injury involved in the pathogenesis of CCHF. Here we present a patient with CCHF complicated by acute pancreatitis, including pleural and intra-abdominal effusions. A 70-year-old patient was referred to our hospital from an endemic area with the suspicion of CCHF. The physical examination of the patient revealed high fever (38°C), somnolence, and petechial eruption. The diagnosis of case was confirmed with positive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The viral load of the patient was 4×10(9) copies/mL. On the fifth day of admission, upper abdominal pain, scleral ichter, and abdominal distention developed. The patient had abdominal tenderness with guarding. The laboratory tests revealed an amylase level of 1740 U/L (28-100), lipase level of 583 U/L (13-60), and total bilirubin level of 3.75 mg/dL (<0.3). The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was confirmed with radiological findings. Until now, atypical presentations of CCHF have been reported in some case reports, but not acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of acute pancreatitis in the literature seen in the course of CCHF.

  9. [Mucosal changes in the periulcer zone and endocrine system in patients with gastroduodenal ulcer, complicated by hemorrhage].

    Trofimov, M V

    2014-07-01

    Examination of patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcer, complicated by hemorrhage, was conducted, using clinical, microbiological, immunohistochemical methods and chromatomassspectrography. Enhanced activity of inducible NO-synthase, contamination of periulcer zone with microorganisms Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus beta-haemoliticus, enhancement of contents of catecholamines and serotonin in the blood serum were revealed. These changes are most expressed in severe blood loss, unstable local endoscopic hemostasis, high risk of a recurrent hemorrhage occurrence. The data obtained permit to prognosticate severity of a pathologic process course and to improve the treatment programe.

  10. Incidence, risk factors, and prognosis of gastrointestinal hemorrhage complicating acute renal failure.

    Fiaccadori, E; Maggiore, U; Clima, B; Melfa, L; Rotelli, C; Borghetti, A

    2001-04-01

    Few prospective data are currently available on acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage (AGIH) as a complication of acute renal failure (ARF). The aim of the present study was to define incidence, sources, risk factors, and outcome of AGIH in patients with ARF. We performed a prospective study on an inception cohort of 514 patients admitted for ARF to a nephrology intermediate care unit. Data on clinical risk factors for bleeding, frequency of occurrence of AGIH, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality were collected. Independent predictors of AGIH were identified. The relative odds of death and the relative increase in length of hospital stay associated with AGIH were calculated after adjusting for baseline comorbidities. Sixty-nine patients out of 514 [13.4% (95% CI, 10.6 to 16.7)] had AGIH as a complication of ARF; 59 were upper AGIH. Forty patients had clinically important bleeding. Erosions and/or ulcers accounted for 71% of cases of upper AGIH. Independent baseline predictors of AGIH were represented by severity of illness [odds ratio 1.45 (95% CI, 1.05 to 2.01) for every 10 point increase in APACHE II score], low platelet count [<50,000 mm3; 3.71 (1.70 to 8.11)], noncirrhotic chronic hepatic disease [2.22 (1.09 to 4.55)], liver cirrhosis [3.38 (1.50 to 7.60)], de novo ARF [2.77 (1.30 to 5.90)], and severe ARF [2.07 (1.10 to 3.88)]. In-hospital mortality was 63.8% in patients with AGIH and 34.2% in the other patients; after adjusting for baseline confounders, AGIH remained significantly associated with an increase in both mortality [2.57 (1.30 to 5.09), P = 0.006] and length of hospital stay [37% (1 to 87%), P = 0.047]. AGIH and clinically important bleeding are frequent complications of ARF. In this clinical condition, AGIH is more often due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is associated with a significantly increased risk of death and length of hospital stay. Both renal and extrarenal risk factors are related to the occurrence of AGIH.

  11. Race/Ethnic differences in the risk of hemorrhagic complications among patients with ischemic stroke receiving thrombolytic therapy.

    Mehta, Rajendra H; Cox, Margueritte; Smith, Eric E; Xian, Ying; Bhatt, Deepak L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Peterson, Eric D

    2014-08-01

    Race/ethnic-related differences in safety of intravenous thrombolytic therapy have been shown in patients with myocardial infarction, but not studied in ischemic stroke. Using data from the Get With The Guidelines (GWTG)-Stroke program (n=54 334), we evaluated differences in risk-adjusted bleeding rates (any, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage [sICH], serious life-threatening [excluding sICH], or other) and mortality in white (n=40 411), black (n=8243), Hispanic (n=4257), and Asian (n=1523) patients receiving intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) for acute ischemic stroke. Compared with white patients, overall adjusted hemorrhagic complications after tPA were higher in black (odds ratio, 1.14, 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.28) and Asian (odds ratio, 1.36, 95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.61) patients. Overall adjusted bleeding complications in Hispanics were similar to those of whites. Increased risk of overall bleeding in Asians was related to higher risk of adjusted sICH (odds ratio, 1.47, 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.82), whereas in blacks, it was related to higher risk of other bleeding. No significant race-related difference was noted in risk of serious or life-threatening bleeding or in overall mortality or death in patients with sICH or any hemorrhagic complications. In patients with stroke receiving tPA, hemorrhagic complications were slightly higher in blacks and Asians, but not in Hispanics compared with whites. Asians also faced significantly higher risk for sICH relative to other race/ethnic groups. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether reduction in tPA dose similar to that used in many Asian countries could improve the safety of tPA therapy in Asians in the United States with acute ischemic strokes while maintaining efficacy. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. [Clinical efficacy and safety of uterine artery chemoembolization in abnormal placental implantation complicated with postpartum hemorrhage].

    Chen, Yao-ting; Xu, Lin-feng; Sun, Hong-liang; Li, Hui-qing; Hu, Ren-mei; Tan, Qi-yin

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the safety and clinical efficacy of uterime artery chemoembolization in postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) caused by abnormal placental implantation. Between December 2006 and September 2009, there were 23 cases of abnormal placental implantation with PPH in our hospital, among which 9 presented with continuous small amount of vaginal bleeding and 14 with acute excessive bleeding. The average bleeding time was (8+/-6) d and the mean blood loss was (980+/-660) ml. Abnormal placental implantation was confirmed by color Doppler ultrasound (CD-US) in all cases, the internal iliac artery angiography was performed to identify the uterine artery and bilateral uterine artery chemoembolization (UACE) with methotrexate (MTX) and gelfoam particles to the distal end of uterine artery was conducted after. CD-US rechecked all patients within 48 h after UACE and those patients with blurred margins between placenta and uterus and abnormal blood flow (>1 cmx1 cm) received ultrasonic-guided per vagina MTX multipoint injections. All cases were followed up for 3-26 months (average 12 months) to observe vaginal bleeding, placenta tissue discharge, serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), uterine involution, menses, and side-effects or complications. (1) Curative effect: These 23 cases underwent 24 procedures of UACE successfully and vaginal bleeding ceased at an average of (3.5+/-1.3) min after UACE. Reduced blood flow in the placental implantation area was detected under CD-US after UACE. Among the 23 patients, wterine curettage was required in 16 cases due to retained placenta tissues with the mean blood loss of (40+/-28) ml during the operation, 2 underwent subtotal hysterectomy and confirmed to be placenta percreta by pathology examination, and placenta tissues were spontaneously discharged completely in 5 cases. Totally, 91% of the patients (21/23) reserved their uterus. (2) FOLLOW-UP: the serum hCG reduced to normal within 1-13 d after the placenta tissue were evacuated

  13. Acute lung injury complicating blood transfusion in post-partum hemorrhage: incidence and risk factors.

    Teofili, Luciana; Bianchi, Maria; Zanfini, Bruno A; Catarci, Stefano; Sicuranza, Rossella; Spartano, Serena; Zini, Gina; Draisci, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the incidence and risk factors for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) among patients transfused for post-partum hemorrhage (PPH). We identified a series of 71 consecutive patients with PPH requiring the urgent transfusion of three or more red blood cell (RBC) units, with or without transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and/or platelets (PLT). Clinical records were then retrieved and examined for respiratory distress events. According to the 2004 consensus definition, cases of new-onset hypoxemia, within 6 hours after transfusion, with bilateral pulmonary changes, in the absence of cardiogenic pulmonary edema were identified as TRALI. If an alternative risk factor for acute lung injury was present, possible TRALI was diagnosed. Thirteen cases of TRALI and 1 case of possible TRALI were identified (overall incidence 19.7%). At univariate analysis, patients with TRALI received higher number of RBC, PLT and FFP units and had a longer postpartum hospitalization. Among the diseases occurring in pregnancy- and various pre-existing comorbidities, only gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, significantly increased the risk to develop TRALI (p = 0.006). At multivariate analysis including both transfusion- and patient-related risk factors, pregnancy-related, hypertensive disorders were confirmed to be the only predictors for TRALI, with an odds ratio of 27.7 ( 95% CI 1.27-604.3, p=0.034). Patients suffering from PPH represent a high-risk population for TRALI. The patients with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, not receiving anti-hypertensive therapy, have the highest risk. Therefore, a careful monitoring of these patients after transfusions is recommended.

  14. Life-threatening haematological complication occurring in a cat after chronic carbimazole administration

    Andrea Mosca

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Case summary An 11-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat with a history of hyperthyroidism treated with carbimazole for 7 months was presented for a check-up after a few episodes of vomiting. The cat had been receiving prednisolone at 0.5 mg/kg PO q12h for recent pancreatitis and concurrent inflammation of liver and small intestines confirmed by biopsies. Clinical examination revealed pale mucous membranes with a capillary refill time of 120 s and fibrinogen serum concentration (3.5 g/l. Morphological changes of thrombocytes in the absence of thrombocytopenia were also noted. In-saline agglutination test was positive. Abdominal radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations excluded the presence of organ abnormalities and peritoneal effusion. Blood biochemistry was unremarkable. Feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus tests were negative. On the basis of these findings, immune-mediated anaemia secondary to chronic carbimazole administration was suspected. Prednisolone was increased to 2 mg/kg PO q24h and carbimazole tablets were stopped. Despite close monitoring and intensive care, the cat died the same evening of admission to the hospital. Relevance and novel information This report suggests that severe haemotoxicity may occur as a sequel of chronic carbimazole administration in cats. Routine bloodwork and accurate follow-up of cats under treatment with thyrotoxic therapy may be advisable, in order to detect haematological changes before lethal complications occur.

  15. [Case report: Aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage -- complicated course due to coincidental manifestation of an inverted Tako-Tsubo-cardiomyopathy].

    Zech, Nina; Kieninger, Martin; Seemann, Milena; Künzig, Holger; Bele, Sylvia; Dietl, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    We report the case of a patient who suffered a serious subarachnoid hemorrhage with a cardialaffection and development of an inverted Tako-Tsubo-cardiomyopathy. To avoid apparent cerebral ischemia due to severe cerebral vasospasm after exhaustion of conservative therapeutic options a temporarily endovascular therapy with continuous intra-arterial application of Nimodipine was necessary. In the overall protracted and complicated course the special challenge were the therapeutic efforts to avoid apparent cerebral ischemia in context to the significant cardial affection. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Severe Renal Hemorrhage in a Pregnant Woman Complicated with Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A Case Report

    Shohei Kawaguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease with thrombotic tendency. Consensus guidelines for pregnancy with antiphospholipid syndrome recommend low-dose aspirin combined with unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin because antiphospholipid syndrome causes habitual abortion. We report a 36-year-old pregnant woman diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome receiving anticoagulation treatment. The patient developed left abdominal pain and gross hematuria at week 20 of pregnancy. An initial diagnosis of left ureteral calculus was made. Subsequently abdominal-pelvic computed tomography was required for diagnosis because of the appearance of severe contralateral pain. Computed tomography revealed serious renal hemorrhage, and ureteral stent placement and pain control by patient-controlled analgesia were required. After treatment, continuance of pregnancy was possible and vaginal delivery was performed safely. This is the first case report of serious renal hemorrhage in a pregnant woman with antiphospholipid syndrome receiving anticoagulation treatment and is an instructive case for urological and obstetrical practitioners.

  17. Significant complications occurred in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions:an analysis of 1620 consecutive procedures

    Yan Zicai; Liu Li; Zhang Haibo; Wang Ning; Li Yu; Yan Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To categorize the significant complications occurred in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions and to analyze their causes, outcomes and managements in order to make a further understanding of the cause of occurrence and to improve the handling ability. Methods: Over the past five years a total of 1620 consecutive peripheral vascular interventions were carried out in our institute. Significant complications, which occurred in the perioperative period, and the clinical data were carefully examined. The occurrence, treatment, consequence and final outcome of each complication were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of 1620 consecutive peripheral interventional procedures, significant complication which developed during the operation or within one week after the treatment was seen in 76 (4.69%). The significant complications could be classified into twelve kinds. After proper management most complications were cured without leaving any sequelae. Nevertheless, in some patients permanent damages such as paraplegia, lower limb paralysis, necrosis of gluteus, etc. were left over. Death occurred in six patients. Of the six patients, four died of concomitant hepatic failure and agranulocytosis, one of retroperitoneal hematoma and hemoperitoneum, and another one of pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: (1) Significant complications may occur in most peripheral vascular interventional therapies, which, in most cases, are mainly related to the insufficient understanding of the disease and improper manipulation. (2) A comprehensive and solid fundamental knowledge of the disease, strictly following the indications and careful handling the operation are the key points to reduce the occurrence of severe complications in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions. (authors)

  18. Acute Lung Injury Complicating Blood Transfusion in Post-Partum Hemorrhage: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Teofili, Luciana; Bianchi, Maria; Zanfini, Bruno A.; Catarci, Stefano; Sicuranza, Rossella; Spartano, Serena; Zini, Gina; Draisci, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Background. We retrospectively investigated the incidence and risk factors for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) among patients transfused for post-partum hemorrhage (PPH).  Methods. We identified a series of 71 consecutive patients with PPH requiring the urgent transfusion of three or more red blood cell (RBC) units, with or without fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelet (PLT) transfusion. Clinical records were then retrieved and examined for respiratory distress events. Accor...

  19. Impact of collateral circulation on early outcome and risk of hemorrhagic complications after systemic thrombolysis.

    Brunner, Freimuth; Tomandl, Bernd; Hanken, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Helmut; Kastrup, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    In stroke patients, collateral flow can rapidly be assessed on computed tomography angiography (CTA). In this study, the impact of baseline collaterals on early outcome and risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhages after systemic thrombolysis in patients with proximal arterial occlusions within the anterior circulation were analyzed. Collateralization scores were determined on the CT angiography source images (0 = absent; 1 ≤ 50%, 2 > 50% but collateral filling) of patients with distal intracranial carotid artery and/or M1 segment occlusions treated from 2008 to December 2011. A collateral score of 0 to 1 was designated as poor and 2 to 3 as good collateral vessel status. Outcome variables included in hospital mortality, favorable outcome at discharge (modified Rankin score ≤ 2), and rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage based on the European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study II definition. Among 246 subjects (mean age of 74 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale N at admission 14), 205 patients (83%) had good collaterals, whereas 41 patients (17%) had poor collaterals, respectively. Patients with poor collaterals had significantly higher rates of in-hospital mortality (41% vs. 12%, P collaterals. The grade of collateralization was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (P collaterals have a poor early functional outcome and high rates of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage after systemic thrombolysis. Since similar findings have also been reported after endovascular therapy, strategies to improve collateral blood flow should be assessed in this patient population. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke Organization.

  20. Prevention and nursing care of the complications occurred in interventional therapy for arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremity

    Xu Yang; Qi Yuchun; Wang Hua; Han Yajun; Fu Wenli; Fan Rui; Lv Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the prevention and nursing care of the perioperative complications occurred in interventional therapy for arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremity. Methods: During the period of July 2006 to June 2009, interventional treatment for the arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremity was performed in 380 cases. The clinical data and complications were reviewed and analyzed, and the prevention and nursing care of the complications were summarized. Results: Complications occurred in 41 cases. During the surgery, vascular rupture or arterial dissection occurred in 5 cases, hypoglycemia reaction in 3 cases and elevation of blood pressure in 2 cases. The complications,which occurred after the treatment,included acute arterial thrombosis (n=3), deep vein thrombosis (n=2), bleeding of different tissues or organs (n=17), acute myocardial infarction (n=2), pseudoaneurysm (n=2), excessive lower limb perfusion syndrome (n=4) and compression sores (n=1). Conclusion: Detailed information of medical history, careful observation of clinical condition, intensive care of patient, adequate preparation of medical materials, seriously handing over the duty to the next shift and taking one's turn on duty, etc. are all the effective measures to prevent and to reduce the occurrence of complications. (authors)

  1. Pulmonary aspergillosis and central nervous system hemorrhage as complications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with corticosteroids.

    Cleri, Dennis J; Moser, Robert L; Villota, Francisco J; Wang, Yue; Husain, Syed A; Nadeem, Shahzinah; Anjari, Tarek; Sajed, Mohammad

    2003-06-01

    Warm, active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is the most common form of hemolytic anemia not related to drug therapy. Mortality in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia is related to the inability to successfully treat patients' underlying disease, or the infectious complications of splenectomy and prolonged steroid therapy. Predisposing factors for invasive aspergillosis are neutropenia and steroid therapy. We present a fatal case of aspergillosis complicating a nonneutropenic case of warm active antibody adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia treated with prolonged steroid therapy.

  2. Dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated with acute liver failure: a case report.

    Dalugama, Chamara; Gawarammana, Indika Bandara

    2017-12-08

    Dengue is a common arboviral infection with a clinically diverse spectrum of presentations. Although hepatic dysfunction is commonly identified in patients will dengue illness, acute liver failure is rare. The etiopathogenesis of hepatic dysfunction is multifactorial and related to direct viral invasion of hepatocytes, immunological factors and hypoxia particularly in cases of shock in dengue hemorrhagic fever. Ideal management of dengue-related hepatic dysfunction and acute liver failure is still debated. We report a 53-year-old Sri Lankan Sinhalese male with serologically confirmed dengue fever presenting with evidence of plasma leakage developing acute liver failure evidenced by deranged liver functions, coagulopathy and altered sensorium. In addition to the 'standard care', the patient was managed with intravenous N-acetyl cysteine and blood transfusions even in the absence of bleeding or dropping packed cell volume (PCV), targeting a higher PCV in anticipation of better oxygenation at tissue level. He made a full recovery with no sequential infections. N-acetyl cysteine and packed cell transfusion aiming at a higher PCV to maintain adequate tissue perfusion during shock may be beneficial in acute liver failure due to dengue virus. Large randomized trials should be carried out to establish the efficacy of these treatment strategies to support these observations and change the current practice.

  3. Infarction of the entire corpus callosum as a complication in subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report

    Satoru Takahashi, M.D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum is the major commissural pathway connecting the cerebral hemispheres. This pathway receives its blood supply from anterior communicating artery, pericallosal artery, and posterior pericallosal artery. However, in some cases, the entire corpus callosum is supplied by median callosal artery; thus, occlusion of this artery can lead to infarction of the entire corpus callosum. Few reports have described this type of infarction, and no reports after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH exist. Here, we report on a 42-year-old female who was diagnosed with SAH after two aneurysms were discovered in bifurcation of left anterior cerebral artery (A1-A2. After successful clipping was performed, the patient was alert and had no neurological deficits; moreover, the computed tomography images that were acquired after the operation showed no evidence of infarction. Nine days after admittance to the hospital, drowsiness and weakness of the left limbs with brain swelling appeared and decompressive hemi-craniectomy was performed. Diagnostic cerebral angiography revealed vasospasms in both anterior and middle cerebral arteries, thus fasudil hydrochloride was administered intra-arterially. While blood flow in all arteries improved, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detected infarction along the entire length of the corpus callosum and in the medial region of the right frontal lobe. We believe this infarction was due to secondary ischemia of median callosal artery. This case reminded us of the anatomical variation wherein median callosal artery is the sole blood supply line for the corpus callosum and demonstrated that infarction of the entire corpus callosum is possible.

  4. Hemorragia alveolar como complicación del uso de trombolíticos Alveolar hemorrhage as a complication of thrombolytic therapy

    Alejandra González

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La trombolisis se usa como estrategia de reperfusión coronaria en el infarto agudo de miocardio. El sangrado es su principal complicación; la mayoría ocurre en los sitios de accesos venosos y es leve, pero también pueden presentarse hemorragia gastrointestinal, retroperitoneal, genitourinaria, pulmonar y a nivel del sistema nervioso central, episodios estos generalmente de mayor gravedad y a veces fatales. Se describe aquí el caso de un paciente que recibió terapia trombolítica con estreptoquinasa como tratamiento por un infarto de miocardio, y que posteriormente desarrolló insuficiencia respiratoria aguda, infiltrados pulmonares bilaterales, caída del hematocrito y aumento de la difusión de monóxido de carbono, cuadro compatible con diagnóstico de hemorragia alveolar.Coronary thrombolysis is used as a strategy for coronary reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction. Bleeding is the main complication described. Although most of these events occur at sites of vascular access and are mild, in some cases gastrointestinal, retroperitoneal, genitourinary, lung and central nervous system bleeding may occur. These episodes are usually serious and sometimes fatal. The following report describes the case of a patient who received thrombolytic therapy with streptokinase as a treatment for myocardial infarction. Subsequently he developed acute respiratory failure, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and fall of hematocrit compatible with diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage.

  5. The prevention and treatment of biliary complications occurred after CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatic neoplasms

    Li Jianjun; Zheng Jiasheng; Cui Xiongwei; Cui Shichang; Sun Bin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the prevention and treatment of biliary complications occurred after CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatic neoplasms. Methods: A total of 1136 patients, including 920 males and 216 females, with hepatic neoplasms were enrolled in this study. The hepatic tumors consisted of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1037), hepatic metastasis (n=83) and hepatic cavernous hemangioma (n=16). The diameters of the tumors ranged from 0.5 to 16 cm. A total of 1944 RFA procedures were carried out in all patients. Results: Thirty-five patients developed biliary complication (35/1944, 1.80%). Twelve patients developed asymptomatic bile duct dilatation and no special treatment was given. Obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiocholecystic drainage (PTCD) together with subsequent inner stent implantation had to be carried out. Eighteen patients developed biloma, and liver abscess formation secondary to biloma infection occurred in seven of them. Percutaneous transhepatic biloma drainage (PTBD) was adopted in all these patients. One patient suffered from obstructive jaundice complicated by biloma, and both PTCD and PTBD combined with inner stent implantation were simultaneously performed. One patient had the biloma secondary to obstructive jaundice, and PTCD followed by PTBD was conducted in turn. One patient developed obstructive jaundice secondary to biloma, and PTBD followed by PTCD was employed in turn. Conclusion: Obstructive jaundice and biloma are severe biliary complications occurred after CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatic tumors, and PTCD and/or PTBD should be carried out without delay to treat these complications. The clinical symptoms can be relieved, or even completely disappear, after treatment. (authors)

  6. Cerebral microbleeds and intracerebral hemorrhages in patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    Watanabe, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are important causes of death in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Recently, it has become clear that the presence of cerebral microbleeds (MBs) on T2 * -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is closely related to intracerebral hemorrhages. This study investigated the incidence of MBs in chronic dialysis patients and prospective hemorrhagic complications of chronic dialysis patients with old intracerebral hemorrhages. Eighty patients (34 males, 46 females) with chronic renal failure, whose mean age was 62.9±11.4 years, were examined by MRI. The mean duration of hemodialysis was 7.8±6.3 years. MBs were found in 28 patients (35%) by T2 * -weighted MRI. Old intracerebral hemorrhages were seen in seven of the patients, and MBs were found in five (71%) of these seven patients. The frequency of old intracerebral hemorrhages was significantly higher in patients with MBs than in those without (p=0.048), and the numbers of MBs were significantly larger in patients with old intracerebral hemorrhages than in those without (p=0.0065). Three of the seven patients with old intracerebral hemorrhages had new hemorrhagic complications (two intracerebral hemorrhages and one cerebral microbleed) within a year. These intracerebral hemorrhages occurred in areas without MBs on the first T2 * -weighted MRI. T2 * -weighted MRI is useful for the detection of MBs, which may be a predictor of intracerebral hemorrhage. When a patient has a large number of MBs and old intracerebral hemorrhages, the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage undoubtedly increases. (author)

  7. Treatment of Obesity-Related Complications with Novel Classes of Naturally Occurring PPAR Agonists.

    Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guri, Amir J; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and its associated comorbidities has grown to epidemic proportions in the US and worldwide. Thus, developing safe and effective therapeutic approaches against these widespread and debilitating diseases is important and timely. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) α, γ, and δ through several classes of pharmaceuticals can prevent or treat a variety of metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including type II diabetes (T2D). Thus, PPARs represent important molecular targets for developing novel and better treatments for a wide range of debilitating and widespread obesity-related diseases and disorders. However, available PPAR γ agonistic drugs such as Avandia have significant adverse side effects, including weight gain, fluid retention, hepatotoxicity, and congestive heart failure. An alternative to synthetic agonists of PPAR γ is the discovery and development of naturally occurring and safer nutraceuticals that may be dual or pan PPAR agonists. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the health effects of three plant-derived PPAR agonists: abscisic acid (ABA), punicic acid (PUA), and catalpic acid (CAA) in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and metabolic diseases and disorders.

  8. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart

  9. Delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : the role of coagulation and fibrinolysis

    Vergouwen, M.D.I.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are at risk to develop complications, especially within the first two weeks after the hemorrhage. Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a complication which occurs in about 30% of SAH patients, leading to symptoms such as aphasia, hemiparesis, or

  10. Intracerebral Hemorrhage

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  11. [Clinical effect of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation combined with pulmonary surfactant in treatment of neonatal severe meconium aspiration syndrome complicated by pulmonary hemorrhage].

    Huang, Jing; Lin, Xin-Zhu; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-11-01

    To study the clinical effect and safety of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) combined with pulmonary surfactant (PS) in the treatment of neonatal severe meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) complicated by neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage (NPH). A total of 48 children with severe MAS complicated by NPH were enrolled, and a retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical effects of HFOV+PS (trial group, 25 children) and HFOV alone (control group, 23 children). The blood gas parameters, oxygenation index (OI), PaO 2 /FiO 2 (P/F) value, duration of pulmonary hemorrhage, ventilation time, length of hospital stay, incidence of complications, and outcome were compared between the two groups. At 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after treatment, the trial group had significantly better PaO 2 , OI, and P/F value than the control group (Phemorrhage (P0.05). HFOV combined with PS can better improve oxygenation function and shorten the duration of NPH and ventilation time. Meanwhile, it does not increase the incidence of adverse events. Therefore, it is a safe and effective therapy.

  12. Risk factor analysis of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided lung biopsy in coaxial and non-coaxial core biopsy techniques in 650 patients

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A., E-mail: nour410@hotmail.com [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department, Cairo University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Alsubhi, Mohammed [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Naguib, Nagy N. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Department, Alexandria University Hospital, Alexandria (Egypt); Lehnert, Thomas; Emam, Ahmed; Beeres, Martin; Bodelle, Boris; Koitka, Karen; Vogl, Thomas J.; Jacobi, Volkmar [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors involved in the development of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques. Materials and methods: Retrospective study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD: 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique in coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were: lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors for pulmonary hemorrhage complicating lung biopsy were classified into: (a) patient's related risk factors, (b) lesion's related risk factors and (d) technical risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher's exact tests for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 19.6% (65/332) in non-coaxial group and 22.3% (71/318) in coaxial group. The difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.27). Hemoptysis developed in 5.4% (18/332) and in 6.3% (20/318) in the non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively. Traversing pulmonary vessels in the needle biopsy track was a significant risk factor of the development pulmonary hemorrhage (incidence: 55.4% (36/65, p = 0.0003) in the non-coaxial group and 57.7% (41/71, p = 0.0013) in coaxial group). Other significant risk factors included: lesions of less than 2 cm (p value of 0.01 and 0.02 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), basal and middle zonal lesions in comparison to upper zonal lung lesions (p = 0.002 and 0.03 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), increased lesion

  13. Risk factor analysis of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided lung biopsy in coaxial and non-coaxial core biopsy techniques in 650 patients

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Alsubhi, Mohammed; Naguib, Nagy N.; Lehnert, Thomas; Emam, Ahmed; Beeres, Martin; Bodelle, Boris; Koitka, Karen; Vogl, Thomas J.; Jacobi, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk factors involved in the development of pulmonary hemorrhage complicating CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques. Materials and methods: Retrospective study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD: 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique in coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were: lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors for pulmonary hemorrhage complicating lung biopsy were classified into: (a) patient's related risk factors, (b) lesion's related risk factors and (d) technical risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher's exact tests for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Incidence of pulmonary hemorrhage was 19.6% (65/332) in non-coaxial group and 22.3% (71/318) in coaxial group. The difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.27). Hemoptysis developed in 5.4% (18/332) and in 6.3% (20/318) in the non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively. Traversing pulmonary vessels in the needle biopsy track was a significant risk factor of the development pulmonary hemorrhage (incidence: 55.4% (36/65, p = 0.0003) in the non-coaxial group and 57.7% (41/71, p = 0.0013) in coaxial group). Other significant risk factors included: lesions of less than 2 cm (p value of 0.01 and 0.02 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), basal and middle zonal lesions in comparison to upper zonal lung lesions (p = 0.002 and 0.03 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups respectively), increased lesion

  14. High-density lipoprotein-based therapy reduces the hemorrhagic complications associated with tissue plasminogen activator treatment in experimental stroke.

    Lapergue, Bertrand; Dang, Bao Quoc; Desilles, Jean-Philippe; Ortiz-Munoz, Guadalupe; Delbosc, Sandrine; Loyau, Stéphane; Louedec, Liliane; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Mazighi, Mikael; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that intravenous injection of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) was neuroprotective in an embolic stroke model. We hypothesized that HDL vasculoprotective actions on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may decrease hemorrhagic transformation-associated with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) administration in acute stroke. We used tPA alone or in combination with HDLs in vivo in 2 models of focal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (embolic and 4-hour monofilament MCAO) and in vitro in a model of BBB. Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to MCAO, n=12 per group. The rats were then randomly injected with tPA (10 mg/kg) or saline with or without human plasma purified-HDL (10 mg/kg). The therapeutic effects of HDL and BBB integrity were assessed blindly 24 hours later. The integrity of the BBB was also tested using an in vitro model of human cerebral endothelial cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation. tPA-treated groups had significantly higher mortality and rate of hemorrhagic transformation at 24 hours in both MCAO models. Cotreatment with HDL significantly reduced stroke-induced mortality versus tPA alone (by 42% in filament MCAO, P=0.009; by 73% in embolic MCAO, P=0.05) and tPA-induced intracerebral parenchymal hematoma (by 92% in filament MCAO, by 100% in embolic MCAO; Phemorrhagic transformation in rat models of MCAO. Both in vivo and in vitro results support the vasculoprotective action of HDLs on BBB under ischemic conditions.

  15. Intrahepatic and adrenal hemorrhage as a rare cause of neonatal anemia.

    Akin, Mustafa Ali; Coban, Dilek; Doganay, Selim; Durak, Zehra; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2011-05-01

    Vaginal delivery of the macrosomic fetus may result in hemorrhage of intra-abdominal organs. Mostly affected organs are the liver and adrenal glands. Hemorrhage of liver is usually occurs as a subcapsular hemorrhage and it is clinically presented an abdominal mass without symptoms of anemia. But intraparenchymal hemorrhage of liver is very rare and there is no sign of abdominal mass. However, in contrast to subcapsular hemorrhage, symptoms of anemia are rapidly developed in newborns. A macrosomic newborn by vaginal delivery at term. Within 6 h after delivery, the patient showed pallor without tachycardia and hypotension. In laboratory studies, hemoglobin level failed from 14 g/dL to 10 g/dL within 6 h. Physical examination revealed no signs of abdominal mass. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the sixth segment of liver and right adrenal hemorrhage were detected on the ultrasonographic scan. Hepatic function tests were normal in the whole follow-up period, and hemorrhage resolved within two weeks. Following months after discharge, adrenal hemorrhage also resolved without any complication. Hepatic hemorrhages, causing hemorrhagic anemia in neonates, usually occur in subcapsular form. Intraparenchymal hepatic hemorrhage should especially be considered in those newborns, which are rapidly developed symptoms of anemia without any abdominal mass.

  16. Levator Ani Necrosis: An Exceptional Complication Occurring after “High Intensity Focused Ultrasound” of the Prostate

    Danny Badawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is a minimally invasive treatment option that might be considered in the management of localized prostate cancer. It is a well-tolerated treatment with few minor urologic complications and no major toxicities. In this paper, we report to our knowledge the first case of levator ani necrosis in a patient treated with HIFU, manifesting as sturdy perineal pain, which took years of NSAID intake and serial MRIs to demonstrate partial improvement. Therefore, we regard HIFU as a serious potential treatment option that still requires longer follow-up data before its approval in the personalized treatment panel of prostate cancer.

  17. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Brown, Lawrence W.; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Coffey, Barbara J.; de Bruijn, Sebastian F. T. M.; Elzerman, Lonneke; Garcia-Delgar, Blanca; Gilbert, Donald L.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Hagstrom, Julie; Hedderly, Tammy; Heyman, Isobel; Hong, Hyun Ju; Huyser, Chaim; Ibanez-Gomez, Laura; Kim, Young Key; Kim, Young-Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Kook, Sodahm; Kuperman, Samuel; Lamerz, Andreas; Leventhal, Bennett; Ludolph, Andrea G.; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Maras, Athanasios; Messchendorp, Marieke D.; Mir, Pablo; Morer, Astrid; Munchau, Alexander; Murphy, Tara L.; Openneer, Thaira J. C.; Plessen, Kerstin J.; Rath, Judith J. G.; Roessner, Veit; Frundt, Odette; Shin, Eun-Young; Sival, Deborah A.; Song, Dong-Ho; Song, Jungeun; Stolte, Anne-Marie; Tubing, Jennifer; van den Ban, Els; Visscher, Frank; Wanderer, Sina; Woods, Martin; Zinner, Samuel H.; State, Matthew W.; Heiman, Gary A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Dietrich, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Pre- and perinatal complications have been implicated in the onset and clinical expression of Tourette syndrome albeit with considerable inconsistencies across studies. Also, little is known about their role in co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity

  18. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Abdulkadir, M. (Mohamed); J.A. Tischfield (Jay); King, R.A. (Robert A.); T.V. Fernandez (Thomas); Brown, L.W. (Lawrence W.); Cheon, K.-A. (Keun-Ah); Coffey, B.J. (Barbara J.); S.F. de Bruijn (S.); Elzerman, L. (Lonneke); Garcia-Delgar, B. (Blanca); D.L. Gilbert (D.); S.F.J. Le Grice; Hagstrøm, J. (Julie); T. Hedderly (Tammy); Heyman, I. (Isobel); Hong, H.J. (Hyun Ju); J. Huyser (Jochanan); Ibanez-Gomez, L. (Laura); Kim, Y.K. (Young Key); Kim, Y.-S. (Young-Shin); Koh, Y.-J. (Yun-Joo); Kook, S. (Sodahm); Kuperman, S. (Samuel); Lamerz, A. (Andreas); Leventhal, B. (Bennett); Ludolph, A.G. (Andrea G.); Madruga-Garrido, M. (Marcos); A. Maras (Athanasios); Messchendorp, M.D. (Marieke D.); Mir, P. (Pablo); Morer, A. (Astrid); A. Münchau (Alexander); Murphy, T.L. (Tara L.); Openneer, T.J.C. (Thaïra J.C.); Plessen, K.J. (Kerstin J.); S. Rath (Santosh); V. Rœssner (Veit); Fründt, O. (Odette); Shin, E.-Y. (Eun-Young); D.A. Sival (Deborah); Song, D.-H. (Dong-Ho); Song, J. (Jungeun); Stolte, A.-M. (Anne-Marie); Tübing, J. (Jennifer); van den Ban, E. (Els); F. Visscher (Frank); Wanderer, S. (Sina); Woods, M. (Martin); Zinner, S.H. (Samuel H.); M.W. State (Matthew); M.L. Heiman (Mark); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); A. Dietrich (Andrea)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPre- and perinatal complications have been implicated in the onset and clinical expression of Tourette syndrome albeit with considerable inconsistencies across studies. Also, little is known about their role in co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and

  19. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Brown, Lawrence W.; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Coffey, Barbara J.; de Bruijn, Sebastian F. T. M.; Elzerman, Lonneke; Garcia-Delgar, Blanca; Gilbert, Donald L.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Hagstrøm, Julie; Hedderly, Tammy; Heyman, Isobel; Hong, Hyun Ju; Huyser, Chaim; Ibanez-Gomez, Laura; Kim, Young Key; Kim, Young-Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Kook, Sodahm; Kuperman, Samuel; Lamerz, Andreas; Leventhal, Bennett; Ludolph, Andrea G.; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Maras, Athanasios; Messchendorp, Marieke D.; Mir, Pablo; Morer, Astrid; Münchau, Alexander; Murphy, Tara L.; Openneer, Thaïra J. C.; Plessen, Kerstin J.; Rath, Judith J. G.; Roessner, Veit; Fründt, Odette; Shin, Eun-Young; Sival, Deborah A.; Song, Dong-Ho; Song, Jungeun; Stolte, Anne-Marie; Tübing, Jennifer; van den Ban, Els; Visscher, Frank; Wanderer, Sina; Woods, Martin; Zinner, Samuel H.; State, Matthew W.; Heiman, Gary A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Dietrich, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Pre- and perinatal complications have been implicated in the onset and clinical expression of Tourette syndrome albeit with considerable inconsistencies across studies. Also, little is known about their role in co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention–deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with a tic disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of pre- and perinatal complications in relation to the presence and symptom severity of chronic tic disorder and co-occurring OCD and ADHD using data of 1,113 participants from the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics study. This study included 586 participants with a chronic tic disorder and 527 unaffected family controls. We controlled for age and sex differences by creating propensity score matched subsamples for both case-control and within-case analyses. We found that premature birth (OR=1.72) and morning sickness requiring medical attention (OR=2.57) were associated with the presence of a chronic tic disorder. Also, the total number of pre- and perinatal complications was higher in those with a tic disorder (OR=1.07). Furthermore, neonatal complications were related to the presence (OR=1.46) and severity (b=2.27) of co-occurring OCD and also to ADHD severity (b=1.09). Delivery complications were only related to co-occurring OCD (OR=1.49). We conclude that early exposure to adverse situations during pregnancy is related to the presence of chronic tic disorders. Exposure at a later stage, at birth or during the first weeks of life, appears to be associated with co-occurring OCD and ADHD. PMID:27494079

  20. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Fernandez, Thomas V; Brown, Lawrence W; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Coffey, Barbara J; de Bruijn, Sebastian F T M; Elzerman, Lonneke; Garcia-Delgar, Blanca; Gilbert, Donald L; Grice, Dorothy E; Hagstrøm, Julie; Hedderly, Tammy; Heyman, Isobel; Hong, Hyun Ju; Huyser, Chaim; Ibanez-Gomez, Laura; Kim, Young Key; Kim, Young-Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Kook, Sodahm; Kuperman, Samuel; Lamerz, Andreas; Leventhal, Bennett; Ludolph, Andrea G; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Maras, Athanasios; Messchendorp, Marieke D; Mir, Pablo; Morer, Astrid; Münchau, Alexander; Murphy, Tara L; Openneer, Thaïra J C; Plessen, Kerstin J; Rath, Judith J G; Roessner, Veit; Fründt, Odette; Shin, Eun-Young; Sival, Deborah A; Song, Dong-Ho; Song, Jungeun; Stolte, Anne-Marie; Tübing, Jennifer; van den Ban, Els; Visscher, Frank; Wanderer, Sina; Woods, Martin; Zinner, Samuel H; State, Matthew W; Heiman, Gary A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Dietrich, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Pre- and perinatal complications have been implicated in the onset and clinical expression of Tourette syndrome albeit with considerable inconsistencies across studies. Also, little is known about their role in co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with a tic disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of pre- and perinatal complications in relation to the presence and symptom severity of chronic tic disorder and co-occurring OCD and ADHD using data of 1113 participants from the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics study. This study included 586 participants with a chronic tic disorder and 527 unaffected family controls. We controlled for age and sex differences by creating propensity score matched subsamples for both case-control and within-case analyses. We found that premature birth (OR = 1.72) and morning sickness requiring medical attention (OR = 2.57) were associated with the presence of a chronic tic disorder. Also, the total number of pre- and perinatal complications was higher in those with a tic disorder (OR = 1.07). Furthermore, neonatal complications were related to the presence (OR = 1.46) and severity (b = 2.27) of co-occurring OCD and also to ADHD severity (b = 1.09). Delivery complications were only related to co-occurring OCD (OR = 1.49). We conclude that early exposure to adverse situations during pregnancy is related to the presence of chronic tic disorders. Exposure at a later stage, at birth or during the first weeks of life, appears to be associated with co-occurring OCD and ADHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How can we predict microstructural changes caused by the multiscale irradiation process occurred in materials having complicated and hierarchical structures?

    Morishita, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimatsu, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Challenging efforts are discussed to establish an advanced methodology for prediction of material's property and performance changes by irradiation, which will be necessary by all means for the advanced reactor maintenance technology in the future. The changes of material's properties and performance caused by irradiation, such as irradiation-induced hardening, ductility loss, and material's degradation leading to reduction in reactor lifetime, are primarily determined by microstructural changes in materials during irradiation, where athermal lattice defects are continuously produced by collisions between an irradiating particle and a target material atom, and subsequently the defects are aggregated via diffusion in the form of dislocation loops, voids, and solute precipitation. These radiation damage processes are in essence multiscale phenomena, which involve varying time- and length-scales, from ballistic binary collisions to collective atomic motion in the thermal spike stage followed by the thermal activation process. In this report, the multiscale modeling approach is proposed to understand the processes in materials having complicated and hierarchical structures. (author)

  2. Pre- and perinatal complications in relation to Tourette syndrome and co-occurring obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Abdulkadir, Mohamed; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    -deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in individuals with a tic disorder. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of pre- and perinatal complications in relation to the presence and symptom severity of chronic tic disorder and co-occurring OCD and ADHD using data of 1113 participants from the Tourette International...... Collaborative Genetics study. This study included 586 participants with a chronic tic disorder and 527 unaffected family controls. We controlled for age and sex differences by creating propensity score matched subsamples for both case-control and within-case analyses. We found that premature birth (OR = 1.......72) and morning sickness requiring medical attention (OR = 2.57) were associated with the presence of a chronic tic disorder. Also, the total number of pre- and perinatal complications was higher in those with a tic disorder (OR = 1.07). Furthermore, neonatal complications were related to the presence (OR = 1...

  3. Splinter hemorrhages

    Fingernail hemorrhage ... Splinter hemorrhages look like thin, red to reddish-brown lines of blood under the nails. They run in the direction of nail growth. They are named splinter hemorrhages because they look like a splinter under the ...

  4. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Freehand technique for putaminal hemorrhage. Technical note

    Yokosuka, Kimihiko; Uno, Masaaki; Hirano, Kazuhiro; Toi, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Matsubara, Shunji

    2011-01-01

    We designed a new endoscopic surgical procedure for putaminal hemorrhage (freehand technique) and evaluated its effectiveness and safety in patients with putaminal hemorrhage. Computed tomography (CT) data sets from 40 healthy patients were used. The CT data were transformed into three-dimensional images using AZE VirtualPlace Plus. The nasion and external auditory foramen were the intraoperative reference points. The median point from medial of the globus pallidus to the insula was the target point. The location of the burr hole point was 80-125 mm above and 27.5 mm lateral to the nasion, and the direction was parallel to the midline and a line drawn from the burr hole to the ipsilateral external auditory foramen. This point was used for 15 patients with putaminal hemorrhage. In all cases, only one puncture was required, and there were no complications. The median surgical time was 91.7 minutes, and the median hematoma removal rate was 95.9%. No recurrent bleeding or operative complications occurred. The freehand technique is a simple and safe technique for patients with putaminal hemorrhage. We believe that this technique of endoscopic hematoma evacuation may provide a less-invasive method for treating patients with putaminal hemorrhage. (author)

  6. Evaluation of occurring complications after flow diverter treatment of elastase-induced aneurysm in rabbits using micro-CT and MRI at 9.4 T

    Simgen, Andreas; Ley, Desiree; Muehl-Benninghaus, Ruben; Koerner, Heiko; Reith, Wolfgang; Yilmaz, Umut [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Roth, Christian [Clinic Bremen-Mitte, Department of Neuroradiology, Bremen (Germany); Cattaneo, Giorgio Franco Maria [Acandis GmbH, Pforzheim (Germany); Mueller, Andreas [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Experimental Surgery, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Kim, Yoo-Jin [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Homburg, Saar (Germany); Scheller, Bruno [Saarland University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Homburg, Saar (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Flow diverters are increasingly being used to treat intracranial aneurysms. This study evaluates occurring complications of flow-diverting devices in the treatment of experimental aneurysms, involving the use of micro-CT and small animal MRI at 9.4 T, in correlation to angiographic and histological findings. We previously published two preclinical studies, in which we assessed two different flow diverters in the treatment of elastase-induced aneurysms. Devices have been implanted across the aneurysm neck as well as in the abdominal aorta. From these studies, a total of 65 devices (prototype FD (n = 30) and Derivo embolization device (n = 35)) additionally underwent micro-CT and MRI after angiographic follow-up and before being histologically examined. The different architectures of both devices were precisely comparable due to high-resolution micro-CT imaging. Micro-CT revealed wire fractures in nine cases (30 %) only with the prototype FD. In three cases (10 %), severe wire fractures correlated with an in-stent stenosis due to intimal hyperplasia. Other complications, like distal stent occlusions and post-stent stenosis, were seen in both groups and verified with both imaging techniques. Osseous metaplasia were correlated to calcifications seen with micro-CT. MRI enabled visualization of the position of the implanted devices relative to the aneurysm and revealed incomplete aneurysm neck coverage with the prototype FD in two cases (6.7 %). Micro-CT and 9.4-T MRI are valid to discover and understand occurring complications of flow diverters in the preclinical phase and can serve as evaluation tools to minimize complication rates of endovascular devices in the future. (orig.)

  7. CT and MRI diagnosis of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage

    Wu Shike; Zhang Yalin; Xu Derong; Zou Gaowei; Chen Dan; He Sujun; Zhou Lichao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT and MRI features of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and investigate the diagnostic value. Methods: 21 cases with traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage diagnosed by clinic, CT and MRI in our hospital were collected in this study Plain CT scan were immediately performed in 21 cases after injury, plain MR scan were performed in 1 to 3 days. 12 cases of them underwent diffusion weighted imagine (DWI). The CT and MRI findings were retrospectively summarized. Results: 8 cases were found with simple traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage. Complexity of basal ganglia hemorrhage occurred in 13 cases, 6 cases combined with subdural hemorrhage, 3 cases with epidural hematoma, 2 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, 6 cases with brain contusion and laceration in other locations, 4 cases with skull fracture. 26 lesions of basal ganglia hematoma were showed in 21 cases, 14 lesions of pallidum hemorrhage in 11 cases confirmed by MR could not be distinguished from calcification at the fast CT scan. 5 more lesions of brain contusion and laceration and 4 more lesions of brain white matter laceration were found by MR. Conclusion: CT in combination with MRI can diagnose traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and its complications early, comprehensively and accurately, which plays an important role in the clinical therapy selection and prognosis evaluation. (authors)

  8. "Neurologic complications in Hemophilia: A study in 214 cases "

    Ghaffarpoor M

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hemorrhage and entrapment neuropathy are the most serious and disabling complications in hemophilia.The occurance of these neurological complications was studied in 214 hemophiliac patients during a 3 month period. Nine patients (4.2% suffered intracranial hemorrhage (One epidural and others intracerebral. All of intracranial hemorrhage patients had the sevee form of disease (<1% factor VIII or IX. 6 out of 9 intracranial hemorrhage cases mentioned a history of head trauma. Entrapment neuropathy was presen in 10 patients (femoral neuropathy 5, ulnar n. 3, radial n. 1 median n. 1 all of entropament neuropathy patients described a history of trauma to the extremities. Eight patients in the latter group had severe disease and two patients had moderate disease (1-5%. The proportion of intracranial hemorrhage following head trauma (20% in this series was greater than other studies. In conclusion, early diagnostic evaluation and replacement therapy may be beneficial in hemophilic patients with trauma.

  9. Internal iliac artery embolotherapy for primary postpartum hemorrhage

    Chen Weijun; Mei Haibing; He Zhongwei; Li Meimei

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of internal iliac artery embolotherapy (IIAE) for primary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Methods: 9 cases of PPH were treated with IIAE. Results: Selective catheterization and embolotherapy were successful in 9 cases of PPH, with only one case of left lower extremity arterial thrombosis. No serious complications occurred in others. Conclusions: IIAE is a quick, safe, effective technique for PPH

  10. Embolization for hemorrhage of liver metastases from choriocarcinoma

    Lok, C. A. R.; Reekers, J. A.; Westermann, A. M.; van der Velden, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Because gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is highly sensitive to chemotherapy, life-threatening hemorrhage from metastases can occur especially early after starting therapy. Cases. Two cases of post-term choriocarcinoma with liver metastases complicated by profuse life-threatening

  11. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    Christian von der Brelie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%. 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS. IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD, before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the

  12. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Cevik, Belma; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  13. Hemorrhagic brain metastases

    Takahashi, Motoichiro; Takekawa, S.D.; Suzuki, Kenzo

    1986-01-01

    Tumor hemorrhage on computed tomography (CT) was found in 14 patients with brain metastases (7 % of two hundred patients with brain metastases), from April 1979 to July 1983. Primary foci of these lesions were the lung (6 patients), breast (2), kidney (2), uterus (2), colon (1) and adrenal gland (1). ''Stroke'' syndrome was the initial presenting symptom in 3 patients; neurological focal sign or symptoms of increased intracranial pressure in the remaining patients. CT demonstrated peritumoral hemorrhage in all patients with solid mass, intratumoral hemorrhage in a few patients and also cerebral or ventricular hemorrhage, which was fatal complication, in 2 patients (colon and breast cancers). A cystic mass with fluid-blood level was noted in a patient with breast cancer. Several predisposing factors including chemotherapy, thrombocytopenia, radiotherapy or combination of these were recognized in 8 patients. Of these, chemotherapy was the most causative factor of tumor hemorrhage. Brain irradiation for hemorrhagic brain metastases was effective for prolongation of mean survival time of these patients as follows; 10 months in irradiated group, whereas 1.5 months in non-irradiated group. (author)

  14. Adrenal hemorrhage presenting as a scrotal hematoma in the newborn: A case report.

    Yarci, Erbu; Arayici, Sema; Sari, Fatma Nur; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Uras, Nurdan; Dilmen, Ugur

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage is uncommon. It is present in 0,2% of newborns. Ten percent of the cases occur bilaterally. It can be associated with birth trauma, large birth weight, or neonatal course complicated by hypoxia and asphyxia, hypotension, or coagulopathy. Scrotal hematoma is an extremely rare manifestation of NAH. Most patients present scrotal swelling with bluish discolouration. Scrotal swelling with/without bluish discoloration in newborns may result from different causes. We report an unusual case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage secondary to perinatal asphyxia, associated with SH. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage and scrotal hematoma were diagnosed by ultrasonography and treated by conservative treatment, avoiding unnecessary surgical exploration.

  15. Preretinal hemorrhage

    Eduardo Felippe

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of Valsalva hemorrhagic retinopathy treated with Nd:YAGlaser indescribed. The patient presented decreased visual acuityafter coughing, and a preretinal hemorrhage was diagnosed in theposterior pole; puncturing the posterior hyaloid face was performedwith Nd:Yag laser. Rapid hemorrhage absorption was observedafter the therapy proposed and visual acuity was recovered. Nd:Yaglaser proved to be safe and efficient in the management of preretinalhemorrhage.

  16. Postpartum complications

    Kronthal, A.J.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the CT findings of major postpartum complications and determine what role CT plays in their evaluation. The CT scans of nine patients with major postpartum complications were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had been referred to CT for evaluation of postpartum fever, abdominal pain, and elevated results of liver function tests. Complications identified at CT included hepatic infarctions (n = 2), endometritis (n = 2), postoperative wound abscess (n = 1), massive abdominal hemorrhage (n = 1), septic thrombophlebitis (n = 1), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). CT findings of hepatic infarction included wedge-shaped areas of decreased enhancement conforming to a vascular distribution

  17. Spontaneous muscle hematomas in a patient with Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Jency Maria Koshy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and Dengue shock syndrome manifest in various forms, ranging from petechial skin hemorrhage to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary hemorrhages. However it is very rare to have muscle hematomas in DHF. We report a rare case of spontaneous Iliopsoas hematoma complicating Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  18. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  19. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  20. Neurological complications of alcoholism

    I. I. Nikiforov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nervous system lesions associated with chronic alcohol intoxication are common in clinical practice. They lead to aggravated alcoholic disease, its more frequent recurrences, and intensified pathological craving for alcohol. Neurological pathology in turn occurs with frequent exacerbations. The interaction of diseases, age, and medical  pathomorphism modifies the clinical presentation and course of the  major pathology, as well as comorbidity, the nature and severity of  complications, worsens quality of life in a patient, and makes the  diagnostic and treatment process difficult. The paper discusses the  classification, clinical variants, biochemical and molecular biological  aspects of various complications of alcoholic disease. It considers its  most common form, in particular alcoholic polyneuropathy, as well as its rarer variants, such as hemorrhagic encephalopathy with a subacute course (Gayet–Wernicke encephalopathy.

  1. Laryngeal complications after type 1 thyroplasty.

    Cotter, C S; Avidano, M A; Crary, M A; Cassisi, N J; Gorham, M M

    1995-12-01

    Type I thyroplasty has become a primary surgical choice for voice restoration in patients with glottal incompetence. This study examines factors associated with laryngeal complications after type I thyroplasty. Ten laryngoscopic variables were analyzed from preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative videolaryngoscopies of 51 patients undergoing 58 medialization procedures. Ten patient and operative variables were examined by medical record review. Major complications were defined as wound hemorrhage, airway obstruction, or prosthesis extrusion. Minor complications were defined as vocal fold hematoma without airway obstruction or prosthesis movement. The major complication rate was 8.6%, and the minor complication rate was 29%. No delayed hemorrhage or airway obstruction occurred. Prosthesis extrusion occurred in five (8.6%) patients 1 week to 5 months after surgery. Extrusion was associated with suboptimal prosthesis placement in 80% of cases. Two patients retained excellent glottal closure despite extrusion. Vocal fold hematoma was identified in 14 (24%) cases and resolved within 1 week. Prosthesis movement occurred in three (5%) patients 1 week to 6 months after surgery and resulted in poor glottal closure. All patients with prosthesis extrusion or movement were female. Type I thyroplasty remains a safe outpatient procedure with few major complications. Prosthesis extrusion was associated with suboptimal prosthesis placement and may or may not result in poor glottal closure. Minor vocal fold hematomas were relatively frequent, resolved rapidly, and were not associated with airway obstruction. Female patients may be more prone to complications because of their small laryngeal size.

  2. Circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Schievink, W. I.; Karemaker, J. M.; Hageman, L. M.; van der Werf, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in a group of 500 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosurgical center. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during stressful events in 42.8% of the patients, during nonstrenuous activities in 34.4%, and during rest or

  3. Anosmia After Perimesencephalic Nonaneurysmal Hemorrhage

    Greebe, Paut; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Algra, Ale

    Background and Purpose-Anosmia frequently occurs after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage not only after clipping, but also after endovascular coiling. Thus, at least in part, anosmia is caused by the hemorrhage itself and not only by surgical treatment. However, it is unknown whether anosmia is

  4. Thalamic hemorrhage following carotid angioplasty and stenting

    Friedman, Jonathan A.; Kallmes, David F.; Wijdicks, Eelco F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has emerged as an alternative treatment of carotid stenosis for patients poorly suited for endarterectomy. Intracerebral hemorrhage following carotid revascularization is rare and thought to be related to hyperperfusion injury in most cases. Early experience suggests an increased incidence of hemorrhage following CAS as compared to endarterectomy. We describe a patient who suffered a thalamic hemorrhage following CAS. Because this hemorrhage occurred in a vascular territory unlikely to have been supplied by the treated artery, this case suggests that the mechanism of intracerebral hemorrhage following CAS may in some cases be different from the hyperperfusion hemorrhage classically described following endarterectomy. (orig.)

  5. Subconjunctival hemorrhage

    ... the eyes Viral infection Certain eye surgeries or injuries A subconjunctival hemorrhage is common in newborn infants. In this case, the condition is thought to be caused by the pressure changes across the infant's body during childbirth.

  6. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  7. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  8. CT differential diagnosis between hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction localized in basal ganglia

    Tazawa, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Masahiro; Kawase, Takeshi.

    1984-01-01

    The symptoms of hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage and of middle cerebral artery occlusion are sometimes similar to each other. Hemorrhage sometimes occurs following cerebral infarction. We experienced 7 patients with hemorrhages localized in the basal ganglia following cerebral infarction. The CT findings of 55 patients with putaminal hemorrhage and 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction localized at the basal ganglia were investigated retrospectively in order to discuss their characteristics. The high-density area (HD) of a putaminal hemorrhage was homogeneous on a plain CT within a week of the onset. There was a close correlation between the size of the HD and the timing of its disappearance. The HD with a maximum diameter of A cm generally disappeared A weeks after. On the other hand, the HD of a hemorrhagic infarction was lower in density than that of the putaminal hemorrhage. The HD of a hemorrhagic infarction generally disappeared earlier than that of a putaminal hemorrhage. Ring enhancement was visualized on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) from 2 or 3 weeks after the onset in patients with putaminal hemorrhages except in the case of small hemorrhages (less than 1 cm diameter). Ring enhancement was also visualized in 6 out of 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction; one of them was recognized within a week of the onset. Contrast enhancement of the cortex in the territory of the middle cerebral artery was visualized in 4 out of 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction. This finding seems to indicate one characteristic of hemorrhagic infarction. (author)

  9. [Twin pregnancy as the risk factor for neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage].

    Wieczorek, Aleksandra I; Krasomski, Grzegorz

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to find the perinatal risk factors of intravenricular hemorrhage in twin neonates. A retrospective analysis of 203 twin pregnancies and deliveries between 2003 and 2009 was performed. Then data according birth state and neonatal complications in 406 twins were analyzed. Twin outcome was compared with the outcome of 105 singletons born at the same time and at the same gestational age as twins. Intraventricular hemorrhage was diagnosed in 116/406 (29%) of twins. IVH was found two times more often in the analyzed group than in singletons born at the same gestational age (29% vs. 18%, p = 0,03). In 96% I and II grade hemorrhage was diagnosed and in 4% III and IV grade hemorrhage in the Papille scale was found. 1) Intraventricular hemorrhage is found more often in twins than in singleton neonates born at the same gestational age. 2) IVH in twins correlate with preterm birth and low birth weight. IVH occur more often in twins with birth weight discordance and with too small maternal weight gain.

  10. Observation and nursing of complications due to high re-perfusion injury occurring after balloon angioplasty for diabetic vascular diseases of lower extremity

    Zhang Lingling; Zhu Yueqi; Mou Ling

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the symptomatic nursing in treating the complications caused by high re-perfusion which develops after balloon angioplasty for the treatment of diabetic vascular diseases of lower extremity. Methods: Eighteen patients with lower limb ischemia caused by diabetes mellitus developed high re-perfusion injury complications after receiving balloon angioplasty. The patients were randomly and equally divided into study group and control group. The special nursing measures designed by the author's department, including raising the diseased lower limb, enforcing the flexion and extension movement of the leg, cold compress, wound exposure, etc. were carried out for patients of study group, while no special nursing measures were adopted for patients of control group. The clinical results, such as limb pain, swelling and subcutaneous petechia after re-perfusion injury, were evaluated and compared between two groups. Results: After the treatment, the limb pain, swelling and subcutaneous petechia due to high re-perfusion injury in study group were relieved more markedly than that in control group, the difference in evaluation score between two groups was statistically significant (P<0.01). Conclusion: The special symptomatic nursing measures are very effective in relieving the high re-perfusion injury after balloon angioplasty for the treatment of diabetic lower limb ischemia. (authors)

  11. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  12. Complications of bladder distension during retrograde urethrography.

    Barsanti, J A; Crowell, W; Losonsky, J; Talkington, F D

    1981-05-01

    A severe, ulcerative cystitis that resulted in macroscopic hematuria occurred in 8 of 20 healthy dogs undergoing a series of diagnostic tests. Four of the remaining 12 dogs had mild bladder lesions consisting of submucosal edema and hemorrhage. Nine of the 20 dogs developed urinary tract infection after the procedures. These complications seemed associated with the radiographic technique of retrograde urethrography performed when the urinary bladder was distended. To test this hypothesis, retrograde urethrography was performed on 5 additional dogs. With the bladder undistended, no complications occurred. However, distention of these same dogs' bladders for 1 minute or less with sterile lactated Ringer's solution administered through a Foley catheter in the penile urethra resulted in a macroscopic hematuria in all 5 dogs which persisted for 24 hours. A microscopic hematuria continued for 5 days. One dog developed a bacterial urinary tract infection. A severe fibrinopurulent cystitis was present at necropsy of 2 dogs 2 days after distention. The morphologic changes in the bladder gradually diminished over 7 days, but mild submucosal edema and hemorrhage were still present when 2 dogs were necropsied, 7 days after distention. These studies indicated that retrograde urethrography in dogs may be complicated by hemorrhagic cystitis and urinary tract infection if performed with urinary bladder distention.

  13. Is Palliative Laparoscopic Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Effective in Patients with Malignant Hemorrhagic Ascites?

    de Mestier, Louis; Volet, Julien; Scaglia, Elodie; Msika, Simon; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bouché, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hemorrhagic ascites may complicate the terminal evolution of digestive cancers with peritoneal carcinomatosis. It has a bad influence on prognosis and may severely impair patients’ quality of life. Palliative laparoscopic hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) has been proposed to treat debilitating malignant ascites. Two cases of peritoneal carcinomatosis causing hemorrhagic ascites and severe anemia that needed iterative blood transfusions are reported. These patients were treated by laparoscopic HIPEC (mitomycin C and cisplatin with an inflow temperature of 43°C), resulting in cessation of peritoneal bleeding. No postoperative complication or relapse of ascites occurred during the following months. No more blood transfusion was needed. Laparoscopic HIPEC might be an effective and safe therapeutic option to consider in patients with malignant hemorrhagic ascites. PMID:22679405

  14. Previously undiagnosed hemophilia patient with intracerebral hemorrhage

    Eray Atalay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial bleeding in hemophilia patients is a rare but a mortal complication. Diagnosis of hemophilia in adulthood is an uncommon occurrence. In this case report an adult patient with intracranial hemorrhage is presented.

  15. Neurologic Complications of Transplantation.

    Dhar, Rajat

    2018-02-01

    Neurologic disturbances including encephalopathy, seizures, and focal deficits complicate the course 10-30% of patients undergoing organ or stem cell transplantation. While much or this morbidity is multifactorial and often associated with extra-cerebral dysfunction (e.g., graft dysfunction, metabolic derangements), immunosuppressive drugs also contribute significantly. This can either be through direct toxicity (e.g., posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome from calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus in the acute postoperative period) or by facilitating opportunistic infections in the months after transplantation. Other neurologic syndromes such as akinetic mutism and osmotic demyelination may also occur. While much of this neurologic dysfunction may be reversible if related to metabolic factors or drug toxicity (and the etiology is recognized and reversed), cases of multifocal cerebral infarction, hemorrhage, or infection may have poor outcomes. As transplant patients survive longer, delayed infections (such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy) and post-transplant malignancies are increasingly reported.

  16. Reperfusion hemorrhage following superior mesenteric artery stenting.

    Moore, Michael

    2012-02-03

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement is now an established treatment option for chronic mesenteric ischemia and is associated with low mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of reperfusion hemorrhage complicating endovascular repair of superior mesenteric artery stenosis. Although a recognized complication following repair of carotid stenosis, hemorrhage has not previously been reported following mesenteric endovascular reperfusion. We describe both spontaneous cessation of bleeding and treatment with coil embolization.

  17. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    ... control blood pressure Medicine to prevent artery spasms Painkillers and anti-anxiety medicines to relieve headache and ... Other complications include: Complications of surgery Medicine side effects Seizures Stroke When to Contact a Medical Professional ...

  18. Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage

    Heidemann, Christian; Wallén, Mia; Aakesson, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) is a relatively common and potentially life-threatening complication. The objective of this study was to examine the rate of PTH and identify risk factors. A retrospective cohort study was carried out including all tonsillectomies (430 patients) performed...... as surgical technique" [relative risk (RR) = 5.3], "peritonsillar abscess as indication for surgery" (RR = 0.3) and "age equal to or above 15 years at the time of surgery" (RR = 5.4). It is concluded that patient age, PTA as indication for surgery and the use of coblation significantly affect the occurrence...

  19. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  20. Hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Koga, Nobunori; Nakamura, Saburo; Kushi, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Moriyasu, Nobuo

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between the extension and severity of subarachnoid hemorrhage, as demonstrated by computed tomography (CT), and hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage was studied. In 94 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, as analyzed by CT scan performed within 7 days after onset, high-density areas in the subarachnoid space were recognized in 61 cases (64%) and secondary hydrocephalus occurred in 22 cases (23%). 17 cases died within 2 weeks, before the occurrence of the hydrocephalus. The CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage was classified into 5 types, according to its severity and extension; especially the degree of high density in the basal cistern and/or cisterns around the brain stem was remarked. Secondary hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage was observed in 90% of the cases; they had a density higher than a CT number of 60 in the basal cistern and/or cisterns around the brain stem (Type V). The mean interval between the onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage and the appearance of hydrocephalus was 20.6 days. We conclude that a significantly high density of extravasated blood in the subarachnoid space, especially in the basal cistern and/or the cisterns around the brain stem, can be predictive of secondary hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  1. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  2. [Renal hemorrhage after ESWL: From small hematoma to renal blowout].

    Panach-Navarrete, Jorge; Palmero Martí, Jose Luis; Ganau Ituren, Amparo; Pastor Lence, Juan Carlos; Benedicto Redón, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    To report two cases of renal hemorrhage after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) and their therapeutic management. Description of the clinical cases, together with the diagnosis and therapeutic management of these complications. We present two cases of patients with renal hemorrhage after ESWL, which were performed without immediate complications. One of the cases, after detecting an important laceration of the renal parenchyma, needed two embolization sessions for its short-term resolution; however, the patient finally passed away due to the complications derived from hemorrhage. The other case was solved through conservative management. Even though hemorrhage is an infrequent complication after ESWL, it should be suspected when the patient presents compatible clinical symptoms, since even though most cases are resolved in a conservative manner, on some occasions specific treatments for the hemorrhage are necessary. Old age and the presence of vascular comorbidities seem to be related to a higher risk of hemorrhage after ESWL.

  3. Managing aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: It takes a team.

    de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Turkel-Parrella, David; Duggal, Abhijit; Murphy, Amanda; McCredie, Victoria; Marotta, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are at high risk of complications, including rebleeding, delayed cerebral ischemia, cerebral infarction, and death. This review presents a practical approach for managing this condition and its complications. Copyright © 2015 Cleveland Clinic.

  4. Massive postpartum right renal hemorrhage.

    Kiracofe, H L; Peterson, N

    1975-06-01

    All reported cases of massive postpartum right renal hemorrhage have involved healthy young primigravidas and blacks have predominated (4 of 7 women). Coagulopathies and underlying renal disease have been absent. Hematuria was painless in 5 of 8 cases. Hemorrhage began within 24 hours in 1 case, within 48 hours in 4 cases and 4 days post partum in 3 cases. Our first case is the only report in which hemorrhage has occurred in a primipara. Failure of closure or reopening of pyelovenous channels is suggested as the pathogenesis. The hemorrhage has been self-limiting, requiring no more than 1,500 cc whole blood replacement. Bleeding should stop spontaneously, and rapid renal pelvic clot lysis should follow with maintenance of adequate urine output and Foley catheter bladder decompression. To date surgical intervention has not been necessary.

  5. A case report for fatal Churg-Strauss syndrome complications: first reported death due to rapid progression of prominently huge hepatic capsular hematoma and multi-system organ hemorrhage

    Qian, Jiejing; Tong, Hongyan; Chen, Feifei; Mai, Wenyuan; Lou, Yinjun; Jin, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare disease that has an extremely low incidence rate. CSS prognosis is good, in general; and there are no reports of multiple-organ hemorrhage in CSS. We report a unique case of CSS, wherein, an elderly man experienced multiple organ hemorrhage -- a particularly huge hematoma under the capsule of the liver and poor prognosis. PMID:25419420

  6. Variables affecting the risk of pneumothorax and intrapulmonal hemorrhage in CT-guided transthoracic biopsy

    Khan, M.F.; Straub, R.; Moghaddam, S.R.; Maataoui, A.; Gurung, J.; Thalhammer, A.; Vogl, T.J.; Jacobi, V.; Wagner, T.O.F.; Ackermann, H.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of various variables on the rate of pneumothorax and intrapulmonal hemorrhage associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of the lung were evaluated retrospectivly. One hundred and thirty-three patients underwent CT guided biopsy of a pulmonary lesion. Two patients were biopsied twice. Variables analyzed were lesion size, lesion location, number of pleural needle passes, lesion margin, length of intrapulmonal biopsy path and puncture time. Eighteen-gauge (18G) cutting needles (Trucut, Somatex, Teltow, Germany) were used for biopsy. Pneumothorax occured in 23 of 135 biopsies (17%). Chest tube placement was required in three out of 23 cases of pneumothorax (2% of all biopsies). Pneumothorax rate was significantly higher when the lesions were located in the lung parenchyma compared with locations at the pleura or chest wall (P < 0.05), but all pneumothorax cases which required chest tube treatment occured in lesions located less than 2 cm from the pleura. Longer puncture time led to an increase in pneumothorax rate (P < 0.05). Thirty-seven (27%) out of 135 biopsies showed perifocal hemorrhage. Intrapulmonal biopsy paths longer than 4 cm showed significantly higher numbers of perifocal hemorrhage and pneumothorax (P < 0.05). Significantly more hemorrhage occured when the pleura was penetrated twice during the puncture (P < 0.05). Lesion size <4 cm is strongly correlated with higher occurence of perifocal hemorrhage (P < 0.05). Lesion margination showed no significant effect on complication rate. CT-guided biopsy of smaller lesions correlates with a higher bleeding rate. Puncture time should be minimized to reduce pneumothorax rate. Passing the pleura twice significantly increases the risk of hemorrhage. Intrapulmonal biopsy paths longer than 4 cm showed significantly higher numbers of perifocal hemorrhage as well as pneumothorax. (orig.)

  7. Clinical observation of two treatments for vitreous hemorrhage

    He-Yi Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the indications and therapeutic effect of the conservative treatment and surgical treatment for vitreous hemorrhage.METHODS: Hemorrhage reasons, degree of illness, and treatment and final results of vitreous hemorrhage were recorded from 2008 to 2013, and curative effect of different treatments was analyzed.RESULTS: Selected 22 cases(24 eyesof conservative treatment, vision degree of 6 eyes(25%had raised, 5 eyes(21%occurred secondary retinal detachment without treatment, 3 eyes(12.5%suffered neovascular glaucoma were underwent operation, but the vision had lost completely. In 26 cases(31 eyesof control(operationgroup, vision of 17 eyes(55%had improved, 2 eyes(6.5%suffered the second operation, 2 eyes(6.5%suffered the third surgery, 3 eyes(10%suffered eyeball atrophy. The number of ultimate vision improved with conservative treatment were significantly lower than the number of cases with surgical treatment(PCONCLUSION: The surgical treatment is still visible vitreous hemorrhage treatment means of positive, but there will be eyeball atrophy and other serious complications, so we should choose a different methods in according to the different treatment objects and treatment time.

  8. DSA diagnosis and embolization therapy of gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Zhou Ruming; Qiu Shuibo; Liu Minhua; Yang Huijun; Zhuang Shaoyu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of digital subtraction angiography and transcatheter embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage received celiac arteries, superior mesenteric arteries and inferior mesenteric arteries angiography. Superselective angiography were performed when the arteries were suspicious by clinic or angiogrraphy. Ten patients with definite diagnosis and manifestation of hemorrhagic arteries by angiography were embolized after superselective catheterization with gelfoam particles, gelfoam particles and coils, polyvinyl alcohol particles. Results: The positive signs were observed in 13 cases. The DSA features including contrast medium accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract outside vascular, aneurysm, tumorous vascularization and staining, artery affect and local vasospasm. The bleedings were stopped immediately in 8 patients. No rebleeding and intestinal ischaemia or necrosis were observed in 30 days. One patient died in the second day after embolization from multiple organ failure. Rebleeding occurred 3 days after embolization in another patient, and was recovered after surgical operation. Conclusion: DSA is more effective for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal vascular malformation and tumors complicating acute bleeding. Transcatheter embolization is effective and safe to control the hemorrhage. (authors)

  9. A case of immune thrombocytopenic purpura presenting with intracranial hemorrhage

    Sinan Akbayram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is an acute, generally considered a self-limiting benign disorder with a 60%-80% change of spontaneous recovery occurring usually within a few months after onset. Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare but life-threatening complication of childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We report a 4-year-old girl who admitted with headache, vomiting, bleeding from noise and bruises on the extremities. Her neurological examination was normal. Based on laboratory finding she was diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura and intracranial hemorrhage. We suggest that cranial imaging should be perform in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura admitted with bleeding symptoms, vomiting and headache even if they had no abnormal neurological signs.

  10. Fatal hemorrhage in irr[iated esophageal cancer patients

    Nemoto, Kenji; Takai, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Ariga, Hisanori; Matsushita, Haruo; Wada, Hitoshi; Yamada, Shogo

    1998-01-01

    Between 1980 and 1994, 423 patients with esophageal cancer were given curative r[iation therapy. Of these patients, 31 died of massive hemorrhage and were used as the subjects of analysis in this study. The incidence of massive hemorrhage in all patients was 7% (31/423). In the 31 patients who died of massive hemorrhage, 27 h[ local tumors and two h[ no tumors at hemorrhage (two unknown cases). The mean time interval from the start of r[iation to hemorrhage was 9.2 months. In 9 autopsy cases the origin of hemorrhage was a tear of the aorta in 5 cases, necrotic local tumor in 3 cases and esophageal ulcer in 1 case. The positive risk factors for this complication seemed to be excess total dose, infection, metallic stent, and tracheoesophageal fistula. Chest pain or sentinel hemorrhage proceeding to massive hemorrhage was observed in about half of the patients. (orig.)

  11. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Complications in Endovascular Neurosurgery: Critical Analysis and Classification.

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Mazur, Marcus D; Park, Min S; Kilburg, Craig; Moran, Christopher J; Hardman, Rulon L; Couldwell, William T; Taussky, Philipp

    2016-11-01

    Precisely defining complications, which are used to measure overall quality, is necessary for critical review of delivery of care and quality improvement in endovascular neurosurgery, which lacks common definitions for complications. Furthermore, in endovascular interventions, events that may be labeled complications may not always negatively affect outcome. Our objective is to provide precise definitions for quality evaluation within endovascular neurosurgery. Thus, we propose an endovascular-specific classification system of complications based on our own patient series. This single-center review included all patients who had endovascular interventions from September 2013 to August 2015. Complication types were analyzed, and a descriptive analysis was undertaken to calculate the incidence of complications overall and in each category. Two hundred and seventy-five endovascular interventions were performed in 245 patients (65% female; mean age, 55 years). Forty complications occurred in 39 patients (15%), most commonly during treatment of intracranial aneurysms (24/40). Mechanical complications (eg, device deployment, catheter, or closure device failure) occurred in 8/40, technical complications (eg, failure to deploy flow diverter, unintended embolization, air emboli, retroperitoneal hemorrhage, dissection) in 11/40, judgment errors (eg, patient or equipment selection) in 9/40, and critical events (eg, groin hematoma, hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications) in 12/40 patients. Only 12/40 complications (30%) resulted in new neurologic deficits, vessel injury requiring surgery, or blood transfusion. We propose an endovascular-specific classification system of complications with 4 categories: mechanical, technical, judgment errors, and critical events. This system provides a framework for future studies and quality control in endovascular neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intranasal Fentanyl Intoxication Leading to Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage.

    Ruzycki, Shannon; Yarema, Mark; Dunham, Michael; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Tremblay, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Increasing rates of opioid abuse, particularly fentanyl, may lead to more presentations of unusual effects of opioid toxicity. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare complication of fentanyl overdose. A 45-year-old male presented in hypoxic respiratory failure secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage requiring intubation. Comprehensive drug screening detected fentanyl without exposure to cocaine. Further history upon the patient's recovery revealed exposure to snorted fentanyl powder immediately prior to presentation. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potential, though rare, presentation of opioid intoxication. Recognition of less common complications of opioid abuse such as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is important in proper management of overdoses.

  14. Management of Postoperative Complications Following Splenectomy

    Qu, Yikun; Ren, Shiyan; Li, Chunmin; Qian, Songyi; Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Complications of post-splenectomy, especially intra-abdominal hemorrhage can be fatal, with delayed or inadequate treatment having a high mortality rate. The objective of this study was to investigate the cause, prompt diagnosis, and outcome of the fatal complications after splenectomy with a focus on early diagnosis and management of hemorrhage after splenectomy. The medical files of patients who underwent splenectomy between January 1990 and March 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. The cause, characteristics, management, and outcome in patients with post-splenectomy hemorrhage were analyzed. Fourteen of 604 patients (1.19%) undergoing splenectomy had intraperitoneal hemorrhage: reoperation was performed in 13 patients, and 3 patients died after reoperation, giving the hospital a mortality rate of 21.43%; whereas, 590 of 604 patients (98%) had no hemorrhage following splenectomy, and the mortality rate (0.34%) in this group was significantly lower (P splenectomy, including pneumonia pancreatitis, gastric fistula, gastric flatulence, and thrombocytosis, in patients with postoperative hemorrhage were significantly higher than those without hemorrhage (P splenectomy, 14 patients with post-splenectomy hemorrhage were grouped into two groups: splenic trauma (n = 9, group I) and portal hypertension (n = 5, group II). The median interval between splenectomy and diagnosis of hemorrhage was 15.5 hours (range, 7.25–19.5 hours). No differences were found between groups I and II in terms of incidence of postoperative hemorrhage, time of hemorrhage after splenectomy, volume of hemorrhage, and mortality of hemorrhage, except transfusion. Intra-abdominal hemorrhage after splenectomy is associated with higher hospital mortality rate and complications. Early massive intraperitoneal hemorrhage is often preceded by earlier sentinel bleeding; careful clinical inquiry and ultrasonography are the mainstays of early diagnosis. PMID:23438277

  15. Ultrasound diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage in meningococcemia

    Sarnaik, A.P.; Sanfilippo, D.J.K.; Slovis, T.L.; Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit; Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI

    1988-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a well-described complication of the neonatal period, anticoagulant therapy, and overwhelming bacterial infection especially with N. meningitis. Until recently the diagnosis of acute AH was based predominantly on autopsy findings. Ultrasound and computed tomography examinations have been successfully used for antemortem detection of AH in neonates and anticoagulated patients. We report two patients with fulminant meningococcal infection who demonstrated bilateral adrenal hemorrhages on ultrasonography. (orig.)

  16. Microdebrider complications in laryngologic and airway surgery.

    Howell, Rebecca J; Solowski, Nancy L; Belafsky, Peter C; Courey, Mark C; Merati, Albert L; Rosen, Clark A; Weinberger, Paul M; Postma, Gregory N

    2014-11-01

    There is a paucity of experience in the published literature documenting complications of powered surgical instruments in laryngologic surgery. Our objective was to ascertain the nature of these complications from expert opinion and review of the literature, and to recommend strategies to decrease major complications. Review of the literature and an e-mail survey. A literature review of microdebrider complications in laryngologic surgery was conducted using PubMed and Ovid (1985 to 2013), along with an analysis of a confidential e-mail survey of various surgeons in selected high-volume laryngologic centers. Powered instrumentation is frequently used in the operating room for larynx and airway surgery. The microdebrider can improve efficiency, lower costs, and shorten operative times. However, use of the microdebrider has the potential for serious complications in the larynx and airway. Great care must be taken when utilizing the microdebrider in laryngologic surgery. Significant complications including major vocal fold scar, airway compromise, severe hemorrhage, and unintentional tissue loss have occurred. The microdebrider is a popular and valuable tool for the otolaryngologist. A thorough knowledge of the instrument and its potential complications will improve surgical outcomes and may prevent complications. Awareness of the risks and surgeon experience with use of the microdebrider will allow the surgeon to successfully utilize this device in a safe and effective manner. 5. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms

    Orrù, Emanuele, E-mail: surgeon.ema@gmail.com [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Roccatagliata, Luca, E-mail: lroccatagliata@neurologia.unige.it [Neuroradiology Department, IRCCS San Martino University Hospital and IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132 (Italy); Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa (Italy); Cester, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.cester@sanita.padova.it [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Causin, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.causin@sanita.padova.it [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Castellan, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.castellan@hsanmartino.it [Neuroradiology Department, IRCCS San Martino University Hospital and IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132 (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    The number of neuroendovascular treatments of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has increased substantially in the last two decades. Complications of endovascular treatments of cerebral aneurysms are rare but can potentially lead to acute worsening of the neurological status, to new neurological deficits or death. Some of the possible complications, such as vascular access site complications or systemic side effects associated with contrast medium (e.g. contrast medium allergy, contrast induced nephropathy) can also be encountered in diagnostic angiography. The most common complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms are related to acute thromboembolic events and perforation of the aneurysm. Overall, the reported rate of thromboembolic complications ranges between 4.7% and 12.5% while the rate of intraprocedural rupture of cerebral aneurysms is about 0.7% in patients with unruptured aneurysms and about 4.1% in patients with previously ruptured aneurysms. Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications may occur during different phases of endovascular procedures and are related to different technical, clinical and anatomic reasons. A thorough knowledge of the different aspects of these complications can reduce the risk of their occurrence and minimize their clinical sequelae. A deep understanding of complications and of their management is thus part of the best standard of care.

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Wajnberg, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy corresponds to a syndrome characterized by a transient myocardial dysfunction affecting the left ventricular apex that classically occurs after major physical or emotional stress (also called 'broken heart syndrome' or 'stress-induced cardiomyopathy'). The author describes the case of a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  19. [Clinical picture of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Croatia].

    Kuzman, Ilija

    2003-01-01

    Among many viral hemorrhagic fevers, only hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) occurs in Croatia. HFRS is a natural focus zoonosis with sudden onset, characterized by high fever and other clinical symptoms, renal insufficiency and hemorrhages. In Croatia, HFRS is caused by two types of hantaviruses--Puumala (PUU) and Dobrava (DOB). The basic pathologic and patophysiologic disorder in HFRS is capillary damage (vasculitis). Incubation of HFRS has not been precisely determined, it is most frequently around two weeks. The disease onset is usually abrupt. At the beginning, general symptoms include high fever and myalgias, especially in the lumbar region, and abdominal pain, as well as strong headaches, malaise and nausea, and often vomiting or diarrhea. In half of the patients respiratory symptoms occur. Later on, some patients may experience hypotension, oliguria and other signs of renal failure, and apart from petechial, severe hemorrhages may also occur in other organs. During typical clinical presentation of the disease, some characteristic symptoms are clearly distinguished in particular stages of the disease. Therefore, the course of HFRS is usually divided into five distinct stages (febrile, hypotensive, oliguric, polyuric and convalescent). Such a course of the disease is more commonly present in case of DOB virus than PUU virus infection. The febrile stage with sudden onset usually lasts from 3 to 7 days, when thrombocytopenia and hemoconcentration, as well as albuminuria and hematuria are almost always recorded. The hypotensive stage lasts from one to 2 days on an average and is characterized by lower blood pressure and signs of renal failure. The oliguric stage usually starts at the beginning of the second week of the disease, when extensive hemorrhage may occur and urea and creatinine reach their highest values. The oliguric stage is followed by the polyuric stage which can last for up to two weeks, and is characterized by excretion of a large

  20. Subdural Hemorrhage after Scoliosis and Detethering of Cord Surgery

    Rohan Bhimani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intracranial hypotension may occur when CSF leaks from the subarachnoid space. Formation of intracranial, subdural, and subarachnoid hemorrhage has been observed after significant CSF leak as seen in lumbar puncture or ventricular shunt placement. However, very few cases, referring to these remote complications following spine surgery, have been described in literature. We present a case of a 10-year-old male child operated for idiopathic scoliosis with low-lying conus medullaris who postoperatively developed subdural hemorrhage. Case Report. A case of a 10-year-old male operated for idiopathic scoliosis with low-lying conus medullaris is presented. To correct this, detethering was done at the L3 level, laminectomy was done from L2 to L3 with pedicular screw fixation from T3 to L2, and bone grafting with right costoplasty was done from the 3rd to the 6th ribs. On the 5th day postoperatively, the patient developed convulsions and drowsiness and recovered subsequently by postoperative day 7. Conclusion. We report a rare case of an acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage caused by intracranial hypotension following scoliosis and detethering of cord surgery. This report highlights the potential morbidity associated with CSF leak occurring after this surgery.

  1. Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cryptic angioma

    Yoshida, Shinichi; Sano, Keiji; Kwak, Suyong; Saito, Isamu.

    1981-01-01

    A series of 44 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and nine patients with cerebellar hemorrhage caused by small angiomas is described. Hypertensive hemorrhage occurred most frequently in the patients in their seventies, whereas the onset of angioma-caused hemorrhage was often seen below the age of 40. Clinical syndromes of cerebellar hemorrhages can be categorized into three basic types: the vertigo syndrome, cerebellar dysfunction syndrome and brain stem compression syndrome. Patients with small (>= 2 cm in diameter in CT scans) and medium-sized (2 cm = 3 cm) hematomas deteriorated into unresponsive conditions and developed signs of brain stem compression. Surgical mortality was 32% in the hypertensive group, while it was 0% in the angioma group. Mortality as well as morbidity in both groups was strongly influenced by the preoperative status of consciousness. Our results suggest that substantial improvement could be obtained in the overall outcome of this disease by emergency craniectomy and removal of hematomas in all patients with large hematomas regardless of the levels of consciousness and regardless of the causes of bleeding. Furthermore, when clinical information and CT findings are suggestive of a ''cryptic'' angioma as the causative lesion, posterior fossa surgery may be indicated to extirpate the lesion, even if the hematoma is small. (author)

  2. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J.; Siech, M.

    2000-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  3. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Ulm (Germany); Siech, M. [Dept. of Abdominal Surgery, University of Ulm (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  4. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and pregnancy: potential adverse events and pregnancy outcomes

    Bari O

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar Bari,1 Philip R Cohen2 1School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Abstract: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant condition with a prevalence of ~1 in 5,000 individuals. The pathophysiology of this condition centers on the lack of capillary beds between arterioles and venules, leading to direct contact between these vessels. This results in telangiectases on characteristic locations such as the face, fingers, mouth, and nasal mucosa. Visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs are also observed in many patients, and these are most commonly seen in the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and lungs. Liver AVMs are present in many patients with HHT, though these individuals are usually asymptomatic; however, liver AVMs may lead to serious complications, such as high output cardiac failure. Diagnosis of HHT hinges upon fulfilling three out of four criteria: family history of the condition, mucocutaneous telangiectases, spontaneous and recurrent episodes of epistaxis, and visceral AVMs. Management is guided by international consensus guidelines and targets patients’ specific AVMs. Prognosis is good, though severe complications including hemorrhage and paradoxical emboli are possible. Novel therapeutics are being explored in clinical trials; bevacizumab and pazopanib inhibit angiogenesis, while thalidomide bolsters blood vessel maturation. Pregnancy in patients with HHT is considered high risk. While the majority of pregnancies proceed normally, severe complications have been reported in some women with HHT; these include heart failure, intracranial hemorrhage, pulmonary hemorrhage, and stroke. Such complications occur most often in the second and third trimesters when maternal changes such as peripheral vasodilation and increased cardiac output are at their maximum. Awareness of the diagnosis of HHT has

  5. Incidence of Intraventricular Hemorrhage and Post Hemorrhagic Hydrocephalus in Preterm Infants

    Negar Sajjadian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nGerminal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH is the most common variety of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage and is characteristics of the premature infant. The importance of the lesion relates not only to its high incidence but to their attendant complications (IC: hydrocephalus. Brain sonography is the procedure of choice in diagnosis of germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage and hydrocephalus. In this study we have used brain sonography for detection of intraventricular hemorrhage and post hemorrhagic hydrocephalus and their incidences. The studied population was consisted of premature neonate (birth weight equal or less than 1500g and gestational age equal or less than 37 weeks who admitted in Mofid Hospital NICU (Tehran, Iran during a one year period. For all neonate (including criteria brain sonography in first week of life was done and in presence of IVH, serial Brain sonography was done weekly for detection of hydrocephalus. A total of 57 neonate entered the study. Intraventicular-germinal matrix hemorrhage was seen in 64.4% (35 patients. Forty percent of patients with intraventricular-germinal matrix hemorrhage had grade I, 11% grade II, 25.7% grade III, 2.8% grade VI. Hydrocephalus was detected in 20 percent of patients who had intraventricular-germinal matrix hemorrhage. That incidence of IVH in our study in comparison with other area and situation is higher. Hydrocephaly had direct relation with severity of IVH. This shows that with control of risk factor of IVH, we can control Post hemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

  6. Drought occurence

    John W. Coulston

    2007-01-01

    Why Is Drought Important? Drought is an important forest disturbance that occurs regularly in the Western United States and irregularly in the Eastern United States (Dale and others 2001). Moderate drought stress tends to slow plant growth while severedrought stress can also reduce photosynthesis (Kareiva and others 1993). Drought can also interact with...

  7. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Role of Interventional Therapy

    Barge, Jaideep U.; Lopera, Jorge E. [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management.

  8. A case of idiopathic omental hemorrhage

    Toshimitsu Hosotani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the exception of trauma, intraperitoneal hemorrhage in young women is caused by the high frequency of ectopic pregnancy and ovarian bleeding. Here, we describe a case of idiopathic omental hemorrhage, which is a rare cause of intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was suspected in a 38-year-old Japanese woman based on contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Her last menstrual period was 23 days prior, and ovarian bleeding was considered based on bloody ascites revealed by culdocentesis. She underwent emergency surgery for hypovolemic shock. Although both ovaries were of normal size and no abnormal findings were observed, we performed a partial omentectomy because multiple clots were attached only to the greater omentum. Postoperatively, no rebleeding occurred, and she was discharged 11 days after the surgery. Because she did not have a clear history of trauma and underlying disease, idiopathic omental hemorrhage was diagnosed.

  9. Intracerebral hemorrhage (image)

    Intracerebral hemorrhage may be caused by trauma (brain injury) or abnormalities of the blood vessels (aneurysm or angioma), but it is most commonly associated with high blood pressure (hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage).

  10. CT in pontine hemorrhage

    Iwasaki, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Masao; Ikeda, Ken; Sasaki, Atsushi.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and CT findings in 10 patients with primary pontine hemorrhage were reviewed. All patients were hypertensive. Pontine hemorrhage can be divided into 3 groups from the viewpoint of location of hematomas. These are the tegmentobasilar type, tegmental type and basilar type. The tegmentobasilar type produces characteristic clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and poor prognosis, otherwise, another two types produce atypical clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and good prognosis. (author)

  11. The diagnosis and therapy of intractable upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by hepatic arterioportal vein fistulas in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Luo Pengfei; Chen Xiaoming; Lu Ligong; Hu Baoshan; Li Yong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hemodynamics of increasing portal venous pressure(PVP) in hepatocellular carcinoma patients complicated with hepatic arterioportal vein fistulas (HAPVF) and the diagnosis and therapy of intractable upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by HAPVF. Methods: One hundred and fifteen cases of hepatocellular carcinoma with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage were checked by hepatic arteriography and were treated through orifices embolization in cases with severe HAPCF by coils and/or ethanol. Results: Twenty-six out of 31 patients suffering intractable upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage have severe HAPVF (the main stem of portal veins are visible). However, there are only 15 patients with light HAPVF among the 84 patients who have mild upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (the main stem of portal veins are invisible). After the embolization, all of the 26 patients who have severe HAPVF stopped bleeding. Among them, the main stem of hepatic arteries are occluded in 2 patients. Conclusion: The existence of severe HAPVF should be taken into consideration when intractable upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurs in hepatocellular carcinoma patients, and it can be diagnosed through hepatic artery DSA. Orifice embolization is the most effective method for such kind of hemorrhage. (authors)

  12. Impaired fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Gorp, E. van; Setiati, T.E.; Mairuhu, A.T.; Suharti, C.; Cate, H.H.; Dolmans, W.M.V.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Hack, C.E.; Brandjes, D.P.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to bleeding complications in dengue hemorrhagic fever were studied by investigating the pattern of activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in 50 children with severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. Thirteen patients (26%) died, and activation of coagulation was

  13. Impaired fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    van Gorp, Eric C. M.; Setiati, Tatty E.; Mairuhu, Albert T. A.; Suharti, Catharina; Cate Ht, Hugo ten; Dolmans, Wil M. V.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Hack, C. Erik; Brandjes, Dees P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to bleeding complications in dengue hemorrhagic fever were studied by investigating the pattern of activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in 50 children with severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. Thirteen patients (26%) died, and activation of coagulation was

  14. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy after Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure.

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Francis, Andrew W; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-08-01

    To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female subject after lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. A 38-year-old woman presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery that was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately after witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal, and subretinal involvement. At 4-month follow-up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy after lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted after episodes of seizure in adults.

  15. Potentialities of embolization of life threatening hemorrhages

    Moskvichev, V.G.

    1985-01-01

    The author analysed experience in the embolization of the abdominal vessels in 79 patients with diseases and lesions of the peritoneal cavity and retroperitoneal space accompanied by life threatening hemorrhage. In 51 cases embolization was used as an independent method of hemorrhage arrest and in 28 cases for patients' preoperative preparation. A hemostatic sponge combined with a superselective administration of 150-200 ml of aminocaproic acid was used as an emboilizing material. Complications attributed to embolization were noted in 5 patients: pancreatitis, subdiaphragmatic abscess, paranephritis, ischemia of the gluteal soft tissues, sciatic neuritis. An analysis has shown that urgent embolization of the abdominal vessels in diseases and lesions of the organs of the peritoneal cavity and retroperitoneal space accompanied by massive hemorrhage, can be used as an independent method for hemorrhage arrest

  16. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Ruptured due to Acute Intracystic Hemorrhage

    Kunishige Okamura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst is one of the rare complications and usually results in high mortality. The present case was a rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst that could be treated by surgical intervention. A 74-year-old man developed abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, and he was diagnosed with cholecystitis and pneumonia. Three days later, acute pancreatitis occurred and computed tomography (CT showed slight hemorrhage in the cyst of the pancreatic tail. After another 10 days, CT showed pancreatic cyst ruptured due to intracystic hemorrhage. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed leakage of contrast agent from pancreatic tail cyst to enclosed abdominal cavity. His left hypochondrial pain was increasing, and CT showed rupture of the cyst of the pancreatic tail into the peritoneal cavity was increased in 10 days. CT showed also two left renal tumors. Therefore we performed distal pancreatectomy with concomitant resection of transverse colon and left kidney. We histopathologically diagnosed pancreatic pseudocyst ruptured due to intracystic hemorrhage and renal cell carcinoma. Despite postoperative paralytic ileus and fluid collection at pancreatic stump, they improved by conservative management and he could be discharged on postoperative day 29. He has achieved relapse-free survival for 6 months postoperatively. The mortality of pancreatic pseudocyst rupture is very high if some effective medical interventions cannot be performed. It should be necessary to plan appropriate treatment strategy depending on each patient.

  17. Dysphonia and vocal fold telangiectasia in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Chang, Joseph; Yung, Katherine C

    2014-11-01

    This case report is the first documentation of dysphonia and vocal fold telangiectasia as a complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Case report of a 40-year-old man with HHT presenting with 2 years of worsening hoarseness. Hoarseness corresponded with a period of anticoagulation. Endoscopy revealed vocal fold scarring, vocal fold telangiectasias, and plica ventricular is suggestive of previous submucosal vocal fold hemorrhage and subsequent counterproductive compensation with ventricular phonation. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may present as dysphonia with vocal fold telangiectasias and place patients at risk of vocal fold hemorrhage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Transarterial embolization for postoperative massive hemorrhage in patients with abdominal tumors

    Wang Zhiwei; Shi Haifeng; Sun Hao; Zhou Kang; Li Xiaoguang; Pan Jie; Zhang Xiaobo; Liu Wei; Yang Ning; Jin Zhengyu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility and effectiveness of transarterial embolization for the management of postoperative massive hemorrhage in patients with abdominal tumors. Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2009 in authors' hospital transarterial embolization for postoperative massive hemorrhage was performed in thirteen patients with abdominal tumors. The clinical data and the technical points were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of 13 patients,the bleeding was completely controlled in 10 after single embolization procedure. Re-bleeding occurred in the other 3 patients, and angiography showed the new bleeding arteries. Trans arterial embolization was carried out again, and the bleeding was successfully stopped in 2 patients. The remaining one patient had to be treated with surgery as the microcatheter could not be super-selectively placed into the bleeding vessel. The overall clinical success rate of trans arterial embolization for postoperative massive hemorrhage was 92% (12 /13). No severe complications occurred. Conclusion: Trans arterial embolization is a safe and effective treatment for postoperative massive hemorrhage in patients with abdominal tumors. (authors)

  19. Management of Agitation Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Is There a Role for Beta-Blockers?

    Ibrahim, Fayaz; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. About 20% of the stroke is hemorrhagic and about 50% of these is due to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A troublesome neuropsychiatric complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage is agitation/aggression. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old man with no prior psychiatric history, sustained subarachnoid hemorrhage. After initial stabilization for 2 days, he underwent craniotomy and clipping of anterior cerebral...

  20. Superselective embolization with microcoil in acute gastronitestinal hemorrhage

    Ko, Eun Hye; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jang, Nam Kyu

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of superselective arterial embolization using the microcoil in acute gastrointerstinal hemorrhage. We evaluated 11 of 42 patients who had undergone diagnostic angiography and transcatheter arterial embolization due to acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage and subsequently underwent superselective arterial embolization using the microcoil. Nine were males and two were females, and their age ranged from 33 to 70 (mean, 51) years. The etiologies were bleeding ulcer (n=3D5), pseudoaneurysm from pancreatitis (n=3D3), and postoperative bleeding (n=3D3). The symptoms were melena, hematemesis, and hematochzia, and the critical signs were cecreased hemoglobin and worsening of vital signs. All patients underwent superselective embolization using the microcatheter and microcoil. Bleeding occurred in the gastroduodenal artery (n=3D5), inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (n=3D2), left gastric artery (n=3D2), right hepatic artery (n=3D1), and ileal branch of the superior mesenteric artery (n=3D1). All cases were treated succesfully, without complications. In one case in which there was bleeding in the right hepatic artery, reembolization with a microcoil was needed because of persistent melena. During follow up, three patients died from complications arising underlying diseases, namely disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, chronic renal failure, and adult resiratory distress syndrome. (author)=20

  1. Pathogenesis of lober intracerebral hemorrhage related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Sakai, Naoto; Namba, Hiroki; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Satoshi; Isoda, Haruo; Yokoyama, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of lober intracerebral hemorrhage in the elderly. Although leptomeningeal and cortical arteries with the deposition of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) have been thought to rupture in CAA, the pathogenesis of CAA-related hemorrhage still remains obscure. We studied 10 cases of CAA according to the Boston criteria from April 2006 to July 2009 in Omaezaki Municipal Hospital. Based on clinical data, we examined the primary site of hemorrhage and hypothesized the mechanisms of bleeding. Intracerebral hematoma evacuation was performed to alleviate neurological deteriolation in 2 patients and to make diagnosis in 3 patients. The surgical specimens were pathologically examined. The characteristic MR images of CAA related hemorrhage were characterized by microbleeds, superficial siderosis, subpial or subarachnoid hemorrhage, subcortical hemorrhage and lober intracerebral hemorrhage. Chronological images obtained in 1 patient revealed that lober intracerebral hemorrhage developed from microbleed with subpial hemorrhage without subarachnoid hemorrhage in one side of the cortex in the affected facing cerebral sulci. Operative findings showed subpial and subarachnoid hemorrhages around the cortical veins on the affected cerebral sulci in all cases. Abnormal fragile vessels existed in one side of the cortex of the affected sulci but not in the other side of the cortex. Complete hamatoma evacuation was performed in 4 cases. The surgical specimens of the hematoma and the adjacent brain parenchyma were pathologically examined by tissue staining with hematoxylin-eosin and Congo red. Many vessels in subpial, subcortical and subarachnoid space along the cerebral sulci were deposited with Aβ. From these findings, we speculated that the primary hemorrhage related to CAA occurred from the cortical arteries with Aβ deposition in the subpial space along the cerebral sulci and formed a lober intracerebral hematoma. Subarachnoid

  2. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome

    Robertson, R.L.; Chavali, R.V.; Robson, C.D.; Barnes, P.D.; Burrows, P.E. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Eldredge, E.A. [Department of Anesthesia, Children`s Hospital Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Scott, R.M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children`s Hospital Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1998-11-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher`s exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. (orig.) With 8 tabs., 37 refs.

  3. Neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in childhood moyamoya syndrome

    Robertson, R.L.; Chavali, R.V.; Robson, C.D.; Barnes, P.D.; Burrows, P.E.; Eldredge, E.A.; Scott, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of neurologic complications of cerebral angiography in children with moyamoya syndrome (MMS) as compared to children without MMS. Materials and methods. One-hundred-ninety consecutive cerebral angiograms obtained in 152 children were evaluated. Sixty of these angiograms were obtained in 40 children with MMS. Patients underwent neurologic evaluation prior to and after the procedure. For this study, a neurologic complication was defined as any new focal neurologic deficit or alteration in mental status occurring during the procedure or within the ensuing 24 hours. Results. There were 2 neurologic complications within 24 hours of angiography, one in the MMS group and one in the non-MMS group. One patient with MMS became mute following angiography. The symptom resolved within 12 hours. One patient without MMS being examined postoperatively for residual arteriovenous malformation developed intracranial hemorrhage requiring reexploration 12 hours after the angiogram. Using a two-tail Fisher's exact test, there was no significant statistical difference in the ischemic (P = 0.3) or hemorrhagic (P = 1.0) complication rates between the group of patients with MMS and the non-MMS groups. Conclusion. The risk of a neurologic complication from cerebral angiography in children with MMS is low and not statistically different from the risk in children with other cerebrovascular disorders. (orig.)

  4. Fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version.

    Boucher, Marc; Marquette, Gerald P; Varin, Jocelyne; Champagne, Josette; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2008-07-01

    To estimate the frequency and volume of fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version for term breech singleton fetuses and to identify risk factors involved with this complication. A prospective observational study was performed including all patients undergoing a trial of external cephalic version for a breech presentation of at least 36 weeks of gestation between 1987 and 2001 in our center. A search for fetal erythrocytes using the standard Kleihauer-Betke test was obtained before and after each external cephalic version. The frequency and volume of fetomaternal hemorrhage were calculated. Putative risk factors for fetomaternal hemorrhage were evaluated by chi(2) test and Mann-Whitney U test. A Kleihauer-Betke test result was available before and after 1,311 trials of external cephalic version. The Kleihauer-Betke test was positive in 67 (5.1%) before the procedure. Of the 1,244 women with a negative Kleihauer-Betke test before external cephalic version, 30 (2.4%) had a positive Kleihauer-Betke test after the procedure. Ten (0.8%) had an estimated fetomaternal hemorrhage greater than 1 mL, and one (0.08%) had an estimated fetomaternal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL. The risk of fetomaternal hemorrhage was not influenced by parity, gestational age, body mass index, number of attempts at version, placental location, or amniotic fluid index. The risk of detectable fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version was 2.4%, with fetomaternal hemorrhage more than 30 mL in less than 0.1% of cases. These data suggest that the performance of a Kleihauer-Betke test is unwarranted in uneventful external cephalic version and that in Rh-negative women, no further Rh immune globulin is necessary other than the routine 300-microgram dose at 28 weeks of gestation and postpartum. II.

  5. Frequency and determinants for hemorrhagic transformation of posterior cerebral stroke : Posterior ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic transformation.

    Valentino, Francesca; Gentile, Luana; Terruso, Valeria; Mastrilli, Sergio; Aridon, Paolo; Ragonese, Paolo; Sarno, Caterina; Savettieri, Giovanni; D'Amelio, Marco

    2017-11-13

    hemorrhagic transformation is a threatening ischemic stroke complication. Frequency of hemorrhagic transformation differs greatly among studies, and its risk factors have been usually studied in patients with anterior ischemic stroke who received thrombolytic therapy. We evaluated, in a hospital-based series of patients with posterior ischemic stroke not treated with thrombolysis, frequency and risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Patients with posterior circulation stroke were seen in our Department during the period January 2004 to December 2009. Demographic and clinical information were collected. We estimated risk for spontaneous hemorrhagic transformation by means of uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses. 119 consecutive patients were included (73 males, 61.3%). Hemorrhagic transformation was observed in 7 patients (5.9%). Only clinical worsening was significantly associated with hemorrhagic transformation (OR 6.8, 95% CI 1.3-34.5). Our findings indicate that patients with posterior have a low risk of spontaneous hemorrhagic transformation, suggesting that these patients might have greater advantage from intravenous thrombolysis.

  6. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Beslow, Lauren A; Engelmann, Kyle; Smith, Sabrina E; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies of pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage have investigated isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We investigated whether detailed assessment of intraventricular hemorrhage enhanced outcome prediction after intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled 46 children, full-term to 17 years, median age 2.7 years with spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage and/or intraventricular hemorrhage. Outcome was assessed with the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury. Twenty-si...

  7. How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Oliveri, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids and red blood cells (RBC) in the early phase, and plasma and platelets...... in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid 1990ties, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance...... outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We here present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage....

  8. Massive thymic hemorrhage and hemothorax occurring in utero.

    Gargano, Giancarlo; Paltrinieri, Anna Lucia; Gallo, Claudio; Di Pancrazio, Luciana; Roversi, Maria Federica; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2015-11-14

    Thymic enlargement is a common and physiological finding in children and neonates' X-rays, but it is usually asymptomatic. Occasionally it can cause respiratory distress. In most cases the aetiology of this expansion remains unclear and it is diagnosed as a thymic hyperplasia. True thymic hyperplasia is defined as a gland expansion, both in size and weight, while maintaining normal microscopic architecture. Often it is a diagnosis of exclusion and prognosis is good. Thymic haemorrhage is an unusual condition related to high foetal and neonatal mortality. We report a case of spontaneous massive thymic haemorrhage in a newborn developing at birth acute respiratory distress associated with severe bilateral haemothorax. Thymic enlargement was evident after pleural evacuation and confirmed by radiographic, Computed Tomography (CT) images and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences. The spontaneous resolution of this enlargement seen with CT scan and MRI sequences suggested a thymic haemorrhage; surgery was not necessary. Thymic haemorrhage should be considered in newborn infants with pleural effusion, mediastinal space enlargement and Respiratory Distress.

  9. Early outcomes of empiric embolization of tumor-related gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients with advanced malignancy.

    Tandberg, Daniel J; Smith, Tony P; Suhocki, Paul V; Pabon-Ramos, Waleska; Nelson, Rendon C; Desai, Svetang; Branch, Stanley; Kim, Charles Y

    2012-11-01

    To report short-term results of empiric transcatheter embolization for patients with advanced malignancy and gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage directly from a tumor invading the GI tract wall. Between 2005 and 2011, 37 mesenteric angiograms were obtained in 26 patients with advanced malignancy (20 men, six women; mean age, 56.2 y) with endoscopically confirmed symptomatic GI hemorrhage from a tumor invading the GI tract wall. Angiographic findings and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical success was defined as absence of signs and symptoms of hemorrhage for at least 30 day following embolization. Active extravasation was demonstrated in three cases. Angiographic abnormalities related to a GI tract tumor were identified on 35 of 37 angiograms, including tumor neovascularity (n = 21), tumor enhancement (n = 24), and luminal irregularity (n = 5). In the absence of active extravasation, empiric embolization with particles and/or coils was performed in 25 procedures. Cessation of hemorrhage (ie, clinical success) occurred more frequently when empiric embolization was performed (17 of 25 procedures; 68%) than when embolization was not performed (two of nine; 22%; P = .03). Empiric embolization resulted in clinical success in 10 of 11 patients with acute GI bleeding (91%), compared with seven of 14 patients (50%) with chronic GI bleeding (P = .04). No ischemic complications were encountered. In patients with advanced malignancy, in the absence of active extravasation, empiric transcatheter arterial embolization for treatment of GI hemorrhage from a direct tumor source demonstrated a 68% short-term success rate, without any ischemic complications. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    ... Text Size: SMALL • LARGE Cerebral Cavernous Angioma and Hemorrhage By Jack Hoch; Reviewed by Dr. Issam Awad ... for years, the mechanism by which these lesions hemorrhage remains poorly understood. Hemorrhage Types Since cavernous angiomas ...

  11. Post-Operative hemorrhage after myomectomy: Safety and efficacy of transcatheter uterine artery embolization

    Wan, Alvin Yu Hon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Ko, Gi Young; Park, Sang Gik; Seong, Nak Jong; Yoon, Chang Jin

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and clinical efficacy of transcatheter uterine artery embolization (UAE) for post-myomectomy hemorrhage. We identified eight female patients (age ranged from 29 to 51 years and with a median age of 37) in two regional hospitals who suffered from post-myomectomy hemorrhage requiring UAE during the time period from 2004 to 2012. A retrospective review of the patients' clinical data, uterine artery angiographic findings, embolization details, and clinical outcomes was conducted. The pelvic angiography findings were as follows: hypervascular staining without bleeding focus (n = 5); active contrast extravasation from the uterine artery (n = 2); and pseudoaneurysm in the uterus (n = 1). Gelatin sponge particle was used in bilateral uterine arteries of all eight patients, acting as an empirical or therapeutic embolization agent for the various angiographic findings. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate was administered to the target bleeding uterine arteries in the two patients with active contrast extravasation. Technical and clinical success were achieved in all patients (100%) with bleeding cessation and no further related surgical intervention or embolization procedure was required for hemorrhage control. Uterine artery dissection occurred in one patient as a minor complication. Normal menstrual cycles were restored in all patients. Uterine artery embolization is a safe, minimally invasive, and effective management option for controlling post-myomectomy hemorrhage without the need for hysterectomy.

  12. Case report of massive fetomaternal hemorrhage and a guideline for acute neonatal management.

    Markham, Lori A; Charsha, Dianne S; Perelmuter, Bezalel

    2006-08-01

    Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage resulting in profound anemia and shock is associated with high perinatal morbidity and mortality. Although diagnosis before delivery is difficult, the clinical index of suspicion rises when a woman presents with history of decreased or absent fetal movements and antenatal monitoring shows a sinusoidal rhythm strip. The diagnosis can be made quickly by demonstration of fetal red blood cells in the maternal circulation and there is consistent recommendation in the literature to immediately order a Kleihauer-Betke test. Clinical manifestations of a fetomaternal hemorrhage depend on the volume of blood lost and the rate with which it occurred. The severely compromised anemic infant indicative of acute hemorrhage will be pale with gasping respirations and signs of circulatory shock. Immediate intervention with volume resuscitation is crucial for optimal outcome. This article describes a patient with massive fetomaternal hemorrhage and subsequent devastating neonatal complications. The focus of this article is to provide clinical guidance for the management and care of the infant affected by profound anemia.

  13. [Associated vessel heteromorphosis in laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision and solutions to intraoperative hemorrhage].

    Jiao, Yurong; He, Jinjie; Li, Jun; Xu, Dong; Ding, Kefeng

    2018-03-25

    Vessel identification and dissection are the key processes of laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME). Vascular injury will lead to complications such as prolonged operative time, intraoperative hemorrhage and ischemia of anastomotic stoma. Superior mesenteric artery (SMA), superior mesenteric vein(SMV), gastrointestinal trunk, left colic artery(LCA), sigmoid artery and marginal vessels in the mesentery have been found with possibility of heteromorphosis, which requires better operative techniques. Surgeons should recognize those vessel heteromorphosis carefully during operations and adjust strategies to avoid intraoperative hemorrhage. Preoperative abdominal computed tomography angiography(CTA) with three-dimensional reconstruction can find vessel heteromorphosis within surgical area before operation. Adequate dissection of veins instead of violent separation will decrease intraoperative bleeding and be helpful for dealing with the potential hemorrhage. When intraoperative hemorrhage occurs, surgeons need to control the bleeding by simple compression or vascular clips depending on the different situations. When the bleeding can not be stopped by laparoscopic operation, surgeons should turn to open surgery without hesitation.

  14. Treating viral hemorrhagic fever.

    Mairuhu, A.T.; Brandjes, D.P.; Gorp, E. van

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are illnesses associated with a number of geographically restricted, mostly tropical areas. Over recent decades a number of new hemorrhagic fever viruses have emerged. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases have improved our initial supportive

  15. Hemorrhagic prepatellar bursitis

    Donahue, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Turkel, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mnaymneh, W. [Dept. of Orthopedics, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Ghandur-Mnaymneh, L. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Simple prepatellar bursitis is easily diagnosed both clinically and by MRI. MRI shows the typical T1 and T2 lengthening of fluid within the bursa. However, because of complex MRI appearance of hemorrhage, chronic hemorrhagic bursitis and the size of the prepatellar mass the clinical and MRI appearance can be very different. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of the incidence of intracranial hemorrhage in two different planning techniques for stereotactic electrode placement in the deep brain stimulation.

    Piacentino, M; Zambon, G; Pilleri, M; Bartolomei, L

    2013-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is an infrequent but potentially devastating complication associated with the placement of electrodes for deep brain stimulation (DBS). The objective of this retrospective review is to compare the risk of hemorrhage before and after the introduction of image-guided neuronavigation for the implant of electrodes for DBS. We reviewed all DBS implant performed at our Institute between 1998 and 2010. In 63 of the 106 patients, the targeting was based on ventriculography and merge of CT/MRI. After 2006, in the latter 43 procedures, we introduced targeting based on the merging of angio CT and MRI.. In both implant techniques, microelectrode recording (MER) was used to better define the target. All DBS procedures were performed by a single surgeon (M.P.). Patients had postoperative imaging (MRI or CT) 4-24 h following surgery. In the group of patients implanted with the first targeting technique, 3 hematomas occurred and all of them solved with sequelae (one residual weakness and two hemiplegias.) After the introduction of neuronavigator, 2 hemorrhages occurred, one solved without sequelae while the second resulted in epileptic seizures. Although the incidence of hemorrhage occurred before and after the use of neuronavigation is the same, the severity is lower in the neuronavigated procedures. Targeting based on the merging of CT angiography and MRI T1/T2 seemed to increase the safety of the lead placement reducing the risk of sequelae related to bleeding. The use of MER was not found to be correlated with an increased hemorrhage rate.

  17. Transcatheter embolization of pseudoaneurysms complicating acute severe pancreatitis

    Wu Hanping; Liang Huimin; Zheng Chuansheng; Feng Gansheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic roles of transcatheter embolization in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating acute severe pancreatitis. Methods: Seven patients who suffered from pseudoaneurysms complicating acute severe pancreatitis received abdominal angiography and were treated with transcatheter embolization. The angiographic findings, complications related to the procedure and post- embolization, and rebleeding were observed. Results: The pseudoaneurysms developed at the splenic artery (n=5), right gastroepiploic artery (n=1), and left gastric artery (n=1), respectively. Findings of active bleeding were observed in 3 patients. Six of them were embolized with coils, and the bleedings were stopped immediately. Rebleeding occurred 14-60 days after the embolization in 3 patients, and in one of them, another pseudo aneurysm was observed in repeated angiography and was successfully treated by repeated embolization. No causes of bleeding were found in repeated angiography in the other 2 patients, who died from severe hemorrhage. One pseudo aneurysm was embolized with gelfoam granule. The gastrointestinal bleeding was not controlled and the patient died 3 days later. Procedure related complications occurred in 2 patients. One was celiac trunk rupture during angiography, the other was intima dissecting in splenic artery. Severe post procedure complications occurred in none of the patients. Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and relatively effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating acute severe pancreatitis. (authors)

  18. Bilateral putaminal hemorrhage related to methanol poisoning: a complication of hemodialysis? Case report Hemorragia putaminal bilateral em intoxicação por metanol: uma complicação de hemodiálise? Relato de caso

    Miguel Giudicissi Filho

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of acute methanol intoxication is presented, in which bilateral putaminal hemorrhage developed after hemodialysis. Even though the patient was initially comatose and profoundly acidotic, favorable outcome was achieved, with long-term neurologic impairments essentially restricted to mild crural paraparesis, retrograde amnesia, and marked visual deficit. A comparative literature review is evaluated.Um caso de intoxicação aguda por metanol é relatado, no qual o paciente desenvolveu hemorragia putaminal bilateral após hemodiálise. Muito embora o paciente se encontrasse inicialmente comatoso e profundamente acidótico, a recuperação foi favorável, com comprometimento neurológico a longo prazo essencialmente restrito a paraparesia crural discreta, amnésia retrógrada e déficit visual acentuado. Uma revisão comparativa da literatura é avaliada.

  19. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    Philipp Lichte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes. Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing.

  20. Risk factors for post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage.

    Ikoma, Ryo; Sakane, Sayaka; Niwa, Kazutomo; Kanetaka, Sayaka; Kawano, Toshiro; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate of post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) in a single institution and to evaluate the clinical risk factors for PTH. We reviewed the records of 692 patients who underwent tonsillectomy (TE) at Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital in Japan. PTH grades were grouped into three categories according to the severity of the hemorrhagic episode: (I) minimal hemorrhage that stopped after noninvasive treatment, (II) hemorrhage requiring treatment with local anesthesia, and (III) hemorrhage requiring reoperation under general anesthesia in the operating room. Clinical risk factors such as sex, age (adults vs. children), TE indication, surgeon's skill level, operative time, ligature type, and duration of antibiotic administration for PTH were investigated. Among the 692 patients, 80 (11.6%) showed PTH, with primary and secondary hemorrhage accounting for 1.6% and 10.0%, respectively. A category III PTH was observed in 18 patients; thus, the overall risk of reoperation was 2.6%. The PTH episode most frequently occurred on postoperative days 5 and 6. The frequency of PTH was significantly higher in male patients and in adults (Pdefinition of PTH. Clinical risk factors for PTH were adult age and male gender. The surgeon's skill level was an additional risk factor for category III PTH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Complications and risk factors in transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies

    Carlos Márcio Nóbrega de Jesus

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Prostate biopsy is not a procedure without risk. There is concern about major complications and which antibiotics are best for routine use before these biopsies. The objective was to determine the rate of complications and the possible risk factors in prostate biopsies. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu. METHODS: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS guided prostate biopsies were carried out in 174 patients presenting either abnormality in digital rectal examinations (DRE or levels higher than 4 ng/ml in prostate-specific antigen (PSA tests, or both. RESULTS: Hemorrhagic complications were the most common (75.3%, while infectious complications occurred in 19% of the cases. Hematuria was the most frequent type (56%. Urinary tract infection (UTI occurred in 16 patients (9.2%. Sepsis was observed in three patients (1.7%. The presence of an indwelling catheter was a risk factor for infectious complications (p < 0.05. Higher numbers of biopsies correlated with hematuria, rectal bleeding and infectious complications (p < 0.05. The other conditions investigated did not correlate with post-biopsy complications. CONCLUSIONS: Post-biopsy complications were mostly self-limiting. The rate of major complications was low, thus showing that TRUS guided prostate biopsy was safe and effective. Higher numbers of fragments taken in biopsies correlated with hematuria, rectal bleeding and infectious complications. An indwelling catheter represented a risk factor for infectious complications. The use of aspirin was not an absolute contraindication for TRUS.

  2. Pressor and hemodilution responses compensate for acute hemorrhage in bluefish.

    Ogilvy, C S; Tremml, P G; DuBois, A B

    1988-01-01

    1. After hemorrhage of 21% blood volume (0.9% body weight) blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (H.R.) of unanesthetized bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) recovered within 5 min. 2. Phentolamine blocked this recovery. 3. Atropine increased control H.R. from 48 to 87 per min, and to 108 after hemorrhage, with delay of BP recovery to 10 min. 4. With small, repeated hemorrhages every 20 min, hemodilution and recovery of BP occurred between hemorrhages. Removal of 27% blood volume resulted in only temporary recovery. 5. Thirty min after hemorrhage, plasma epinephrine was 5 x and norepinephrine 8 x control. 6. Thus, bluefish tolerate hemorrhage with initial vasoconstriction via alpha-adrenergic pathways, and hemodilution.

  3. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Patient and Spouse Perspectives

    Brice, Roanne G.; Brice, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    This second article of a two-part case study focuses on the experiences of a patient and his spouse (caregiver) when a neurological trauma occurs. It is the personal account when A.B. survived a vertebral artery aneurysm and hemorrhage resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage. It is also an in-depth post-trauma account from two speech-language…

  4. Acute dysphonia secondary to vocal fold hemorrhage after vardenafil use.

    Singh, Vikas; Cohen, Seth M; Rousseau, Bernard; Noordzij, J Pieter; Garrett, C Gaelyn; Ossoff, Robert H

    2010-06-01

    Owing to their vasodilatory effects, the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have become widely used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. Among the reported adverse events of these agents are epistaxis, variceal bleeding, intracranial hemorrhage, and hemorrhoidal bleeding. We report a case of vocal fold hemorrhage that occurred after vardenafil use in a 31-year-old man who was a professional singer.

  5. Acute vocal fold hemorrhage caught on video during office exam.

    Carroll, Thomas L; Smith, Libby J

    2009-03-01

    This article presents a unique video of a laryngeal exam during which a vocal fold hemorrhage occurs. This patient had likely been suffering from intermittent vocal fold hemorrhages for the last decade due to a persistent vascular lesion and an underlying chronic cough.

  6. Hemorrhagic Transformation of Scrub Typhus Encephalitis: A Rare Entity.

    Kim, H-C; Yoon, K-W; Yoo, D-S; Cho, C-S

    2015-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement of scrub typhus infection is well known. Most CNS involvement of scrub typhus infection present as meningitis or encephalitis. We report on a patient suffering from hemorrhagic transformation of intracranial lesions caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. A 53-year-old female farmer who was infected by scrub typhus was treated with doxycycline and recovered from the systemic illness. However, headache persisted. Brain radiologic studies revealed acute intracranial hemorrhage and enhancing lesion, which implied a CNS involvement. Hemorrhagic transformation of encephalitis by scrub typhus is very rare complication and to our best knowledge, this is the first report of hemorrhagic transformation of scrub typhus encephalitis. Clinician should consider the possibility of hemorrhagic transformation of encephalitis in cases of scrub typhus infection.

  7. [Selective embolization to treat obstetric hemorrhage].

    Ferrer Puchol, M D; Lanciego, C; Esteban, E; Ciampi, J J; Edo, M A; Ferragud, S

    2014-01-01

    To describe cases of obstetric hemorrhage that have called for selective intra-arterial embolization and the different embolization techniques used. To assess the clinical outcomes and postprocedural fertility. We studied 27 women with obstetric hemorrhage. In 24 patients, embolization was performed by catheterizing both uterine arteries and in 2 patients only one uterine artery was catheterized (pseudoaneurysm). The materials used for embolization consisted of Spongostan in 17/27, particles in 9/27, and coils in 1/27. Clinical follow-up included an analysis of early and late complications and of postprocedural fertility. Hemorrhage was classified as primary (25/27) or secondary (2/27). The cause of bleeding was vaginal delivery (20), cesarean sections (5), abortion (1), and cervical ectopic pregnancy (1). The initial technical success rate was 100% and the clinical success rate was 92.6% (25 of the 27 patients). Bleeding ceased and the outcome was satisfactory in 25 patients. During clinical follow-up ranging from one to seven years, 23 patients had normal menstruation and 6 patients completed 7 full-term pregnancies. Intra-arterial embolization for obstetric hemorrhage leads to good outcomes and few complications and it preserves fertility. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Embolization techniques in severe obstetrical and nonmalignant vaginal hemorrhage

    Sniderman, K.W.; Shewchun, J.; Colapinto, R.F.; Odurny, A.; Rosenthal, D.

    1988-01-01

    Fifteen of 16 patients with vaginal hemorrhage following vaginal delivery (n=2), cesarian section (n=2), vaginal hysterectomy (n=1), abdominal hysterctomy (n=10), or vaginal trachelectomy (n=1) were treated with transcatheter embolotherapy when conservative methods failed. Pelvic and/or hypogastric arteriography showed a bleeding point in 15 patients. Unilateral hypogastric embolization stopped the bleeding in 12 and was unsuccessful in one; recurrent bleeding in four patients was managed with contralateral embolization. Bilateral synchronous embolizations were performed in one patient. One of two patients with continued bleeding following hypogastric artery ligation was treated with collateral artery embolization. No serious complications occurred. In this patient population, the authors recommend therapeutic embolotherapy as the treatment of choice

  9. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Beslow, Lauren A; Engelmann, Kyle; Smith, Sabrina E; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage have investigated isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We investigated whether detailed assessment of intraventricular hemorrhage enhanced outcome prediction after intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled 46 children, full-term to 17 years, median age 2.7 years with spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage and/or intraventricular hemorrhage. Outcome was assessed with the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury. Twenty-six (57%) had intraparenchymal hemorrhage, 10 (22%) had pure intraventricular hemorrhage, and 10 (22%) had both. There were 2 deaths, both with intraparenchymal hemorrhage + intraventricular hemorrhage volume ≥4% of total brain volume. Presence of intraventricular hemorrhage was not associated with poor outcome, but hydrocephalus showed a trend (p=0.09) toward poor outcome. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, combined intraparenchymal hemorrhage + intraventricular hemorrhage volume also showed a trend toward better outcome prediction than intraparenchymal hemorrhage volume alone. Although not an independent outcome predictor, future studies should assess intraventricular hemorrhage qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:22068828

  10. Simultaneous Onset of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke Due To Intracranial Artery Dissection

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Jung, Young-Jin; Chang, Chul-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial dissections commonly present as ischemic stroke and as hemorrhagic stroke. In general, while either ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke may develop, the simultaneous onset of both may also occasionally occur. In this report, we present a case of simultaneous development of ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke due to an intracranial artery dissection.

  11. Hemophilia A Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with High Responding Inhibitors Complicating Total Knee Arthroplasty: Embolization: A Cost-Reducing Alternative to Medical Therapy

    Kickuth, Ralph; Anderson, Suzanne; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Laemmle, Bernhard; Eggli, Stefan; Triller, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Joint hemorrhages are very common in patients with severe hemophilia. Inhibitors in patients with hemophilia are allo-antibodies that neutralize the activity of the clotting factor. After total knee replacement, rare intra-articular bleeding complications might occur that do not respond to clotting factor replacement. We report a 40-year-old male with severe hemophilia A and high responding inhibitors presenting with recurrent knee joint hemorrhage after bilateral knee prosthetic surgery despite adequate clotting factor treatment. There were two episodes of marked postoperative hemarthrosis requiring extensive use of subsititution therapy. Eleven days postoperatively, there was further hemorrhage into the right knee. Digital subtraction angiography diagnosed a complicating pseudoaneurysm of the inferior lateral geniculate artery and embolization was successfully performed. Because clotting factor replacement therapy has proved to be excessively expensive and prolonged, especially in patients with inhibitors, we recommend the use of cost-effective early angiographic embolization

  12. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from leptospirosis

    Mauro Razuk Filho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses in the world, although the mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of spirochetes of the genus Leptospira are largely unknown. Human infection occurs either by direct contact with infected animals or indirectly, through contact with water or soil contaminated with urine, as the spirochetes easily penetrate human skin. The present report exposes the case of a female patient, diagnosed with leptospirosis after having had contact with a dog infected by Leptospira sp. that developed pulmonary hemorrhage, acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure.

  13. CT findings in initial diagnosis and follow-up in surgically and medically treated intracerebral hemorrhage of non-traumatic and non-aneurysmatic origin

    Nahser, H.C.; Loehr, E.; Nau, H.E.; Reinhardt, V.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of computerized tomography (CT) in diagnosis and follow-up of intracerebral hemorrhage is demonstrated. The study is based on 37 patients suffering from medical diseases such as high blood pressure, diabetics, generalized arteriosclerosis, valvular heart disease and anticoagulation therapy. Ensuing complications, such as rupture into the ventricles and hydrocephalus, are being discussed. Special effort is made to explain the finding of the hyperdense ring structure occurring after contrast enhancement. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MKO [de

  14. Remote hemorrhage from the site of craniotomy Hemorragia à distância da área da craniotomia

    José Alberto Landeiro

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative intracranial hemorrhage is a serious and sometimes a fatal neurosurgical complication. Hemorrhage occurring at regions remote from the site of intracranial operations comprises an uncommon affection, most ignored by the assistant physicians. It bares a still incomprehensive pathophysiology, despite several theories trying to explain it. Looks like a common sense that the presence of the remote site hemorrhage cannot be related to concomitant presence of hypertension, coagulopathy or undiscovered lesions. We report three cases of postoperative hemorrhages occurring in a remote site of supratentorial craniotomies, two patients presented cavernous sinus meningeoma and one patient was submitted to intracranial vascular surgery.Hemorragia intracraniana de ocorrência em pós-operatório é grave complicação das cirurgias intracranianas. O aparecimento de foco hemorrágico em regiões distantes ao sítio operatório original é considerado incomum, e muitas vezes ignorado pelos médicos assistentes. A fisiopatologia envolvida no processo não é de todo compreendida, apesar das diversas teorias já propostas. São apresentados três casos de hemorragia á distancia da área cirúrgica, no pós-operatório de dois pacientes portadores de meningeoma do seio cavernoso e de um submetido à clipagem de aneurisma intracraniano.

  15. Mortality after hemorrhagic stroke

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate short-term case fatality and long-term mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using data from The Health Improvement Network database. METHODS: Thirty-day case fatality was stratified by age, sex, and calendar year after ICH...... = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: More than one-third of individuals die in the first month after hemorrhagic stroke, and patients younger than 50 years are more likely to die after ICH than SAH. Short-term case fatality has decreased over time. Patients who survive hemorrhagic stroke have a continuing elevated......, 54.6% for 80-89 years; SAH: 20.3% for 20-49 years, 56.7% for 80-89 years; both p-trend stroke patients...

  16. Discussion of percutanous nephrostomy technique with prevention and treatment of complications

    Zhang Zefu; Liang Huiming; Zheng Chuansheng; Wu Hanpin; Zhou Guofeng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the complications and treatment technique of percutaneous nephrostomy. Methods: 247 hydronephrosis eases treated with percutaneous nephrostomy guided by ultrosound and fluroseopy flora Januray 2007 to April 2008 were evaluated retrospectively and the causes of complications and suitable treatments were analyzed. Results: The successful rate of percutaneous nephrostomy in 247 hydronephrotic cases reached 100%. In all cases, 4 cases occurred with severe complications (1.6%) including 3 massive hemorrhage and 1 septic shock during the operation. The minor complications (25 cases, 10% ) were hematuria, urinary tract infection, local haematoma, perirenal haematoma, detachment of drainage tube with obstruction and exodus, internal double-J catheter displacement and obstruction, etc. Conclusion: The operative safety and treatment efficacy of percutaneous nephrostomy could be achieved through skillful management and comprehensive preoperative evaluation of the risk factors for the complications. (authors)

  17. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Memis, Ahmet E-mail: ahmemis@yahoo.com; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-09-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices.

  18. Interventional radiological treatment in complications of pancreatitis

    Memis, Ahmet; Parildar, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    Percutaneous interventional therapy plays an important role in treating complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis. With the development of cross-sectional imaging and advanced interventional techniques, percutaneous drainage has become the preferred treatment for pancreatic fluid collections such as acute collections, pseudocysts and abscesses. Abscess and pancreatic hemorrhage are the most life threatening complications of pancreatitis. Massive hemorrhage is rare but frequently lethal. As a rule, bleeding complications of pancreatitis require prompt diagnosis and an aggressive surgical approach. In unstable patients with a severely bleeding pseudoaneurysm, hemostasis can be obtained by occlusion with mechanical devices

  19. Recurrent Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Schmidt, Linnea Boegeskov; Goertz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a disease with high mortality and a substantial risk of recurrence. However, the recurrence risk is poorly documented and the knowledge of potential predictors for recurrence among co-morbidities and medicine with antithrombotic effect is limited....... OBJECTIVES: 1) To estimate the short- and long-term cumulative risks of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). 2) To investigate associations between typical comorbid diseases, surgical treatment, use of medicine with antithrombotic effects, including antithrombotic treatment (ATT), selective serotonin...

  20. Asymptomatic endoalveolar hemorrhage in a young male

    Alain Kafyeke

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a young male affected by granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting with non-specific complaints and complicated by the occurrence of a diffuse endoalveolar hemorrhage characterized by atypical clinical and radiological features. The importance of a rapid and aggressive diagnostic and therapeutic approach has to be strongly underlined. Available data regarding prevalence, clinical and radiological characteristics and treatment of this uncommon manifestation have also been hereby reviewed.

  1. [Hemorrhagic syndrome after transfusion of incompatible blood].

    Fedorova, Z D; Bsryshev, B A; Khanin, A Z; Chuslov, A G

    1979-11-01

    The patients were observed by a reanimation-hematological team of the Leningrad emergency service. It has been established that the hemorrhagic syndrome is the main one deterimining the unity of pathogenesis and clinical picture of the hemotransfusional complication. Phase character of the changes in the homeostasis system during the transfusion of incompatible blood was noted. The express diagnosis of the disorders and a scheme of the sequence of administration of hemostatic drugs are proposed. Mortality among such patients was reduced.

  2. Endovascular treatment of a post-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage in a pediatric patient: A case report

    Kim, Dong Gun; Jung, Hyun Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Adrenal hemorrhage following blunt trauma is a rare occurrence. We report here the case of a 5-year-old child with adrenal hemorrhage, which developed as a result of an accidental fall. Embolization treatment of adrenal hemorrhage was successfully performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of adrenal hemorrhage occurring in a child which was treated with transcatheter embolization.

  3. Endovascular treatment of a post-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage in a pediatric patient: A case report

    Kim, Dong Gun; Jung, Hyun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage following blunt trauma is a rare occurrence. We report here the case of a 5-year-old child with adrenal hemorrhage, which developed as a result of an accidental fall. Embolization treatment of adrenal hemorrhage was successfully performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of adrenal hemorrhage occurring in a child which was treated with transcatheter embolization

  4. Factors Influencing Complications of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Single-Center Study.

    Oner, Sedat; Okumus, Muhammed Masuk; Demirbas, Murat; Onen, Efe; Aydos, Mustafa Murat; Ustun, Mehmet Hakan; Kilic, Metin; Avci, Sinan

    2015-11-14

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is a minimally invasive procedure used for successful treatment of renal calculi. However, it is associated with various complications. We assessed the complications and their potential influencing factors in patients who had undergone PNL. In total, 1750 patients who had undergone PNL from November 2003 to June 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. PNL complications and possible contributing risk factors (age, sex, serum creatinine level, previous operations, hydronephrosis, calculi size, localization, opacity, surgeon's experience, accessed calyxes, number of accesses, and costal entries) were determined. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to investigate the cutoff values of the data. Ideal cutoff value was determined by Youden's J statistic. All the demographic and clinical variables were examined using backward stepwise logistical regression analysis. Continuous variables were categorized with logistic regression analysis according to the cutoff values. Complications occurred in 396 (24.4%) patients who had undergone PNL. Hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion occurred in 221 (12.6%) patients, hemorrhage requiring arterial embolization occurred in 7 (0.4%) patients, perirenal hematoma occurred in 17 (0.97%) patients, hemo-pneumothorax occurred in 32 (1.8%) patients, and colon perforation occurred in 4 (0.22%) patients. Three patients (0.06%) died of severe urosepsis, and one patient (0.02%) died of severe bleeding. The calculus size, localization, access site, number of accesses, presence of staghorn stones, surgeon's experience, and duration of the operation significantly affected the complication risk. Our retrospective evaluation of this large patient series reveals that, PNL is a very effective treatment modality for kidney stones. However, although rare, serious complications including death can occur.

  5. A rare complication of Meckel's diverticulum: A fistula between Meckel's diverticulum and the appendix

    Ping-Fu Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Meckel diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the small intestine, occurring in about 2%–4% of the population. Meckel diverticulum results from incomplete closure of the omphalomesenteric duct. The presentation of symptomatic Meckel diverticulum includes gastrointestinal hemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, volvulus, intussusception, diverticulitis, and neoplasms. The development of fistula is an extremely rare complication. Previous literature has even shown an enterocolonic fistula, a vesicodiverticular fistula, ileorectal fistula, and fistula-in-ano. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first case of the fistula complicated between Meckel diverticulum and the appendix in a review of the English literature.

  6. [A case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    Ito, Miiko; Kato, Naoki; Su, Ching-Chan; Kayama, Takamasa

    2014-03-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a vasculitis syndromes and is only rarely complicated by subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the current report, we describe a case of CSS with subarachnoid hemorrhage, which showed a favorable outcome following conservative treatment. A 68-year-old man with CSS on maintenance steroid therapy underwent MRI/A during tinnitus aggravation, and showed dilation of the left middle cerebral artery and stenosis of the peripheral area of the right vertebral artery. After 2 months, he presented sudden pain in the occipitocervical area, and CT revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Intracranial 3D CT-A and MRI/A showed the development of a protrusion at the base of the left anterior cerebral artery. Although both findings suggested cerebral artery dissection, the source of hemorrhage could not be identified. The 2009 Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Stroke recommends early diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection because of the high risk of re-bleeding. However, considering the risks of vasculitis aggravation, development of systemic complications, and recurrence, conservative treatment was selected. In addition, owing to the risk of complications associated with the frequent use of iodinated contrast agents and angiography procedures, patient was followed up using MRI. His course was favorable, and he was discharged despite mild right abducens paralysis. When patients with hemorrhagic cerebral artery dissection have a history of allergic diseases, CCS should be considered; conservative treatment consisting of rest, strict blood pressure control, and steroid therapy may be the most appropriate option for certain patients.

  7. Morbidity after Hemorrhage in Children with Untreated Brain Arteriovenous Malformation

    Ma, Li; Kim, Helen; Chen, Xiao-Lin; Wu, Chun-Xue; Ma, Jun; Su, Hua; Zhao, Yuanli

    2017-01-01

    Background Children with untreated brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVM) are at risk of encountering life-threatening hemorrhage very early in their lives. The primary aim of invasive treatment is to reduce unfavorable outcome associated with a bAVM rupture. A better understanding of the morbidity of bAVM hemorrhage might be helpful for weighing the risks of untreated bAVM and invasive treatment. Our aim was to assess the clinical outcome after bAVM rupture and identify features to predict severe hemorrhage in children. Methods We identified all consecutive children admitted to our institution for bAVMs between July 2009 and December 2014. Clinical outcome after hemorrhagic presentation and subsequent hemorrhage was evaluated using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) for children. The association of demographic characteristics and bAVM morphology with severe hemorrhage (mRS >3 or requiring emergency hematoma evacuation) was studied using univariate and multivariable regression analyses. A nomogram based on multivariable analysis was formulated to predict severe hemorrhage risk for individual patients. Results A total of 134 patients were identified with a mean treatment-free follow-up period of 2.1 years. bAVM ruptured in 83 (62%) children: 82 had a hemorrhage at presentation and 6 of them experienced a recurrent hemorrhage during follow-up; 1 patient had other diagnostic symptoms but bled during follow-up. Among them, 49% (41/83) had a severe hemorrhage; emergency hematoma evacuation was required in 28% of them (23/83), and 24% (20/83) remained as disabled (mRS ≥ 3) at last follow-up. Forty-six percent (38/82) of children with hemorrhagic presentation were severely disabled (mRS >3). Forty-three percent (3/7) were severely disabled after subsequent hemorrhage. The annual rate of severe subsequent hemorrhage was 1% in the overall cohort and 3.3% in children with ruptured presentation. All the subsequent severe hemorrhage events occurred in children with severe

  8. A new way of thinking about complications of prematurity.

    Moore, Tiffany A; Berger, Ann M; Wilson, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of preterm infants are impacted by their ability to maintain physiologic homeostasis using metabolic, endocrine, and immunologic mechanisms independent of the mother's placenta. Exploring McEwen's allostatic load model in preterm infants provides a new way to understand the altered physiologic processes associated with frequently occurring complications of prematurity such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, and retinopathy of prematurity. The purpose of this article is to present a new model to enhance understanding of the altered physiologic processes associated with complications of prematurity. The model of allostatic load and complications of prematurity was derived to explore the relationship between general stress of prematurity and complications of prematurity. The proposed model uses the concepts of general stress of prematurity, allostasis, physiologic response patterns (adaptive-maladaptive), allostatic load, and complications of prematurity. These concepts are defined and theoretical relationships in the proposed model are interpreted using the four maladaptive response patterns of repeated hits, lack of adaptation, prolonged response, and inadequate response. Empirical evidence for cortisol, inflammation, and oxidative stress responses are used to support the theoretical relationships. The proposed model provides a new way of thinking about physiologic dysregulation in preterm infants. The ability to describe and understand complex physiologic mechanisms involved in complications of prematurity is essential for research. Advancing the knowledge of complications of prematurity will advance clinical practice and research and lead to testing of interventions to reduce negative outcomes in preterm infants.

  9. Peri-procedural complications and associated risk factors in wingspan stent-assistant angioplasty of intracranial artery stenosis

    Li Zhaoshuo; Li Tianxiao; Wang Ziliang; Bai Weixing; Xue Jiangyu; Zhu Liangfu; Li Li

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the cerebrovascular complications from stenting for symptomatic intracranial stenosis and to detect the factors associated with complications. Methods: Medical records of Wingspan stenting were reviewed for 306 cases with symptomatic intracranial stenosis from July 2007 to February 2012, including transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke, death and intracranial hemorrhage as clinical in-hospital complications. The location of lesions included middle cerebral artery level M1 (114 lesions), intracranial portion of the internal carotid artery (50 lesions), vertebral artery 4 (75 lesions), venebro-basilar artery (14 lesions), basilar artery (76 lesions). Complications were evaluated and analyzed to find out whether they were associated with patient-or stenosis-related risk factors using χ"2 test. Results: The technical success rate was 99% (303/306). Cerebrovascular complications rate was 6.9% (21/303), with 1.6% (14/303) of disabling stroke events and 0.7% (2/303) of deaths. Hemorrhagic events were consisted of procedure-related events (3 cases), hyperperfusion (3 cases), ischemic events of perforator stroke (8 cases), transient ischemic attack (3 cases), embolization (2 cases), thrombosis in stent (2 cases). Hemorrhagic events were associated with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates (χ"2 = 2.908, P < 0.05) and occurred more frequently after treatment of middle cerebral artery stenosis than other lesions (χ"2 = 1.168, P < 0.05). Perforating branches were detected to be affected mainly in the basilar artery than other locations (χ"2 = 4.263, P < 0.05). Conclusion: The complication rates in the study are preliminary consistent with the previously published data. Hemorrhagic events are prone to occur in the treatment of middle cerebral artery stenosis, while perforating branches are affected mainly in the basilar artery. (authors)

  10. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Carette, Marie-France; Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  11. How Hemorrhage Control Became Common Sense.

    Hawk, Alan James

    2018-02-27

    Just over 200 years ago, surgeons were puzzled that the use of the tourniquet to control hemorrhage as common sense during surgery was a relatively recent development. Within the last 20 years, much progress has been made to controlling hemorrhage in the prehospital context. Then, as now, it was surprising that progress on something that appeared obvious had occurred only recently, begging the question how controlling blood loss was common sense in a surgical context, but not for emergency treatment. Paper is a historical survey of the evolution of the medical understanding of hemorrhage along with technological response. The danger of blood loss had historically been consistently underestimated as physicians looked at other explanations for symptoms of how the human body responded to trauma. As the danger from hemorrhage became apparent, even obvious, responsibility for hemorrhage control was delegated down from the surgeon to the paramedic and eventually to individual service members and civilian bystanders with training to "Stop the Bleed." Hippocratic medicine assumed that blood diffused centrifugally into periphery through arteries. William Harvey's observation in 1615 that blood ran through a closed circulatory system gradually transformed conventional wisdom about blood loss, leading to the development of the tourniquet about a century later by Jean-Louis Petit, which made amputation of limbs survivable. However, physicians were cautious about their application during the First World War over concerns over effects on patient recovery. Hemorrhage had generally been seen as symptom to be managed until the patient would be seen by a surgeon who would stop the bleeding. More thorough collection and analysis of data related to case histories of soldiers wounded during the Vietnam Conflict transformed how surgeons understood the importance to hemorrhage leading to development of the doctrine of Tactical Combat Casualty Care in the late 1990's. economic

  12. Endovascular Therapy for Management of Oral Hemorrhage in Malignant Head and Neck Tumors

    Kakizawa, Hideaki; Toyota, Naoyuki; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endovascular therapy in oral hemorrhage from malignant head and neck tumors. Methods. Ten patients (mean age 56 years) with oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors underwent a total of 13 emergency embolization procedures using gelatin sponge particles, steel and/or platinum coils, or a combination of these embolic materials. Angiographic abnormalities, technical success rate, clinical success rate, recurrence rate, complications, hemostatic period, hospital days, survival days, and patient outcome were all analyzed. Results. Angiographic abnormalities were identified during 85% of procedures (11/13). The technical success rate was 100% (13/13 procedures). The primary and secondary clinical success rates were 77% (10/13 procedures) and 67% (2/3 procedures), respectively. The overall clinical success rate was 92%, and the recurrence rate was 22% (2/9 procedures) in patients whom we were able to observe during the 1-month period after embolization. No major complications occurred. Several patients in whom gelatin sponge particles had been used complained of transient local pain after the procedure. The median hemostatic period was 71 days (range 0-518 days). Median hospital and survival days were 59 days (range 3-209 days) and 141 days (range 4-518 days), respectively. Three patients survived and 7 patients died during the observation period. Only 1 of these 7 patients died from hemorrhage. Conclusion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that endovascular therapy is an effective, safe, and repeatable treatment for oral hemorrhage caused by malignant head and neck tumors

  13. Recurrent Bleeding After Perimesencephalic Hemorrhage.

    Kauw, Frans; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kizilates, Ufuk; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-12-01

    Perimesencephalic hemorrhage (PMH) is a type of subarachnoid hemorrhage with excellent long-term outcomes. Only 1 well-documented case of in-hospital rebleeding after PMH is described in the literature, which occurred after initiating antithrombotic treatment because of myocardial ischemia. We describe a patient with PMH without antithrombotic treatment who had 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding on the day of ictus. To validate the radiologic findings, we conducted a case-control study. Six neuroradiologists and 2 neuroradiology fellows performed a blinded assessment of serial unenhanced head computed tomography (CT) scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern (1 index patient, 6 patients with PMH, 1 patient with perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and basilar artery aneurysm) to investigate a potential increase in amount of subarachnoid blood. A 56-year-old woman with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and negative CT angiography had 2 episodes after the onset headache with a sudden increase of the headache. Blinded assessment of serial head CT scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern identified the patient who was clinically suspected to have 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding to have an increased amount of subarachnoid blood on 2 subsequent CT scans. Recurrent bleeding after PMH may also occur in patients not treated with antithrombotics. Even after early rebleeding, the prognosis of PMH is excellent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Putaminal hemorrhage: Clinical-computed tomographic correlations

    Weisberg, L.A.; Stazio, A.; Elliott, D.; Shamsnia, M.; Veterans Administration Hospital, New Orleans, LA

    1990-01-01

    Ninety-two percent of 100 patients with putaminal hemorrhage were hypertensive. Of the eight normotensive patients, seven were substance abusers or had bilateral putaminal hemorrhages. The one other normotensive patient was less than 40 years old. The 100 hemorrhages had the following locations: 1. Medial putaminal (17 cases; six were normotensive and less than 40 years old and five were substance abusers); 2. lateral putaminal extending through the external capsule (eleven cases); 3. putaminal-capsular and subcortical white matter (32 cases); 4. putaminal cerebral hemispheric (19 cases); 5. putaminal-thalamic (19 cases); 6. bilateral (two cases). A disproportionate number of black patients suffered hematoma extension to the cerebral hemispheres or thalamus (46%) compared to Caucasians (23%). Overall mortality was 20% (17 blacks and three Caucasians) and occurred in patients with hematoma extension to the thalamus or cerebral hemispheres. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed in all 100 patients and provided no additional diagnostic yield. This indicates limited use for enhanced CT in hypertensive patients with putaminal hemorrhage who have a characteristic appearance of the acute hemorrhage on the nonenhanced CT. (orig.)

  15. 泮托拉唑针剂联合硫糖铝治疗消化性溃疡并出血40例疗效分析%Analysis of Clinical Efficacy of Pantoprazole Combined with Sucralfate on 40 Cases with Peptic UIcer Complicated with Hemorrhage

    贺新国

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨泮托拉唑针剂联合硫糖铝治疗消化性溃疡并出血的临床疗效.方法:选择我院2008年9月~2010年9月消化性溃疡合并出血患者80例.将上述患者随机分为两组,观察组和对照组.两组患者均给予相应对症治疗.观察组给予泮托拉唑、云南白药粉剂、硫糖铝.对照组给予奥美托唑、云南白药粉剂,硫糖铝.观察两组患者止血和溃疡愈合情况.结果:观察组止血总有效率为97.5%,对照组为82.5%,两组止血效果总有效率比较,差异有统计学意义(P(0.05);观察组溃疡愈合总有效率为95.0%,对照组溃疡愈合总有效率为80.0%,两组溃疡总有效率比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:泮托拉唑针剂联合硫糖铝治疗消化性溃疡并出血临床效果显著,止血效果迅速,溃疡愈合率高,值得借鉴.%Objective:To explore the clinical efficacy of Pantoprazole combined with sucralfate on peptic ulcer complicated with hemorrhage.Methods:80 cases with peptic ulcer complicated with hemorrhage were selected from September,2008 to September,2010 and divided into observation group and control group.Symptomatic treatment were administered in two groups,pantoprazole, Yunnan White Drug Powder and sucralfate were given to observation group,omeprazole, Yunnan White Drug Powder and sucralfate were given to control group .Hem ostasis and ulcer healing were observed in two groups.Results :the total effective rate of hemostasis in observation group was 97.5%,and the total effective rate of hemostasis incontrol group was 82.5%,the total effective rate of hemostasis in two groups compared,there was statistical difference(P<0.05).The total effective rate of ulcer healing in observation group was 95.0%,and the total effective rate of ulcer healing incontrol group was 80.0%,the total effective rate of ulcer healing in two groups compared,there was statistical difference(P<0.05).Conclusion:Pantoprazole combined with sucralfate on peptic

  16. Smoking and hemorrhagic stroke mortality in a prospective cohort study of older Chinese.

    Xu, Lin; Schooling, Catherine Mary; Chan, Wai Man; Lee, Siu Yin; Leung, Gabriel M; Lam, Tai Hing

    2013-08-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is more common in non-Western settings and does not always share risk factors with other cardiovascular diseases. The association of smoking with hemorrhagic stroke subtypes has not been established. We examined the association of cigarette smoking with hemorrhagic stroke, by subtype (intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage), in a large cohort of older Chinese from Hong Kong. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to assess the adjusted associations of smoking at baseline with death from hemorrhagic stroke and its subtypes, using a population-based prospective cohort of 66 820 Chinese aged>65 years enrolled from July 1998 to December 2001 at all the 18 Elderly Health Centers of the Hong Kong Government Department of Health and followed until May 31, 2012. After follow-up for an average of 10.9 years (SD=3.1), 648 deaths from hemorrhagic stroke had occurred, of which 530 (82%) were intracerebral hemorrhage. Current smoking was associated with a higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.22), intracerebral hemorrhage (1.94; 1.25-3.01), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.58; 1.62-7.94), adjusted for age, sex, education, public assistance, housing type, monthly expenditure, alcohol use, and exercise. Further adjustment for hypertension and body mass index slightly changed the estimates. Smoking is strongly associated with hemorrhagic stroke mortality, particularly for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  17. Tamponade of presacral hemorrhage with hemostatic sponges fixed to the sacrum with endoscopic helical tackers: report of two cases.

    Vurst, T.J. van der; Bodegom, M.E.; Rakic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Presacral venous hemorrhage is a severe complication in low rectal surgery. This complication was encountered in 5 of 165 patients (3 percent) who underwent a presacral dissection for rectal mobilization. Conventional hemostatic measures often are ineffective to arrest this hemorrhage, and a number

  18. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  19. Microcatheter embolization of hemorrhages

    Seppaenen, Seppo K.; Leppaenen, Martti J.; Pimenoff, Georg; Seppaenen, Janne M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of embolotherapy using microcatheters in patients with hemorrhage from various locations. Methods. Among 29 patients there were 13 with severe epistaxis, 7 with gastrointestinal bleeding, 4 with hemorrhage in the kidney, 4 with bleeding in pelvic organs and 1 with bleeding in the shoulder region. In all cases, a Tracker-18 or Tracker-10 microcatheter was advanced coaxially through a 4.1 Fr guiding catheter in order to reach the bleeding site as distally as possible. Polyvinyl alcohol microparticles and/or platinum microcoils were used as embolic material. Results. The bleeding was stopped in 90% (26 of 29) of cases. In 66% of cases the treatment was curative, in 7% preoperative, and in 17% palliative. There were 3 clinical failures. Conclusion. Microcatheter embolization is an effective and safe means of managing different kinds of hemorrhage of various causes from a variety of sites

  20. Arterial complications of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Eagleton, Matthew J

    2016-12-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a relatively rare genetic syndrome that occurs owing to disorders in the metabolism of fibrillary collagen. These defects affect the soft connective tissues resulting in abnormalities in the skin, joints, hollow organs, and blood vessels. Patients with these defects frequently present at a young age with spontaneous arterial complications involving the medium-sized arteries. Complications involving the hollow organs, such as spontaneous colonic perforation, are observed as well. Given the fragility of the soft tissue, open and endovascular intervention on patients with vascular EDS is fraught with high complication rates. A PubMed search was performed to identify manuscripts published related to vascular EDS. This search included more than 747 articles. These findings were cross-referenced using key terms, including endovascular, embolization, surgery, genetics, pathophysiology, connective tissue disorders, vascular complications, systematic review, type III collagen, and COL3A1. The references in key articles and review articles were evaluated for additional resources not identified in the PubMed search. Care must be taken to balance the risk of intervention vs the risk of continued observation. Life-threatening hemorrhage, however, mandates intervention. With careful, altered approaches to tissue handling, endovascular approaches may provide a safer option for managing the arterial complications observed in patients with vascular EDS. Additional hope may also be found in the use of pharmacologic agents that reduce the incidence and severity of the arterial complications. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007301.htm Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the newborn is bleeding into the ...

  2. An observational study of complications in chickenpox with special reference to unusual complications in an apex infectious disease hospital, Kolkata, India

    A K Kole

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox can cause serious complications and even death in persons without any risk factors. Aims: To observe the different complications with special reference to unusual complications of chickenpox and their outcomes. Materials and Methods: The present study was a prospective observational study where 300 patients suffering from chickenpox were evaluated with special reference to unusual complications and outcomes. Results: The usual complications of chickenpox commonly observed were acute hepatitis in 30 (10% and cerebellar ataxia in 22 patients (7.3%, whereas common unusual complications were acute pancreatitis in 45 (15%, hemorrhagic rash in 10 (3.3%, Guillain-Barrι syndrome in 4 (1.3%, disseminated intravascular coagulation in 4 (1.3%, necrotizing fasciitis in 4 (1.3%, and acute renal failure in 3 patients (1%. It had been observed that most of these unusual complications occurred in patients without any risk factor. A total of 18 patients (6% died in this study and of them 12 patients (4% died due to unusual complications. Conclusions: Compulsory childhood varicella vaccination including vaccination of risk groups and susceptible individuals are all essential to reduce the incidence of chickenpox, associated complications, and subsequent death.

  3. Clinical and CT analysis of GCS 15 patients with intracranial hemorrhage

    Yang Lin; He Jianyuan; Jiang Shanyue; Zhang Yanling

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical symptoms and CT manifestations of GCS 15 patients with intracranial hemorrhage. Methods: Clinical data and manifestations of the CT images of 35 patients with GCS 15 and intracranial hemorrhage were retrospectively analyzed and followed up. in short term. Results: Clinical symptoms: Deficits in short-term memory appeared in 17% of patients, vomiting in 26%, headache in 97%, physical evidence of trauma above the clavicles in 100%. CT scanning: intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 18 patients, epidural hemorrhage in 9 patients, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 8 patients, subdural hemorrhage in 7 patients. During follow up, clinical severe degree was in consistent of craniocerebral CT scanning. Conclusion: For patients with GCS 15 brain injuries early head CT scanning is very important. Intracranial hemorrhage may occur in these patients. If possible, re-assessment of clinical examination and CT scanning is remarkably necessary. (authors)

  4. Tranexamic Acid for Lower GI Hemorrhage: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Smith, Stephen R; Murray, David; Pockney, Peter G; Bendinelli, Cino; Draganic, Brian D; Carroll, Rosemary

    2018-01-01

    Lower GI hemorrhage is a common source of morbidity and mortality. Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic that has been shown to reduce blood loss in a variety of clinical conditions. Information regarding the use of tranexamic acid in treating lower GI hemorrhage is lacking. The aim of this trial was to determine the clinical efficacy of tranexamic acid when used for lower GI hemorrhage. This was a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral university hospital in Australia. Consecutive patients aged >18 years with lower GI hemorrhage requiring hospital admission from November 2011 to January 2014 were screened for trial eligibility (N = 265). A total of 100 patients were recruited after exclusions and were randomly assigned 1:1 to either tranexamic acid or placebo. The primary outcome was blood loss as determined by reduction in hemoglobin levels. The secondary outcomes were transfusion rates, transfusion volume, intervention rates for bleeding, length of hospital stay, readmission, and complication rates. There was no difference between groups with respect to hemoglobin drop (11 g/L of tranexamic acid vs 13 g/L of placebo; p = 0.9445). There was no difference with respect to transfusion rates (14/49 tranexamic acid vs 16/47 placebo; p = 0.661), mean transfusion volume (1.27 vs 1.93 units; p = 0.355), intervention rates (7/49 vs 13/47; p = 0.134), length of hospital stay (4.67 vs 4.74 d; p = 0.934), readmission, or complication rates. No complications occurred as a direct result of tranexamic acid use. A larger multicenter trial may be required to determine whether there are more subtle advantages with tranexamic acid use in some of the secondary outcomes. Tranexamic acid does not appear to decrease blood loss or improve clinical outcomes in patients presenting with lower GI hemorrhage in the context of this trial. see Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A453.

  5. In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies: Are there risk factors for complications?

    Meier-Schroers, Michael, E-mail: michael.meier@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Homsi, Rami, E-mail: rami.homsi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Kukuk, Guido, E-mail: guido.kukuk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Wolter, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.wolter@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Decker, Georges, E-mail: georges.decker@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Fischer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.fischer@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Marx, Christian, E-mail: christian.marx@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Schmeel, Frederic Carsten, E-mail: carsten.schmeel@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Block, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.block@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Sprinkart, Alois Martin, E-mail: sprinkart@uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Traeber, Frank, E-mail: frank.traeber@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Schild, Hans Heinz, E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, Winfried, E-mail: w.willinek@bk-trier.de [Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Sonography and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital of the Barmherzige Brüder Trier, Nordallee 1, 54292 Trier (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Purpose: To systematically analyze risk factors for complications of in-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies (MRGB). Materials and methods: 90 patients, who were scheduled for MRGB were included for this study. Exclusion criteria were coagulation disorders, therapy with anticoagulant drugs, and acute infections of the urinary and the lower gastrointestinal tract. Directly after, one week and one year after the biopsy, we assessed biopsy related complications (e.g. hemorrhages or signs of prostatitis). Differences between patients with and without complications were analyzed regarding possible risk factors: age, prostate volume, number of taken samples, biopsy duration, biopsy of more than one lesion, diabetes, arterial hypertension, hemorrhoids, benign prostate hyperplasia, carcinoma or prostatitis (according to histopathological analysis), and lesion localization. Complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: We observed 15 grade I complications in 90 biopsies (16.7%) with slight hematuria in 9 cases (10%), minor vasovagal reactions in 4 cases (4.4%), and urinary retention and positioning-related facial dysesthesia in 1 case each (1.1%). One patient showed acute prostatitis requiring antibiotics as the only grade II complication (1.1%). There were no adverse events that occurred later than one week. Complications grade III or higher such as pelvic abscesses, urosepsis or severe hemorrhages were not seen. There were no significant associations between the assessed risk factors and biopsy-related complications. Conclusion: In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies can be considered safe procedures in the diagnosis of prostate cancer with very low complication rates. There seem to be no risk factors for complications.

  6. In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies: Are there risk factors for complications?

    Meier-Schroers, Michael; Homsi, Rami; Kukuk, Guido; Wolter, Karsten; Decker, Georges; Fischer, Stefan; Marx, Christian; Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Block, Wolfgang; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Traeber, Frank; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically analyze risk factors for complications of in-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies (MRGB). Materials and methods: 90 patients, who were scheduled for MRGB were included for this study. Exclusion criteria were coagulation disorders, therapy with anticoagulant drugs, and acute infections of the urinary and the lower gastrointestinal tract. Directly after, one week and one year after the biopsy, we assessed biopsy related complications (e.g. hemorrhages or signs of prostatitis). Differences between patients with and without complications were analyzed regarding possible risk factors: age, prostate volume, number of taken samples, biopsy duration, biopsy of more than one lesion, diabetes, arterial hypertension, hemorrhoids, benign prostate hyperplasia, carcinoma or prostatitis (according to histopathological analysis), and lesion localization. Complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: We observed 15 grade I complications in 90 biopsies (16.7%) with slight hematuria in 9 cases (10%), minor vasovagal reactions in 4 cases (4.4%), and urinary retention and positioning-related facial dysesthesia in 1 case each (1.1%). One patient showed acute prostatitis requiring antibiotics as the only grade II complication (1.1%). There were no adverse events that occurred later than one week. Complications grade III or higher such as pelvic abscesses, urosepsis or severe hemorrhages were not seen. There were no significant associations between the assessed risk factors and biopsy-related complications. Conclusion: In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies can be considered safe procedures in the diagnosis of prostate cancer with very low complication rates. There seem to be no risk factors for complications.

  7. Ultra-early tranexamic acid after subarachnoid hemorrhage (ULTRA): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Germans, Menno R.; Post, René; Coert, Bert A.; Rinkel, Gabriël J. E.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Verbaan, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    A frequent complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is recurrent bleeding from the aneurysm. The risk is highest within the first 6 hours after the initial hemorrhage. Securing the aneurysm within this timeframe is difficult owing to logistical delays. The rate of recurrent

  8. Hemorrhage is the most common cause of neonatal mortality in patients with sacrococcygeal teratoma

    Kremer, Marijke E. B.; Wellens, Lianne M.; Derikx, Joep P. M.; van Baren, Robertine; Heij, Hugo A.; Wijnen, Marc H. W. A.; Wijnen, René M. H.; van der Zee, David C.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest

    2016-01-01

    A small percentage of neonates with sacrococcygeal teratoma die shortly after birth from hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of and risk factors associated with hemorrhagic mortality are unknown. In this multicenter study we determined the incidence of early death in neonates born with SCT and

  9. Hemorrhage is the most common cause of neonatal mortality in patients with sacrococcygeal teratoma

    Kremer, Marijke E B; Wellens, Lianne M; Derikx, Joep P M; van Baren, Robertine; Heij, Hugo A; Wijnen, Marc H W A; Wijnen, René M H; van der Zee, David C; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A small percentage of neonates with sacrococcygeal teratoma die shortly after birth from hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of and risk factors associated with hemorrhagic mortality are unknown. In this multicenter study we determined the incidence of early death in neonates born

  10. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany); Ernemann, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University of Tübingen (Germany); Bischof, Felix, E-mail: felix.bischof@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology.

  11. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bischof, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology

  12. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time.

  13. Subarachnoid mesencephalic hemorrhage

    Oviedo, Soledad; De Luca, Silvina; Ceciliano, Alejandro; Mondello, Eduardo; Oviedo, Jorge D.; Lopardo Villarino, Guzman; Eyheremendy, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    The case of a 57 y.o. male who has had severe headache of sudden onset without neck stiffness or other signs of neurological foci was reported. Initial CT scan showed perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain MRI and digital angiography were performed later and bleeding was interpreted as a result of an abnormal hemodynamic status developed by cerebral venous thrombosis. (author)

  14. Hemorrhage and vascular abnormalities

    Bradley, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    While many brain lesions have a similar appearance on MRI and CT, this is not true of hemorrhage. On CT, acute hemorrhage becomes hyperdense within an hour as the clot forms. This lasts for several days and then fades to isodensity and eventually hypodensity. On MRI, hemorrhage less than 12 to 24 hours old may not be distinguishable from vasogenic edema. Its appearance subsequently is an evolving pattern of variable signal intensity which depends on the specific form of hemoglobin which is present, or whether the red cells are intact or lysed, on the operating field strength, on the type of signal (that is, spin echo or gradient echo), and on contrast (that is, T 1 - or T 2 -weighing). The appearance of hemorrhage also depends on the compartment of the brain involved---subarachnoid, subdural, or intraparenchymal. Finally, for parenchymal hematomas, different zones may be defined from the inner core to the outer rim which all vary in appearance depending on field strength and imaging technique

  15. Massive antenatal fetomaternal hemorrhage

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Koldkjaer, Ole; Berkowicz, Adela

    2005-01-01

    Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) can lead to life-threatening anemia. Quantification based on flow cytometry with anti-hemoglobin F (HbF) is applicable in all cases but underestimation of large fetal bleeds has been reported. A large FMH from an ABO-compatible fetus allows an estimation...

  16. Neurogenic stunned myocardium following hemorrhagic cerebral contusion

    Deleu, D.; Miyares, F.; Kettern, M.; Kumar, S.; Hassens, Y.; Salim, K.

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium NSM is a well-known complication of subarachnoidal hemorrhage, but has been reported rarely in association with other central nervous system disorders. A case of NSM is described in a patient with hemorrhagic brain contusion associated with cerebral edema. An 18-year-old man was admitted with severe cranial trauma following a car roll-over. Six days after admission, he developed findings suggestive for NSM. The troponin T and creatine kinase-MB level were elevated and echocardiogram showed apical and inferoposterior hypokinesis and diffuse left ventricular akinesis with severely reduced ejection fraction 18%. Invasive measurements confirmed low cardiac output. His cardiac function resolved completely within 6 days after decompressive craniotomy. This case supports the presumed unifying role of the increased intracranial pressure, probably triggering a vigorous sympathetic outflow hyperactivity leading to NSM. (author)

  17. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Troponin (tr elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neurosurgical books, were used for this review. Some type of cardiovascular abnormality develops in most SAH patients. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a frequent SAH complication, due to catecholamine surge which induces cardiac injury, as evidenced by increased serum tr levels, electrocardiographic (ECG changes and cardiac wall motion abnormalities. Tr elevation, usually modest, is an early and specific marker for cardiac involvement after SAH and its levels peak about two days after SAH. Cardiac tr elevation predictors include poor clinical grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, loss of consciousness at ictus, global cerebral edema, female sex, large body surface area, lower systolic blood pressure, higher heart rate and prolonged Q-Tc interval. Elevated tr levels are associated with disability and death (especially tr >1 μg/L, worse neurological grade, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, longer intensive care unit stay and incidence of vasospasm. Tr elevation is a common finding in SAH patients and constitutes a rightful cause of worry about the patients' cardiac function and prognosis. It should be therefore early detected, carefully monitored and appropriately managed by clinicians.

  18. Imaging of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt-related complications in infants and children with hydrocephalus

    Jeon, Se Ok; Kim, Ji Hye; Oh, Eun Young; Hwang, Hee Young; Lee, Seon Kyu; Lee, Eun Joo; Kwak, Min Sook; Kim, Hyung Sik

    1999-01-01

    th ventricle (n=1) was persistently distended in spite of the presence of a shunt tube within the other ventricle. Collapsed ventricles, thick calvarium, and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure were helpful in the diagnosis of slit ventricle syndrome (n=1). Immediate postoperative intraventricular and parenchymal hemorrhage were noted in one case each. Shunt-related complications were found on postoperative images in 54% of pediatric patients with hydrocephalus ; the frequency was highest in cases of hydrocephalus caused by infection. Shunt malfunction occurred most frequently and each complication had various imaging findings. For the diagnosis of post-operative shunt-related complications, continuous follow-up studies are therefore necessary

  19. Anabolic steroid abuse causing recurrent hepatic adenomas and hemorrhage

    Martin, Nicole M; Dayyeh, Barham K Abu; Chung, Raymond T

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse is common among athletes and is associated with a number of medical complications. We describe a case of a 27-year-old male bodybuilder with multiple hepatic adenomas induced by anabolic steroids. He initially presented with tumor hemorrhage and was treated with left lateral hepatic segmentectomy. Regression of the remaining tumors was observed with cessation of steroid use. However, 3 years and a half after his initial hepatic segmentectomy, he presented with recurrent tumor enlargement and intraperitoneal hemorrhage in the setting of steroid abuse relapse. Given his limited hepatic reserve, he was conservatively managed with embolization of the right accessory hepatic artery. This is the first reported case of hepatic adenoma re-growth with recidivistic steroid abuse, complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. While athletes and bodybuilders are often aware of the legal and social ramifications of steroid abuse, they should continue to be counseled about its serious medical risks. PMID:18680242

  20. Anabolic steroid abuse causing recurrent hepatic adenomas and hemorrhage.

    Martin, Nicole M; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Chung, Raymond T

    2008-07-28

    Anabolic steroid abuse is common among athletes and is associated with a number of medical complications. We describe a case of a 27-year-old male bodybuilder with multiple hepatic adenomas induced by anabolic steroids. He initially presented with tumor hemorrhage and was treated with left lateral hepatic segmentectomy. Regression of the remaining tumors was observed with cessation of steroid use. However, 3 years and a half after his initial hepatic segmentectomy, he presented with recurrent tumor enlargement and intraperitoneal hemorrhage in the setting of steroid abuse relapse. Given his limited hepatic reserve, he was conservatively managed with embolization of the right accessory hepatic artery. This is the first reported case of hepatic adenoma re-growth with recidivistic steroid abuse, complicated by life-threatening hemorrhage. While athletes and bodybuilders are often aware of the legal and social ramifications of steroid abuse, they should continue to be counseled about its serious medical risks.

  1. Hemorrhagic Stroke Associated with Pulmonary Edema and Catastrophic Cardiac Failure

    Jiun-Chang Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral arteriovenous fistula (AVF is a vascular malformation that is rare in the pediatric population. Older children with cerebral AVF tend to present with neurologic problems related to intracranial venous hypertension or intracranial hemorrhage. Cardiac and pulmonary complications following acute neurologic injury such as subarachnoid hemorrhage are common in adults, but are rarely reported in children. However, complications have been reported in cases of enterovirus 71 rhombencephalitis in infants and children and can cause high morbidity and mortality. Here, we report a 14-year-old boy who presented with cardiac failure associated with pulmonary edema following cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to AVF. After aggressive investigation and management, we intervened before significant hypoxia and hypotension developed, potentially reducing the risk of long-term adverse neurologic consequences in this patient.

  2. The Cause of Unexpected Acute Abdomen and Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhage in 24-Week Pregnant Woman: Bochdalek Hernia

    Yavuz Savas Koca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bochdalek hernia (BH is the most common type of congenital diaphragm hernia and is rarely seen in adults. In adult patients, BH often remains asymptomatic or presents with nondiagnostic symptoms and may lead to complications, though rarely. The necrosis and perforations occurring in the hernia may lead to mortality. In this report, we present a 34-year-old pregnant woman at 24 gestational weeks who presented with Bochdalek hernia causing gastric volvulus associated with perforation and intra-abdominal hemorrhage associated with splenic rupture.

  3. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy: report of three cases.

    Emerich, Paulo Sergio; Prebianchi, Patricia Almeida; Motta, Luciene Lage da; Lucas, Elton Almeida; Ferreira, Leonardo Mello

    2011-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is an infrequent leukocytoclastic vasculitis which occurs almost exclusively in children between 4 months and 2 years of age. It is clinically characterized by the triad fever, purpuric lesions on the face, auricular pinna and extremities, and edema. Although the cutaneous findings are dramatic and of rapid onset, the prognosis is favorable, with spontaneous resolution within 1 to 3 weeks. Three cases are described in which clinical and histopathological findings are characteristic of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy.

  4. Hemorrhagic abscess in a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Casado-Naranjo, I.; Lopez-Trigo, J.; Ferrandiz, A.; Cervello, A.; Navarro, V.

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral toxoplasmosis is frequent among patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The common computed tomography appearance of this complication is multiple low density area with ring enhancement. We describe a very rare picture of cerebral toxoplasmosis, this is multiple hemorrhagic toxoplasmic abscess. (orig.)

  5. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a young woman with systemic lupus ...

    Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage (DAH) is rarely reported complication of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). A young woman diagnosed SLE, with a previously normal plain chest radiograph, developed acute onset cough, dyspnoea and hemoptysis. The repeat urgent chest radiograph revealed alveolar opacities. The triad ...

  6. Pulmonary alveolar hemorrhage mimicking a pneumopathy: a rare ...

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a rare complication. The diagnosis is difficult and can mimic by clinical and radiological features other diagnosis as pneumopathy. We herein report the case of a 63-year-old female admitted to the hospital for ST elevation myocardial infarction.

  7. The analysis of the causes of uterine bleeding occurred after cesarean section and the evaluation of interventional therapy for bleeding

    Hu Peng; Li Yuwei; Li Yunhui; Luo Bin; Wen Wen; Yang Bo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the causes of uterine hemorrhage occurred after cesarean section and to investigate the value of angiography and transcatheter artery embolization (TAE) in the diagnosis and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage after cesarean section. Methods: During the period from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2011, a total of 65 cases suffering from uterine bleeding after cesarean section had underwent uterine arteriography to clarify the diagnosis, which was followed by transcatheter uterine artery embolization (TUAE). The clinical data, the causes of bleeding and the angiographic features were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The causes of uterine bleeding after cesarean section included uterine artery pseudoaneurysm (n=26), uterine atony (n=18), placental factors (n=11), gestational hypertension (n=8), coexisting uterine fibroids (n=1) and uterine bleeding of unknown reason (n=1). Uterine artery angiography revealed contrast extravasation in all patients except one patient. The angiographic findings confirmed the diagnosis of uterine artery bleeding after cesarean section. The bleeding stopped after TUAE, and the patients were in stable condition. No serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Pseudoaneurysm is the primary cause of postpartum uterine hemorrhage after cesarean section. Transcatheter uterine artery angiography can promptly and reliably determine the causes of bleeding, and, at the same time, embolization therapy can be carried out to effectively stop the bleeding. (authors)

  8. Analysis of angiography findings in cerebral arteriovenous malformations: Correlation with hemorrhage

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Kim, Hyung Jin; Jung, Jin Myung; Ha, Choong Kun; Chung, Sung Hoon [Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is the most serious complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). To identify angiographic characteristics of AVM which correlate with a history of hemorrhage, we retrospectively analyzed angiographic findings of 25 patients with AVM. Nine characteristic were evaluated; these include nidus size, location, arterial aneurysm, intranidal aneurysm, angiomatous change, venous drainage pattern, venous stenosis, delayed drainage and venous ectasia. The characteristic were correlated with hemorrhage,which was seen in 18 (72%) patients on CT or MR images. Venous stenosis (P<0.5) and delaved venous drainage (P<0.5) well correlated with a history of hemorrhage. Arterial aneurysm and intranidal aneurysm also had a tendency hemorrhage although they did not prove to be statistically significant. Detailed analysis of angiographic finding of AVM is important for recognition of characteristic which are related to hemorrhage and may contribute to establishing a prognosis and treatment planning.

  9. Clinical value of arteriography in postpartum hemorrhage by transcatheter arterial embolization

    Wang Kai; Jiang Guomin; Zhao Jinwei; Huang Wenhua; Liu Yizhi; Jin Yonghai

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the arterial supply in postpartum hemorrhage and to evaluate the clinical value of arteriography in transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for treating postpartum hemorrhage. Methods: The arteriography of 37 patients with postpartum hemorrhage was analyzed. TAE were performed after the bleeding artery was identified. Post TAE angiography was performed to confirm the success of embolization. Results: The bleeding artery in atonic uterus and abnormal placenta was the uterine artery. The bleeding artery in birth canal laceration is mainly non-uterine artery. Postpartum hemorrhage was successfully controlled in all 37 patients without sever complication of TAE. Conclusion: Arteriography in postpartum hemorrhage can demonstrate the bleeding artery and is potential collaterals allowing adequate embolization without complication. (authors)

  10. Neonatal Brain Hemorrhage (NBH) of Prematurity: Translational Mechanisms of the Vascular-Neural Network

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; Poblete, Roy; Krafft, Paul R.; Rolland, William B.; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain hemorrhage (NBH) of prematurity is an unfortunate consequence of preterm birth. Complications result in shunt dependence and long-term structural changes such as post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, periventricular leukomalacia, gliosis, and neurological dysfunction. Several animal models are available to study this condition, and many basic mechanisms, etiological factors, and outcome consequences, are becoming understood. NBH is an important clinical condition, of which treatment may potentially circumvent shunt complication, and improve functional recovery (cerebral palsy, and cognitive impairments). This review highlights key pathophysiological findings of the neonatal vascular-neural network in the context of molecular mechanisms targeting the post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus affecting this vulnerable infant population. PMID:25620100

  11. Brain abscesses and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Vives, Daniel A.; Bauni, Carlos E.; Mendoza, Monica E.

    2003-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a generalized familial angiodysplastic disorder. The neurological manifestations of this entity are due to Central Nervous System vascular lesions or to complications of other visceral lesions such as pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae. This report describes two patients (males, 40 and 61 years old), with brain abscesses associated with HHT. The CT, MRI and Angiographic findings as well as the therapeutic approach are analyzed. Patients with brain abscess of unknown origin must be evaluated for the presence of lung vascular malformation in association with HHT. (author)

  12. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis presenting as intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Wigger, Olivier; Windecker, Stephan; Bloechlinger, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis is a rare cause of valvular heart disease, most commonly associated with advanced malignancy. The morbidity of this kind of endocarditis lies in its tendency to embolize, while the valve function is usually preserved. The central nervous system is the most common site of embolization, leading to ischemic stroke. We report a case of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage as the first manifestation of adenocarcinoma of the lung. The endocarditis led to severe aortic regurgitation. In view of the advanced stage of lung cancer, the patient refused further therapy. He passed away 3 weeks after first diagnosis of the adenocarcinoma.

  13. Remote Hemorrhage after Burr Hole Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Kim, Chang Hyeun; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2017-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and symptomatic subdural hygroma are common diseases that require neurosurgical management. Burr hole trephination is the most popular surgical treatment for CSDH and subdural hygroma because of a low recurrence rate and low morbidity compared with craniotomy with membranectomy, and twist-drill craniotomy. Many reports suggest that placing a catheter in the subdural space for drainage can further reduce the rate of recurrence; however, complications associated with this type of drainage include acute subdural hematoma, cortical injury, and infection. Remote hemorrhage due to overdrainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is another possible complication of burr hole trephination with catheter drainage that has rarely been reported. Here, we present 2 cases of remote hemorrhages following burr hole trephination with catheter drainage for the treatment of CSDH and symptomatic subdural hygroma. One patient developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the contralateral hemisphere, while another patient developed remote hemorrhage 3 days after the procedure due to the sudden drainage of a large amount of subdural fluid over a 24-hour period. These findings suggest that catheter drainage should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage of CSF after burr hole trephination.

  14. Post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus: Recent advances and new therapeutic insights.

    Chen, Qianwei; Feng, Zhou; Tan, Qiang; Guo, Jing; Tang, Jun; Tan, Liang; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi

    2017-04-15

    Post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH), also referred to as progressive ventricular dilatation, is caused by disturbances in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption following hemorrhage in the brain. As one of the most serious complications of neonatal/adult intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and traumatic brain injury (TBI), PHH is associated with increased morbidity and disability of these events. Common sequelae of PHH include neurocognitive impairment, motor dysfunction, and growth impairment. Non-surgical measures to reduce increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in PHH have shown little success and most patients will ultimately require surgical management, such as external ventricular drainage and shunting which mostly by inserting a CSF drainage shunt. Unfortunately, shunt complications are common and the optimum time for intervention is unclear. To date, there remains no comprehensive strategy for PHH management and it becomes imperative that to explore new therapeutic targets and methods for PHH. Over past decades, increasing evidence have indicated that hemorrhage-derived blood and subsequent metabolic products may play a key role in the development of IVH-, SAH- and TBI-associated PHH. Several intervention strategies have recently been evaluated and cross-referenced. In this review, we summarized and discussed the common aspects of hydrocephalus following IVH, SAH and TBI, relevant experimental animal models, clinical translation of in vivo experiments, and potential preventive and therapeutic targets for PHH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Complications of Tattoos and Tattoo Removal: Stop and Think Before you ink.

    Khunger, Niti; Molpariya, Anupama; Khunger, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Tattooing is a process of implantation of permanent pigment granules in the skin. Tattoos can be decorative, medical or accidental. There has been a exponential increase in decorative tattooing as a body art in teenagers and young adults. Unfortunately there are no legislations to promote safe tattooing, hence complications are quite common. Superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic reactions, photodermatitis, granulomatous reactions and lichenoid reactions may occur. Skin diseases localised on the tattooed area, such as eczema, psoriasis, lichen planus, and morphea can be occasionally seen. When used as a camouflage technique, colour mismatch and patient dissatisfaction are common complications. On the other hand, regrets after a tattoo are also seen and requests for tattoo removal are rising. Laser tattoo removal using Q-switched lasers are the safest; however, complications can occur. Acute complications include pain, blistering, crusting and pinpoint hemorrhage. Among the delayed complications pigmentary changes, hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation, paradoxical darkening of cosmetic tattoos and allergic reactions can be seen. Another common complication is the presence of residual pigmentation or ghost images. Scarring and textural changes are potential irreversible complications. In addition, tattoo removal can be a prolonged tedious procedure, particularly with professional tattoos, which are difficult to erase as compared to amateur tattoos. Hence the adage, stop and think before you ink holds very much true in the present scenario.

  16. MR of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.; Dion, J.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging was performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR images as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of MR of the basal cisterns results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR studies in many cases

  17. Various phases of intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Cases of intracerebral hemorrhage except typical putamen thalamic hemorrhage were reported. It is not difficult to diagnose typical attacks of cerebral apoplexy in patients older than 40 years with hypertension by CT. When the condition of the onset is not typical, cerebral infarction must be considered. Though conservative treatment is performed for severe cerebral hemorrhage and cerbral infarction, there is no specific medicine curing these diseases completely. On the contrary, the risk that the administration of fibrinolysis activators and STA-MCA anastomosis may induce cerebral hemorrhage is stressed. Not a few patients with cerebral apoplexy accompanied by small hemorrhagic focuses have been found, especially since CT was used widely. However, treatment for this disease has many inconsistencies. From above-mentioned facts, we recognize excellent roles of CT in an application of surgery for cerebral hemorrhage of early stage, and we, general radiologists, are under an obligation to advise most adequate theraphy for each patient. (Tsunoda, M.)

  18. Airway Complications of Total Artificial Heart.

    Pathak, Vikas; Donovan, Colin; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2017-02-01

    The total artificial heart is the mechanical device which is used as a bridge to the heart transplant in patients with biventricular failure. Due to the mechanical nature of the device, patients receiving total artificial heart (TAH) require to be on anticoagulation therapy. Hemorrhage and coagulopathy are few of the known complications of TAH.

  19. Towards a Possible Therapy for Diabetes Complications

    2011-10-01

    such as endothelin Table 1. Long-Term Complications of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)  Retinopathy Results in retinal edema, hemorrhage and loss of...fact, people with type 1 diabetes who retain a low but detectable level of C-peptide are less prone to develop microvascular complications of the eyes...induced apoptosis of pericytes in early diabetic retinopathy . J Ophthalmol 2010:746978 33. Zhao X, Carnevale KA, Cathcart MK (2003) Human monocytes use

  20. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bashir, Asma; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Sørensen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Repeat imaging in patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NASAH) remains controversial. We aim to report our experience with NASAH with different hemorrhage patterns, and to investigate the need for further diagnostic workup to determine the underlying cause of hemorrhage. M...... adequate with absence of hematoma and vasospasm. In contrast, a follow-up DSA should be mandatory for confirming or excluding vascular pathology in case of nPMSAH in order to prevent rebleeding....

  1. Management of sinonasal complications after endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' orbitopathy.

    Antisdel, Jastin L; Gumber, Divya; Holmes, Janalee; Sindwani, Raj

    2013-09-01

    Endoscopic orbital decompression (EnOD) has proven to be safe and effective for the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy; however, complications do occur. Although the literature focuses on orbital complications, sinonasal complications including postobstructive sinusitis, hemorrhage, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak can also be challenging to manage. This study examines the incidence and management of sinonasal complications in these patients. Retrospective review. Clinical data, surgical findings, and postoperative outcomes were reviewed of patients who underwent EnOD for Graves' disease between March 2004 and November 2010. The incidence and management of postoperative sinonasal complications requiring an intervention were examined. The study group consisted of 50 consecutive patients (86 decompression procedures): 11 males and 39 females with an average age of 48.6 years (SD = 12.9). Incidence of significant sinonasal complications was 3.5% (5/86): with one patient experiencing postoperative hemorrhage requiring operative management, three patients with postoperative obstructive sinusitis, and one patient with nasal obstruction secondary to nasal adhesions that required lysis. The maxillary sinus was the most commonly involved and was managed using the mega-antrostomy technique. In the case of frontal sinusitis, an endoscopic transaxillary approach was utilized to avoid injury to decompressed orbital contents. All complications were successfully managed without sequelae. Sinonasal complications following EnOD are uncommon. In the setting of a decompressed orbit, even routine types of postoperative issues can be challenging and require additional considerations. Successful management of postoperative sinusitis related to outflow obstruction may require more extensive approaches and novel techniques. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Intraoperative Active Bleeding in Endoscopic Surgery for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage is Predicted by the Spot Sign.

    Miki, Koichi; Yagi, Kenji; Nonaka, Masani; Iwaasa, Mitsutoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Morishita, Takashi; Arima, Hisatomi; Inoue, Tooru

    2018-05-30

    Endoscopic evacuation of hematoma (EEH) has recently been applied to treat patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). Intraoperative active bleeding (IAB), which is occasionally observed in EEH, might lead to greater blood loss, further brain damage, and more postoperative recurrent hemorrhage. However, no definite predictor of IAB has been established. Because the spot sign is associated with other hemorrhagic complications, we aimed to evaluate whether it predicts IAB. We retrospectively assessed the incidence and risk factors of IAB, including the spot sign, in 127 sICH patients who underwent EEH within 6 hours after computed tomography angiography at our institution between June 2009 and December 2017. The study included 53 women and 74 men with an average age of 66.7 ± 11.8 years. IAB occurred in 40 (31.5%) of the 127 patients, and it was more frequent in patients with the spot sign than in patients without it (14/24 [58.3%] vs. 26/103 [25.2%]; P = 0.003). Multivariable regression analyses suggested that the spot sign was an independent predictor of IAB (odds ratio [OR], 3.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-8.30; P = 0.03). In addition, earlier surgery gradually increased the risk of IAB, and surgery within 4 hours of onset was an independent risk factor (OR, 4.34; 95% CI, 1.12-16.9; P = 0.03, referring to postonset 8 hours or more). The spot sign and early surgery were independent predictors of IAB in EEH for sICH. In patients with sICH and spot sign, complete treatment of IAB by electrocoagulation might be important for minimizing surgical complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hemorrhagic Aspects of Gaucher Disease

    Hanna Rsenbaum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD is an inherited lysosomal disorder, originating from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Normally, GCase hydrolyzes glucocerebroside (GC to glucose and ceramide; however, impaired activity of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of GC in macrophages, termed “Gaucher cells.” Gaucher disease is associated with hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, skeletal complications and in some forms involves the central nervous system. Coagulation abnormalities are common among GD patients due to impaired production and chronic consumption of coagulation factors. Bleeding phenomena are variable (as are other symptoms of GD and include mucosal and surgical hemorrhages. Four main etiological factors account for the hemostatic defect in GD: thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, reduced production of coagulation factors, and activation of fibrinolysis. Thrombocytopenia relates not only to hypersplenism and decreased megakaryopoiesis by the infiltrated bone marrow but also to immune thrombocytopenia. Autoimmunity, especially the induction of platelet antibody production, might cause persistent thrombocytopenia. Enzyme replacement therapy reverses only part of the impaired coagulation system in Gaucher disease. Other therapeutic and supportive measures should be considered to prevent and/or treat bleeding in GD. Gaucher patients should be evaluated routinely for coagulation abnormalities especially prior to surgery and dental and obstetric procedures.

  4. [Hemorrhagic adrenal pseudocyst: case report].

    Basile, G; Buffone, A; Cicciarella, G; di Mari, P; Cirino, E

    2004-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are usually asymptomatic; they are usually identified occasionally during ultrasound or C.T. scans (incidentaloma). Among adrenal cysts the most common types are epithelial cysts and pseudocysts. Intracystic haemorrhage is one of the possible complications of adrenal pseudocysts. We report a case of a young woman with right superior abdominal pain, fever and acute anemia. A C.T. scan showed a 10 cm. mass between the liver and the right kidney. To be sure of the nature of this mass also M.R., urography and C.T.-guided biopsy were carried out. This latter only let us make the final diagnosis of hemorrhagic adrenal pseudocyst. Thereafter, a laparotomic right adrenalectomy was performed, with full recovery of the patient. Adrenal cysts may cause differential diagnostic problems with masses of contiguous organs like kidney, liver and gallbladder. For this reason, ultrasound and C.T. scans may not be sufficient and must be completed by M.R., urography and/or C.T.-guided biopsy. Intracystic hamorrhage, spontaneous or post-traumatic, may cause to the patient acute anemia which, as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed, indicates surgery. The operation usually is a laparotomic adrenalectomy, since the laparoscopic approach is not sufficient to control large masses with active bleeding inside.

  5. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  6. Bladder hemorrhage after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix uteri

    Matsuyama, Toshitake; Tsukamoto, Naoki; Sugimori, Hajime; Yoshino, Teruo; Kashiwamura, Masamichi.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship among the incidence, the time of occurrence, and radiation dose was studied in regard to hemorrhagic cystitis after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the cervix uteri. Of 1004 patients with carcinoma of the cervix uteri observed between 1961 and 1974, 28 (2.8%) had bladder hemorrhage seemingly due to radiation injury (0.7% were serious). Incidences varied every year. The radiation dose was increased from 4000 to 6000 rad after 1971. In addition to this external dose, because the depth-dose has also increased, the rate of bladder hemorrhage has become high. Seven patients with serious bladder hemorrhage were exposed to more than 5000 rad of 60 Co. Bladder hemorrhage occurred comparatively frequently in patients in whom two hila were irradiated. It usually occurred a few years after irradiation (about 1 year after initial rectal hemorrhage). It continued for approximately 1 year in 21 patients, for approximately 3 years in 4 patients, and for approximately 4 years in 3 patients. Adrenochrome (a hemostatic agent) and antiplasmin were used as therapeutic agents. Serious patients improved remarkably when a large amount of diluted formaline solution or conjugated estrogen was administered intravenously. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries.

    Yang, Fei; Zhao, Jianning; Xu, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  8. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries

    Fei Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  9. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report

    Maria Paula Gomes Mourão

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  10. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report.

    Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de; Bastos, Michele de Souza; Albuquerque, Bernardino Cláudio de; Alecrim, Wilson Duarte

    2004-12-01

    Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  11. Renal Artery Embolization of Perirenal Hematoma in Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: A Case Report

    Choi, Hee Seok; Lee, Yong Seok; Lim, Ji Hyon; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yoon, Yup [Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Cheol [Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute viral disease characterized by fever, hemorrhage and renal failure. Among the various hemorrhagic complications of HFRS, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma are very rare findings. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute infectious disease caused by hantavirus. HFRS is clinically characterized by fever, renal failure and hemorrhage in organs such as lung, kidney, spleen and the pituitary gland. Renal medullary hemorrhage is a well-known complication in the kidney, but spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma in HFRS is rare, and patients showing continuous bleeding and massive perirenal hematoma have often been surgically treated. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and the patient was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. In summary, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma is a rare complication of HFRS. We report here on a case of HFRS that caused massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with superselective renal artery embolization.

  12. Renal Artery Embolization of Perirenal Hematoma in Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: A Case Report

    Choi, Hee Seok; Lee, Yong Seok; Lim, Ji Hyon; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yoon, Yup; Hwang, Jae Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute viral disease characterized by fever, hemorrhage and renal failure. Among the various hemorrhagic complications of HFRS, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma are very rare findings. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute infectious disease caused by hantavirus. HFRS is clinically characterized by fever, renal failure and hemorrhage in organs such as lung, kidney, spleen and the pituitary gland. Renal medullary hemorrhage is a well-known complication in the kidney, but spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma in HFRS is rare, and patients showing continuous bleeding and massive perirenal hematoma have often been surgically treated. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and the patient was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. In summary, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma is a rare complication of HFRS. We report here on a case of HFRS that caused massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with superselective renal artery embolization

  13. Clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter embolization for vascular complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Poyraz, Necdet; Balasar, Mehmet; Gökmen, İbrahim Erdem; Koç, Osman; Sönmez, Mehmet Giray; Aydın, Arif; Göger, Yunus Emre; Öztürk, Ahmet

    2017-12-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is the preferred procedure for safe and effective surgical treatment of kidney stones. Hemorrhage is the most serious complication of PNL, resulting from pseudoaneurysm (PA) or arteriovenous fistula (AVF), and can usually be controlled with conservative treatment. To evaluate endovascular treatments and outcomes of vascular complications observed after PNL. We retrospectively reviewed data on 19 patients who underwent renal embolization due to post-PNL renal artery bleeding between March 2005 and September 2016. Embolization materials included embolization coils and glue. The incidence of post-PNL vascular complications and their endovascular treatments, outcomes, and the follow-up data were analyzed. Nineteen (1.1%) of 1,609 patients (mean age: 44.9 years, range: 19-75 years) underwent angiography and subsequent transcatheter embolization to control bleeding. The mean time to onset of hemorrhage was 7.2 days after PNL (range: 3-18 days). The PNL entry site was the lower calyx in 15 patients, the middle calyx in 3, and the upper calyx in 1. PA, AVF, and PA plus AVF occurred in 14, 5, and 3 of the 19 renal angiography patients, respectively. Embolization of the affected vessels was successful in all 19 patients. The embolization materials of coil, glue, and coil plus glue were used in 16, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Severe hematuria is a rare complication of PNL and can be successfully treated with transcatheter embolization.

  14. Prenatal intraventricular hemorrhage in a term infant with congenital ...

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) occurs rarely in term infant, since subependymal area is a transient structure in fetal life. IVH in term infant indicates generally that it happened prenatally. Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is frequent, occurring in 1% of live births. It is a severe infection leading to developmental ...

  15. Perimesencephalic hemorrhage: a nonaneurysmal and benign form of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    van Gijn, J.; van Dongen, K. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Hijdra, A.

    1985-01-01

    We studied 28 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and normal angiograms. On early CT (within 5 days) in 13 cases, blood was seen mainly or only in the cisterns around the midbrain. This pattern of hemorrhage was found in only 1 of 92 patients with a ruptured aneurysm. None of the unexplained

  16. Subconjunctival Hemorrhage (Broken Blood Vessel in Eye)

    Subconjunctival hemorrhage (broken blood vessel in eye) Overview A subconjunctival hemorrhage (sub-kun-JUNK-tih-vul HEM-uh-ruj) ... may not even realize you have a subconjunctival hemorrhage until you look in the mirror and notice ...

  17. Decreased renal function and hypertension are long-term complications of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Williams, C.M.; Kaude, J.V.; Newman, R.C.; Peterson, J.C.; Thomas, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative radionuclide renography performed in 21 patients 17-21 months after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy showed a significant decrease in the percentage of effective renal plasma flow (%ERPF) of the treated kidney; in five (24%) patients the %ERPF had decreased by more than 5 percentage units. In seven (8%) of 91 patients sustained hypertension developed that required pharmacologic treatment after lithotripsy. Decreased %ERPF of a treated kidney and hypertension may be related to a Page kidney or similar process resulting from renal trauma and hemorrhage occurring as a side effect of lithotripsy. Hypertension is an important complication of lithotripsy in about 8% of patients

  18. Complications in percutaneous transluminal stenting for carotid artery stenosis

    Li Shenmao; Miao Zhongrong; Zhu Fengshui; Ji Xunming; Jiao Liqun; Qi Jianshu; Ling Feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the complications of endovascular stenting for carotid artery stenosis. Methods: Cerebral vascular angiography and cervical Doppler sonography were performed in 648 patients with carotid artery stenosis. Emboli-protected device was used in 365 patients and none in 283 patients. Results: All 648 patients were technically successful (100%). Symptoms disappeared or improved in 78.7% patients. Slow heart rate during operation existed in 26.4% patients. Embolism caused by dislodgment of emboli occurred in 5 patients, 3 of them recovered after treatment and 2 had unilateral dyskinesias. Intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 3 patients. Stroke or death within 30 days after operation occurred in 6 patients(1.24%). 322 patients (77.8%)were followed up. Restenosis occurred in 17 patients(3.3%). Conclusion: Percutaneous transluminal stenting is a safe option for carotid artery stenosis. Correct evaluation of clinical and angiographic data before operation, together with normative manipulation and nursing during and after operation are the key points to avoid complications. (authors)

  19. Outcome of pregnancy complicated by threatened abortion.

    Dongol, A; Mool, S; Tiwari, P

    2011-01-01

    Threatened abortion is the most common complication in the first half of pregnancy. Most of these pregnancies continue to term with or without treatment. Spontaneous abortion occurs in less than 30% of these women. Threatened abortion had been shown to be associated with increased incidence of antepartum haemorrhage, preterm labour and intra uterine growth retardation. This study was to asses the outcome of threatened abortion following treatment. This prospective study was carried out in Dhulikhel Hospital - Kathmandu University Hospital from January 2009 till May 2010. Total 70 cases of threatened abortion were selected, managed with complete bed rest till 48 hrs of cessation of bleeding, folic acid supplementation, uterine sedative, and hormonal treatment till 28 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonogram was performed for diagnosis and to detect the presence of subchorionic hematoma. Patients were followed up until spontaneous abortion or up to delivery of the fetus. The measures used for the analysis were maternal age, parity, gestational age at the time of presentation, previous abortions, presence of subchorionic hematoma, complete abortion, continuation of pregnancy, antepartum hemorrhage, intrauterine growth retardation and intrauterine death of fetus. Out of 70 cases subchorionic haematoma was found in 30 (42.9%) cases. There were 12 (17.1%) patients who spontaneously aborted after diagnosis of threatened abortion during hospital stay, 5 (7.1%) aborted on subsequent visits while 53 (75.8%) continued pregnancy till term. Among those who continued pregnancy intrauterine growth retardation was seen in 7 (13.2%), antepartum hemorrhage in 4 (7.5%), preterm premature rupture of membrane in 3 (5.66%) and IUD in 3 (5.66%). Spontaneous abortion was found more in cases with subchorionic hematoma of size more than 20 cm2. In cases of threatened abortion with or without the presence of subchorionic hematoma, prognostic outcome is better following treatment with bed rest

  20. Occurrence of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in military unit stationed in the combat zone

    Ćirić Slaviša

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Since it has been recognized as a separate disease during the Korean war hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS has often been discovered among the members of different armies in various countries, military personnel being the highest risk group for the disease. In the period from March to May 1999 we treated 6 soldiers coming from the military formation stationed at Kosovo and Metohia. The reaction of indirect hemagglutination test proved the presence of antibodies against Hantavira in each of them. They were infected during the stay in a dugout in the area with great population of field rodents. Only one patient was slightly ill, on the admission to the hospitalall. The others had severe clinical and laboratory findings: several days lasting fever, strong abdominal pain, as well as the pain in the loins dyspeptical discomfort, manifold increased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine values, thrombocytopenia, etc. Oliguria occurred in 4 patients. Hemorrhagic manifestations were slight (epistaxis, petechial rash conjunctival injection, or absent. Because of the aggravation of the acute renal failure, hemodialysis was performed in 3 patients, while other 3 underwent conservative treatment. Two of the patients had severe anemia because of which transfusions of erythrocytes and plasma were performed. Complications occurred in 2 patients (convulsive crises and lung infections. All patients recovered completely.

  1. [Manifestations of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in a military unit stationed in a combat zone].

    Cirić, Slavisa; Denić, Vesna; Mitrović, Vekoslav; Mitrović-Perisić, Natasa; Denić, Nebojsa; Cirić, Slobodan

    2003-01-01

    Since it has been recognized as a separate disease during the Korean war, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) has often been discovered among the members of different armies in various countries, military personnel being the highest risk group for the disease. In the period from March to May 1999 we treated 6 soldiers coming from the military formation stationed at Kosovo and Metohia. The reaction of indirect hemagglutination test proved the presence of antibodies against Hantavira in each of them. They were infected during the stay in a dugout in the area with great population of field rodents. Only one patient was slightly ill, on the admission to the hospital. The others had severe clinical and laboratory findings: several days lasting fever, strong abdominal pain, as well as the pain in the loins, dyspeptical discomfort, manifold increased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine values, thrombocytopenia, etc. Oliguria occurred in 4 patients. Hemorrhagic manifestations were slight (epistaxis, petechial rash, conjunctival injection), or absent. Because of the aggravation of the acute renal failure, hemodialysis was performed in 3 patients, while other 3 underwent conservative treatment. Two of the patients had severe anemia because of which transfusions of erythrocytes and plasma were performed. Complications occurred in 2 patients (convulsive crises and lung infections). All patients recovered completely.

  2. Skin Complications

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  3. Diphtheria Complications

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  4. Computed Tomography of Interacerebral Hemorrhage

    Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Lee, Kwan Seh; Park, Soo Soung

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate and reliable method for the diagnosis of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. The precise anatomic extent of the nematoma, associated cerebral edema, ventricular deformity and displacement, and hydrocephalus are all readily assessed. Aside from head trauma, the principal cause of intracerebral hematoma is hypertensive vascular disease. Although hematomas from various causes may present similar CT appearances frequently the correct etiology may be suggested by consideration of patient's age, clinical history, and the location of the hematoma. The analytical study was performed in 180 cases of intracerebral hemorrhages by CT from October 1981 to January 1983. The results were as follows; 1. The most prevalent age group was 6th decade (37.2%). Male was prevalent to female at the ration of 1.6 to 1. 2. The most common symptom and sign was mental disturbance (48.7%), motor weakness (23%), headache (10.6%), nausea and vomiting (9.8%). 3. The causes of hemorrhage were hypertension (53.9%), head trauma (30.6%), aneurysm (6.1%) and A-V malformation (7.2%). 4. The frequent locations of hemorrhage were basal ganglia and thalamus (40.4%), lobes (35%), ventricles (21.8%). 5. The distribution of hemorrhage was intracerebral hemorrhage (65.6%), intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage (30.3%), intraventricular hemorrhage (4.4%).

  5. Isolated unilateral cytomegalovirus retinitis: a rare long-term complication after pediatric liver transplantation.

    Squires, James E; Sisk, Robert A; Balistreri, William F; Kohli, Rohit

    2013-02-01

    To highlight the rare yet devastating complication of CMV retinitis in a minimally immunosuppressed patient eight yr after liver transplantation for biliary atresia. A 22-yr-old female status-post deceased donor liver transplant at age 13 secondary to biliary atresia receiving single agent immunosuppression presented with acute, unilateral, profound decrease in visual acuity. The patient was diagnosed to have acute onset unilateral CMV retinitis. Retinal examination uncovered classical appearance of retinal whitening and retinal hemorrhages with extensive macular involvement. CMV retinitis can occur as a late complication following liver transplantation. Additionally, CMV retinal disease can occur in the absence of laboratory evidence of CMV infection and independent of additional clinical features suggesting CMV disease. Currently, there is no standard of care regarding screening for CMV retinitis, and thus, further research is needed to define the need for potential changes in current clinical practices and post-transplant screening protocols. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Peliosis Hepatis with Hemorrhagic Necrosis and Rupture: a Case Report with Emphasis on the Multi-Detector CT Findings

    Kim, Eun-A; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Jeon, Se-Jung; Cai, Quan-Yu; Lee, Young-Whan; Yoon, Seong Eon; Yoon, Ki-Jung; Juhng, Seon-Kwan

    2007-01-01

    We report here on an uncommon case of peliosis hepatis with hemorrhagic necrosis that was complicated by massive intrahepatic bleeding and rupture, and treated by emergent right lobectomy. We demonstrate the imaging findings, with emphasis on the triphasic, contrast-enhanced multidetector CT findings, as well as reporting the clinical outcome in a case of peliosis hepatis with fatal hemorrhage.

  7. Clinical application of bilateral uterine arterial chemoembolization in the treatment of massive hemorrhage due to cesarean scar pregnancy

    Wan Jun; Gu Weijin; Wang Haiyun; Ye Lei; Wang Wei; Zhang Lei; Ji Lihua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of bilateral uterine arterial chemoembolization in treating massive hemorrhage due to uterine scar pregnancy after cesarean section. Methods: Sixteen patients with massive hemorrhage due to cesarean scar pregnancy were enrolled in the study, the mean blood loss was (2 200 ± 1 400) ml. With Seldinger technique, abdominal angiography by using a pig-tail catheter was carried out. When bilateral uterine arterial bleeding was confirmed, selective or super-selective catheterization was employed and bilateral uterine arterial chemoembolization with infusion of 5-Fu or methotrexate (MTX) together with gelatin sponge via the catheters was conducted. The clinical results were observed. Results: The technical success was achieved in all 16 patients. No recurrent bleeding occurred during a follow-up of 3-6 months. Conclusion: The emergency bilateral uterine arterial chemoembolization is a safe and effective treatment for massive hemorrhage due to cesarean scar pregnancy with no serious complications, therefore, this technique is worth being used in clinical practice. (authors)

  8. Bleeding points in cerebral hemorrhage caused by Moyamoya disease in adults

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Sakurai, Yoshiharu; Shimizu, Yukihiko; Ogawa, Akira; Komatsu, Shinro.

    1983-01-01

    Even before the introduction of CT we reported that the intracranial hemorrhage in Moyamoya disease was not subarachnoid hemorrhage but intraventricular hemorrhage and that the bleeding point was the paraventricular subependymal region of lateral ventricles; these findings were based on our experience with three Moyamoya cases in which ventricular hemorrhage occurred and pseudoaneurysms were revealed in the territory of the posterior choroidal artery. Twelve cases with intracranial hemorrhage caused by Moyamoya disease have now been studied by CT in order to determine (1) whether the hemorrhage is subarachnoid or intraventricular, and (2) where the bleeding point is. In the results for the eight cases for which the CT scan was performed within one day after the onset, intraventricular hemorrhage was shown in all cases. The bleeding point was examined in twelve cases; in four cases it was recognized by initial CT only, but if five cases in which ventricular hemorrhage only appeared in the initial CT,follow-up plain and contrast-enhanced CT were necessary. In a total of nine cases, then, bleeding points were recognized. In one case putaminal hemorrhage penetrated into the lateral ventricle, while in eight cases the intracerebral hematoma was located in the paraventricular region of the lateral ventricle, such as at the head of the caudate nucleus or the thalamus. In some cases, small subependymal hematoma projected into the lateral ventricle. In cases with symptoms of intracranial hemorrhage at the onset, the bleeding points were at the paraventricular parenchyma of the lateral ventricle in almost all cases. (author)

  9. Co-Occurring Disorders

    ... the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring Disorders and ... 500 Montgomery Street, Suite 820 Alexandria, VA 22314 Phone (703) 684.7722 Toll Free (800) 969.6642 ...

  10. Development of a vaccine for the prevention of hemorrhagic enteritis in turkeys

    Hurk, van den J.V.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Hemorrhagic enteritis (HE) in turkeys is an acute infectious disease characterized by depression, intestinal bleeding, and death. HE occurs worldwide affecting 6 to 12 week-old turkeys and lasting 4 to 6 days. This economically important disease is caused by hemorrhagic enteritis virus (HEV), a

  11. A case of repeated intracerebral hemorrhages secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    Jinbing Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ventriculoperitoneal shunt is a routinely performed treatment in neurosurgical department. Intracerebral hemorrhage, as a complication after shunt catheterization, is really rare but with high mortality. In this study, we reported a case of a 74-year-old man who suffered from repeated intracerebral hemorrhage after ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The first hemorrhage happened 63 h after the 1st surgery, and most hematomas were located in the ipsilateral occipital lobe and intraventricles, along the ventricular catheter. Fresh blood clot casts blocked the external ventricular draining catheter, which was inserted into the right front horn during the 3rd surgery, indicating new intraventricular bleeding happened. A large hematoma in ipsilateral frontal lobe was detected on the 3rd day after the removal of external ventricular draining catheter. Different hemorrhagic locations and time points were encountered on the same case. We discussed the possible causes of repeated hemorrhage for this case, and the pre-operative preparation including risk evaluation in future clinical work.

  12. Treatment of Nonvariceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    Ali, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Salam, Basit; Beg, Madiha; Sayani, Raza; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% postembolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention

  13. Treatment of Non variceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    Ali, M.; Ul Haq, T.; Salam, B.; Beg, M.; Sayani, R.; Azeemuddin, M.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute non variceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute non variceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% post embolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention.

  14. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  15. Complications of laryngeal framework surgery (phonosurgery).

    Tucker, H M; Wanamaker, J; Trott, M; Hicks, D

    1993-05-01

    The rising popularity of surgery involving the laryngeal framework (surgical medialization of immobile vocal folds, vocal fold tightening, pitch variation, etc.) has resulted in increasing case experience. Little has appeared in the literature regarding complications or long-term results of this type of surgery. Several years' experience in a major referral center with various types of laryngeal framework surgery has led to a small number of complications. These have included late extrusion of the prosthesis and delayed hemorrhage. A review of these complications and recommendations for modification of technique to minimize them in the future are discussed.

  16. PRINCIPLES OF INTENSIVE CARE OF PATIENTS WITH SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGES AFTER CEREBRAL ANEURYSMS RUPTURE

    V. V. Krylov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The paper presents the modern principles of intensive care of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage after cerebral aneurysms ruptures focusing on neuromonitoring, mechanical ventilation, intracranial pressure and hemodynamic correction, calcium antagonists prescription, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, nutritional support, thromboembolic complications prevention and infection complications management. 

  17. Nontraumatic temporal subcortical hemorrhage

    Weisberg, L.A.; Stazio, A.; Shamsnia, M.; Elliott, D.; Charity Hospital, New Orleans, LA

    1990-01-01

    Thirty patients with temporal hematomas were analyzed. Four with frontal extension survived. Of 6 with ganglionic extension, three had residual deficit. Of 8 with parietal extension, 4 had delayed deterioration and died, two patients recovered, and two with peritumoral hemorrhage due to glioblastoma multiforme died. Five patients with posterior temporal hematomas recovered. In 7 patients with basal-inferior temporal hematomas, angiography showed aneurysms in 3 cases, angiomas in 2 cases and no vascular lesion in 2 cases. Of 23 cases with negative angiography and no systemic cause for temporal hematoma, 12 patients were hypertensive and 11 were normotensive. Ten hypertensive patients without evidence of chronic vascular disease had the largest hematomas, extending into the parietal or ganglionic regions. Seven of these patients died; 3 had residual deficit. Eleven normotensive and two hypertensive patients with evidence of chronic vascular change had smaller hematomas. They survived with good functional recovery. (orig.)

  18. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    Fujita, Katsuzo; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1980-01-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief. (author)

  19. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    Fujita, K; Matsumoto, S [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-10-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief.

  20. Efficacy of transcatheter uterine artery embolization for treating emergency hemorrhage obstetrics and gynecology

    Li Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of selective iliac artery embolization (TAE) or uterine artery embolization (UAE) for treatment of emergency hemorrhage in obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: Selective bilateral TAE or UAE were performed on 59 patients with acute cervical hemorrhage from postpartum hemorrhage (30), cervical cancer (16), endometrial cancer (8), and choriocarcinoma (5). Gelfoam particles were used in postpartum hemorrhage; chemotherapeutics and Iodipin suspension were used in malignancy. Results: Bleeding was stopped completely in all 59 patients with TAE or UAE procedure time of 30-50 minutes (mean: 42.17±4.78 minutes). There were no serious complications. Conclusion: TAE or UAE are effective for treating emergency hemorrhage in obstetrics and gynecology. (authors)

  1. Endovascular Management of Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Caused by Vaginal Laceration

    Koganemaru, Masamichi; Nonoshita, Masaaki; Iwamoto, Ryoji; Kuhara, Asako; Nabeta, Masakazu; Kusumoto, Masashi; Kugiyama, Tomoko; Kozuma, Yutaka; Nagata, Shuji; Abe, Toshi

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWe evaluated the management of transcatheter arterial embolization for postpartum hemorrhage caused by vaginal laceration.Materials and MethodsWe reviewed seven cases of patients (mean age 30.9 years; range 27–35) with intractable hemorrhages and pelvic hematomas caused by vaginal lacerations, who underwent superselective transcatheter arterial embolization from January 2008 to July 2014. Postpartum hemorrhage was evaluated by angiographic vascular mapping to determine the vaginal artery’s architecture, technical and clinical success rates, and complications.ResultsThe vaginal artery was confirmed as the source of bleeding in all cases. The artery was found to originate from the uterine artery in three cases, the uterine and obturator arteries in two, or the internal pudendal artery in two. After vaginal artery embolization, persistent contrast extravasation from the inferior mesenteric artery as an anastomotic branch was noted in one patient. Nontarget vessels (the inferior vesical artery and nonbleeding vaginal arterial branches) were embolized in one patient. Effective control of hemostasis and no post-procedural complications were confirmed for all cases.ConclusionPostpartum hemorrhages caused by vaginal lacerations involve the vaginal artery arising from the anterior trunk of the internal iliac artery with various branching patterns. Superselective vaginal artery embolization is clinically acceptable for the successful treatment of vaginal laceration hemorrhages, with no complications. After vaginal artery embolization, it is suggested to check for the presence of other possible bleeding vessels by pelvic aortography with a catheter tip at the L3 vertebral level, and to perform a follow-up assessment.

  2. Endovascular Management of Intractable Postpartum Hemorrhage Caused by Vaginal Laceration

    Koganemaru, Masamichi, E-mail: mkoganemaru@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Nonoshita, Masaaki, E-mail: z2rs-1973@yahoo.co.jp; Iwamoto, Ryoji, E-mail: iwamoto-ryouji@kurume-u.ac.jp; Kuhara, Asako, E-mail: kuhara-asako@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Nabeta, Masakazu, E-mail: nabeta-masakazu@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Kusumoto, Masashi, E-mail: kusumoto-masashi@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Kugiyama, Tomoko, E-mail: kugiyama-tomoko@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Kurume University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kozuma, Yutaka, E-mail: kouduma-yutaka@kurume-u.ac.jp [Kurume University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Japan); Nagata, Shuji, E-mail: sn4735@med.kurume-u.ac.jp; Abe, Toshi, E-mail: toshiabe@med.kurume-u.ac.jp [Kurume University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeWe evaluated the management of transcatheter arterial embolization for postpartum hemorrhage caused by vaginal laceration.Materials and MethodsWe reviewed seven cases of patients (mean age 30.9 years; range 27–35) with intractable hemorrhages and pelvic hematomas caused by vaginal lacerations, who underwent superselective transcatheter arterial embolization from January 2008 to July 2014. Postpartum hemorrhage was evaluated by angiographic vascular mapping to determine the vaginal artery’s architecture, technical and clinical success rates, and complications.ResultsThe vaginal artery was confirmed as the source of bleeding in all cases. The artery was found to originate from the uterine artery in three cases, the uterine and obturator arteries in two, or the internal pudendal artery in two. After vaginal artery embolization, persistent contrast extravasation from the inferior mesenteric artery as an anastomotic branch was noted in one patient. Nontarget vessels (the inferior vesical artery and nonbleeding vaginal arterial branches) were embolized in one patient. Effective control of hemostasis and no post-procedural complications were confirmed for all cases.ConclusionPostpartum hemorrhages caused by vaginal lacerations involve the vaginal artery arising from the anterior trunk of the internal iliac artery with various branching patterns. Superselective vaginal artery embolization is clinically acceptable for the successful treatment of vaginal laceration hemorrhages, with no complications. After vaginal artery embolization, it is suggested to check for the presence of other possible bleeding vessels by pelvic aortography with a catheter tip at the L3 vertebral level, and to perform a follow-up assessment.

  3. Hemorrhagic shock caused by sigmoid colon volvulus: An autopsy case

    Sato, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tanaka, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Many reports have described sigmoid volvulus, but fatal hemorrhagic shock resulting from the rupture of the involved artery has not been reported as a complication of a sigmoid volvulus. Case Report A 71-year-old man with slight abdominal pain and obstipation in hypotension died at a nursing home without seeing a doctor. At autopsy, a mesenteric hematoma and hemoperitoneum was observed with approximately 1,000 ml of blood in the abdominal cavity. The sigmoid colon and the mesentery were twisted at an adhesion site of a sigmoid colon to an ileum, and the condition was determined to be a sigmoid volvulus. The volvulus was observed to be loosened. The inferior mesenteric artery was incorporated into the twisted part of the mesentery, but remained patent, and its peripheral branch near the hematoma ruptured without histological abnormality. Conclusions Since ischemic-reperfusion injury occurs with a temporarily occluded artery, the acute re-loading of blood flow may injure the distal vessels after spontaneous reduction of compression by loosening of the volvulus. PMID:22129905

  4. Non-operative management of arterial liver hemorrhages

    Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Vogel, J.; Sokiranski, R.; Brambs, H.J. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulm (Germany); Brado, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Huppert, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Siech, M.; Ganzauge, F.; Beger, H.G. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. of Ulm (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    A retrospective evaluation of embolotherapy in patients with arterial liver hemorrhages was carried out. Twenty-six patients, ranging in age from 10 days to 77 years with active arterial liver hemorrhages, underwent non-surgical embolotherapy. Bleeding was attributed to trauma (n = 21), tumor (n = 3), pancreatitis (n = 1), or unknown cause (n = 1). Twenty-nine embolizations were performed via a transfemoral (n = 26) or biliary (n = 2) approach. One bare Wallstent was placed into the common hepatic artery via to an axillary route to cover a false aneurysm due to pancreatitis. Treatment was controlled in 4 patients by cholangioscopy (n = 2) or by intravascular ultrasound (n = 2). Prior surgery had failed in 3 patients. Intervention controlled the hemorrhage in 24 of 26 (92 %) patients within 24 h. Embolotherapy failed in 1 patient with pancreatic carcinoma and occlusion of the portal vein. In 1 patient with an aneurysm of the hepatic artery treated by Wallstent insertion, total occlusion was not achieved in the following days, as demonstrated by CT and angiography. However, colour Doppler flow examination showed no flow in the aneurysm 6 months later. Complications were one liver abscess, treated successfully by percutaneous drainage for 10 days, and one gallbladder necrosis after superselective embolization of the cystic artery. Embolization is a effective tool with a low complication rate in the treatment of liver artery hemorrhage, even in patients in whom surgery has failed. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 26 refs.

  5. Imaging features of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage

    Schmit, M.; Vogel, W.; Horger, M.

    2006-01-01

    There are diverse etiologies of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, so specific diagnosis may be difficult. Conventional radiography tends to be misleading as hemoptysis may lacking in patients with hemorrhagic anemia. Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage should be differentiated from focal pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, active infection (tuberculosis) neoplasia, trauma, or embolism. (orig.)

  6. [Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers--pathogens, epidemiology and therapy].

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers are severe, systemic viral diseases affecting humans and non-human primates. They are characterized by multiple symptoms such as hemorrhages, fever, headache, muscle and abdominal pain, chills, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Elevated liver-associated enzyme levels and coagulopathy are also associated with these diseases. Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers are caused by (Lake victoria) Marburg virus and different species of Ebola viruses, respectively. They are enveloped, single-stranded RNA viruses and belong to the family of filoviridae. Case fatality rates of filovirus disease outbreaks are among the highest reported for any human pathogen, ranging from 25 to 90% or more. Outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fever occur in certain regions of equatorial Africa at irregular intervals. Since 2000, the number of outbreaks has increased. In 2014, the biggest outbreak of a filovirus-induced hemorrhagic fever that has been documented so far occurred from March to July 2014 in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. The outbreak was caused by a new variant of Zaire Ebola-Virus, affected more than 2600 people (stated 20 August) and was associated with case-fatality rates of up to 67% (Guinea). Treatment of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers is symptomatic and supportive, licensed antiviral agents are currently not available. Recently, BCX4430, a promising synthetic adenosine analogue with high in vitro and in vivo activity against filoviruses and other RNA viruses, has been described. BCX4430 inhibits viral RNA polymerase activity and protects cynomolgus macaques from Marburg virus infection when administered as late as 48 hours after infection. Nucleic acid-based products, recombinant vaccines and antibodies appear to be less suitable for the treatment of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers.

  7. Hemorrhagic Lacrimation and Epistaxis in Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy

    Shireen Mreish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is an uncommon benign cutaneous vasculitis. Despite its worrisome presentation, it carries good prognosis with rarely reported systemic involvement. Management of these cases has been an area of debate with majority of physicians adopting conservative modalities. We report a case that presented with classic triad of rash, low grade fever, and peripheral edema along with two rarely reported manifestations in literature: hemorrhagic lacrimation and epistaxis.

  8. Influence of Bleeding Pattern on Ischemic Lesions After Spontaneous Hypertensive Intracerebral Hemorrhage with Intraventricular Hemorrhage.

    Rivera-Lara, Lucia; Murthy, Santosh B; Nekoovaght-Tak, Saman; Ali, Hasan; McBee, Nichol; Dlugash, Rachel; Ram, Malathi; Thompson, Richard; Awad, Issam A; Hanley, Daniel F; Ziai, Wendy C

    2018-03-27

    Concomitant acute ischemic lesions are detected in up to a quarter of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Influence of bleeding pattern and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) on risk of ischemic lesions has not been investigated. Retrospective study of all 500 patients enrolled in the CLEAR III randomized controlled trial of thrombolytic removal of obstructive IVH using external ventricular drainage. The primary outcome measure was radiologically confirmed ischemic lesions, as reported by the Safety Event Committee and confirmed by two neurologists. We assessed predictors of ischemic lesions including analysis of bleeding patterns (ICH, IVH and subarachnoid hemorrhage) on computed tomography scans (CT). Secondary outcomes were blinded assessment of mortality and modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 30 and 180 days. Ischemic lesions occurred in 23 (4.6%) during first 30 days after ICH. Independent risk factors associated with ischemic lesions in logistic regression models adjusted for confounders were higher IVH volume (p = 0.004) and persistent subarachnoid hemorrhage on CT scan (p = 0.03). Patients with initial IVH volume ≥ 15 ml had five times the odds of concomitant ischemic lesions compared to IVH volume < 15 ml. Patients with ischemic lesions had significantly higher odds of death at 1 and 6 months (but not poor outcome; mRS 4-6) compared to patients without concurrent ischemic lesions. Occurrence of ischemic lesions in the acute phase of IVH is not uncommon and is significantly associated with increased early and late mortality. Extra-parenchymal blood (larger IVH and visible subarachnoid hemorrhage) is a strong predictor for development of concomitant ischemic lesions after ICH.

  9. Spot sign as a predictor of rebleeding after endoscopic surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Miki, Koichi; Yagi, Kenji; Nonaka, Masani; Iwaasa, Mitsutoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Morishita, Takashi; Arima, Hisatomi; Inoue, Tooru

    2018-05-25

    OBJECTIVE In patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH), postoperative recurrent hemorrhage (PRH) is one of the most severe complications after endoscopic evacuation of hematoma (EEH). However, no predictors of this complication have been identified. In the present study, the authors retrospectively investigated whether PRH can be preoperatively predicted by the presence of the spot sign on CT scans. METHODS In total, 143 patients with sICH were treated by EEH between June 2009 and March 2017, and 127 patients who underwent preoperative CT angiography were included in this study. Significant correlations of PRH with the patients' baseline, clinical, and radiographic characteristics, including the spot sign, were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS The incidence of and risk factors for PRH were assessed in 127 patients with available data. PRH occurred in 9 (7.1%) patients. Five (21.7%) cases of PRH were observed among 23 patients with the spot sign, whereas only 4 (3.8%) cases of PRH occurred among 104 patients without the spot sign. The spot sign was the only independent predictor of PRH (OR 5.81, 95% CI 1.26-26.88; p = 0.02). The following factors were not independently associated with PRH: age, hypertension, poor consciousness, antihemostatic factors (thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and use of antithrombotic drugs), the location and size of the sICH, other radiographic findings (black hole sign and blend sign), surgical duration and procedures, and early surgery. CONCLUSIONS The spot sign is likely to be a strong predictor of PRH after EEH among patients with sICH. Complete and careful control of bleeding in the operative field should be ensured when surgically treating such patients. New surgical strategies and procedures might be needed to improve these patients' outcomes.

  10. Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients.

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2010-06-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients need maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated in our surgery unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented with a bilateral CLP, two with a unilateral CLP, and one with a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years. All underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. An external distractor was used for the first two patients and an internal distractor for the six following patients. After a seven-day latency, activation was implemented at a rate of 1mm twice a day. The average period of consolidation was four months. Maxillary advancement ranged between 7 and 19mm, with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. Complications were noted in seven patients: one intra-operative hemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth anchored at the pterygoid process during osteotomy, three cases of device dysfunction, two cases of significant pain during activation, one loosening of the orthodontic arch in an external system, two cases of labial ulceration, and one maxillary sinusitis due to migration of a wisdom tooth. Complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients were very frequent. Most were related to the device and did not interfere with the final result. This must be taken into account when indicating distraction and choosing the device. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the device. The complications related to the osteotomy are linked to the cicatricial ground of previous

  11. [Neurological complications of infective endocarditis in Burkina Faso. Clinical features, management and evolutionary profile].

    Yaméogo, N V; Seghda, A; Kagambèga, L J; Diallo, O; Millogo, G R C; Toguyéni, B J Y; Samadoulougou, A K; Niakara, A; Simporé, J; Zabsonré, P

    2015-04-01

    Neurological complications are the most frequent extracardiac complications of infective endocarditis (IE). This study aimed to describe the epidemiological, clinical and paraclinical aspects, and outcome of neurological complications of infective endocarditis in three hospitals in the city of Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso. From 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012, we included all patients suffering from IE and selected those in whom a neurological complication was objectified. Neurological involvement was sought on clinical examination but especially CT brain (ischemic infarcts, hemorrhages, aneurysms and abscesses). Blood cultures were systematic. Echocardiography was done for vegetations and characteristics. Among 63 cases of IE, neurological complications were found in 14 patients (22.2%). The average age of patients with neurological complications was 37.4 ± 5.8 years. The sex ratio was 1.3 for women. Neurological damage consisted of nine cases of stroke (64.3%), three cases of hemorrhagic stroke (21.4%) and two cases of brain abscess (14.3%). Neurological complications had already occurred before hospitalization in 4 cases. Blood cultures were positive in 8 cases. Germs found were predominantly Staphylococcus aureus (5 cases) and Streptococcus a- viridans (2 cases). All cases of S. aureus were complicated by stroke. At echocardiography, vegetation was found in all cases. It was found on the mitral in 7 cases, the aorta in 3 cases, the mitral and aortic in 2 cases and the mitral and tricuspid in 2 cases also. The EI had occurred on a native valve in 11 cases, prosthesis in 4 cases (2 mitral and 2 aortic). The vegetations average diameter was 11.2 ± 2.1 mm (6.4 and 1 7.7 mm). Vegetations were mobile in 12 cases. The treatment consisted of antibiotics adapted to the antibiogram, neurological and cardiovascular monitoring. The evolution was marked by seven deaths (50%), including 5 deaths related to cerebral complication (71.4% of deaths). This study shows that

  12. An intractable case of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to radiation colitis. Usefulness of transcatheter arterial embolization

    Inoue, Koichi; Koyama, Tukasa [Yoka Hospital, Hyogo (Japan); Sugamura, Kenji; Ogawa, Toshihide [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    2003-05-01

    We tried transcatheter arterial embolization for lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to radiation colitis. In this case, colostomy and endoscopic therapy were not effective. We succeeded in arresting the hemorrhage without any complications. Transcatheter embolization is a low-invasive and safe method of treatment. For prevention of inflammation and iatrogenic abscess formation, we repeated this therapy and we tried arterial injection of antibiotics and steroid. And so, this therapy is one of the effective methods. (author)

  13. Timing of deep vein thrombosis formation after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Liang, Conrad W.; Su, Kimmy; Liu, Jesse J.; Dogan, Aclan; Hinson, Holly E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). The time period of greatest risk for developing DVT after aSAH is not currently known. aSAH induces a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to DVT formation. Using repeated ultrasound screening, the hypothesis that patients would be at greatest risk for developing DVT in the subacute post-rupture period was tested. METHODS One hundred ninety-eight patients with aSAH admitted to the Oregon Health & Science University Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit between April 2008 and March 2012 were included in a retrospective analysis. Ultrasound screening was performed every 5.2 ± 3.3 days between admission and discharge. The chi-square test was used to compare DVT incidence during different time periods of interest. Patient baseline characteristics as well as stroke severity and hospital complications were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS Forty-two (21%) of 198 patients were diagnosed with DVT, and 3 (2%) of 198 patients were symptomatic. Twenty-nine (69%) of the 42 cases of DVT were first detected between Days 3 and 14, compared with 3 cases (7%) detected between Days 0 and 3 and 10 cases (24%) detected after Day 14 (p < 0.05). The postrupture 5-day window of highest risk for DVT development was between Days 5 and 9 (40%, p < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, length of hospital stay and use of mechanical prophylaxis alone were significantly associated with DVT formation. CONCLUSIONS DVT formation most commonly occurs in the first 2 weeks following aSAH, with detection in this cohort peaking between Days 5 and 9. Chemoprophylaxis is associated with a significantly lower incidence of DVT. PMID:26162047

  14. The causes and the nursing interventions of the complications due to repeated embolization therapy for huge cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    Sun Lingfang; Sun Ge

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the causes of the complications occurred after repeated embolization therapy for huge cerebral arteriovenous malformations and to discuss their nursing interventions. Methods: A total of 54 embolization procedures were performed in 17 patients with huge cerebral arteriovenous malformations. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The causes of complications were carefully examined and the preventive measures were discussed. The prompt and necessary nursing interventions were formulated in order to prevent the complications or serious consequences. Results: Among the total 17 patients, one patient gave up the treatment because of the cerebral hemorrhage which occurred two months after receiving 3 times of embolization therapy. One patient experienced cerebral vascular spasm during the procedure, which was relieved after antispasmodic medication and no neurological deficit was left behind. Two patients developed transient dizziness and headache, which were alleviated spontaneously. One patient presented with nervousness, fear and irritability, which made him hard to cooperate with the operation and the basis intravenous anesthesia was employed. No complications occurred in the remaining cases. Conclusion: The predictive nursing interventions for the prevention of complications are very important for obtaining a successful repeated embolization therapy for huge cerebral arteriovenous malformations, which will ensure that the patients can get the best treatment and the complications can be avoided. (authors)

  15. Factors Associated with Acute and Chronic Hydrocephalus in Nonaneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Kang, Peter; Raya, Amanda; Zipfel, Gregory J; Dhar, Rajat

    2016-02-01

    Hydrocephalus requiring external ventricular drain (EVD) or shunt placement commonly complicates aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but its frequency is not as well known for nonaneurysmal SAH (NA-SAH). Those with diffuse bleeding may have greater risk of hydrocephalus compared to those with a perimesencephalic pattern. We evaluated the frequency of hydrocephalus in NA-SAH and whether imaging factors could predict the need for EVD and shunting. We collected admission clinical and imaging variables for 105 NA-SAH patients, including bicaudate index (BI), Hijdra sum score (HSS), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) score, modified Fisher scale (mFS), and bleeding pattern. Hydrocephalus was categorized as acute (need for EVD) or chronic (shunt). We applied logistic regression to determine whether hydrocephalus risk was independently related to bleeding pattern or mediated through blood volume or ventriculomegaly. Acute hydrocephalus was seen in 26 (25%) patients but was more common with diffuse (15/28, 54%) versus perimesencephalic (10/59, 17%, p hydrocephalus had worse clinical grade and higher BI, HSS, and IVH scores. Adjusting the relationship between hydrocephalus and diffuse bleeding for HSS (but not BI) nullified this association. Nine (35%) patients requiring EVD eventually required shunting for chronic hydrocephalus, which was associated with greater blood burden but not poor clinical grade. Acute hydrocephalus occurs in one-quarter of NA-SAH patients. The greater risk in diffuse bleeding appears to be mediated by greater cisternal blood volume but not by greater ventriculomegaly. Imaging characteristics may aid in anticipatory management of hydrocephalus in NA-SAH.

  16. Headache-like Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Digital Subtraction Angiography: A Case Report

    Fettah Eren

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a clinical condition with acute-onset, sudden, and severe headache. In addition to headache, severe nausea, vomiting, dizziness, confusion, agitation, focal neurologic deficits, and hypertension can be detected. Findings of meningeal irritation may accompany to these clinical features, 6-24 hours after the hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA is used for surgical or endovascular treatment planning in order to identify vascular abnormalities, in addition to other imaging studies. After DSA, the frequency of all neurologic complications is between 0.2% and 4.5%. Headache may occur after DSA in an average 50% of patients. This rate is especially higher in female patients. Headache types are usually classified as migraine, tension or postoperative atypical headaches The incidence of severe headache after DSA is low. Vascular wall rupture should be considered first in severe headache after the procedure. It should also be kept in mind that after all other secondary causes are excluded; SAH-like headaches after DSA can be detected

  17. Symbol "&" suture to control atonic postpartum hemorrhage with placenta previa accreta.

    Li, Guang Tai; Li, Xiao Fan; Liu, Ya Jing; Li, Wei; Xu, Hong Mei

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a symbol "&" compression suture technique in controlling severe atonic postpartum hemorrhage with placenta previa accreta during cesarean delivery. Nine women with heavy postpartum bleeding from uterine inertia and placenta previa percret, which did not react to conventional initial management protocols, were underwent the suture in the shape of symbol "&" in China Meitan General Hospital. The suture procedure was to staple the anterior and posterior walls (of the lower uterine segment as well as corpus uterus) together using number 1 chromic catgut, with a cross at about 2 cm above the upper boundary of lower uterine segment. Symbol "&" compression suture was capable of stanching the postpartum hemorrhage immediately in all nine women. None of these patients developed complications related to this method. Subsequent pregnancies after the suture were occurred in two women and delivered with repeat cesarean section. Symbol "&" compression suture is a simple, safe and highly effective technique to control the treatment-resistant uterine atonic bleeding, particularly in previous cesarean scar at lower segment and placenta previa accreta.

  18. Risk factors for rebleeding of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a meta-analysis.

    Chao Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rebleeding is a serious complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhaging. To date, there are conflicting data regarding the factors contributing to rebleeding and their significance. METHODS: A systematic review of PubMed and Embase databases was conducted for studies pertaining to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH and rebleeding in order to assess the associated risk factors. Odds ratios (ORs and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated from fourteen studies comprised of a total of 5693 patients that met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Higher rebleeding rates were observed 10 mm in size (OR  = 1.70, 95% CI  = 1.35-2.14. CONCLUSIONS: Aneurysmal rebleeding occurs more frequently within the first 6 hours after the initial aSAH. Risk factors associated with rebleeding include high systolic pressure, the presence of an intracerebral or intraventricular hematoma, poor Hunt-Hess grade (III-IV, aneurysms in the posterior circulation, and an aneurysm >10 mm in size.

  19. Strategy and clinical significance of interventional management before surgical therapy for massive hemorrhage of gastrointestinal tract

    Hu Tingyang; Yu Wenqiang; Mao Yingmin; Yuan Jianhua; CChen Fanghong; Luo Zuyan; Ding Xiaonan; Zhou Bing; Ding Zhongxiang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of interventional management before surgical therapy for massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and to compare the clinical efficacy and re-bleeding rate between hypophysin infusion group and embolization group. Methods: During the period of June 1998-Apr. 2009, 31 patients with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage in our institution underwent preoperative interventional managements before they received surgical treatment. According to DSA manifestations, the patients underwent transarterial hypophysin infusion or transcatheter embolization as interventional management. The clinical efficacy of interventional procedures and its influence on the surgery were evaluated, and the hemostasis rate and re-bleeding rate were compared the two kind of intervention managements. The numeration data were analyzed with Fisher's exact test, and the SPSS 11.0 was used as statistical software. Results: The interventional managements were successfully performed in all the 31 patients, with a total hemostasis rate of 83.9% (26/31) and a total re-bleeding rate 30.7% (8/26). The hemostasis rate and re-bleeding rate of hypophysin infusion group and embolization group were 69.2% (9/ 13), 94.4% (17/18) and 44.4% (4/9), 23.7% (4/17), respectively. All the 31 patients received surgery after interventional therapy, of which selective operation was carried out in 20. Neither surgery-related or intervention-related serious complications nor death occurred. Conclusion: Preoperative interventional managements can provide patients with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage with valuable chance of a successful surgery, enable the physician to take a selective operation to replace an emergency one,as a result, the surgical risk will be greatly reduced. Therefore, it is worth popularizing the preoperative interventional managements in clinical practice. (authors)

  20. Emergent embolization for control of massive hemorrhage from a splanchnic artery with a new coaxial catheter system

    Okazaki, M.; Higashihara, H.; Koganemaru, F.; Ono, H.; Fujimitsu, R.; Yamasaki, S.; Toyoshima, H.; Sato, S.; Hoashi, T.; Kimura, T.

    1992-01-01

    Emergent superselective embolization with a 3.0 F (1 mm) coaxial catheter and a steerable guidewire was performed in 27 patients with massive hemorrhage from a small-caliber splanchnic artery. Eight patients had intraperitoneal hemorrhage, 3 had hemobilia, 9 had gastric hemorrhage, and 7 had intestinal hemorrhage. Out of 27 patients, 7 had hemorrhage from a splanchnic artery pseudoaneurysm. Complete cessation of bleeding was obtained in all patients initially, but in 3 patients gastric hemorrhage recurred later. Otherwise, there was no rebleeding nor any major complication such as marked infarction of tissue or misplacement of embolic materials. This coaxial catheter system was highly reliable for achieving superselective catheterization in small-caliber arteries, minimizing the volume of infarcted tissue and allowing maximal preservation of splanchnic organic function. We conclude that this system represents a major advance in interventional radiology. (orig.)

  1. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions

  2. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Divyesh Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS. As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  3. Hemorrhage is the most common cause of neonatal mortality in patients with sacrococcygeal teratoma.

    Kremer, Marijke E B; Wellens, Lianne M; Derikx, Joep P M; van Baren, Robertine; Heij, Hugo A; Wijnen, Marc H W A; Wijnen, René M H; van der Zee, David C; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2016-11-01

    A small percentage of neonates with sacrococcygeal teratoma die shortly after birth from hemorrhagic complications. The incidence of and risk factors associated with hemorrhagic mortality are unknown. In this multicenter study we determined the incidence of early death in neonates born with SCT and evaluated potential risk factors for hemorrhagic mortality. 235 children with SCT treated from 1970 to 2010 in the Netherlands were retrospectively included. The following candidate risk factors for hemorrhagic mortality were examined: sex, prematurity, Altman type, tumor volume, tumor histology, necessity of emergency operation and time of diagnosis. Eighteen patients (7.7%) died at a median age of 163.5days (range 1.7-973days). Nine patients died of a malignancy. Nine others (3.8%) died postnatally (age 1-27days), six even within two days after birth. In seven of these nine patients death was related to tumor-hemorrhage and/or circulatory failure. Risk factors for hemorrhagic mortality were prematurity, tumor volume>1000cm 3 and performance of an emergency operation. Hemorrhagic mortality of neonates with SCT is relatively high (3.8%) representing almost 70% of the overall mortality in the neonatal period. High-output cardiac failure, internal tumor hemorrhage and perioperative bleeding were the most common causes of early death and were all strongly associated with larger tumor sizes. II (Retrospective study). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage in the emergency department

    Diego Garbossa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is one of the major cause of mortality for stroke. The leading cause is the rupture of an intracrnial aneurym. Acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a complex multifaceted disorder that plays out over days to weeks. The development of aneurysms is mainly due to a hemodynamic stress. Considerableadvances have been made in endovascular techniques, diagnostic methods, and surgical and perioperative management guidelines. Rebleeding remains the most imminent danger until the aneurysm is excluded from cerebral circulation. The only effective prevention of rebleeding is repair the aneurysm; choosing the right way with surgical or an endovascular approach. Outcome for patients with SAH remains poor, with population-based mortality rates as high as 45% and significant morbidity among survivors. In this work we analyzed the diagnostic-therapeutic course of patients presenting SAH. We analyzed the types and the occurrence of complications. We present two cases report to better demonstrate that treatments for specific patients need to be individualized.

  5. CLINICAL APPROACH TO HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA

    Mary Hachmeriyan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a rare syndrome, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incidence of 1/10000. The clinical manifestations are due to vascular malformations and predisposition to hemorrhages in different organs, the leading symptom being recurrent epistaxis. If diagnosed with HHT, the patient and his relatives and especially children have to be screened for occult vascular malformations.Case report: A 30 years old woman was treated for cerebral stroke, epistaxis, anemia, arterio-venous malformations for over 6 months. Only at this point she was diagnosed with HHT, after noticing the typical mucosal changes. Focused family history revealed symptoms of HHT in her only child, her father, aunt and two cousins The child was screened for occult vascular malformations – attainment of the nasal mucosa, lungs, gastrointestinal system, liver and brain. Pulmonary and gastrointestinal arterio-venous malformations were proven.Conclusion: Any case of recurrent epistaxis should be evaluated for HHT. After confirmation of the diagnosis every patient and close relatives have to be screened for attainment of other organs and followed up in order to prevent severe life threatening complications.

  6. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

  7. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  8. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer

    Takashi Orii

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage.

  9. Hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage

    Munaka, Masahiro; Nishikawa, Michio; Hirai, Osamu; Kaneko, Takaaki; Watanabe, Syu; Fukuma, Jun; Handa, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    In the past six years, we have had experience with 40 patients with hypertensive thalamic hemorrhages, as verified by CT scan at our hospital within 24 hours. These patients were classified into the following three groups according to the location of the bleeding point and the size of the hematoma: (1) anteromedial (4 cases), (2) posterolateral (16 cases), and (3) massive (20 cases). The (1) and (2) hematomas were small (less than 3 cm in diameter), while those in (3) were large (more than 3 cm in diameter). Twenty cases (50% of all the thalamic hematomas) were small hematomas. The characteristic clinical symptoms of the anteromedial type were a mild disturbance of consciousness and thalamic dementia, while those of the posterolateral type were motor and sensory disturbance, and thalamic aphasia, respectively. Twenty cases (50%) were large hematomas. The clinical symptoms of these cases were mainly consciousness disturbance; 7 of them expired. Based on this experience, it may be considered that the patients whose hematoma size was larger than 3 cm had a poor prognosis and that the patients with the posterolateral type had a poor functional diagnosis. (author)

  10. MRI of intracranial hemorrhage

    Inoue, Yuichi; Takemoto, Kazumasa; Hashimoto, Hiromi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 23 patients with putaminal or thalamic hematomas were reviewed. Inversion recovery (IR, TR; 2100 - 2500 msec, TI; 600 msec) and long spin echo (SE, TR; 1800 - 2500 msec, TE; 120 msec) images were obtained with a 0.5T MR scanner. Hematomas within 3 hours after hemorrhage were isointense to the gray matter on both IR and long SE images. Two day-old hematomas were hyperintense in part of it on IR images and hypointense on long SE images. In acute hematomas, there was a marked hyperintense crescent area around hematomas on long SE images which marked hypointense on IR images. Hematomas in the resolving stage had peripheral hyperintensity on IR images and then on long SE images. This hyperintensity filled into the center of hematomas with time. In the resolving stage linear hypointensity was recognized at immedeately adjacent to the hematoma on long SE images. In the chronic stage, hematomas were hypointense on both IR and long SE images. In a few cases, the central portion of hematomas demonstrated hyperintensity on long SE images which indicated the presence of fluid in the old hematoma cavity. (author)

  11. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Transconjunctival drainage of serous and hemorrhagic choroidal detachment.

    Rezende, Flávio A; Kickinger, Mônica C; Li, Gisèle; Prado, Renata F; Regis, Luiz Gustavo T

    2012-02-01

    To describe a novel surgical technique for drainage of bullous serous and hemorrhagic choroidal detachments. A prospective, consecutive case series of 6 eyes with serous and/or hemorrhagic choroidal detachments secondary to intraocular surgery was documented to evaluate the feasibility of using the 25-gauge and 20-gauge transconjunctival trocar/cannula systems to drain choroidal detachments. Two eyes had expulsive hemorrhagic choroidal detachments and 4 eyes had serous choroidal detachments after glaucoma surgeries. A 25-gauge infusion line was placed in the anterior chamber. A 20-gauge (in eyes with hemorrhagic choroidal detachments) or a 25-gauge (in eyes with serous detachments) trocar/cannula system was inserted into the suprachoroidal space 7.0 mm from limbus. After drainage, the cannulas were removed and no sutures were placed. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed only in eyes with concomitant pathology that demanded the additional procedure. The primary outcome measure was presence of choroidal detachment at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 1 month postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures were visual acuity at 6 months and intraocular pressure at 1 week and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Drainage of hemorrhagic choroidal detachments resulted in resolution of the detachments by 1 month postoperatively. In eyes with serous detachments, resolution was achieved by 1 week postdrainage. In both groups, intraocular pressure increased to at least 10 mmHg by postoperative Week 1. The visual acuity improved in all eyes. No complications related to the transconjunctival technique were noted. Transconjunctival drainage of serous and hemorrhagic choroidal detachments seems to be a feasible and simple surgical option with minimal scleral and conjunctival damage. Pars plana vitrectomy may not be necessary when draining choroidal detachments in this manner.

  13. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera

    Shruti Bhandari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency.

  14. Presentation of moyamoya disease with occipital hemorrhage: a case report

    Serkan Demir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular disease which is characterized with stenosis and occlusions at the distal part of internal carotid artery and at the proximal part of anterior and middle cerebral arteries. It rarely causes temporary or recurrent hemiparesis due to intracranial hemorrhage while symptoms like headache, convulsion, nystagmus, aphasia and ataxia may also occur. In this paper, we present a case of Moyamoya disease which was diagnosed with a 23 year old female patient who was admitted to our emergency department with headache, nausea and vomiting complaints and whose radiological findings showed occipital lobe hemorrhage.

  15. ''Intraventricular'' hemorrhage and cystic periventricular leukomalacia in preterm infants: how are they related?

    Kusters, C.D.J.; Chen, M.L.; Follett, P.L.; Dammann, O.

    2009-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage and cystic periventricular leukomalacia are often co-occurring characteristics of brain damage in preterm infants. Using data from 1016 infants born before 30 completed weeks' gestational age, we sought to clarify the relationship between severe intraventricular

  16. Complications of acucise endopyelotomy.

    Kim, F J; Herrell, S D; Jahoda, A E; Albala, D M

    1998-10-01

    Endoscopic management of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction has a success rate of 80% to 86%. We have been performing a ureteral cutting balloon procedure under fluoroscopic control (Acucise endopyelotomy) for UPJ obstruction at Loyola University Medical Center since 1991. The overall success rate in 77 patients was 78%. All patients had a preoperative intravenous urogram or a retrograde pyelogram, but none had vascular imaging studies. Acucise endopyelotomy consisted of a posterolateral incision of the UPJ and placement of an endopyelotomy or double-J stent. Foley catheter placement at the end of the procedure demonstrated significant gross hematuria in three patients (4%). All three remained hemodynamically stable but with significant drops in postprocedure hemoglobin levels, which necessitated blood transfusion. Aggressive management included angiographic studies and embolization of lower-pole branching arteries in two patients (3%). One patient stopped bleeding after being given two units of blood. None of the patients required an open exploratory procedure. Although the risk of vascular injury is low with Acucise endopyelotomy, prolonged postoperative gross hematuria does mandate investigation and observation. Angiographic embolization appears to be the therapeutic modality of choice for patients with hemorrhagic complications after an Acucise endopyelotomy.

  17. Determinants of myocardial hemorrhage after coronary reperfusion in the anesthetized dog

    Higginson, L.A.J.; White, F.; Heggtveit, H.A.; Sanders, T.M.; Bloor, C.M.; Covell, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Intramyocardial hemorrhage often occurs with reperfusion in experimental acute myocardial infarction and is thought to be associated with extension of necrosis. To determine if hemorrhage was associated with extension of necrosis, 10 anesthetized dogs were reperfused after 6 hours of circumflex coronary artery occlusion and 10 others had control occlusion with no reperfusion. Fifteen of the 20 reperfused dogs had gross hemorrhage and none of the control dogs did. In 12 reperfused and 10 control dogs, radioactive microspheres were injected after coronary occlusion to quantitate collateral flow and in the reperfusion group microspheres were injected to quantitate reflow. Complete flow data were available in eight reperfused and 10 analyzed for hemorrhage, collateral flow and creatine kinase activity. Serial microscopic examination was performed in eight additional dogs reperfused after 6 hours to determine if hemorrhage occurs into otherwise microscopically normal myocardium. Pathologic examination indicatd that hemorrhage did not occur into otherwise microscopically normal myocardium. These studies indicate that hemorrhage or reperfusion is associated with severe myocardial necrosis and markedly depressed flow before reperfusion and this occurs only into myocardium already markedly compromised at the time of reperfusion

  18. Relation between reperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke

    Horsch, Alexander D. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Niesten, Joris M.; Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Utrecht Stroke Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: DUST investigators

    2015-12-15

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) is given in acute ischemic stroke patients to achieve reperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a serious complication of IV-rtPA treatment and related to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. It is unclear whether HT occurs secondary to reperfusion in combination with ischemic BBB injury or is caused by the negative effect of IV-rtPA on BBB integrity. The aim of this study was to establish the association between reperfusion and the occurrence of HT. From the DUST study, patients were selected with admission and follow-up non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging, and a perfusion deficit in the middle cerebral artery territory on admission. Reperfusion was categorized qualitatively as reperfusion or no-reperfusion by visual comparison of admission and follow-up CTP. Occurrence of HT was assessed on follow-up NCCT. The association between reperfusion and occurrence of HT on follow-up was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) with additional stratification for IV-rtPA treatment. Inclusion criteria were met in 299 patients. There was no significant association between reperfusion and HT (OR 1.2 95%CI 0.5-3.1). In patients treated with IV-rtPA (n = 203), the OR was 1.3 (95%CI 0.4-4.0), and in patients not treated with IV-rtPA (n = 96), the OR was 0.8 (95%CI 0.1-4.5). HT occurred in 14 % of the IV-rtPA patients and in 7 % of patients without IV-rtPA (95%CI of difference -1 to 14 %). Our results suggest that the increased risk of HT after acute ischemic stroke treatment is not dependent on the reperfusion status. (orig.)

  19. Effectiveness of therapeutic barium enema for diverticular hemorrhage.

    Matsuura, Mizue; Inamori, Masahiko; Nakajima, Atsushi; Komiya, Yasuhiko; Inoh, Yumi; Kawasima, Keigo; Naitoh, Mai; Fujita, Yuji; Eduka, Akiko; Kanazawa, Noriyoshi; Uchiyama, Shiori; Tani, Rie; Kawana, Kennichi; Ohtani, Setsuya; Nagase, Hajime

    2015-05-14

    To evaluate the effectiveness of barium impaction therapy for patients with colonic diverticular bleeding. We reviewed the clinical charts of patients in whom therapeutic barium enema was performed for the control of diverticular bleeding between August 2010 and March 2012 at Yokohama Rosai Hospital. Twenty patients were included in the review, consisting of 14 men and 6 women. The median age of the patients was 73.5 years. The duration of the follow-up period ranged from 1 to 19 mo (median: 9.8 mo). Among the 20 patients were 11 patients who required the procedure for re-bleeding during hospitalization, 6 patients who required it for re-bleeding that developed after the patient left the hospital, and 3 patients who required the procedure for the prevention of re-bleeding. Barium (concentration: 150 w%/v%) was administered per the rectum, and the leading edge of the contrast medium was followed up to the cecum by fluoroscopy. After confirmation that the ascending colon and cecum were filled with barium, the enema tube was withdrawn, and the patient's position was changed every 20 min for 3 h. Twelve patients remained free of re-bleeding during the follow-up period (range: 1-19 mo) after the therapeutic barium enema, including 9 men and 3 women with a median age of 72.0 years. Re-bleeding occurred in 8 patients including 5 men and 3 women with a median age of 68.5 years: 4 developed early re-bleeding, defined as re-bleeding that occurs within one week after the procedure, and the remaining 4 developed late re-bleeding. The DFI (disease-free interval) decreased 0.4 for 12 mo. Only one patient developed a complication from therapeutic barium enema (colonic perforation). Therapeutic barium enema is effective for the control of diverticular hemorrhage in cases where the active bleeding site cannot be identified by colonoscopy.

  20. Role of avastin on the incidence of post-operative vitreous hemorrhage after vitrectomy in diabetic vitreous hemorrhage

    Ahmed, N.; Shaheer, M.; Tahir, M.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common cause of legal blindness. Five to 10% of diabetic patients suffer from the proliferative diabetic retinopathy which includes the formation of new vessels on the retina and optic disc which can be complicated as vitreous hemorrhage and tractional retinal detachment. Pars plana vitrectomy along with laser photocoagulation is being used for the management of vitreous hemorrhage. In our study we used injection avastin one week before surgery to see its role on the incidence of rebleed after vitrectomy in diabetic vitreous hemorrhage. Materials and Methods; Fifty patients were divided into 2 equal groups on the basis of simple random sampling. 25 patients in Group I were operated with routine pars plana vitrectomy with endolaser photo- coagulation while in Group II all the 25 patients were given injection avastin intra-vitreally one week before surgery. Evaluation was done on the first post operative day, first follow up visit (one week) and after one month to see the incidence of re-bleed. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Fifty patients divided into two groups. In Group I, 3 patients had recurrent vitreous hemorrhage on first post-operative day, 3 patients had re-bleed on first follow up visit, and only 2 patients had re-bleed after one month. In Group II, none of the patients had recurrent vitreous hemorrhage on first post-operative day and on first follow-up visit (one week) while 2 patients had re-bleed after one month. Conclusion: Injection intravitreal Avastin (Bevaci- zumab) one week before surgery significantly reduces the risk of vitreous hemorrhage after vitrectomy in diabetic patients. (author)

  1. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever: novel biomarker correlates of clinical outcome.

    McElroy, Anita K; Erickson, Bobbie R; Flietstra, Timothy D; Rollin, Pierre E; Nichol, Stuart T; Towner, Jonathan S; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2014-08-15

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) outbreaks occur sporadically in Africa and result in high rates of death. The 2000-2001 outbreak of Sudan virus-associated EHF in the Gulu district of Uganda led to 425 cases, of which 216 were laboratory confirmed, making it the largest EHF outbreak on record. Serum specimens from this outbreak had been preserved in liquid nitrogen from the time of collection and were available for analysis. Available samples were tested using a series of multiplex assays to measure the concentrations of 55 biomarkers. The data were analyzed to identify statistically significant associations between the tested biomarkers and hemorrhagic manifestations, viremia, and/or death. Death, hemorrhage, and viremia were independently associated with elevated levels of several chemokines and cytokines. Death and hemorrhage were associated with elevated thrombomodulin and ferritin levels. Hemorrhage was also associated with elevated levels of soluble intracellular adhesion molecule. Viremia was independently associated with elevated levels of tissue factor and tissue plasminogen activator. Finally, samples from nonfatal cases had higher levels of sCD40L. These novel associations provide a better understanding of EHF pathophysiology and a starting point for researching new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Intracranial hemorrhage: principles of CT and MRI interpretation

    Parizel, P.M.; Makkat, S.; Miert, E. van; Goethem, J.W. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Schepper, A.M. de

    2001-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage represents a frequent challenge for the practicing radiologist. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a synoptic overview of the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, using text, tables, and figures to illustrate time-dependent changes. We examine the underlying physical, biological, and biochemical factors of evolving hematoma and correlate them with the aspect on cross-sectional imaging techniques. On CT scanning, the appearance of intracranial blood is determined by density changes which occur over time, reflecting clot formation, clot retraction, clot lysis and, eventually, tissue loss. However, MRI has become the technique of choice for assessing the age of an intracranial hemorrhage. On MRI the signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage is much more complex and is influenced by multiple variables including: (a) age, location, and size of the lesion; (b) technical factors (e.g., sequence type and parameters, field strength); and (c) biological factors (e.g., pO2, arterial vs venous origin, tissue pH, protein concentration, presence of a blood-brain barrier, condition of the patient). We discuss the intrinsic magnetic properties of sequential hemoglobin degradation products. The differences in evolution between extra- and intracerebral hemorrhages are addressed and illustrated. (orig.)

  3. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  4. Neuromuscular complications of thyrotoxicosis.

    Kung, Annie W C

    2007-11-01

    Thyroid hormones exert multiple effects on the neuromuscular system and the brain, with the most important being their role in stimulating the development and differentiation of the neuromuscular system and brain in foetal and neonatal life. In the presence of hyperthyroidism, muscular and neurological symptoms may be the presenting clinical features of the disease. The frequency and severity of neuromuscular complications vary considerably and are probably related to the degree of hyperthyroidism, although in some patients the neuromuscular dysfunction is caused by associated disorders rather than by hyperthyroidism per se. This update focuses on the most common neurological and muscular disorders that occur in patients with thyrotoxicosis. It is beyond the scope of this paper to discuss thyroid eye disease and cardiac complications, in themselves separate complications of specific myocytes.

  5. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Harrer, J. [Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Cesak, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Herman, A. [1. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  6. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A.; Harrer, J.; Cesak, T.; Herman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  7. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Complicated infective endocarditis: a case series.

    Kim, Joo Seop; Kang, Min-Kyung; Cho, A Jin; Seo, Yu Bin; Kim, Kun Il

    2017-05-08

    Infective endocarditis is associated with not only cardiac complications but also neurologic, renal, musculoskeletal, and systemic complications related to the infection, such as embolization, metastatic infection, and mycotic aneurysm. We report three cases (the first patient is Chinese and the other two are Koreans) of complicated infective endocarditis; two of the cases were associated with a mycotic aneurysm, and one case was associated with a splenic abscess. One case of a patient with prosthetic valve endocarditis was complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage caused by mycotic aneurysm rupture. A second case of a patient with right-sided valve endocarditis associated with a central catheter was complicated by an abdominal aortic mycotic aneurysm. The third patient had a splenic infarction and abscess associated with infected cardiac thrombi. Complicated infective endocarditis is rare and is associated with cardiac, neurologic, renal, musculoskeletal, and systemic complications related to infection, such as embolization, metastatic infection, and mycotic aneurysm. Infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is more frequently associated with complications. Because the mortality rate increases when complications develop, aggressive antibiotic therapy and surgery, combined with specific treatments for the complications, are necessary.

  9. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of emergency transcatheter arterial embolization in intractable postpartum hemorrhage

    Qi Weihong; Wang Song; Zhan Ying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of emergency transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of intractable postpartum hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty-five patients with intractable postpartum hemorrhage were undertaken superselective catheterization into the bilateral internal iliac arteries or uterial arteries to find the causes and sites of bleeding through DSA and then followed by arterial embolization with gelfoam particles. Result: All of the 25 patients with obstetrical bleeding were successfully controlled by TAE, the procedure lasted for 25-60 min, (mean 42.5 ± 4.6 min); with both catheterization and bleeding halt successful rates of 100%. Comparison of hemoglobin and heartbeat before and after the procedure showed significance (t=29.49, P<0.01; t=16.51, P<0.01). The uterus showed reintegration on time and menstruation resumed in all patients. Conclusions: Emergency arterial embolization is a safe and effective means for control of intractable postpartum hemorrhage, providing less trauma and no severe complications, especially as an unique management for fetal postpartum hemorrhage. (authors)

  11. Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelets, Severe Fetal Growth Restriction, Postpartum Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, and Craniotomy: A Rare Case Report and Systematic Review

    Shadi Rezai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome is a relatively uncommon but traumatic condition occurring in the later stage of pregnancy as a complication of severe preeclampsia or eclampsia. Prompt brain computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and a multidisciplinary management approach are required to improve perinatal outcome. Case. A 37-year-old, Gravida 6, Para 1-0-4-1, Hispanic female with a history of chronic hypertension presented at 26 weeks and 6 days of gestational age. She was noted to have hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome accompanied by fetal growth restriction (FGR, during ultrasound evaluation, warranting premature delivery. The infant was delivered in stable condition suffering no permanent neurological deficit. Conclusion. HELLP syndrome is an uncommon and traumatic obstetric event which can lead to neurological deficits if not managed in a responsive and rapid manner. The central aggravating factor seems to be hypertension induced preeclamptic or eclamptic episode and complications thereof. The syndrome itself is manifested by hemolytic anemia, increased liver enzymes, and decreasing platelet counts with a majority of neurological defects resulting from hemorrhagic stroke or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. To minimize adverse perinatal outcomes, obstetric management of this medical complication must include rapid clinical assessment, diagnostic examination, and neurosurgery consultation.

  12. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    Neal Carlin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser.

  13. Vascular complications following 1500 consecutive living and cadaveric donor renal transplantations: A single center study

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Salahi, Heshmatollah; Jalaeian, Hamed; Bahador, Ali; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Barzideh, Ehsan; Ariafar, Ali; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document vascular complications that occurred following cadaveric and living donor kidney transplants in order to assess the overall incidence of these complications at our center as well as to identify possible risk factors. In a retrospective cohort study, 1500 consecutive renal transplant recipients who received a living or cadaveric donor kidney between December 1988 and July 2006 were evaluated. The study was performed at the Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. The assessment of the anatomy and number of renal arteries as well as the incidence of vascular complications was made by color doppler ultrasonography, angiography, and/or surgical exploration. Clinically apparent vascular complications were seen in 8.86% of all study patients (n = 133) with the most frequent being hemorrhage (n = 91; 6.1%) followed by allograft renal artery stenosis (n = 26; 1.7%), renal artery thrombosis (n = 9; 0.6%), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 7; 0.5%). Vascular complications were more frequent in recipients of cadaveric organs than recipients of allografts from living donors (12.5% vs. 7.97%; P0.017). The occurrence of vascular complications was significantly more frequent among recipients of renal allografts with multiple arteries when compared with recipients of kidneys with single artery (12.3% vs. 8.2%; P0.033). The same was true to venous complications as well (25.4% vs. 8.2%; P< 0.001). Our study shows that vascular complications were more frequent in allografts with multiple renal blood vessels. Also, the complications were much less frequent in recipients of living donor transplants. (author)

  14. Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    Afshan B. Hameed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman with a mechanical prosthetic mitral valve was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin in the first trimester followed by warfarin until 36 weeks' gestation. She was then switched to intravenous unfractionated heparin infusion to allow for regional anesthesia in anticipation of vaginal delivery. She developed severe headache on hospital day 2 that was refractory to pain medications. Cranial imaging demonstrated a large subdural hematoma with midline shift. She delivered a healthy baby girl by cesarean section. Eventually, symptoms and intracranial abnormalities resolved over time. In conclusion, subdural hematoma is a relatively rare complication that requires multidisciplinary management plan.

  15. Spontaneous Atraumatic Mediastinal Hemorrhage

    Morkos Iskander BSc, BMBS, MRCS, PGCertMedEd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atraumatic mediastinal hematomas are rare. We present a case of a previously fit and well middle-aged lady who presented with acute breathlessness and an increasing neck swelling and spontaneous neck bruising. On plain chest radiograph, widening of the mediastinum was noted. The bruising was later confirmed to be secondary to mediastinal hematoma. This life-threatening diagnostic conundrum was managed conservatively with a multidisciplinary team approach involving upper gastrointestinal and thoracic surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiologists, intensivists, and hematologists along with a variety of diagnostic modalities. A review of literature is also presented to help surgeons manage such challenging and complicated cases.

  16. Spontaneous non aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bian Jieyong; Wang Zhong; Zhou Dai

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the etiology and the treatment of spontaneous non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty five cases of cerebral vessel angiography negative patients were analysed retrospectively, the majority of them had been undergone CT, DSA, MRI examination in order to define the etiological factor. Results: Among them, there was 1 case of spinal arteria-vena malformation, 1 case of hemorrhagic blood and 2 cases according to the revealing of MRI could be explained as bled vascular-occult malformation or cavernous angioma. Conclusion: The management and prognosis of patients in whom non-aneurysm is founded on the initial angiogram depends on the pattern of hemorrhage of the initial CT scanning, repeated angiography should be avoided for the case of premise encephalic non-aneurysmal SAH and MRI examination may be indicated to defining of etiological factors

  17. Endovascular Management of Patients with Head and Neck Cancers Presenting with Acute Hemorrhage: A Single-Center Retrospective Study

    Vilas Boas, P. P.; Castro-Afonso, L. H. de; Monsignore, L. M.; Nakiri, G. S. [University of São Paulo, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil); Mello-Filho, F. V. de [University of São Paulo, Department of Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil); Abud, D. G., E-mail: dgabud@fmrp.usp.br [University of São Paulo, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    PurposeAcute hemorrhage associated with cancers of the head and neck is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate action. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endovascular embolization for acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers.Materials and MethodsData were retrospectively collected from patients with head and neck cancers who underwent endovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage. The primary endpoint was the rate of immediate control of hemorrhage during the first 24 h after embolization. The secondary endpoints were technical or clinical complications, rate of re-hemorrhage 24 h after the procedure, time from embolization to re-hemorrhage, hospitalization time, mortality rate, and time from embolization to death.ResultsFifty-one patients underwent endovascular embolization. The primary endpoint was achieved in 94% of patients. The rate of technical complications was 5.8%, and no clinical complication was observed. Twelve patients (23.5%) had hemorrhage recurrence after an average time of 127.5 days. The average hospitalization time was 7.4 days, the mortality rate during the follow-up period was 66.6%, and the average time from embolization to death was 132.5 days.ConclusionEndovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers is a safe and effective method for the immediate control of hemorrhage and results in a high rate of hemorrhage control. Larger studies are necessary to determine which treatment strategy is best for improving patient outcomes.

  18. Endovascular Management of Patients with Head and Neck Cancers Presenting with Acute Hemorrhage: A Single-Center Retrospective Study

    Vilas Boas, P. P.; Castro-Afonso, L. H. de; Monsignore, L. M.; Nakiri, G. S.; Mello-Filho, F. V. de; Abud, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    PurposeAcute hemorrhage associated with cancers of the head and neck is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate action. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endovascular embolization for acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers.Materials and MethodsData were retrospectively collected from patients with head and neck cancers who underwent endovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage. The primary endpoint was the rate of immediate control of hemorrhage during the first 24 h after embolization. The secondary endpoints were technical or clinical complications, rate of re-hemorrhage 24 h after the procedure, time from embolization to re-hemorrhage, hospitalization time, mortality rate, and time from embolization to death.ResultsFifty-one patients underwent endovascular embolization. The primary endpoint was achieved in 94% of patients. The rate of technical complications was 5.8%, and no clinical complication was observed. Twelve patients (23.5%) had hemorrhage recurrence after an average time of 127.5 days. The average hospitalization time was 7.4 days, the mortality rate during the follow-up period was 66.6%, and the average time from embolization to death was 132.5 days.ConclusionEndovascular embolization to treat acute hemorrhage in patients with head and neck cancers is a safe and effective method for the immediate control of hemorrhage and results in a high rate of hemorrhage control. Larger studies are necessary to determine which treatment strategy is best for improving patient outcomes.

  19. Hemorrhagic myocardial infarction after reperfusion detected by X-ray CT

    Tamura, Tsutomu; Toyoki, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Tomoko

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether computed tomography (CT) can detect hemorrhagic infarction occurring after intracoronary thrombolytic therapy (ICT) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In an experimental study, 12 dogs underwent 2-4 h of left anterior descending artery (LAD) occlusion, followed by reperfusion, and infusion of contrast material into the LAD. After CT examination, the heart was cut into transverse sections. A good correlation was obtained between the CT-enhanced area and the hemorrhagic area in the sliced heart section (r=0.895, p 0.1). The SPECT defect areas were consistently smaller than the CT enhancement areas. These results indicate that CT can detect hemorrhage into the myocardium after ICT, and that after ICT half the AMI patients showed hemorrhagic infarction. However, hemorrhage did not cause complete deterioration of the myocardium. (author)

  20. FLAIR images of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Mikami, Takeshi; Saito, Koji; Okuyama, Tohru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira; Shibata, Kazunori [Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We studied MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences in 37 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by aneurysmal rupture. FLAIR sequence suppressed the CSF signal and produced very heavy T{sub 2} weighted images. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be demonstrated as high signal intensity on FLAIR sequences in all patients clear visualization of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be obtained by MR FLAIR sequences in not only Fisher`s group 3 or 4, but also Fisher`s group 2. Moreover it was suited for the detection of intraaxial hematoma, Sylvian hematoma, subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the posterior fossa and interhemispheric fissure. Especially, it was useful for detecting intraventricular hemorrhage. Therefore, if patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage present slight headache or atypical symptoms, sometimes it may be more suitable to perform MRI FLAIR pulse sequences first. Aneurysms were found in 21 cases (56.8%). When the aneurysmal size is more than 7 mm, the rate of detection becomes 100%. Aneurysms present various MR appearances because of flow characteristics. Aneurysms were demonstrated as low signal intensity except in 3 cases. In one out of 3 cases, aneurysms were revealed as high signal intensity and in the other two cases, it was revealed as mixed signal intensity. According to the previous studies, rapid flow was demonstrated as low signal intensity by vascular flow void, and delayed flow was demonstrated as high or mixed signal intensity by flow related enhancement and even echo rephasing. MR clearly delineates the size, the lumen, the flow, and the extraaxial location of aneurysms. (K.H.)

  1. Rodent neonatal germinal matrix hemorrhage mimics the human brain injury, neurological consequences, and post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

    Lekic, Tim; Manaenko, Anatol; Rolland, William; Krafft, Paul R; Peters, Regina; Hartman, Richard E; Altay, Orhan; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2012-07-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most common neurological disease of premature newborns. GMH causes neurological sequelae such as cerebral palsy, post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, and mental retardation. Despite this, there is no standardized animal model of spontaneous GMH using newborn rats to depict the condition. We asked whether stereotactic injection of collagenase type VII (0.3 U) into the ganglionic eminence of neonatal rats would reproduce the acute brain injury, gliosis, hydrocephalus, periventricular leukomalacia, and attendant neurological consequences found in humans. To test this hypothesis, we used our neonatal rat model of collagenase-induced GMH in P7 pups, and found that the levels of free-radical adducts (nitrotyrosine and 4-hyroxynonenal), proliferation (mammalian target of rapamycin), inflammation (COX-2), blood components (hemoglobin and thrombin), and gliosis (vitronectin and GFAP) were higher in the forebrain of GMH pups, than in controls. Neurobehavioral testing showed that pups with GMH had developmental delay, and the juvenile animals had significant cognitive and motor disability, suggesting clinical relevance of the model. There was also evidence of white-matter reduction, ventricular dilation, and brain atrophy in the GMH animals. This study highlights an instructive animal model of the neurological consequences after germinal matrix hemorrhage, with evidence of brain injuries that can be used to evaluate strategies in the prevention and treatment of post-hemorrhagic complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanisms of Vascular Damage by Hemorrhagic Snake Venom Metalloproteinases: Tissue Distribution and In Situ Hydrolysis

    Baldo, Cristiani; Jamora, Colin; Yamanouye, Norma; Zorn, Telma M.; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Envenoming by viper snakes constitutes an important public health problem in Brazil and other developing countries. Local hemorrhage is an important symptom of these accidents and is correlated with the action of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The degradation of vascular basement membrane has been proposed as a key event for the capillary vessel disruption. However, SVMPs that present similar catalytic activity towards extracellular matrix proteins differ in their hemorrhagic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms might be contributing to the accumulation of SVMPs at the snakebite area allowing capillary disruption. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we compared the tissue distribution and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins induced by jararhagin (highly hemorrhagic SVMP) and BnP1 (weakly hemorrhagic SVMP) using the mouse skin as experimental model. Jararhagin induced strong hemorrhage accompanied by hydrolysis of collagen fibers in the hypodermis and a marked degradation of type IV collagen at the vascular basement membrane. In contrast, BnP1 induced only a mild hemorrhage and did not disrupt collagen fibers or type IV collagen. Injection of Alexa488-labeled jararhagin revealed fluorescent staining around capillary vessels and co-localization with basement membrane type IV collagen. The same distribution pattern was detected with jararhagin-C (disintegrin-like/cysteine-rich domains of jararhagin). In opposition, BnP1 did not accumulate in the tissues. Conclusions/Significance These results show a particular tissue distribution of hemorrhagic toxins accumulating at the basement membrane. This probably occurs through binding to collagens, which are drastically hydrolyzed at the sites of hemorrhagic lesions. Toxin accumulation near blood vessels explains enhanced catalysis of basement membrane components, resulting in the strong hemorrhagic activity of SVMPs. This is a novel mechanism that underlies the difference between

  3. Recurrent encephalic hemorrhage associated with cocaine abuse

    Pumar, J.; Otero, E.; Castineira, A.; Arrojo, L.; Linares, M.; Castineira, J.A.; Vidal, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage secondary to cocaine abuse in a patient with no other predisposing factors. The hemorrhages were located both supra- and infratentorially. (orig.)

  4. PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    A. M. Gasanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we report the incidence and etiology of pulmonary hemorrhage, and modern classifications according to the literature data. Methods of endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hemorrhage are analyzed.

  5. Pleural liquid during hemorrhagic hypotension.

    Tresoldi, Claudio; Porta, Cristina; Zocchi, Luciano; Agostoni, Emilio

    2007-02-15

    The effect of approximately 25% or 35% blood loss (b.l.) on volume, pressure, and protein concentration of pleural liquid has been determined in anesthetized rabbits in lateral or supine posture. Volume and pressure of pleural liquid did not change with 25% b.l. 30 and 60 min after beginning of hemorrhage, and with 35% b.l. at 30 min (bleeding time approximately 10 and 12 min, respectively). With 35% b.l. protein concentration of pleural liquid was 85% greater (PPleural liquid seems protected against derangements from hemorrhage up to 25% b.l. for periods shorter than 1 h.

  6. [Carbetocin use to prevent obstetric hemorrhage].

    Posadas Robledo, Francisco Javier

    2011-07-01

    in Mexico, obstetric hemorrhage and its complications are the second leading cause of maternal death and is the origin of irreversible functional consequences. Carbetocin is a synthetic analogue of oxytocin with an average lifespan four times that of oxytocin and pharmacological effects of 120 minutes produces a tonic contraction which reduces postpartum blood loss. To evaluate the usefulness of carbetocin to prevent uterine bleeding complications and maternal deaths and assess the benefits, effectiveness and side effects. Prospective, observational clinical research in two phases, the first from May 2005 to January 2006 with a sample of 40 patients and the second from January to December of 2008 with a sample of 72 patients conducted at the Hospital Materno Infantil Dr. Alberto López Hermosa, San Luis Potosi. All were high-risk pregnancies and medical complications that warranted specialty hospital management. The intervention consisted of applying undiluted single dose of 100 micrograms of intravenous carbetocin at the time of delivery, as prophylaxis in patients with uterine overdistention in the first phase of the study and complicated pregnancies in the second phase. Were born by caesarean section over 60%. Initially, the hemoglobin showed a reduction of 17% after delivery. Seven patients required blood transfusion (17.5%). In the second phase, 65 patients (90%) did not require transfusion, only 6 patients (8%) required transfusion. No side effects were documented. Uterine overdistension was the main risk factor for bleeding and transfusion. Carbetocin combines the safety of oxytocin and the strength of the ergonovine preparations. To determine where carbetocin will be situated in the future as an useful oxytocic, it requires more than a simple demonstration of its effectiveness. This should be determined in each clinical situation, with factors such as overdistended uterus, indicating the convenience and economic constraints.

  7. Investigation on the clinical practice of transcatheter embolization for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Gao Bin; Xu Shengde; Cheng Bing; Peng Qiong; Hong Ci; Xu Guozhong; Wang Tao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the tactics, methods and relevant factors of transcatheter embolization for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Methods: Fifteen patients with acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage were embolized by one of the methods of Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA), gelfoam or metal coils. Four of the fifteen patients were upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, the other cases were lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage which were embolized using coaxial microcatheter. Results: Fourteen of the fifteen patients were treated successfully by these methods. There were total 17 times of embolization for 16 parts, the success rate reached 94. 1%. The other one revealed an infarction of intestine after the embolization and was cured by resection. One of the fifteen patients appeared a recurrent hemorrhage 3 months later, and confirmed to be a hemangiolymphangioma. Two patients with malignant tumor were operated upon selectively. The other patient of intestinal hemorrhage was embolized successfully by using a metal coil after shock. Leiomyoma complicated with large area of bleeding was finally proven by operation. Conclusions: Transcatheter embolization for acute massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage is safe and efficient under different choice of methods. The key of success is the right selection of embolized target artery and dosage of emboli

  8. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  9. [Emerging diseases. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Kuljić-Kapulica, Nada

    2004-01-01

    Recognized for many years in central Asia and Eastern Europe, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a severe zoonotic disease which affects people coming into contact with livestock or ticks. The range of the CCHF virus is now known to extend form central Asia to India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and to most of Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa. CCHF virus is a member of the Bunyavirus family, and is classified as a Nairovirus. After an incubation period of approximately 3 to 6 days the abrupt onset of acute febrile illness occurs. The first symptoms are similar to severe influenza and include fever, headache, severe back and abdominal pain. The hemorrhagic fever manifestations occur after several days of illnesses and include petechial rash, ecchymoses, hematemmesis, and melenna. Cases typically present with some form of hepatitis. The mortality rate is 10-50% in different outbreaks with deaths typically occurring during the second week of illness. The genus Hyalomma of ixodid ticks is the most important vector of the CCHF virus. Vertebrates including birds and small animals provide excellent amplifier hosts of both the virus and the tick. The virus can be transmitted to humans by direct contact with infected animals and from person to person. Early diagnosis is possible in special laboratories using antigen detection by imunofluorescence or ELISA tests or molecular methods as PCR and antibody detection. Tick control measures need to be emphasized and utilized to prevent CCHF. This includes spraying camp sites, clothing and danger areas with acaricides or repellent. Strict isolation of patients with CCHF and a focus on barrier nursing would help to prevent nosocomial spread. Presently the vaccine is a dangerous mouse brain-derived version. Future development of a vaccine would help to prevent human infection.

  10. Antifibrinolytic treatment in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Vermeulen, M.; Lindsay, K. W.; Murray, G. D.; Cheah, F.; Hijdra, A.; Muizelaar, J. P.; Schannong, M.; Teasdale, G. M.; van Crevel, H.; van Gijn, J.

    1984-01-01

    We enrolled 479 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether treatment with the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid improves outcome by preventing rebleeding. At three months there was no statistical difference

  11. Reducing postpartum hemorrhage in Africa

    Lazarus, Jeff; Lalonde, A

    2005-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. This is being addressed by leading professional organizations, which point to the importance of a skilled attendant at birth. But they also emphasize that the active management of the third stage of labor...

  12. Rebleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Astrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms leading to rebleeding and the prevention of rebleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: A literature search was performed to investigate factors associated with rebleeding after SAH. RESULTS: The review of the literature...

  13. Risk factors for reported obstetric complications and near misses in rural northwest Bangladesh: analysis from a prospective cohort study.

    Sikder, Shegufta S; Labrique, Alain B; Shamim, Abu A; Ali, Hasmot; Mehra, Sucheta; Wu, Lee; Shaikh, Saijuddin; West, Keith P; Christian, Parul

    2014-10-04

    In rural Bangladesh, more than 75% of all births occur at home in the absence of skilled birth attendants. Population-based data are lacking on the burden and risk factors for obstetric complications in settings with low rates of institutional delivery. We sought to describe the prevalence of reported complications and to analyze risk factors for obstetric complications and near misses, using data from a representative, rural setting of Bangladesh. This study utilized existing data on 42,214 pregnant women enrolled in a micronutrient supplementation cohort trial between 2007 and 2011 in rural northwest Bangladesh. Based on self-report of complications, women were categorized as having obstetric complications, near misses, or non-complicated pregnancies using definitions modified from the World Health Organization. Multivariable multinomial regression was used to analyze the association of biological, socioeconomic, and psychosocial variables with obstetric complications or near misses. Of enrolled women, 25% (n = 10,380) were classified as having at least one obstetric complication, 2% (n = 1,004) with reported near misses, and 73% (n = 30,830) with non-complicated pregnancies. Twelve percent (n = 5,232) reported hemorrhage and 8% (n = 3,259) reported sepsis. Of the 27,241 women with live births or stillbirths, 11% (n = 2,950) reported obstructed labor and 1% (n = 328) reported eclampsia. Biological risk factors including women's age less than 18 years (Relative Risk Ratio [RRR] 1.26 95%CI:1.14-1.39) and greater than 35 years (RRR 1.23 95%CI:1.09-1.38), history of stillbirth or miscarriage (RRR 1.15 95%CI:1.07-1.22), and nulliparity (RRR 1.16 95%CI:1.02-1.29) significantly increased the risk of obstetric complications. Neither partner wanting the pregnancy increased the risk of obstetric complications (RRR 1.33 95%CI:1.20-1.46). Mid-upper arm circumference <21.5 cm increased the risk of hemorrhage and sepsis. These analyses indicate a high burden of obstetric

  14. Chest complication after abdominal surgery

    Koh, B. H.; Choi, J. Y.; Hahm, C. K.; Kang, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of many advances in medicine, anesthetic technique and surgical managements, pulmonary problems are the most frequent postoperative complications, particularly after abdominal surgery. As postoperative pulmonary complications, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, chronic bronchitis and lung abscess can be occurred. This study include evaluation of chest films of 2006 patients (927 male, 1079 female), who had been operated abdominal surgery from Jan. 1979 to June, 1980 in the Hanyang university hospital. The results were as follows: 1. 70 cases out of total 2006 cases (3.5%) developed postoperative chest complications, 51 cases (5.5%) in male, 19 cases (1.8%) in female. 2. The complication rate was increased according to the increase of age. The incidence of the postoperative complications over 40 years of age was higher than the overall average complications rate. 3. The most common postoperative pulmonary complication was pleural effusion, next pneumonia, atelectasis and pulmonary edema respectively. 4. The complication rate of the group of upper abdominal surgery is much higher than the group of lower abdominal surgery. 5. Complication rate was increased according to increase of the duration of operation. 6. There were significant correlations between the operation site and side of the complicated hemithorax

  15. Computed tomography in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Lee, Seung Ro; Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung; Sim, Bo Sung

    1981-01-01

    Computed Tomography has become increasingly important diagnostic method as the initial examination in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage with direct detection of extravasated blood in basal cistern and cortical sulci. Furthermore, CT provides better and exact visualization of the presence, localization, extent and degree of intracerebral, intraventricular and subdural hemorrhage, infarction, hydrocephalus and rebleeding which may be associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and also could detect the causative lesions with contrast enhancement in many cases. The purpose of the paper is to describe the CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to various causes and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Authors analysed a total of 153 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage confirmed by lumbar puncture at Seoul National University Hospital from March 1979 to April 1981, with special emphasis on CT findings. All of the cases took CT scan and 125 cases of them angiography. The results are as follows: 1. Most prevalent age group was 4th to 6th decades (78%). The ratio of male to female was 1.1: 1. 2. Of 125 cases with angiography, aneurysm was a major cause (68%). Others were arterio-venous malformation (9.6%), Moya-moya disease (4%) and unknown (18.4%). 3. Of all 153 cases with CT scan, hemorrhage was demonstrated in 98 cases (64.1%); SAH in 72 cases (47.1%), ICH in 65 cases (42.5%), IVH in 34 cases (22.2%) and SDH in 1 case (0.7%). SAH combined with ICH was a major group (34.7%) in SAH. Detection rate of SAH was 68.3% within the first 7 days and 5.8% after 7 dyas. 4. In aneurysms, SAH was detected in 60 of 85 cases (70.6%); 88.1% within the first 7 dyas and 5.6% after 7 dyas. Anterior communicating artery was the most common site of the aneurysms (40%), in which detection rate of SAH was 100% within the first 7 days. SAH was combined with ICH in 38.3%. 5. On CT, SAH of unilateral Sylvian fissure was pathognomonic for ruptured MCA

  16. The single unit transfusion in post partum hemorrhage: A new perspective.

    Nama, Vivek; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Kakumani, V

    2006-01-01

    Every year, about 210 million women become pregnant. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is one of the major complications of pregnancy, accounting for 14 million cases annually. Of these, it is estimated that around 140,000 women die, resulting in a case fatality rate of 1%. PPH is defined by WHO as a blood loss > or = 500 mls. Most instances of PPH occur suddenly and without warning even in women without any of the known risks for this condition. If women do not receive timely medical treatment, as is often the case in many parts of the world, death can occur within two hours. The chance of receiving a safe blood transfusion as part of the therapy for PPH varies enormously from country to country, depending on whether a safe blood transfusion program has been set up as a part of the national health policy. The increasing realization of the potential deleterious effects of blood transfusion, including exposure to HIV and other viral agents, has changed the practices that were previously acceptable for the transfusion of blood, as has the recent recognition of specific patients who will benefit from a single unit of blood. In countries with limited resources, where a majority of women have anemia at the onset of their pregnancies, the slightest deviation from normality during labor and/or delivery leading to excessive hemorrhage can put a women's life at risk. In these instances, the patient needs urgent resuscitation, stabilization and transfer to a nearby center. Available blood, preferably typed cross matched and screened for infections, should be given until the patient receives specific treatment. This is especially true in bled- out obstetrics patients, where one unit may make the difference between a near death state and the possibility of slow recovery and survival.

  17. Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: predictive factors of intracranial hemorrhage.

    Delbos, Florent; Bertrand, Gérald; Croisille, Laure; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bierling, Philippe; Kaplan, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    In Caucasians, fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is most frequently caused by maternal alloimmunization against the human platelet antigen HPA-1a. The most serious complication of severe FNAIT is intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). ICH mainly occurs in utero; therefore, there is a need to identify noninvasive predictive factors of ICH to facilitate early identification of this condition and to determine response to maternal therapy. We studied gynecologic and immunogenetic variables of severe cases of anti-HPA-1a FNAIT within three groups: Group I, FNAIT without ICH; Group II, FNAIT with ICH; and Group III, suspected FNAIT cases without detectable maternal anti-HPA-1a alloantibodies. ICH was associated with a poor outcome because it led to death in 59% of cases. Multigravida (two or more pregnancies) was overrepresented in Group II, consistent with the high concentrations of maternal HPA-1a alloantibody and the frequent detection of a strong newborn-specific HLA class I antibody response at delivery. The proportion of HLA-DRB4*01:01P (*01:01 or *01:03) women was similar in Groups I and II, but this allele was overrepresented in Group III, in which FNAIT was less severe than in the other two groups. Finally, antenatal intravenous immunoglobulin therapy tended to be more effective in HLA-DRB3*01:01(+)/HLA-DRB4*01:01P(+) women than for HLA-DRB3*01:01(+)/HLA-DRB4*01:01P(-) women. The number of gestations is a predictive factor of ICH in anti-HPA-1a-alloimmunized women. Maternal immunogenetic variables should be investigated in the context of maternal immunization and may predict response to maternal therapy in subsequent pregnancies. © 2015 AABB.

  18. Hyponatremia in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Jaime Robenolt Gray

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the most frequently encountered electrolyte abnormality in critically ill patients. Hyponatremia on admission has been identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH. However, the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia (HN during hospitalization in a neurointensive care unit following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH remains unknown. This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for sICH between January 2006 and July 2009. All serum Na levels were recorded for patients during the ICU stay. HN was defined as Na <135 mmol/L. A total of 99 patients were analyzed with HN developing in 24% of sICH patients. Patients with HN had an average sodium nadir of 130 ± 3 mmol/L and an average time from admission to sodium <135 mmol/L of 3.9 ± 5.7 days. The most common cause of hyponatremia was syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (90% of HN patients. Patients with HN were more likely to have fever (50% vs. 23%; p = 0.01, infection (58% vs. 28%; p = 0.007 as well as a longer hospital length of stay (14 (8–25 vs. 6 (3–9 days; p < 0.001. Of the patients who developed HN, fifteen (62.5% patients developed HN in the first week following sICH. This shows HN has a fairly high incidence following sICH. The presence of HN is associated with longer hospital length of stays and higher rates of patient complications, which may result in worse patient outcomes. Further study is necessary to characterize the clinical relevance and treatment of HN in this population.

  19. Infectious and non-infectious neurologic complications in heart transplant recipients.

    Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela; Palomo, Jesús; Fernández-Yáñez, Juan; Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Guinea, Jesús; Bouza, Emilio

    2010-05-01

    Neurologic complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in heart transplant (HT) recipients. New immunomodulating agents have improved survival rates, although some have been associated with a high rate of neurologic complications (infectious and non-infectious). We conducted this study to analyze the frequency of these complications, before and after the use of daclizumab induction therapy. We reviewed all neurologic complications in our HT cohort, comparing infectious with non-infectious complications over 2 periods of time in which different induction therapies were used (316 patients with OKT3 or antithymocyte globulin from 1988 to 2002, and 68 patients with daclizumab from 2003 to 2006). Neurologic complications were found in 75/384 patients (19.5%) with a total of 78 episodes. Non-infectious complications accounted for 68% of the 78 episodes of neurologic complications. A total of 51 patients and 53 episodes were detailed as follows: 25 episodes of stroke (25 of 78 total episodes, 32%; 19 ischemic, 6 hemorrhagic); 7 neuropathies; 6 seizures; 4 episodes of transient ischemic attack (TIA); 3 anoxic encephalopathy; 2 each brachial plexus palsy and metabolic encephalopathy; and 1 each myoclonia, central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, subdural hematoma, and Cotard syndrome. Mean time to presentation of stroke, TIA, and encephalopathy was 1 day (range, 1-19 d) posttransplant. Mortality rate among non-infectious complications was 12/53 (22.6%). Infectious complications accounted for 32% of the 78 total episodes. We found 25 episodes in 24 patients: 17 herpes zoster (median, 268 d after HT), 3 CNS aspergillosis (median, 90 d after HT), 1 CNS toxoplasmosis and tuberculosis (51 d after HT), 1 pneumococcal meningitis (402 d after HT), and 2 Listeria meningitis (median, 108 d after HT). The 3 patients with CNS aspergillosis died. The mortality rate among patients with infectious neurologic complications was 12% (42.8% if the CNS was involved). When we

  20. Glycemia in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Clinical Implications

    Alvis-Miranda Hernando

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous cerebral hemorrhage or intracranial hemorrhage accounts for 10-15% of all strokes. Intracranial hemorrhage is much less common than ischemic stroke, but has higher mortality and morbidity, one of the leading causes of severe disability. Various alterations, among these the endocrine were identified when an intracerebral hemorrhage, these stress-mediated mechanisms exacerbate secondary injury. Deep knowledge of the injuries which are directly involved alterations of glucose, offers insight as cytotoxicity, neuronal death and metabolic dysregulations alter the prognosis of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

  1. Migraine and risk of hemorrhagic stroke

    Gaist, David; González-Pérez, Antonio; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    to select 10,000 controls free from hemorrhagic stroke. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we calculated the risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with migraine, adjusting for age, sex, calendar year, alcohol, body mass index, hypertension, previous cerebrovascular disease, oral contraceptive......BACKGROUND: We investigated the association between hemorrhagic stroke and migraine using data from The Health Improvement Network database. FINDINGS: We ascertained 1,797 incident cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 1,340 of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Density-based sampling was used...

  2. Adverse effects of anticoagulation treatment: clinically significant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last years, the use of oral anticoagulant treatment has increased dramatically, principally for the prevention of venous thrombosis and thrombembolic events. This treatment is demanding, especially among the elderly with concommitant diseases and different medication. Aim of the study to evaluate the rate of serious complications, clinically significant hemorrhage from upper gastointestinal tract in patients treated with oral antiocoagulants in a prospective cohort study.Patients and methods: Included were patients admitted to our institution between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003 due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Emergency endoscopy and laboratory testing was performed in all patients.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %, mean age 59.1 years, SD 17.2. Among our patients, 55 % were aged over 60 years. In 86.4 % of patients the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. In the last week prior to bleeding, 20.4 % (1309/6416 of all patients were regularly taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulant therapy or antiplatelet agents in single daily doses at least. 6.3 % of patients (82/1309 with abundant hemorrhage from upper gastrointestinal tract were using oral anticoagulant therapy and had INR > 5 at admission, 25.6 % of them had INR > 10. The mortality of patients using oral anticoagulants and INR > 5 was 17.1 %.Conclusions: Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a serious complication of different medications, particularly in elderly patients. Safe use of anticoagulant therapy is based on careful selection of patients and correct intake of the prescribed drugs.

  3. Recurrent hemorrhagic pericardial effusion in a child due to diffuse lymphangiohemangiomatosis: a case report

    Bakhshi Sameer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Recurrent hemorrhagic pericardial effusion in children with no identifiable cause is a rare presentation. Case presentation We report the case of a 4-year-old Indian girl who presented with recurrent hemorrhagic pericardial effusion. Diffuse lymphangiomatosis was suspected when associated pulmonary involvement, soft tissue mediastinal mass, and lytic bone lesions were found. Pericardiectomy and lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse lymphangiohemangiomatosis. Partial clinical improvement occurred with thalidomide and low-dose radiotherapy, but our patient died from progressive respiratory failure. Conclusion Diffuse lymphangiohemangiomatosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic pericardial effusion of unclear cause.

  4. Fatal Complications after Pediatric Surgical Interventions: Lessons Learned

    Klein, W.M.; Putten, M.E. van der; Kusters, B.; Verhoeven, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    Placement of catheters, drains, shunts, and tubes in children can lead to serious or even fatal complications at the moment of placement, such as hemorrhage at insertion, or in the longterm, such as infections and migration into adjacent organs. The clinician should always be aware of these

  5. In-hospital cerebrovascular complications following orthotopic liver transplantation: A retrospective study

    Liang Zhijian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrovascular complications are severe events following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. This study aimed to observe the clinical and neuroimaging features and possible risk factors of in-hospital cerebrovascular complications in the patients who underwent OLT. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 337 consecutive patients who underwent 358 OLTs. Cerebrovascular complications were determined by clinical and neuroimaging manifestations, and the possible risk factors were analyzed in the patients with intracranial hemorrhage. Results Ten of 337 (3.0% patients developed in-hospital cerebrovascular complications (8 cases experienced intracranial hemorrhage and 2 cases had cerebral infarction, and 6 of them died. The clinical presentations were similar to common stroke, but with rapid deterioration at early stage. The hematomas on brain CT scan were massive, irregular, multifocal and diffuse, and most of them were located at brain lobes and might enlarge or rebleed. Infarcts presented lacunar and multifocal lesions in basal gangliar but with possible hemorrhagic transformation. The patients with intracranial hemorrhage had older age and a more frequency of systemic infection than non-intracranial hemorrhage patients. (P = 0.011 and 0.029, respectively. Conclusion Posttransplant cerebrovascular complications have severe impact on outcome of the patients who received OLT. Older age and systemic infection may be the possible risk factors of in-hospital intracranial hemorrhage following OLT.

  6. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  7. Neurological Complications in Child with Chronic Renal Failure

    Faruk Incecik

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital uremic encephalopathy, progressive dialysis encephalopathy, Wernicke encefalopathy, headache, seizures because of dialysis, disequilibrium syndrome, cerebral hemorrhage and uremic neuropathy are the neurologic complications seen in child with chronic renal failure. Here it is aimed to discuss these complications with literature, and to emphasize the importance of evaluation of patients with these aspects. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 406-412

  8. CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications.

    Shakespear, Jonathan S; Shaaban, Akram M; Rezvani, Maryam

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications. CT findings suggesting acute cholecystitis should be interpreted with caution and should probably serve as justification for further investigation with abdominal ultrasound. CT has a relatively high negative predictive value, and acute cholecystitis is unlikely in the setting of a negative CT. Complications of acute cholecystitis have a characteristic CT appearance and include necrosis, perforation, abscess formation, intraluminal hemorrhage, and wall emphysema.

  9. A multicenter prospective cohort study of volume management after subarachnoid hemorrhage: circulatory characteristics of pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Obata, Yoshiki; Takeda, Junichi; Sato, Yohei; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsui, Toru; Isotani, Eiji

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by pulmonary complications, which may lead to poor outcomes and death. This study investigated the incidence and cause of pulmonary edema in patients with SAH by using hemodynamic monitoring with PiCCO-plus pulse contour analysis. METHODS A total of 204 patients with SAH were included in a multicenter prospective cohort study to investigate hemodynamic changes after surgical clipping or coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms by using a PiCCO-plus device. Changes in various hemodynamic parameters after SAH were analyzed statistically. RESULTS Fifty-two patients (25.5%) developed pulmonary edema. Patients with pulmonary edema (PE group) were significantly older than those without pulmonary edema (non-PE group) (p = 0.017). The mean extravascular lung water index was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group throughout the study period. The pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) was significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group on Day 6 (p = 0.029) and Day 10 (p = 0.011). The cardiac index of the PE group was significantly decreased biphasically on Days 2 and 10 compared with that of the non-PE group. In the early phase (Days 1-5 after SAH), the daily water balance of the PE group was slightly positive. In the delayed phase (Days 6-14 after SAH), the serum C-reactive protein level and the global end-diastolic volume index were significantly higher in the PE group than in the non-PE group, whereas the PVPI tended to be higher in the PE group. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary edema that occurs in the early and delayed phases after SAH is caused by cardiac failure and inflammatory (i.e., noncardiogenic) conditions, respectively. Measurement of the extravascular lung water index, cardiac index, and PVPI by PiCCO-plus monitoring is useful for identifying pulmonary edema in patients with SAH.

  10. A follow-up study by CT scan of intracranial hemorrhages in newborn children

    Shibata, Iekado; Kushida, Yoshimasa; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Tsutsumi, Shunichiro; Kuramitsu, Toru

    1983-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhages in perinatal babies and their sequelae are two of the targets of recent investigations. This study was designed to make clear the correlation between intracranial hemorrhage in perinates and the sequential widening of the cerebrospinal fluid space, including ventricles. 600 cases with moderate or severe clinical symptoms were treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Toho University Hospital from February, 1981, to October, 1982. Of these, 137 cases were suspected clinically to have had an intracranial hemorrhage at birth. In the CT study of these cases, intracranial hemorrhages of various types were confirmed in 55 cases. These included subarachnoid hemorrhages (29 cases), intraventricular hemorrhages (3 cases), intracerebral hemorrhages (3 cases), and combined hemorrhages (20 cases). A follow-up check of these cases by means of CT scan and neurological examinations was done for a period of from 40 days to 20 months. In 35 cases (63.5%) out of the 55, a temporary or persistent enlagement of the ventricle and/or widenings of the CSF space of various types were demonstrated. The latter included subdural effusion, the widening of the Sylvian fissure and/or interhemispheric fissure, and the widening of the basal cisterns. An enlargement of the ventricle occurred often following an intraventricular or intracerebral hemorrhage. On the other hand, subdural effusion was a common sequela after a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These changes in the ventricle or CSF space seem to be benign in nature and were improved in most cases during the period of the follow-up study. The ventricular enlargement disappeared substantially in 5 cases, and in the remaining 30 cases the abnormalities on the CT scans were much improved. Clinically, retarded physical development was evident in 3 cases, but the others showed no developmental retardation

  11. Renal posttransplant's vascular complications

    Bašić Dragoslav

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Despite high graft and recipient survival figures worldwide today, a variety of technical complications can threaten the transplant in the postoperative period. Vascular complications are commonly related to technical problems in establishing vascular continuity or to damage that occurs during donor nephrectomy or preservation [13]. AIM The aim of the presenting study is to evaluate counts and rates of vascular complications after renal transplantation and to compare the outcome by donor type. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 463 kidneys (319 from living related donor LD and 144 from cadaveric donor - CD were transplanted during the period between June 1975 and December 1998 at the Urology & Nephrology Institute of Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade. Average recipients' age was 33.7 years (15-54 in LD group and 39.8 (19-62 in CD group. Retrospectively, we analyzed medical records of all recipients. Statistical analysis is estimated using Hi-squared test and Fischer's test of exact probability. RESULTS Major vascular complications including vascular anastomosis thrombosis, internal iliac artery stenosis, internal iliac artery rupture obliterant vasculitis and external iliac vein rupture were analyzed. In 25 recipients (5.4% some of major vascular complications were detected. Among these cases, 22 of them were from CD group vs. three from LD group. Relative rate of these complications was higher in CD group vs. LD group (p<0.0001. Among these complications dominant one was vascular anastomosis thrombosis which occurred in 18 recipients (17 from CD vs. one from LD. Of these recipients 16 from CD lost the graft, while the rest of two (one from each group had lethal outcome. DISCUSSION Thrombosis of renal allograft vascular anastomosis site is the most severe complication following renal transplantation. In the literature, renal allograft thrombosis is reported with different incidence rates, from 0.5-4% [14, 15, 16]. Data from the

  12. Computed tomography of intraventricular hemorrhage

    Cho, Bum Shin; Shin, Kyoung Hee; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a new non-invasive diagnostic imaging method, which has ability to differentiate C.S.F., hematoma, and even edematous brain from normal brain tissue. Prior to the introduction of the CT, the diagnosis of the intraventricular hemorrhage in living patients was difficult and was confirmed by surgery of autopsy. Intracranial hemorrhages are visible on the CT with density higher than brain tissue in acute phase. CT is an accurate method for detecting of intraventricular hemorrhage including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. CT is also useful as a guidance and in the evaluation of fate of the hematomas by easily performable follow up studies. The causes of the intraventricular hemorrhages are hypertension, rupture of aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, head trauma, brain tumor, and others. This study included evaluation of CT of 69 patients who show the high density in cerebral ventricular system during the period of 31 months from Feb. 1979 to Aug. 1981 in the Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 69 patient was broad ranging from 1 month to 80 years. 28% of patients were in the 6th decade. The mate to female ratio was 2 : 1. 2. The consciousness of patients at CT study: Those were conscious in 11 cases, stuporous in 41 cases and unconscious in 17 cases. 3. The causes of intraventricular hemorrhages were hypertension in 28 cases, head trauma in 12 cases, aneurysm in 4 cases, tumor in 2 cases and others in 23 cases. 4. 9 cases showed intraventricular hematomas only, other 60 cases showed associated intracranial hematomas: Those were intracerebral hematomas in 53 cases including 30 cases of basal ganglial and thalamic hematomas, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 17 cases, epidural hematomas in 3 cases, and subdural hematomas in 2 cases. 5. All cases of the intraventricular hematomas except one sowed hematoma in the lateral

  13. CT findings of fundal hemorrhage in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Munemoto, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Shuzo; Kimura, Akira; Futami, Kazuya; Kogure, Yuzaburo; Wakamatsu, Koichi; Demachi, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    The patient was a 66-year-old man. He lost consciousness as a result of a third subarachnoid hemorrhage attack. On neurological examination, he was found to be comatose and to have no spontaneous respiration. A mydriasis was noticed on both eyes. Bilateral retinal bleeding was also observed, with the bleeding of the left side more severe than that of the right side. After his death, his brain and eyes were examined by means of a CT scan. The CT films showed a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage and ventricular hematoma. The thin-sliced CT films showed left retinal bleeding. Retinal bleeding may be caused by a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Usually we make a sketch of the retinal bleeding on the basis of a doctor's report. A photo of an optic fundus is a good record; however, taking a photo is troublesome for severely ill patients. The CT finding of retinal bleeding is gross, but a CT image is one good way to record retinal bleeding. (author)

  14. Prediction of complications following caustic ingestion in adults

    Christesen, H B

    1995-01-01

    The records of 86 adults admitted to hospital following caustic ingestion were reviewed. Eighteen patients (21%) developed complications; of these, six were fatal. Patients without symptoms or signs did not develop complications. Complications occurred only following lye ingestion, or intentional...

  15. A Case of Hemophilia A Associated with Spontaneous Hemorrhagic Pleural Effusion and Intracranial Hem

    Nuri Tutar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a sex-linked recessive coagulation disorder almost exclusively occurring in male subjects and caused by a deficiency of factor VIII. It  is a rare disorder characterized by spontaneous hemorrhages. Spontaneous bleeding in the pleural space is very rare in hemophilia both in children and adults. Here in, we present the case of a 56-year-old hemophilia A patient with hemorrhagic pleural effusion and intracranial hematoma.

  16. Clinical features and patient management of Lujo hemorrhagic fever.

    Nivesh H Sewlall

    Full Text Available In 2008 a nosocomial outbreak of five cases of viral hemorrhagic fever due to a novel arenavirus, Lujo virus, occurred in Johannesburg, South Africa. Lujo virus is only the second pathogenic arenavirus, after Lassa virus, to be recognized in Africa and the first in over 40 years. Because of the remote, resource-poor, and often politically unstable regions where Lassa fever and other viral hemorrhagic fevers typically occur, there have been few opportunities to undertake in-depth study of their clinical manifestations, transmission dynamics, pathogenesis, or response to treatment options typically available in industrialized countries.We describe the clinical features of five cases of Lujo hemorrhagic fever and summarize their clinical management, as well as providing additional epidemiologic detail regarding the 2008 outbreak. Illness typically began with the abrupt onset of fever, malaise, headache, and myalgias followed successively by sore throat, chest pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, rash, minor hemorrhage, subconjunctival injection, and neck and facial swelling over the first week of illness. No major hemorrhage was noted. Neurological signs were sometimes seen in the late stages. Shock and multi-organ system failure, often with evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, ensued in the second week, with death in four of the five cases. Distinctive treatment components of the one surviving patient included rapid commencement of the antiviral drug ribavirin and administration of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins, N-acetylcysteine, and recombinant factor VIIa.Lujo virus causes a clinical syndrome remarkably similar to Lassa fever. Considering the high case-fatality and significant logistical impediments to controlled treatment efficacy trials for viral hemorrhagic fever, it is both logical and ethical to explore the use of the various compounds used in the treatment of the surviving case reported here in future outbreaks

  17. Aspirin in Alzheimer's Disease Increased Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Cause for Concern?

    Thoonsen, Hanneke; Richard, Edo; Bentham, Peter; Gray, Richard; van Geloven, Nan; de Haan, Rob J.; van Gool, Willem A.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose-In a randomized controlled trial in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we found a higher number of intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) in patients randomized to aspirin treatment. Here, we evaluate the literature on the risk of ICH as a complication in patients with AD treated with

  18. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  19. Compression of the posterior fossa venous sinuses by epidural hemorrhage simulating venous sinus thrombosis: CT and MR findings

    Singh, Sumit; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H.; Hegde, Shilpa V.; Glasier, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa dural venous sinus thrombus is a well-described complication of head trauma, especially when fracture crosses the dural sinus grooves or in association with epidural hemorrhage. We have found that post-traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma compressing a dural venous sinus can mimic dural venous thrombus. To discuss the CT and MRI findings of posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages simulating sinus thrombosis, to make radiologists aware of this important imaging pitfall. We describe radiologic findings in four children in whom a posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage mimicked dural venous sinus thrombus. Routine CT head and CT venography were obtained on Toshiba volume and helical CT scanners. MRI and MR venography were performed on a Philips scanner. In all cases there was medial displacement and compression of the posterior fossa dural venous sinuses without intraluminal thrombosis. The epidural hemorrhage was seen tracking along sinus grooves in the occipital bone, peeling the dura containing the sinuses from the calvarium and compressing the sinus, simulating thrombosis on axial CT views. Both venous sinus thrombosis and posterior fossa epidural hemorrhages in children are well-described complications of head trauma. Posterior fossa epidural hemorrhage can mimic a sinus thrombus by compressing and displacing the sinuses. It is important to recognize this pitfall because treatment of a suspected thrombus with anticoagulation can worsen epidural hemorrhage. (orig.)

  20. Complications related to conventional self-expandable metal stent insertion and internal irradiation stent insertion in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma: an analysis of 32 cases

    Xu Xingwen; Di Haiting; Zhu Jun; Shi Jian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the occurrence of complications between conventional self-expandable metal stent and internal irradiation stent insertion in treating patients with advanced esophageal carcinomas. Methods: A total of 32 patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma were randomly divided into irradiation stent group (n=15) and conventional stent group (n=17). Internal irradiation stent loaded with 125 I seeds was employed in patients of irradiation stent group, while conventional self-expandable metal stent was used in patients of conventional stent group. After the treatment, clinical follow-up was regularly conducted. Postoperative complications such as fever, severe chest pain, cough, esophageal perforation, pneumonia, hemorrhage, stent migration and restenosis, etc. were observed. Results: No significant difference in the occurrence of fever, severe chest pain, esophageal perforation and hemorrhage existed between the two groups (P>0.05). The difference in the occurrence of long-term complications such as stent migration or restenosis between the two groups was out statistically significant (P>0.05). However, the restenosis in irradiation stent group occurred obviously much later than that in conventional stent group. Conclusion: For the treatment of advanced esophageal carcinomas, the insertion of internal irradiation esophageal stent is safe. It dose not increase the incidence of postoperative complications. Therefore, it is worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  1. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Image Analysis Methods: A Survey

    Pérez, Noel; Valdés, Jose; Guevara, Miguel; Silva, Augusto

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) account for 10-30% of all strokes and are a result of acute bleeding into the brain due to ruptures of small penetrating arteries. Despite major advancements in the management of ischemic strokes and other causes of hemorrhagic strokes, such as ruptured aneurysm, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), or cavernous angioma, during the past several decades, limited progress has been made in the treatment of ICH, and the prognosis for patients who suffer them remains poor. The societal impact of these hemorrhagic strokes is magnified by the fact that affected patients typically are a decade younger than those afflicted with ischemic strokes. The ICH continues to kill or disable most of their victims. Some studies show that those who suffer ICH have a 30-day mortality rate of 35-44% and a 6-month mortality rate approaching 50%. Approximately 700,000 new strokes occur in the United States annually and approximately 15% are hem-orrhagic strokes related to ICH. The poor outcome associated with ICH is related to the extent of brain damage. ICH produces direct destruction and compression of surrounding brain tissue. Direct compression causes poor perfusion and venous drainage to surrounding penumbra at risk, resulting in ischemia to the tissues that most need perfusion [16].

  2. Polyuria and cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Brown, Robert J.; Epling, Brian P.; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gilbert; Grady, James J.; McCullough, Louise D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Natriuresis with polyuria is common after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Previous studies have shown an increased risk of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm or delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with hyponatremia and/or the cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW). However, natriuresis may occur in the absence of hyponatremia or hypovolemia and it is not known whether the increase in DCI in patients with CSW is secondary to a concomitant hypovolemia or because the phys...

  3. Nuclear scan of pulmonary hemorrhage in radiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis

    Miller, T.; Tanaka, T.

    1979-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, a disease of unknown etiology most often occuring in children, is characterized by recurring episodes of alveolar consolidation. Exacerbations of pulmonary hemorrhage coincide with episodes of alveolar filling; repeated episodes lead to progressive interstitial fibrosis and eventually to corpulmonale. Serial nuclear scans of the lungs after injection of radiolabeled red blood cells should parallel the pathologic and radiographic findings. We observed the accumulation of radiolabeled red blood cells in the lungs on scan images, a finding not previously reported

  4. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Retinal complications after aqueous shunt surgical procedures for glaucoma.

    Law, S K; Kalenak, J W; Connor, T B; Pulido, J S; Han, D P; Mieler, W F

    1996-12-01

    To assess retinal complications and to identify risk factors for retinal complications following aqueous shunt procedures. Records of 38 consecutive aqueous shunt procedures that were performed on 36 patients at the Eye Institute of the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, from June 1993 to March 1995 (minimum follow-up, 6 months) were reviewed. The mean +/- SD follow-up was 11.4 +/- 5.2 months (median, 10.5 months). Twelve patients (32%) had the following retinal complications: 4 serous choroidal effusions (10%) that required drainage, 3 suprachoroidal hemorrhages (8%), 2 vitreous hemorrhages (5%), 1 rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (3%), 1 endophthalmitis (3%), and 1 scleral buckling extrusion (3%). Surgical procedures for retinal complications were required in 8 (67%) of these 12 patients. Visual acuity decreased 2 lines or more in 9 (75%) of these 12 patients. The median onset of a postoperative retinal complication was 12.5 days, with 10 patients (83%) experiencing complications within 35 days. Serous choroidal effusions developed in 10 other patients (26%), and these effusions resolved spontaneously. Visual acuity decreased 2 lines or more in 2 (20%) of these additional 10 patients. Patients who experienced serious retinal complications were significantly older, had a higher rate of hypertension, and postoperative ocular hypotony. Serious retinal complications were distributed evenly among patients with Krupin valves with discs and Molteno and Baerveldt devices. Experience with the Ahmed glaucoma valve implant was limited. Aqueous shunt procedures may be associated with significant retinal complications and subsequent visual loss.

  6. [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Saijo, Masayuki; Moriikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2004-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute infectious disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus. The case fatality rate of CCHF ranges from 10-40%. Because CCHF is not present in Japan, many Japanese virologists and clinicians are not very familiar with this disease. However, there remains the possibility of an introduction of CCHFV or other hemorrhagic fever viruses into Japan from surrounding endemic areas. Development of diagnostic laboratory capacity for viral hemorrhagic fevers is necessary even in countries without these diseases. At the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan, laboratory-based systems such as recombinant protein-based antibody detection, antigen-capture and pathological examination have been developed. In this review article, epidemiologic and clinical data on CCHF in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, compiled through field investigations and diagnostic testing utilizing the aforementioned laboratory systems, are presented. CCHFV infections are closely associated with the environmental conditions, life styles, religion, occupation, and human economic activities. Based on these data, preventive measures for CCHFV infections are also discussed.

  7. MR imaging of intraocular hemorrhage

    Saint-Louis, L.A.; Weiss, R.; Ellsworth, R.; Chang, S.; Deck, M.D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors evaluated with MR imaging 11 globes (nine patients) with spontaneous or traumatic intraocular hemorrhage. Subretinal blood was present in eight. Intravitreal bleeding was associated in seven and three subchoroidal. The ages of the hemorrhages ranged from 1 day to 6 months. Six of the subretinal and two subchoroidal cases had clotted blood with different intensity on the short TE images but were markedly hypointense on long TR/long TE images. The intravitreal blood was hyperintense on all sequences except in one. All imaging was performed with .5 T, 256 matrix, and 4- and 7- mm section thickness. Because of the varied appearance of hemorrhages, the authors scanned and are scanning two rabbits with intravitreal blood in vivo. Parameters include: 3-mm sections, T1, PD, T2 scans in .3-T and 1.5-T imagers. Initial results for the first 2 days show no change in signal intensity (hyperintense on all sequences). The T1 images show a diminishing intensity up to 8 days, and T2 scans remained hyperintense. These results so far correlate with the patient findings. The authors present the clinical findings and experimental correlation

  8. Analysis of angiographic findings in cerebral arteriovenous malformation with hemorrhage: comparison between intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage

    Kim, Jae Kyun; Kim, Joon Hyung; Kwon, Jin Sook; Yoon, Soo Woong; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the angioarchitectures of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and to determine whether there was correlation between angioarchitectures and patterns of intracranial hemorrhage (intracerebral, intraventricular, and both) in cerebral AVM. One hundred and twenty-eight patients who between November 1989 and December 1994 suffered supratentorial AVM with intracranial hemorrhage were studied retrospectively. Among 128 patients, intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage were seen in 68(53%) and 24 patients(19%), respectively, while both types were seen in the remaining 36 (28%). We analyzed the angioarchitectual characteristics of AVM, namely nidi, feeding arteries and draining veins, in three hemorrhagic groups of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage and both. The X 2 test or Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. A cortically located nidus was most common in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while a periventricular location was most common in those with intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001). Location in the corpus callosum, choroid plexus, or intraventricular area was more frequent in the intraventricular than the intracerebral hemorrhagic group (p<0.05). Superficial venous drainage was most common in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (p<0.001), and deep venous drainage in those with intraventricular hemorrhage (p=3D0.001). The angioarchitectual characteristics of cerebral arteriovenous malformation correlate significantly with patterns of intracranial hemorrhage, and awareness of the type of hemorrhage could help to manage patients and determine prognosis.=20

  9. Thromboembolic risks of recombinant factor VIIa Use in warfarin-associated intracranial hemorrhage: a case–control study

    H-Y Chou Sherry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa may be used for rapid hemostasis in life-threatening hemorrhage. In warfarin-associated intracerebral hemorrhage (wICH, FVIIa use is controversial and may carry significant thromboembolic risks. We compared incidence of baseline thromboembolic risk factors and thromboembolism rates in wICH patients treated with additional rFVIIa to those treated with standard therapy of fresh frozen plasma (FFP and vitamin K alone. Methods We identified 45 consecutive wICH patients treated with additional rFVIIa over 5-year period, and 34 consecutive wICH patients treated with standard therapy alone as comparison group. We compared the incidence of post-hemorrhage cardiac and extra-cardiac thromboembolic complications between two treatment groups, and used logistic regression to adjust for significant confounders such as baseline thromboembolic risk factors. We performed secondary analysis comparing the quantity of FFP transfused between two treatment cohorts. Results Both rFVIIa-treated and standard therapy-treated wICH patients had a high prevalence of pre-existing thromboembolic diseases including atrial fibrillation (73% vs 68%, deep venous thrombosis (DVT or pulmonary embolism (PE (22% vs 18%, coronary artery disease (CAD (38% vs 32%, and abnormal electrocardiogram (EKG (78% vs 85%. Troponin elevation following wICH was prevalent in both groups (47% vs 41%. Clinically significant myocardial infarction (MI, defined as troponin > 1.0 ng/dL, occurred in 13% of rFVIIa-treated and 6% of standard therapy-treated patients (p=0.52. Past history of CAD (p=0.0061 and baseline abnormal EKG (p=0.02 were independently associated with clinically significant MI following wICH while rFVIIa use was not. The incidences of DVT/PE (2% vs 9%; p=0.18 and ischemic stroke (2% vs 0%; p=0.38 were similar between two treatment groups. Recombinant FVIIa-treated patients had lower mean INR at 3 (p=0.0001 and 6 hours (p Conclusions Pre

  10. The impact of prophylactic fresh-frozen plasma and cryoprecipitate on the incidence of central nervous system thrombosis and hemorrhage in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia receiving asparaginase.

    Abbott, Lesleigh S; Deevska, Mariana; Fernandez, Conrad V; Dix, David; Price, Victoria E; Wang, Hao; Parker, Louise; Yhap, Margaret; Fitzgerald, Colleen; Barnard, Dorothy R; Berman, Jason N

    2009-12-10

    Asparaginase (ASP) therapy is associated with depletion of antithrombin (AT) and fibrinogen (FG). Potential toxicities include central nervous system thrombosis (CNST) and hemorrhage. Historical practice at the Izaak Walton Killam Health Centre (IWK) involves measuring AT and FG levels after ASP administration and transfusing fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate (CRY) to prevent thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications. To determine whether this reduced these complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), incidence, outcome, and clinical characteristics of ASP-related CNST in ALL patients at IWK were compared with a similar cohort from BC Children's Hospital (BCCH), where prophylaxis was not performed. Costs associated with preventative versus expectant management were estimated. From 1990 to 2005, 240 patients were treated at IWK and 479 at BCCH. Seven BCCH patients developed venous CNST (1.5%), compared with none at IWK. CNST occurred exclusively during induction. Six patients received anticoagulation and continued ASP. All 7 patients remain in remission. National Cancer Institute high-risk ALL predicted CNST risk (P = .02), whereas sex, age, race, and body mass index did not. Neither FFP nor CRY protected against CNST, suggesting prophylaxis is unwarranted for unselected ALL patients. However, prophylactic replacement for HR patients in induction may be cost-effective.

  11. Neurological complications of infective endocarditis

    Khan, Sonia A.A.; Yaqub, Basim A.; Al-Deeb, Saleh M.

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed the files of 80 successive patients with native and prosthetic valve endocarditis admitted to Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital. Neurolological complications (NC) occurred in 28 (35%) patients. The valves involved were mitral in 12 (43%), aortic in eight (29%), combined mitral and aortic lesions in six (21%) and others in two (7%). The common causative organisms were Streptococci in 12 (43%), Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermides, both occurring in four (14%). Compared to the 52 infective endocarditis patients with no neurological complications (NNC), the NC occurred more frequently in male patients, those with aortic valve lesion, those with atrial fibrillation, those with delayed therapy and those with causative organisms being Streptococci or Staphylococci. Eleven patients died (39%), 12 (43%) recovered with motor sequelae, six (21%) had seizure disorder and five (18%) had full recovery. The frequency of neurological complications and mortality is comparable to those reported in the literature: however, the frequency was higher in our patients. (author)

  12. A convolutional neural network for intracranial hemorrhage detection in non-contrast CT

    Patel, Ajay; Manniesing, Rashindra

    2018-02-01

    The assessment of the presence of intracranial hemorrhage is a crucial step in the work-up of patients requiring emergency care. Fast and accurate detection of intracranial hemorrhage can aid treating physicians by not only expediting and guiding diagnosis, but also supporting choices for secondary imaging, treatment and intervention. However, the automatic detection of intracranial hemorrhage is complicated by the variation in appearance on non-contrast CT images as a result of differences in etiology and location. We propose a method using a convolutional neural network (CNN) for the automatic detection of intracranial hemorrhage. The method is trained on a dataset comprised of cerebral CT studies for which the presence of hemorrhage has been labeled for each axial slice. A separate test dataset of 20 images is used for quantitative evaluation and shows a sensitivity of 0.87, specificity of 0.97 and accuracy of 0.95. The average processing time for a single three-dimensional (3D) CT volume was 2.7 seconds. The proposed method is capable of fast and automated detection of intracranial hemorrhages in non-contrast CT without being limited to a specific subtype of pathology.

  13. Effects of Psychosocial Stress on Subsequent Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation in Male Mice.

    Langgartner, Dominik; Wachter, Ulrich; Hartmann, Clair; Gröger, Michael; Vogt, Josef; Merz, Tamara; McCook, Oscar; Fink, Marina; Kress, Sandra; Georgieff, Michael; Kunze, Julia F; Radermacher, Peter L; Reber, Stefan O; Wepler, Martin

    2018-06-08

    Hypoxemia and tissue ischemia during hemorrhage as well as formation of oxygen and nitrogen radicals during resuscitation promote hyperinflammation and, consequently, trigger severe multiple-organ-failure (MOF). Individuals diagnosed with stress-related disorders or reporting a life history of psychosocial stress are characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation and a reduced glucocorticoid (GC) signaling. We hypothesized that exposure to chronic psychosocial stress during adulthood prior to hemorrhagic shock increases oxidative/nitrosative stress and therefore the risk of developing MOF in mice. To induce chronic psychosocial stress linked to mild immune activation and reduced GC signaling in male mice, the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) paradigm was employed. Single-housed (SHC) mice were used as controls. Subsequently, CSC and SHC mice were exposed to hemorrhagic shock following resuscitation to investigate the effects of prior psychosocial stress load on survival, organ function, metabolism, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and inflammatory readouts. An increased adrenal weight in CSC mice indicates that the stress paradigm reliably worked. However, no effect of prior psychosocial stress on outcome after subsequent hemorrhage and resuscitation could be detected. Chronic psychosocial stress during adulthood is not sufficient to promote hemodynamic complications, organ dysfunction, metabolic disturbances and did not increase the risk of MOF after subsequent hemorrhage and resuscitation. Intravenous norepinephrine to keep target hemodynamics might have led to a certain level of oxidative stress in both groups and, therefore, disguised potential effects of chronic psychosocial stress on organ function after hemorrhagic shock in the present murine trauma model.

  14. [in-hospital mortality in patient with acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke].

    Sadamasa, Nobutake; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Narumi, Osamu; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2011-09-01

    There is a lack of evidence to compare in-hospital mortality with different types of stroke. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the in-hospital mortality after acute ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke and compare the factors associated with the mortality among stroke subtypes. All patients admitted to Kurashiki Central Hospital in Japan between January 2009 and December 2009, and diagnosed with acute ischemic/hemorrhagic stroke were included in this study. Demographics and clinical data pertaining to the patients were obtained from their medical records. Out of 738 patients who had an acute stroke, 53 (7.2%) died in the hospital. The in-hospital mortality was significantly lower in the cerebral infarction group than in the intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage group (3.5%, 15.1%, and 17.9%, respectively; Phemorrhage group than in the other 2 groups. With regard to past history, diabetes mellitus was significantly found to be a complication in mortality cases of intracranial hemorrhage. Further investigation is needed to clarify the effect of diabetes on mortality after intracranial hemorrhage.

  15. Preliminary model of fluid and solute distribution and transport during hemorrhage.

    Gyenge, C C; Bowen, B D; Reed, R K; Bert, J L

    2003-01-01

    The distribution and transport of fluid, ions, and other solutes (plasma proteins and glucose) are described in a mathematical model of unresuscitated hemorrhage. The model is based on balances of each material in both the circulation and its red blood cells, as well as in a whole-body tissue compartment along with its cells. Exchange between these four compartments occurs by a number of different mechanisms. The hemorrhage model has as its basis a validated model, due to Gyenge et al., of fluid and solute exchange in the whole body of a standard human. Hypothetical but physiologically based features such as glucose and small ion releases along with cell membrane changes are incorporated into the hemorrhage model to describe the system behavior, particularly during larger hemorrhages. Moderate (10%-30% blood volume loss) and large (> 30% blood loss) hemorrhage dynamics are simulated and compared with available data. The model predictions compare well with the available information for both types of hemorrhages and provide a reasonable description of the progression of a large hemorrhage from the compensatory phase through vascular collapse.

  16. Guillain-Barre syndrome associated with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in China: a case report.

    Jiao, Jie; Wu, Lei; Yin, Jianyuan; Quan, Xiaojiao; Chen, Wei; Hu, Jie

    2018-03-27

    We describe a case of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) associated with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. To our knowledge, only five cases of GBS associated with Hantavirus infection have been reported so far. A 62-year-old man presented intermittent fever, chill and oliguria. According to remarkable leukocytosis, atypical lymphocytes, thrombocytopenia and former dwelling in hemorrhagic fever-endemic area, he was suspected as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndromeand certified with positive Hantavirus IgG. Later, the patient had symmetrical flaccid paralysis of all extremities. Electromyography showed peripheral nerve injury (mainly in axon). The patient was diagnosed as having acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN). After immunoglobulin infusion, patient showed progressive recovery and was transferred 3 weeks after his first admission to a rehabilitation center. Our case was the 6th reported case of GBS associated with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Moreover, we for the first time classified the subtype of GBS (AMSAN) based on the electrophysiology characteristics. GBS should be suspected in patients who are already diagnosed as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome when delayed symmetrical limb paralysis occurs. Until recent now, GBS was only reported in hemorrhagic fever patients in Europe and Asia, which termed as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

  17. Effect of dexamethasone in primary intracerebral hemorrhage in the south west of iran

    Sharafadinzadeh, N.; Baghebanian, S.M.; Pipelzadeh, M.; Moravej, A. A.; Ghanavatiz, P.

    2008-01-01

    Previous study revealed the value of dexamethasone in the treatment of vasogenic edema associated with brain tumor and abscess. However there are poor documented studies about its usefulness in primary intracerebral hemorrhage. In this study we evaluated dexamethasone effects in primary intracerebral hemorrhage. In a double blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial we evaluated 200 intracerebral hemorrhage cases between 40 to 80 years old whom were admitted at Golestan Hospital (Ahwaz, IR) between March 2002 and March 2003. They were divided in two groups dexamethasone (N=100) and placebo (N=100). Then mortality, GI bleeding, fever, electrolytes disturbances, hypertension and hyperglycemic status were analyzed in two groups. Ethical considerations were employed and subjects were followed by appropriate statistical methods for 21 days to assess the major outcomes. Mortality was much higher in the dexamethasone group; Dexamethasone group (49.3%) and placebo (23.4%) and also fever was higher seen in the dexamethasone group; dexamethasone group (40.2%) and placebo group (24.7%) but there was not any significant statistical difference between two groups as regards other complications. Dexamethasone is widely used for cerebral edema associated conditions but in this study we saw that it's complications in intracerebral hemorrhage such as increasing fever and mortality are significantly higher. Hence it use for treatment of primary intracerebral hemorrhage should be reconsidered. (author)

  18. Birth rates and pregnancy complications in adolescent pregnant women giving birth in the hospitals of Thailand.

    Butchon, Rukmanee; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; McNeil, Edward; Suchonwanich, Yolsilp

    2014-08-01

    To determine the rates of births in adolescent pregnant women in diferent regions of Thailand and assess the rates of complications occurring at pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum in women admitted in the hospitals ofThailand. The secondary analysis of data from pregnant women aged 10 to 49 years, who were admitted to hospitals and recorded in the National Health Security Office database between October 2010 and September 2011 was carried out. Adolescent birth rate by the regions and rate of complications ofpregnancy, delivery, and postpartum by age groups were analyzed. Highest birth rate was found among women aged 19 years (58.3 per 1, 000 population). The distribution of adolescent births varied across regions of Thailand, which was high in central region. Rate of preterm delivery was highest (10%) in adolescent aged 10 to 14 years. Rate of diabetes mellitus (6%), preeclampsia (4%), and postpartum hemorrhage (3%) among women aged 35 to 49 years were substantially higher than those among women aged 34 years or less. Adolescent birth rate varied across regions of Thailand. Complications occurred differently by ages of women. Holistic policy and planning strategies for proper prevention and management among pregnant women in different age groups are needed

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an intraventricular hemorrhage

    Kwak, Ryungchan; Higashi, Tooru; Ito, Shotaro; Kadoya, Satoru; Takarada, Akira; Sato, Shuji; Kurauchi, Manabu.

    1987-08-01

    The utility of MRI was investigated in 10 patients with intraventricular hemorrhage. MRI was found to be, in many respects, superior to CT: 1) MRI is able to detect to some extent the aging of an intraventricular hematoma. 2) It can determine the character of intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid, whether it is normal, bloody, or hyperprotein. 3) It can detect the cause of hemorrhage in the case of arterio-venous malformation. 4) MRI permits the detection of the penetration course and the location of a ventricular hematoma. 5) It can clearly detect periventricular lesions of early-stage hydrocephalus, accompanied by increased intracranial pressure and followed by intraventricular hemorrhage, by imaging the periventricular high-signal-intensity area. 6) MRI can clearly diagnose complications of intracranial lesions. For instance, it can distinguish subdural fluid collection from chronic subdural hematoma and can detect whether a cerebral infarction is new or old. On the other hand, MRI also has some disadvantages: 1) The imaging time is long, and clinical application is difficult, in serious and/or infant cases. 2) It is impossible to use MRI in some patients who have magnetic material in their bodies. 3) The spatial-image resolution is not good.

  20. Intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants and coagulation--ambivalent perspectives?

    Kuperman, Amir A; Brenner, Benjamin; Kenet, Gili

    2013-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a major complication of preterm birth, and large hemorrhages may yield significant future disability. During the last few decades, the survival of preterm infants has increased dramatically. Nevertheless, morbidity is still a major problem especially for very young and extremely low birth weight infants. As both, mortality and incidence of morbidities known to influence outcome, show a weekly decline with increasing gestational age, prematurity and low birth weight have been identified as major risk factors for IVH occurrence. This stems probably from the increased vulnerability of the premature germinal matrix as well as the physiologically impaired hemostasis, demonstrated in neonates. The hypothesis that a severe coagulation deficiency in the premature newborn could be a major contributing factor for IVH has been suggested, and small open label interventional studies targeting the premature coagulation system have been conducted with ethamsylate, vitamin K, fresh frozen plasma, recombinant activated factor VII and prothrombin complex concentrate. Nevertheless, potential venous origin of hemorrhages, which may be related to thrombophilic risk factors, has also been discussed. The following manuscript will focus upon IVH pathogenesis and address potential therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical analysis of the outcome of patients with brainstem hemorrhage

    Arimoto, Hirohiko; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    To identify prognostic factors in patients with brainstem hemorrhage, we analyzed their clinical symptoms and laboratory data on admission to our hospital. In 70 patients with brainstem hemorrhage (51 men and 19 women aged 29-93, with a mean of 59 gears) who had been admitted to our hospital from 1995 to 2000, we statistically evaluated the association of the outcome with their age and clinical symptoms on admission, blood glucose levels and white blood counts within 6 hours of admission, and the volume and extent of hematoma, concomitant hydrocephalus, and intraventricular perforation on admission CT scans. The mortality tended to be higher, but not significantly (P=0.07), in patients aged 70 years or older (83%) than in those aged less than 70 years (55%). Quadriplegia or decerebrate rigidity (P 2 or higher (P<0.01) on admission were significantly correlated with the prognosis. Hematoma volumes of 6 ml or larger on CT scans were most strongly correlated with the prognosis (P<0.001). Central hematoma and hematoma with extension to the midbrain, thalamus, or medulla oblongata (P<0.05), as well as hemorrhage complicated by hydrocephalus or intraventricular perforation (P<0.01), were correlated with the prognosis. (author)

  2. Pseudarthrosis due to galvanic corrosion presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Rosemary Noel Beavers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two unlike metals near one another can break down as they move toward electrochemical equilibrium resulting in galvanic corrosion. We describe a case of electrochemical corrosion resulting in pseudarthrosis, followed by instrumentation failure leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage. A 53-year-old female with a history of cervical instability and two separate prior cervical fusion surgery with sublaminar cables presented with new onset severe neck pain. Restricted range of motion in her neck and bilateral Hoffman's was noted. X-ray of her cervical spine was negative. A noncontrast CT scan of her head and neck showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the prepontine and cervicomedullary cisterns. Neurosurgical intervention involved removal of prior stainless steel and titanium cables, repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and nonsegmental C1–C3 instrumented fusion. She tolerated the surgery well and followed up without complication. Galvanic corrosion of the Brook's fusion secondary to current flow between dissimilar metal alloys resulted in catastrophic instrumentation failure and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  3. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    Dreizen, S.

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references

  4. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as late onset neonatal jaundice

    Qureshi, Umar Amin; Ahmad, Nisar; Rasool, Akhter; Choh, Suhail

    2009-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of adrenal hemorrhage vary depending on the degree and rate of hemorrhage, as well as the amount of adrenal cortex compromised by hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage that presented with late onset neonatal jaundice. The cause of adrenal hemorrhage was birth asphyxia.

  5. Intraretinal hemorrhages in cystoid macular edema.

    Bovino, J A; Kelly, T J; Marcus, D F

    1984-08-01

    Retinal hemorrhages can be associated with typical cystoid macular edema. We examined the fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms of 313 eyes of 264 patients with documented cystoid macular edema to establish the incidence and characteristics of associated intraretinal hemorrhages. As we wanted to study only those hemorrhages unique to cystoid macular edema, we excluded 86 eyes because the patients had diseases known to be associated with retinal hemorrhages. These diseases included diabetes mellitus, branch retinal vein occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, venous stasis retinopathy, and perifoveal telangiectasia. Of the remaining 227 eyes with cystoid macular edema, 56 (24.7%) were identified with retinal hemorrhages not associated with systemic disease. The hemorrhages were characteristically oval, round, or linear and frequently filled or partially filled the intraretinal cystoid space. In many patients, a blood-fluid level was observed.

  6. MR imaging of acute hemorrhagic brain infarction

    Uchino, Akira; Ohnari, Norihiro; Ohno, Masato

    1989-01-01

    Six patients with acute hemorrhagic brain infarct were imaged using spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner. Including two patients with repeated MR imaging, a total of eight examinations, all performed within 15 days after stroke, were analyzed retrospectively. Four patients revealed massive hemorrhages in the basal ganglia or cerebellum and three cases demonstrated multiple linear hemorrhages in the cerebral cortex. On T1-weighted images, hemorrhages were either mildly or definitely hyperintense relative to gray matter, while varied from mildly hypointense to hyperintense on T2-weighted images. T1-weighted images were superior to T2-weighted images in detection of hemorrhgage. CT failed to detect hemorrhage in two of five cases: indicative of MR superiority to CT in the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic infarcts. (author)

  7. MR imaging of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.B.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.R.; Dion, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging were performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of the basal cisterns on MR images results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR in many cases

  8. Clinical Features of Patients with Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Negative-Pressure Pulmonary Edema.

    Contou, Damien; Voiriot, Guillaume; Djibré, Michel; Labbé, Vincent; Fartoukh, Muriel; Parrot, Antoine

    2017-08-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) with negative-pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) is an uncommon yet life-threatening condition. We aimed at describing the circumstances, clinical, radiological, and bronchoscopic features, as well as the outcome of patients with NPPE-related DAH. We performed a retrospective, observational cohort study, using data prospectively collected over 35 years in an intensive care unit (ICU). Of the 149 patients admitted for DAH, we identified 18 NPPE episodes in 15 patients, one admitted four times for recurrent NPPE-related DAH. The patients were primarily young, male, and athletic. The NPPE setting was postoperative (n = 12/18, 67%) or following generalized tonic-clonic seizures (n = 6/18, 33%). Hemoptysis was almost constant (n = 17/18, 94%), yet rarely massive (>200 cc, n = 1/18, 6%), with anemia observed in 10 (56%) episodes. The DAH triad (hemoptysis, anemia, and pulmonary infiltrates) was observed in 50% of episodes (n = 9/18), and acute respiratory failure in 94% (n = 17/18). Chest computed tomography revealed diffuse bilateral ground glass opacities (n = 10/10, 100%), while bronchoscopy detected bilateral hemorrhage (n = 12/12, 100%) and macroscopically bloody bronchoalveolar lavage, with siderophage absence in most (n = 7/8, 88%), indicating acute DAH. While one episode proved fatal, the other 17 recovered rapidly, with a mean ICU stay lasting 4.6 (2-15) days. Typically, the evolution was rapidly favorable under supportive care. NPPE-related DAH is a rare life-threatening condition occurring primarily after tonic-clonic generalized seizure or generalized anesthesia. Clinical circumstances are a key to its diagnosis. Early diagnosis and recognition likely allow for successful management of this potentially serious complication, whereas ictal-DAH appears ominous in epileptic patients.

  9. Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

    Perna, Robert; Temple, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic (n = 172) or hemorrhagic stroke (n = 112) within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program....

  10. Intracranial Hemorrhage: A Devastating Outcome of Congenital Bleeding Disorders-Prevalence, Diagnosis, and Management, with a Special Focus on Congenital Factor XIII Deficiency.

    Alavi, Seyed Ezatolla Rafiee; Jalalvand, Masumeh; Assadollahi, Vahideh; Tabibian, Shadi; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2018-04-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a medical emergency. In congenital bleeding disorders, ICH is a devastating presentation accompanied with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of ICH is highly variable among congenital bleeding disorders, with the highest incidence observed in factor (F) XIII deficiency (FXIIID) (∼30%). This life-threatening presentation is less common in afibrinogenemia, FVIII, FIX, FVII, and FX deficiencies, and is rare in severe FV and FII deficiencies, type 3 von Willebrand disease and inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In FXIIID, this diathesis most often occurs after trauma in children, whereas spontaneous ICH is more frequent in adults. About 15% of patients with FXIIID and ICH die; the bleeding causes 80% of deaths in this coagulopathy. Although in FXIIID, the bleed most commonly is intraparenchymal (> 90%), epidural, subdural, and subarachnoid hemorrhages also have been reported, albeit rarely. As this life-threatening bleeding causes neurological complications, early diagnosis can prevent further expansion of the hematoma and secondary damage. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of ICH, but signs and symptoms in patients with severe FXIIID should trigger replacement therapy even before establishment of the diagnosis. Although a high dose of FXIII concentrate can reduce the rate of morbidity and mortality of ICH in FXIIID, it may occasionally trigger inhibitor development, thus complicating ICH management and future prophylaxis. Nevertheless, replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment for ICH in FXIIID. Neurosurgery is performed in patients with FXIIID and epidural hematoma and a hemorrhage diameter exceeding 2 cm or a volume of ICH is more than 30 cm 3 . Contact sports are not recommended in people with FXIIID as they can elicit ICH. However, a considerable number of safe sports and activities have been suggested to have more benefits than dangers for patients with congenital bleeding

  11. Hypertensive Cerebral Hemorrhage in a Patient with Turner Syndrome Caused by Deletion in the Short Arm of the X Chromosome.

    Hori, Yusuke S; Ohkura, Takahiro; Ebisudani, Yuki; Umakoshi, Michiari; Ishi, Masato; Oda, Kazunori; Aoi, Mizuho; Inoue, Takushi; Furujo, Mahoko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Fukuhara, Toru

    2018-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a chromosomal disorder usually caused by complete deletion of an X chromosome, with deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome being a rare cause of the condition. Patients with Turner syndrome commonly develop hypertension, and associated vascular complications such as aortic dissection or cerebral hemorrhage have been reported. Cerebral hemorrhage in Turner syndrome is a rare complication, and only a few reports have been published. In these reports, all patients have XO karyotypes or a mosaic type as the cause of Turner syndrome, while no other Turner syndrome types have been documented. In this report, we present for the first time a patient with Turner syndrome caused by deletion in the short arm of the X chromosome who experienced hypertensive hemorrhage as a late complication. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Frequency of neonatal complications after premature delivery

    Gordana Grgić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preterm delivery is the delivery before 37 weeks of gestation are completed. The incidence of preterm birth ranges from 5 to 15%. Aims of the study were to determine the average body weight, Apgar score after one and five minutes, and the frequency of the most common complications in preterminfants.Methods: The study involved a total of 631 newborns, of whom 331 were born prematurely Aims of this study were to (24th-37th gestational weeks-experimental group, while 300 infants were born in time (37-42 weeks of gestation-control group.Results: Average body weight of prematurely born infants was 2382 grams, while the average Apgar score in this group after the fi rst minute was 7.32 and 7.79 after the fifth minute. The incidence of respiratory distress syndrome was 50%, intracranial hemorrhage, 28.1% and 4.8% of sepsis. Respiratory distresssyndrome was more common in infants born before 32 weeks of gestation. Mortality of premature infants is present in 9.1% and is higher than that of infants born at term.Conclusions: Birth body weight and Apgar scores was lower in preterm infants. Respiratory distress syndrome is the most common fetal complication of prematurity. Intracranial hemorrhage is the second most common complication of prematurity. Mortality of premature infants is higher than the mortality of infants born at term birth.

  13. CT-guided needle biopsy of lung lesions: A survey of severe complication based on 9783 biopsies in Japan

    Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Nakajima, Yasuo; Adachi, Shuji; Arai, Yasuaki; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Eguchi, Kenji; Kuriyama, Keiko; Sakai, Fumikazu; Noguchi, Masayuki; Murata, Kiyoshi; Murayama, Sadayuki; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Mori, Kiyoshi; Yamada, Kozo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to update the rate of severe complications following CT-guided needle biopsy in Japan via a mailed survey. Materials and methods: Postal questionnaires regarding CT-guided needle biopsy were sent out to multiple hospitals in Japan. The questions regarded: the total number and duration of CT-guided lung biopsies performed at each hospital, and the complication rates and numbers of pneumothorax, hemothorax, air embolism, tumor seeding, tension pneumothorax and other rare complications. Each severe complication was followed with additional questions. Results: Data from 9783 biopsies was collected from 124 centers. Pneumothorax was the most common complication, and occurred in 2412 (35%) of 6881 cases. A total of 39 (35%) hospitals reported 74 (0.75%) cases with severe complications. There were six cases (0.061%) with air embolism, six cases (0.061%) with tumor seeding at the site of the biopsy route, 10 cases (0.10%) with tension pneumothorax, six cases (0.061%) with severe pulmonary hemorrhage or hemoptysis, nine cases (0.092%) with hemothorax, and 27 cases (0.26%) with others, including heart arrest, shock, and respiratory arrest. From a total of 62 patients with severe complications, 54 patients (0.55%) recovered without sequela, however one patient (0.01%) recovered with hemiplegia due to cerebral infarction, and the remaining seven patients (0.07%) died. Conclusions: This is the first national study documenting severe complications with respect to CT-guided needle biopsy in Japan. The complication rate in Japan is comparable to internationally published figures. We believe this data will improve both clinicians as well as patients understanding of the risk versus benefit of CT-guided needle biopsy, resulting better decisions

  14. Surgical management of spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage

    Bal Krishna Shrestha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage is the spontaneous brainstem hemorrhage associated with long term hypertension but not having definite focal or objective lesion. It is a catastrophic event which has a poor prognosis and usually managed conservatively. It is not uncommon, especially in eastern Asian populations, accounting approximately for 10% of the intracerebral hemorrhage. Before the advent of computed tomography, the diagnosis of brainstem hemorrhage was usually based on the clinical picture or by autopsy and believed to be untreatable via surgery. The introduction of computed tomography permitted to categorize the subtypes of brainstem hemorrhage with more predicted outcome. Continuous ongoing developments in the stereotactic surgery and microsurgery have added more specific surgical management in these patients. However, whether to manage conservatively or promptly with surgical evacuation of hematoma is still a controversy. Studies have shown that an accurate prognostic assessment based on clinical and radiological features on admission is critical for establishing a reasonable therapeutic approach. Some authors have advocate conservative management, whereas others have suggested the efficacy of surgical treatment in brainstem hemorrhage. With the widening knowledge in microsurgical techniques as well as neuroimaging technology, there seems to have more optimistic hope of surgical management of spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage for better prognosis. Here we present five cases of severe spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage patients who had undergone surgery; and explore the possibilities of surgical management in patients with the spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage.

  15. CT findings of fulminant subarachnoid hemorrhages

    Ikeda, Yukio; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1985-01-01

    We studied the clinical features and CT findings of 20 cases with fulminant subarachonid hemorrhages in the acute stage. They were admitted to our hospital within 3 hours after the attack as DOA (dead on arrival) or near DOA. CT-visualized subarachnoid hemorrhages were located in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain stem in all cases. In 90 % of the cases, the subarachnoid hemorrhage formed a clot or a thick layer. Massive intracerebral hematomas were observed in 10 % of the cases. Acute intraventricular hemorrhages were seen in 80 % of the cases. The mechanism of intraventricular hemorrhage in 70 % of the cases was of the reflux type, which was characterized by a reflux of the severe subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern. Acute and diffuse brain swelling on CT scan was observed in several cases, which also showed initial increased intracranial pressures. The major mechanisms leading to acute death or a very severe state soon after subarachnoid hemorrhage might be caused by acute brain-stem failure due to severe subarachnoid hemorrhages in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain-stem and an acute increase in intracranial pressure by cerebral edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage and secondary cerebral ischemia due to cardiac and respiratory arrest. (author)

  16. The Roles of Thrombospondins in Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Xuan Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke is a devastating cerebrovascular disease with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Thrombospondins (TSPs, as matricellular proteins, belong to the TSP family which is comprised of five members. All TSPs modulate a variety of cellular functions by binding to various receptors. Recently, TSPs gained attention in the area of hemorrhagic stroke, especially TSP-1. TSP-1 participates in angiogenesis, the inflammatory response, apoptosis, and fibrosis after hemorrhagic stroke through binding to various molecules including but not limited to CD36, CD47, and TGF-β. In this review, we will discuss the roles of TSPs in hemorrhagic stroke and focus primarily on TSP-1.

  17. Outcome in adult patients with hemorrhagic moyamoya disease after combined extracranial-intracranial bypass.

    Jiang, Hanqiang; Ni, Wei; Xu, Bin; Lei, Yu; Tian, Yanlong; Xu, Feng; Gu, Yuxiang; Mao, Ying

    2014-11-01

    The outcome of patients with hemorrhagic moyamoya disease (MMD) after cerebral revascularization is uncertain. The purpose of this study was to delineate the efficacy of this surgical method in the treatment of hemorrhagic MMD. Between January 2007 and August 2011, a consecutive cohort of 113 patients with hemorrhagic MMD was enrolled into this prospective single-center cohort study. The surgical method was combined direct and indirect bypass. The cumulative probability of the primary end point (all stroke and deaths from surgery through 30 days after surgery and ipsilateral recurrent hemorrhage afterward) was analyzed. The angiographic outcome was measured by the following parameters: bypass patency, reduction of basal MMD vessels, improved degree of dilation, and branch extension of the anterior choroidal and posterior communicating arteries (AChA-PCoA). Of the 113 enrolled cases, CT scans revealed pure intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in 63 cases (55.7%), pure intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in 14 cases (12.4%), and ICH with IVH in 36 cases (31.9%). In 74 of 113 hemorrhagic hemispheres (65.5%), the AChA-PCoA was extremely dilated with extensive branches beyond the choroidal fissure. A total of 114 surgeries were performed. No patient suffered ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke through 30 days after surgery. Ipsilateral rebleeding occurred in 5 patients, 4 of whom died of the rebleeding event. The cumulative probability of the primary end point was 0% at 1 year and 1.9% at 2 years. The annual rebleeding rate was 1.87%/person/year. The improvement in AChA-PCoA extension was observed in 75 of 107 operated hemispheres (70.1%), which was higher than that in 7 of 105 unoperated hemispheres (35.2%). Revascularization may provide a benefit over conservative therapy for hemorrhagic MMD patients. The improvement of dilation and branch extension of AChA-PCoA might be correlated with the low rebleeding rate.

  18. Effectiveness of therapeutic barium enema for diverticular hemorrhage

    Matsuura, Mizue; Inamori, Masahiko; Nakajima, Atsushi; Komiya, Yasuhiko; Inoh, Yumi; Kawasima, Keigo; Naitoh, Mai; Fujita, Yuji; Eduka, Akiko; Kanazawa, Noriyoshi; Uchiyama, Shiori; Tani, Rie; Kawana, Kennichi; Ohtani, Setsuya; Nagase, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effectiveness of barium impaction therapy for patients with colonic diverticular bleeding. METHODS: We reviewed the clinical charts of patients in whom therapeutic barium enema was performed for the control of diverticular bleeding between August 2010 and March 2012 at Yokohama Rosai Hospital. Twenty patients were included in the review, consisting of 14 men and 6 women. The median age of the patients was 73.5 years. The duration of the follow-up period ranged from 1 to 19 mo (median: 9.8 mo). Among the 20 patients were 11 patients who required the procedure for re-bleeding during hospitalization, 6 patients who required it for re-bleeding that developed after the patient left the hospital, and 3 patients who required the procedure for the prevention of re-bleeding. Barium (concentration: 150 w%/v%) was administered per the rectum, and the leading edge of the contrast medium was followed up to the cecum by fluoroscopy. After confirmation that the ascending colon and cecum were filled with barium, the enema tube was withdrawn, and the patient’s position was changed every 20 min for 3 h. RESULTS: Twelve patients remained free of re-bleeding during the follow-up period (range: 1-19 mo) after the therapeutic barium enema, including 9 men and 3 women with a median age of 72.0 years. Re-bleeding occurred in 8 patients including 5 men and 3 women with a median age of 68.5 years: 4 developed early re-bleeding, defined as re-bleeding that occurs within one week after the procedure, and the remaining 4 developed late re-bleeding. The DFI (disease-free interval) decreased 0.4 for 12 mo. Only one patient developed a complication from therapeutic barium enema (colonic perforation). CONCLUSION: Therapeutic barium enema is effective for the control of diverticular hemorrhage in cases where the active bleeding site cannot be identified by colonoscopy. PMID:25987779

  19. Severe neonatal anemia from fetomaternal hemorrhage: report from a multihospital health-care system.

    Christensen, R D; Lambert, D K; Baer, V L; Richards, D S; Bennett, S T; Ilstrup, S J; Henry, E

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of fetomaternal hemorrhage that is severe enough to cause neonatal anemia is not known. Owing to its relative rarity, much of the literature describing this condition is in the form of case reports and small case series. We performed a large, muiticentered, sequential, case series to determine the incidence, antecedents and outcomes. From the multicentered databases of Intermountain Healthcare, we obtained records of all neonates with hematocrit (Hct) hemorrhage. Among 219,853 live births, 24 had anemia with evidence of fetomaternal hemorrhage (incidence estimate, 1 per 9160 live births). The initial Hgb ranged from 1.4 to 10.2 g dl(-1) (Hct 29.8%). The initial Hgb was neonatal Hgb was hemorrhage (IVH). The adverse outcomes of death, IVH, periventricular leukomalacia, bronchopulmonary dysplasia or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were common; occurring in 71% (17 of the 24), including all with an initial Hgb hemorrhage is a rare but sometimes devastating condition. Those with fetomaternal hemorrhage and an initial Hgb of <5 g dl(-1) are expected to need resuscitation at birth, to receive emergent transfusion support and to be at risk for death and major morbidities. Antenatal suspicion of this diagnosis should occur when absent fetal movement is reported. Improvements in rapid diagnosis are needed to prepare first responders and transfusion services.

  20. Macular hemorrhages associated with neonatal polycythemia and thrombocytopenia: A case report.

    Cui, Z; Zhang, Y; Liang, L; Li, Z; Hao, Q

    2017-02-01

    Thrombocytopenia occurs in 51% of neonates with polycythemia and is independently associated with growth restriction. Increased hematocrit is associated with decreased platelet count. The possibility of a hemorrhage should be noted. A Chinese male newborn presented with elevated hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The platelet count decreased to 10×10 9 /L during the 1st week after birth and remained abnormal at day 12. Vitreous turbidity of the right eye was detected 2 days later and was suspected of stemming from endophthalmitis or ocular inflammation. Two weeks later, vitreous turbidity decreased and a macular hemorrhage became visible. Optical coherence tomography confirmed the diagnosis of a retinal hemorrhage. Thrombocytopenia associated with polycythemia can induce a vitreous hemorrhage, which may be confused with ocular infection or inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Numerous cerebral hemorrhages in a patient with influenza-associated encephalitis: A case report

    Lee, Ji Ye; Seong, Su Ok; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sup [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Influenza-associated encephalitis (IAE) is a complication of a common disease that is rare even during an epidemic. Awareness of magnetic resonance imaging features of IAE is important in treatment planning and prognosis estimation. Several reports have described necrotizing encephalopathy in children with influenza. However, few reports have described multifocal hemorrhages in both cerebral hemispheres in adults with concomitant infection with influenza A and B. Here, we describe a case of influenza A- and B-associated encephalitis accompanied by numerous cerebral hemorrhages.

  2. Spontaneous hemorrhage simulating rapid growth of a benign subperiosteal plexiform neurofibroma

    Blitman, Netta M.; Levsky, Jeffrey M.; Thornhill, Beverly A.; Villanueva-Siles, Esperanza

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous subperiosteal hemorrhage is a rare complication of von Recklinghausen's disease. There are few reports describing the MR imaging characteristics of this entity. Our case is unique among these as an underlying plexiform neurofibroma was visualized by MR imaging. We present a 12-year-old child with neurofibromatosis 1 who presented with a rapidly enlarging mass of the fibula. Surgery and pathology revealed subperiosteal hemorrhage into a benign, plexiform neurofibroma. The MR imaging features, pathogenesis and clinical implications of this entity are discussed. Recognition of this disease process and differentiating it from malignant transformation can prevent unnecessary surgery. (orig.)

  3. HEMORRHAGE EXPRESS-DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY IN CHILDREN 0-6 MONTHS OF AGE

    P. V. Svirin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic conditions are associated with severe health problems and an increase in mortality rate among children. Quick and adequate reaction of a doctor who was the first to appear beside such a patient is necessary to save the child’s life; mistakes may lead to severe complications, including fatal outcome. The article formulates methodological recommendations on diagnosing and rendering help to children of the first months of age with developing hemorrhagic manifestations in the environment of neonatal and newborn centers taking into account their laboratorial and therapeutic capabilities.

  4. Use of therapeutic surfactant lavage in a preterm infant with massive pulmonary hemorrhage

    Ino Kanavaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a premature infant presenting with recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage in which we performed a therapeutic lavage with diluted surfactant after an acute episode of bleeding with severe intractable hypoxemia. Repeated small aliquots of diluted surfactant (10x2 mL allowed rapid improvement in oxygenation and reduction of required mean airway pressures during high frequency oscillatory ventilation. This observation may suggest that surfactant lavage could be beneficial in massive pulmonary hemorrhage in infants. A randomized controlled trial might be needed to clarify the potential benefit of this therapeutic intervention on outcome of infants suffering from this life-threatening complication.

  5. An uncommon initial presentation of snake bite-subarachnoid hemorrhage: A case report with literature review

    Manoj Kumar Roy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake bites are very common in India, particularly in West Bengal. Snake bite can cause various hematological, neuromyopathical complications. It can be very fatal if not detected and treated early. Timely intervention can save the patient. We are reporting a case of hematotoxic Russell viper snake bite presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patient was successfully treated with antivenom serum (AVS along with other conservative management. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as an initial presentation in viper bite is very rare and we discuss the case with proper literature review.

  6. Spontaneous ICA rupture: a severe late complication after giant nasopharyngeal angiofibroma resection.

    Succo, G; Gisolo, M; Crosetti, E; Bergui, M; Danesi, G

    2013-04-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign vascular tumor occurring in young males. Surgery for giant JNA is a complex procedure, with a high risk of major complications. We report a rare case of massive epistaxis in a 15-year-old boy resulting from spontaneous rupture of the intracavernous tract of the internal carotid artery 20 days after resection of a giant JNA by midface degloving. The event was managed by an emergency arteriography with coils selectively deployed to occlude the vessel and to stop hemorrhage. This treatment has been shown to be effective in producing immediate hemostasis and stable long-term occlusion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiographic complications of biologic response modifiers

    Miketic, L.M.; Bahnson, R.R.; Ernstoff, M.S.; Kirkwood, J.M.; Nair, S.; Logan, T.; Downs, M.A.; Neuhart, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Biologic response modifiers, such as the interferons, are increasingly used in the treatment of cancer as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy. In certain malignancies, particularly renal cell carcinoma, they are becoming agents of choice due to higher tumor response rate. The authors have reviewed 202 patients. Protocols include interferon, interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, and monoclonal antibodies. The radiology of significant clinical complications is discussed, especially the vascular leak syndrome often seen with interleukin administration and the cardiac toxicity of interferon. Less common abnormalities include progressive splenomegaly in one interferon study and a hemorrhagic episode caused by tumor necrosis factor

  8. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  9. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage – some epidemiological characteristics of patients in the period 1994–2003

    Pavel Skok

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a frequent medical problem and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this prospective, cohort study, which was carried out at our institution, was to establish the causes of hemorrhage from the digestive tract and mortality during a 10-year period.Patients and methods: The study includes patients with emergency endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract and other diagnostic procedures of the digestive tract due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2003.Results: 6416 patients were investigated: 2452 women (38.2 % and 3964 men (61.8 %. The average age of our patients was 59.3 years (a 1–106 year span, SD ± 17.2. In 2142 patients (33.4 %, endoscopic investigation of the upper digestive tube revealed signs of acute or traces of previous hemorrhage. Different methods of endoscopic hemostasis were carried out in 1486 cases (23.2 %. Sequelae of ulcer disease were the cause of hemorrhage in 36.4 % of investigated patients. Frequent causes of hemorrhage were also inflammatory, hemorrhagically-erosive changes of the gastric and duodenal mucosa (16.6 %, esophageal reflux disease (11.2 %, ruptured esophageal varices (10.7 %. Less frequent causes of hemorrhage from the upper digestive tract were different tumors (3.8 %, Mallory-Weiss tear (2.9 %, polyps (1.4 % and Dieulafoy lesion (1.3 %. In 13.7 % of patients the cause of hemorrhage was in the large bowel and in 0.4 % in the small intestine. More than half of our patients (53.4 % were aged over 60, 11.4 % older than 80 years. The total mortality of our patients was 9.9 %, the majority of them (8.5 %, were older than 60 years, with concommitant diseases and complications during treatment.Conclusions: In the observed period, sequelae of ulcer disease were the most significant cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemorrhages are frequent in elderly patients who usually have significant medical conditions

  10. Can femoral dialysis catheter insertion cause a life threatening complication?

    Nurkay Katrancıoğlu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous catheter (VC insertion may be necessary for the patients with renal failure facing vascular access problem. Femoral VCs are commonly used for their lower complication rates especially in emergency clinics. The incidence of bleeding associated with VC is reported 0.5-1.6%, however, life threatening hemorrhage and complications requiring surgical intervention are very rare. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated with retroperitoneal hematoma after femoral VC insertion. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 472-474

  11. Hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischaemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation.

    Marsh, E B; Llinas, R H; Hillis, A E; Gottesman, R F

    2013-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) can occur in patients following acute ischaemic stroke in the form of hemorrhagic transformation, and results in significant long-term morbidity and mortality. Anticoagulation theoretically increases risk. We evaluated stroke patients with an indication for anticoagulation to determine the factors associated with hemorrhagic transformation. Three-hundred and forty-five patients with ICD-9 codes indicating: (i) acute ischaemic stroke; and (ii) an indication for anticoagulation were screened. One-hundred and twenty-three met inclusion criteria. Data were collected retrospectively. Neuroimaging was reviewed for infarct volume and evidence of ICH. Hemorrhages were classified as: hemorrhagic conversion (petechiae) versus intracerebral hematoma (a space occupying lesion); symptomatic versus asymptomatic. Using multivariable logistic regression, we determined the hypothesized factors associated with intracerebral bleeding. Age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.50 per 10-year increment, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-2.08], infarct volume (OR = 1.10 per 10 ccs, 95% CI 1.06-1.18) and worsening category of renal impairment by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR; OR = 1.95, 95% CI 1.04-3.66) were predictors of hemorrhagic transformation. Ninety- nine out of 123 patients were anticoagulated. Hemorrhage rates of patients on and off anticoagulation did not differ (25.3% vs. 20.8%; P = 0.79); however, all intracerebral hematomas (n = 7) and symptomatic bleeds (n = 8) occurred in the anticoagulated group. The risk of hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischaemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation is multifactorial, and most closely associated with an individual's age, infarct volume and eGFR. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  12. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in pituitary tumor

    Ashis Patnaik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is the bleeding into the subarachnoid space containing cerebrospinal fluid. The most common cause of SAH is trauma. Rupture of aneurysms, vascular anomalies, tumor bleeds and hypertension are other important etiologies. SAH in the setting of pituitary tumor can result from various causes. It can be due to intrinsic tumor related pathology, injury to surrounding the vessel during the operative procedure or due to an associated aneurysm. We discuss the pathological mechanisms and review relevant literature related to this interesting phenomenon. Early and accurate diagnosis of the cause of the SAH in pituitary tumors is important, as this influences the management.

  13. Ebola and Marburg Hemorrhagic Fevers: Neglected Tropical Diseases?

    MacNeil, Adam; Rollin, Pierre E.

    2012-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) and Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) are rare viral diseases, endemic to central Africa. The overall burden of EHF and MHF is small in comparison to the more common protozoan, helminth, and bacterial diseases typically referred to as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). However, EHF and MHF outbreaks typically occur in resource-limited settings, and many aspects of these outbreaks are a direct consequence of impoverished conditions. We will discuss aspects of EHF and MHF disease, in comparison to the “classic” NTDs, and examine potential ways forward in the prevention and control of EHF and MHF in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as examine the potential for application of novel vaccines or antiviral drugs for prevention or control of EHF and MHF among populations at highest risk for disease. PMID:22761967

  14. Vaccines against viral hemorrhagic fevers: non-human primate models.

    Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L

    2011-06-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are a group of disease syndromes caused by infection with certain RNA viruses. The disease is marked by a febrile response, malaise, coagulopathy and vascular permeability culminating in death. Case fatality rates can reach 90% depending on the etiologic agent. Currently, there is no approved antiviral treatment. Because of the high case fatality, risk of importation and the potential to use these agents as biological weapons, development of countermeasures to these agents is a high priority. The sporadic nature of disease outbreaks and the ethical issues associated with conducting a human trial for such diseases make human studies impractical; therefore, development of countermeasures must occur in relevant animal models. Non-human primates are superior models to study infectious disease because their immune system is similar to humans and they are good predictors of efficacy in vaccine development and other intervention strategies. This review article summarizes viral hemorrhagic fever non-human primate models.

  15. Complications of pneumoconiosis: Radiologic overview

    Jun, Jae Sup; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hyo Rim; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Ko, Jeong Min; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2013-01-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure

  16. Complications of pneumoconiosis: Radiologic overview

    Jun, Jae Sup [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jung Im, E-mail: jijung@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Rim [Department of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, St. Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Arakawa, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine (Japan); Koo, Jung-Wan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure.

  17. Incidence and prognostic significance of postoperative complications demonstrated on CT after brain tumor removal

    Fukamachi, Akira; Koizumi, Hidehito; Kimura, Ryoichi; Nukui, Hideaki; Kunimine, Hideo

    1987-06-01

    We surveyed the computed tomographic (CT) findings in 273 patients who had undergone 301 craniotomies for brain tumors to determine the incidence and clinical outcome of the postoperative complications demonstrated on CT. The frequencies of medium-sized or large postoperative lesions were as follows: intracerebral hemorrhage, 11% of 301 operations; subdural fluid collection, 8%; brain edema, 6%; extradural hemorrhage, 4%; cerebral infarction, 3%; ventricular enlargement, 3%; intraventricular hemorrhage, 2%; chronic subdural hematoma, 1%; porencephalic cyst, 0.7%; tension pneumocephalus, 0.7%. In association with these complications, poor outcomes (deaths) developed with the following frequencies: intracerebral hemorrhage including an association with other types of hemorrhage, 4% (deaths, 2%) of 301 operations; cerebral infarction, 1% (deaths, 0.7%); brain edema, 0.7% (deaths, 0.7%); simple intraventricular hemorrhage, 0.3% (no deaths); tension pneumocephalus, 0.3% (no deaths). From these results, we conclude that medium-sized or large intracerebral hemorrhage, massive cerebral infarction and edema have a grave clinical significance in the postoperative course of patients with brain tumors.

  18. Incidence and prognostic significance of postoperative complications demonstrated on CT after brain tumor removal

    Fukamachi, Akira; Koizumi, Hidehito; Kimura, Ryoichi; Nukui, Hideaki; Kunimine, Hideo.

    1987-01-01

    We surveyed the computed tomographic (CT) findings in 273 patients who had undergone 301 craniotomies for brain tumors to determine the incidence and clinical outcome of the postoperative complications demonstrated on CT. The frequencies of medium-sized or large postoperative lesions were as follows: intracerebral hemorrhage, 11 % of 301 operations; subdural fluid collection, 8 %; brain edema, 6 %; extradural hemorrhage, 4 %; cerebral infarction, 3 %; ventricular enlargement, 3 %; intraventricular hemorrhage, 2 %; chronic subdural hematoma, 1 %; porencephalic cyst, 0.7 %; tension pneumocephalus, 0.7 %. In association with these complications, poor outcomes (deaths) developed with the following frequencies: intracerebral hemorrhage including an association with other types of hemorrhage, 4 % (deaths, 2 %) of 301 operations; cerebral infarction, 1 % (deaths, 0.7 %); brain edema, 0.7 % (deaths, 0.7 %); simple intraventricular hemorrhage, 0.3 % (no deaths); tension pneumocephalus, 0.3 % (no deaths). From these results, we conclude that medium-sized or large intracerebral hemorrhage, massive cerebral infarction and edema have a grave clinical significance in the postoperative course of patients with brain tumors. (author)

  19. Prospective evaluation of dermatologic surgery complications including patients on multiple antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications.

    Bordeaux, Jeremy S; Martires, Kathryn J; Goldberg, Dori; Pattee, Sean F; Fu, Pingfu; Maloney, Mary E

    2011-09-01

    Few prospective studies have evaluated the safety of dermatologic surgery. We sought to determine rates of bleeding, infection, flap and graft necrosis, and dehiscence in outpatient dermatologic surgery, and to examine their relationship to type of repair, anatomic location of repair, antibiotic use, antiplatelet use, or anticoagulant use. Patients presenting to University of Massachusetts Medical School Dermatology Clinic for surgery during a 15-month period were prospectively entered. Medications, procedures, and complications were recorded. Of the 1911 patients, 38% were on one anticoagulant or antiplatelet medication, and 8.0% were on two or more. Risk of hemorrhage was 0.89%. Complex repair (odds ratio [OR] = 5.80), graft repair (OR = 7.58), flap repair (OR = 11.93), and partial repair (OR = 43.13) were more likely to result in bleeding than intermediate repair. Patients on both clopidogrel and warfarin were 40 times more likely to have bleeding complications than all others (P = .03). Risk of infection was 1.3%, but was greater than 3% on the genitalia, scalp, back, and leg. Partial flap necrosis occurred in 1.7% of flaps, and partial graft necrosis occurred in 8.6% of grafts. Partial graft necrosis occurred in 20% of grafts on the scalp and 10% of grafts on the nose. All complications resolved without sequelae. The study was limited to one academic dermatology practice. The rate of complications in dermatologic surgery is low, even when multiple oral anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications are continued, and prophylactic antibiotics are not used. Closure type and use of warfarin or clopidogrel increase bleeding risk. However, these medications should be continued to avoid adverse thrombotic events. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    T. Schepers (Tim); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); M.R. de Vries (Mark); M. van der Elst (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of

  1. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    Schepers, Tim; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; de Vries, Mark R.; van der Elst, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of the syndesmotic screw

  2. Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Hoff, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a devastating disorder with an often poor prognosis. The occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important factors determining outcome in

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    ... Central OMIM: JUVENILE POLYPOSIS/HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA SYNDROME McDonald J, Bayrak-Toydemir P, Pyeritz RE. Hereditary hemorrhagic ... 10.1097/GIM.0b013e3182136d32. Review. Citation on PubMed McDonald J, Wooderchak-Donahue W, VanSant Webb C, Whitehead ...

  4. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M.; Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture

  5. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage mimicking an acute scrotum.

    Adorisio, O; Mattei, R; Ciardini, E; Centonze, N; Noccioli, B

    2007-02-01

    Twenty-two cases of scrotal hematoma caused by neonatal adrenal hemorrhage are reported in the literature and unnecessary surgical exploration was performed in nine (41%), suspecting testicular torsion. In this paper, we present a newborn male with right adrenal gland hemorrhage causing right scrotal swelling and discoloration of groin managed conservatively.

  6. Primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage

    Tsunoda, Shigeru; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo; Kamada, Kitaro; Inui, Shoji; Masuda, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage were studied in terms of the radiological and histological findings. The cases having hemorrhage in the tumor, as established through CT or histologically, were excluded if their onsets were not sudden due to intracranial hemorrhages. The results obtained may be summarized as follows: 1) From an anatomical point of view, cerebral subcortical hemorrhages account for 80%; hemorrhages in the cerebellopontine angle, 10%, and hemorrhages in the basal ganglia, 10%. 2) Plain CT findings showed perifocal low-density areas within 24 hours after onset in all 10 cases. 3) Enhanced CT findings showed enhanced areas in 4 or 6 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 5) From a histological point of view, glioblastomas account for 30%; malignant astrocytomas, 20%; astrocytomas, 20%; malignant ependymomas, 10%; hemangioblastoma, 10%, and transitional meningiomas, 10%. In conclusion, a perifocal low-density area on CT within 24 hours after onset is the most meaningful indication of intracranial hemorrhage originating from a brain tumor. A histological 'perinuclear halo' in an astrocytoma as an artifact due to hemorrhage may often be misleading in diagnosing mixed oligo-astrocytomas. (author)

  7. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as acute scrotum

    Introduction. In newborns, adrenal hemorrhage is not an uncommon event. The large size of the adrenal cortex contributes to an increased vulnerability to trauma during a difficult delivery [1]. However, the neonatal adrenal hemorrhage may rarely present as inguinoscrotal swelling [2,3]. This condition can simulate torsion of ...

  8. Detecting fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed; Berkowicz, Adela

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the area of detection of fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry.......The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the area of detection of fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry....

  9. Recurrent spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage associated with ...

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 15% of stroke cases in the US and Europe and up to 30% in Asian populations. Intracerebral hemorrhage is a relatively uncommon form of stroke-it causes only 10 to 15 percent of all strokes. It is more disabling and has a higher mortality rate than ischemic stroke, ...

  10. Hydrocephalus associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Nosaka, Yoshiki

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen patients exhibited a communicating hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysms and were treated with shunt procedures. The interval between subarachnoid hemorrhage and surgery averaged 9 weeks. Seven of the patients showed improvement. The prognostic value for surgical management was evaluated on the basis of three different diagnostic examinations (computed tomography (CT), cisternography and constant infusion test). A correct diagnosis was obtained in 78 per cent in cisternography, and 63 per cent in infusion test and CT. All patients responding to surgery showed a typical pattern in cisternography, consisting of ventricular retention of radiopharmaceutical tracer for 48 h or longer in association with no radioactivity over the cerebral hemispheres. The constant infusion test correlated well with typical cisternographic patterns. CT is useful in demonstrating pathophysiological changes in hydrocephalus. Periventricular hypodensity was visible in patients with normal or slightly elevated intracranial pressure, accompanied by fairly rapid deterioration. All of them responded well to shunting. In most cases which benefited from the shunt, the postoperative CT showed not only normal-sized ventricles but also marked regression of the hypodensity over a short period. (author)

  11. Lateral type of intracerebral hemorrhage

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Gotoh, Yasunobu; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Niijima, Kyo; Handa, Hajime.

    1987-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of intracerebral hemorrhages (lateral type) was studied. The strength of the magnetic field was 0.2 Tesla. Four cases were studied with inversion recovery (IR) and saturation recovery (SR) images. The findings of the acute stage (within 1 week) were a central isointensity and a peripheral low intensity on the IR image. On the SR image we recognized a central isointensity and a peripheral high intensity holding a faintly high intensity area around the hematoma. The findings of the subacute stage (from 1 to 3 weeks) were characterized by a central isointensity and a peripheral high-intensity ring, with a low-intensity area outside the hematoma on the IR image. A widespread high-intensity area including the hematoma itself and the surrounding white matter was observed on the SR image. The findings of the chronic stage (over 3 weeks) were the disapperance of a high-intensity ring and a change to a low-intensity area on the IR image. The hematoma itself and surrounding white matter had a high intensity, which has decreased in size in comparison with that of the subacute stage. The hypointensity rim was found in the immediately adjacent part of the original hematoma on the SR image. The MRI of a small hematoma 70 days from the onset showed an almost normal brain structure. Some magnetic resonance findings of intracerebral hemorrhage were reviewed. (author)

  12. Medulla Oblongata Hemorrhage and Reverse Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Gobeske, Kevin T; Sarano, Maurice E; Fugate, Jennifer E; Wijdicks, Eelco F

    2017-12-19

    Acute brain injury with strong surges of adrenergic outflow has resulted in takotsubo cardiomyopathy, but there are surprisingly few reports of takotsubo cardiomyopathy after intracranial hemorrhage, and none have been described from hemorrhage within the brainstem. We describe a patient with reverse and reversible cardiomyopathy following a hemorrhage in the lateral medulla oblongata. While it is limited in size, the location of the hemorrhage caused acute systolic failure with left ventricular ejection fraction of 27% and vasopressor requirement for cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema. There was full recovery after 7 days. Detailed case report. Hemorrhage into medulla oblongata pressor centers may result in acute, reversible, stress-induced cardiomyopathy, affirming the adrenergic origin of this condition.

  13. Neck and scleral hemorrhage in drowning.

    Alexander, Russell T; Jentzen, Jeffrey M

    2011-03-01

    The determination of the cause and manner of death for a body recovered from the water can be difficult because of a lack of autopsy findings specific for drowning. This case report describes a 30-year-old man found submerged at the bottom of a hotel pool. An autopsy revealed scleral hemorrhages and fascial hemorrhages of multiple muscles of the anterior and posterior neck bilaterally. No evidence of traumatic injury was on the surface of the body. An investigation by law enforcement found no evidence of foul play. The occurrence of petechial and neck hemorrhage in a body recovered from the water is controversial, and a review of this literature will be given. We suggest that fascial hemorrhages of the muscles of the neck, as well as cephalic hemorrhages, can be explained by drowning-related elevated central venous pressure that is communicated to the head through the valveless veins of the neck. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. A case of traumatic intraventricular hemorrhage

    Ikeda, Yukio; Yamakawa, Kazuomi; Nakazawa, Shozo.

    1980-01-01

    CT scan is recognized to be a rapid, noninvasive and informative examination in evaluation of the head injured patient. It is also possible to evaluate the presence of the intracerebral hematoma without remarkable mass effect, cerebral contusion, associated cerebral edema and ventricular hemorrhage. We present a case of traumatic intraventricular hemorrhage. The patient was a 40-year-old male admitted to our hospital in a drowsy state following a fall from about one meter high. Craniogram showed a linear fracture in the left parietotemporal regions. In the CT scan, intraventricular hemorrhage associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage without intracerebral hematoma was shown. A symmetrical moderate dilatation of both lateral ventricles was also shown. Cerebral angiography revealed no abnormality. His condition deteriorated progressively, so ventricular drainage was performed, but he expired 5 days later. Considering this case, the mechanisms of pure intraventricular hemorrhage following head injury were discussed. (author)

  15. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset). Comparison of pre- and post-CT era and their prognostic factors

    Ban, S.; Ogata, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakao, S.; Mizue, H. (Kobe Central Municipal Hospital (Japan)); Kobayashi, Y.

    1982-04-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages.

  16. Role of angiography in diagnosis of endovasal treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Prokubovskij, V.I.; Ovchininskij, M.N.; Cherkasov, V.A.; Kapranov, S.A. (Vtoroj Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR))

    Potentialities of angiography in the diagnosis of the nature and site of gastrointestinal hemorrhages have been defined; indications to its application have been specified. The results of angiographic studies and endovascular interventions in 106 patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhages are presented. The authors describe angiographic manifestations of deseases that most frequently are complicated by hemorrhages to the gastrointestinal tract, peptic ulcer in the gastroduodenal zone, gastric cancer, hepatocirrhosis and colonic cancer. The paper is concerned with the data on the frequency of the angiographic signs of these deseases. A necessity to use X-ray contrast examination of the vessels for endovasal catheter hemostasis is shown with reference to 52 patients; the peculiarities of its performance are described.

  17. Subinternal limiting membrane hemorrhage post-Ahmed glaucoma valve in vitrectomized eye

    Bhuvan Chanana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma drainage devices are mostly used for refractory glaucoma. Early postoperative complications include flat anterior chamber, choroidal effusion, and suprachoroidal hemorrhage. An 8-year-old male patient with a prior history of vitreous surgery for traumatic vitreous hemorrhage, presented to us with angle recession glaucoma in his right eye. His intraocular pressure (IOP was 44 mmHg despite maximum antiglaucoma medication. Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV surgery was performed to control his IOP. In the early postoperative period, the patient developed premacular subinternal limiting membrane (ILM hemorrhage, which did not resolve even after 4 weeks. Vitreoretinal intervention involving removal of the thickened ILM and sub-ILM bleed had to be performed. To the best of our knowledge, no case has been reported with sub-ILM bleed post aqueous humor shunts. Here, we report a case of premacular sub-ILM bleed following AGV in vitrectomized eye.

  18. Treatment of non-neoplastic renal hemorrhage with segmental embolization of renal artery

    Zhu Bing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of segmental embolization of renal artery in dealing with non- neoplastic renal hemorrhage. Methods: Four cases of non-neoplastic hemorrhage, including 2 with bleeding after renal acupuncture biopsy, 2 with bleeding after nephrolithotomy and 1 with congenital renal arteriovenous malformation, were treated with superselective segmental embolization of renal artery. 2 were embolized with coil, 1 with alcohol plus coil and 1 with PVA parcels. Results: Hematuria disappeared in 1-3 days. There was no recurrence in 7-45 months follow up and no complications induced by embolization. Conclusion: It is a safe and reliable therapy to treat non-neoplastic renal hemorrhage with segmental embolization of renal artery. (authors)

  19. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the Yaeyama islands, Japan, from 1989 to 2002

    Izumihara, Akifumi; Shimoji, Takashi; Uesugi, Masashi; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Ie, Tomoji

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze epidemiological and clinical data of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the Yaeyama islands, an isolated subtropical region of Japan. A total of 94 patients (31 men and 63 women, mean age 57.3 years) were diagnosed as having non-traumatic SAH during a 13-year period from 1989 to 2002. The age-and sex-adjusted annual incidence rate of SAH was 17.4 per 100,000 population. The incidence of SAH was the highest in August. Seventy-nine patients were hospitalized within 24 hours after onset of SAH. Seventeen patients were transferred by helicopter. The Hunt and Kosnik grade was I in 29 patients (30.9%). The CT Fisher group was 3 in 42 patients (44.7%). Ruptured aneurysm was detected in 78 patients (saccular type in 70 patients, small size in 49 patients, and internal carotid artery in 28 patients). Rebleeding occurred in 20 patients (21.3%). Symptomatic vasospasm occurred in 26 patients (27.7%). Acute and chronic hydrocephalus occurred in 25 (26.6%) and 22 (23.4%) patients respectively. A total of 120 neurosurgical operations were performed in 70 patients (operation for ruptured aneurysm in 62, early operation in 39). A total of 42 operative complications occurred in 29 patients. Fifty-one patients (54.3%) had a good outcome. The number of full-time neurosurgeons did not influence the performance of neurosurgical operation and outcome. In conclusion, epidemiologically, the high incidence of SAH in August is unusual. Patients with aneurysmal SAH in the Yaeyama islands have common clinical characteristics and undergo standard neurosurgical treatment. (author)

  20. Vocal fold varices and risk of hemorrhage.

    Tang, Christopher Guan-Zhong; Askin, Gülce; Christos, Paul J; Sulica, Lucian

    2016-05-01

    To establish risk of hemorrhage in patients with varices compared to those without, determine additional risk factors, and make evidence-based treatment recommendations. Retrospective cohort study. Patients who were vocal performers presenting for care during a 24-month period were analyzed to determine incidence of hemorrhage. Patients with varices were compared to those without. Demographic information and examination findings (presence, location, character, and size of varices; presence of mucosal lesions or paresis) were analyzed to determine predictors of hemorrhage. A total of 513 patients (60.4% female, mean age 36.6 years ± 13.95 years) were evaluated; 14 patients presenting with hemorrhage were excluded. One hundred and twelve (22.4%) patients had varices; 387 (77.6%) did not. The rate of hemorrhage in patients with varices was 2.68% at 12 months compared to 0.8% in patients without. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed a hazard ratio of 10.1 for patients with varix developing hemorrhage compared to nonvarix patients (P hemorrhage was 3.3 cases per 1,000 person-months for varix patients compared to 0.5 cases per 1,000 person-months in the nonvarix group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of paresis, mucosal lesions, location of varix (left or right side; medial or lateral), or varix morphology (pinpoint, linear, lake) between patients who hemorrhaged and those that did not. The presence of varices increases the risk of hemorrhage. Varix patients had 10 times the rate of hemorrhage compared to nonvarix patients, although the overall incidence is low. This data may be used to inform treatment of patients with varices. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1163-1168, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Analysis of multi-factors affecting symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in intraarterial thrombolysis with urokinase for acute ischemic stroke

    Qiao Qianlin; Zhou Shi; Wang Xuejian; Wu Qinghua; Song Jie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the causes and preventive measures of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in 217 patients with acute cerebral ischemic stroke treated with local intra-arterial urokinase. Methods: From February 1999 to June 2004, 217 patients were treated for acute ischemic stroke with local intra-arterial urokinase in our hospital. Factors associated with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage of intra-arterial thrombolysis were analyzed by Stepwise logistic regression to identify some factors relating the prediction symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. Results: Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 8 cases (3.7%). Predictors of the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage were the elevated systolic blood pressure before therapy (odds ratio, 1.096; 95% CI, 1.006 to 1.194) and urokinase (UK) treatment (odds ratio, 1.068 ; 95% CL, 1.053 to 1.247). Risk of secondary symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was increased with elevated systolic blood pressure. Other factors like age, initial treating time, NIHSS, diabetes and collateral circulation did not predict the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage respectively. Conclusions: Predictors of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after local intra-arterial infusion of urokinase for acute ischemic stroke were the elevated systolic blood pressure before therapy and urokinase (UK) treatment. (authors)

  2. Long-Term Evaluation of Changes in Operative Technique and Hardware-Related Complications With Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Falowski, Steven M; Ooi, Yinn Cher; Bakay, Roy A E

    2015-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation is the most frequent neurosurgical procedure for movement disorders. While this elective procedure carries a low-risk profile, it is not free of complications. As a new procedure, the pattern of complications changed with experience and modification of surgical technique and equipment. This review analyzes the most common hardware-related complications that may occur and techniques to avoid them. It is a retrospective review of 432 patients undergoing 1077 procedures over a 14-year period by one surgeon with emphasis on the analysis of surgical technique and the changes over time. Comparisons were made pre and postimplementation of different surgical techniques over different time periods. The epochs relate to the learning curve, new equipment, and new techniques. Overall lead revision was observed at 5.7%, extension revision at 3.2%, infection rate at 1.2%, infarct without intracerebral hemorrhage at 0.8%, and intracerebral hemorrhage at 2.5% with a permanent deficit of 0.2%. An analysis and change in surgical technique which involved isolating the lead from the skin surface at both the cranial and retro-auricular incision also demonstrated a substantial decrease in lead fracture rate and infection rate. There was no mortality. This large series of patients and long-term follow-up demonstrates that risks are very low in comparison with other neurosurgical procedures, but DBS is still an elective procedure that necessitates extensive care and precision. In a rapidly evolving field, attention to surgical technique is imperative and will keep rates of complications at a minimum. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  3. Outcomes in variceal hemorrhage following the use of a balloon tamponade device.

    Nadler, Jonathan; Stankovic, Nikola; Uber, Amy; Holmberg, Mathias J; Sanchez, Leon D; Wolfe, Richard E; Chase, Maureen; Donnino, Michael W; Cocchi, Michael N

    2017-10-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A balloon tamponade device (BTD), such as the Sengstaken-Blakemore or Minnesota tube, may be used in cases of variceal hemorrhage. While these devices may be effective at controlling acute bleeding, the effect on patient outcomes remains less clear. We sought to describe the number of patients with variceal hemorrhage and a BTD who survive to discharge, survive to one-year, and develop complications related to a BTD. In this retrospective study, we identified patients at a single, tertiary care center who underwent placement of a BTD for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage between 2003 and 2014. Patient characteristics and outcomes were summarized using descriptive statistics. 34 patients with a BTD were identified. Median age was 57.5 (IQR 47-63) and 76% (26/34) were male. Approximately 59% (20/34) of patients survived to discharge, and 41% (13/32) were alive after one year. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Of those surviving to discharge, 95% (19/20) had undergone transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), while 36% (5/14) of patients who did not survive to discharge had TIPS (p<0.01). One complication, an esophageal perforation, was identified and managed conservatively. In this cohort of patients undergoing BTD placement for variceal hemorrhage, approximately 59% of patients were alive at discharge and 41% were alive after one year. Placement of a BTD as a temporizing measure in the management of acute variceal hemorrhage may be helpful, particularly when utilized as a bridge to more definitive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Outcomes in variceal hemorrhage following the use of a balloon tamponade device

    Nadler, Jonathan; Stankovic, Nikola; Uber, Amy; Holmberg, Mathias J.; Sanchez, Leon D.; Wolfe, Richard E.; Chase, Maureen; Donnino, Michael W.; Cocchi, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Variceal hemorrhage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A balloon tamponade device (BTD), such as the Sengstaken-Blakemore or Minnesota tube, may be used in cases of variceal hemorrhage. While these devices may be effective at controlling acute bleeding, the effect on patient outcomes remains less clear. We sought to describe the number of patients with variceal hemorrhage and a BTD who survive to discharge, survive to one-year, and develop complications related to a BTD. Methods In this retrospective study, we identified patients at a single, tertiary care center who underwent placement of a BTD for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage between 2003 and 2014. Patient characteristics and outcomes were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results 34 patients with a BTD were identified. Median age was 57.5 (IQR 47–63) and 76% (26/34) were male. Approximately 59% (20/34) of patients survived to discharge, and 41% (13/32) were alive after one year. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Of those surviving to discharge, 95% (19/20) had undergone transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), while 36% (5/14) of patients who did not survive to discharge had TIPS (p < 0.01). One complication, an esophageal perforation, was identified and managed conservatively. Conclusion In this cohort of patients undergoing BTD placement for variceal hemorrhage, approximately 59% of patients were alive at discharge and 41% were alive after one year. Placement of a BTD as a temporizing measure in the management of acute variceal hemorrhage may be helpful, particularly when utilized as a bridge to more definitive therapy. PMID:28460805

  5. Impact of leukoaraiosis on parenchymal hemorrhage in elderly patients treated with thrombolysis

    Nighoghossian, Norbert; Cho, Tae-Hee; Cottaz, Vincent; Mechtouff, Laura; Derex, Laurent [Universite Lyon 1, Department of Stroke, Neurological Hospital, Lyon (France); Abbas, Fatima; Schott, Anne Marie [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pole Information Medicale Evaluation Recherche, Lyon (France); Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Janecek, Elie; Hermier, Marc; Tisserand, Louis Guy; Amelie, Roxana; Chamard, Leila; Berthezene, Yves [Universite Lyon 1, Department of Neuroradiology, Neurological Hospital, Bron, Lyon (France); Bischoff, Magali; El Khoury, Carlos [RESUVAL Stroke Network, Lyon (France)

    2016-10-15

    Severity of vascular damage of white matter may predict hemorrhagic transformation (HT). We assess the relationship between leukoaraiosis (LA) severity and the type of hemorrhagic transformation in elderly patients treated with thrombolysis. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data and pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 180 consecutive ischemic stroke patients aged over 75 years. LA severity was graded according to the Fazekas scale, and acute diffusion-weighted-imaging (DWI) lesion volumes were semi-automatically outlined. Predictors of hemorrhagic infarction (HI) and parenchymal hemorrhage (PH) were identified using logistic regression analysis and exact multinomial logistic analysis. HT occurred in 31 patients (17 %). Baseline National Institute of Health Stroke Score (NIHSS; p = 0.008), severe LA (p = 0.02), and diffusion lesion volume (p = 0.02) were predictors of HT in univariable logistic regression. Adjusted to lesion volume and baseline NIHSS score, exact multinomial logistic analysis showed that severe LA was the only independent predictor of parenchymal hemorrhage (p = 0.03). In elderly patients, LA severity better predicts parenchymal hemorrhage than infarct size. (orig.)

  6. [Severe post-partum hemorrhage: descriptive study at the Robert-Debré Hospital maternity ward].

    Reyal, F; Deffarges, J; Luton, D; Blot, P; Oury, J F; Sibony, O

    2002-06-01

    To analyze the prevalence, cause, treatment, and risk factors of severe post-partum hemorrhage (transfusion, surgery, radiology) observed at the maternity ward of the Robert-Debré Hospital, Paris. Method. This retrospective cohort was collected from a database including 19182 deliveries from 1992 to 1998. The entire medical file was reviewed in cases of severe hemorrhage. The prevalence of severe post-partum hemorrhage was 23 per 10,000 deliveries (44 patients). Transfusion was performed in 44/44 and hysterectomy in 3/44. Three patients were transferred to the intensive care unit. There were no deaths. At multivariate analysis, risk factors for severe post-partum hemorrhage were: abnormal placental insertion (OR=7.2; 95CI: 2.18-18.3), cesarean (OR=5.8; 95CI: 2.9-11.6), multiple pregnancy (OR=3.2; 95CI: 1.3-7.8), prematurity (OR=3, 95CI: 1.5-6.2), hypertension (OR=2.9; 95CI: 1.3-6.3). Twenty-six percent of the patients had no risk factors. The prevalence of severe pot-partum hemorrhage is low in our experience. The methodology used for this retrospective cohort does not enable an explanation. Intensive obstetrical care is necessary in case of abnormal placenta insertion. In 10 out of 44 cases, severe post-partum hemorrhage occurred in a context of insufficient monitoring, late or erroneous diagnosis, or incorrect treatment.

  7. Brain hemorrhage associated with maintenance hemodialysis. CT analysis of 19 cases

    Kawahata, Nobuya

    1994-01-01

    The CT findings of 19 hemodialyzed patients with brain hemorrhage (BH) were evaluated. The 30-day mortality rate was 78.9%. The lesion locations in the 19 cases with BH were putaminal hemorrhage in 8 patients, putaminothalamic (mixed) hemorrhage in 7, thalamic hemorrhage in one, subcortical hemorrhage in one, and cerebellar hemorrhage in one. In the remaining patient, the bleeding was confined to the ventricular system. One remarkable CT finding was the formation of a massive hematoma in most cases. In some cases, the hematoma occupied the greater part of one cerebral hemisphere. Oral anticoagulants and/or antiplatelet drugs, and intravenous heparinization could produce massive accumulations of blood in the brain parenchyma. The second major finding was the low CT absorption values of the hematoma at the acute stage, as compared to that of hypertensive BH. This decreased absorption density resulted from a low hemoglobin concentration in the hematoma itself due to the severe anemia occurring in patients on long-term maintenance hemodialysis. (author)

  8. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Jan Betka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225 removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI was observed in 124 cases (45% immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33% on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%, headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery.

  9. Intracerebral hematoma complicating herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Rodríguez-Sainz, Aida; Escalza-Cortina, Inés; Guio-Carrión, Laura; Matute-Nieves, Alexandra; Gómez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carbayo-Lozano, Guillermo; Garcia-Monco, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    To describe two patients who developed an intracranial hematoma as a complication of temporal lobe encephalitis due to herpes simplex type 1 virus, and to review the literature. The first patient, a 45-year-old woman developed a brain hematoma in the location of the encephalitic lesion on day 9 after the onset of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) that required surgical evacuation. The second patient, a 53-year-old woman was being treated for HSE; on day 8 after admission a temporal lobe hematoma with midline shift was disclosed due to persistent headache. Both patients survived but were left with sequelae. We conducted a PubMed/MEDLINE search from 1986 to April 2013 on this topic. We have found 20 additional cases reported in the literature and review their characteristics. Hemorrhage was present on admission in 35% of pooled patients, and consistently involved the area of encephalitis. Clinical presentation of intracranial hemorrhage overlapped the encephalitic symptoms in two-thirds of the patients. Half of patients underwent surgery. Overall, mortality rate was low (5.2%), and half of patients fully recovered. Intracranial bleeding, although infrequent, can complicate the evolution of herpes simplex encephalitis and should be borne in mind since its presence may require neurosurgery. Although its presentation may overlap the encephalitic features, the lack of improvement or the worsening of initial symptoms, particularly during the second week of admission, should lead to this suspicion and to perform a neuroimaging study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare up as acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage with bilateral lower limb paralysis

    Xiang Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is an uncommon complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Solitary association of fatal spinal SAH as a complication of SLE, has not been encountered much in literature although coexisting acute cerebral and spinal SAH have been associated with SLE. We present a 39-year old female with initial diagnosis of SLE eight years ago who suddenly developed a productive cough, acute abdomen and paralysis of the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed thoracic spinal SAH with varying degrees of thoracic spinal cord compression. The hemorrhage was total evacuated via surgery. She regained normal function of her lower limbers after the operation with no further neurological complications. One of the rare but fatal complications of SLE is solitary spinal SAH without cranial involvement. The best and most appropriate management of this kind of presentation is surgical decompression of the hematoma with total hemostasis. The cause of hemorrhage should be identified intra-operatively and treated appropriately.

  11. Ultrasound Imaging of Mouse Fetal Intracranial Hemorrhage Due to Ischemia/Reperfusion

    Kenichi Funamoto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite vast improvement in perinatal care during the 30 years, the incidence rate of neonatal encephalopathy remains unchanged without any further Progress towards preventive strategies for the clinical impasse. Antenatal brain injury including fetal intracranial hemorrhage caused by ischemia/reperfusion is known as one of the primary triggers of neonatal injury. However, the mechanisms of antenatal brain injury are poorly understood unless better predictive models of the disease are developed. Here we show a mouse model for fetal intracranial hemorrhage in vivo developed to investigate the actual timing of hypoxia-ischemic events and their related mechanisms of injury. Intrauterine growth restriction mouse fetuses were exposed to ischemia/reperfusion cycles by occluding and opening the uterine and ovarian arteries in the mother. The presence and timing of fetal intracranial hemorrhage caused by the ischemia/reperfusion were measured with histological observation and ultrasound imaging. Protein-restricted diet increased the risk of fetal intracranial hemorrhage. The monitoring of fetal brains by ultrasound B-mode imaging clarified that cerebral hemorrhage in the fetal brain occurred after the second ischemic period. Three-dimensional ultrasound power Doppler imaging visualized the disappearance of main blood flows in the fetal brain. These indicate a breakdown of cerebrovascular autoregulation which causes the fetal intracranial hemorrhage. This study supports the fact that the ischemia/reperfusion triggers cerebral hemorrhage in the fetal brain. The present method enables us to noninvasively create the cerebral hemorrhage in a fetus without directly touching the body but with repeated occlusion and opening of the uterine and ovarian arteries in the mother.

  12. Clinical aspects and prognosis of intraventricular hemorrhage with cerebrovascular disease

    Ikeda, Yukio; Nakazawa, Shozo; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Kenji; Kouzo

    1982-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage with cerebrovascular disease was identified in 81 cases and death occurred within seven days in 34 cases. Hypertension was the most common etiological factor, accounting for 40 of the 81 cases. Cerebral aneurysm was the second most common cause accounting for 27 cases, arteriovenous malformation accounted for 9 of the cases, and 5 were of other causes. Signs of primary or secondary brain stem dysfunction were mainly seen in cases with hypertension and aneurysm, while cases with arteriovenous malformation had benign courses. The mortality depended on the severity of intraventricular hemorrhage; i.e., the distribution, site, and the number of cast formation. The presence of intraventricular clot in the third and/or fourth ventricles was correlated with a high mortality rate, especially in cases accompanied by cast formation and third and fourth ventricular dilatation, which affects hypothalamus and brain stem function. Analysis of CT findings for the mechanism of intraventricular hemorrhage revealed three types: extension type, in which massive intracerebral hematomas extended and ruptured into ventricles; the direct type, which bled directly into ventricles without forming definite intracerebral hematomas; and the reflux type, which was characterized by reflux of the subarachnoid blood. (J.P.N.)

  13. Modified Approach in Management of Submacular Hemorrhage Secondary to Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Kumar, Atul; Roy, Sangeeta; Bansal, Mayank; Tinwala, Sana; Aron, Neelima; Temkar, Shreyas; Pujari, Amar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical outcomes of a modified approach in the management of thick submacular hemorrhage in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration. This was a retrospective study. A retrospective chart review was performed on 10 eyes of 10 patients with submacular hemorrhage secondary to wet age-related macular degeneration treated with 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy, followed by submacular injection of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (12.5 μg/0.1 mL), bevacizumab (2.5 mg/0.1 mL), and air (0.3 mL). Gas tamponade was given with 20% SF6 and postoperative propped-up positioning. Patients were evaluated for displacement of hemorrhage, preoperative and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity, occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications, and recurrence of hemorrhage. All patients were followed up for 6 months. Displacement of the submacular bleed was achieved in all cases. Improvement of best-corrected visual acuity was seen in 8 of 10 patients. Rebleed was seen in 2 eyes that were retreated with intravitreal injection of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, bevacizumab, and 20% SF6 gas. This modified technique aids in the effective displacement of thick submacular hemorrhage with simultaneous treatment of the underlying choroidal neovascular membrane, which halts the disease progression resulting in significant improvement of visual acuity.

  14. UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT HEMORRHAGE AND NONSTEROIDALANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS (NSAIDs – A 5-YEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Pavel Skok

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are a common cause of digestive tract hemorrhage.Study aims. The purpose of the study was to ascertain the percent of patients taking NSAIDs with upper digestive tract hemorrhage.Type of study. Prospective, analytical.Patients and methods. The study includes patients in which urgent endoscopic investigations of the upper digestive tract were carried out due to gastrointestinal hemorrhage between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 1998.Results. 3366 patients were investigated: 1222 women and 2144 men; the average age of our patients was 57.5 years (SD ± 17.1, a 2–97 year span. In 2905 patients (86.3% the source of bleeding was confirmed in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Among our patients 55% were aged over 60 years, 26.7% were older than 80 years. Sequelae of peptic ulcer disease were the most significant cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage, in 47.7% of our patients (1387/2905. In the last week prior to bleeding, 19% of patients (552/2905 were taking regularly NSAIDs, corticosteroids, salycilates or anticoagulant therapy at least in single daily dose. The majority of patients, 94.5%, were taking NSAIDs or salycilates. Among NSAIDs they were taking most often ketoprofen, diclofenac or naproxen/ naproxen natrium, less often ibuprofen, nabumeton, etodolac or piroxicam.Conclusions. Upper digestive tract hemorrhage is a serious complication of NSAIDs medication, particularly in older patients

  15. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy

    Sultan Ecer Menteş

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is a rare form of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Mostly it appears under three years of age and is characterized by purpuric skin lesions, fever and edema. A three years-old boy, who has cough and coryzea was admitted to our clinic for fever and red spots on legs and arms. In physical examination; ecimotic skin lesions on right ear, face, arms, dorsal of the hands, buttocks, legs and dorsal of the feet were found. In the laboratory tests acute phase reactants were elevated and blood coagulation tests were in normal range. Hepatit A,B,C and TORCH markers were negative. Punch biopsy obtained from gluteal area showed leukositoclastic vasculity. Focal fibrinogen accumulation was detected by immun fluorescent microscopy. Regression on lesions was not observed despite supportive therapy, so prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day therapy was started. On the third day of the steroid therapy, complete recovery was achived.

  16. Management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Etminan, N; Macdonald, R L

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) affects people with a mean age of 55 years. Although there are about 9/100 000 cases per year worldwide, the young age and high morbidity and mortality lead to loss of many years of productive life. Intracranial aneurysms account for 85% of cases. Despite this, the majority of survivors of aneurysmal SAH have cognitive deficits, mood disorders, fatigue, inability to return to work, and executive dysfunction and are often unable to return to their premorbid level of functioning. The main proven interventions to improve outcome are aneurysm repair in a timely fashion by endovascular coiling rather than neurosurgical clipping when feasible and administration of nimodipine. Management also probably is optimized by neurologic intensive care units and multidisciplinary teams. Improved diagnosis, early aneurysm repair, administration of nimodipine, and advanced neurointensive care support may be responsible for improvement in survival from SAH in the last few decades. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Intracraneal complications after raquis surgery.

    Sierra, J J; Malillos, M

    Intracraneal bleeding is a rare complication after raquis surgery. It is believed to occur as a drop in the intracraneal pressure after a loss of CSF secondary to an iatrogenic dural tear. We report a patient who after surgery for lumbar stenosis presented a subarachnoid haemorrhage, an intraparenchymal haematoma, and a subdural haematoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature with such complications after this type of surgery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito

    1991-01-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author)

  19. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-03-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author).

  20. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    Emadi Koochak H

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF was first described in the Crimea in 1944 and then in 1956 in congo. CCHF is a viral hemorrhagic fever of the Nairovirus group that belongs to Bunyaviridae family virus. It is transmitted to human by tick bite. The most efficient and common tick that is the vectors of CCHF is a member of the Hyalomma genus which infected many mammals such as livestock, this tick is the main reservoire of virus in nature. Humans also become infected with CCHF virus by direct contact with blood or other infected tissues from livestock or human patients (nosocomial infection. Disease has been found in saharic Africa, Eastern Europe, Pakistan, India and Middle East (specially Iran and Iraq. This disease recently spread in Iran so in 1999 to 2001 at least 222 suspected case(81 definite case reported that led to the death of 15 of 81 cases. It is estimated that 30 percent of the country's cattle are contaminated with this virus."nIn humans, after a short incubation period it appears suddenly with fever, chills, myalgia and GI symptoms followed by severe bleeding and DIC that led to death .If the patient improved, has a long {2-4 weeks convalescence period. Disease diagnosed by clinical manifestations, serologic tests, viral culture and PCR and its specific treatment is oral ribavirin for 10 days, for prevention of disease personal protective measures from tick bite, spraying poison of mews to reduce of ticks crowd, isolation of patients and dis-infection of contaminated personal equipments that who suffering from CCHF is recommended.