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Sample records for hemophilia cohort hgds-3

  1. Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemophilia is a rare disorder in which the blood does not clot normally. It is usually inherited. Hemophilia usually occurs in males. If you have hemophilia, you have little or no clotting factor. Clotting ...

  2. Hemophilia - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - hemophilia ... The following organizations provide further information on hemophilia : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemophilia/index.html National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov/ ...

  3. The Hypertension of Hemophilia Is Not Explained by the Usual Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Results of a Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Thomas J.; Sait, Afrah S.; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Quon, Doris V. K.; von Drygalski, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Background. The etiology of the high prevalence of hypertension among patients with hemophilia (PWH) remains unknown. Methods. We compared 469 PWH in the United States with males from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to determine whether differences in cardiovascular risk factors can account for the hypertension in hemophilia. Results. Median systolic and diastolic BP were higher in PWH than NHANES (P hemophilia. New investigations into the missing link between hemophilia and hypertension should include age of onset of hypertension and hemophilia-specific morbidities such as the role of inflammatory joint disease. PMID:27965893

  4. Hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor VIII deficiency; Classic hemophilia; Bleeding disorder - hemophilia A ... When you bleed, a series of reactions take place in the body that helps blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation ...

  5. [Hemophilia camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Sierra, Julieta; Del Pilar Torres-Arreola, Laura; Marín-Palomares, Teresa; Dueñas-González, María Teresa; Monteros-Rincón, Martha Patricia; Osorio-Guzmán, Maricela

    2013-01-01

    We reported the experience of hemophilia camps which was accomplished with patients from hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. The aim was to prepare the families and patients regarding the disease treatment, in order to promote the self sufficiency and to know the impact of the program on the course of the disease. Surveys were applied about treatment items and personal opinions were collected. The results of the national hemophilia camp were: group of 56 patients, average 14 years, 2 % women, 51 % severe hemophilia and 43 % had hemophilic brothers. Benefits: patients increased their knowledge about earlier bleeding identification and the self-infusion method; they became aware on their responsibility in self care, timely treatment and duties at home. Hemophilia camps with patients are an option for attitude change before disease complications. Social network creation and the increase in self-sufficiency are other benefits.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions hemophilia hemophilia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder that slows the blood ...

  7. Living with Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Hemophilia If you or your child has hemophilia, you ... today is likely to live a normal lifespan. Hemophilia Treatment Centers The Federal Government funds a nationwide ...

  8. Hemophilia Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Hemophilia Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hemophilia Homepage Facts Diagnosis How Hemophilia is Inherited Treatment ...

  9. Hemophilia Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, testing for hemophilia is planned before the baby’s delivery so that a sample of blood can be ... after drawing blood and heel sticks (pricking the infant’s heel to draw blood ... after a difficult delivery or after using special devices or instruments to ...

  10. Risk Factors for High-Titer Inhibitor Development in Children with Hemophilia A: Results of a Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Halimeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the discussed risk factors for high-titre inhibitor (HRI development in patients with hemophilia A (HA are high dose FVIII replacement therapy and use of recombinant FVIII concentrates (rFVIII. The aim of this study was to evaluate the aforementioned risk factors for HRI development in children with hemophilia A ≤2%. About 288 ascertained PUPs (Israel and Germany were followed after initial HA diagnosis over 200 exposure days. Inhibitor-free survival, hazard ratios (HR, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. Adjustment was performed for factor VIII concentrates, median single dose over the first three months of treatment, first FVIII administration before the age of three months, presence of risk HA gene mutations, “intensive treatment moments” and “year of birth” (proxy for different treatment periods. HRI occurred in 71/288 children (24.7%. In multivariate analysis adjusted for “year of birth”, underlying risk gene mutations (HR/CI: 2.37/1.40–3.99, FVIII dose, measured per one IU increase per kgbw (HR/CI: 1.05/1.04–1.07, and first FVIII administration before the age of three months showed a significant impact on HR development. The risk of HRI development was similar for recombinant or plasmatic FVIII products. Children at risk should be treated with carefully calculated lower dose regimens, adapted to individual bleeding situations.

  11. Risk factors for high-titer inhibitor development in children with hemophilia A: results of a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimeh, Susan; Bidlingmaier, Christoph; Heller, Christine; Gutsche, Sven; Holzhauer, Susanne; Kenet, Gili; Kurnik, Karin; Manner, Daniela; Iorio, Alfonso; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Among the discussed risk factors for high-titre inhibitor (HRI) development in patients with hemophilia A (HA) are high dose FVIII replacement therapy and use of recombinant FVIII concentrates (rFVIII). The aim of this study was to evaluate the aforementioned risk factors for HRI development in children with hemophilia A ≤2%. About 288 ascertained PUPs (Israel and Germany) were followed after initial HA diagnosis over 200 exposure days. Inhibitor-free survival, hazard ratios (HR), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Adjustment was performed for factor VIII concentrates, median single dose over the first three months of treatment, first FVIII administration before the age of three months, presence of risk HA gene mutations, "intensive treatment moments" and "year of birth" (proxy for different treatment periods). HRI occurred in 71/288 children (24.7%). In multivariate analysis adjusted for "year of birth", underlying risk gene mutations (HR/CI: 2.37/1.40-3.99), FVIII dose, measured per one IU increase per kgbw (HR/CI: 1.05/1.04-1.07), and first FVIII administration before the age of three months showed a significant impact on HR development. The risk of HRI development was similar for recombinant or plasmatic FVIII products. Children at risk should be treated with carefully calculated lower dose regimens, adapted to individual bleeding situations.

  12. What Causes Hemophilia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Hemophilia? A defect in one of the genes that ... the hemophilia gene is inherited. Inheritance Pattern for Hemophilia—Example 1 The image shows one example of ...

  13. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed? If you or your child appears to ... have bleeding problems. However, some people who have hemophilia have no recent family history of the disease. ...

  14. Hemophilia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Hemophilia KidsHealth > For Parents > Hemophilia Print A A A ... bike or a stray kick in a soccer game means a temporary bruise or a cut that ... with hemophilia, these everyday mishaps are cause for concern. What ...

  15. Learning about Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learning About Hemophilia Specific Genetic Disorders Specific Genetic Disorders Learning About Prostate Cancer See Also: Talking Glossary of ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About ... hemophilia? Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder that slows down the blood clotting process. People ...

  16. What is Hemophilia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemophilia? Español Hemophilia (heem-o-FILL-ee-ah) is a rare ... blood doesn't clot normally. If you have hemophilia, you may bleed for a longer time than ...

  17. Frequently Asked Questions: Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resource Annual Global Survey Treatment Guidelines Laboratory Manual Hemophilia in Pictures Young Voices Compendium of Assessment Tools Educational Games Video Library Find a Treatment Centre Haemophilia Journal ...

  18. Variation in baseline factor VIII concentration in a retrospective cohort of mild/moderate hemophilia A patients carrying identical F8 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomans, J.I.; Velzen, A.S. van; Eckhardt, C.L.; Peters, M.; Makipernaa, A.; Holmstrom, M.; Brons, P.P.T.; Dors, N.; Haya, S.; Voorberg, J.; Bom, J.G. Van Der; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor VIII levels vary in mild and moderate hemophilia A (MHA) patients with the same mutation. We aimed to estimate the variation and determinants of factor VIII levels among MHA patients. Age and genotype explain 59% of the observed inter-individual variation in factor VIII levels.

  19. How Is Hemophilia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ways to correct the faulty genes that cause hemophilia. Gene therapy hasn't yet developed to the point that it's an accepted treatment for hemophilia. However, researchers continue to test gene therapy in clinical trials. For more information, go to ...

  20. Hemophilia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on something called gene therapy for people with hemophilia. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that tries to provide ... with the genetic information it doesn't have. Hemophilia is considered a good test for gene therapy because it is caused by only one defective ...

  1. Hemophilia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on something called gene therapy for people with hemophilia. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that tries to provide ... with the genetic information it doesn't have. Hemophilia is considered a good test for gene therapy because it is caused by only one defective ...

  2. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, M K; Evens, H; VandenDriessche, T

    2013-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders resulting from deficiencies of factor VIII and FIX, respectively. Purified clotting factor concentrates are currently intravenously administered to treat hemophilia, but this treatment is non-curative. Therefore, gene-based therapies for hemophilia have been developed to achieve sustained high levels of clotting factor expression to correct the clinical phenotype. Over the past two decades, different types of viral and non-viral gene delivery systems have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy research with a variety of target cells, particularly hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, skeletal muscle cells, and endothelial cells. Lentiviral and adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. In preclinical hemophilia A and B animal models, the bleeding phenotype was corrected with these vectors. Some of these promising preclinical results prompted clinical translation to patients suffering from a severe hemophilic phenotype. These patients receiving gene therapy with AAV vectors showed long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels, which is a major step forwards in this field. Nevertheless, the levels were insufficient to prevent trauma or injury-induced bleeding episodes. Another challenge that remains is the possible immune destruction of gene-modified cells by effector T cells, which are directed against the AAV vector antigens. It is therefore important to continuously improve the current gene therapy approaches to ultimately establish a real cure for hemophilia. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  3. Animal Models of Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Denise E.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Merricks, Elizabeth; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Herzog, Roland W.; Monahan, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    The X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia is caused by mutations in coagulation factor VIII (hemophilia A) or factor IX (hemophilia B). Unless prophylactic treatment is provided, patients with severe disease (less than 1% clotting activity) typically experience frequent spontaneous bleeds. Current treatment is largely based on intravenous infusion of recombinant or plasma-derived coagulation factor concentrate. More effective factor products are being developed. Moreover, gene therapies for sustained correction of hemophilia are showing much promise in pre-clinical studies and in clinical trials. These advances in molecular medicine heavily depend on availability of well-characterized small and large animal models of hemophilia, primarily hemophilia mice and dogs. Experiments in these animals represent important early and intermediate steps of translational research aimed at development of better and safer treatments for hemophilia, such a protein and gene therapies or immune tolerance protocols. While murine models are excellent for studies of large groups of animals using genetically defined strains, canine models are important for testing scale-up and for longer-term follow-up as well as for studies that require larger blood volumes. PMID:22137432

  4. Understanding Hemophilia. Implications for the Physical Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Jeffrey D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes hemophilia and ways to provide appropriate physical education experiences to children with hemophilia. The article focuses on what hemophilia is, how to treat hemophilia, benefits of physical activity, how to teach children with hemophilia, choosing and modifying sports and activities, and safety and emergency situations. (SM)

  5. Eloctate for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Eloctate, a recombinant factor VIII Fc fusion protein with an extended half-life, was effective in preventing and controlling bleeding in patients with severe hemophilia A. Compared to other currently available factor VIII products, Eloctate's extended half-life reduces the number of doses required for routine prophylaxis, which could improve adherence. Eloctate has not been associated with formation of neutralizing antibodies, but it was not studied in previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A, who have a higher risk of this complication. Like other recombinant factor VIII products, Eloctate is very expensive.

  6. Porcine model of hemophilia A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Kashiwakura

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a common X chromosome-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities in the coagulation factor VIII gene (F8. Hemophilia A patients suffer from a bleeding diathesis, such as life-threatening bleeding in the brain and harmful bleeding in joints and muscles. Because it could potentially be cured by gene therapy, subhuman animal models have been sought. Current mouse hemophilia A models generated by gene targeting of the F8 have difficulties to extrapolate human disease due to differences in the coagulation and immune systems between mice and humans. Here, we generated a porcine model of hemophilia A by nuclear transfer cloning from F8-targeted fibroblasts. The hemophilia A pigs showed a severe bleeding tendency upon birth, similar to human severe hemophiliacs, but in contrast to hemophilia A mice which rarely bleed under standard breed conditions. Infusion of human factor VIII was effective in stopping bleeding and reducing the bleeding frequency of a hemophilia A piglet but was blocked by the inhibitor against human factor VIII. These data suggest that the hemophilia A pig is a severe hemophilia A animal model for studying not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also the next generation recombinant coagulation factors, such as recombinant factor VIII variants with a slower clearance rate.

  7. Porcine model of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwakura, Yuji; Mimuro, Jun; Onishi, Akira; Iwamoto, Masaki; Madoiwa, Seiji; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Suzuki, Misae; Sembon, Shoichiro; Ishiwata, Akira; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Sakata, Asuka; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yazaki, Satoko; Sakata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X chromosome-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities in the coagulation factor VIII gene (F8). Hemophilia A patients suffer from a bleeding diathesis, such as life-threatening bleeding in the brain and harmful bleeding in joints and muscles. Because it could potentially be cured by gene therapy, subhuman animal models have been sought. Current mouse hemophilia A models generated by gene targeting of the F8 have difficulties to extrapolate human disease due to differences in the coagulation and immune systems between mice and humans. Here, we generated a porcine model of hemophilia A by nuclear transfer cloning from F8-targeted fibroblasts. The hemophilia A pigs showed a severe bleeding tendency upon birth, similar to human severe hemophiliacs, but in contrast to hemophilia A mice which rarely bleed under standard breed conditions. Infusion of human factor VIII was effective in stopping bleeding and reducing the bleeding frequency of a hemophilia A piglet but was blocked by the inhibitor against human factor VIII. These data suggest that the hemophilia A pig is a severe hemophilia A animal model for studying not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also the next generation recombinant coagulation factors, such as recombinant factor VIII variants with a slower clearance rate.

  8. Hemophilia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment of factor replacement therapy. If you cannot give it, take your child to the doctor's office or hospital ... care. This can include teaching them how to give their own factor injections ... they might have to take on a different role. For example, hemophilia might ...

  9. Musculoskeletal Complications of Hemophilia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The most important clinical strategy for management of patients with hemophilia is the avoidance of recurrent hemarthroses by means of continuous, intravenous hematological prophylaxis. When only intravenous on-demand hematological treatment is available, frequent evaluations are necessary for the early diagnosis and treatment of episodes of intra-articular bleeding. The natural history of the disease in patients with poorly controlled intra-articular bleeding is the development of chronic sy...

  10. Gene therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, G; Chang, P L

    2000-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked genetic disorders caused by deficiency of the coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively. Because of the health hazards and costs of current product replacement therapy, much effort is devoted to the development of gene therapy for these disorders. Approaches to gene therapy for the hemophilias include: ex vivo gene therapy in which cells from the intended recipients are explanted, genetically modified to secrete Factor VIII or IX, and reimplanted into the donor; in vivo gene therapy in which Factor VIII or IX encoding vectors are directly injected into the recipient; and non-autologous gene therapy in which universal cell lines engineered to secrete Factor VIII or IX are enclosed in immuno-protective devices before implantation into recipients. Research into these approaches is aided by the many murine and canine models available. While problems of achieving high and sustained levels of factor delivery, and issues related to efficacy, safety and cost are still to be resolved, progress in gene therapy for the hemophilias has been encouraging and is likely to reach human clinical trial in the foreseeable future.

  11. How to Deal with Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... working to develop gene therapy for people with hemophilia. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that tries to provide ... with the genetic information it doesn't have. Hemophilia is considered a good test for gene therapy because it is caused by only one defective ...

  12. How to Deal with Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... working to develop gene therapy for people with hemophilia. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that tries to provide ... with the genetic information it doesn't have. Hemophilia is considered a good test for gene therapy because it is caused by only one defective ...

  13. Limited protective effect of the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype on human immunodeficiency virus infection incidence in a cohort of patients with hemophilia and selection for genotypic X4 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K N; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Attermann, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    The relationship among CCR5 genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and disease progression and death was studied among 159 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with hemophilia. One patient (0.6%) had the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype (which occurs in approximately 2% of the Scand......The relationship among CCR5 genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and disease progression and death was studied among 159 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with hemophilia. One patient (0.6%) had the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype (which occurs in approximately 2...

  14. Researchers Develop Potential Oral Treatment for Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 162798.html Researchers Develop Potential Oral Treatment for Hemophilia Currently, genetic bleeding disorder is treated with injections ... THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with hemophilia have to endure painful injections every few days ...

  15. Hemophilia Treatments Have Come a Long Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Hemophilia Treatments Have Come a Long Way Share Tweet ... be life-threatening. back to top Treatments for Hemophilia "We have seen shifting toward the prevention of ...

  16. Previously undiagnosed hemophilia patient with intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eray Atalay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial bleeding in hemophilia patients is a rare but a mortal complication. Diagnosis of hemophilia in adulthood is an uncommon occurrence. In this case report an adult patient with intracranial hemorrhage is presented.

  17. Limited protective effect of the CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32 genotype on human immunodeficiency virus infection incidence in a cohort of patients with hemophilia and selection for genotypic X4 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K. N.; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Attermann, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    The relationship among CCR5 genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and disease progression and death was studied among 159 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients with hemophilia. One patient (0.6%) had the CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32 genotype (which occurs in ∼2% of the Scandinavian population...

  18. Adenoviral Vectors for Hemophilia Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Ng, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited blood clotting disorder resulting from deficiency of blood coagulation factors. Current standard of care for hemophilia patients is frequent intravenous infusions of the missing coagulation factor. Gene therapy for hemophilia involves the introduction of a normal copy of the deficient coagulation factor gene thereby potentially offering a definitive cure for the bleeding disorder. A variety of approaches have been pursued for hemophilia gene therapy and this review ...

  19. Neonatal hemophilia: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Ferreira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a X-linked hereditary condition that lead to decreased factor VIII activity, occurs mainly in males. Decreased factor VIII activity leads to increased risk of bleeding events. During neonatal period, diagnosis is made after post-partum bleeding complication or unexpected bleeding after medical procedures. Subgaleal hemorrhage during neonatal period is a rare, severe extracranial bleeding with high mortality and usually related to traumatic labor or coagulation disorders. Subgaleal hemorrhage complications result from massive bleeding. We present a neonate with unremarkable family history and uneventful pregnancy with a vaginal delivery with no instrumentation, presenting with severe subgaleal bleeding at 52 hours of life. Aggressive support measures were implemented and bleeding managed. The unexpected bleeding lead to a coagulation study and the diagnosis of severe hemophilia A. There were no known sequelae. This case shows a rare hemophilia presentation reflecting the importance of coagulation studies when faced with unexplained severe bleeding.

  20. Discrepant ratios of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A as compared with hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Antonio; Bertozzi, Irene; de Marinis, Giulia Berti; Tasinato, Valentina; Sambado, Luisa

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of thrombosis in patients with congenital bleeding disorders represents an exceptional event. Hemophilia A and hemophilia B patients have been showed to present both arterial and venous thrombosis (85 cases of arterial thrombosis and 34 cases of venous thrombosis). The great majority of arterial thrombosis are myocardial infarction or other acute coronary syndromes, whereas the majority of venous thrombosis are deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolisms. However there are discrepancies in the proportion of arterial and venous thrombosis seen in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B. The ratio of arterial versus venous thrombosis in hemophilia A is 3.72 whereas that for hemophilia B is 1.12. This indicates that arterial thrombosis is more frequent in hemophilia A as compared to hemophilia B and the opposite is true for venous thrombosis. The potential significance of this discrepancy is discussed.

  1. Epidemiology of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shrimati; Sharma, Nitika; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important cause of increasing mortality in elderly hemophilia population. Majority of the patients treated with virus non-inactivated factor concentrates prepared from large plasma pools prior to 1985 have been found to be infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), a major risk factor for HCC. A PubMed search of articles published until February 2015 was performed utilizing the keywords hemophilia, malignancy, neoplasm, cancer, mortality, ageing hemophilia, epidemiology, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cancer and the relevant articles were included. Contradictory reports are available in literature on the incidence of cancers in general in hemophilia population. Almost all the studies where the incidence of HCC or mortality due to HCC have been analyzed in hemophilia population show that a vast majority of these patients are HCV infected. The incidence of HCC though higher in hemophilic population is related to the higher incidence of HCV infection and not due to the hemophilia phenotype.

  2. Clinical, instrumental, serological and histological findings suggest that hemophilia B may be less severe than hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Linari, Silvia; Manetti, Mirko; Romano, Eloisa; Sofi, Francesco; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patients with severe hemophilia B may have a less severe disease compared to severe hemophilia A. To investigate clinical, radiological, laboratory and histological differences in the arthropathy of severe hemophilia A and hemophilia B, 70 patients with hemophilia A and 35 with hemophilia B with at least one joint bleeding were consecutively enrolled. Joint bleedings (50), regimen of treatment (prophylaxis/on demand), World Federation of Hemophilia, Pettersson and ultrasound scores, serum soluble RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin were assessed in all patients. RANK, RANK ligand and osteoprotegerin expression was evaluated in synovial tissue from 18 hemophilia A and 4 hemophilia B patients. The percentage of patients with either 10-50 or more than 50 hemarthrosis was greater in hemophilia A than in hemophilia B (Phemophilia B (PHemophilia (36.6 vs. 20.2; Phemophilia A patients. Serum osteoprotegerin and soluble RANK ligand were decreased in hemophilia A versus hemophilia B (Phemophilia A patients. In conclusion, the reduced number of hemarthrosis, the lower World Federation of Hemophilia and ultrasound scores, and higher osteoprotegerin expression in serum and synovial tissue in hemophilia B suggest that hemophilia B is a less severe disease than hemophilia A. Osteoprotegerin reduction seems to play a pivotal role in the progression of arthropathy in hemophilia A.

  3. CLINICOHEMATOLOGICAL STUDY OF HEMOPHILIA PATIENTS IN BHOPAL

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The X-linked inherited coagulation disorders, hemophilia A (Factor VIII deficiency) and hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency), together with Von Willebrand disease comprise 95 to 97 percent of all the Inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors. (1,2) Replacement of the deficient factor is the mainstay of treatment; it may be “on demand” or “prophylactic” to prevent hemarthrosis in severe deficiency. The prevalence of hemophilia A is 1 in 5000 and that of ...

  4. Hemophilia A in the third millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-07-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked hereditary bleeding disorder due to the deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). According to the degree of FVIII deficiency, mild, moderate or severe forms are recognized. Although patients with mild hemophilia A usually bleed excessively only after trauma or surgery, those with severe hemophilia experience frequent episodes of spontaneous or excessive bleeding after minor trauma, particularly into joints and muscles. The modern management of hemophilia began in the 1970s and is actually based upon several plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII products. In addition, the synthetic drug desmopressin can be used to prevent or treat bleeding episodes in patients with mild hemophilia A. Long-term and continuous substitution therapy (prophylaxis), the recommended treatment in severe hemophilia, prevents bleeding and the resultant joint damage. In the last twenty years the high standard of hemophilia care has greatly improved the quality of life of patients and their life expectancy has reached that of the non-hemophilic male population, at least in high-income countries. The most serious and challenging complication of treatment of hemophilia A is the development of inhibitors, which renders FVIII concentrate infusion ineffective and exposes patients to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. In this narrative review, the actual knowledge on the clinical features and management of patients with hemophilia A is summarized.

  5. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell-directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV.

  6. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell–directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M Lytle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII and IX (FIX represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV.

  7. Effects of FVIII immunity on hepatocyte and hematopoietic stem cell–directed gene therapy of murine hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Allison M; Brown, Harrison C; Paik, Na Yoon; Knight, Kristopher A; Wright, J Fraser; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses to coagulation factors VIII (FVIII) and IX (FIX) represent primary obstacles to hemophilia treatment. Previously, we showed that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) retroviral gene therapy induces immune nonresponsiveness to FVIII in both naive and preimmunized murine hemophilia A settings. Liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV)-FIX vector gene transfer achieved similar results in preclinical hemophilia B models. However, as clinical immune responses to FVIII and FIX differ, we investigated the ability of liver-directed AAV-FVIII gene therapy to affect FVIII immunity in hemophilia A mice. Both FVIII naive and preimmunized mice were administered recombinant AAV8 encoding a liver-directed bioengineered FVIII expression cassette. Naive animals receiving high or mid-doses subsequently achieved near normal FVIII activity levels. However, challenge with adjuvant-free recombinant FVIII induced loss of FVIII activity and anti-FVIII antibodies in mid-dose, but not high-dose AAV or HSC lentiviral (LV) vector gene therapy cohorts. Furthermore, unlike what was shown previously for FIX gene transfer, AAV-FVIII administration to hemophilia A inhibitor mice conferred no effect on anti-FVIII antibody or inhibitory titers. These data suggest that functional differences exist in the immune modulation achieved to FVIII or FIX in hemophilia mice by gene therapy approaches incorporating liver-directed AAV vectors or HSC-directed LV. PMID:26909355

  8. The next generation of hemophilia treatment specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntorp, Erik; Gomperts, Edward; Hoots, Keith; Wong, Wing-Yen

    2006-06-01

    We currently are witnessing a serious attrition of physicians specializing in hemophilia treatment in Europe and the United States while most physicians who complete training in hematology-oncology choose oncology practice as their career. Nevertheless, recent therapeutic developments, including advances in prophylaxis and inhibitor management, have renewed the demand for experts in hemophilia and related disorders. To meet this demand, several specialty training programs have been developed in the United States and Europe, specifically the International Course in Hemophilia in Malmö, Sweden, the Children's Hospital of Los Angeles International Pediatric Hemostasis and Thrombosis Program, and the Baxter/National Hemophilia Foundation Fellowship Programs. The purpose of these programs is to enhance the clinical expertise and further the professional development of individuals dedicated to treating patients with coagulation disorders.

  9. Ethical dilemmas in the pediatric hemophilia community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, J

    1999-01-01

    How can pediatric nurses best advocate appropriately and knowledgeably for patients with hemophilia in our rapidly changing health care system. This commentary raises many questions, questions that can provide the basis for discussion among parents, providers, and payors. Children with hemophilia have benefited greatly by the creation of comprehensive care teams that support home treatment (Butler, 1998). Ongoing excellence in home care can be achieved by parents' and patients' self-advocacy. The hemophilia community's self-advocacy has been so successful as demonstrated by the move to home care, self-infusion, and the Ricky Ray legislation. This community has an ownership of its preventive care and recognizes that federally funded centers of excellence exist by the use of the family's tax dollars and the patient's patronage. Hemophilia programs are a model for further examination for preventive self-care in other chronic disease states.

  10. CLINICOHEMATOLOGICAL STUDY OF HEMOPHILIA PATIENTS IN BHOPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The X-linked inherited coagulation disorders, hemophilia A (Factor VIII deficiency and hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency, together with Von Willebrand disease comprise 95 to 97 percent of all the Inherited deficiencies of coagulation factors. (1,2 Replacement of the deficient factor is the mainstay of treatment; it may be “on demand” or “prophylactic” to prevent hemarthrosis in severe deficiency. The prevalence of hemophilia A is 1 in 5000 and that of hemophilia B is 1 in 30,000(3,4 male live births and Von Willebrand disease with over all prevalence in the general population being 1:100. (4 Clinically both the deficiencies present as a lifelong bleeding disorder with considerable morbidity due to crippling arthropathy. Most common cause of death in these patients is Intra Cerebral Hemorrhage. Hemophilia A and B can only be distinguished on the basis of specific coagulation Factor VIII or IX assays. AIM: The present study was conducted with the aim to study the clinico-hematological profile of Persons With Hemophilia(PWH, their clinical presentations, incidence of inhibitors, estimating the burden of transfusion related complications at our hemophilia care center and to compare the findings with other studies of similar nature MATERIAL & METHOD: This retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Pathology in collaboration with Hemophilia Care Centre at Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal during the period of August 2003 to July 2013. Diagnosis was made on the basis of history, physical examination and laboratory investigations such as bleeding time (BT, Prothrombin time (PT, Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT,correction studies(factor VIII and factor IX estimation whenever possible. CONCLUSION: Bleeding after injury is obvious in healthy people but difficult to decide, when it is due to bleeding disorder. Serious congenital conditions e. g. severe hemophilia becomes obvious in early childhood but may be

  11. Recent progress in gene therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Marinee K; Nair, Nisha; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2012-06-01

    Hemophilia A and B are X-linked monogenic disorders caused by deficiencies in coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and factor IX (FIX), respectively. Current treatment for hemophilia involves intravenous infusion of clotting factor concentrates. However, this does not constitute a cure, and the development of gene-based therapies for hemophilia to achieve prolonged high level expression of clotting factors to correct the bleeding diathesis are warranted. Different types of viral and nonviral gene delivery systems and a wide range of different target cells, including hepatocytes, skeletal muscle cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and endothelial cells, have been explored for hemophilia gene therapy. Adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based and lentiviral vectors are among the most promising vectors for hemophilia gene therapy. Stable correction of the bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia A and B was achieved in murine and canine models, and these promising preclinical studies prompted clinical trials in patients suffering from severe hemophilia. These studies recently resulted in the first demonstration that long-term expression of therapeutic FIX levels could be achieved in patients undergoing gene therapy. Despite this progress, there are still a number of hurdles that need to be overcome. In particular, the FIX levels obtained were insufficient to prevent bleeding induced by trauma or injury. Moreover, the gene-modified cells in these patients can become potential targets for immune destruction by effector T cells, specific for the AAV vector antigens. Consequently, more efficacious approaches are needed to achieve full hemostatic correction and to ultimately establish a cure for hemophilia A and B.

  12. Inhibitor development in nonsevere hemophilia A

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder that affects approximately 1 in 5000 male live births. It is caused by a deficient plasma level of clotting factor VIII and can be treated by the intravenous administration of factor VIII concentrates. A severe complication of the treatment with factor VIII concentrates is the development of inhibiting antibodies against factor VIII, also called inhibitors. Inhibitors challenge the treatment of hemophilia A as they inactivate factor VIII...

  13. Coagulation Factor IX for Hemophilia B Therapy


    OpenAIRE

    Orlova, N.; Kovnir, S.; Vorobiev, I.; Gabibov, A.

    2012-01-01

    Factor IX is a zymogen enzyme of the blood coagulation cascade. Inherited absence or deficit of the IX functional factor causes bleeding disorder hemophilia B, which requires constant protein replacement therapy. Reviewed herein are the current state in the manufacturing of FIX, improved variants of the recombinant protein for therapy, transgenic organisms for obtaining FIX, and the advances in the gene therapy of hemophilia B.

  14. Woman Doctor Declares War Against Hemophilia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    DANGERS of hereditary diseases are hidden in the complicated process by which life is formed. There are many who work hard to save lives and fight against such misfortune. And Doctor Zhao Cuilan is one such soldier who has chosen hemophilia as her battlefield. Hemophilia is a hereditary disease characterized by the inability of the patient’s blood to clot. When a person lacks the substance that causes blood clotting, he can bleed to death. In the

  15. Demographic and clinical data in acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoebl, P.; Marco, P.; Baudo, F.; Collins, P.; Huth-Kuhne, A.; Nemes, L.; Pellegrini, F.; Tengborn, L.; Levesque, H.; Aspoek, G.; Heistinger, M.; Knobl, P.; Makipernaa, A; Andre, H.; Aouba, A.; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, P.; Borg, J.Y.; Darnige, L.; Devignes, J.; D'Oiron, R.; Gautier, P.; Gay, V.; Girault, S.; Gruel, Y.; Guerin, V.; Hezard, N.; Khellaf, M.; Koenig, M.; Levesque, H.; Lifermann, F.; Marlu, R.; Ninet, Jacques; Peynet, J.; Quemeneur, T.; Rothschild, C.; Schleinitz, N.; Sigaud, M.; Trouillier, S.; Voisin, S.; Giebl, A.; Holstein, K; Huth-Kuhne, A.; Loreth, R.M.; Steigerwald, U.; Tiede, A.; Theodossiades, G.; Nemes, L.; Radvanyi, G.; Schlammadinger, A.; Barillari, G.; Pasca, S.; Baudo, F.; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; Di Minno, G.; Cerbone, A.M.; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, M.; Falanga, A.; Maggioni, A.; Lerede, T.; Franchini, M.; Gaidano, G.; De Paoli, L.; Gamba, G.; Ghirardi, R.; Girotto, M; Tasca, D.; Grandone, E.; Tiscia, G.; Imberti, D.; Iorio, A.; Landolfi, R.; Di Gennaro, L.; Novarese, L.; Mariani, G.; Lapecorella, M.; Marietta, M.; Pedrazzi, P.; Mazzucconi, M.G.; Santoro, C.; Morfini, M.; Linari, S.; Moratelli, S.; Paolini, R.; Piseddu, G.; Poggio, R.; Pogliani, E; Carpenedo, M.; Remiddi, C; Santagostino, E; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, R.; Papaleo, G.; Schinco, P.; Borchiellini, A.; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, A.R.; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, G.; Squizzato, A.; Sartori, R.; Tagariello, G.; Tagliaferri, A.R.; Di Perna, C.; Rivolta, G.F.; Testa, S.; Paoletti, O.; Toschi, V.; Zanon, E; Brandolini, B.; Hamulyak, K.; Kamphuisen, P.; Laros-van Gorkom, B.; Leebeek, F.W.; Marten, N.; Novakova, I.; Schutgens, R.; van der Linden, P.W.; van Esser, J.; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, P.; Campos, M.; Aguilar, C.; Altisent, C.; Bermejo, N.; Del Campo, R.; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Boullosa, R.; Gutierrez Pimentel, M.J.; Jimenez-Yuste, V.; Jose-Felix, L.; Pascual, M; Mingot, M.E.; Garrido, R.P.; Perez Gonzale, Nz; Prieto Garcia, M.; Rodriguez-Huerta, A.M.; Sedano, C; Tolosa Munoz, A.; Baghaei, F; Tengborn, L.; Boehlen, F.; Korte, W.; Chowdary, P.; Collins, P.; Evans, G.; Pavord, S.; Rangarajan, S.; Wilde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII and characterized by spontaneous hemorrhage in patients with no previous family or personal history of bleeding. Although data on several AHA cohorts have been collected, lim

  16. INCIDENCE OF LYMPHOMAS AND OTHER CANCERS IN HIV-INFECTED AND HIV-UNINFECTED PATIENTS WITH HEMOPHILIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RABKIN, CS; HILGARTNER, MW; HEDBERG, KW; ALEDORT, LM; HATZAKIS, A; EICHINGER, S; EYSTER, ME; WHITE, GC; KESSLER, CM; LEDERMAN, MM; DEMOERLOOSE, P; BRAY, GL; COHEN, AR; ANDES, WA; MANCOJOHNSON, M; SCHRAMM, W; KRONER, BL; BLATTNER, WA; GOEDERT, JJ

    1992-01-01

    Objective. - To determine the types and rates of cancers occurring in excess in the presence of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Design. - Cohort analytic study of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects followed for up to 12 years. Setting. - Fifteen hemophilia treat

  17. Gene Therapy Offers Hope to Some Hemophilia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162389.html Gene Therapy Offers Hope to Some Hemophilia Patients Small, preliminary trial suggests it may free hemophilia B patients from transfusions To use the sharing features on this page, please enable ...

  18. The Hemophilia Games: An Experiment in Health Education Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The Hemophilia Health Education Planning Project was designed to (1) create a set of tools useful in hemophilia planning and education, and (2) create a planning model for other diseases with similar factors. The project used the game-simulations technique which was felt to be particularly applicable to hemophilia health problems, since as a…

  19. Hemophilia Care in the Pediatric Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bertamino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia is the most common of the severe bleeding disorders and if not properly managed since early infancy can lead to chronic disease and lifelong disabilities. However, it enjoys the most efficacious and safe treatment among the most prevalent monogenic disorders. Hemophilia should be considered in the neonatal period in the case of unusual bleeding or in the case of positive family history. Later, hemophilia should be suspected mainly in males because of abnormal bruising/bleeding or unusual bleeding following invasive procedures—for example, tonsillectomy or circumcision. Prophylactic treatment that is started early with clotting-factor concentrates has been shown to prevent hemophilic arthropathy and is, therefore, the gold standard of care for hemophilia A and B in most countries with adequate resources. Central venous access catheters and arterovenous fistulas play an important role in the management of hemophilia children requiring repeated and/or urgent administration of coagulation factor concentrates. During childhood and adolescence, personalized treatment strategies that suit the patient and his lifestyle are essential to ensure optimal outcomes. Physical activity is important and can contribute to better coordination, endurance, flexibility and strength. The present article focuses also on questions frequently posed to pediatric hematologists like vaccinations, day-care/school access and dental care.

  20. Slipped upper femoral epiphysis with hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Deepa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old boy who had hemophilia A was reported with pain in the left thigh and hip on walking. He had no history of trauma. Severe hemophilia A is diagnosed with a Factor VIII level of < 1 iu/dl. The presumptive diagnosis was that of a spontaneous bleed into the hip joint. Factor VIII mutational analysis revealed a C to G substitution at nucleotide 6683 which results in a cystine change at codon 2194. However, the symptoms persisted and an X-ray demonstrated the presence of an acute on chronic slip of the upper femoral epiphysis. The patient was transferred to the center treating his hemophilia where the hip was pinned in situ under cover with Factor VIII. This case demonstrates the need to be aware of a possible traumatic diagnosis of hip pain in a hemophiliac child with a longstanding history of spontaneous bleeding into joints.

  1. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in a hemophilia B patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopiński, Tomasz; Szczepanik, Andrzej B.; Sosnowski, Roman; Szczepanik, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery in patients with hemophilia is a serious challenge. It requires a comprehensive approach, as well as careful postoperative monitoring. We present here the first case of a transperitoneal laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (TLRN) for renal cell carcinoma, of the clear-cell type, performed in a hemophilia B patient. The level of factor IX clotting activity before surgery and on postoperative days 1–6 was maintained at 65–130% and at 30–40% on subsequent days until healing of the post-operative wound was achieved. The intraoperative and postoperative courses were uneventful. TLRN can therefore be considered safe and effective for renal cell carcinoma. In hemophilia patients, the TLRN procedure requires proper preparation, as well as adequate substitution therapy for the deficient coagulation factor provided by a multidisciplinary team in a comprehensive center. PMID:27729993

  2. Practice of Iranian Adolescents with Hemophilia in Prevention of Complications of Hemophilia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prerequisite for management of a chronic disease involves knowledge about its complications and their prevention. Hemophilia in adolescents influences all the aspects of their lives and thier performance. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine the performance of Iranian hemophilic adolescents in prevention of disease complications. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 108 adolescents with hemophilia were selected through convenience sampling....

  3. Global Emerging HEmophilia Panel (GEHEP): A Multinational Collaboration for Advancing Hemophilia Research and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    James, Paula; Kasthuri, Raj; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Soni, Amit; Kulkarni, Roshni; Bidlingmaier, Christoph; Chitlur, Meera; Fogarty, Patrick; Gomez, Keith; Holm, Pål Andrè; Mahlangu, Johnny; Mancuso,Maria Elisa; Mingot-Castellano, Maria Eva; Dolan, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    GEHEP, established in 2009, is an independent, multi-institutional, international consortium of early career hematology specialists in the field of hemophilia and other inherited bleeding disorders. The main objective of the group, whose members practice at institutions in North America, Europe, and South Africa, is to advance hemophilia care by providing a forum for mentored collaborative research, developing programs for improving clinical care, and promoting academic career development of ...

  4. Impact of mild to severe hemophilia on education and work by US men, women, and caregivers of children with hemophilia B: The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Susan; Molter, Don; Dunn, Spencer; Hunter, Susan; Peltier, Skye; Haugstad, Kimberly; Frick, Neil; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L

    2017-04-01

    The psychosocial impact of hemophilia on work was recently investigated in the Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) study. The findings revealed that hemophilia had an impact for adults with moderate/severe hemophilia and caregivers of children with hemophilia. HERO did not specifically evaluate impact on education in adults/children with mild/moderate hemophilia or the impact on employment of spouses/partners of caregivers of affected children. The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study evaluated the impact of hemophilia on the lives of adult men/women with mild-severe hemophilia B and caregivers of boys/girls with hemophilia B and their spouses/partners. Many adults with hemophilia B (94%) reported that hemophilia had a negative effect on their ability to complete a formal education, often attributed to the inability to attend or concentrate in school as a result of hemophilia-related bleeding or pain. Most adults with hemophilia B (95%) and caregivers/partners (89%/84%) indicated that hemophilia had a negative impact on employment. Most adults with hemophilia were employed (81%), with construction/manufacturing (35%) as the most frequently reported industry; many worked in jobs requiring manual labor (39%). Of those unemployed, 62% never worked, and those who stopped working reported that they left the workforce due to financial issues (59%), including insurance coverage/co-pays, or hemophilia-related issues (55%). Nearly one-third of caregivers voluntarily left the workforce to care for children with hemophilia. These results suggest a need to focus more effort on career counseling for adults with hemophilia B and caregivers of affected children, especially around mild/moderate hemophilia, as this population may not be as well informed regarding potential impact in school and the workplace.

  5. Inhibitor development in nonsevere hemophilia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder that affects approximately 1 in 5000 male live births. It is caused by a deficient plasma level of clotting factor VIII and can be treated by the intravenous administration of factor VIII concentrates. A severe complication of the treatment wit

  6. Molecular genetics of hemophilia A: Clinical perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza A.G. Tantawy

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of hemophilia is multifactorial, mainly related to F8 mutation ... Inhibitor development is mainly related to F8 null mutations, but other genetic and non genetic factors could .... Individuals with a history of a lifelong bleeding tendency ... nic and geographical variation in the allele frequencies of these.

  7. Bruising and Hemophilia: Accident or Child Abuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Charles F.; Coury, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    Two case histories illustrate the difficulty in evaluating abuse/neglect in children with bleeding problems such as hemophilia. Discussed are guidelines for diagnosis and prevention of abuse, including: screening techniques, the need for protection from environmental trauma, parental stress, evaluation of parents' disciplinary methods, and the…

  8. Hemophilia: The Role of the School Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Mary Lou; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Care of the school student with hemophilia requires a cooperative effort by the health care team. A multidisciplinary approach is suggested for the team, whose members include a hematologist, orthopedist, oral surgeon, geneticist, physical therapist, social worker, and school nurse. (JD)

  9. Animal Models of Hemophilia and Related Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jay N.; Nichols, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of hemophilia and related diseases are important for development of novel treatments and to understand the pathophysiology of bleeding disorders in humans. Testing in animals with the equivalent human disorder provides informed estimates of doses and measures of efficacy, which aids in design of human trials. Many models of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease have been developed from animals with spontaneous mutations (hemophilia A dogs, rats, sheep; hemophilia B dogs; and von Willebrand disease pigs and dogs), or by targeted gene disruption in mice to create hemophilia A, B, or VWD models. Animal models have been used to generate new insights into the pathophysiology of each bleeding disorder and also to perform pre-clinical assessments of standard protein replacement therapies as well as novel gene transfer technology. Both the differences between species and differences in underlying causative mutations must be considered in choosing the best animal for a specific scientific study PMID:23956467

  10. Hemophilia: What the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon Needs to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julie Ann

    2016-11-01

    Hemophilia will be encountered in the oral and maxillofacial surgeon's office. A thorough understanding of hemophilia is necessary to safely care for these patients. One must understand the severity of the patient's hemophilia as well as whether or not inhibitors are present. The patient's surgical management will be influenced by these two factors. In addition to the possible need to transfuse factors or desmopressin, special care must be taken perioperatively to avoid bleeding complications. This article reviews the overall management of hemophilia A and B as well as the specific perioperative management of these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Global Emerging HEmophilia Panel (GEHEP): A Multinational Collaboration for Advancing Hemophilia Research and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Paula; Kasthuri, Raj; Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca; Soni, Amit; Kulkarni, Roshni; Bidlingmaier, Christoph; Chitlur, Meera; Fogarty, Patrick; Gomez, Keith; Holm, Pål Andrè; Mahlangu, Johnny; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Mingot-Castellano, Maria Eva; Dolan, Gerry

    2013-10-01

    GEHEP, established in 2009, is an independent, multi-institutional, international consortium of early career hematology specialists in the field of hemophilia and other inherited bleeding disorders. The main objective of the group, whose members practice at institutions in North America, Europe, and South Africa, is to advance hemophilia care by providing a forum for mentored collaborative research, developing programs for improving clinical care, and promoting academic career development of junior faculty. GEHEP members collect and document anonymized data on intra- and interinstitutional differences in patient populations, diagnosis, and treatment in the field of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders. To facilitate sharing of aggregated data among GEHEP members, a global protocol was developed and approved by most members' local institutional review board. Current GEHEP research initiatives are varied, encompassing work in pediatric and adult patients. GEHEP members have presented research at international meetings on the initiation of prophylaxis in children, use of immune tolerance induction in adults, and prevalence of acute coronary syndromes in older patients with hemophilia. The main goal of the continuing work of GEHEP is to advance the care of patients with hemophilia worldwide.

  12. Nonviral gene therapy approaches to hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Vargas, Andrew; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2004-04-01

    The goal of hemophilia gene therapy is to obtain long-term therapeutic levels of factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) without stimulating an immune response against the transgene product or the vector. The success of gene therapy is largely dependent on the development of appropriate gene delivery vectors. Both viral vectors and nonviral vectors have been considered for the development of hemophilia gene therapy. In general, viral vectors are far more efficient than nonviral gene delivery approaches and resulted in long-term therapeutic levels of FVIII or FIX in preclinical animal models. However, there are several reasons why a nonviral treatment would still be desirable, particularly because some viral vectors are associated with inflammatory reactions, that render transgene expression transient, or with an increased risk of insertional oncogenesis when random integrating vectors are used. Nonviral vectors may obviate some of these concerns. Since nonviral vectors are typically assembled in cell-free systems from well-defined components, they have significant manufacturing advantages over viral vectors. The continued development of improved nonviral gene delivery approaches offers new perspectives for gene therapy of chronic diseases including hemophilia.

  13. Managing hemophilia: the role of mobile technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khair K

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kate Khair,1 Mike Holland21Haemophilia Centre, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Haemnet Ltd, London, UKAbstract: The ubiquity of mobile technology offers the potential for instantaneous and two-way transfer of information, as well as the potential for improving medical care delivery and extending it to those in countries and regions with a less developed medical infrastructure. This review considers the role of mobile health (mHealth technology in managing hemophilia. This is a disease area in which good record-keeping is an essential component of home-based hemophilia care. Health care professionals contribute patients' data to national registries and databases and frequently interrogate those data for commercial and academic purposes. Only rarely are the data used to directly improve the care of the individual patient. Patient-focused apps designed to respond to an individual's personal data may offer the potential to empower patients to live healthier lifestyles, reinforcing the care provided by health care professionals and offering a mechanism for peer-support and promoting adherence to an individualized management plan.Keywords: mHealth, hemophilia, peer-support, adherence

  14. New approaches to gene and cell therapy for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, T; Mizukami, H; Ozawa, K; Sakata, Y; Nishimura, S

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia is considered suitable for gene therapy because it is caused by a single gene abnormality, and therapeutic coagulation factor levels may vary across a broad range. Recent success of hemophilia B gene therapy with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in a clinical trial showed the real prospect that, through gene therapy, a cure for hemophilia may become a reality. However, AAV-mediated gene therapy is not applicable to patients with hemophilia A at present, and neutralizing antibodies against AAV reduce the efficacy of AAV-mediated strategies. Because patients that benefit from AAV treatment (hemophilia B without neutralizing antibodies) are estimated to represent only 15% of total patients with hemophilia, the development of basic technologies for hemophilia A and those that result in higher therapeutic effects are critical. In this review, we present an outline of gene therapy methods for hemophilia, including the transition of technical developments thus far and our novel techniques. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. Hemophilia and Sports: Guidelines for Participation. Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Larry G.; Heldrich, Fred T.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a case report of a 15-year-old boy with severe hemophilia who played soccer 1 school year but was denied continued participation following another screening examination. Before deciding about participation, physicians must assess the type and severity of hemophilia and risk factors for injury. Appropriate sports for hemophiliacs are…

  16. The Impact of HIV Infection on the Hemophilia Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Christopher K.

    1989-01-01

    The hemophilia community has been deeply affected by the catastrophe of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The use of blood products that had first restored the potential for normal survival now bring the threat of AIDS infection and fear and discrimination from others. Strong leadership has come from the National Hemophilia Foundation.…

  17. Gene therapy for hemophilia: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Lindsey A; Fogarty, Patrick F

    2016-01-01

    After numerous preclinical studies demonstrated consistent success in large and small animal models, gene therapy has finally seen initial signs of clinically meaningful success. In a landmark study, Nathwani and colleagues reported sustained factor (F)IX expression in individuals with severe hemophilia B following adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated in vivo FIX gene transfer. As the next possible treatment-changing paradigm in hemophilia care, gene therapy may provide patients with sufficient hemostatic improvement to achieve the World Federation of Hemophilia's aspirational goal of "integration of opportunities in all aspects of life… equivalent to someone without a bleeding disorder." Although promising momentum supports the potential of gene therapy to replace protein-based therapeutics for hemophilia, several obstacles remain. The largest challenges appear to be overcoming the cellular immune responses to the AAV capsid; preexisting AAV neutralizing antibodies, which immediately exclude approximately 50% of the target population; and the ability to scale-up vector manufacturing for widespread applicability. Additional obstacles specific to hemophilia A (HA) include designing a vector cassette to accommodate a larger cDNA; avoiding development of inhibitory antibodies; and, perhaps the greatest difficulty to overcome, ensuring adequate expression efficiency. This review discusses the relevance of gene therapy to the hemophilia disease state, previous research progress, the current landscape of clinical trials, and considerations for promoting the future availability of gene therapy for hemophilia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals.

  19. Problems and solutions in laboratory testing for hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Meijer, Piet; Jennings, Ian; Sioufi, John; Bonar, Roslyn A; Kitchen, Dianne P; Kershaw, Geoffrey; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    A diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B begins with clinical assessment of the patient and is facilitated by laboratory testing. The influence of the latter on a diagnosis of hemophilia A or hemophilia B is clear-a diagnosis cannot be made without laboratory confirmation of a deficiency of factor FVIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX), respectively. Moreover, the degree of hemophilia severity is specifically characterized by laboratory test results. In turn, patient management, including choice and application of therapies, is influenced by the diagnosis, as well as by identification of respective disease severity. An incorrect diagnosis may lead to inappropriate management and unnecessary therapy, and thus to adverse outcomes. Moreover, identification of factor inhibitors in hemophilia will lead to additional and differential treatments, and incorrect identification of inhibitors or inhibitor levels may also lead to inappropriate management. Problems in hemophilia diagnosis or inhibitor detection can occur at any stage in the clinical diagnosis/laboratory interface, from the "pre-preanalytical" to "preanalytical" to "analytical" to "postanalytical" to "post-postanalytical." This report outlines the various problems in laboratory testing for hemophilia and provides various strategies or solutions to overcome these challenges. Although some outlined solutions are specific to the potential errors related to hemophilia, others are general in nature and can be applied to other areas of laboratory hemostasis. Key to improvement in this area is adoption of best practice by all involved, including clinicians, phlebotomists, and laboratories. Also key is the recognition that such errors may occur, and thus that clinicians should assess laboratory test results in the context of their patient's clinical history and follow-up any potential errors, thus avoid misdiagnoses, by requesting repeat testing on a fresh sample.

  20. Gene therapy in an era of emerging treatment options for hemophilia B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B) is less common than factor VIII deficiency (hemophilia A) and innovations in therapy for hemophilia B have generally lagged behind those for hemophilia A. Recently the first sustained correction of the hemophilia bleeding phenotype by clotting factor gene therapy has been described using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver factor IX. Despite this success, many individuals with hemophilia B, including children, men with active hepatitis, and individuals who have pre-existing natural immunity to AAV are not eligible for the current iteration of hemophilia B gene therapy. In addition, recent advances in recombinant factor IX protein engineering have led some hemophilia treaters to reconsider the urgency of genetic cure. Current clinical and preclinical approaches to advancing AAV-based and alternative approaches to factor IX gene therapy are considered in the context of current demographics and treatment of the hemophilia B population. PMID:26149016

  1. Validation of a New Pediatric Joint Scoring System From the International Hemophilia Prophylaxis Study Group: Validity of the Hemophilia Joint Health Score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman , M. Brian; Funk, M. Sharon; Bergstrom, Britt-Marie; Zourikian, Nichan; Hillard, Pamela; Net, van der Janjaap; Engelbert , H.H. Raoul; Petrini, Pia; Berg, Marijke van den H.; Manco-Johnson, J. Marilyn; Rivard, E. Georges; Abad, Audrey; Blanchette , S. Victor

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Repeated hemarthrosis in hemophilia causes arthropathy with pain and dysfunction. The Hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS) was developed to be more sensitive for detecting arthropathy than the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) physical examination scale, especially for children and tho

  2. Surgical treatment of Perthes disease in child with hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisimov D.I.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia is a genetically mediated disease caused by recessive transmission of the gene. At present etiological orientation in treatment of the given pathology has just begun to develop. Replacement therapy by the concentrate of blood factors is the principal method of treatment. With great success in the sphere of medicine life quality of children suffering from hemophilia has improved significantly. However, the given category of patients refers to the high risk group to render surgical care as before. The example of the surgical intervention is an intertrochanteric osteotomy of the femur in a child with hemophilia

  3. Factor VIII therapy for hemophilia A: current and future issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aledort, Louis; Ljung, Rolf; Mann, Kenneth; Pipe, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Hemophilia A is a congenital, recessive, X-linked bleeding disorder that is managed with infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant factor (F) VIII. The primary considerations in FVIII replacement therapy today are the: 1) immunogenicity of FVIII concentrates, 2) role of longer-acting FVIII products, 3) prophylactic use of FVIII in children and adults with severe hemophilia A, and 4) affordability and availability of FVIII products. Improving patient outcomes by increasing the use of FVIII prophylaxis, preventing or eliminating FVIII inhibitors, and expanding access to FVIII concentrates in developing countries are the major challenges confronting clinicians who care for patients with hemophilia A.

  4. "Camping up" self-esteem in children with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D; Gaslin, T C

    2001-01-01

    Children with hemophilia have often been viewed at greater risk for altered self-esteem than their healthy counterparts. Our article shares the positive effects of the camp experience on children with hemophilia and subsequent enhancement of self-esteem. Interaction and support in the camp environment provide an opportunity for these children to gain independence and "prove" their self-worth and ability. Previous literature has provided a variety of findings on the relationship between chronic illness, such as hemophilia, and self-esteem alterations. We identify many opportunities for future education and research to provide quality nursing support to this unique population.

  5. Emerging and future therapies for hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carr ME

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcus E Carr,1,2 Bartholomew J Tortella3,4 1Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2Worldwide Research and Development, Pfizer, Inc., Cambridge, MA, 3Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, 4Global Innovative Pharma, Pfizer, Inc., Collegeville, PA, USA Abstract: The evolution of care in hemophilia is a remarkable story. Over the last 60 years, advances in protein purification, protein chemistry, donor screening, viral inactivation, gene sequencing, gene cloning, and recombinant protein production have dramatically enhanced the treatment and lives of patients with hemophilia. Recent efforts have produced enhanced half-life (EHL clotting factors to better support prophylaxis and decrease the frequency of infusions. Medical needs remain in the areas of alternate modes of administration to decrease the need for venous access, better treatment, and prophylaxis for patients who form antibodies to clotting factors, and ultimately a cure of the underlying genetic defect. In this brief review, the authors summarize data on EHL clotting factors, introduce agents whose mode of action is not clotting factor replacement, and list current gene therapy efforts. Keywords: extended half-life clotting factors, gene therapy, anti-tissue factor pathway inhibitor antibodies, clotting factor analogs, nonfactor replacement therapy

  6. Clinical Evaluation of the Joints of Patients with Hemophilia

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    Sezai Ozkan

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Treatment and monitoring of patients with hemophilia requires a multidisciplinary approach. Early diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and a constant monitoring will be effective in preventing arthropaty. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(4.000: 233-239

  7. Hemophilia A. Considerations for dental management of pediatric patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia López-Villareal; Osvelia Rodríguez-Luis; Norma Cruz-Fierro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It comes to consulting the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Nuevo León pediatric male patient of 9 years 10 months, who was admitted with a presumptive diagnosis of hemophilia due to a subsequent persistent bleeding to treatment with steel crowns made in an earlier appointment. Interconsultation is performed with the hematologist who by laboratory examinations notice decreased coagulation factor VIII confirming the diagnosis of hemophilia A. It plans and conducts comprehens...

  8. Aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparović, Hrvoje; Zupancic-Salek, Silva; Brida, Vojtjeh; Dulić, Grgur; Jelić, Ivan

    2007-03-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by factor VIII deficiency. The basis for insufficient hemostasis lies within inadequate amplification of factor Xa production with the undersupplied factor VIII. We report on a young patient with critical aortic stenosis bearing all the clinical stigmata of severe hemophilia, in whom aortic valve replacement was performed with a tissue valve in order to avoid the need for long term anticoagulation.

  9. Motivational techniques to improve self-care in hemophilia: the need to support autonomy in children

    OpenAIRE

    Bérubé, Sarah; Mouillard, Florine; Amesse, Claudine; Sultan, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Background In pediatric hemophilia, caregivers are facing unique challenges to adherence and self-care in children and adolescents with hemophilia. Hemophilia treatment requires adequate prophylaxis and on-demand treatment, as well as a clear behavioral strategy to limit risk-taking in terms of physical exercise and diet. Medication adherence rates of hemophilia patients have been reported to decrease during late childhood and adolescence. In the developing child, moving safely from parent-ca...

  10. Sporting activities and quality of life in children with hemophilia: An observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Cuesta Barriuso, Rubén; Torres Ortuño, Ana; Pérez Alenda, Sofía; Carrasco, Juan José; Querol Fuentes, Felipe; Nieto Munuera, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Sports activities are part of multidisciplinary treatments in people with hemophilia. Aim: The objective of this study was to assess the incidence of sports activities in the quality of life as perceived by children with hemophilia. Methods: A total of 53 children with hemophilia aged 7 to 13 years and 51 children without hemophilia were evaluated. The perception of quality of life, clinical variables, and the frequency of sports activities were registered. The joint condition of patients wit...

  11. 78 FR 57868 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive Patent License: Oral Treatment of Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... Treatment of Hemophilia AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is notice..., ``Oral Treatment of Hemophilia'' and ``Induction of Tolerance by Oral administration of Factor VIII and Treatment of Hemophilia''. The patent rights in these inventions have been assigned to or exclusively...

  12. Acquired hemophilia A in the United Kingdom: a 2-year national surveillance study by the United Kingdom Haemophilia Centre Doctors' Organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Peter W; Hirsch, Sybil; Baglin, Trevor P; Dolan, Gerard; Hanley, John; Makris, Michael; Keeling, David M; Liesner, Ri; Brown, Simon A; Hay, Charles R M

    2007-03-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a severe bleeding disorder caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Previous reports have focused on referral center patients and it is unclear whether these findings are generally applicable. To improve understanding of the disease, a 2-year observational study was established to identify and characterize the presenting features and outcome of all patients with acquired hemophilia A in the United Kingdom. This allowed a consecutive cohort of patients, unbiased by referral or reporting practice, to be studied. A total of 172 patients with a median age of 78 years were identified, an incidence of 1.48/million/y. The cohort was significantly older than previously reported series, but bleeding manifestations and underlying diseases were similar. Bleeding was the cause of death in 9% of the cohort and remained a risk until the inhibitor had been eradicated. There was no difference in inhibitor eradication or mortality between patients treated with steroids alone and a combination of steroids and cytotoxic agents. Relapse of the inhibitor was observed in 20% of the patients who had attained first complete remission. The data provide the most complete description of acquired hemophilia A available and are applicable to patients presenting to all centers.

  13. Treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impact of hemophilia on young adults (aged 18-30 years) with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkop, Michelle; Guelcher, Christine; Forsyth, Angela; Hawk, Sarah; Curtis, Randall; Kelley, Laureen; Frick, Neil; Rice, Michelle; Rosu, Gabriela; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    The Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) initiative assessed psychosocial issues reported by people with moderate to severe hemophilia and was led by a multidisciplinary international advisory board. This analysis reports data from young adult respondents (aged 18-30 years), including both US and overall global (including US respondents) results, and investigates treatment outcomes, quality of life, and impacts of hemophilia on relationships. More young adults in HERO received prophylaxis than on-demand treatment, although a majority reported not using factor products exactly as prescribed, and 50% of global respondents and 26% of US respondents reported issues with access to factor replacement therapy in the previous 5 years. Many young adults with hemophilia reported comorbidities, including bone/skeletal arthritis, chronic pain, and viral infections, and nearly half of young adults reported anxiety/depression. Most reported pain interference with daily activities in the past 4 weeks, although a majority reported participating in lower-risk activities and approximately half in intermediate-risk activities. Most young adults were very or quite satisfied with the support of partners/spouses, family, and friends, although roughly one-third reported that hemophilia affected their ability to develop close relationships with a partner. A majority of young adults reported that hemophilia has had a negative impact on employment, and 62% of global respondents and 78% of US respondents were employed at least part-time. Together these data highlight the psychosocial issues experienced by young adults with hemophilia and suggest that increased focus on these issues may improve comprehensive care during the transition to adulthood.

  14. Past, present and future of hemophilia: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2012-05-02

    Over the past forty years the availability of coagulation factor replacement therapy has greatly contributed to the improved care of people with hemophilia. Following the blood-borne viral infections in the late 1970s and early 1980, caused by coagulation factor concentrates manufactured using non-virally inactivated pooled plasma, the need for safer treatment became crucial to the hemophilia community. The introduction of virus inactivated plasma-derived coagulation factors and then of recombinant products has revolutionized the care of these people. These therapeutic weapons have improved their quality of life and that of their families and permitted home treatment, i.e., factor replacement therapy at regular intervals in order to prevent both bleeding and the resultant joint damage (i.e. primary prophylaxis). Accordingly, a near normal lifestyle and life-expectancy have been achieved. The main current problem in hemophilia is the onset of alloantibodies inactivating the infused coagulation factor, even though immune tolerance regimens based on long-term daily injections of large dosages of coagulation factors are able to eradicate inhibitors in approximately two-thirds of affected patients. In addition availability of products that bypass the intrinsic coagulation defects have dramatically improved the management of this complication. The major challenges of current treatment regimens, such the short half life of hemophilia therapeutics with need for frequent intravenous injections, encourage the current efforts to produce coagulation factors with more prolonged bioavailability. Finally, intensive research is devoted to gene transfer therapy, the only way to ultimately obtain cure in hemophilia.

  15. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

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    duTreil S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sue duTreil Louisiana Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders, Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. Keywords: adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, adherence, physical challenges, psychosocial challenges, health-related quality of life

  16. Repeated Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in a Patient with Hemophilia B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Hajime; Terada, Jiro; Hoshi, Hiromasa; Urushibara, Takashi; Kato, Fumiaki; Nishimura, Rintaro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening complication that occurs in association with various diseases including coagulation disorders. In rare cases, it is caused by hemophilia. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for a third time due to DAH. Although the cause of DAH could not be identified by bronchoscopy or laboratory tests, a good response to corticosteroids suggested idiopathic DAH with pulmonary capillaritis. The patient was diagnosed with hemophilia B based on the results of a detailed inquiry, a mildly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, and low factor IX activity. Hemophilia may be an underlying factor that exacerbates the bleeding of patients with DAH, even when they show a good response to corticosteroids. PMID:28202865

  17. Hemophilia A. Considerations for dental management of pediatric patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia López-Villareal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It comes to consulting the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Nuevo León pediatric male patient of 9 years 10 months, who was admitted with a presumptive diagnosis of hemophilia due to a subsequent persistent bleeding to treatment with steel crowns made in an earlier appointment. Interconsultation is performed with the hematologist who by laboratory examinations notice decreased coagulation factor VIII confirming the diagnosis of hemophilia A. It plans and conducts comprehensive treatment dental team with the hematologist who said that patients in hospitals with the replacement of missing clotting factor is prepared by cryo precipitates or with concentrated factor VIII intravenously before and after his dental intervention. The aim of the article is to highlight that hemophilia can be a disease detected during dental surgery in some patients and for it to be successfully treated with multidisciplinary management protocol is required between hematologists and dentists.

  18. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pain Experience in Hemophilia Patients: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambod, Masoume; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Molazem, Zahra; Khair, Kate

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Pain, as a crucial subsequence of joint hemorrhages in hemophilia patients, is chronic, debilitating, and distracting. This study aimed to describe and interpret pain experiences of hemophilia patients in their lives. Methods: This qualitative study with hermeneutic phenomenological approach was conducted on fourteen hemophilia patients who had been referred to a hemophilia center affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The study question was “what is the meaning of pain in hemophilia patients’ lives? The data were collected through semi-structured interviews and field notes through purposeful sampling. Then, thematic analysis with van Manen’s six-step methodological framework was used. MAX.QDA qualitative software package, 2010, was used to analyze the data. Results: The three main themes that emerged in this study were “alteration in physical health”, “engagement in psychological problems”, and “impairment in social relationships”. Alteration in physical health consisted of three subthemes, namely “impairment of physical function”, “change in body physics”, and “disturbance in sleep quality”. In addition, two subthemes including “nostalgia of pain in adults with hemophilia” and “psychological distress” emerged from engagement in psychological problems. Finally, “loss of social activity” and “change in relationships” were related to impairment in social relationships. Conclusion: The present study highlighted alteration in physical health, engagement in psychological problems, and impairment in social relationship as a result of pain in hemophilia patients. Thus, healthcare providers and family members have to pay special attention to these problems. Besides, providing complementary therapy interventions is suggested for reducing these issues. PMID:27713894

  20. Acquired Hemophilia A successfully treated with rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hemophilia A (AHA is a rare bleeding disorder due to the development of specific autoantibodies against factor VIII. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab has been proven to be effective in  obtaining a long-term suppression of inhibitors of AHA,  besides other immunosuppressive standard treatments. Here we describe a case of idiopathic AHA in a 60-year old man successfully treated with rituximab. He showed a complete clinical response with  a normalization of clotting  parameters after 5 weekly courses of rituximab given at a dose of 375 mg/sqm. , but after stopping rituximab, an initial worsening of coagulation  parameters  induced the addition of 3 further courses. At present, the patient is in complete clinical and hematological remission after 200 days.  This case confirms that Rituximab may be a safe and useful tool to treat AHA and, a prolonged administration can overcome the initial resistance. However, the precise position of this drug in the therapeutic strategy (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs remains to be established and warrants further investigation.

  1. Prevention of the Musculoskeletal Complications of Hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Rodriguez-Merchan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia is an inherited disorder of clotting factor deficiencies resulting in musculoskeletal bleeding, including hemarthroses, leading to musculoskeletal complications. The articular problems of hemophiliac patients begin in infancy. These include: recurrent hemarthroses, chronic synovitis, flexion deformities, hypertrophy of the growth epiphyses, damage to the articular cartilage, and hemophilic arthropathy. The most commonly affected joints are the ankle, the knee, and the elbow. Hematologic prophylactic treatment from ages 2 to 18 years could avoid the development of hemophilic arthropathy if the concentration of the patient's deficient factor is prevented from falling below 1% of normal. Hemarthroses can be prevented by the administration of clotting factor concentrates (prophylaxis. However, high costs and the need for venous access devices in younger children continue to complicate recommendations for universal prophylaxis. Prevention of joint arthropathy needs to focus on prevention of hemarthroses through prophylaxis, identifying early joint disease through the optimal use of cost-effective imaging modalities and the validation of serological markers of joint arthropathy. Screening for effects on bone health and optimal management of pain to improve quality of life are, likewise, important issues. Major hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilic synovitis should be treated aggressively to prevent hemophilic arthropathy.

  2. Acquired hemophilia A in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T; Tsukamoto, N; Suto, M; Uchiumi, H; Mitsuhashi, H; Yokohama, A; Maesawa, A; Nojima, Y; Naruse, T

    2001-06-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed acquired hemophilia A. The patient, a 24-year-old Japanese woman, was referred to our hospital because of uncontrollable bleeding following a tooth extraction. Laboratory examination revealed prolonged APTT (116 seconds), reduced factor VIII activity (2.8 %) and the presence of factor VIII inhibitor at a titer of 46.5 Bethesda units/ml. Transfusion of prothrombin complex concentrate and activated prothrombin complex concentrate followed by administration of prednisolone and cyclophosphamide successfully arrested bleeding and reduced the factor VIII inhibitor level. Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but lethal condition. Rapid diagnosis and introduction of adequate therapies are critical.

  3. Hemophilia A in a Belgian Shepherd Malinois dog: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazza, A; Lubas, G; Trotta, M; Caldin, M

    2014-08-01

    This case report presents a Belgian Shepherd Malinois dog affected by hemophilia A recognized at the age of seven months. The clinical follow-up including all the diagnostic procedures leading to the final diagnosis and the course of this disorder are presented. This is a typical proband case demonstrating the appearance of this genetic disease in a breed never involved by this coagulation disorder so far documented that started an intensive and laborious plan to reduce the incidence of hemophilia A and the further appearance of new cases.

  4. Airway obstruction and hemophilia-A: epiglottis hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshoren, Nir; Varon, David; Weinberger, Jeffrey M; Gross, Menachem

    2010-07-01

    Acute upper airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening event. Hemophilia-A is a coagulopathy with high risk for spontaneous bleeding. Here we describe for the first time a spontaneous epiglottic internal hemorrhage leading to upper airway narrowing in a hemophilia-A patient. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for airway observation and treatment with factor VIII supplementation. In the first 48 hours there was rapid respiratory improvement. The epiglottic swelling resolved on the 5th day. In this patient no oral intubation or surgical management was needed.

  5. Hemoaction game: an educational step to improve hemophilia children and nurses self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOOASHIN BEHESHTIPOOR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As hemophilia is a chronic bleeding disease and can interfere with daily performance of children, these children require continuous training to prevent bleeding and take timely action (1. Since children nurses play an important role in the education of involved children and their Selfefficacy and also due to today’s approach which is using educational computer games, the use of educational games in respect to teach hemophilia children how to have self-efficacy can be effective (2. Hemoaction game is a computerized educational game designed by the World Federation of Hemophilia to educate hemophilia disease and related procedures to the care of children with hemophilia. By the use of this game children with hemophilia (aged 8-12 and also nursing experts were educated how to increase self efficacy. Nursing School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has used this game for the first time after its publishing, in the world (3. The results of the mentioned study demonstrates that after the Hemophilia disease and its related procedures were instructed to children with hemophilia and nursing experts in order to know how to increase patients’ self efficacy by modern approaches, self efficacy of hemophilia children and nurses were both improved. This educational method is a novel way to enhance both Hemophilia children and nursing staff, as major participants in routine and lifelong education process, self-efficacy. Due to nurses’ important role in improving children with hemophilia self-efficacy by different instructions and world leading educational approaches towards use of modern technology in education, using Hemoaction educational game, published by World Federation of Hemophilia and used by Nursing and Midwifery College of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for the first time, can fulfill hemophilia children needs of care.

  6. Adeno-associated viral vectors for the treatment of hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Katherine A.; Anguela, Xavier M.

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer studies for the treatment of hemophilia began more than two decades ago. A large body of pre-clinical work evaluated a variety of vectors and target tissues, but by the start of the new millennium it became evident that adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated gene transfer to the liver held great promise as a therapeutic tool. The transition to the clinical arena uncovered a number of unforeseen challenges, mainly in the form of a human-specific immune response against the vector that poses a significant limitation in the application of this technology. While the full nature of this response has not been elucidated, long-term expression of therapeutic levels of factor IX is already a reality for a small number of patients. Extending this success to a greater number of hemophilia B patients remains a major goal of the field, as well as translating this strategy to clinical therapy for hemophilia A. This review summarizes the progress of AAV-mediated gene therapy for the hemophilias, along with its upcoming prospects and challenges. PMID:26614390

  7. Surgery and inhibitor development in hemophilia A : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckhardt, C.L.; Van der Bom, J.G.; Van Der Naald, M.; Peters, M.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Fijnvandraat, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although the association between intensive treatment and the formation of inhibiting antibodies towards factor VIII (FVIII) in hemophilia A has been demonstrated, the contributing effect of surgery is presently unclear. The release of immunological danger signals resulting from tissue da

  8. Problems of Hemophilia and the Role of the Rehabilitation Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrai, Edward B.; Handford, H. Allen

    1983-01-01

    Because of the multiple problems associated with hemophilia, optimal treatment is usually provided in a comprehensive care setting by a team of medical and nonmedical professionals. The rehabilitation counselor contributes expertise to that of other team members in development and implementation of an individual rehabilitation plan for…

  9. Posttonsillectomy hemorrhage in children with von Willebrand disease or hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gordon H; Auger, Katherine A; Aliu, Oluseyi; Patrick, Stephen W; DeMonner, Sonya; Davis, Matthew M

    2013-03-01

    It is uncertain whether children with bleeding disorders are at higher risk of posttonsillectomy hemorrhage compared with the general pediatric population. To estimate the national rate of posttonsillectomy hemorrhage in children previously diagnosed with von Willebrand disease (VWD) or hemophilia, and to analyze potential risk factors for postoperative bleeding in these children. A cross-sectional analysis of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. Academic and community-based nonrehabilitation hospitals from 44 states participating in the KID project. An estimated 508 children with either VWD or hemophilia. Tonsillectomy with and without adenoidectomy, and subsequent hospitalization. Treatment for posttonsillectomy hemorrhage. We extracted all cases of tonsillectomy, adenotonsillectomy, and posttonsillectomy hemorrhage in patients with VWD or hemophilia using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnostic and procedure codes and applied national weights to estimate rates of posttonsillectomy hemorrhage. Using data regarding patient demographic characteristics, surgical indication, blood transfusion, hospital length of stay, and mortality, we conducted bivariate analyses to identify associations between possible risk factors and posttonsillectomy hemorrhage. Mean age was 7 years, and most patients were male, white, urbanites who had private insurance and underwent tonsillectomy for airway obstruction. The hemorrhage rate within 1 day of tonsillectomy (immediate) was 1.6% while the hemorrhage rate at least 2 days after tonsillectomy (delayed) was estimated at 15%. Delayed hemorrhage was associated with older age (P < .001) and was as high as 35% in children at least 16 years old. The rate of blood transfusion was 2.4%. There were no fatalities. The frequency of immediate posttonsillectomy hemorrhage in children with VWD or

  10. Past, present and future of hemophilia: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franchini Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past forty years the availability of coagulation factor replacement therapy has greatly contributed to the improved care of people with hemophilia. Following the blood-borne viral infections in the late 1970s and early 1980, caused by coagulation factor concentrates manufactured using non-virally inactivated pooled plasma, the need for safer treatment became crucial to the hemophilia community. The introduction of virus inactivated plasma-derived coagulation factors and then of recombinant products has revolutionized the care of these people. These therapeutic weapons have improved their quality of life and that of their families and permitted home treatment, i.e., factor replacement therapy at regular intervals in order to prevent both bleeding and the resultant joint damage (i.e. primary prophylaxis. Accordingly, a near normal lifestyle and life-expectancy have been achieved. The main current problem in hemophilia is the onset of alloantibodies inactivating the infused coagulation factor, even though immune tolerance regimens based on long-term daily injections of large dosages of coagulation factors are able to eradicate inhibitors in approximately two-thirds of affected patients. In addition availability of products that bypass the intrinsic coagulation defects have dramatically improved the management of this complication. The major challenges of current treatment regimens, such the short half life of hemophilia therapeutics with need for frequent intravenous injections, encourage the current efforts to produce coagulation factors with more prolonged bioavailability. Finally, intensive research is devoted to gene transfer therapy, the only way to ultimately obtain cure in hemophilia.

  11. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. PMID:27390359

  12. A Case of Hemophilia A Associated with Spontaneous Hemorrhagic Pleural Effusion and Intracranial Hem

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    Nuri Tutar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a sex-linked recessive coagulation disorder almost exclusively occurring in male subjects and caused by a deficiency of factor VIII. It  is a rare disorder characterized by spontaneous hemorrhages. Spontaneous bleeding in the pleural space is very rare in hemophilia both in children and adults. Here in, we present the case of a 56-year-old hemophilia A patient with hemorrhagic pleural effusion and intracranial hematoma.

  13. Traumatic Hemarthrosis of the Knee Secondary to Hemophilia A in a Collegiate Soccer Player: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Fiala, Kelly A; Hoffmann, Sandra J.; Ritenour, Donna M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To present the case of a collegiate soccer player who suffered from a traumatic knee hemarthrosis secondary to hemophilia A. This case presents an opportunity to discuss the participation status of athletes with hemophilia.

  14. Bayesian approach to the assessment of the population-specific risk of inhibitors in hemophilia A patients: a case study

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    Cheng J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ji Cheng,1,2 Alfonso Iorio,2,3 Maura Marcucci,4 Vadim Romanov,5 Eleanor M Pullenayegum,6,7 John K Marshall,3,8 Lehana Thabane1,2 1Biostatistics Unit, St Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 3Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 4Geriatrics, Fondazione Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; 5Baxter HealthCare, Global Medical Affairs, Westlake Village, CA, USA; 6Child Health Evaluation Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, 7Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, 8Division of Gastroenterology, Hamilton Health Science, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Developing inhibitors is a rare event during the treatment of hemophilia A. The multifacets and uncertainty surrounding the development of inhibitors further complicate the process of estimating inhibitor rate from the limited data. Bayesian statistical modeling provides a useful tool in generating, enhancing, and exploring the evidence through incorporating all the available information.Methods: We built our Bayesian analysis using three study cases to estimate the inhibitor rates of patients with hemophilia A in three different scenarios: Case 1, a single cohort of previously treated patients (PTPs or previously untreated patients; Case 2, a meta-analysis of PTP cohorts; and Case 3, a previously unexplored patient population – patients with baseline low-titer inhibitor or history of inhibitor development. The data used in this study were extracted from three published ADVATE (antihemophilic factor [recombinant] is a product of Baxter for treating hemophilia A post-authorization surveillance studies. Noninformative and informative priors were applied to Bayesian standard (Case 1 or random-effects (Case 2 and Case 3 logistic models. Bayesian probabilities of satisfying three meaningful thresholds of the risk of developing a clinical

  15. Anesthetic management of patient with hemophilia a undergoing emergency ventriculoperitoneal shunting: A case report and review of literature

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    Rashid Saeed Khokhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a hemorrhagic trend almost exclusively affecting males (X-related recessive disease. In 85% of cases, it is caused by factor VIII deficiency, called hemophilia A or classic hemophilia. Successful anesthetic management depends on the special care and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals informed about the disease, including qualified hematologist, surgeon, and anesthesiologist.

  16. Anesthetic management of patient with hemophilia a undergoing emergency ventriculoperitoneal shunting: A case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Hussain, Altaf; Khan, Mueen Ullah; Hajnour, Muhammad; Qureshi, Sadia; Aqil, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a hemorrhagic trend almost exclusively affecting males (X-related recessive disease). In 85% of cases, it is caused by factor VIII deficiency, called hemophilia A or classic hemophilia. Successful anesthetic management depends on the special care and a multidisciplinary team of health professionals informed about the disease, including qualified hematologist, surgeon, and anesthesiologist.

  17. Using genetic diagnostics in hemophilia and von Willebrand disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swystun, Laura L; James, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Most bleeding disorders encountered in clinical practice will be diagnosed, at least initially, by phenotypic assays. However, since the characterization of the genes that encode coagulation factors in the 1980s, significant progress has been made in translating this knowledge for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. For hemophilia A and B, molecular genetic testing to determine carrier status, prenatal diagnosis, and likelihood of inhibitor development or anaphylaxis to infused coagulation factor concentrates is an established component of comprehensive clinical management. In contrast, although significant recent advances in our understanding of the molecular genetic basis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) have allowed for the development of rational approaches to genetic diagnostics, questions remain about this complex genetic disorder and how to incorporate emerging knowledge into diagnostic strategies. This article will review the state-of-the-art for molecular diagnostics for both hemophilia and VWD.

  18. Factoring nonviral gene therapy into a cure for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrovsky, Vanessa; Calos, Michele P

    2008-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemophilia A has fallen short of success despite several clinical trials conducted over the past decade. Challenges to its success include vector immunogenicity, insufficient transgene expression levels of Factor VIII, and inhibitor antibody formation. Gene therapy has been dominated by the use of viral vectors, as well as the immunogenic and oncogenic concerns that accompany these strategies. Because of the complexity of viral vectors, the development of nonviral DNA delivery methods may provide an efficient and safe alternative for the treatment of hemophilia A. New types of nonviral strategies, such as DNA integrating vectors, and the success of several nonviral animal studies, suggest that nonviral gene therapy has curative potential and justifies its clinical development.

  19. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy); the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy); or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering). For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors) and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells). Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells) in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression. PMID:23237078

  20. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives

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    Liras Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy; the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy; or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering. For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells. Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression.

  1. Clinical profile of hemophilia patients in Jodhpur Region

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    Vikas Payal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemophilia is widely distributed all over the world, but little is known about its clinical profile in resource-limited regions. An insight into its clinical spectrum will help in the formulation of policies to improve the situation in these areas. Aims: To study the clinical profile of hemophiliacs (age <18 years in Jodhpur region and screen them for transfusion-transmitted infections. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted in the Department of Pediatrics, Umaid Hospital, Dr. S. N. Medical College, Jodhpur, over a period of 12 months. Result: Out of a total of 56 cases enrolled, 51 (91% cases were diagnosed as hemophilia A while 5 (9% were diagnosed as hemophilia B. Positive family history was found in 26 (46% cases. According to their factor levels, 25 (44% cases had severe disease, 20 (36% had moderate disease, and 11 (20% had mild disease. The mean age of onset of symptoms and diagnosis was 1.73 ± 1.43 and 3.87 ± 3.84 years, respectively. First clinical presentation was posttraumatic bleed in 20 (36%, gum bleeds in 17 (30%, epistaxis in 4 (7%, joint bleeds in 4 (7%, skin bleeds in 4 (7%, and circumcision bleed in 3 (5% cases. Knee joint was the predominant joint affected by hemarthrosis in 38 (68%, followed by ankle in 29 (52%, elbow in 20 (36%, and hip joint in 7 (13% cases. All patients had a negative screening test for transfusion-transmitted infections. Conclusion: Occurrence of posttraumatic bleeds and gum bleeds in an otherwise normal child should warn the clinician for evaluation of hemophilia.

  2. Acquired hemophilia a: retrospective analysis of 49 cases from a single Chinese hemophilia center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanhui; Xue, Feng; Shi, Hao; Wang, Hongmei; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Linxiang; Yang, Renchi

    2015-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder caused by the autoantibody directed against factor VIII in patients without previous history of a bleeding disorder. We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics and outcomes of 49 patients with AHA diagnosed in our center from February 1994 to October 2012. Twenty-four patients with acute bleeding episodes were treated with prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) at a relative low dose of 30 to -50 U/kg/d and achieved good outcomes without any adverse reaction. Corticosteroids alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide were used as the first-line therapy to eradicate the inhibitors. In 39 evaluable patients, 35 (89.7%) achieved complete remission (CR). This study demonstrates that when bypassing agents such as recombinant activated factor VII and activated PCCs are not affordable or available, low dose PCC is effective and safe to control acute bleeding in patients with AHA. First-line therapy achieved good outcomes with a CR rate of 89.7%.

  3. Importance of immune response genes in hemophilia A

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    Josiane Bazzo de Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is a disease caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII resulting from genetic inheritance linked to chromosome X. One treatment option is the administration of plasma or recombinant FVIII. However, some patients develop inhibitors or antibodies against this factor. Inhibitors are alloantibodies that bind to the epitope of factor VIII causing it to be recognized by the immune system as a foreign peptide. This is the most serious complication in hemophilia patients in respect to replacement therapy. Some studies have suggested that genetic factors influence the development of factor VIII inhibitors such as ethnicity, family history, mutations in the factor VIII gene and in genes of the immune system. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to assess the influence of genetic factors of immune response genes, especially genes of the major histocompatibility complex and cytokines, which may be related to the development of factor VIII inhibitors in hemophilia A patients. Understanding these risk factors will help to determine future differential treatment in the control and prevention of the development of inhibitors.

  4. INSIGHT in risk factors and treatment of inhibitors in nonsevere hemophilia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited X-linked bleeding disorder that occurs in male offspring of carrier females. In these individuals a mutation in the F8 gene, located on the X-chromosome, causes a deficiency of the factor VIII protein, clotting factor VIII. The worldwide prevalence of hemophilia is 1 in

  5. Hypocoagulability does not protect against atherosclerosis in hemophilia A patients with obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, S.; Tuinenburg, A.; Haak, B.; Peters, M.; De Groot, E.; Verhamme, P.; Peerlinck, K.; Visseren, F.; Kruip, M.; Gorkom, B.L.-V.; Buller, H.; Gerdes, V.; Schutgens, R.; Kamphuisen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Hemophilia A patients have a 50% lower cardiovascular mortality than the general population. Whether this is caused by less atherosclerosis due to hypocoagulability is unclear. We assessed whether hemophilia A patients with obesity, a major atherosclerotic risk factor, have a lower pre

  6. Hemodialysis in a patient with severe hemophilia A and factor VIII inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Usha, Thiruvengadam; Thopalan, Balasubramaniyan; Dhanapriya, Jeyachandran; Dineshkumar, Thanigachalam; Thirumalvalavan, Kaliaperumal; Sakthirajan, Ramanathan

    2016-10-01

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding factor VIII (FVIII), occurring in 1 out of 10,000 persons. Life expectancy and quality of life have dramatically improved recently in patients with hemophilia. Chronic kidney disease and need for renal replacement therapy in these patients are rare. The development of inhibitors to FVIII is the most serious complication of hemophilia and makes treatment of bleeds very challenging. We describe here a 28-year-old male patient with severe hemophilia A with presence of factor VIII inhibitor, who had end stage renal disease. Central venous access device was inserted along with infusion of factor eight inhibitor bypass activity before and after the procedure. He is currently on thrice weekly hemodialysis and doing well for 6 months without bleeding episodes. To our knowledge, hemophilia A with factor VIII inhibitor managed with hemodialysis has not been reported so far. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  7. Understanding cardiovascular risk in hemophilia: A step towards prevention and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousos, Nikolaos; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Garipidou, Vasileia

    2016-04-01

    Advances in hemophilia care have led to increased life expectancy and new challenges in the management of the aging hemophilia population, including cardiovascular risk. Despite the deep knowledge into cardiovascular disease in terms of pathophysiology, risk prediction, prevention, early detection and management gained over the last decades, studies in hemophiliacs are scarce and mainly descriptive. As a growing amount of evidence points towards a similar or increased prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in hemophilia compared to the general population, the role of non-traditional, disease-related and treatment-related cardiovascular risk factors remains under investigation. Better understanding of cardiovascular risk in hemophilia is mandatory for proper cardiovascular risk prevention and management. Therefore, this review aims to summarize current knowledge on cardiovascular risk in hemophilia patients focusing on a) cardiovascular risk factors (traditional, non-traditional, disease-related and treatment-related), b) cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and c) cardiovascular prevention and management.

  8. The Fourth Annual Meeting of the International Network for Pediatric Hemophilia: Current Challenges and Recommendations in the Clinical Care of Children with Hemophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Ljung, Rolf; van den Berg, Marijke; Valentino, Leonard A.; Manco-Johnson, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The International Network for Pediatric Hemophilia (INPH) comprises a group of physicians committed to the unique care of and challenges facing pediatric hemophilia patients. By collaborating on an international level, extensive experience can be shared on current practice, new trends can be discussed and scientifically valid studies can be developed and performed. The three overall objectives of the group (scientific progress, education and networking) are achieved at each annual meeting sta...

  9. Multiple Comorbid Conditions among Middle-Aged and Elderly Hemophilia Patients: Prevalence Estimates and Implications for Future Care

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    Aroub A. Khleif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Advances in hemophilia care and treatment have led to increases in the life expectancy among hemophiliacs. As a result, persons with hemophilia are reaching an older age and experiencing various age-related health conditions never seen before in this population. Aim. To determine the prevalence of comorbidities among middle-aged and elderly hemophilia A and hemophilia B patients. Methods. Retrospective chart review among all hemophilia patients, who attended the Gulf States Hemophilia and Thrombophilia Center. Results. All patients had at least one comorbid condition other than hemophilia, and the majority had between 3 and 6 comorbidities. The most common conditions identified were chronic hepatitis C, hypertension, HIV, chronic arthropathy, and overweight/obesity. Conclusions. Since persons with comorbidities are more likely to have poorer health outcomes and require greater care in managing their health needs, caring for aging hemophiliacs is likely to pose various social and economic challenges for both patients and providers.

  10. Small FVIII gene rearrangements in 18 hemophilia A patients: five novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicocchi, Maria Patrizia; Pasino, Mirella; Lanza, Tiziana; Bottini, Federico; Molinari, Angelo Claudio; Caprino, Daniela; Rosano, Camillo; Acquila, Maura

    2005-02-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a disorder caused by mutations of the FVIII gene, which is located on the tip of the long arm of the X chromosome. In a cohort of 18 unrelated Italian patients affected with HA of varying severity, we performed mutational screening of the gene by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and direct sequencing of abnormal peaks. We identified five novel mutations and 9 previously reported DNA alterations. Two of the 9 previously reported alterations were each common to 3 unrelated patients. Six different mutations were characterized as missense alterations, while 8 were non-missense mutations. Among the new gene alterations, one created a stop codon, one consisted of an out-of frame deletion, and one was a splice-site mutation. The last two were missense alterations. In an attempt to better understand the causative effect of the mutations and the clinical variability of the patients, we investigated the consequences of each missense mutation and visualized the effect of the amino acid change on structural FVIII models.

  11. Hemophilia A in Brazil – epidemiology and treatment developments

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    Ferreira AA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Aparecida Ferreira,1 Isabel Cristina Gonçalves Leite,2 Maria Teresa Bustamante-Teixeira,2 Maximiliano Ribeiro Guerra2 1Foundation and Center for Hematology and Hemotherapy of Minas Gerais (Hemominas, 2Department of Collective Health, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, BrazilAbstract: Hemophilia A is an inherited disorder characterized by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII, which predisposes patients to bleeding events. Treatment is based on replacement of the deficient factor, in a therapeutic or prophylactic manner. Brazil is the country with the third largest population of people with hemophilia, for which the public health system provides free comprehensive care. Maintaining an updated registry of patients, documenting the prevalence of complications, and assessing the effectiveness of resource use are indispensable elements in the design of a well-coordinated national program. According to sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory data collected by the computerized Brazilian system on coagulopathies, in June 2013, there were 9,122 registered patients with hemophilia A in Brazil, of which 36.1% had a severe form of the disease. Clotting factor inhibitors were present in 7.5%, but 25.7% of records did not provide this type of data. Around 70% of the patients belonged to the economically active population, being between 15 and 59 years old. Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus was present in 23.4% of the patients tested and infection by hepatitis C virus antibodies in 59.3%. Infection by the hepatitis B virus and human T-lymphotropic virus was also reported. The high percentage of incomplete records regarding serological data shows the fragility of the information system to date. There was also no information available on the prevalence of permanent or disabling joint damage. Although few hemophiliacs receive adequate care in developing countries, and despite Brazil exhibiting great social

  12. In vitro and In vivo Model Systems for Hemophilia A Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jianhua; Xi, Xiaodong; Kapranov, Philipp; Dong, Biao; Firrman, Jenni; Xu, Ruian; Xiao, Weidong

    2013-01-17

    Hemophilia A is a hereditary disorder caused by various mutations in factor VIII gene resulting in either a severe deficit or total lack of the corresponding activity. Recent success in gene therapy of a related disease, hemophilia B, gives new hope that similar success can be achieved for hemophilia A as well. To develop a gene therapy strategy for the latter, a variety of model systems are needed to evaluate molecular engineering of the factor VIII gene, vector delivery efficacy and safety-related issues. Typically, a tissue culture cell line is the most convenient way to get a preliminary glimpse of the potential of a vector delivery strategy. It is then followed by extensive testing in hemophilia A mouse and dog models. Newly developed hemophilia A sheep may provide yet another tool for evaluation of factor VIII gene delivery vectors. Hemophilia models based on other species may also be developed since hemophiliac animals have been identified or generated in rat, pig, cattle and horse. Although a genetic nonhuman primate hemophilia A model has yet to be developed, the non-genetic hemophilia A model can also be used for special purposes when specific questions need to be addressed that cannot not be answered in other model systems. Hemophilia A is caused by a functional deficiency in the factor VIII gene. This X-linked, recessive bleeding disorder affects approximately 1 in 5000 males [1-3]. Clinically, it is characterized by frequent and spontaneous joint hemorrhages, easy bruising and prolonged bleeding time. The coagulation activity of FVIII dictates severity of the clinical symptoms. Approximately 50% of all cases are classified as severe with less than 1% of normal levels of factor VIII detected [4]. This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding. In contrast, patients with 5-30% of normal factor VIII activity exhibit mild clinical manifestations.

  13. Abo and Rh Blood Groups Distribution in Hemophilia and Anti Hiv Positive Individuals

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    D.D. FARHUD

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available A group of Iranian patients suffering from Factor VIII deficiency (Hemophilia A and treated with contaminated coagulation factor (imported, became seropositive as determined by ELISA method. Sixty of these individuals, which were available, were studied for ABO distribution. The B blood group in anti HIV pos. individuals (13.33% shows a significant decrease in comparison with the total (1504 of factor VIII hemophilia (21.87%. Statistical analysis of ABO distribution in anti HIV Pos. compared with hemophilia A and the control group showed x2 values of 6.86(0.10 > p>0.05 and 10.21(0.02> P >0.01 respectively.

  14. Management of Pregnancy in a Patient with Severe Hemophilia Type A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vipra; Khalid, Aysha; Cohen, Alice J.

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia type A is a rare inherited bleeding disorder with a diversity of clinical manifestations ranging from persistent bleeding after minor trauma, spontaneous deep muscle or joint hemorrhage, to intracranial hemorrhage. As an X-linked disorder, hemophilia is rare in females and therefore there is little experience with pregnancy and no standardized guidelines to prevent bleeding antepartum, at delivery, and postpartum. We report the clinical course and management of a woman with severe hemophilia A who on two occasions had uncomplicated pregnancies and vaginal deliveries at term utilizing bolus recombinant factor VIII concentrate. PMID:23943706

  15. Management of Pregnancy in a Patient with Severe Hemophilia Type A

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    Vipra Sharma

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia type A is a rare inherited bleeding disorder with a diversity of clinical manifestations ranging from persistent bleeding after minor trauma, spontaneous deep muscle or joint hemorrhage, to intracranial hemorrhage. As an X-linked disorder, hemophilia is rare in females and therefore there is little experience with pregnancy and no standardized guidelines to prevent bleeding antepartum, at delivery, and postpartum. We report the clinical course and management of a woman with severe hemophilia A who on two occasions had uncomplicated pregnancies and vaginal deliveries at term utilizing bolus recombinant factor VIII concentrate.

  16. Idiopathic Acquired Hemophilia A with Undetectable Factor VIII Inhibitor

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    Nicholas B. Abt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We present the case of a 73-year-old female, with no family or personal history of a bleeding disorder, who had a classic presentation for acquired hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was low but detectable and a factor VIII inhibitor was undetectable. Methods. The patient’s plasma was comprehensively studied to determine the cause of the acquired coagulopathy. Using the Nijmegen modification of the Bethesda assay, no factor VIII autoantibody was measureable despite varying the incubation time from 1 to 3 hours. Results. The aPTT was prolonged at 46.8 seconds, which did not correct in the 4 : 1 mix but did with 1 : 1 mix. Using a one stage factor VIII activity assay, the FVIII activity was 16% and chromogenic FVIII activity was also 16%. The patient was treated with recombinant FVII and transfusion, significantly reducing bleeding. Long-term therapy was initiated with cyclophosphamide and prednisone with normalization of FVIII activity. Conclusions. Physicians can be presented with the challenging clinical picture of an acquired factor VIII inhibitor without a detectable inhibitor by the Bethesda assay. Standard therapy for an acquired hemophilia A should be considered.

  17. Hemofilia e anestesia Hemofilia y anestesia Hemophilia and anesthesia

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    Rafael Py Gonçalves Flores

    2004-12-01

    equipo multidisciplinar. CONTENIDO: Están definidas las características de la hemofilia en cuanto a la clínica y a los hallazgos laboratoriales, la terapia farmacológica actual y las atenciones con el manoseo del paciente hemofílico en el intra-operatorio. CONCLUSIONES: El manoseo del paciente hemofílico fue perfeccionado. Como consecuencia de ese avance, se percibe la importancia y la necesidad de que nuevos conocimientos, principalmente con relación a la terapia de reposición, sean dominados por hematologistas y por todo el cuerpo clínico-quirúrgico. Cuando pacientes hemofílicos se someten a procedimientos quirúrgicos, es necesario el envolvimiento de un equipo multidisciplinar de la cual el anestesiologista hace parte. A este profesional cabe la responsabilidad de tomar las conductas más adecuadas frente al paciente hemofílico, participando y comunicándose activamente con los miembros del equipo multidisciplinar.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: For more than 25 years, there has been no discussion in the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology about hemophiliac patients' perioperative management. Hemophilia has been described as a disease from the early 19th Century, but still today there are many hemophilia-related breakthroughs. This review aimed at pointing hemophilia patient-related perioperative care, focusing on hemophilia A management and the role of the anesthesiologist as part of the multidisciplinary team. CONTENTS: Hemophilia features are described in terms of clinical and laboratory findings, current pharmacological therapy and intraoperative care of hemophilia patients. CONCLUSIONS: Hemophiliac patients management has improved. As a consequence of this advance, it is important that new knowledge, especially related to replacement therapy, be mastered not only by hematologists but also by the whole clinical-surgical team. A multidisciplinary team of which the anesthesiologist is part has to be involved when hemophilia patients are submitted to surgical

  18. Treatment of hepatitis C in patients with haemophilia - the Israeli National Hemophilia Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Y; Schapiro, J M; Bashari, D; Lurie, Y; Safadi, R; Segol, O; Paritsky, M; Rachlis, Z; Avidan, B; Bar-Meir, S; Martinowitz, U

    2008-03-01

    Treatment with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin, now the standard of care, has been shown to achieve sustained viral response (SVR) in up to 60% of patients with hepatitis C (HCV). Studies of response to this combination in HCV-infected haemophilia patients are scarce. The aim of the study was to report the results and safety of interferon/ribavirin treatment in HCV and HCV-/HIV-infected patients at the Israeli National Hemophilia Center. A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted on haemophilia patients infected with HCV or HCV/HIV. Patients received combination of Peg-IFN and ribavirin. Few were still treated with standard interferon. The primary end-point was sustained viral response (SVR). The secondary end-point was safety, with emphasis on increased bleeding episodes. Some 18/43 (42%) HCV mono-infected haemophilia patients achieved SVR. Relapse occurred in 14 (33%), while 11 patients (25%) were non-responders. SVR was achieved among 17/37 (46%) naïve patients receiving Peg-IFN and ribavirin. Among patients with genotype-1, SVR was achieved in 12/36 (33%) and 11/30 (37%) in the whole group and Peg-IFN treated naïve patients, respectively. In HCV/HIV co-infected patients only 1 patient achieved SVR. Severe anaemia occurred in 14/50 (28%) patients, four received erythropoietin. None maintained stable haemoglobin levels. Two patients had significant bleeding episodes. In our cohort of haemophilia patients, SVR was achieved in a lower than expected rates. A relatively high relapse rate in the HCV mono-infected patients and a very high non-response rate in the HCV/HIV co-infected patients were observed as anticipated. Anaemia was a major side effect and the use of growth factors seemed unrevealing.

  19. Case of linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis associated with acquired hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Osao; Yamamoto, Yu-ichi; Awazawa, Ryoko; Nonaka, Kimiko; Taira, Kiyohito; Asato, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Keisuke; Oyama, Bungo; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Uezato, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    Linear immunoglobulin (Ig)A bullous dermatosis is a rare autoimmune subepidermal bullous dermatosis caused by circulating IgA autoantibodies directed against the antigens at the basement membrane zone. Most linear IgA bullous dermatosis cases are idiopathic, but some are associated with the use of certain drugs, infections, lymphoproliferative disorders, internal malignancies, autoimmune disorders, collagen diseases or, very rarely, other skin diseases, including autoimmune bullous diseases. Acquired hemophilia is also rare; it is a coagulation disease caused by anti-factor VIII IgG antibodies. Acquired hemophilia has been reported to be associated with malignant tumors, pregnancy or postpartum, drug reactions, collagen diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disorders, and skin diseases such as psoriasis and pemphigus. We report a case of hemophilia acquired during the course of linear IgA bullous dermatosis and review reported cases of autoimmune bullous dermatoses associated with acquired hemophilia.

  20. Novel, high incidence exercise-induced muscle bleeding model in hemophilia B mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranholm, M.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Broberg, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Muscle hematomas are the second most common complication of hemophilia and insufficient treatment may result in serious and even life-threatening complications. Hemophilic dogs and rats do experience spontaneous muscle bleeding, but currently, no experimental animal model is available...... specifically investigating spontaneous muscle bleeds in a hemophilic setting. AIM: The objective of this study was to develop a model of spontaneous muscle bleeds in hemophilia B mice. We hypothesized that treadmill exercise would induce muscle bleeds in hemophilia B mice but not in normal non-hemophilic mice...... and that treatment with recombinant factor IX (rFIX) before treadmill exercise could prevent the occurrence of pathology. METHODS: A total of 203 mice (123 F9-KO and 80 C57BL/6NTac) were included in three separate studies: (i) the model implementation study investigating the bleeding pattern in hemophilia B mice...

  1. Improving the management of chronic diseases using web-based technologies: an application in hemophilia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonor; Saavedra, Vasco; Ferreira, Carlos; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Modern methods of information and communication that use web technologies provide an opportunity to facilitate closer communication between patients and healthcare providers, allowing a joint management of chronic diseases. This paper describes a web-based technological solution to support the management of inherited bleeding disorders integrating, diffusing and archiving large sets of data relating to the clinical practice of hemophilia care, more specifically the clinical practice at the Hematology Service of Coimbra Hospital Center (a Hemophilia Treatment Center located in Portugal).

  2. Nasal hemophilic pseudotumor in a patient with mild hemophilia A and allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yoshiyasu; Monji, Mikio; Kai, Keita; Matsuo, Muneaki

    2017-02-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare complication, even in patients with severe hemophilia. Herein we report on a case of hemophilic pseudotumor in a patient with mild hemophilia A and allergic rhinitis, initially suspected to be a nasal tumor. The pseudotumor was cured by supplementation with recombinant factor VIII concentrates, and medication for allergic rhinitis. Pseudotumor should always be considered in hemophiliac patients, even in those with only mild deficiency of coagulation factors.

  3. Hemoaction Game: An educational Step to Improve Hemophilia Children and Nurses Self-Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    NOOASHIN BEHESHTIPOOR; SHIRIN GHANAVATI; MITRA EDRAKI; MEHRAN KARIMI; SEZANEH HAGHPANAH

    2016-01-01

    As hemophilia is a chronic bleeding disease and can interfere with daily performance of children, these children require continuous training to prevent bleeding and take timely action (1). Since children nurses play an important role in the education of involved children and their Selfefficacy and also due to today’s approach which is using educational computer games, the use of educational games in respect to teach hemophilia children how to have self-efficacy can ...

  4. Changing Paradigm of Hemophilia Management: Extended Half-Life Factor Concentrates and Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Riten; Dunn, Amy; Carcao, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Management of hemophilia has evolved significantly in the last century-from recognition of the causative mechanism in the 1950s to commercially available clotting factor concentrates in the 1960s. Availability of lyophilized concentrates in the 1970s set the stage for home-based therapy, followed by introduction of virally attenuated plasma-derived, and then recombinant factor concentrates in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively. The subsequent years saw a paradigm shift in treatment goals from on-demand therapy to prophylactic factor replacement starting at an early age, to prevent hemarthrosis becoming the standard of care for patients with severe hemophilia. In the developed world, the increasing use of home-based prophylactic regimens has significantly improved the quality of life, and life expectancy of patients with severe hemophilia. Seminal developments in the past 5 years, including the commercial availability of extended half-life factor concentrates and the publication of successful results of gene therapy for patients with hemophilia B, promise to further revolutionize hemophilia care over the next few decades. In this review, we summarize the evolution of management for hemophilia, with a focus on extended half-life factor concentrates and gene therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Unmet needs in the transition to adulthood: 18- to 30-year-old people with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Doris; Reding, Mark; Guelcher, Chris; Peltier, Skye; Witkop, Michelle; Cutter, Susan; Buranahirun, Cathy; Molter, Don; Frey, Mary Jane; Forsyth, Angela; Tran, Duc Bobby; Curtis, Randall; Hiura, Grant; Levesque, Justin; de la Riva, Debbie; Compton, Matthew; Iyer, Neeraj N; Holot, Natalia; Cooper, David L

    2015-12-01

    Young adults with hemophilia face unique challenges during the transition to adulthood, including issues associated with switching from pediatric to adult hematology care, building mature interpersonal relationships, and establishing an independent career with an assurance of medical insurance coverage. A greater understanding of these challenges is essential for developing effective strategies to address the specific needs of this population. These challenges may be differentiated from those of older adults with hemophilia in large part because of more extensive childhood prophylaxis and safer factor products, resulting in fewer joint problems and lower rates of HIV and HCV infections. This analysis of the changing nature and unmet needs of today's young adults entering into adult hemophilia treatment centers, as well as potential strategies for optimally addressing these needs, was developed following roundtable discussions between patients, caregivers, hematologists, and other health care professionals participating in comprehensive care. Challenges identified among young adults with hemophilia include psychosocial issues related to maturity, personal responsibility, and increased independence, as well as concerns regarding when and with whom to share information about one's hemophilia, limited awareness of educational and financial resources, and a low perceived value of regular hematology care. The initiatives proposed herein highlight important opportunities for health care professionals at pediatric and adult hemophilia treatment centers, as well as national organizations, community groups, and career counselors, to address key unmet needs of this patient population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Current and future prospects for hemophilia gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Peter; Walsh, Christopher E

    2016-07-01

    Here we review the recent literature on Hemophilia gene transfer/therapy. Gene therapy is one of several new technologies being developed as a treatment for bleeding disorders. We will discuss current and pending clinical efforts and attempt to relate how the field is trending. In doing so, we will focus on the use of recombinant Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector-mediated gene transfer since all currently active trials are using this vector. Recent exciting results embody nearly 20 years of preclinical and translational research. After several early clinical attempts, therapeutic factor levels that can now be achieved reflect several modifications of the original vectors. Patterns of results are slowly starting to emerge as different AAV vectors are being tested. As with any new technology, there are drawbacks, and the potential for immune/inflammatory and oncogenic risks have emerged and will be discussed.

  7. Registry of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, T; Schved, J F

    2012-11-01

    Creating a national registry for bleeding disorders is a major step in establishing a National Hemophilia Care Program in all countries. Creating such a registry which would contain accurate and regularly updated data, including laboratory analysis confirmed by a reference laboratory established at the Syrian Hemophilia Society. Blood samples were drawn and analysed in the Society reference laboratory for the following screening tests: prothrombin time (PT), APTT and coagulation factor assays. Inhibitor detection and VWF RiCof were performed depending on the result of the screening tests. HBs Ag, anti-HCV, anti-HIV 1+2 and syphilis tests were also performed to detect transfusion transmitted agents (TTA). Diagnosis of the bleeding disorder type was confirmed for 760 of these cases. Among the 760 confirmed patients, 82.5% had haemophilia. Among these, 89.6%were haemophilia A; 10.4% were haemophilia B; 8.3% had VWD; 9.2% had other rare bleeding disorders as follows: 1.2% FVII deficiency, 0.7% FV deficiency, 1.8% F1 deficiency, 0.4% FX deficiency, 1.4% platelets dysfunctions (mainly Glanzmann Thrombasthenia) and 3.7% had combined FVIII and FV deficiency. Eighty (21.3%) cases of 375 screened for transfusion transmitted agents were positive for at least one infection: 0.5% were HBsAg positive, 19.7% were anti-HCV positive, 0.8% had combined HBsAg and anti-HCV positivity and 0.3% was anti-Syphilis positive. All patients were negative for HIV1 and HIV2. The preliminary data presented here follow known data on haemophilia A, haemophilia B and VWD disease. This registry will certainly help in improving haemophilia care in Syria.

  8. Coronary artery calcification in hemophilia A: No evidence for a protective effect of factor VIII deficiency on atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinenburg, A.; Rutten, A.; Kavousi, M.; Leebeek, F.W.G.; Ypma, P.F.; Laros-Van Gorkom, B.A.P.; Nijziel, M.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Mauser-Bunschoten, E.P.; Roosendaal, G.; Biesma, D.H.; Van Der Lugt A., [No Value; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Bots, M.L.; Schutgens, R.E.G.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality due to ischemic heart disease is lower in hemophilia patients when compared to the general male population. As coagulation plays a role in the inflammatory pathways involved in atherogenesis, we investigated whether the clotting factor deficiency protects hemophilia patients from developin

  9. Consensus review of the treatment of cardiovascular disease in people with hemophilia A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A; Boral, Leonard I; Cohen, Alice J; Smyth, Susan S; White, Gilbert C

    2015-01-01

    With advances in care, increasing numbers of people with hemophilia (PWH) achieve near-normal life expectancies and present with typical age-related cardiovascular conditions. Evidence-based guidelines for medical or surgical management of cardiovascular conditions in individuals with hemophilia are limited. Published recommendations exist for the management of some common cardiovascular conditions (eg, ischemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation), but identifying optimal strategies for anticoagulant or antithrombotic therapy constitutes the primary challenge of managing nonoperative cardiovascular disease (CVD) in PWH. In general, as long as factor concentrates or other hemostatic therapies maintain adequate hemostasis, the recommended medical and surgical management of CVD in PWH parallels that in individuals without hemophilia. The presence of factor inhibitors complicates hemophilia management. Published outcomes of CVD treatment in PWH are similar to those in the general population. Specific knowledge about factor replacement, factor inhibitors, and disease-specific treatment distinguishes the cardiovascular care of PWH from similar care of individuals without this rare bleeding disorder. Furthermore, a multidisciplinary approach incorporating a hematologist with an onsite coagulation laboratory, ideally associated with a hemophilia treatment center, is integral to the management of CVD in PWH.

  10. Outcomes in Patients With Hemophilia and von Willebrand Disease Undergoing Invasive or Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, John; Bamme, Jaqueline; Hsu, Fraustina; Christos, Paul; DeSancho, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Adults with hemophilia A (HA), hemophilia B (HB), and von Willebrand disease (VWD) frequently require surgery and invasive procedures. However, there is variability in perioperative management guidelines. We describe our periprocedural outcomes in this setting. A retrospective chart review from January 2006 to December 2012 of patients with HA, HB, and VWD undergoing surgery or invasive procedures was conducted. Type of procedures, management including the use of continuous factor infusion, and administration of antifibrinolytics were reviewed. Adverse outcomes were defined as acute bleeding (patients with HA and HB. In all, 24 patients had severe hemophilia and 12 had mild/moderate hemophilia. Twelve patients had inhibitors. There were also 5 female carriers of HA and 6 patients with VWD. There were 34 major surgeries (26 orthopedic, 8 nonorthopedic) and 129 minor surgeries. Continuous infusion was used in 55.9% of major surgeries versus 8.5% of minor surgeries. Antifibrinolytics were administered in 14.7% of major surgeries versus 23.2% of minor surgeries. In all, 4 patients developed acute bleeding and 10 patients developed delayed bleeding. Delayed bleeding occurred in 28.6% of genitourinary procedures and in 16.1% of dental procedures. Five patients acquired an inhibitor and 2 had thrombosis. In conclusion, patients with HA, HB, or VWD had similar rates of adverse outcomes when undergoing minor surgeries or major surgeries. This finding underscores the importance of an interdisciplinary management and procedure-specific guidelines for patients with hemophilia and VWD prior to even minor invasive procedures.

  11. Shortened Lifespan and Lethal Hemorrhage in a Hemophilia A Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Staber

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A animal models have helped advance our understanding of factor VIII deficiency. Previously, factor VIII deficient mouse models were reported to have a normal life span without spontaneous bleeds. However, the bleeding frequency and survival in these animals has not been thoroughly evaluated.To investigate the survival and lethal bleeding frequency in two strains of E-16 hemophilia A mice.We prospectively studied factor VIII deficient hemizygous affected males (n = 83 and homozygous affected females (n = 55 for survival and bleeding frequency. Animals were evaluated for presence and location of bleeds as potential cause of death.Hemophilia A mice had a median survival of 254 days, which is significantly shortened compared to wild type controls (p < 0.0001. In addition, the hemophilia A mice experienced hemorrhage in several tissues. This previously-underappreciated shortened survival in the hemophilia A murine model provides new outcomes for investigation of therapeutics and also reflects the shortened lifespan of patients if left untreated.

  12. Protein replacement therapy and gene transfer in canine models of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, von willebrand disease, and factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Timothy C; Dillow, Aaron M; Franck, Helen W G; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Arruda, Valder R; High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    Dogs with hemophilia A, hemophilia B, von Willebrand disease (VWD), and factor VII deficiency faithfully recapitulate the severe bleeding phenotype that occurs in humans with these disorders. The first rational approach to diagnosing these bleeding disorders became possible with the development of reliable assays in the 1940s through research that used these dogs. For the next 60 years, treatment consisted of replacement of the associated missing or dysfunctional protein, first with plasma-derived products and subsequently with recombinant products. Research has consistently shown that replacement products that are safe and efficacious in these dogs prove to be safe and efficacious in humans. But these highly effective products require repeated administration and are limited in supply and expensive; in addition, plasma-derived products have transmitted bloodborne pathogens. Recombinant proteins have all but eliminated inadvertent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, but the other limitations persist. Thus, gene therapy is an attractive alternative strategy in these monogenic disorders and has been actively pursued since the early 1990s. To date, several modalities of gene transfer in canine hemophilia have proven to be safe, produced easily detectable levels of transgene products in plasma that have persisted for years in association with reduced bleeding, and correctly predicted the vector dose required in a human hemophilia B liver-based trial. Very recently, however, researchers have identified an immune response to adeno-associated viral gene transfer vector capsid proteins in a human liver-based trial that was not present in preclinical testing in rodents, dogs, or nonhuman primates. This article provides a review of the strengths and limitations of canine hemophilia, VWD, and factor VII deficiency models and of their historical and current role in the development of improved therapy for humans with these inherited bleeding disorders.

  13. The Use Of Feiba In Hemophilia A Patient With Inhibitory And Sign Of Severe Intraabdominal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Çelik

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of a factor VIII inhibitory is the most serious problem of Hemophilia A. High dose FVIII, recombinant FVIIa or FVIII inhibitor bypass activator (FEIBA only or combined may use in the treatment of hemophilia with inhibitory. We present here 42 year-old male was admitted to our clinic with sign of shock, abdominal tenderness and image of mass. In laboratory, Hemoglobin was found 5 gr/dl, aPTT: 106 sec, FVIII: %0 and inhibitory level was found 14 BU. Abdominal computerized tomography was shown hemorrhage in abdominal cavity and in psoas muscle. In treatment; We used blood transfusion and 100 U/kgx2/d FEIBA along 4 days. General symptoms and signs was healed after 2 days and hematologic parameters turned to normal. Immune tolerans treatment program was planned for patient, later. FEIBA treatment is very useful in hemophilia patients suffered from hemorrhage and inhibitors in addition to supportive treatment.

  14. Successful Phenotype Improvement following Gene Therapy for Severe Hemophilia A in Privately Owned Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Mary Beth; Haskins, Mark E; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A; Arruda, Valder R

    2016-01-01

    Severe hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, the canine model has been one of the best predictors of the therapeutic dose tested in clinical trials for hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) and other genetic diseases, such as congenital blindness. Here we report our experience with liver gene therapy with AAV-FVIII in two outbred, privately owned dogs with severe HA that resulted in sustained expression of 1-2% of normal FVIII levels and prevented 90% of expected bleeding episodes. A Thr62Met mutation in the F8 gene was identified in one dog. These data recapitulate the improvement of the disease phenotype in research animals, and in humans, with AAV liver gene therapy for hemophilia B. Our experience is a novel example of the benefits of a relevant preclinical canine model to facilitate both translational studies in humans and improved welfare of privately owned dogs.

  15. The treatment of hemophilia A: from protein replacement to AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youjin, Shen; Jun, Yin

    2009-03-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is an essential component in blood coagulation, a deficiency of which causes the serious bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Recently, with the development of purification level and recombinant techniques, protein replacement treatment to hemophiliacs is relatively safe and can prolong their life expectancy. However, because of the possibility of unknown contaminants in plasma-derived FVIII and recombinant FVIII, and high cost for hemophiliacs to use these products, gene therapy for hemophilia A is an attractive alternative to protein replacement therapy. Thus far, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy. Further improvement of the virus for clinical application depends on better understanding of the molecular structure and fate of the vector genome. It is likely that hemophilia will be the first genetic disease to be cured by somatic cell gene therapy.

  16. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  17. Impact of inhibitors on hemophilia A mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Christopher E; Soucie, J Michael; Miller, Connie H

    2015-05-01

    The previously published mortality studies are limited in hemophilia populations but suggest that there is no increased risk of mortality in factor VIII inhibitor patients. This retrospective study analyzed surveillance data collected on 7,386 males with severe hemophilia A over a 13-year period to assess the association between a current inhibitor and death. During the study period, 432 participants died, among whom 48 were patients with an inhibitor. Clinical characteristics most strongly associated with death were increased number of reported bleeds, signs of liver disease, infection with either HIV or HCV, and the presence of inhibitor. Patients who underwent successful tolerization were not considered inhibitor patients in our analysis. In a multivariable analysis, the odds of death were 70% higher among patients with a current inhibitor compared to those without an inhibitor (P hemophilia A and a current inhibitor are at increased risk of death.

  18. Hemobilia as the initial manifestation of cholangiocarcinoma in a hemophilia B patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hemobilia is a rare manifestation of hemophilia and is usually iatrogenic following liver biopsy. There are only few reports of spontaneous hemobilia in hemophilia patients. Cholangiocarcinoma is a well- established cause of hemobilia. We describe a case of a 70-year-old male, with known haemophilia B and a past history of papillotomy, who presented with classical symptoms of hemobilia. The initial diagnostic work-up failed to demonstrate a potential cause of bleeding other than the coagulopathy. Three months later, he was readmitted to our hospital with a second episode of hemobilia. During the second work-up, a cholangiocarcinoma was diagnosed both by imaging studies and by a significant elevation of cancer antigen 19-9. Although hemobilia could be attributed to hemophilia, especially in a patient with previous papillotomy, an underlying malignancy of the biliary tree should be suspected.

  19. New developments in the management of moderate-to-severe hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeef, Moniba; Sheehan, John P

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic deficiency of coagulation factor IX (FIX) activity associated with recurrent deep tissue and joint bleeding that may lead to long-term disability. FIX replacement therapy using plasma-derived protein or recombinant protein has significantly reduced bleeding and disability from hemophilia B, particularly when used in a prophylactic fashion. Although modern factor replacement has excellent efficacy and safety, barriers to the broader use of prophylaxis remain, including the need for intravenous (IV) access, frequent dosing, variability in individual pharmacokinetics, and cost. To overcome the requirement for frequent factor dosing, novel forms of recombinant FIX have been developed that possess extended terminal half-lives. Two of these products (FIXFc and rIX-FP) represent fusion proteins with the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) Fc domain and albumin, respectively, resulting in proteins that are recycled in vivo by the neonatal Fc receptor. The third product has undergone site-specific PEGylation on the activation peptide of FIX, similarly resulting in a long-lived FIX form. Clinical trials in previously treated hemophilia B patients have demonstrated excellent efficacy and confirmed less-frequent dosing requirements for the extended half-life forms. However, gaps in knowledge remain with regard to the risk of inhibitor formation and allergic reactions in previously untreated patient populations, safety in elderly patients with hemophilia, effects on in vivo FIX distribution, and cost-effectiveness. Additional strategies designed to rebalance hemostasis in hemophilia patients include monoclonal-antibody-mediated inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity and siRNA-mediated reduction in antithrombin expression by the liver. Both of these approaches are long acting and potentially involve subcutaneous administration of the drug. In this review, we will discuss the biology of FIX, the evolution of FIX replacement therapy, the

  20. Phenotypic correction of murine hemophilia A using an iPS cell-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Alipio, Zaida; Fink, Louis M; Adcock, Dorothy M; Yang, Jianchang; Ward, David C; Ma, Yupo

    2009-01-20

    Hemophilia A is caused by mutations within the Factor VIII (FVIII) gene that lead to depleted protein production and inefficient blood clotting. Several attempts at gene therapy have failed for various reasons-including immune rejection. The recent generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from somatic cells by the ectopic expression of 3 transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4, provides a means of circumventing the immune rejection barrier. To date, iPS cells appear to be indistinguishable from ES cells and thus provide tremendous therapeutic potential. Here we prepared murine iPS cells from tail-tip fibroblasts and differentiated them to both endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells by using the embryoid body differentiation method. These iPS cells express major ES cell markers such as Oct4, Nanog, SSEA-1, alkaline phosphatase, and SALL4. Endothelial/endothelial progenitor cells derived from iPS cells expressed cell-specific markers such as CD31, CD34, and Flk1 and secreted FVIII protein. These iPS-derived cells were injected directly into the liver of irradiated hemophilia A mice. At various times after transplantation (7-90 days) hemophilia A mice and their control mice counterparts were challenged by a tail-clip bleeding assay. Nontransplanted hemophilia A mice died within a few hours, whereas transplanted mice survived for more than 3 months. Plasma FVIII levels increased in transplanted hemophilia A mice during this period to 8% to 12% of wild type and corrected the hemophilia A phenotype. Our studies provide additional evidence that iPS cell therapy may be able to treat human monogenetic disorders in the future.

  1. Specific and global coagulation assays in the diagnosis of discrepant mild hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Annette E; Van Veen, Joost J; Goodeve, Anne C; Kitchen, Steve; Makris, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The activity of the factor VIII coagulation protein can be measured by three methods: a one or two-stage clotting assay and a chromogenic assay. The factor VIII activity of most individuals with mild hemophilia A is the same regardless of which method is employed. However, approximately 30% of patients show marked discrepancies in factor VIII activity measured with the different methods. The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of assay discrepancy in our center, assess the impact of alternative reagents on factor VIII activity assays and determine the usefulness of global assays of hemostasis in mild hemophilia A. Factor VIII activity was measured in 84 individuals with mild hemophilia A using different reagents. Assay discrepancy was defined as a two-fold or greater difference between the results of the one-stage and two-stage clotting assays. Rotational thromboelastometry and calibrated automated thrombography were performed. Assay discrepancy was observed in 31% of individuals; 12% with lower activity in the two-stage assay and 19% with lower activity in the one-stage assay. The phenotype could not always be predicted from the individual's genotype. Chromogenic assays were shown to be a suitable alternative to the two-stage clotting assay. Thromboelastometry was found to have poor sensitivity in hemophilia. Calibrated automated thrombography supported the results obtained by the two-stage and chromogenic assays. The current international guidelines do not define the type of assay to be used in the diagnosis of mild hemophilia A and some patients could be misclassified as normal. In our study, 4% of patients would not have been diagnosed on the basis of the one-stage factor VIII assay. Laboratories should use both one stage and chromogenic (or two-stage) assays in the diagnosis of patients with possible hemophilia A.

  2. Hemophilia A: An Ideal Disease to Correct in Utero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Porada

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A (HA is the most frequent inheritable defect of the coagulation proteins. The current standard of care for patients with HA is prophylactic factor infusion, which is comprised of regular (2-3 times per week intravenous infusions of recombinant or plasma-derived FVIII to maintain hemostasis. While this treatment has greatly increased the quality of life and lengthened the life expectancy for many HA patients, its high cost, the need for lifelong infusions, and the fact that it is unavailable to roughly 75% of the world’s HA patients make this type of treatment far from ideal. In addition, this lifesaving therapy suffers from a high risk of treatment failure due to immune response to the infused FVIII. There is thus a need for novel treatments, such as those using stem cells and/or gene therapy, which have the potential to mediate long-term correction or permanent cure following a single intervention. In the present review, we discuss the clinical feasibility and unique advantages that an in utero approach to treating HA could offer, placing special emphasis on a new sheep model of HA we have developed and on the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC as cellular vehicles for delivering the FVIII gene.

  3. Immune tolerance induction in hemophilia A: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Guglielmo; Siragusa, Sergio; Kroner, Barbara L

    2003-02-01

    In this article, a comparative analysis of the data stemming from the studies conducted in the field of immune tolerance treatment (ITT) of hemophilia A was attempted. Comparisons are difficult because previous studies differ in many respects, including the dosage of factor (F) VIII, the number of FVIII administrations per day, the association with immunosuppressive drugs (prednisone, cyclophosphamide), and, most importantly, the definition of success in terms of the reacquisition of tolerance. However, a number of variables consistently influenced outcome: the inhibitor titer, either the maximum one or the one assayed before immune tolerance (IT) start and age. As to the FVIII dose, results are contrasting, even though the overall impression is that high dosages are associated with higher success rates. Treatment duration analyses appear to be fairly consistent in all the studies, with 1 year as the crucial time period useful in predicting outcome. Preliminary data suggest that concentrates containing von Willebrand factor may increase the success rate and allow patients refractory to IT procedures carried out with ultrapure or recombinant concentrates to become tolerant in the end. These data need to be formally confirmed in trials that compare the different brands. In the studies published so far, a common language and widely accepted definitions of the variables have emerged, which are important in setting up the controlled trials and improving the comparison among published data.

  4. Acquired hemophilia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulliez, S M N; Vantilborgh, A; Devreese, K M J

    2014-06-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies against clotting factor VIII (FVIII). FVIII autoantibody is characterized as polyclonal immunoglobulin G directed against the FVIII procoagulant activity. This disease occurs most commonly in the elderly population and with preponderance of men in nonpregnancy-related AHA. There are well-established clinical associations with AHA such as malignancy, other autoimmune diseases and pregnancy. However, up to 50% of reported cases remain idiopathic. The clinical manifestation of AHA includes mostly spontaneous hemorrhages into skin, muscles and soft tissues, or mucous membranes. AHA should be suspected when a patient with no previous history of bleeding presents with bleeding and an unexplained prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. The diagnosis is confirmed in the laboratory by the subsequent identification of reduced FVIII levels and FVIII inhibitor titration. There is a high mortality, making prompt diagnosis and treatment vitally important. The principles of treatment consist in controlling the bleeding and eradicating the inhibitor. Because of the overall high relapse rate (15-33%), it is also recommended to follow up these patients. The review summarizes what is currently known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of AHA and starts with a case report.

  5. Desvenlafaxine as a possible cause of acquired hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaligram, Deepika; Alqassem, Tahani; Koby, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is characterized by the depletion of Factor VIII mediated by specific autoantibodies. While the cause is unknown in 50% of the cases, an association with malignancy, peripartum period, autoimmune disease and the use of drugs has been described. We report a case of AHA possibly induced by desvenlafaxine. Mr. P, a 70-year-old Caucasian male with alcohol and opioid dependence in remission, was started on 50 mg of desvenlafaxine for a moderate depressive episode. After 10 weeks, he developed an ecchymosis of the right upper extremity, in the absence of past or family history of bleeding disorder. He had a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (74.5 s) not corrected on performing mixing study, decreased Factor VIII activity (desvenlafaxine was discontinued and the patient was infused with Factor VIIa followed by a 6-week prednisone taper with which he achieved remission. While serotonin inhibitors are known to impair platelet aggregation leading to bleeding, abnormalities in the coagulation cascade have not been described so far. Desvenlafaxine appears to be the probable cause of AHA given the temporal association, remission after withdrawal of the drug and the lack of any other probable cause. New-onset abnormalities of the coagulation cascade such as AHA should be considered in the context of bleeding events with desvenlafaxine and perhaps other serotonin inhibitors, given the significant mortality rates when untreated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Advances in Overcoming Immune Responses following Hemophilia Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Carol H

    2011-12-23

    Both Clinical trials and pre-clinical experiments for hemophilia gene therapy showed that it is important to overcome potential immune responses against gene transfer vectors and/or transgene products to ensure the success of gene therapy. Recently various approaches have been investigated to prevent or modulate such responses. Gene transfer vectors have been specifically engineered and immunosuppressive regimens have been administered to avoid or manipulate the immune responses against the vectors. In order to prevent cytotoxic lymphocyte or antibody formation induced by transgene expression, novel approaches have been developed, including methods to manipulate antigen presentation, development of variant genes encoding less immunogenic proteins or gene transfer protocols to evade immune responses, as well as immunosuppressive strategies to target either T and/or B cell responses. Most of these successful protocols involve the induction of activated regulatory T cells to create a regulatory immune environment during tolerance induction. Recent development of these strategies to evade vector-specific immune responses and induce long-term immune tolerance specific to the transgene product will be discussed.

  7. Immune tolerance induction in patients with hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astermark, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Replacement therapy with factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates has become the mainstay of treatment for hemophilia, but about 30% of patients with a severe disease develop neutralizing antibodies against FVIII, which can lead to treatment resistance and an increased risk of bleeding. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) overcomes the immune response to FVIII concentrates in the majority of patients. Several factors may influence the efficacy of ITI, including disease-related factors (e.g. peak inhibitor titer and pre-ITI titer), and genetic factors (e.g. type of mutation). Treatment-related factors, such as the type of FVIII concentrate used in ITI will also potentially influence the outcome. Specifically, higher success rates with von Willebrand factor (VWF)-containing factor VIII concentrates than with high-purity FVIII concentrates have been reported, but further studies are needed. Potential mechanisms involved include steric hindrance, inhibition of FVIII degradation, or immunomodulatory effects. However, the exact mechanism by which immune tolerance is induced remains unclear. High-dose FVIII ITI appears to induce immune tolerance more rapidly than low-dose protocols and with a reduced risk of bleeding episodes. The addition of immunosuppressive therapy, such as rituximab, to ITI may improve outcomes, although the optimal approach to combined ITI/immunosuppression has not been established. Ongoing studies are likely to provide further insight into the role of genetic features and the type of FVIII concentrate on the success rate of ITI.

  8. Children with Hemophilia and their Dental Care by Pediatric Stomatology. Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Grandas Ramírez, Ángela Liliana; Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Bogotá, Colombia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Purpose: To carry out systematic review of literature about diagnostics, severity, and dental treatment considerations of children with Hemophilia A. Methods: The search for articles and other document was conducted through the databases available at the National Library System of the National University of Colombia. The English and Spanish terms used in the search were “pediatric dentistry,” “hemophilia A,” dental care,” “coagulation factors,” and/or “coagulation disorders.” Result...

  9. Successful medical management of a neonate with spontaneous splenic rupture and severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Rossoff, Jenna; Yallapragada, Sushmita; Liem, Robert I; Sharathkumar, Anjali A

    2017-03-01

    Splenic rupture in neonates is a rare event, usually occurring in the setting of underlying predisposing conditions. Here, we present the case of a term neonate who presented with worsening anemia in the setting of known hemolytic disease during the newborn period and was later found to have a spontaneous splenic rupture. He was subsequently diagnosed with severe hemophilia A, and was managed medically with recombinant factor VIII replacement therapy without any surgical intervention. This is the first reported case of a neonate who had spontaneous splenic rupture and severe hemophilia A, and underwent successful medical treatment without any surgical intervention.

  10. Traumatic Hemarthrosis of the Knee Secondary to Hemophilia A in a Collegiate Soccer Player: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Kelly A; Hoffmann, Sandra J; Ritenour, Donna M

    2002-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present the case of a collegiate soccer player who suffered from a traumatic knee hemarthrosis secondary to hemophilia A. This case presents an opportunity to discuss the participation status of athletes with hemophilia. BACKGROUND: Hemophilia is a hereditary blood disease characterized by impaired coagulability of the blood. Hemophilia A is the most common of the severe, inherited bleeding disorders. This type, also called classic hemophilia, is due to a deficiency of clotting factor VIII. The athlete with hemophilia A reported pain and loss of function of his knee during a soccer game despite the absence of injury. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS: Anterior cruciate ligament tear, intra-articular fracture, meniscus tear, capsular tear, hemarthrosis. TREATMENT: After the injury, the athlete was admitted to the hospital, where his knee joint was aspirated and he was infused with factor VIII. Later, he participated in traditional knee rehabilitation and was returned to play at the discretion of the orthopaedist and the hematologist. UNIQUENESS: In past participation guidelines, individuals with bleeding disorders were disqualified from athletic participation; however, with advances in medical care, these individuals may be permitted to participate in accordance with the law. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with hemophilia participate in athletics; therefore, team physicians and athletic trainers must be prepared to care for these individuals.

  11. Identification and Genetic Analysis of a Factor IX Gene Intron 3 Mutation in a Hemophilia B Pedigree in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hua Cao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hemophilia B is caused by coagulation defects in the factor IX gene located in Xq27.1 on the X chromosome. A wide range of mutations, showing extensive molecular heterogeneity, have been described in hemophilia B patients. Our study was aimed at genetic analysis and prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia B in order to further elucidate the pathogenesis of the hemophilia B pedigree in China. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of all the coding regions was conducted in hemophilia B patients and carriers. Prenatal diagnosis of the proband was conducted at 20 weeks. RESULTS: We identified the novel point mutation 10.389 A>G, located upstream of the intron 3 acceptor site in hemophilia B patients. The fetus of the proband’s cousin was identified as a carrier. CONCLUSION: Our identification of a novel mutation in the F9 gene associated with hemophilia B provides novel insight into the pathogenesis of this genetically inherited disorder and also represents the basis of prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Transitioning issues in adolescent to young adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors: an approach for a growing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Guy

    2010-09-01

    The major adverse effect of factor replacement therapy in patients with hemophilia is the development of neutralizing antibodies termed inhibitors. This complication renders standard factor replacement therapy ineffective resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Until recently, the population of adults with inhibitors was relatively small due to the death of many of the patients from HIV that they contracted from contaminated factor in the early 1980s. With the advent of factor products with reduced risks for deadly infections in the mid-1980s to early 1990s, a cohort of inhibitor patients is now beginning to enter adulthood thus raising the issues regarding the transition of these patients into adulthood. It is, therefore, expected that adult hematologists will be seeing more inhibitor patients and that pediatric hematologists will be faced with managing this transition process, which may not necessarily include transition to an adult facility or adult hematologist. This review will discuss the various issues ranging from choice of medical provider to a discussion of psychosocial and financial issues facing this specific patient population.

  13. Identification of intron 1 and intron 22 inversions of factor VIII gene in Serbian patients with hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A (HA is a common X-linked recessive bleeding disease caused by mutations of FVIII gene. Inversion of intron 1 (inv1 and intron 22 (inv22 are recurrent mutations in severe HA, causing 50% of cases. Inv1 has been reported to occur in 2-5% and inv 22 in 45% of severe HA patients. Our objective was to determine, for the first time in Serbia, the frequency of inv1 and inv22 in a group of severe HA patients and to compare these data with those from other countries. Study subjects were 50 HA patients, diagnosed and treated from April 2009 to June 2012 at Mother and Child Health Care Institute of Serbia “Dr Vukan Cupic” (IHS and Institute for Child and Youth Health Care of Vojvodina (IHV.The presence of inv1 and inv22 was analyzed using Inverse shifting PCR (IS-PCR. Our results revealed that the frequencies of inv1 and inv22 in the cohort of Serbian patients were 6 % and 42% (34% of inv22 type I and 8% of inv22 type II respectively . These frequencies were in line with those found in other populations. Carrier status analyses of 65 family members (mothers and sisters showed the de novo inversion of intron 22 in one patient. Genetic Counseling Units of IHS and IHV provide the adequate genetic advice to all HA affected patients and their family members. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173046 i br. 175056

  14. A CpG mutational hotspot in a ONECUT binding site accounts for the prevalent variant of Hemophilia B Leyden

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia B, or the “royal disease,” arises from mutations in coagulation factor IX (F9). Mutations within the F9 promoter are associated with a remarkable hemophilia B subtype, termed hemophilia B Leyden, in which symptoms ameliorate after puberty. Mutations at the −5/−6 site (nucleotides −5 and −6 relative to the transcription start site, designated +1) account for the majority of Leyden cases and have been postulated to disrupt the binding of a transcriptional activator, the identity of w...

  15. Challenges and successes in the treatment of hemophilia: the story of a patient with severe hemophilia A and high-titer inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Hussain I Saba, Duc Quang Tran, JrDepartment of Medicine, University of South Florida Medical Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: In the past, patients with severe hemophilia have suffered a substantially reduced quality of life with frequent bleeding episodes, disabling arthropathy, and shorter life expectancy. In addition, methods of treatment and management have been costly and time-consuming, and have placed a considerable burden on patients' physical and psychological well-being. Wit...

  16. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  17. Validation of the VERITAS-Pro treatment adherence scale in a Spanish sample population with hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Barriuso, Rubén; Torres-Ortuño, Ana; Galindo-Piñana, Pilar; Nieto-Munuera, Joaquín; Duncan, Natalie; López-Pina, José Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to conduct a validation in Spanish of the Validated Hemophilia Regimen Treatment Adherence Scale – Prophylaxis (VERITAS-Pro) questionnaire for use in patients with hemophilia under prophylactic treatment. Patients and methods The VERITAS-Pro scale was adapted through a process of back translation from English to Spanish. A bilingual native Spanish translator translated the scale from English to Spanish. Subsequently, a bilingual native English translator translated the scale from Spanish to English. The disagreements were resolved by agreement between the research team and translators. Seventy-three patients with hemophilia, aged 13–62 years, were enrolled in the study. The scale was applied twice (2 months apart) to evaluate the test–retest reliability. Results Internal consistency reliability was lower on the Spanish VERITAS-Pro than on the English version. Test–retest reliability was high, ranging from 0.83 to 0.92. No significant differences (P>0.05) were found between test and retest scores in subscales of VERITAS-Pro. In general, Spanish patients showed higher rates of nonadherence than American patients in all subscales. Conclusion The Spanish version of the VERITAS-Pro has high levels of consistency and empirical validity. This scale can be administered to assess the degree of adherence of prophylactic treatment in patients with hemophilia.

  18. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Levesque, Herve; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul; Aspoeck, G.; Heistinger, M.; Knobl, P.; Makipernaa, A.; Andre, H; Aouba, A.; Bellucci, S.; Beurrier, P.; Borg, J.Y.; Darnige, L.; Devignes, J.; d'Oiron, R.; Gautier, P.; Gay, V.; Girault, S.; Gruel, Y.; Guerin, V.; Hezard, N.; Khellaf, M.; Koenig, M.; Levesque, H.; Lifermann, F; Marlu, R; Ninet, J.; Peynet, J.; Quemeneur, T.; Rothschild, C.; Schleinitz, N.; Sigaud, M.; Trouillier, S; Voisin, S.; Giebl, A.; Holstein, K.; Huth-Kuhne, A; Loreth, R.M.; Steigerwald, U.; Tiede, A.; Theodossiades, G.; Nemes, L.; Radvanyi, G.; Schlammadinger, A.; Barillari, G.; Pasca, S.; Baudo, F; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo Armando, C.L.; Fattorini, A.; Di Minno, G.; Cerbone, A.M.; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, M.; Falanga, A.; Maggioni, A.; Lerede, T.; Franchini, M.; Gaidano, G.; De Paoli, L.; Gamba, G.; Ghirardi, R; Girotto, M.; Tasca, D.; Grandone, E.; Tiscia, G.; Imberti, D.; Iorio, A.; Landolfi, R; Di Gennaro, L.; Novarese, L.; Mariani, G.; Lapecorella, M.; Marietta, M.; Pedrazzi, P.; Mazzucconi, M.G.; Santoro, C.; Morfini, M.; Linari, S.; Moratelli, S.; Paolini, R.; Piseddu, G.; Poggio, R.; Pogliani, E.; Carpenedo, M.; Remiddi, C.; Santagostino, E.; Mancuso, M.E.; Santoro, R.; Papaleo, G.; Schinco, P.; Borchiellini, A.; Valeri, F.; Scortechini, A.R.; Siragusa, S.; Sottilotta, G.; Squizzato, A.; Tagariello, G.; Sartori, R; Tagliaferri, A.R.; Di Perna, C.; Rivolta, G.F.; Testa, S.; Paoletti, O.; Toschi, V.; Zanon, E.; Brandolin, B.; Hamulyak, K.; Kamphuisen, P.; Laros-van Gorkom, B.; Leebeek, F.W.; Marten, N.; Novakova, I.; Schutgens, R.; van der Linden, P.W.; van Esser, J.; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, P.; Campos, M.; Aguilar, C.; Altisent, C.; Bermejo, N.; Del Campo, R.; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Bolos', R.; Gutierrez Pimentel, M.J.; Jimenez-Yuste, V.; Jose-Felix, L.; Marco, P.; Mingot, M.E.; Perez Garrido, R.; Perez Gonzale, N.Z.; Prieto Garcia, M.; Rodriguez-Huerta, A.M.; Sedano, C.; Tolosa Munoz, A.; Baghaei, F.; Tengborn, L.; Boehlen, F.; Korte, W.; Chowdary, P.; Collins, P.; Evans, G.; Pavord, S.; Rangarajan, S.; Wilde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH

  19. The etiology of inhibitor development in children with severe hemophilia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with severe hemophilia, a deficiency of functional clotting factor VIII, typically suffer from joint and muscle bleedings spontaneously or after minor trauma. The bleeding tendency can be effectively corrected by intravenous substitution of factor VIII products. However, about 25% of

  20. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Levesque, Herve; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knobl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; Andre, Helene; Aouba, A; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; dOiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valerie; Girault, Stephane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hezard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Levesque, Herve; Lifermann, Francois; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, J.; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quemeneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sebastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Huth-Kuhne, Angela; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Nemes, Laszlo; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Baudo, Francesco; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo, Armando; Crippa, Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; De Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyak, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W.G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P.W.G; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; Del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Boullosa, Rosario; Gutierrez Pimentel, Maria Jose; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor [No Value; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Marco, Pascual; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia z; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana Maria; Maranon, HGUG [No Value; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Tengborn, Lilian; Boehlen, Francoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive

  1. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Levesque, Herve; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knobl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; Andre, Helene; Aouba, A; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; dOiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valerie; Girault, Stephane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hezard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Levesque, Herve; Lifermann, Francois; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, J.; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quemeneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sebastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Huth-Kuhne, Angela; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Nemes, Laszlo; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Baudo, Francesco; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo, Armando; Crippa, Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; De Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyak, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W.G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P.W.G; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; Del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Boullosa, Rosario; Gutierrez Pimentel, Maria Jose; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor [No Value; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Marco, Pascual; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia z; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana Maria; Maranon, HGUG [No Value; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Tengborn, Lilian; Boehlen, Francoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regim

  2. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Levesque, Herve; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knobl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; Andre, Helene; Aouba, A; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; dOiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valerie; Girault, Stephane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hezard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Levesque, Herve; Lifermann, Francois; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, J.; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quemeneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sebastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Huth-Kuhne, Angela; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Nemes, Laszlo; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Baudo, Francesco; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo, Armando; Crippa, Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; De Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyak, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W.G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P.W.G; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; Del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Boullosa, Rosario; Gutierrez Pimentel, Maria Jose; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor [No Value; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Marco, Pascual; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia z; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana Maria; Maranon, HGUG [No Value; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Tengborn, Lilian; Boehlen, Francoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regim

  3. Left ventricular assist device and heart transplantation in hemophilia a patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quader, Mohammed; Rusina, Zane; Lewis, Neil P; Martin, Lisa; Katlaps, Gundars

    2013-12-01

    We report here a hemophilia patient who was bridged with a left ventricle assist device and later received heart transplantation. Preparation for surgery with factor VIII supplementation, intraoperative conduct of surgery, and challenges of postoperative course are described with a brief literature review.

  4. "Prevalence of inhibitors in a population of 1280 Hemophilia A patients in Iran "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifian R

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of inhibitor to factor VIII is the most serious complication of hemophilia therapy. To determine the prevalence of inhibitors in Iran hemophilia A patients exposed to blood products, 1280 hemophilia A patients (age range 9 months-84 years were evaluated. All patients received several blood products such as fresh frozen plasma (FFP, cryoprecipitate, and factor VIII. 635 of 1280 patients (49.6%, 277 patients (21.6% and 368 patients (28.8% had severe, moderate and mild disease, respectively. 184 of 1280 patients (14.4% developed inhibitor. The prevalence of inhibitor for severe, moderate and mild in hemophilia A patients was 22.8%, 9.4%, and 3.5% respectively. 41 patients (22.2% and 143 patients (77.8% were high responder and low responder respectively. Among 184 patients with inhibitor, 67 patients (36.4% had blood group O and for B, A, AB blood groups, number of patients with inhibitor was 55 (29.9%, 50 (27.2%, 12(6.5% respectively and 153 patients (83.1% had Rh blood group.

  5. End-stage liver disease in persons with hemophilia and transfusion-associated infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedert, JJ; Eyster, ME; Lederman, MM; Mandalaki, T; de Moerloose, P; White, GC; Angiolillo, AL; Luban, NLC; Sherman, KE; Manco-Johnson, M; Preiss, L; Leissinger, C; Kessler, CM; Cohen, AR; DiMichele, D; Hilgartner, MW; Aledort, LM; Kroner, BL; Rosenberg, PS; Hatzakis, A

    2002-01-01

    Many persons with hemophilia were infected with hepatitis C and B viruses (HCV, HBV) and HIV, but the consequences of these transfusion-acquired infections are poorly defined. We estimated the risk of HCV-related end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and the associations of age, HBV, and HIV with that risk

  6. A systematic review of the effects of hemophilia and von Willebrand disease on arterial trombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biere-Rafi, Sara; Zwiers, M.; Peters, Marjolein; Van Der Meer, Jan; Rosendaal, Frits R; Buller, Harry R; Kamphuisen, Pieter W

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients with hemophilia and von Willebrand disease (VWD) may be protected against arterial thrombosis, through a hy-pocoagulable state or atherosclerosis. We performed a systematic review to assess the association between these clotting disorders, arterial thrombosis and the prevalence

  7. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariette; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathot, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registere

  8. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariette; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathot, Ron

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently

  9. New developments in the management of moderate-to-severe hemophilia B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeef M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Moniba Nazeef,1,2 John P Sheehan1,2 1Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, 2UW Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic deficiency of coagulation factor IX (FIX activity associated with recurrent deep tissue and joint bleeding that may lead to long-term disability. FIX replacement therapy using plasma-derived protein or recombinant protein has significantly reduced bleeding and disability from hemophilia B, particularly when used in a prophylactic fashion. Although modern factor replacement has excellent efficacy and safety, barriers to the broader use of prophylaxis remain, including the need for intravenous (IV access, frequent dosing, variability in individual pharmacokinetics, and cost. To overcome the requirement for frequent factor dosing, novel forms of recombinant FIX have been developed that possess extended terminal half-lives. Two of these products (FIXFc and rIX-FP represent fusion proteins with the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1 Fc domain and albumin, respectively, resulting in proteins that are recycled in vivo by the neonatal Fc receptor. The third product has undergone site-specific PEGylation on the activation peptide of FIX, similarly resulting in a long-lived FIX form. Clinical trials in previously treated hemophilia B patients have demonstrated excellent efficacy and confirmed less-frequent dosing requirements for the extended half-life forms. However, gaps in knowledge remain with regard to the risk of inhibitor formation and allergic reactions in previously untreated patient populations, safety in elderly patients with hemophilia, effects on in vivo FIX distribution, and cost-effectiveness. Additional strategies designed to rebalance hemostasis in hemophilia patients include monoclonal-antibody-mediated inhibition of tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity and siRNA-mediated reduction in antithrombin

  10. Recombinant factor VIII in the management of hemophilia A: current use and future promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry S Powell

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Jerry S PowellDivision of Hematology and Oncology, University of California Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA, USAAbstract: Hemophilia A is a rare inherited bleeding disorder due to mutation of the gene that encodes the coagulation protein factor VIII. Historically, prior to the availability of treatment with factor VIII preparations, most boys died from uncontrolled bleeding, either spontaneous bleeding or after injury, before reaching 20 years of age. One of the most impressive triumphs of modern medicine is that with current recombinant factor VIII replacement therapy, a boy born in the 21st century with severe hemophilia A can anticipate a normal life expectancy with essentially no permanent complications from bleeding. For severe hemophilia A, current optimal treatment should have two goals: first, to provide sufficient factor VIII to prevent spontaneous bleeding, and second, to provide sufficient factor VIII to have normal coagulation function after any trauma. However, the replacement therapy requires tremendous resources for effective use, and remains extraordinarily expensive. Thus there are opportunities for further advances in therapy for hemophilia A. Two major concerns continue to trouble current optimal treatment approaches: some patients will develop neutralizing antibodies during the first 50 infusions of therapeutic factor VIII, and second, to administer therapeutic factor VIII every other day in young boys often requires placement of a central venous access device, and such use carries the life-threatening risks of infection and thrombosis. Because of the effectiveness of current therapy, any new developments in treatment will require significant concerns for safety, both immediate and in the long term. A number of research groups seek to prolong the biological efficacy of infused recombinant factor VIII. Currently, one such promising development is in the advanced stages of clinical trial. The goals will be to improve

  11. Validation of the VERITAS-Pro treatment adherence scale in a Spanish sample population with hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta-Barriuso R

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rubén Cuesta-Barriuso,1–3 Ana Torres-Ortuño,4 Pilar Galindo-Piñana,4 Joaquín Nieto-Munuera,4 Natalie Duncan,5 José Antonio López-Pina6 1Department of Physiotherapy, School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, European University of Madrid, 2Fishemo, Centro Especial de Empleo, Spanish Federation of Hemophilia, 3Royal Foundation Victoria Eugenia, Madrid, 4Department of Psychiatry and Social Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain; 5Indiana Hemophilia & Thrombosis Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 6Department of Basic Psychology and Methodology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain Purpose: We aimed to conduct a validation in Spanish of the Validated Hemophilia Regimen Treatment Adherence Scale – Prophylaxis (VERITAS-Pro questionnaire for use in patients with hemophilia under prophylactic treatment.Patients and methods: The VERITAS-Pro scale was adapted through a process of back translation from English to Spanish. A bilingual native Spanish translator translated the scale from English to Spanish. Subsequently, a bilingual native English translator translated the scale from Spanish to English. The disagreements were resolved by agreement between the research team and translators. Seventy-three patients with hemophilia, aged 13–62 years, were enrolled in the study. The scale was applied twice (2 months apart to evaluate the test–retest reliability.Results: Internal consistency reliability was lower on the Spanish VERITAS-Pro than on the English version. Test–retest reliability was high, ranging from 0.83 to 0.92. No significant differences (P>0.05 were found between test and retest scores in subscales of VERITAS-Pro. In general, Spanish patients showed higher rates of nonadherence than American patients in all subscales.Conclusion: The Spanish version of the VERITAS-Pro has high levels of consistency and empirical validity. This scale can be administered to assess the degree of

  12. Progress and challenges in the development of a cell-based therapy for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, M E; Togarrati, P P; Muench, M O

    2014-12-01

    Hemophilia A results from an insufficiency of factor VIII (FVIII). Although replacement therapy with plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII is a life-saving therapy for hemophilia A patients, such therapy is a life-long treatment rather than a cure for the disease. In this review, we discuss the possibilities, progress, and challenges that remain in the development of a cell-based cure for hemophilia A. The success of cell therapy depends on the type and availability of donor cells, the age of the host and method of transplantation, and the levels of engraftment and production of FVIII by the graft. Early therapy, possibly even prenatal transplantation, may yield the highest levels of engraftment by avoiding immunological rejection of the graft. Potential cell sources of FVIII include a specialized subset of endothelial cells known as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) present in the adult and fetal liver, or patient-specific endothelial cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells that have undergone gene editing to produce FVIII. Achieving sufficient engraftment of transplanted LSECs is one of the obstacles to successful cell therapy for hemophilia A. We discuss recent results from transplants performed in animals that show production of functional and clinically relevant levels of FVIII obtained from donor LSECs. Hence, the possibility of treating hemophilia A can be envisioned through persistent production of FVIII from transplanted donor cells derived from a number of potential cell sources or through creation of donor endothelial cells from patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  13. Effect of resistance and aerobic exercises on bone mineral density, muscle strength and functional ability in children with hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Eid

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Based on obtained data, it can be concluded that, resistance and aerobic exercise training program is effective in increasing BMD, muscle strength and functional ability in children with hemophilia.

  14. The effect of aquatic exercise therapy on muscle strength and joint′s range of motion in hemophilia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Kargarfard

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The results showed that aquatic exercise therapy can be a useful method to improve joints′ strength and range of motion in hemophilia patients in order to improve their daily functioning and quality of life.

  15. The ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) developed by the WHO for measuring function in hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Corte-Rodriguez, H; Rodriguez-Merchan, E C

    2016-07-01

    Assessment of the disease in people with hemophilia (PWH) must include an analysis of functioning. Researchers have done a lot of work over the last two decades in developing disease specific assessment tools in hemophilia - some of them based on the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health). This article is a narrative review of the ICF developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) in the context of hemophilia. Expert commentary: The WFH has developed a website with a 'compendium of assessment tools' based on the ICF. The ICF developed by the WHO makes it possible to propose an approach that prioritizes capacities over difficulties. This article is intended to motivate physicians who treat PWH to incorporate the ICF into their assessments. A generalized use of the ICF will provide a common communication context. The ICF developed by the WHO should be used in hemophilia.

  16. Tranexamic acid combined with recombinant factor VIII increases clot resistance to accelerated fibrinolysis in severe hemophilia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Sørensen, Hanne Thykjær; Norengaard, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with severe hemophilia A suffer from a profoundly compromised hemostatic response. In addition to both the delayed and slow development of a clot, previous studies have documented that severe hemophilia A is also associated with reduced clot stability. OBJECTIVES: We...... examined whether the clot stability in hemophiliacs could be improved by treatment with tranexamic acid (TXA) in combination with recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII). PATIENTS/METHODS: Baseline blood samples were obtained from eight males with severe hemophilia A. Thereafter, a bolus injection of r...... the elasticity curve increased 5-fold after rFVIII and 24-fold after addition of TXA. CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrates that simultaneous treatment with TXA and rFVIII significantly improves the clot stability in patients with hemophilia A. Udgivelsesdato: December...

  17. Cohort Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Cohorts are the aggregate of individuals who experience the same event within the same time interval. Cohorts can be based on people born in a given year, for example in 1940 or within a span of years, e.g. born in 1940-1944. The year of birth is here the defining event for cohorts. The health di...... differs between cohorts. This article focuses on the protective and detrimental cohort effect in relation to the risk of death from apoplexy. A dummy variable method is recommended to describe the changing cohort effect over a century....

  18. The effect of aquatic exercise therapy on muscle strength and joint′s range of motion in hemophilia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Kargarfard; Mehdi Dehghadani; Reza Ghias

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was to evaluate the effect of a period of aquatic exercise therapy on muscle strength and joints range of motion in hemophilia patients. Methods: This was a semiexperimental, pretest, post-test study with a control group. This semi-experimental study comprised twenty men suffering moderate hemophilia were selected by convenience sampling method from patients of a referral hospital. They were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups of equal number. The hemop...

  19. Nanocapsule-delivered Sleeping Beauty mediates therapeutic Factor VIII expression in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells of hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kren, Betsy T; Unger, Gretchen M; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Trossen, Alycia A; Korman, Vicci; Diethelm-Okita, Brenda M; Reding, Mark T; Steer, Clifford J

    2009-07-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are a major endogenous source of Factor VIII (FVIII), lack of which causes the human congenital bleeding disorder hemophilia A. Despite extensive efforts, gene therapy using viral vectors has shown little success in clinical hemophilia trials. Here we achieved cell type-specific gene targeting using hyaluronan- and asialoorosomucoid-coated nanocapsules, generated using dispersion atomization, to direct genes to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes, respectively. To highlight the therapeutic potential of this approach, we encapsulated Sleeping Beauty transposon expressing the B domain-deleted canine FVIII in cis with Sleeping Beauty transposase in hyaluronan nanocapsules and injected them intravenously into hemophilia A mice. The treated mice exhibited activated partial thromboplastin times that were comparable to those of wild-type mice at 5 and 50 weeks and substantially shorter than those of untreated controls at the same time points. Further, plasma FVIII activity in the treated hemophilia A mice was nearly identical to that in wild-type mice through 50 weeks, while untreated hemophilia A mice exhibited no detectable FVIII activity. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposon targeted to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells provided long-term expression of FVIII, without apparent antibody formation, and improved the phenotype of hemophilia A mice.

  20. Maternal low-level somatic mosaicism of Cys155Tyr of F9 in severe hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Ki-O; Yoo, Ki-Young; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by deficient coagulation factor IX from a mutation in the F9 gene. Here, we report a family with two brothers having severe hemophilia B inherited from a mother with low-level somatic mosaicism of a F9 mutation. The proband was a 2-year-old boy with severe hemophilia B from a hemizygous mutation of F9, c.464G>A (p.Cys155Tyr). He was the first child and was considered a sporadic case based on the lack of family history of bleeding diathesis. His mother was tested for carrier status and was determined to be homozygous for wild-type genotypes (noncarrier). Subsequently, however, his brother was born and also had severe hemophilia B from Cys155Tyr. This prompted us to review the chromatogram of the mother, which revealed a small peak corresponding to the mutant genotype. On suspicion of somatic low-level mosaicism in the mother, we further performed allele-specific PCR and thymine and adenine cloning, and confirmed the presence of the mutant allele in the mother. To our knowledge, this is the first case of maternal somatic mosaicism for a cytosine-phosphate-guanine transition mutation in hemophilia B. The acknowledgment of somatic mosaicism and further molecular investigation are important in sporadic hemophilia B to deliver informative genetic counseling and risk assessment.

  1. The investigation of relationship between joint findings and serum angiogenic and inflammatory factor levels in severe hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapnar, Tuba H; Karadaş, Nihal; Özek, Gülcihan; Tüfekçi, Özlem; Atabay, Berna; Türker, Meral; Yüksel, Faize; Karapınar, Deniz Y; Vergin, Canan; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2014-10-01

    Despite the use of primary prophylactic Factor VIII replacement in severe hemophilia A patients, bleeding into joints cannot be prevented completely and early diagnosis and treatment of the joint bleedings are important for prevention of permanent joint damage. Recent studies have shown that neoangiogenesis plays important role in development of synovitis after recurrent joint bleedings. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between joint findings and levels of serum angiogenic and inflammatory factors in severe hemophilia A patients.The patient groups consisted of 10 severe hemophilia A patients with acute joint bleeding and 25 severe hemophilia A patients without acute joint bleeding. They were all inhibitor negative. The control group consisted of 22 healthy male children. Complete blood cell count analysis, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum ferritin, lactic acid, and ELISA-based detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), intercellular adhesion molecule-1, thrombomodulin, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), and endostatin were performed from peripheral blood of patient and the control groups. CRP and MIF levels were detected significantly higher in hemophilia patients with acute joint bleeding than patients without acute joint bleeding. There was a positive correlation between serum thrombomodulin, VEGF, and MIF levels. In this study, we demonstrated that serum CRP and MIF levels increases in acute bleeding period regardless of the presence of previous joint damage in children with severe hemophilia. CRP elevation may be a useful and rapid marker for acute bleeding in these patients.

  2. Perioperative treatment for children with hemophilia%血友病患儿的围手术期治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡群; 刘爱国

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia is a common pediatric hereditary bleeding disorder,including hemophilia A (FⅧ deficiency) and hemophilia B (FⅨ deficiency).Children with hemophilia tend to spontaneous bleeding or bleeding after minor injuries or surgery.In this review,we briefly discussed the preoperative diagnosis and classification of hemophilia,dynamic monitoring of FⅧ or FⅨ,dose of clotting factor and duration of treatment and some other perioperative issues when surgery is needed,to guide hemophilia children's surgery and postoperative rehabilitation.%血友病是儿科常见的遗传性出血性疾病,包括血友病A(凝血因子Ⅷ缺乏)和血友病B(凝血因子Ⅸ缺乏).患儿有自发出血或轻微损伤、手术后出血不止的倾向.本文简单介绍血友病患儿在手术需要时,术前诊断及分型、凝血因子动态监测、制剂选择、输注剂量和疗程等围手术期相关问题,以指导血友病患儿的手术和术后康复.

  3. Developments in the treatment of hemophilia B: focus on emerging gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancio MI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria I Cancio,1 Ulrike M Reiss,2 Amit C Nathwani,3 Andrew M Davidoff,4 John T Gray2 1Department of Hematology-Oncology, 2Department of Hematology, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA; 3Department of Haematology, University College London Cancer Institute, London, UK; 4Department of Surgery, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA Abstract: Hemophilia B is a genetic disorder that is characterized by a deficiency of clotting factor IX (FIX and excessive bleeding. Advanced understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease has led to the development of improved treatment strategies that aim to minimize the acute and long-term complications of the disease. Patients with hemophilia B are ideal candidates for gene therapy, mostly because a small increase in protein production can lead to significantly decreased bleeding diathesis. Although human clotting FIX was cloned and sequenced over 30 years ago, progress toward achieving real success in human clinical trials has been slow, with long-term, therapeutically relevant gene expression only achieved in one trial published in 2011. The history of this extensive research effort has revealed the importance of the interactions between gene therapy vectors and multiple arms of the host immune system at multiple stages of the transduction process. Different viral vector systems each have unique properties that influence their ability to deliver genes to different tissues, and the data generated in several clinical trials testing different vectors for hemophilia have guided our understanding toward development of optimal configurations for treating hemophilia B. The recent clinical success implementing a novel adeno-associated virus vector demonstrated sufficient FIX expression in patients to convert a severe hemophilia phenotype to mild, an achievement which has the potential to profoundly alter the impact of this disease on human society. Continued research should

  4. Health-related quality of life in Iranian adult men with severe hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faranoush, Mohammad; Shahverdi, Ehsan; Qorbani, Raheb; Moghaddam, Mostafa

    2017-07-20

    : Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) assessment should be part of the regular clinical assessment of persons with hemophilia. This study assessed quality of life of severe hemophilia patients (Type A) in Tehran comprehensive hemophilia care center. This cross-sectional study was done in 2016 and 84 men aged over 20 years with severe hemophilia (Type A) were assessed. All patients have been treated over 10 years at the comprehensive hemophilia care center, Iran. The HRQOL assessment includes the A36 Hemophilia-QOL questionnaire, sociodemographical and clinical characteristics. The overall HRQOL mean (±SD) in the present sample was 69.1 ± 26.0 (A36Hemofilia-QoL Global Index). The mean (±SD) scores according the domains were: physical health (15.0 ± 5.7), daily activities (6.7 ± 3.8), joint damage (4.2 ± 2.9), pain (3.0 ± 1.9), social activities and relationships (10.7 ± 5.8) and emotional function (9.2 ± 5.0) classified moderate-to-poor state. In contrast with treatment satisfaction (4.8 ± 1.6), treatment difficulties (9.5 ± 3.4) and mental health (6.2 ± 3.3), those were all in moderate-to-good state. Patients with higher education levels had better quality of life in the area of anxiety (P = 0.034), mental health (P = 0.007), social activities and personal relationships (P = 0.002). In general, poor quality of life of patients was 13.1%, 42.9% weak-to-moderate, 38.1% moderate-to-good and 6% good. It was shown that over 50% of patients had low-to-moderate HRQOL in the domains, such as physical health, daily activities, joint damage, pain, social activities and personal relationships. Efforts are necessary to improve their HRQOL.

  5. 小儿血友病93例临床分析%Clinical analysis in 93 childhood hemophilia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋丽; 陈力军; 牛婷婷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To summarize the diagnosis and treatment of children with hemophilia. Methods The onset age, clinical features and laboratory examination of 93 cases with hemophilia were analyzed. Results Seventy-eight cases were hemophilia A (84% ), and 15 cases were hemophilia B ( 16% ). Among them, 45 cases were severe hemophilia (48% ) , 33 were medium hemophilia (35% ) , 14 were light hemophilia (15%) and 1 was subclinical hemophilia (1%). Bleeding was the main clinical manifestation of children with hemophilia. Severe hemophilia was more common in infants and younger children, of which, six cases occurred intracranial hemorrhage (6%). Arthropathy and severe joint deformity were more common in older children ( six cases, 6% ). The median age of the first bleeding was 1.5 years old (aged 0~12 years) , while the median age of the initial diagnosis was 5.4 years old (aged 0.4-12 years). The reasons for delayed diagnosis were diverse. Conclusions Delayed diagnosis and delays in replacement therapy were the main causes leading to organ bleeding and joint deformities.%目的 分析93例血友病患儿的诊断及治疗经验.方法 对患儿的发病年龄、病例特点、实验室检查进行分析.结果 血友病甲78例(84%),血友病乙15例(16%),其中重型45例(48%),中型33例(35%),轻型14例(15%),亚临床型1例(1%).各种类型的出血为小儿血友病的主要表现,重型多见于婴幼儿,其中6例发生颅内出血(6%);关节病变及严重关节畸形多见于年长儿,共6例(6%).初次出现出血症状的中位年龄为1.5(0~12.0)岁,但初次诊断的中位年龄为5.4(0.4~12.0)岁.延迟诊断的原因多种多样.结论 延迟诊断、延误因子替代治疗是导致脏器出血和关节畸形的主要原因.

  6. Advances in the clinical management of inhibitors in hemophilia A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leissinger, Cindy A

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors to factor (F)VIII or FIX are the most serious and challenging complication of hemophilia treatment, increasing morbidity and mortality because bleeds no longer respond to standard clotting factor replacement therapy. For patients with high-titer inhibitors, immune tolerance induction achieved through regular factor exposure is the only proven therapy capable of Inhibitor eradication and is almost always indicated for inhibitors of recent onset. Bypassing therapy is used to treat and prevent bleeding, but neither of the two currently available bypassing agents has the predictable hemostatic efficacy of factor replacement in hemophilia patients without inhibitors. Major research efforts are focused on the development of new, more potent therapies for the management of patients with inhibitors.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell treatment for hemophilia: a review of current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, E M; Lombard, C; Mazza, G

    2015-06-01

    Hemophilia remains a non-curative disease, and patients are constrained to undergo repeated injections of clotting factors. In contrast, the sustained production of endogenous factors VIII (FVIII) or IX (FIX) by the patient's own cells could represent a curative treatment. Gene therapy has thus provided new hope for these patients. However, the issues surrounding the durability of expression and immune responses against gene transfer vectors remain. Cell therapy, involving stem cells expanded in vitro, can provide de novo protein synthesis and, if implanted successfully, could induce a steady-state production of low quantities of factors, which may keep the patient above the level required to prevent spontaneous bleeding. Liver-derived stem cells are already being assessed in clinical trials for inborn errors of metabolism and, in view of their capacity to produce FVIII and FIX in cell culture, they are now also being considered for clinical application in hemophilia patients. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Immunomodulation for inhibitors in hemophilia A: the important role of Treg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Carol H

    2010-08-01

    Approximately 25-30% of the hemophilia A patients develop inhibitory antibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) following protein-replacement therapy. This problem is also thought to occur following gene-replacement therapy. Recently, many approaches have been investigated to modulate FVIII-specific immune responses in either protein-replacement or gene therapy hemophilia A mouse models. Several promising protocols have been demonstrated to successfully prevent or modulate the formation of anti-FVIII antibodies, including methods to manipulate antigen presentation, development of less immunogenic FVIII proteins, or formulations or gene therapy protocols to evade immune responses, as well as immunomodulation strategies to target either T- and/or B-cell responses. Most of these successful protocols involve the induction of activated Treg cells to create a regulatory immune environment during tolerance induction. Innovative strategies to overcome pre-existing anti-FVIII immune responses and induce long-term tolerance in primed subjects still need to be developed.

  9. [Mutational Analysis of Hemophilia B in Russia: Molecular-Genetic Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surin, V L; Demidova, E Yu; Selivanova, D S; Luchinina, Yu A; Salomashkina, V V; Pshenichnikova, O S; Likhacheva, E A

    2016-04-01

    Hemophilia B is a hereditary X-linked coagulation disorder. This pathology is caused by various defects in the factor IX gene, which is, being about 34 kb long and consisting of eight exons, localized in the Xq27 locus of the. X-chromosome long arm. Mutations were revealed in 56 unrelated patients with hemophilia B in this study by using direct sequencing of factor IX gene functionally important fragments. Forty-six mutations were found with prevailing missense mutations (n = 30). The rest of the mutations were nonsense (n = 4) and splicing (n = 4) mutations, large deletions (n = 3), microdeletions (n = 2), microinsertions (n = 2), and promoter mutations (n = 1). Eleven of 46 mutations were previously unknown for human populations.

  10. Attitudes and practices of hemophilia care providers involved in HIV risk-reduction counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, K L; Hannan, J A; Green, T A; Wiley, S D

    1994-10-01

    Hemophilia physicians, nurses, and social workers attending a national conference were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing their attitudes and practices regarding HIV risk-reduction counseling. All of the 150 respondents reported recommending the use of condoms to their clients, but only two-thirds felt comfortable demonstrating a condom, while fewer could explain condom choices or how to make safe sex more pleasurable. Less than half questioned their clients about history of STDs, sexual practices, or level of sexual satisfaction. Those who devoted 50 percent or more time to HIV risk-reduction efforts reported being more complete in their assessment and more comfortable in their counseling role. Providers claimed it would help if they had more time (84%) and better skills (64%, especially nurses) for this practice. Because HIV prevention services in hemophilia are delivered by a team, further studies are required to determine the aggregate impact of their intervention on the client.

  11. EVALUATION OF INFLAMMATORY CHANGES IN JOINTS AT PATIENTS WITH HEMOPHILIA ACCOMPANIED RECURRENT HEMARTHROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Davydkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to search for new diagnostic approaches for estimating the prevalence of posthemorrhagic phase of inflammation in the joints of patients with hemophilia accompanied recurrent hemarthrosis. Using the method of computerized infrared thermography measured the temperature above the knee, ankle and lower leg. Analysis of the data held with a specially developed algorithm that forms the basis of a computer program for computer (2009. It is established that with increasing temperature over the joint at high risk of recurrence monthly hemarthrosis. If the joint hemarthrosis was not, then an increase in temperature may indicate a latent flowing inflammation. Assessing the prevalence of inflammation in the joints of patients with hemophilia has prognostic value: widespread inflammation is characterized by continuous recurrent course, for a limited - monthly recurrent hemarthrosis, in the absence of inflammation in the joint, as evidenced by normal or low-grade fever, recurrent hemarthrosis are likely rare.

  12. An innovative outcome-based care and procurement model of hemophilia management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gringeri, Alessandro; Doralt, Jennifer; Valentino, Leonard A; Crea, Roberto; Reininger, Armin J

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia is a rare bleeding disorder associated with spontaneous and post-traumatic bleeding. Each hemophilia patient requires a personalized approach to episodic or prophylactic treatment, but self-management can be challenging for patients, and avoidable bleeding may occur. Patient-tailored care may provide more effective prevention of bleeding, which in turn, may decrease the likelihood of arthropathy and associated chronic pain, missed time from school or work, and progressive loss of mobility. A strategy is presented here aiming to reduce or eliminate bleeding altogether through a holistic approach based on individual patient characteristics. In an environment of budget constraints, this approach would link procurement to patient outcome, adding incentives for all stakeholders to strive for optimal care and, ultimately, a bleed-free world.

  13. Acquired hemophilia A as a cause of acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Stephen; Gull, Sadaf; Ahmad, Jawad; Carey, Declan

    2014-02-05

    A 71-year-old man presented to the emergency department with his first episode of hematemesis. He was anemic and coagulopathic on admission, and became hemodynamically unstable requiring surgical intervention to control the bleeding. Prior to surgery, he required 100% plasma exchange with human plasma derived prothrombin complex concentrate (Octaplex) as the exchange fluid. At induction of anesthesia, he received tranexamic acid, prothrombin complex concentrate, and platelets. At the time of knife to skin, he was given coagulation factor VIIa intravenously as a bolus. This treatment was on the recommendation of the hematology team who suspected a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia on the basis of his history and coagulation screen. His bleeding was controlled and a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A was confirmed in the postoperative period. This was managed with immunosuppressive therapy, and at the 2 year follow-up he remains well and is off all treatment.

  14. Avoiding the impact of musculoskeletal pain on quality of life in children with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, David D

    2008-01-01

    The most frequent, severe clinical manifestation of hemophilia is hemarthrosis, which often develops at a young age and is initiated by repeated joint bleeds. Blood within a joint results in inflammation and hypertrophy of synovial membranes, causing increased vascularization of the joint and bone degeneration. In addition, hemarthrosis is associated with pain, impaired mobility, and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Although data on the effect of joint pain on pediatric HRQoL are currently lacking, both health-related outcome and treatment-experience studies reported the benefits of early identification, assessment, and treatment of pain in improving patient outcome and HRQoL. Ultimately, prevention of bleeding through aggressive treatment of joint bleeds and prophylaxis with factor concentrates are key to ensuring the best musculoskeletal outcome for pediatric patients with hemophilia.

  15. A case of acquired hemophilia A diagnosed after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Takuma; Komatsu, Michiharu; Ito, Akihiro; Ito, Tetsuya; Suga, Tomoaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Sakai, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    A 65-year-old male with no personal or familial history of bleeding disorders underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for neurogenic dysphagia due to subarachnoid hemorrhage. On postoperative day 6, continuous oozing of venous blood was observed at the stoma. Prothrombin time was within normal range, but activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged. Cross-mixing test results indicated the existence of an inhibitor, and laboratory findings revealed decreased factor VIII activity and high levels of factor VIII inhibitor. The patient was diagnosed as having acquired hemophilia A, for which steroid monotherapy was effective. Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but potentially fatal disease. Clinicians should be aware of this condition in patients presenting with sudden hemorrhage after PEG or other endoscopic treatments, even in those with no apparent history of bleeding.

  16. Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B by a Novel Adenovirus Vector Showing Reduced Leaky Expression of Viral Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Iizuka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy during neonatal and infant stages is a promising approach for hemophilia B, a congenital disorder caused by deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX (FIX. An adenovirus (Ad vector has high potential for use in neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B due to its superior transduction properties; however, leaky expression of Ad genes often reduces the transduction efficiencies by Ad protein-mediated tissue damage. Here, we used a novel Ad vector, Ad-E4-122aT, which exhibits a reduction in the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver, in gene therapy studies for neonatal hemophilia B mice. Ad-E4-122aT exhibited significantly higher transduction efficiencies than a conventional Ad vector in neonatal mice. In neonatal hemophilia B mice, a single neonatal injection of Ad-E4-122aT expressing human FIX (hFIX (Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX maintained more than 6% of the normal plasma hFIX activity levels for approximately 100 days. Sequential administration of Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX resulted in more than 100% of the plasma hFIX activity levels for more than 100 days and rescued the bleeding phenotypes of hemophilia B mice. In addition, immunotolerance to hFIX was induced by Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX administration in neonatal hemophilia B mice. These results indicated that Ad-E4-122aT is a promising gene delivery vector for neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  17. Once-weekly prophylactic dosing of recombinant factor IX improves adherence in hemophilia B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djambas Khayat, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Regular prophylactic treatment in severe hemophilia should be considered an optimal treatment. There is no general agreement on the optimal prophylaxis regimen, and adherence to prophylaxis is a main challenge due to medical, psychosocial, and cost controversies. Improved approaches in prophylaxis regimen of hemophilia B are needed to make patients’ lives easier. There is some evidence to support the efficacy of once-weekly prophylaxis. Longer sampling schedules are required for the determination of pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of factor IX (FIX). The half-life of FIX seems to be longer than previously described and is expected to be 34 hours. The clinical significance of maintaining a 1% trough level is widely debated in hemophilia B. The overall relationship between factor concentrate levels and incidence of joint bleeding was found to be very weak. Data also indicate that the distribution of FIX into an extravascular FIX compartment may contribute to hemostasis independently of circulating plasma FIX levels. Clinical assessment of the frequency and severity of bleeds remain an important measure of the efficacy of treatment. Role of PK-guided therapy remains to be established. Two prospective randomized studies had evaluated the efficacy and safety of 100 IU/kg once-weekly prophylaxis with nonacog alfa, and this prophylaxis regimen was found to be associated with lower annual bleeding rate compared with on-demand treatment in adolescents and adults with moderately severe-to-severe hemophilia B. Secondary prophylaxis therapy with 100 IU/kg nonacog alfa once weekly reduced annual bleeding rate by 89.4% relative to on-demand treatment. Residual FIX may be supportive of effectiveness. Once-weekly prophylaxis was well tolerated in the two studies, with a safety profile similar to that reported during the on-demand treatment period. To individually tailor treatment to clinical response and to minimize costs of factor concentrate, it would be of interest to

  18. Wound healing in hemophilia B mice and low tissue factor mice

    OpenAIRE

    Monroe, Dougald M.; Mackman, Nigel; Hoffman, Maureane

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing involves a number of physiologic mechanisms including coagulation, inflammation, formation of granulation tissue, and tissue remodeling. Coagulation with robust thrombin generation leading to fibrin formation is necessary for wound healing. It is less clear if there is a requirement for ongoing coagulation to support tissue remodeling. We have studied wound healing in mice with defects in both the initiation (low tissue factor) and propagation (hemophilia B) phases. In hemophili...

  19. Potential role of a new PEGylated recombinant factor VIII for hemophilia A

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Tung Thanh Wynn,1 Burak Gumuscu,2,3 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Bon Secours Health System, St. Mary’s Hospital, Richmond, VA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Hemophilia A, a deficiency in the activity of coagulation factor (F) VIII, is an X-linked bleeding disorder with an ap...

  20. EVALUATION OF INFLAMMATORY CHANGES IN JOINTS AT PATIENTS WITH HEMOPHILIA ACCOMPANIED RECURRENT HEMARTHROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    I. L. Davydkin; Y. A. Kosyakova; Y. V. Lartsev; A V Kapishnikov

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to search for new diagnostic approaches for estimating the prevalence of posthemorrhagic phase of inflammation in the joints of patients with hemophilia accompanied recurrent hemarthrosis. Using the method of computerized infrared thermography measured the temperature above the knee, ankle and lower leg. Analysis of the data held with a specially developed algorithm that forms the basis of a computer program for computer (2009). It is established that with increasing temperature ov...

  1. DESCRIPTIVE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HEMOPHILIA AND OTHER COAGULATION DISORDERS IN MANSOURA , EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Al Tonbary

    2010-08-01

    The study included 72 children with hematological disorders registered from 2000 to 2008 in MUCH. The hemophilic patient was defined as a person with physician-diagnosed hemophilia A or B and a measured factor VIII or IX activity level of 30% or less. Persons with acquired inhibitors of FVIII or FIX excluded. Severity level was categorized as mild if the factor activity level was 6–30%, moderate if 1–5% and severe if

  2. Localised prostate cancer and hemophilia A (AHA: Case report and management of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Celestino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired Hemophilia A (AHA is a rare bleeding diathesis characterized by the development of autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII. About half of the cases are idiopathic and the other half are associated with autoimmune diseases, postpartum problems, infections, inflammatory bowel disease, drugs, lymphoproliferative disorders or solid tumors . AHA is associated with malignancies in 7-15% of cases. We report a case of AHA in a 65 year old patient with prostatic carcinoma, who underwent retropubic radical prostatectomy (RP.

  3. Acute promyelocytic leukemia in a hemophilia A patient:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 李洪强; 赵辉; 王婷婷; 季林祥; 杨仁池; 韩忠朝

    2004-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is the M3 subtype of the French-American-British (FAB) classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Hemophilia is a congenital bleeding disorder characterized by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX. In our center, more than one thousand patients with haemophilia A have been treated since 1980.1 In June 2002, APL was first diagnosed in one person with haemophilia (PWH). The coincidence of these two diseases led to challenges in developing a treatment strategy.

  4. LASER versus electromagnetic field in treatment of hemarthrosis in children with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohamed A; Aly, Sobhy M

    2015-11-01

    Children with hemophilia usually have recurrent joint bleeding that leads to joint damage, loss of range of motion, and restriction of mobility, therefore affecting the quality of life in these children. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to that of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) in treatment of hemarthrosis in children with hemophilia. Thirty boys with hemophilia A with ages ranging from 9 to 13 years were selected and assigned randomly, using sealed envelopes, into two equal intervention groups. The study group I received the traditional physical therapy program in addition to LLLT, whereas the study group II received the same physical therapy program given to the study group I in addition to PEMF. Both groups received the treatment sessions three times per week for three successive months. Pain, laboratory investigations, swelling, and range of motion (ROM) of the affected knee joint, in addition to physical fitness were evaluated before, at the end of the sixth week and at 12 weeks of the treatment program. Laser group showed significant improvement in all measured variables after the sixth week of treatment when compared with PEMF. By 12 weeks of treatment, there was a significant improvement in pain, ROM, ESR and leucocytes levels in laser group compared with PEMF, while there was no significant difference in knee circumferences and the 6-min walk test (6MWT) between both groups. Both groups showed significant improvement at 12 weeks of treatment compared with that at 6 weeks. Both LLLT and PEMF are effective modalities in reducing pain, swelling, increasing ROM and improving physical fitness. Twelve weeks of treatment of both modalities demonstrated significant improvement than 6 weeks of treatment. Laser therapy induced significant improvement than electromagnetic therapy in treatment of hemarthrosis-related problems in children with hemophilia.

  5. Gene therapy for hemophilia "A" and "B": efficacy, safety and immune consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, M; Vandendriessche, T

    2007-01-01

    The first successful gene therapy trials for the treatment of hereditary disorders underscore the potential of gene therapy to combat disease and alleviate human suffering. The development of gene therapy for hemophilia is not only a research priority in its own right but also serves as an ideal trailblazer for many different diseases. Significant progress has recently been made in the development of gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A and B. Long-term therapeutic levels of factor VIII and IX could be expressed following gene therapy in hemophilic mice, stably correcting the bleeding diathesis. These advances parallel the development of improved gene delivery systems. The induction of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) to the clotting factors could potentially preclude stable phenotypic correction. The risk of inhibitor formation varied, depending at least in part on the type of vector used and its in vivo tropism. We also demonstrated that the risk of immune responses to the vector particles, the clotting factors and/or transduced cells can be reduced by using vectors that only minimally interact with antigen presenting cells. In hemophilic mice, robust and stable clotting factor expression levels were achieved using adeno-associated viral vectors based on the newly disovered serotypes AAV8 and AAV9 which can efficient deliver the clotting factor genes into hepatocytes without triggering any inflammatory responses or adverse events. Pre-clinical studies in large animal models will be initiated to further validate these improved AAV vectors to ultimately justify a clinical trial in patients with severe hemophilia.

  6. Eradication of neutralizing antibodies to factor VIII in canine hemophilia A after liver gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Jonathan D; Ozelo, Margareth C; Sabatino, Denise E; Franck, Helen W G; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Crudele, Julie M; Zhou, Shangzhen; Kazazian, Haig H; Lillicrap, David; Nichols, Timothy C; Arruda, Valder R

    2010-12-23

    Inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) are a major complication in the treatment of hemophilia A, affecting approximately 20% to 30% of patients. Current treatment for inhibitors is based on long-term, daily injections of large amounts of FVIII protein. Liver-directed gene therapy has been used to induce antigen-specific tolerance, but there are no data in hemophilic animals with pre-existing inhibitors. To determine whether sustained endogenous expression of FVIII could eradicate inhibitors, we injected adeno-associated viral vectors encoding canine FVIII (cFVIII) in 2 strains of inhibitor hemophilia A dogs. In 3 dogs, a transient increase in inhibitor titers (up to 7 Bethesda Units [BU]) at 2 weeks was followed by continuous decline to complete disappearance within 4-5 weeks. Subsequently, an increase in cFVIII levels (1.5%-8%), a shortening of clotting times, and a reduction (> 90%) of bleeding episodes were observed. Immune tolerance was confirmed by lack of antibody formation after repeated challenges with cFVIII protein and normal protein half-life. A fourth dog exhibited a strong early anamnestic response (216 BU), with slow decline to 0.8 BU and cFVIII antigen detection by 18 months after vector delivery. These data suggest that liver gene therapy has the potential to eradicate inhibitors and could improve the outcomes of hemophilia A patients.

  7. Successful Phenotype Improvement following Gene Therapy for Severe Hemophilia A in Privately Owned Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Callan

    Full Text Available Severe hemophilia A (HA is an inherited bleeding disorder characterized by <1% of residual factor VIII (FVIII clotting activity. The disease affects several mammals including dogs, and, like humans, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In gene therapy using adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors, the canine model has been one of the best predictors of the therapeutic dose tested in clinical trials for hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency and other genetic diseases, such as congenital blindness. Here we report our experience with liver gene therapy with AAV-FVIII in two outbred, privately owned dogs with severe HA that resulted in sustained expression of 1-2% of normal FVIII levels and prevented 90% of expected bleeding episodes. A Thr62Met mutation in the F8 gene was identified in one dog. These data recapitulate the improvement of the disease phenotype in research animals, and in humans, with AAV liver gene therapy for hemophilia B. Our experience is a novel example of the benefits of a relevant preclinical canine model to facilitate both translational studies in humans and improved welfare of privately owned dogs.

  8. Expression of von Willebrand factor Normandy: An autosomal mutation that mimics hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuley, E.A.; Worrall, N.K.; Sadler, J.E. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Gaucher, C.; Jorieux, S.; Mazurier, C. (Centre Regional de Transfusion Sanguine, Lille (France))

    1991-07-15

    von Willebrand disease Normandy (vWD Normandy) is a recently described phenotype in which a mutant von Willebrand factor (VWF) appears structurally and functionally normal except that is does not bind to blood coagulation factor VIII. This interaction is required for normal survival of factor VIII in the circulation; consequently, vWD Normandy can present as apparent hemophilia A but with autosomal recessive rather than X chromosome-linked inheritance. AvWF missense mutation, Thr{sup 28} {r arrow} Met, was identified in the propositus in or near the factor VIII binding site. The corresponding mutant recombinant vWF(T28M) formed normal multimers and had normal ristocetin cofactor activity. However, vWF(T28M) exhibited the same defect in factor VIII binding as natural vWF Normandy, confirming that this mutation causes the vWD Normandy phenotype. The distinction between hemophilia A and vWD Normandy is clinically important and should be considered in families affected by apparent mild hemophilia A that fail to show strict X chromosome-linked inheritance and, particularly, in potential female carriers with low factor VIII levels attributed to extreme lyonization.

  9. Factor 8 (F8) gene mutation profile of Turkish hemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidanci, Inanç D; Kavakli, Kaan; Uçar, Canan; Timur, Cetin; Meral, Adalet; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Sayilan, Hülya; Kazanci, Elif; Cağlayan, S Hande

    2008-07-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy is ineffective in hemophilia A patients who develop alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FVIII. The type of factor 8 (F8) gene mutation, genes in the major histocompatibility complex loci, and also polymorphisms in IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are the major predisposing factors for inhibitor formation. The present study was initiated to reveal the F8 gene mutation profile of 30 severely affected high-responder patients with inhibitor levels of more than 5 Bethesda U (BU)/ml and four low-responder patients with inhibitors less than 5 BU/ml. Southern blot and PCR analysis were performed to detect intron 22 and intron 1 inversions, respectively. Point mutations were screened by DNA sequence analysis of all coding regions, intron/exon boundaries, promoter and 3' UTR regions of the F8 gene. The prevalent mutation was the intron 22 inversion among the high-responder patients followed by large deletions, small deletions, and nonsense mutations. Only one missense and one splicing error mutation was seen. Among the low-responder patients, three single nucleotide deletions and one intron 22 inversion were found. All mutation types detected were in agreement with the severe hemophilia A phenotype, most likely leading to a deficiency of and predisposition to the development of alloantibodies against FVIII. It is seen that Turkish hemophilia A patients with major molecular defects have a higher possibility of developing inhibitors.

  10. Life-threatening hemorrhage from acquired hemophilia A as a presenting manifestation of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Chirag; Gill, Amandeep; Sekhon, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Acquired factor VIII deficiency (acquired hemophilia A) is a rare condition characterized by the acquisition of autoantibodies that affect the clotting activity of factor VIII (fVIII). The most common manifestation in affected patients is a hemorrhagic diathesis. This disorder is associated with autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, postpartum period, drugs, and malignancy. Management of this condition begins with attempts to arrest an acute bleed based on the site and severity of bleeding and inhibitor titer. The next priority is eradication of the fVIII antibodies using immunosuppressive therapies. We report the case of a 66-year-old male who presented with spontaneous right thigh hematoma with prolonged activated partial prothrombin time and normal prothrombin time. Mixing studies confirmed the presence of an inhibitor. Further investigation for the underlying etiology of acquired hemophilia A leads to diagnosis of prostate cancer. Treatment consisted of bypassing agents including activated factor VII and activated prothrombin plasma concentrate to arrest the bleeding. Steroids and cyclophosphamide were added to suppress the fVIII inhibitors. Concomitant treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with chemotherapy confirmed the eradication of the inhibitors. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of prostate cancer diagnosed and treated simultaneously with acquired hemophilia A resulting in favorable patient outcome. PMID:27609734

  11. Telehealth Videoconferencing for Children With Hemophilia and Their Families: A Clinical Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kimberly; Hooke, Mary C

    2016-07-01

    Telehealth is the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance health care. It supports quality health care that is accessible, and time- and cost-effective. Telehealth videoconferencing may enhance the care for hemophilia patients who are experiencing a bleed by supporting real-time detailed assessment including appearance, range of motion, and ambulation in addition to the traditional phone methods of verbal description of appearance, pain, and function. The aim of this clinical project was to evaluate the feasibility of using telehealth videoconferencing in children with severe hemophilia in the home setting. Twelve patients with severe hemophilia ages 2to 18 years, who had more than 2 breakthrough bleeds in the past year, and had Internet access with a computer camera were included. The incidence of bleeding was low; however, videoconferencing was effective for 3 patients who completed 4 video appointments. Patients and staff reported that videoconferencing improved communication and satisfaction. Telehealth videoconferencing is a feasible tool for managing bleeding disorders in the home setting.

  12. Acute Compartment Syndrome after an Olecranon Fracture in a Patient with Mild Hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John M; Christophersen, Christy; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2017-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a serious condition characterized by compartmental pressures within 20 mmHg of diastolic blood pressure, or clinical signs of pain, paresthesia, pallor, and lack of pulses. Often a surgical intervention is necessary. Increased surveillance for compartment syndrome is important when a patient with a bleeding disorder sustains a traumatic injury. We present a case of forearm compartment syndrome in a patient with mild hemophilia B who sustained an olecranon fracture. The patient received factor replacement and he underwent emergent forearm fasciotomies to avoid muscle necrosis. Over the subsequent week, the patient returned to the operating room 3 times for repeat irrigation and debridements, partial wound closure, open reduction internal fixation of his olecranon fracture and eventual skin grafting of the volar forearm wound. Failure to recognize compartment syndrome in even mild forms of hemophilia may result in loss of function, neurologic deficits, and limb amputations. The management of acute compartment syndrome in patients with hemophilia requires timely recognition, replacement of clotting factors, and emergent fasciotomies.

  13. Genetic diversity of HCV among various high risk populations (IDAs, thalassemia, hemophilia, HD patients) in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafiei A; Darzyani Azizi M; Taheri S; Haghshenas MR; Hosseinian A; Makhlough A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the patterns of distribution of HCV genotypes among high risk population in north of Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 135 HCV RNA-positive high risk individuals including thalassemia, hemophilia, patients under hemodialysis and intravenous drug addicts. HCV genotypes were determined based on amplification with type-specific primers methods. Results: Among the 187 anti-HCV positive samples, only 135 (72.2%) gave HCV-RNA positvity. Over all, the most identified HCV type was genotype 3a (51.1%) followed by 1a (27.4%), 1b (8.2%). Sixteen (11.9%) out of 135 HCV RNA-positive participants have infected with more than one genotype or subtypes as follow; 1a/1b in 11 (8.2%), 2/3a in 3 (2.2%), and 1a/1b/3a in 2 (1.5%). Stratification of participants revealed that HCV subtype 3a was more prominent in thalassemia, hemophilia and HD patients but 1a and 1b were frequent in intravenous drug addicts. Conclusions: This study is the first report on HCV genotypes among Iranian subjects with different exposure categories resided in Mazandaran, where genotype 3a was found to be the most frequent genotype in thalassemia, hemophilia, and hemodialysis patients but not in IDAs. Since the addiction age is decreasing in Iran and a lot of addicts are IDAs, it might change the subtype pattern of HCV in general population.

  14. Emergency management of childhood hemophilia%儿童血友病的急救处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李君惠; 王天有

    2013-01-01

    普通门诊和急救科医务人员通常缺乏血友病诊治经验,因此,建立针对血友病的急救体系和诊疗标准十分必要.急救科医务人员需要识别未获诊断的出血性疾病患儿,对急诊就诊的血友病患儿应进行出血状况评估,尽快给予凝血因子替代治疗等止血措施,并要警惕抑制物的生成.%Doctors and nurses from general outpatient and emergency department usually lack the treatment experience of hemophilia,therefore,emergency system and diagnostic criteria for hemophilia is es-sential.Physicians of emergency department should be trained on identifying the undiagosed patients with inherited bleeding disorders and assessing the condition of bleeding.Prompt clotting factors replacement therapy should be given to the patients with hemophilia once bleeding is suspected.Physicians should be aware that inhibitors make the emergency treatment more complicated.

  15. Gene Therapy of Hemophilia%血友病的基因治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金中; 薛京伦

    2008-01-01

    Hemophilia is one of the few genetic diseases.which made significant progress in gene therapies.Among genetic diseases,hemophilia has a number of characteristics that real&it attractive as a model for gene therapies,such as.its clarified genetic background,abundant animal model and the reliable standard for evaluating the effects.The progresses and challenges of gene therapies for hemophilia will be discussed.%血友病是基因治疗临床实验最早获得成功的遗传性疾病.血友病不仅是单基因疾病治疗的最佳病种,因其清楚的遗传背景、完备的动物模型以及客观方便的观察指标,也成为检验基因治疗系统最为可信的模型.本文综述血友病基因治疗的代表性文献,对基因治疗血友病的进展、面临的困难以及可能的解决途径及其前景作一简要综述.

  16. Life-threatening hemorrhage from acquired hemophilia A as a presenting manifestation of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag Sheth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired factor VIII deficiency (acquired hemophilia A is a rare condition characterized by the acquisition of autoantibodies that affect the clotting activity of factor VIII (fVIII. The most common manifestation in affected patients is a hemorrhagic diathesis. This disorder is associated with autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, postpartum period, drugs, and malignancy. Management of this condition begins with attempts to arrest an acute bleed based on the site and severity of bleeding and inhibitor titer. The next priority is eradication of the fVIII antibodies using immunosuppressive therapies. We report the case of a 66-year-old male who presented with spontaneous right thigh hematoma with prolonged activated partial prothrombin time and normal prothrombin time. Mixing studies confirmed the presence of an inhibitor. Further investigation for the underlying etiology of acquired hemophilia A leads to diagnosis of prostate cancer. Treatment consisted of bypassing agents including activated factor VII and activated prothrombin plasma concentrate to arrest the bleeding. Steroids and cyclophosphamide were added to suppress the fVIII inhibitors. Concomitant treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer with chemotherapy confirmed the eradication of the inhibitors. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of prostate cancer diagnosed and treated simultaneously with acquired hemophilia A resulting in favorable patient outcome.

  17. A population pharmacokinetic model for perioperative dosing of factor VIII in hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazendonk, Hendrika; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Lock, Janske; Driessens, Mariëtte; van der Meer, Felix; Meijer, Karina; Kruip, Marieke; Gorkom, Britta Laros-van; Peters, Marjolein; de Wildt, Saskia; Leebeek, Frank; Cnossen, Marjon; Mathôt, Ron

    2016-10-01

    The role of pharmacokinetic-guided dosing of factor concentrates in hemophilia is currently a subject of debate and focuses on long-term prophylactic treatment. Few data are available on its impact in the perioperative period. In this study, a population pharmacokinetic model for currently registered factor VIII concentrates was developed for severe and moderate adult and pediatric hemophilia A patients (FVIII levels modeling was performed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Population pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated in 75 adults undergoing 140 surgeries (median age: 48 years; median weight: 80 kg) and 44 children undergoing 58 surgeries (median age: 4.3 years; median weight: 18.5 kg). Pharmacokinetic profiles were best described by a two-compartment model. Typical values for clearance, intercompartment clearance, central and peripheral volume were 0.15 L/h/68 kg, 0.16 L/h/68 kg, 2.81 L/68 kg and 1.90 L/68 kg. Interpatient variability in clearance and central volume was 37% and 27%. Clearance decreased with increasing age (Pmodel describes the perioperative pharmacokinetics of various FVIII concentrates, allowing individualization of perioperative FVIII therapy for severe and moderate hemophilia A patients by Bayesian adaptive dosing. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  18. A novel supplemental approach to capturing post-marketing safety information on recombinant factor VIIa in acquired hemophilia: the Acquired Hemophilia Surveillance project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lentz SR

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steven R Lentz,1 Anand Tandra,2 Robert Z Gut,3 David L Cooper31Division of Hematology, Oncology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; 2Hematology, Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Clinical, Medical, and Regulatory Affairs, Novo Nordisk, Inc, Princeton, NJ, USAAcquired hemophilia (AH is a rare (incidence is 1 per 1.5 million but often severe bleeding disorder characterized by autoantibodies to coagulation factor VIII (FVIII. It is associated with life-threatening bleeding and ∼20% mortality.1,2 Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa; NovoSeven® RT, Novo Nordisk A/S, Bagsværd, Denmark received an indication from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in October 2006 for the treatment of bleeding episodes and the prevention of bleeding in surgical interventions or invasive procedures in patients with AH.3View original paper by Collins and colleagues.

  19. Development of a Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service—Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo): Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gary; Navarro-Ruan, Tamara; McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Background Individual pharmacokinetic assessment is a critical component of tailored prophylaxis for hemophilia patients. Population pharmacokinetics allows using individual sparse data, thus simplifying individual pharmacokinetic studies. Implementing population pharmacokinetics capacity for the hemophilia community is beyond individual reach and requires a system effort. Objective The Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service—Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo) project aims to assemble a database of patient pharmacokinetic data for all existing factor concentrates, develop and validate population pharmacokinetics models, and integrate these models within a Web-based calculator for individualized pharmacokinetic estimation in patients at participating treatment centers. Methods Individual pharmacokinetic studies on factor VIII and IX concentrates will be sourced from pharmaceutical companies and independent investigators. All factor concentrate manufacturers, hemophilia treatment centers (HTCs), and independent investigators (identified via a systematic review of the literature) having on file pharmacokinetic data and willing to contribute full or sparse pharmacokinetic data will be eligible for participation. Multicompartmental modeling will be performed using a mixed-model approach for derivation and Bayesian forecasting for estimation of individual sparse data. NONMEM (ICON Development Solutions) will be used as modeling software. Results The WAPPS-Hemo research network has been launched and is currently joined by 30 HTCs from across the world. We have gathered dense individual pharmacokinetic data on 878 subjects, including several replicates, on 21 different molecules from 17 different sources. We have collected sparse individual pharmacokinetic data on 289 subjects from the participating centers through the testing phase of the WAPPS-Hemo Web interface. We have developed prototypal population pharmacokinetics models for 11 molecules. The WAPPS-Hemo website

  20. Strategies to encourage physical activity in patients with hemophilia to improve quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Miwa Goto,1 Hideyuki Takedani,2 Kazuhiko Yokota,1 Nobuhiko Haga3 1Rehabilitation Center, The University of Tokyo Hospital, 2Department of Joint Surgery, Research Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, 3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder caused by a congenital abnormality of blood coagulation. Until the mid-1970s, patients with hemophilia (PWH were advised to refrain from physical activity (PA because of a perceived increased risk of bleeding. Since then, PA, which is recognized as being essential for health maintenance, is now recommended by the World Federation of Hemophilia. Moreover, a number of studies reported that PA can improve treatment efficacy and prevent bleeding in PWH. Physical assessment and intervention in PA are currently used in clinical practice. However, the necessity of PA is not emphasized, and many PWH generally have low- to- no PA. Therefore, a behavior change approach to encourage patient motivation is becoming ever more important. In this article, we review articles addressing PA in PWH and discuss strategies to encourage PA through a behavior change approach by focusing on factors relevant to hemophilia, such as benefits and bleeding risk of PA, risk management of bleeding, PA characteristics, and difficulty with exercise adherence. The trust relationship between clinicians and patients, a transtheoretical model of behavior change, and motivation theory as approaches to promote PA are introduced. Finally, we review a case report of the clinical success of a behavior change approach to promote PA. Many PWH find it difficult to continue PA because of aging, fear of bleeding, insufficient recognition of PA benefits, and psychological problems. Therefore, it is essential and important to perform prophylaxis with PWH and to heighten their understanding of the benefits and risks of

  1. Omental implantation of BOECs in hemophilia dogs results in circulating FVIII antigen and a complex immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozelo, Margareth C; Vidal, Barbara; Brown, Christine; Notley, Colleen; Hegadorn, Carol; Webster, Sandra; Harpell, Lori; Ahlin, James; Winterborn, Andrew; Handforth, Janine; Arruda, Valder R; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2014-06-26

    Ex vivo gene therapy strategies avoid systemic delivery of viruses thereby mitigating the risk of vector-associated immunogenicity. Previously, we delivered autologous factor VIII (FVIII)-expressing blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to hemophilia A mice and showed that these cells remained sequestered within the implanted matrix and provided therapeutic levels of FVIII. Prior to translating this strategy into the canine (c) model of hemophilia A, we increased cFVIII transgene expression by at least 100-fold with the use of the elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α) promoter and a strong endothelial enhancer element. BOECs isolated from hemophilia A dogs transduced with this lentiviral vector express levels of cFVIII ranging between 1.0 and 1.5 U/mL per 10(6) cells over 24 hours. Autologous BOECs have been implanted into the omentum of 2 normal and 3 hemophilia A dogs. These implanted cells formed new vessels in the omentum. All 3 hemophilia A dogs treated with FVIII-expressing autologous BOECs developed anti-FVIII immunoglobulin G2 antibodies, but in only 2 of the dogs were these antibodies inhibitory. FVIII antigen levels >40% in the absence of FVIII coagulant function were detected in the circulation for up to a year after a single gene therapy treatment, indicating prolonged cellular viability and synthesis of FVIII. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Treatment of Hemophilia A in Utero and Postnatally using Sheep as a Model for Cell and Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, Christopher D.; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A represents the most common inheritable deficiency of the coagulation proteins. Current state-of- the-art treatment consists of frequent prophylactic infusions of plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII protein to maintain hemostasis, and has greatly increased life expectancy and quality of life for many hemophilia A patients. This treatment approach is, however, far from ideal, due to the need for lifelong intravenous infusions, the high treatment cost, and the fact that it is unavailable to a large percentage of the world’s hemophiliacs. There is thus a need for novel treatments that can promise long-term or permanent correction. In contrast to existing protein based therapeutics, gene therapy offers to provide a permanent cure following few, or even a single, treatment. In the present paper, we review ongoing work towards this end, focusing on studies we have performed in a large animal model. Some of the key topics covered in this review include the unique opportunities sheep offer as a model system, the re-establishment and clinical and molecular characterization of a line of sheep with severe hemophilia A, the advantages and feasibility of treating a disease like hemophilia A in utero, and the use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) as cellular delivery vehicles for the FVIII gene. The review finishes with a brief discussion of our recent success correcting ovine hemophilia A with a postnatal transplant with gene-modified MSC, and the limitations of this approach that remain to be overcome. PMID:23264887

  3. Thromboprophylaxis and Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Hemophilia A or B Who Underwent High-Risk Orthopedic Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Shahzad; Kale, Gautam; Kim, Daniel; Akbar, Syed A; Holm, Lisa; Naidzionak, Ulad; Hossain, Akm M; Dong, Xiang; Doll, Donald C; Freter, Carl E; Hopkins, Tamara

    2016-03-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) carry a high risk of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE); therefore, anticoagulation prophylaxis is recommended in these patients. Unfortunately, there are no guidelines about VTE prophylaxis in patients with hemophilia who underwent these high-risk surgeries. To determine whether these patients have high risk of VTE, we conducted a retrospective study on patients with hemophilia who underwent elective THR/TKA at our institute from 2004 to 2012. Postoperatively, we collected information on duration and method of factor VIII/IX infusion, VTE-prophylaxis, and complications. There were 23 patients with hemophilia, 18 (78%) with hemophilia A and 5 (22%) with hemophilia B, who underwent high-risk surgeries (39% THR and 61% TKA). The VTE prophylaxis included sequential compression device, 12 (52%), and prophylactic enoxaparin, 1 (4%). Ten (43%) patients did not receive VTE prophylaxis. At 1-year follow-up, we did not find any evidence of clinical VTE in our patients. Better risk stratification is needed to identify patients who would benefit from pharmacological prophylaxis.

  4. The Utilization of Rehabilitation in Patients with Hemophilia A in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rehabilitation plays an important role in the physical health of patients with hemophilia. However, comprehensive information regarding the utilization of rehabilitation for such patients remains scarce. Aim This population-based study aimed to examine the characteristics, trends, and most important factors affecting rehabilitation usage in patients with hemophilia A using a nationwide database in Taiwan. Methods Data from 777 patients with hemophilia A who were registered in the National Health Insurance Research Database between 1998 and 2008 were analyzed using SAS 9.0. Results Musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures and clotting factor VIII concentrate costs were identified as factors affecting rehabilitation usage; musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures (odds ratio = 3.788; P Joint disorders, arthropathies, bone and cartilage disorders, intracranial hemorrhage, and brain trauma were common diagnoses during rehabilitation use. The costs of physical therapy (physiotherapy) comprised the majority (71.2%) of rehabilitation therapy categories. Increasingly, rehabilitation therapy was performed at physician clinics. The total rehabilitation costs were <0.1% of the total annual medical costs. Conclusion Musculoskeletal or nervous system-related surgical procedures and increased use of clotting factor VIII concentrate affect the rehabilitation utilization of patients with hemophilia A the most. The findings in this study could help clinicians comprehensively understand the rehabilitation utilization of patients with hemophilia A. PMID:27690229

  5. Social Worker Perceptions and Observations Regarding Men's Management of Hemophilia and Use of Community-Based Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolstad, Erik Bruce

    2015-08-01

    The study reported in this article was conducted in response to Utah service provider concerns that men with hemophilia may be disengaged from their local community-based support network. This study explored the challenges, adaptations, and needs of men with hemophilia from the perspective of Hemophilia Treatment Center (HTC) social workers. Utah's two active HTC social workers participated in face-to-face interviews. Fourteen HTC social workers from surrounding regions completed written interviews. The researcher used a qualitative, grounded theory approach to analyze the data. Resilience theory provided a lens for interpreting the results. Findings from these professionals indicate that men with hemophilia appear to be ambivalent toward services that are available to them for reasons that include work and insurance status, prior personal history with the bleeding disorders community, strength of relationship with local service providers, degree of customization of HTC services, and the desire to maintain personal independence. Understanding this dynamic may be helpful in developing services that are more specifically tailored to the needs of men with hemophilia, in addition to potentially providing stronger community-based support to men with other genetic disorders.

  6. 血友病甲合并艾滋病的治疗%Treatment of hemophilia A patients with AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴振声; 卢洪洲

    2012-01-01

    血友病甲患者输注凝血因子时易感染人免疫缺陷病毒(HIV),上述患者除接受针对血友病的治疗外,还需接受正规的高效抗反转录病毒治疗(HAART)等.本文综述血友病甲合并艾滋病的临床治疗.%People with hemophilia A may easily suffer from infection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) because of the clotting factors infusion frequently. So hemophilia A patients with AIDS should receive additional treatments of HAART . This review summarizes the treatment of hemophilia A patients with AIDS.

  7. Complete Correction of Hemophilia A with Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors Containing a Full-Size Expression Cassette

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Hui; Chen, Lingxia; Wang, Jinhui; Huack, Bernd; Sarkar, Rita; Zhou, Shangzhen; Xu, Ray; Ding, Qiulan; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, HongLi; Xiao, Weidong

    2008-01-01

    Hemophilia A is caused by a deficiency in the factor VIII (FVIII) gene. Constrained by limited packaging capacity, even the 4.3-kb B domain-deleted FVIII remained a challenge for delivery by a single adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector. Studies have shown that up to a 6.6-kb vector sequence may be packaged into AAV virions, which suggested an alternative strategy for hemophilia A gene therapy. To explore the usefulness of AAV vectors carrying an oversized FVIII gene, we constructed the AAV-FV...

  8. Cohort profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollånes, Mette C; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Forthun, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of MOthers and BAbies in Norway and Denmark cerebral palsy (MOBAND-CP) was to study CP aetiology in a prospective design. PARTICIPANTS: MOBAND-CP is a cohort of more than 210 000 children, created as a collaboration between the world's two largest pregnancy cohorts-the Norweg......PURPOSE: The purpose of MOthers and BAbies in Norway and Denmark cerebral palsy (MOBAND-CP) was to study CP aetiology in a prospective design. PARTICIPANTS: MOBAND-CP is a cohort of more than 210 000 children, created as a collaboration between the world's two largest pregnancy cohorts...... investigating various hypotheses regarding CP aetiology are currently on-going. FUTURE PLANS: Additional data can be harmonised as necessary to meet requirements of new projects. Biological specimens collected during pregnancy and at delivery are potentially available for assay, as are results from assays...

  9. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel M. Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD. Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B. Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%, constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders.

  10. Epidemiology of Occult Hepatitis B Infection Among Thalassemic, Hemophilia, and Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazemi Arababadi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Context: Hepatitis B virus (HBV is the most common disease commuted through blood transfusion. Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI is a form of the disease which does not present Hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg in the serum of patients; however, HBVDNA is detectable in the serum and hepatocytes of patients. OBI is an important risk factor to induce post transfusion hepatitis (PTH, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and reactivation of the HBV. Recently, several reports from various regions of the world have been published regarding PTH among blood recipients as well as HCC, and cirrhosis among patients who require permanent blood transfusion, including diseases such as hemophilia, hemodialysis and thalassemia. This form of the hepatitis also creates problems for individuals that are co-infected with other viruses such as HCV and HIV. To determine the prevalence of OBI among hemophilia, hemodialysis and thalassemia patients is important because it is a high risk factor for PTH, HCC and cirrhosis therefore, its detection is a critical strategy for most health care services. This review addresses recent information regarding prevalence of OBI in relation to the mentioned diseases.Evidence Acquisition: The data presented here was collected by searching the key words in Pubmed and Scopous databases.Results: Our searching in the published papers revealed that OBI prevalence is frequent in patients receiving frequent blood transfusions.Conclusions: it seems that one of the main mechanisms for OBI transmission is most likely through infected blood and its component and evaluation of the prevalence of OBI in donors and patients, especially those with hemophilia and thalassemia should be foul considered.

  11. Direct detection of common and rare inversion mutations in the genetic diagnosis of severe hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windsor, A.S.; Lillicrap, D.P.; Taylor, S.A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 50% of the cases of severe hemophilia A (factor VIII:C < 0.01 units/ml) may be due to gross rearrangements of the factor VIII gene. The mutation involves homologous sequences upstream of the factor VIII locus and within intron 22 in an intrachromosomal recombination, inversion, event. The rearrangements can readily be detected on a Southern blot using a probe that is complementary to sequences from within intron 22. We describe here the analysis of this mutation in 71 severe hemophilia A patients. Thirty two of the patients (45%) showed evidence of a rearrangement. Five different patterns of rearrangements were seen, two of which have previously been described and account for the majority of cases (pattern 1, 70% and pattern 2, 16%). Three other abnormal patterns were observed. The inversion mechanism does not usually result in the loss or gain of any genetic material, but in one patient, in whom a unique rearrangement pattern was observed (pattern 3), we have previously documented a gross deletion which removes exons 1-22 of the factor VII gene as well as sequences 5{prime} to the gene. In another individual a fourth pattern in which an extra 19.0 kb band is present was detected. In this case it is unclear as to whether the rearrangement is responsible for the disease or is simply coincident normal variation. A fifth pattern, in which an extra 16.0 kb band was detected, was observed in a family with a new mutation causing hemophilia A. The affected individual and his mother inherited a de novo rearrangement of the factor VIII gene from his unaffected grandfather, implicating it as the cause of the disease. In conclusion, testing for the factor VIII inversion mutation was positive in approximately 45% of severe hemophiliacs, 72% of whom were isolated cases, and as such should constitute the initial stage in the genetic testing protocol for these patients` families.

  12. Characterization of genetic defects of hemophilia A in patients of Chinese origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shu-Wha; Lin, Shu-Rung; Shen, Ming-Ching (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-12-01

    The molecular characterization of hemophilia A of Chinese origin was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing of patient's factor VIII genes. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF) were used as screening methods to detect mutated DNAs. A total of 102 individuals from 87 different families, including 10 patients (10 families) with mild-to-moderate and 92 patients (77 families) with severe hemophilia A, were analyzed by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF. Of the 87 independent cases, 40 revealed a single mutation in the coding regions of their factor VIII genes. These mutations include 21 with single base changes resulting in 8 nonsense and 13 missense codons, 16 with deletion or insertion of 1-11 nucleotides, and 3 with deletion of large DNA fragments. The frequency of 8 of the identified factor VIII polymorphisms or silent mutations was also determined among Chinese. The frequencies for codons 1241, 1269, and 2223 (the numbering system follows J. Gitschier et al., 1984, Nature 312: 326-330) were found to be different from those reported for other populations. As for the 47 severe cases whose mutational events were not readily detected by PCR-SSCP and PCR-ddF, the reverse transcriptase PCR method was applied. In 24 such cases analyzed, 17 were found to be of the [open quotes]intron 22 mutations[close quotes] as described by Naylor et al. (1992, The Lancet, 342: 1066-1067), accounting for 39% of Chinese patients with hemophilia A. 31 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Emerging Issues in Diagnosis, Biology, and Inhibitor Risk in Mild Hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaman, Giancarlo; Eckhardt, Corien; van Velzen, Alice; Linari, Silvia; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Mild hemophilia A (MHA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder defined by factor VIII (FVIII) levels between 5 and 40 U/dL. Diagnosis occurs later in life compared with severe or moderate disease. Although bleeding episodes are especially posttraumatic, their unexpected occurrence may be potentially life threatening if diagnosis is missed or delayed. Desmopressin is the treatment of choice for MHA since it is cheap and safe, but a significant proportion of cases do not attain FVIII postinfusion greater than 50 U/dL, which is considered a safe level for major surgery. Thus, replacement therapy may be needed and is usually successful in MHA, but recent data indicate that this can be associated with the occurrence of inhibitors against FVIII, as for severe hemophilia A. However, in contrast to severe or moderate hemophilia A, patients with MHA have a lifelong risk of inhibitor formation. Inhibitors may change the clinical phenotype dramatically, as the inhibitor frequently cross-reacts with the patient's endogenous FVIII, reducing the endogenous FVIII plasma levels below 1 U/dL. Specific F8 missense mutations predispose to inhibitor development. Inhibitors are frequently provoked by intensive treatment with therapeutic FVIII concentrates (more than 5 consecutive exposure days). Bleeding in inhibitor patients may be treated with desmopressin, high doses of FVIII concentrate or FVIII bypassing agents. Many inhibitors disappear over time when no FVIII concentrate is administered. However, this does not imply that a patient is tolerant and an anamnestic reaction may occur when treatment with FVIII concentrate is again necessary. To eradicate, an inhibitor different strategies may be used: watchful waiting, immunosuppression, or immune tolerance induction regimen.

  14. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  15. Potential role of a new PEGylated recombinant factor VIII for hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynn TT

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tung Thanh Wynn,1 Burak Gumuscu,2,3 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Bon Secours Health System, St. Mary’s Hospital, Richmond, VA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: Hemophilia A, a deficiency in the activity of coagulation factor (F VIII, is an X-linked bleeding disorder with an approximate incidence of one in 5,000 male infants. Bleeding-related complications often result in greater severity of disease, poor quality of life, surgical interventions for severe joint destruction, and shortened life span. With the availability of plasma-derived and recombinant FVIII products, the benefits of primary prophylaxis were demonstrated and is now the standard of care for patients with severe factor deficiencies. Current hemophilia research is focusing on the creation of new factor replacement therapies with longer half-lives; accessing alternative mechanisms to achieve desired hemostasis and enhance bypassing ­activity; and limiting the immunogenicity of the protein. PEGylation involves the covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG to a protein, peptide, or a small molecule drug. PEG effectively increases the molecular weight and size of the protein by creating a hydrophilic cloud around the molecule. This molecular change may reduce susceptibility of the molecule to proteolytic activity and degradation. It is also believed that PEGylation changes the surface charge of the protein that ultimately interferes with some receptor-mediated clearance processes. The half-life of PEGylated factor is more prolonged when compared to non-PEGylated full-length recombinant FVIII. The dawn of a new era in the care of hemophilia patients is upon us with the release of recombinant FVIII products with extended half-lives, and products with even more extended half

  16. Comparing the Effects of Therapeutic Exercise and Hydrotherapy on Pain Severity and Knee Range of Motion in Patients with Hemophilia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Mazloum

    2013-10-01

    . Results: Both experimental groups exhibited significant reduction of pain along with improved knee flexion and extension compared with the control group (P<0.001. Pain reduction in subjects treated in water treatment was significantly higher than exercise group in drought (P0.05. Conclusion: The use of therapeutic exercise in water with regular exercise rehabilitation for patients with hemophilia can be helpful to reduce pain and improve range of motion in hemophilia patients. The effect of exercise therapy on pain reduction is more effective compared to traditional pain therapy. Key words: Hydrotherapy, Exercise Therapy, Hemophilia, Knee Range of Motion

  17. Survey of the anti-factor IX immunoglobulin profiles in patients with hemophilia B using a fluorescence-based immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, B; Rice, A S; Neff, A T; Manco-Johnson, M J; Kempton, C L; Miller, C H

    2016-10-01

    Essentials Studies characterizing neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) in hemophilia B (HB) are lacking. The current study describes anti-factor (F) IX antibody profiles in 37 patients who have HB. Anti-FIX IgG4 levels exhibited a strong positive correlation with Nijmegen-Bethesda results. These data will help to more clearly define, predict, and treat alloantibody formation in HB.

  18. AAV-based neonatal gene therapy for hemophilia A: long-term correction and avoidance of immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C; Lipshutz, G S

    2012-12-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy has been hampered by immune responses to vector-associated antigens and by neutralizing antibodies or inhibitors against the factor VIII (FVIII) protein; these 'inhibitors' more commonly affect hemophilia A patients than those with hemophilia B. A gene replacement strategy beginning in the neonatal period may avoid the development of these immune responses and lead to prolonged expression with correction of phenotype, thereby avoiding long-term consequences. A serotype rh10 adeno-associated virus (AAV) was developed splitting the FVIII coding sequence into heavy and light chains with the chicken β-actin promoter/CMV enhancer for dual recombinant adeno-associated viral vector delivery. Virions of each FVIII chain were co-injected intravenously into mice on the second day of life. Mice express sustained levels of FVIII antigen ≥5% up to 22 months of life without development of antibodies against FVIII. Phenotypic correction was manifest in all AAV-FVIII-treated mice as demonstrated by functional assay and reduction in bleeding time. This study demonstrates the use of AAV in a gene replacement strategy in neonatal mice that establishes both long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A and lack of antibody development against FVIII in this disease model where AAV is administered shortly after birth. These studies support the consideration of gene replacement therapy for diseases that are diagnosed in utero or in the early neonatal period.

  19. Phenotypic correction and stable expression of factor VIII in hemophilia A mice by embryonic stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J J; Kuang, Y; Zhang, L L; Shen, C L; Wang, L; Lu, S Y; Lu, X B; Fei, J; Gu, M M; Wang, Z G

    2013-05-13

    Hereditary deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII) leads to hemophilia A, a severe X-linked bleeding disorder. Current therapies include fixed-dose FVIII prophylaxis, factor replacement therapy, and most recently, gene therapy. Prophylaxis and FVIII replacement therapies are limited by incomplete efficacy, high cost, restricted availability, and development of neutralizing antibodies in chronically treated individuals. Limited success has been obtained in preclinical trials using gene therapy for the treatment of hemophilia. Therefore, new options for therapy for hemophilia A are needed. We evaluated the potential of embryonic stem cells for correcting hemophilia A in mice. FVIII-deficient mouse blastocysts were collected and injected with mouse embryonic stem cells stably expressing green-fluorescent protein (GFP) and transferred to pseudopregnant recipient mice. Expression of FVIII was measured in the liver and plasma of the 5 chimeric mice that were produced. Three of these mice were GFP-positive at the age of 6 months. The plasma FVIII activity levels were equal to those of wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that embryonic stem cell transplantation at an early embryonic stage has potential as therapy for this progressively debilitating, life-threatening bleeding disorder.

  20. Risk stratification for inhibitor development at first treatment for severe hemophilia A : a tool for clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Avest, P. C.; Mancuso, M. E.; Santagostino, E.; Yuste, V. J.; van den Berg, H. M.; van der Bom, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Replacement therapy in severe hemophilia A patients is complicated by formation of inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (inhibitors) in around 25% of children. Management of bleeds and eradicating inhibitors is complicated, costly and not always successful. Objective: To develop a

  1. [Prophylaxis in hemophilia: situation analysis and call-to-action in Latin America. A report from the GLAITH group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijares, Mercedes Elena; De Sánchez, Apsara Boadas

    2015-09-01

    Prophylactic treatment in the management of hemophilia has been a crucial factor in improving the prognosis and quality of life for people with hemophilia (PCH). However, it is not globally implemented. In Latin America it is difficult to assess the status of PCH and the its management does not conform to ideal standards. The GLAITH group discussed the problem in Latin America. A survey of its members and its findings were discussed at a meeting in Bogota in May 2013. Proportions of hemophilia A and B were 75-90% and 10-25% respectively. Severe hemophilia represents 26-55% of cases. A high percentage of PCH have hemophilic arthropathy. The general care and specific treatments of PCH vary by country, only 50-60% of the treatment is covered and in 85-95% of the cases are performed on an on- demand basis. Just 5-15% receives prophylaxis, most of them secondary. Few countries have a national program or homogeneous records. Finally the GLAITH group proceeded to develop a conclusion and call to action for the region where the following points are recommended: the establishment of a unified Latin American registry; prospective cost-effectiveness studies and evaluation criteria related to secondary prophylaxis; comparative studies of quality of life with and without prophylaxis in the region; promotion of individualization of treatment and, the increase of primary and secondary prophylaxis globally in Latin America.

  2. Perioperative management of hemophilia patients receiving total hip and knee arthroplasty: a complication report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tateiwa T

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Tateiwa,1 Yasuhito Takahashi,1,2 Tsunehito Ishida,1 Kosuke Kubo,1 Toshinori Masaoka,1 Takaaki Shishido,1 Keiji Sano,1 Kengo Yamamoto11Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 2Department of Bone and Joint Biomaterial Research, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: It has been recognized that perioperative hemostasis management after joint-replacement surgery for hemophilia patients is complicated and cumbersome, due to the necessity of rigorous monitoring for clotting-factor levels throughout the infusion. Between 2005 and 2014, we examined seven patients with hemophilia A (ten joints: six hips and four knees receiving total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA for hemophilic arthropathy. One male patient (31 years old showed an intra-articular hematoma formation after THA (case 1. In another male patient (46 years old receiving TKA, the postoperative trough factor VIII level became lower significantly than reference levels (80%–100% for the 5–10 postoperative days recommended by the guidelines from the Japanese Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis, despite sufficient coagulant based on the guidelines being administered (case 2. In the latter patient, deep infection and hematoma formation were observed postoperatively. In this article, we provide a detailed clinical report regarding these two complication cases at the early postoperative periods, and the management of bleeding control for hemophilia patients is discussed.Keywords: hemophilia A, arthroplasty, clotting factor VIII levels, hematoma, infection

  3. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: Implications in human hemophilia treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVII...

  4. Characterization of a genetically engineered mouse model of hemophilia A with complete deletion of the F8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B N; Baldwin, W H; Healey, J F; Parker, E T; Shafer-Weaver, K; Cox, C; Jiang, P; Kanellopoulou, C; Lollar, P; Meeks, S L; Lenardo, M J

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibody formation is a severe complication in hemophilia A therapy. We genetically engineered and characterized a mouse model with complete deletion of the F8 coding region. F8(TKO) mice exhibit severe hemophilia, express no detectable F8 mRNA, and produce FVIII inhibitors. The defined background and lack of FVIII in F8(TKO) mice will aid in studying FVIII inhibitor formation. The most important complication in hemophilia A treatment is the development of inhibitory anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in patients after FVIII therapy. Patients with severe hemophilia who express no endogenous FVIII (i.e. cross-reacting material, CRM) have the greatest incidence of inhibitor formation. However, current mouse models of severe hemophilia A produce low levels of truncated FVIII. The lack of a corresponding mouse model hampers the study of inhibitor formation in the complete absence of FVIII protein. We aimed to generate and characterize a novel mouse model of severe hemophilia A (designated the F8(TKO) strain) lacking the complete coding sequence of F8 and any FVIII CRM. Mice were created on a C57BL/6 background using Cre-Lox recombination and characterized using in vivo bleeding assays, measurement of FVIII activity by coagulation and chromogenic assays, and anti-FVIII antibody production using ELISA. All F8 exonic coding regions were deleted from the genome and no F8 mRNA was detected in F8(TKO) mice. The bleeding phenotype of F8(TKO) mice was comparable to E16 mice by measurements of factor activity and tail snip assay. Similar levels of anti-FVIII antibody titers after recombinant FVIII injections were observed between F8(TKO) and E16 mice. We describe a new C57BL/6 mouse model for severe hemophilia A patients lacking CRM. These mice can be directly bred to the many C57BL/6 strains of genetically engineered mice, which is valuable for studying the impact of a wide variety of genes on FVIII inhibitor formation on a

  5. The Future of Hemophilia Treatment: Longer-Acting Factor Concentrates versus Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gene therapy is the only novel technology that currently offers the prospect of a lasting cure for hemophilia and freedom from the burden of repeated injections. Recent data from a handful of patients who have undergone gene therapy for hemophilia B are very encouraging with a sustained factor IX (FIX) level of 0.05 IU/mL maintained for over 4 years. While this level is above the current usual target trough levels, it falls well short of the level that patients on prophylaxis with longer-acting products can expect. Prophylaxis is also associated with high peak levels, which permits patients to maintain an active lifestyle. A major barrier to widespread adoption of gene therapy is a high seroprevalence of antibodies to adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors in the general population. Young children would be the best candidates for gene therapy in view of much lower seroprevalence to AAV in infants. A stable level of FIX early in life would prevent the onset of joint bleeds and the development of arthropathy. The recent experience with apolipoprotein tiparvovec (Glybera; uniQure, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) indicates that gene therapy is unlikely to prove to be a cheap therapeutic option. It is also quite possible that other new technologies that do not require viral vectors (such as stem cell therapy) may overtake gene therapy during development and make it redundant. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Hemophilia A inhibitor treatment: the promise of engineered T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvathaneni, Kalpana; Abdeladhim, Maha; Pratt, Kathleen P; Scott, David W

    2017-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a bleeding disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding factor VIII (FVIII), a cofactor protein that is essential for normal blood clotting. Approximately, 1 in 3 patients with severe hemophilia A produce neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) that block its biologic function in the clotting cascade. Current efforts to eliminate inhibitors consist of repeated FVIII injections under what is termed an "ITI" protocol (Immune Tolerance Induction). However, this method is extremely costly and approximately 30% of patients undergoing ITI do not achieve peripheral tolerance. Human T regulatory cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a new strategy to treat this antidrug antibody response, as well as other diseases. Polyclonal Tregs are nonspecific and could potentially cause general immunosuppression. Novel approaches to induce tolerance to FVIII include the use of engineered human and mouse antigen-specific Tregs, or alternatively antigen-specific cytotoxic cells, to delete, anergize, or kill FVIII-specific lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss the current state of engineered T-cell therapies, and we describe the recent progress in applying these therapies to induce FVIII-specific tolerance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Tolerance induction in hemophilia A animal models: battling inhibitors with antigen-specific immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Patrick; Su, Yan; Scott, David W

    2013-05-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder due to either a lack of or greatly reduced activity in the blood coagulation protein factor VIII (FVIII), due to mutations in the F8 gene. This poses significant challenges for FVIII replacement therapy since hemophilic patients are not immunologically tolerant to the protein. Thus, a proportion of patients who receive plasma-derived or recombinant FVIII replacement therapy develop anti FVIII neutralizing antibodies, known as "inhibitors." These patients require long-term regimens of high dose FVIII administration, which has varying success rates and prohibitive costs. Therefore, therapeutics for tolerance induction in such patients with inhibitors are desired. In this review, we address the current progress of immunotherapies for inducing FVIII specific tolerance in animal models of hemophilia A. Specifically we discuss the beneficial effects of B-cell depletion on immune tolerance induction (ITI), B-cell mediated gene therapy, antigen-coupled lymphocyte therapy, and regulatory T-cell epitopes (Tregitopes).

  8. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase attenuates inhibitor development in gene-therapy-treated hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Liu, H; Mah, C; Fletcher, B S

    2009-06-01

    A serious impediment to gene and protein replacement therapy in hemophilia A is the development of inhibitors. Mechanisms responsible for inhibitor development include T-cell-dependent adaptive immune responses and the CD28-B7 signaling pathway that eventually leads to the formation of antibodies directed against factor VIII (FVIII). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a potent immunosuppressive enzyme that can inhibit T-cell responses and induce T-cell apoptosis by regulation of tryptophan metabolism. Kynurenine, one of the metabolites of tryptophan, has been implicated as an immune modulator. Here we hypothesize that co-delivery of the genes for FVIII and IDO can attenuate inhibitor formation. Using transposon-based gene delivery, we observed long-term therapeutic FVIII expression and significantly reduced inhibitor titers when the genes were co-delivered. Co-expression of FVIII and IDO in the liver was associated with increased plasma kynurenine levels, an inhibition of T-cell infiltration and increased apoptosis of T cells within the liver. These experiments suggest that modulation of tryptophan catabolism through IDO expression provides a novel strategy to reduce inhibitor development in hemophilia gene/protein therapy.

  9. Ex vivo expanded autologous polyclonal regulatory T cells suppress inhibitor formation in hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debalina Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cell therapy utilizing ex vivo expanded polyclonal CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg is in use in clinical trials for the treatment of type 1 diabetes and prevention of graft versus host disease in bone marrow transplantation. Here, we seek to evaluate this approach in the treatment of inherited protein deficiencies, i.e., hemophilia, which is often complicated by antibody formation against the therapeutic protein. Treg from mice that express green fluorescent protein–marked FoxP3 were highly purified by two-step magnetic/flow sorting and ex vivo expanded 50- to 100-fold over a 2-week culture period upon stimulation with antibody-coated microbeads. FoxP3 expression was maintained in >80% of expanded Treg, which also expressed high levels of CD62L and CTLA-4. Transplanted Treg suppressed inhibitory antibody formation against coagulation factors VIII and IX in protein and gene therapies in strain-matched hemophilia A and B mice, including in mice with pre-existing antibodies. Although transplanted Treg became undetectable within 2 weeks, suppression persisted for >2 months. Additional studies suggested that antigen-specific suppression emerged due to induction of endogenous Treg. The outcomes of these studies support the concept that cell therapy with ex vivo expanded autologous Treg can be used successfully to minimize immune responses in gene and protein replacement therapies.

  10. Wound healing in hemophilia B mice and low tissue factor mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Dougald M; Mackman, Nigel; Hoffman, Maureane

    2010-04-01

    Wound healing involves a number of physiologic mechanisms including coagulation, inflammation, formation of granulation tissue, and tissue remodeling. Coagulation with robust thrombin generation leading to fibrin formation is necessary for wound healing. It is less clear if there is a requirement for ongoing coagulation to support tissue remodeling. We have studied wound healing in mice with defects in both the initiation (low tissue factor) and propagation (hemophilia B) phases. In hemophilia B mice, dermal wound healing is delayed; this delay is associated with bleeding into the granulation tissue. Mice can be treated with replacement therapy (factor IX) or bypassing agents (factor VIIa) to restore thrombin generation. If treated just prior to wound placement, mice will have normal hemostasis in the first day of wound healing. As the therapeutic agents clear, the mice will revert to hemophilic state. If the primary role of coagulation in wound healing is to provide a stable platelet/fibrin plug that is loaded with thrombin, then treating hemophilic animals just prior to wound placement should restore normal wound healing. The results from this study did not support that hypothesis. Instead the results show that restoring thrombin generation only at the time of wound placement did not improve the delayed wound healing. In preliminary studies on low tissue factor mice, there also appears to be a delay in wound healing with evidence of bleeding into the granulation tissue. The current data suggests that ongoing coagulation function needs to be maintained to support a normal wound healing process.

  11. Severe hemophilia in a girl infant with mosaic Turner syndrome and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Mahdi; Bazrafshan, Asghar; Moghadam, Mohamad; Karimi, Mehran

    2016-04-01

    A 6-month-old girl was referred by an ophthalmologist because of postoperative bleeding. She was scheduled for operation because of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. Workups were done and prolonged partial thromboplastin time with normal platelet count, normal bleeding time, and prothrombin time were detected. There was negative family history of bleeding tendency in both maternal and paternal family, so at the first step, Factor XI assay was requested which was normal. Then, von Willebrand factor and factor VIII were assayed which was 127% and less than 1%, respectively. Severe factor VIII deficiency was not suspected in a girl unless in siblings of a hemophilic patient who gets married with her carrier cousin. Chromosomal study and genetic testing were requested and mosaic Turner syndrome (45 XO) with ring X (p22, 2q13) along with inversion 22 (hemizygote) was detected. Abdominal and pelvic sonography showed absence of both ovaries with presence of infantile uterus. Maternal genetic study was in favor of carrier of hemophilia (heterozygote inversion 22). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of association of Turner syndrome with severe hemophilia A and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

  12. DESCRIPTIVE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HEMOPHILIA AND OTHER COAGULATION DISORDERS IN MANSOURA , EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha ElAshry

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Hemophilia represent the most severe inherited bleeding  disorder (INB , it’s thought to affect inviduals from all geographical areas in equal frequency. In Egypt which has a population of approximately (80million consanguineous marriage are frequent, therefore autosomal recessive coagulation disorders reach a higher prevalence than in many other countries.

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological situation of hemophilia in Mansoura, Egypt ,as based on retrospective analysis of clinical records Mansoura University Children Hospital between years 2000 and 2008. The second aim was to assess the orthopedic complications and occurrence of hepatitis C in those patients and relate this status to the type of replacement therapy received prior to the study.

    The study included 72 children with hematological disorders registered from 2000 to 2008 in MUCH. The hemophilic patient was defined as a person with physician-diagnosed hemophilia A or B and a measured factor VIII or IX activity level of 30% or less. Persons with acquired inhibitors of FVIII or FIX excluded. Severity level was categorized as mild if the factor activity level was 6

  13. Gene transfer to hemophilia A mice via oral delivery of FVIII-chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Katherine; Sarkar, Rita; Raut, Sanj; Leong, Kam W

    2008-12-18

    Effective oral delivery of a non-viral gene carrier would represent a novel and attractive strategy for therapeutic gene transfer. To evaluate the potential of this approach, we studied the oral gene delivery efficacy of DNA polyplexes composed of chitosan and Factor VIII DNA. Transgene DNA was detected in both local and systemic tissues following oral administration of the chitosan nanoparticles to hemophilia A mice. Functional factor VIII protein was detected in plasma by chromogenic and thrombin generation assays, reaching a peak level of 2-4% FVIII at day 22 after delivery. In addition, a bleeding challenge one month after DNA administration resulted in phenotypic correction in 13/20 mice given 250-600 microg of FVIII DNA in chitosan nanoparticles, compared to 1/13 mice given naked FVIII DNA and 0/6 untreated mice. While further optimization would be required to render this type of delivery system practical for hemophilia A gene therapy, the findings suggest the feasibility of oral, non-viral delivery for gene medicine applications.

  14. Repeated oral administration of chitosan/DNA nanoparticles delivers functional FVIII with the absence of antibodies in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadwar, S S; Kiernan, J; Wen, J; Hortelano, G

    2010-12-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A is expensive and involves regular infusions of factor (F)VIII concentrates. The supply of functional FVIII is further compromised by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. Thus, the development of an alternative safe, cost effective, non-invasive treatment that circumvents immune response induction is desirable. To evaluate the feasibility of oral administration of chitosan nanoparticles containing FVIII DNA to provide sustainable FVIII activity in hemophilia A mice. Nanoparticles were characterized for morphology, DNA protection and transfection efficiency. Oral administration of nanoparticles containing canine FVIII in C57Bl/6 FVIII(-/-) hemophilia A mice was evaluated for biodistribution, plasma FVIII activity and phenotypic correction. Sustainable FVIII expression was elucidated after repeated nanoparticle administration. Immune responses to repeated oral nanoparticle administration were also investigated. Chitosan nanoparticles had a particle size range of 200-400 nm and protected DNA from endonuclease and pH degradation. In addition, nanoparticles transfected HEK 293 cells resulted in expression of eGFP, luciferase and FVIII. Hemophilia A mice that ingested chitosan nanoparticles demonstrated transient canine FVIII expression reaching > 100 mU 1 day after treatment, together with partial phenotypic correction. The delivered FVIII plasmid DNA was detected in the intestine and, to a lesser extent, in the liver. Importantly, repeated weekly administrations restored FVIII activity. Furthermore, inhibitors and non-neutralizing FVIII antibodies were not detectable. Repeat oral administration of FVIII DNA formulated in chitosan nanoparticles resulted in sustained FVIII activity in hemophilic mice, and thus may provide a non-invasive alternative treatment for hemophilia A. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  15. The Effect of Aquatic Exercise Therapy on Muscle Strength and Joint's Range of Motion in Hemophilia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Dehghadani, Mehdi; Ghias, Reza

    2013-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the effect of a period of aquatic exercise therapy on muscle strength and joints range of motion in hemophilia patients. This was a semiexperimental, pretest, post-test study with a control group. This semi-experimental study comprised twenty men suffering moderate hemophilia were selected by convenience sampling method from patients of a referral hospital. They were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups of equal number. The hemophilia patients who were referred to Sayedo-Shohada Hospital enrolled in this study. Twenty men suffering moderate hemophilia were selected using convenience sampling method and then divided randomly into intervention and control groups (10 patients in each group). Subjects of aquatic exercise therapy group underwent activity in water in three sessions (45-60 minutes) per week for 8 weeks, while the control group was only under follow-up and during this period did not experience any effective physical activity. The patients' muscle strength and joint range of motion were evaluated through standard laboratory tools, using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex, Systems III) and a standard goniometer in the beginning and at end of the study. Finally, data was analyzed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The strength of the muscles around the knee joint (to perform extension and flexion movements) increased significantly in the case group while the control group experienced a significant reduction of strength in left leg, but in right leg remarkable change was observed. Range of motion in all joints was improved in the case group, while the control group did not improve significantly. The results showed that aquatic exercise therapy can be a useful method to improve joints' strength and range of motion in hemophilia patients in order to improve their daily functioning and quality of life.

  16. Cohort Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Oliveira, Inés;

    2014-01-01

    new insights into the overall effect of introducing antiretroviral treatment in a treatment-naı ̈ve population with concomitant infection with three retroviruses (HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-1) and tuberculosis. The cohort includes patients from the HIV clinic at Hospital Nacional Sima ̃ o Mendes, the main...

  17. A novel mutation (4040-4045 nt. delA in exon 14 of the factor VIII gene causing severe hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Onsori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A is an X-linked congenital bleeding disorder caused by Factor VIII deficiency. Different mutations including point mutations, deletions, insertions and inversions have been reported in the FVIII gene, which cause hemophilia A. In the current study, with the use of conformational sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE analysis, we report a novel 1-nt deletion in the A6 sequence at codons 1328-1330 (4040-4045 nt delA occurring in exon 14 of the FVIII gene in a seven-year-old Iranian boy with severe hemophilia A. This mutation that causes frameshift and premature stop-codon at 1331 has not previously been reported in the F8 Hemophilia A Mutation, Structure, Test and Resource Site (HAMSTeRS database.

  18. Duodenal Tumor Presenting as Acquired Hemophilia in an 88-Year-Old Woman: A Clinical Case and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P. Murray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hemophilia is a rare disease, presenting with severe hemorrhage, we present a case caused by a duodenal tumor, the clinical management, ethical implications, treatment recommendations, and a review of the literature.

  19. Antihemophilic factor (recombinant) plasma/albumin-free method for the management and prevention of bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia A

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Steven PipeDepartment of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Hemophilia is a rare genetic bleeding disorder that, if not adequately controlled, is associated with life-threatening bleeding events and serious and costly complications, primarily from joint damage. The advent of effective clotting factor replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia is considered one of the foremost medical advances of the 20th century. The last 3 decades ...

  20. Assessment of the frequency of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+CD127-) in children with hemophilia A: relation to factor VIII inhibitors and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Asrar, Mohamed Abo; Hamed, Ahmed El-Saeed; Darwish, Yasser Wagih; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Ismail, Noha Ali

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing evidence showed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in tolerance to coagulation factors and may be involved in the pathogenesis of inhibitor formation in patients with hemophilia. We determined the percentage of Tregs (CD4CD25CD127) in 45 children with hemophilia A compared with 45 healthy controls, and assessed their relation to the clinical characteristics of patients and factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. Patients were studied stressing on frequency of bleeding attacks, joint pain, history of viral hepatitis, and the received therapy (FVIII precipitate/cryotherapy). FVIII activity and FVIII inhibitors were assessed with flow cytometric analysis of CD4CD25CD127 Tregs. According to residual FVIII activity levels, 30 patients (66.7%) had mild/moderate hemophilia A, whereas 15 (33.3%) patients had severe hemophilia A. The frequency of Tregs was significantly lower among all patients with hemophilia A compared with controls (2.59 ± 1.1 versus 3.73 ± 1.12%; P = 0.002). Tregs were significantly decreased among patients with FVIII inhibitors compared with the inhibitor-negative group (P hemophilia A had lower Tregs levels than those without (P = 0.34 and P = 0.011, respectively). A significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of Tregs and FVIII among hemophilia A patients. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of Tregs at 1.91% could differentiate patients with and without FVIII inhibitors, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 91.3%. We suggest that alteration in the frequency of Tregs in young patients with hemophilia A may contribute to inhibitor formation and disease severity.

  1. Anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine microenvironment mediated by IL-4 and IL-10 coordinates the immune response in hemophilia A patients infected chronically with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, João Paulo; Chaves, Daniel Gonçalves; Araújo, Ana Ruth Silva; de Araújo, Erbênia Maria Martins; da Silva Fraporti, Liziara; Neves, Walter Luiz Lima; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; Torres, Katia Luz; Gentz, Solange Henschke Lima; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Malheiro, Adriana

    2013-06-01

    In the past decades patients with hemophilia were infected commonly by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and a significant number of patients are infected chronically. Focusing on the role of the immune system for controlling and or maintaining HCV infection, the leukocyte and cytokine profiles of peripheral blood from hemophilia A patients and other patients with and without HCV infection were studied. The results demonstrated that hemophilia A is characterized by a general state of circulating leukocytes activation along with an overall increase in the frequency of IL-6 and IL-10 with decrease of IL-8 and IL-12. HCV infection of patients with hemophilia A does not influence further the activation state of circulating leukocytes but is accompanied by lower levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) and a prominent anti-inflammatory/regulatory serum cytokine pattern, mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Additionally, the results demonstrated that hemophilia A patients infected with HCV displaying No/Low antibody response to C33c and C22 have significant lower viral load and higher serum levels of IL-12 and IL-4. This finding suggests that the differential RIBA reactivity to C33c/C22 HCV core proteins may have a putative value as a prognostic biomarker for the infection in hemophilia A patients.

  2. Hemophilia A gene therapy via intraosseous delivery of factor VIII-lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Carol H

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of hemophilia A (HemA) patients with repeated infusions of factor VIII (FVIII; abbreviated as F8 in constructs) is costly, inconvenient, and incompletely effective. In addition, approximately 25 % of treated patients develop anti-factor VIII immune responses. Gene therapy that can achieve long-term phenotypic correction without the complication of anti-factor VIII antibody formation is highly desired. Lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in stable integration of FVIII gene into the host genome, leading to persistent therapeutic effect. However, ex vivo HSC gene therapy requires pre-conditioning which is highly undesirable for hemophilia patients. The recently developed novel methodology of direct intraosseous (IO) delivery of LVs can efficiently transduce bone marrow cells, generating high levels of transgene expression in HSCs. IO delivery of E-F8-LV utilizing a ubiquitous EF1α promoter generated initially therapeutic levels of FVIII, however, robust anti-FVIII antibody responses ensued neutralized functional FVIII activity in the circulation. In contrast, a single IO delivery of G-FVIII-LV utilizing a megakaryocytic-specific GP1bα promoter achieved platelet-specific FVIII expression, leading to persistent, partial correction of HemA in treated animals. Most interestingly, comparable therapeutic benefit with G-F8-LV was obtained in HemA mice with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. Platelets is an ideal IO delivery vehicle since FVIII stored in α-granules of platelets is protected from high-titer anti-FVIII antibodies; and that even relatively small numbers of activated platelets that locally excrete FVIII may be sufficient to promote efficient clot formation during bleeding. Additionally, combination of pharmacological agents improved transduction of LVs and persistence of transduced cells and transgene expression. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV can generate long-term stable

  3. Analysis of factor VIII gene inversions in 164 unrelated hemophilia A families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vnencak-Jones, L.; Phillips, J.A. III; Janco, R.L. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive disease with variable phenotype and both heterogeneous and wide spread mutations in the factor VIII (F8) gene. As a result, diagnostic carrier or prenatal testing often relies upon laborious DNA linkage analysis. Recently, inversion mutations resulting from an intrachromosomal recombination between DNA sequences in one of two A genes {approximately}500 kb upstream from the F8 gene and a homologous A gene in intron 22 of the F8 gene were identified and found in 45% of severe hemophiliacs. We have analyzed banked DNA collected since 1986 from affected males or obligate carrier females representing 164 unrelated hemophilia A families. The disease was sporadic in 37%, familial in 54% and in 10% of families incomplete information was given. A unique deletion was identified in 1/164, a normal pattern was observed in 110/164 (67%), and 53/164 (32%) families had inversion mutations with 43/53 (81%) involving the distal A gene (R3 pattern) and 10/53 (19%) involving the proximal A gene (R2 pattern). While 19% of all rearrangements were R2, in 35 families with severe disease (< 1% VIII:C activity) all 16 rearrangements seen were R3. In 18 families with the R3 pattern and known activities, 16 (89%) had levels < 1%, with the remaining 2 families having {le} 2.4% activity. Further, 18 referrals specifically noted the production of inhibitors and 8/18 (45%) had the R3 pattern. Our findings demonstrate that the R3 inversion mutation patterns is (1) only seen with VIII:C activity levels of {le} 2.4%, (2) seen in 46% of families with severe hemophilia, (3) seen in 45% of hemophiliacs known to have inhibitors, (4) not correlated with sporadic or familial disease and (5) not in disequilibrium with the Bcl I or Taq I intron 18 or ST14 polymorphisms. Finally, in families positive for an inversion mutation, direct testing offers a highly accurate and less expensive alternative to DNA linkage analysis.

  4. Half-life extended factor VIII for the treatment of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, A

    2015-06-01

    Prophylactic infusion of factor VIII (FVIII) prevents joint bleeding and other hemorrhages in patients with hemophilia A. Conventional FVIII concentrates have a short half-life, with an average of about 12 h in adults, ranging in individual patients between 6 and 24 h, and even shorter in younger children. Therefore, effective prophylaxis requires frequent intravenous injection, usually three times per week or every other day. Several technologies are currently under investigation to extend the half-life of FVIII, including Fc fusion (Eloctate, Elocta, efmoroctocog alfa), addition of polyethylene glycol (turoctocog alfa pegol [N8-GP], BAY 94-9027, BAX 855), and a single-chain construct (CSL627). This review summarizes characteristics of products in clinical development and discusses their potential benefits.

  5. The role of physical therapy and rehabilitation in the management of hemophilia in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, Lily; Buzzard, Brenda B

    2005-11-01

    Without replacement therapy, patients with severe hemophilia (PWH) will have five damaged joints by the age of 20, which lead to limitation of activities and prevent normal participation in society. Of all PWH, 80% live in developing countries, where access to factor replacement is limited. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation help to prevent disabilities, stimulate activities and participation, and help to preserve autonomy. Rehabilitation should be organized by creating awareness that physiotherapy and rehabilitation (next to availability of safe clotting factor) are very important in developing countries. Locally available medical and social systems and materials should be used for both education and aids and adaptations. Trainers must be trained to develop local treatment protocols. PWH and their families need to be educated and trained to do exercises. Important treatment modalities are management of pain, active muscle strengthening exercises, combined measures and exercises to regain range of motion, training proprioception and coordination, functional training, and orthotics and shoe adaptations.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial infarction during prothrombin complex concentrate therapy of hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, D.R. [Dept. of Radiology, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Winchester, P.H. [Dept. of Radiology, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Brill, P.W. [Dept. of Radiology, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Ramirez, E. [Dept. of Radiology, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1997-03-01

    In patients with hemophilia, prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) have been successfully used to bypass inhibitors to fctor VIII during bleeding episodes. The use of PCCS, including FEIBA (factor eight inhibitor bypassing activity), has been associated with thromboembolic complications. Myocardial infarction (MI) is a rare but serious complication, reported in 13 previous cases, six in the pediatric age group. In all four patients who died during the acute MI, autopsy revealed extensive myocardial hemorrhage. The hearts of three other patients examined at least 5 months after the acute MI showed no evidence of prior hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been shown to be able to evaluate the sequelae of myocardial infarction in adults with coronary artery disease and in children with Kawasaki syndrome. We report the first case of the used of MR imaging in the evaluation of myocardial damage during the acute stage of a FEIBA-associated MI in a 10-year-old boy. (orig.)

  7. Modeling of hemophilia A using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells derived from urine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bei; Chen, Shen; Zhao, Zhiju; Liu, Pengfei; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Du, Juan; Wu, Changwei; Chen, Qianyu; Cai, Xiujuan; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Yanhong; Pei, Duanqing; Zhong, Mei; Pan, Guangjin

    2014-07-11

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a severe, congenital bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII). For years, traditional laboratory animals have been used to study HA and its therapies, although animal models may not entirely mirror the human pathophysiology. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can undergo unlimited self-renewal and differentiate into all cell types. This study aims to generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific iPSCs that differentiate into disease-affected hepatocyte cells. These hepatocytes are potentially useful for in vitro disease modeling and provide an applicable cell source for autologous cell therapy after genetic correction. In this study, we mainly generated iPSCs from urine collected from HA patients with integration-free episomal vectors PEP4-EO2S-ET2K containing human genes OCT4, SOX2, SV40LT and KLF4, and differentiated these iPSCs into hepatocyte-like cells. We further identified the genetic phenotype of the FVIII genes and the FVIII activity in the patient-specific iPSC derived hepatic cells. HA patient-specific iPSCs (HA-iPSCs) exhibited typical pluripotent properties evident by immunostaining, in vitro assays and in vivo assays. Importantly, we showed that HA-iPSCs could differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells and the HA-iPSC-derived hepatocytes failed to produce FVIII, but otherwise functioned normally, recapitulating the phenotype of HA disease in vitro. HA-iPSCs, particular those generated from the urine using a non-viral approach, provide an efficient way for modeling HA in vitro. Furthermore, HA-iPSCs and their derivatives serve as an invaluable cell source that can be used for gene and cell therapy in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intraosseous delivery of lentiviral vectors targeting factor VIII expression in platelets corrects murine hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(+) hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency.

  9. Enhanced factor VIII heavy chain for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lingxia; Lu, Hui; Wang, Jinhui; Sarkar, Rita; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Hongli; High, Katherine A; Xiao, Weidong

    2009-03-01

    Hemophilia A gene therapy using recombinant adenovirus-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been hampered by the size of the factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA. Previously, splitting the FVIII coding sequence into a heavy-chain (HC) fragment and a light-chain (LC) fragment for dual recombinant AAV vector delivery has been successfully explored. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is a "chain imbalance" problem in which LC secretion is approximately 1-2 logs higher than that of HC, and therefore, the majority of protein synthesized is nonfunctional. To improve HC secretion, we constructed alternate FVIII HCs based on our observation that LC facilitates HC secretion. To our surprise, most of the new HC molecules exhibited enhanced expression over the traditional HC molecule (HC(745)). The optimized HC mutein, HC(HL), including additional acidic-region-3 (ar3) sequences, exhibited three- to fivefold higher activity in both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) assay in in vitro testing. Further characterization suggested ar3 sequences increased HC secretion, rather than promoting HC synthesis. Intravenous delivery of AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC or AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC achieved phenotypic correction in hemophilia A mice. Mice receiving AAV8-HC(HL)+AAV8-LC achieved three- to fourfold higher HC expression than AAV8-HC(745)+AAV8-LC, consistent with the FVIII functional assays. HC(HL) should be substituted for HC(745) in a dual AAV vector strategy due to its enhanced expression.

  10. Comparison of factor VIII transgenes bioengineered for improved expression in gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooriss, Kerry L; Denning, Gabriela; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Javazon, Elisabeth H; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent; Doering, Christopher B

    2009-05-01

    Successful gene therapy of hemophilia A depends on the sustained expression of therapeutic levels of factor VIII (fVIII). Because of mRNA instability, interactions with resident endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones, and the requirement for carbohydrate-facilitated transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, fVIII is expressed at much lower levels from mammalian cells than other proteins of similar size and complexity. A number of bioengineered forms of B domain-deleted (BDD) human fVIII have been generated and shown to have enhanced expression. Previously, we demonstrated that recombinant BDD porcine fVIII exhibits high-level expression due to specific sequence elements that increase biosynthesis via enhanced posttranslational transit through the secretory pathway. In the current study, high-expression recombinant fVIII constructs were compared directly in order to determine the relative expression of the various bioengineered fVIII transgenes. The data demonstrate that BDD porcine fVIII expression is superior to that of any of the human fVIII variant constructs tested. Mean fVIII expression of 18 units/10(6) cells/24 hr was observed from HEK-293 cells expressing a single copy of the porcine fVIII transgene, which was 36- to 225-fold greater than that of any human fVIII transgene tested. Furthermore, greater than 10-fold higher expression was observed in human cells transduced with BDD porcine fVIII versus BDD human fVIII-encoding lentiviral vectors, even at low proviral copy numbers, supporting its use over other human fVIII variants in future hemophilia A gene therapy clinical trials.

  11. Prevention and Reversal of Antibody Responses Against Factor IX in Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushrusha eNayak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intramuscular (IM administration of an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector represents a simple and safe method of gene transfer for treatment of the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B (factor IX, F.IX, deficiency. However, the approach is hampered by an increased risk of immune responses against F.IX. Previously, we demonstrated that the drug cocktail of immune suppressants rapamycin, IL-10, and a specific peptide (encoding a dominant CD4+ T cell epitope caused an induction of regulatory T cells (Treg with a concomitant apoptosis of antigen-specific effector T cells (J. Thromb. Haemost. 7:1523, 2009. This protocol was effective in preventing inhibitory antibody formation against human F.IX (hF.IX in muscle gene transfer to C3H/HeJ hemophilia B mice (with targeted F9 gene deletion. Here, we show that this protocol can also be used to reverse inhibitor formation. IM injection of AAV1-hF.IX vector resulted in inhibitors of on average 8-10 BU within 1 month. Subsequent treatment with the tolerogenic cocktail accomplished a rapid reduction of hF.IX-specific antibodies to <2 BU, which lasted for >4.5 months. Systemic hF.IX expression increased from undetectable to >200 ng/ml, and coagulation times improved. In addition, we developed an alternative prophylactic protocol against inhibitor formation that did not require knowledge of T cell epitopes, consisting of daily oral administration of rapamycin for 1-month combined with frequent, low-dose intravenous injection of hF.IX protein. Experiments in T cell receptor transgenic mice showed that the route and dosing schedule of drug administration substantially affected Treg induction. When combined with intravenous antigen administration, oral delivery of rapamycin had to be performed daily in order to induce Treg, which were suppressive and phenotypically comparable to natural Treg.

  12. MicroRNA-15b Modulates Molecular Mediators of Blood Induced Arthropathy in Hemophilia Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Dwaipayan; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of arthropathy is a major co-morbidity in patients with hemophilia. The present study was designed to study the role of a microRNA biomarker (miR-15b) in the development of joint disease. To investigate the expression profile of miR-15b during the development of arthropathy, we first isolated and studied small RNA from the acute and chronic hemarthrosis model of hemophilia A mice. We observed that miR-15b was consistently repressed (~1- to 4-fold) from the onset of joint bleeding (1, 3, 7 and 24 h) until six bleeding episodes (up to 90 days). To test if reconstitution of miR-15b modulates biomarkers of joint damage in a chronic hemarthrosis model, we administered an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 5-miR-15b vector intra-articularly alone or in combination with systemic administration of AAV2-factor VIII. miR-15b overexpression downregulated markers of angiogenesis and hypoxia (vascular epithelial growth factor α (VEGF-α) and hypoxia inducing factor 2α (HIF-2α), ~70% and ~34%, respectively) in the affected joints. In addition, the co-administration of miR-15b and factor VIII vectors reduced the levels of the chondrodegenerative matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) 1, 3, 9 and 14 (~14% to 60%) in the injured joints. These data demonstrate for the first time the role of a miR-15b in the development of hemophilic arthropathy and has implications in development of miR based therapies for joint disease. PMID:27070581

  13. MicroRNA-15b Modulates Molecular Mediators of Blood Induced Arthropathy in Hemophilia Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwaipayan Sen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of arthropathy is a major co-morbidity in patients with hemophilia. The present study was designed to study the role of a microRNA biomarker (miR-15b in the development of joint disease. To investigate the expression profile of miR-15b during the development of arthropathy, we first isolated and studied small RNA from the acute and chronic hemarthrosis model of hemophilia A mice. We observed that miR-15b was consistently repressed (~1- to 4-fold from the onset of joint bleeding (1, 3, 7 and 24 h until six bleeding episodes (up to 90 days. To test if reconstitution of miR-15b modulates biomarkers of joint damage in a chronic hemarthrosis model, we administered an adeno-associated virus (AAV 5-miR-15b vector intra-articularly alone or in combination with systemic administration of AAV2-factor VIII. miR-15b overexpression downregulated markers of angiogenesis and hypoxia (vascular epithelial growth factor α (VEGF-α and hypoxia inducing factor 2α (HIF-2α, ~70% and ~34%, respectively in the affected joints. In addition, the co-administration of miR-15b and factor VIII vectors reduced the levels of the chondrodegenerative matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs 1, 3, 9 and 14 (~14% to 60% in the injured joints. These data demonstrate for the first time the role of a miR-15b in the development of hemophilic arthropathy and has implications in development of miR based therapies for joint disease.

  14. Spectrum of mutations in CRM-positive and CRM-reduced hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinniss, M.J.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Bi, L.; Antonarakis, S.E. (John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hoyer, L.W. (American Red Cross Blood Services, Rockville, MD (United States)); Inaba, H. (Tokyo Medical College (Japan))

    1993-02-01

    Hemophilia A is due to the functional deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII, gene locus F8C). Although half the patients have no detectable FVIII protein in their plasma, the more rare patients ([approximately]5%) have normal levels of a dysfunctional FVIII and are termed cross-reacting material (CRM)-positive. More commonly ([approximately]45%), patients have plasma FVIII protein reduced to an extent roughly comparable to the level of FVIII activity and are designated CRM-reduced. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations within the F8C gene of 11 patients (6CRM-positive, 5 CRM-reduced) and identified 9 different mutations in 9 patients after analyses of all 26 exons, the promoter region, and the polyadenylation site. Six mutations have not been described previously. Five weree missense (Ser289Leu, Ser558Phe, Val634Ala, Val634Met, Asn1441Lys), and the sixth was a 3-bp deletion ([Delta]Phe652). A review of the literature and the assay of FVIII antigen in 5 hemophilia A patients with previously identified missense mutations from this laboratory yielded a total of 20 other unique CRM-reduced and CRM-positive mutations. Almost all CRM-positive/reduced mutations (24/26) were missense, and many (12/26) occurred at CpG dinucleotides. We examined 19 missense mutation for evolutionary conservation using the portions of the porcine and murine F8C sequences that are known, and 18/19 amino acid residue altered by mutation in these patients wer conserved. Almost 50% of mutations (11/26) clustered in the A2 domain, suggesting that this region is critical for the function of FVIII. The results indicate a nonrandom distribution of mutations and suggest that mutations in a limited number of FVIII regions may cause CRM-positive and CRM-reduced heomphilia A. 48 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Analysis of inversions in the factor VIII gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients and families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, M.; Tizzano, E.; Baiget, M. [Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Altisent, C. [Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    Intron 22 is the largest intron of the factor VIII gene and contains a CpG island from which two additional transcripts originate. One of these transcripts corresponds to the F8A gene which have telomeric extragenic copies in the X chromosome. An inversion involving homologous recombination between the intragenic and the distal or proximal copies of the F8A gene has been recently described as a common cause of severe hemophilia A (HA). We analyzed intron 22 rearrangements in 195 HA patients (123 familial and 72 sporadic cases). According to factor VIII levels, our sample was classified as severe in 114 cases, moderate in 29 cases and mild in 52 cases. An intron 22 (F8A) probe was hybridized to Southern blots of BcII digested DNA obtained from peripheral blood. A clear pattern of altered bands identifies distal or proximal inversions. We detected an abnormal pattern identifying an inversion in 49 (25%) of the analyzed cases. 43% of severe HA patients (49 cases) showed an inversion. As expected, no inversion was found in the moderate and mild group of patients. We found a high proportion (78%) of the distal rearrangement. From 49 identified inversions, 33 were found in familial cases (27%), while the remaining 15 were detected in sporadic patients (22%) in support that this mutational event occurs with a similar frequency in familial or sporadic cases. In addition, we detected a significant tendency of distal inversion to occur more frequently in familial cases than in sporadic cases. Inhibitor development to factor VIII was documented in approximately 1/3 of the patients with inversion. The identification of such a frequent molecular event in severe hemophilia A patients has been applied in our families to carrier and prenatal diagnosis, to determine the origin of the mutation in the sporadic cases and to detect the presence of germinal mosaicism.

  16. Characteristics of hemophilia patients with factor VIII inhibitors detected by prospective screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Connie H.; Rice, Anne S.; Boylan, Brian; Payne, Amanda B.; Kelly, Fiona M.; Escobar, Miguel A.; Gill, Joan; Leissinger, Cindy; Soucie, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Characteristics of inhibitors identified by prospective screening may differ from those detected clinically. In a prospective study at 17 hemophilia centers with central inhibitor measurement by Nijmegen-Bethesda assay, 23 (2.8%) of 824 hemophilia A patients had new inhibitors detected: nine high-titer inhibitors (HTI: 7 ≥5.0 NBU plus 2 of 2.6 and 3.4 NBU at immune tolerance induction initiation) and 14 low-titer inhibitors (LTI: 0.5–1.9 NBU). HTI occurred at an earlier age (median 2 years, range 1–18, vs. median 11 years, range 2–61, P = 0.016). Both HTI (22%) and LTI (43%) occurred in non-severe patients. All HTI, but only 64% of LTI, were found to be FVIII-specific by chromogenic Bethesda assay or fluorescence immunoassay (FLI), indicating a high rate of false-positive LTI. Repeat specimens confirmed all HTI, 7/9 LTI, and 7/7 FVIII-specific LTI. FLI results were similar between HTI and FVIII-specific LTI; all included IgG1 and IgG4 subclasses. A comparable prospective study conducted from 1975 to 1979 at 13 U.S. centers found 31 (2.4%) new inhibitors among 1,306 patients. In both studies, one-third of inhibitors occurred in non-severe patients and one-quarter after 150 exposure days (ED). Significant differences were seen in the age at which inhibitors occurred (median 16 years in the older study vs. 5 years currently, P = 0.024) and in ED before inhibitor development, 10% in the older study and 43% currently study occurring within 20 ED, suggesting a temporal change in inhibitor development. Prospective screening detects inhibitors in patients of all severities, ages, and ED. Some LTI, however, are false positives. PMID:26147783

  17. Cohort description

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Thomas Meinertz; Ebstrup, Jeanette Frost; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    that, after appropriate medical assessment, cannot be explained in terms of a conventional medical or surgical disease. FSS are frequent and the clinical importance varies from vague symptoms to extreme disability. No well-described medical explanations exist for FSS, and how to delimit FSS remains...... a controversial topic. The specific aims with the cohort were to test delimitations of FSS, estimate prevalence and incidence rates, identify risk factors, delimitate the pathogenic pathways, and explore the consequences of FSS. The study population comprises a random sample of 9,656 men and women aged 18...

  18. Unusual Initial Manifestation of Acquired Hemophilia A: A Normal Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time, Intramuscular Hematoma and Cerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyama, Nobuaki; Ichiba, Toshihisa; Naito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of acquired hemophilia A with a normal activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT), intramuscular hematoma and cerebral hemorrhage occurring in a 73-year-old man. The patient visited our emergency department with gait disturbance, pain and swelling in his right leg. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed intramuscular hematoma and intracranial hemorrhage. The results of initial coagulation studies were normal, but repeated coagulation studies revealed an isolated prolongation of the aPTT. Additional laboratory tests confirmed the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A. If the initial aPTT is normal, we should therefore repeat the aPTT and also perform other coagulation studies including a mixing study, factor VIII level and inhibitor, to investigate the underlying diseases in elderly patients with spontaneous hemorrhaging of unknown etiology. PMID:27853081

  19. Successful Endoscopic Injection Sclerotherapy of High-Risk Gastroesophageal Varices in a Cirrhotic Patient with Hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Fukumoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old man with hemophilia A and liver cirrhosis caused by hepatitis C virus was referred to our hospital to receive prophylactic endoscopic treatment for gastroesophageal varices (GOV. He had large, tense, and winding esophageal varices (EV with cherry red spots extending down to lesser curve, predicting the likelihood of bleeding. Esophageal endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS was performed with a total 15 mL of 5% ethanolamine oleate with iopamidol (EOI. Radiographic imaging during EIS demonstrated that 5% EOI reached the afferent vein of the varices. He was administered sufficient factor VIII concentrate before and after EIS to prevent massive bleeding from the varices. Seven days after EIS, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE showed that the varices were eradicated almost completely. Eighteen months after EIS, the varices continued to diminish. We report a successful case of safe and effective EIS for GOV in a high-risk cirrhotic patient with hemophilia A.

  20. Recombinant B domain deleted porcine factor VIII for the treatment of bleeding episodes in adults with acquired hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomperts, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Hemophilia A is an inherited deficiency of clotting factor VIII (FVIII) often complicated by inhibitor development (CHAWI) in which neutralizing antibodies block the therapeutic benefit of replacement therapy. Inhibitors to FVIII can also be seen in an auto-immune disease known as acquired hemophilia A (AHA). 'Bypassing' therapies have been shown to provide hemostasis but dosing must be done empirically because current assays cannot measure objective markers of treatment efficacy and safety. A recombinant porcine sequence factor VIII (r-pFVIII) has been developed for the management of AHA. Preclinical, Phase I and Phase II clinical research studies in CHAWI subjects showed therapeutic potential and safety of this agent. A Phase II/III study in AHA with serious bleeding episodes shows a positive response in all subjects after administration. Based on current preclinical and clinical trial data, r-pFVIII should become the first line of treatment in the management of hemorrhage in patients with AHA.

  1. Severe Hemophilia A in a Male Old English Sheep Dog with a C→T Transition that Created a Premature Stop Codon in Factor VIII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jay N; Kloos, Mark T; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Lemoine, Nathaly; Whitford, Margaret H; Raymer, Robin A; Bellinger, Dwight A; Nichols, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    Animals with hemophilia are models for gene therapy, factor replacement, and inhibitor development in humans. We have actively sought dogs with severe hemophilia A that have novel factor VIII mutations unlike the previously described factor VIII intron 22 inversion. A male Old English Sheepdog with recurrent soft-tissue hemorrhage and hemarthrosis was diagnosed with severe hemophilia A (factor VIII activity less than 1% of normal). We purified genomic DNA from this dog and ruled out the common intron 22 inversion; we then sequenced all 26 exons. Comparing the results with the normal canine factor VIII sequence revealed a C→T transition in exon 12 of the factor VIII gene that created a premature stop codon at amino acid 577 in the A2 domain of the protein. In addition, 2 previously described polymorphisms that do not cause hemophilia were present at amino acids 909 and 1184. The hemophilia mutation creates a new TaqI site that facilitates rapid genotyping of affected offspring by PCR and restriction endonuclease analyses. This mutation is analogous to the previously described human factor VIII mutation at Arg583, which likewise is a CpG dinucleotide transition causing a premature stop codon in exon 12. Thus far, despite extensive treatment with factor VIII, this dog has not developed neutralizing antibodies (‘inhibitors’) to the protein. This novel mutation in a dog gives rise to severe hemophilia A analogous to a mutation seen in humans. This model will be useful for studies of the treatment of hemophilia. PMID:27780008

  2. Antihemophilic factor (recombinant plasma/albumin-free method for the management and prevention of bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Pipe

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Steven PipeDepartment of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Hemophilia is a rare genetic bleeding disorder that, if not adequately controlled, is associated with life-threatening bleeding events and serious and costly complications, primarily from joint damage. The advent of effective clotting factor replacement therapy for patients with hemophilia is considered one of the foremost medical advances of the 20th century. The last 3 decades of experience in hemophilia care have witnessed the effectiveness of the care of patients with hemophilia within specialized comprehensive care centers, advances in factor replacement therapies, the benefits of prophylaxis over on-demand replacement therapy, and the role of aggressive management of joint disease to prevent dysfunction. Ongoing challenges, including the management of inhibitors to factor therapies and the consequences of thousands of patients with hemophilia becoming infected with human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus in the 1980s from contaminated plasma-derived factor concentrates, have highlighted the need for vigilance with respect to clotting factor product safety, access to care, and a full complement of choice of factor replacement therapies. Advate® (antihemophilic factor [recombinant] plasma/albumin-free method [rAHF-PFM] is the first recombinant factor VIII therapy manufactured without human or animal protein additives to eliminate the risk of pathogen transmission that could be carried by these additives. Preclinical studies established bioequivalence with recombinant antihemophilic factor (Recombinate®, a product with 16 years of clinical experience. Currently licensed in 44 countries worldwide, rAHF-PFM has over 7 years of clinical research within 5 global studies supporting its safety and efficacy in the treatment of patients with hemophilia A.Keywords: factor VIII, hemophilia A, recombinant proteins, clinical

  3. Lentivirus-mediated platelet gene therapy of murine hemophilia A with pre-existing anti-FVIII immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuether, E. L.; Schroeder, J. A.; Fahs, S. A.; Cooley, B. C.; Chen, Y.; Montgomery, R. R.; Wilcox, D. A.; Shi, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The development of inhibitory antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against exogenous FVIII in a significant subset of patients with hemophilia A remains a persistent challenge to the efficacy of protein replacement therapy. Our previous studies using the transgenic approach provided proof-of-principle that platelet-specific expression could be successful for treating hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies. Objective To investigate a clinically translatable approach for platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors. Methods Platelet-FVIII expression in pre-immunized FVIIInull mice was introduced by transplantation of lentivirus-transduced bone marrow or enriched hematopoietic stem cells. FVIII expression was determined by a chromogenic assay. The transgene copy number per cell was quantitated by real time PCR. Inhibitor titer was measured by Bethesda assay. Phenotypic correction was assessed by the tail clipping assay and an electrolytic-induced venous injury model. Integration sites were analyzed by LAM-PCR. Results Therapeutic levels of platelet-FVIII expression were sustained long-term without evoking an anti-FVIII memory response in the transduced pre-immunized recipients. The tail clip survival test and the electrolytic injury model confirmed that hemostasis was improved in the treated animals. Sequential bone marrow transplants showed sustained platelet-FVIII expression resulting in phenotypic correction in pre-immunized secondary and tertiary recipients. Conclusions Lentivirus-mediated platelet-specific gene transfer improves hemostasis in hemophilic A mice with pre-existing inhibitors, indicating that this approach may be a promising strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A even in the high-risk setting of pre-existing inhibitory antibodies. PMID:22632092

  4. Complete correction of hemophilia A with adeno-associated viral vectors containing a full-size expression cassette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Chen, Lingxia; Wang, Jinhui; Huack, Bernd; Sarkar, Rita; Zhou, Shangzhen; Xu, Ray; Ding, Qiulan; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongli; Xiao, Weidong

    2008-06-01

    Hemophilia A is caused by a deficiency in the factor VIII (FVIII) gene. Constrained by limited packaging capacity, even the 4.3-kb B domain-deleted FVIII remained a challenge for delivery by a single adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector. Studies have shown that up to a 6.6-kb vector sequence may be packaged into AAV virions, which suggested an alternative strategy for hemophilia A gene therapy. To explore the usefulness of AAV vectors carrying an oversized FVIII gene, we constructed the AAV-FVIII vector under the control of a beta-actin promoter with a cytomegalovirus enhancer (CB) and a bovine growth hormone (bGH) poly(A) sequence. The CB promoter plus bGH signal was shown to be 3- to 5-fold more potent than the mini-transthyretin (TTR) promoter with a synthetic poly(A) sequence for directing FVIII expression in the liver. Despite the 5.75-kb genome size of pAAV-CB-FVIII, sufficient AAV vectors were produced for in vivo testing. Approximately 3- to 5-fold more FVIII secretion was observed in animals receiving AAV-CB-FVIII vectors than in those receiving standard-sized AAV-TTR-FVIII vectors. Both the activated partial thromboplastin time assay and the whole blood thromboelastographic analysis confirmed that AAV-FVIII vectors fully corrected the bleeding phenotype of hemophilia mice. These results suggest that AAV vectors with an oversized genome should be useful for not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also other diseases with large cDNA such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis.

  5. Issues in assessing products for the treatment of hemophilia – the intersection between efficacy, economics, and ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrugia A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Albert Farrugia,1,2 Declan Noone,3 Uwe Schlenkrich,4 Steffen Schlenkrich,5 Brian O'Mahony,3 Josephine Cassar6 1School of Surgery, QEII Medical Centre, The University of Western Australia (M509, Crawley, WA, Australia; 2College of Medicine, Medicine and Environment, Australian National University, Canberra, WA, Australia; 3Irish Haemophilia Society, Dublin, Ireland; 4Deutsche Hämophiliegesellschaft (DHG, Hamburg, Germany; 5Am Holzbiel, Erfurt-Töttleben, Germany; 6Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, WA, Australia Abstract: Following the obviation of the pathogen safety threats posed by previous generations of clotting factor concentrates for the treatment of hemophilia, the principal issue facing the patient community is timely access to adequate supplies of continuously improving therapies. The application of evidence-based medicine has enhanced the basis of hemophilia therapy, while resulting in some challenges to patient care. Increasingly, the criteria used for the approval and payment of treatment products by regulatory and reimbursement agencies, respectively, are becoming inflexible and unrealistic. This is occurring particularly in the requirements for demonstrating product efficacy. Concurrently, emerging evidence of the interpatient variability in the clinical response to therapy has led to the proposed personalization of therapeutic regimens. Possible impediments to optimal care include competitive tensions among suppliers who seek to gain label claims for reimbursement purposes, which result in clinical trial designs of, arguably, unethical design, carried out in poor countries. We synthesize these converging developments to suggest some changes to the current hemophilia treatment paradigm, which should make it more patient-centric and enable speedier access to new therapies. Keywords: hemophilia, treatment products, clinical trials, standards, reimbursement

  6. A novel cell-sheet technology that achieves durable factor VIII delivery in a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kohei; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Lillicrap, David; Shima, Midori; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Matsui, Hideto

    2013-01-01

    Gene- or cell-based therapies aimed at creating delivery systems for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) protein have emerged as promising options for hemophilia A treatment. However, several issues remain to be addressed regarding the efficacies and adverse events of these new classes of therapies. To improve an existing cell-based therapy involving the subcutaneous transplantation of FVIII-transduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs), we employed a novel cell-sheet technology that allows individual dispersed cells to form a thin and contiguous monolayer without traditional bioabsorbable scaffold matrices. Compared to the traditional methodology, our cell-sheet approach resulted in longer-term and 3-5-fold higher expression of FVIII (up to 11% of normal) in recipient hemophilia A mice that lacked a FVIII humoral immune response due to transient immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide. Histological studies revealed that the transplanted BOEC sheets were structured as flat clusters, supporting the long-term expression of therapeutic FVIII in plasma from an ectopic subcutaneous space. Our novel tissue-engineering approach using genetically modified BOEC sheets could aid in development of cell-based therapy that will allow safe and effective in vivo delivery of functional FVIII protein in patients with hemophilia A.

  7. A novel cell-sheet technology that achieves durable factor VIII delivery in a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Tatsumi

    Full Text Available Gene- or cell-based therapies aimed at creating delivery systems for coagulation factor VIII (FVIII protein have emerged as promising options for hemophilia A treatment. However, several issues remain to be addressed regarding the efficacies and adverse events of these new classes of therapies. To improve an existing cell-based therapy involving the subcutaneous transplantation of FVIII-transduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs, we employed a novel cell-sheet technology that allows individual dispersed cells to form a thin and contiguous monolayer without traditional bioabsorbable scaffold matrices. Compared to the traditional methodology, our cell-sheet approach resulted in longer-term and 3-5-fold higher expression of FVIII (up to 11% of normal in recipient hemophilia A mice that lacked a FVIII humoral immune response due to transient immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide. Histological studies revealed that the transplanted BOEC sheets were structured as flat clusters, supporting the long-term expression of therapeutic FVIII in plasma from an ectopic subcutaneous space. Our novel tissue-engineering approach using genetically modified BOEC sheets could aid in development of cell-based therapy that will allow safe and effective in vivo delivery of functional FVIII protein in patients with hemophilia A.

  8. Directed engineering of a high-expression chimeric transgene as a strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Christopher B; Denning, Gabriela; Dooriss, Kerry; Gangadharan, Bagirath; Johnston, Jennifer M; Kerstann, Keith W; McCarty, David A; Spencer, H Trent

    2009-07-01

    Human coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) is inefficiently biosynthesized in vitro and has proven difficult to express at therapeutic levels using available clinical gene-transfer technologies. Recently, we showed that a porcine and certain hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgenes demonstrate up to 100-fold greater expression than human fVIII. In this study, we extend these results to describe the use of a humanized, high-expression, hybrid human/porcine fVIII transgene that is 89% identical to human fVIII and was delivered by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemophilia A. Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-based vectors encoding the fVIII chimera efficiently transduced human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells. Cells transduced with hybrid human/porcine fVIII encoding vectors expressed fVIII at levels 6- to 100-fold greater than cells transduced with vectors encoding human fVIII. Transplantation of transduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into hemophilia A mice resulted in long-term fVIII expression at therapeutic levels despite gene therapy applications for hemophilia A to significantly increase fVIII expression levels compared to what has been previously achieved.

  9. Abnormal joint and bone wound healing in hemophilia mice is improved by extending factor IX activity after hemarthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjiang; Hua, Baolai; Livingston, Eric W; Taves, Sarah; Johansen, Peter B; Hoffman, Maureane; Ezban, Mirella; Monroe, Dougald M; Bateman, Ted A; Monahan, Paul E

    2016-12-30

    Wound healing requires interactions between coagulation, inflammation, angiogenesis, cellular migration, and proliferation. Healing in dermal wounds of hemophilia B mice is delayed when compared to hemostatically normal wild type (WT) mice, with abnormal persistence of iron deposition, inflammation, and neovascularity. We observed healing following induced joint hemorrhage in WT and factor IX (FIX) knockout (FIX(-/-)) mice, examining also parameters previously studied in an excisional skin wound model. Hemostatically normal mice tolerated this joint bleeding challenge, cleared blood from the joint, and healed with minimal pathology, even if additional autologous blood was injected intra-articularly at the time of wounding. Following hemarthrosis, joint wound healing in hemophilia B mice was impaired and demonstrated similar abnormal histologic features as previously described in hemophilic dermal wounds. Therefore, studies of pathophysiology and therapy of hemophilic joint bleeding performed in hemostatically normal animals are not likely to accurately reflect the healing defect of hemophilia. We additionally explored the hypothesis that the use of a FIX replacement protein with extended circulating FIX activity could improve synovial and osteochondral wound healing in hemophilic mice, when compared to treatment with unmodified recombinant FIX (rFIX) in the established joint bleeding model. Significantly improved synovial wound healing and preservation of normal osteochondral architecture are achieved by extending FIX activity after hemarthrosis using glycoPEGylated FIX when compared to an equivalent dose of rFIX. These results suggest that treating joint bleeding only until hemostasis is achieved may not result in optimal joint healing, which is improved by extending factor activity.

  10. Expression of human clotting factor Ⅸ mediated by recombinant lentiviral vector in cultured cells and hemophilia B mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Huanzhang; CHEN Xiaoguang; LI Feng; GONG Juli; XUE Jinglun

    2003-01-01

    To explore the expression of human clotting factor Ⅸ (hFⅨ) cDNA in vitro and the feasibility of gene therapy for hemophilia B mice mediated by recombinant lentiviral vector, a recombinant hFⅨ lentiviral vector driven by ubiquitin-C promoter, FUXW, and by ABP liver specific promoter, FAXW, was constructed respectively. Recombinant lentivirus was harvested from 293T cells by calcium phosphate-mediated transient cotransfection of three plasmids (transgene vector, CMVΔR8.2, VSV-G). hFⅨ expression was detected in supernatant of 293T, BHK and L-02 cells infected with FUXW virus, whereas higher expression of hFⅨ levels (630 ng/106 cells/48 h) was detected only in L-02 cells infected with FAXW virus. Serum hFⅨ antigen was detected in all hemophilia B mice treated with FAXW virus by tail vein injection, an efficiency level of hFⅨ was observed (45 ng/mL, approximately 1% of normal human levels), the expression lasted for more than 60 d. The results indicated that HIV-based lentiviral vectors offer a promising approach to the gene therapy of hemophilia B.

  11. Birth cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Madsen, Mia

    2009-01-01

    ; provides practical guidance on how to set-up and maintain birth cohorts for completing family-based studies in life course epidemiology; describes how to undertake appropriate statistical analyses of family-based studies and correctly interpret results from these analyses; and provides examples...... that illustrate the ways in which family-based studies can enhance our understanding of life course epidemiology. In addition, there is discussion of difficulties specific to setting up such studies in low- and middle-income countries, and issues relating to proxy informants, where parents provide information...... on children and vice versa, or siblings provide information about each other. Examples of how family-based studies have been used in understanding the life course epidemiology of cardiovascular disease, mental health, and reproductive health illustrate the applicability of the research to these areas...

  12. Hemophilia Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is hard to stop after losing a tooth. Bleeding after circumcision (surgery performed on male babies to remove the hood of skin, called the foreskin, covering the head of the penis). Bleeding after having shots, such as vaccinations. Bleeding in the ...

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation of the CHO-KLAT for boys with hemophilia in rural and urban china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Runhui

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life (QoL is increasingly recognized as an important outcome measure in clinical trials. The Canadian Hemophilia Outcomes-Kids Life Assessment Tool (CHO-KLAT shows promise for use in China. Objective To adapt the CHO-KLAT version 2.0 for use in clinical trials in China. Methods Forward and back translations of the CHO-KLAT2.0 were completed in 2008. Between October 2009 and June 2010, a series of 3 focus groups were held with 20 boys and 31 parents in rural and urban China to elicit additional concepts, important to their QoL, for the Chinese CHO-KLAT2.0. All of the items identified by boys and parents were reviewed by a group of experts, resulting in a Chinese version of the CHO-KLAT2.0. This version underwent a detailed cognitive debriefing process between October 2010 and June 2011. Thirteen patient-parent pairs participated in this cognitive debriefing process until a stable and clearly understood Chinese version of the CHO-KLAT2.0 was obtained. Results The initial back translation of the Chinese CHO-KLAT2.0 was slightly discrepant from the original English version on 12 items. These were all successfully adjudicated. The focus groups identified 9 new items that formed an add-on Socio-Economic Context (SEC module for China. Linguistic improvements were made after the 2nd, 5th, 7th and 13th cognitive debriefings pairs and affected a total of 18 items. The result was a 35 item CHO-KLAT2.0 and a SEC module in Simplified Chinese, both of which have good content validity. Conclusion This detailed process proved to be extremely valuable in ensuring the items were accurately interpreted by Chinese boys with hemophilia ages ≤18 years. The need for the additional SEC module highlighted the different context that currently exists in China with regard to hemophilia care as compared to many Western countries, and will be important in tracking progress within both rural and urban China over time. Changes based on the

  14. Joining the patient on the path to customized prophylaxis: one hemophilia team explores the tools of engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gue D

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Deborah Gue,1,2 Sandra Squire,1 Kam McIntosh,1 Claude Bartholomew,1 Nicole Summers,1 Haowei Sun,1 Ming Yang,1 Shannon Jackson1,3 1British Columbia Provincial Bleeding Disorders Program – Adult Division, St Paul’s Hospital, 2School of Nursing, 3Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Background: The relationship between hemophilia team interventions and achievement of optimal clinical outcomes remains to be elucidated. The British Columbia Hemophilia Adult Team has previously reported results of a comprehensive approach to individualize prophylaxis that has resulted in substantially reduced bleeding rates. In order to facilitate knowledge exchange and potential replication, it was important to gain a thorough understanding of the team’s approach.Methods: A focus group of the British Columbia Hemophilia Adult Team was conducted to identify specific roles and processes that might be contributing to the prophylaxis regimen outcomes in this clinic. The focus group consisted of two workshops; one to describe the individual and collective roles of the clinic team in providing clinical care and guiding patients toward individualized prophylaxis; and the other to describe the patient journey from initial contact through reaching a successful engagement with the clinic.Results: Analysis of the results revealed team roles and processes that underpinned a shared decision-making relationship with the patient with a particular focus on supporting the patient’s autonomy. Within this relationship, team focus shifts away from “adherence” toward the process whereby patients design and implement prophylaxis regimens resulting in reduction or elimination of bleeding episodes.Limitations: Using the current methodology, it is not possible to demonstrate a causal link between specific team processes and improved bleeding rates in patients.Conclusion: Through the active support of patient

  15. Bioengineered coagulation factor VIII enables long-term correction of murine hemophilia A following liver-directed adeno-associated viral vector delivery

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    Harrison C Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical data support the feasibility and safety of adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors in gene therapy applications. Despite several clinical trials of AAV-based gene transfer for hemophilia B, a unique set of obstacles impede the development of a similar approach for hemophilia A. These include (i the size of the factor VIII (fVIII transgene, (ii humoral immune responses to fVIII, (iii inefficient biosynthesis of human fVIII, and (iv AAV vector immunity. Through bioengineering approaches, a novel fVIII molecule, designated ET3, was developed and shown to improve biosynthetic efficiency 10- to 100-fold. In this study, the utility of ET3 was assessed in the context of liver-directed, AAV-mediated gene transfer into hemophilia A mice. Due to the large size of the expression cassette, AAV-ET3 genomes packaged into viral particles as partial genome fragments. Despite this potential limitation, a single peripheral vein administration of AAV-ET3 into immune-competent hemophilia A mice resulted in correction of the fVIII deficiency at lower vector doses than previously reported for similarly oversized AAV-fVIII vectors. Therefore, ET3 appears to improve vector potency and mitigate at least one of the critical barriers to AAV-based clinical gene therapy for hemophilia A.

  16. Mutation spectrum of 122 hemophilia A families from Taiwanese population by LD-PCR, DHPLC, multiplex PCR and evaluating the clinical application of HRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chieh-Ting

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemophilia A represents the most common and severe inherited hemorrhagic disorder. It is caused by mutations in the F8 gene, which leads to a deficiency or dysfunctional factor VIII protein, an essential cofactor in the factor X activation complex. Methods We used long-distance polymerase chain reaction and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography for mutation scanning of the F8 gene. We designed the competitive multiplex PCR to identify the carrier with exonal deletions. In order to facilitate throughput and minimize the cost of mutation scanning, we also evaluated a new mutation scanning technique, high resolution melting analysis (HRM, as an alternative screening method. Results We presented the results of detailed screening of 122 Taiwanese families with hemophilia A and reported twenty-nine novel mutations. There was one family identified with whole exons deletion, and the carriers were successfully recognized by multiplex PCR. By HRM, the different melting curve patterns were easily identified in 25 out of 28 cases (89% and 15 out of 15 (100% carriers. The sensitivity was 93 % (40/43. The overall mutation detection rate of hemophilia A was 100% in this study. Conclusion We proposed a diagnostic strategy for hemophilia A genetic diagnosis. We consider HRM as a powerful screening tool that would provide us with a more cost-effective protocol for hemophilia A mutation identification.

  17. Analysis of Intron 22 Inversion Mutation of Factor Ⅷ Gene in the Patients with Hemophilia A in J&K State of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parvinder Kumer; Mohammed Idris; Vikas Dogra; K. Radha Mani; Kulbhushan Singh Jamwal; Wahied Khawar Balwan; T. R. Raina; G. R. Chandak; Subash Gupta

    2005-01-01

    Objective Hemophilia A, an X-linked bleeding disorder, affecting 1 in 5 000 males is caused by heterogeneous mutations in factor Ⅷ gene. Inversion mutation in intron 22 of F8C gene remains its leading cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of the intron 22-inversion mutation in the patients and in the family members in the region. Methods 29 hemophilia A patients from Jammu and Kashmir (20 severe, 8 moderate and 1 mild) were analyzed for intron 22-inversion mutation. Results 11 (38%) were positive for the distal type of inversion mutation. The mutation was found in 9/20 (45%) patients with severe factor Ⅷ deficiency and 2/8 (25%) with moderate severity hemophilia A, whereas the patient with mild hemophilia A was found to be negative for inversion mutation. Evaluation of twenty-six female relatives from 11 families of inversion mutation positive patients identified one mother and one sister from one family to be the carrier, suggesting its origin in the mother. Conclusion The present study confirms the intron-22 inversion mutation in F8C gene as the major cause of hemophilia A in the population from Jammu and Kashmir with a higher frequency of inversion mutation in sporadic cases compared to the familial cases.

  18. Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hemophilia%血友病的诊断及治疗的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆英华; 曾小菁

    2015-01-01

    血友病是相对罕见的遗传性出血性疾病,患者可因反复关节出血导致关节畸形、关节残疾甚至于重要脏器出血危及生命,因此,对血友病的认识、诊断、治疗尤为重要。该文对近年来血友病的基因诊断、治疗方面的进展进行总结。%Hemophilia is a relatively rare hereditary bleeding disorder , the patient may be due to repeated joint bleeds lead to joint deformity , joint disability and even life-threatening bleeding in vital organs , so hemophilia awareness , diagnosis and treatment is important . In this paper, recent advances in genetic diagnosis of hemophilia , treatment of summarizing .

  19. 无义突变在血友病的研究进展%The Adavance of Research on Relationship Between Nonsense Mutation and Hemophilia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耀方

    2010-01-01

    @@ 血友病(hemophilia)是一组由于凝血因子Ⅷ、Ⅸ(FⅧ、FⅨ)基因缺陷致血浆中FⅧ或FⅨ含量不足或功能缺陷,引起凝血障碍而出血的疾病.包括血友病A(hemophilia A,HA)和血友病B(hemophilia B,HB),是临床较常见的遗传性出血性疾病,约占先天性出血性疾病的85%.临床以幼年发病、自发或轻度外伤后关节腔和深部肌肉反复出血为特征.社会人群发病率为5~10/10万,婴儿发生率约为1/5 000[1].

  20. Freeman-Sheldon Syndrome Associated with Hemophilia-A in a Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Tanyeri Bayraktar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS (whistling face is a congenital autosomal dominant disease (rarely described in its autosomal recessive form characterized by small “whistling” mouth, a flat mask-like face, joint contractures (commonly involving the fingers and hands and underdevelopment of the nasal cartilage. Other clinical features include full forehead, deep set eyes, epicanthal folds, high palate, H-shaped cutaneous dimpling on the chin, ulnar deviation of the hands, seizures, and dislocation of the hip. A 10-day-old male newborn was admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit with jaundice and hyperthermia. He had fever of 42.5°C, small whistling mouth, a flat mask-like face, joint contractures of the fingers, and ulnar deviation of the hands. The parents were consanguineous and one of the boys died when he was 1 years old due to intracranial hemorrhage. To our knowledge, there have been more than 60 cases diagnosed with FSS. This is the first reported case of Freeman-Sheldon syndrome associated with hemophilia A and the second case of FSS associated with fever without anesthesia.

  1. Strategies to target long-lived plasma cells for treating hemophilia A inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao Lien; Lyle, Meghan J; Shin, Simon C; Miao, Carol H

    2016-03-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) can persistently produce anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies which disrupt therapeutic effect of FVIII in hemophilia A patients with inhibitors. The migration of plasma cells to BM where they become LLPCs is largely controlled by an interaction between the chemokine ligand CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4. AMD3100 combined with G-CSF inhibit their interactions, thus facilitating the mobilization of CD34(+) cells and blocking the homing of LLPCs. These reagents were combined with anti-CD20 to reduce B-cells and the specific IL-2/IL-2mAb (JES6-1) complexes to induce Treg expansion for targeting anti-FVIII immune responses. Groups of mice primed with FVIII plasmid and protein respectively were treated with the combined regimen for six weeks, and a significant reduction of anti-FVIII inhibitor titers was observed, associated with the dramatic decrease of circulating and bone marrow CXCR4(+) plasma cells. The combination regimens are highly promising in modulating pre-existing anti-FVIII antibodies in FVIII primed subjects.

  2. Identification of FVIII gene mutations in patients with hemophilia A using new combinatorial sequencing by hybridization

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    Chetta M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard methods of mutation detection are time consuming in Hemophilia A (HA rendering their application unavailable in some analysis such as prenatal diagnosis. Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of combinatorial sequencing-by-hybridization (cSBH as an alternative and reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene. Patients/Methods: We have applied a new method of cSBH that uses two different colors for detection of multiple point mutations in the FVIII gene. The 26 exons encompassing the HA gene were analyzed in 7 newly diagnosed Italian patients and in 19 previously characterized individuals with FVIII deficiency. Results: Data show that, when solution-phase TAMRA and QUASAR labeled 5-mer oligonucleotide sets mixed with unlabeled target PCR templates are co-hybridized in the presence of DNA ligase to universal 6-mer oligonucleotide probe-based arrays, a number of mutations can be successfully detected. The technique was reliable also in identifying a mutant FVIII allele in an obligate heterozygote. A novel missense mutation (Leu1843Thr in exon 16 and three novel neutral polymorphisms are presented with an updated protocol for 2-color cSBH. Conclusions: cSBH is a reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene and may represent a complementary method for the genetic screening of HA patients.

  3. Circumventing furin enhances factor VIII biological activity and ameliorates bleeding phenotypes in hemophilia models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siner, Joshua I.; Samelson-Jones, Benjamin J.; Crudele, Julie M.; French, Robert A.; Lee, Benjamin J.; Zhou, Shanzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.

    2016-01-01

    Processing by the proprotein convertase furin is believed to be critical for the biological activity of multiple proteins involved in hemostasis, including coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). This belief prompted the retention of the furin recognition motif (amino acids 1645–1648) in the design of B-domain–deleted FVIII (FVIII-BDD) products in current clinical use and in the drug development pipeline, as well as in experimental FVIII gene therapy strategies. Here, we report that processing by furin is in fact deleterious to FVIII-BDD secretion and procoagulant activity. Inhibition of furin increases the secretion and decreases the intracellular retention of FVIII-BDD protein in mammalian cells. Our new variant (FVIII-ΔF), in which this recognition motif is removed, efficiently circumvents furin. FVIII-ΔF demonstrates increased recombinant protein yields, enhanced clotting activity, and higher circulating FVIII levels after adeno-associated viral vector–based liver gene therapy in a murine model of severe hemophilia A (HA) compared with FVIII-BDD. Moreover, we observed an amelioration of the bleeding phenotype in severe HA dogs with sustained therapeutic FVIII levels after FVIII-ΔF gene therapy at a lower vector dose than previously employed in this model. The immunogenicity of FVIII-ΔF did not differ from that of FVIII-BDD as a protein or a gene therapeutic. Thus, contrary to previous suppositions, FVIII variants that can avoid furin processing are likely to have enhanced translational potential for HA therapy. PMID:27734034

  4. [Establishment of hemophilia A patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells with urine cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiqing; Hu, Xuyun; Pang, Jialun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin Peng, Siyuan; Li, Zhuo; Wu, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induce endothelial differentiation. METHODS Tubular epithelial cells were isolated and cultured from the urine of HA patients. The iPSCs were generated by forced expression of Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4) using retroviruses and characterized by cell morphology, pluripotent marker staining and in vivo differentiation through teratoma formation. Induced endothelial differentiation of the iPSCs was achieved with the OP9 cell co-culture method. RESULTS Patient-specific iPSCs were generated from urine cells of the HA patients, which could be identified by cell morphology, pluripotent stem cell surface marker staining and in vivo differentiation of three germ layers. The teratoma experiment has confirmed that such cells could differentiate into endothelial cells expressing the endothelial-specific markers CD144, CD31 and vWF. CONCLUSION HA patient-specific iPSCs could be generated from urine cells and can differentiate into endothelial cells. This has provided a new HA disease modeling approach and may serve as an applicable autologous cell source for gene correction and cell therapy studies for HA.

  5. User-centered requirements engineering in health information systems: a study in the hemophilia field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonor; Ferreira, Carlos; Santos, Beatriz Sousa

    2012-06-01

    The use of sophisticated information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the health care domain is a way to improve the quality of services. However, there are also hazards associated with the introduction of ICTs in this domain and a great number of projects have failed due to the lack of systematic consideration of human and other non-technology issues throughout the design or implementation process, particularly in the requirements engineering process. This paper presents the methodological approach followed in the design process of a web-based information system (WbIS) for managing the clinical information in hemophilia care, which integrates the values and practices of user-centered design (UCD) activities into the principles of software engineering, particularly in the phase of requirements engineering (RE). This process followed a paradigm that combines a grounded theory for data collection with an evolutionary design based on constant development and refinement of the generic domain model using three well-known methodological approaches: (a) object-oriented system analysis; (b) task analysis; and, (c) prototyping, in a triangulation work. This approach seems to be a good solution for the requirements engineering process in this particular case of the health care domain, since the inherent weaknesses of individual methods are reduced, and emergent requirements are easier to elicit. Moreover, the requirements triangulation matrix gives the opportunity to look across the results of all used methods and decide what requirements are critical for the system success.

  6. Many factor VIII products available in the treatment of hemophilia A: an embarrassment of riches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieuw, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a common bleeding disorder caused by the deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII) with an incidence of ~1 in 5000 male births. Replacement of FVIII is necessary to prevent and treat bleeding episodes. However, with multiple new drugs in addition to old standards, choosing among the different FVIII treatment options is harder than ever. There are FVIII products that are plasma derived or recombinant, FVIII products designed to extend the half-life of FVIII, and the first single-chain FVIII product, recombinant factor VIII single chain (rFVIII-SC). As development of inhibitors to FVIII continues to be a major problem in the care of HA patients, recent studies showing lower rates of inhibitor development with plasma-derived FVIIII products versus recombinant FVIII products have made choosing among the many options now available even more complex. Although still unproven, extended half-life (EHL) products may provide the hope of decreased immunogenicity but need further testing in previously untreated patients (PUPs). This review highlights some of the differences between FVIII products currently available and hopefully assists the clinician to decide which FVIII product to choose for their patients.

  7. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W; Walters, Eric M; Butler, Stephen P; Whyte, Jeff J; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D; Samuel, Melissa S; Murphy, Cliff N; Wells, Kevin D; Masiello, Nick C; Prather, Randall S; Velander, William H

    2015-09-21

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock.

  8. Supporting the need for home care by mothers of children with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergün, Sibel; Sülü, Esma; Başbakkal, Zümrüt

    2011-10-01

    This research is a descriptive study that took place in Turkey and was intended to determine the difficulties experienced by mothers of children with hemophilia in maintaining their care at home and establishing appropriate interventions. Research data were collected using a survey prepared by the researchers after reviewing the existing literature. The survey contained 2 sections: (a) questions about the mothers' sociodemographic data and (b) 5 questions about the difficulties that mothers with hemophiliac children experience. Mothers were observed to have not received education about accidents and first aid and were afraid that their child would have an accident (55%); they experienced difficulty finding medications (75%); they felt they needed healthcare personnel during medication administration (85%); and they were sad that their child was ill (80%). Pediatric haematology nurses should strive to educate mothers with hemophiliac children about the disease and how to deal with accidents, first aid, and medication administration; home care services should be organized and made available for all hemophiliac children and their families.

  9. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH2 registry, a multicenter, pan-European, Web-based database, reports current patient management. The aim was to assess the control of first bleeding episodes treated with a bypassing agent (rFVIIa or aPCC), FVIII, or DDAVP among 501 registered patients. Of 482 patients with one or more bleeding episodes, 144 (30%) received no treatment for bleeding; 31 were treated with symptomatic therapy only. Among 307 patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent, 174 (56.7%) received rFVIIa, 63 (20.5%) aPCC, 56 (18.2%) FVIII, and 14 (4.6%) DDAVP. Bleeding was controlled in 269 of 338 (79.6%) patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent or ancillary therapy alone. Propensity score matching was applied to allow unbiased comparison between treatment groups. Bleeding control was significantly higher in patients treated with bypassing agents versus FVIII/DDAVP (93.3% vs 68.3%; P = .003). Bleeding control was similar between rFVIIa and aPCC (93.0%; P = 1). Thrombotic events were reported in 3.6% of treated patients with a similar incidence between rFVIIa (2.9%) and aPCC (4.8%).

  10. Neonatal circumcision in severe haemophilia: a survey of paediatric haematologists at United States Hemophilia Treatment Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, S; Sharathkumar, A; Rodriguez, V; Chitlur, M; Valentino, L; Boggio, L; Gill, J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal circumcision in patients with severe haemophilia has not been well studied. We performed a survey of paediatric haematologists from Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC) across the United States to better understand the attitudes toward and management of neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients. Response rate to our survey was 40% (n = 64/159). Thirty-eight percent of respondents (n = 24) said that they would allow this procedure in the newborn period but in many cases this was against medical advice. The most reported concern regarding neonatal circumcision in haemophilia patients was the risk of development of an inhibitor (n = 25; 39%) followed by the concern for bleeding (n = 22; 34%) and issues related to vascular access in the neonate (n = 11; 17%). All respondents recommended at least one preprocedure dose of factor replacement. Twenty-two percent (n = 14) of respondents did not use more than one dose of factor replacement but 32% (n = 21) used 1-2 postoperative doses. The remainder of paediatric haematologists surveyed recommended between 3-5 (16%; n = 10) and 6-10 (3%, n = 2) additional days postoperatively. There was wide variation in both techniques of circumcision as well as adjuvant haemostatic agents used. Only 22% of respondents said that they had an established protocol for management of circumcision in the newborn haemophilia patient. These survey results highlight the need for evidence-based guidelines regarding the optimal management of circumcision in neonates with severe haemophilia.

  11. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela

    2012-07-05

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive regimen is unclear; therefore, data from 331 patients entered into the prospective EACH2 registry were analyzed. Steroids combined with cyclophosphamide resulted in more stable complete remission (70%), defined as inhibitor undetectable, factor VIII more than 70 IU/dL and immunosuppression stopped, than steroids alone (48%) or rituximab-based regimens (59%). Propensity score-matched analysis controlling for age, sex, factor VIII level, inhibitor titer, and underlying etiology confirmed that stable remission was more likely with steroids and cyclophosphamide than steroids alone (odds ratio = 3.25; 95% CI, 1.51-6.96; P < .003). The median time to complete remission was approximately 5 weeks for steroids with or without cyclophosphamide; rituximab-based regimens required approximately twice as long. Immunoglobulin administration did not improve outcome. Second-line therapy was successful in approximately 60% of cases that failed first-line therapy. Outcome was not affected by the choice of first-line therapy. The likelihood of achieving stable remission was not affected by underlying etiology but was influenced by the presenting inhibitor titer and FVIII level.

  12. Associations of quality of life, pain, and self-reported arthritis with age, employment, bleed rate, and utilization of hemophilia treatment center and health care provider services: results in adults with hemophilia in the HERO study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsyth AL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Angela L Forsyth,1 Michelle Witkop,2 Angela Lambing,3 Cesar Garrido,4 Spencer Dunn,5 David L Cooper,6 Diane J Nugent7 1BioRx, Cincinnati, OH, USA; 2Munson Medical Center, Traverse City, MI, USA; 3Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA; 4Asociacion Venezolana para la Hemofilia, Caracas, Venezuela; 5Center for Inherited Blood Disorders, Orange, CA, USA; 6Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, NJ, USA; 7Children’s Hospital of Orange County, Center for Inherited Blood Disorders, Orange, CA, USA Introduction: Severe hemophilia and subsequent hemophilic arthropathy result in joint pain and impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Assessment of HRQoL in persons with hemophilia (PWH, including underlying factors that drive HRQoL differences, is important in determining health care resource allocation and in making individualized clinical decisions.Aim: To examine potential associations between HRQoL, pain interference, and self-reported arthritis and age, employment, activity, bleed frequency, and hemophilia treatment center and health care professional utilization.Methods: PWH (age ≥18 years from ten countries completed a 5-point Likert scale on pain interference over the previous 4 weeks, the EQ-5D-3L scale (mobility, usual activities, self-care, pain/discomfort, anxiety/depression including a health-related visual analog scale (0–100, coded as an 11-point categorical response.Results: Pain interference (extreme/a lot was higher in PWH aged >40 years (31% compared to those aged 31–40 years (27% or ≤30 years (21%. In an analysis of eight countries with home treatment, PWH who reported EQ-5D mobility issues were less likely to be employed (53% vs 79%, with no mobility issues. Median annual bleed frequency increased with worsening EQ-5D pain or discomfort. The percentage of PWH with inhibitors reporting visual analog scale scores of 80–90–100 was lower (20% than those without inhibitors (34%. Median bleed frequency increased with pain

  13. [Detection of alloantibodies against Factor VIII in plasma of patients with hemophilia A and its relationship with Factor VIIIC domain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yu, Zi-Qiang; Wan, Chu-Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Hua; Ruan, Chang-Geng

    2013-10-01

    This study was purposed to detect the alloantibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) by ELISA for estimating the incidence of the alloantibodies against Factor VIII (FVIII) in patients with hemophilia A, and to investigate the relationship between factor VIIIC domain and alloantibodies. Total of 140 patients with hemophilia A and 80 normal controls were enrolled in this study, among them plasma FVIII level of 84 patients was less than 1%, plasma FVIII level of 34 patients was between 1% and 5%, and plasma FVIII level of 22 patients was more than 5%. All patients were treated with plasma-derived FVIII concentrate or plasma before. The ELISA plate was coated with McAb (SZ-132) against FVIII prepared in our laboratory, then human recombinant FVIII concentrates were applied. After incubation in room temperature for 2 hours, diluted plasma samples and HRP-conjugated goat anti-human IgG were added successively, finally A490 was recorded. The threshold of alloantibody of patient plasma was set as mean value>3 SD more than control. The plate was coated with antibody against His, then human recombinant FVIII-C1C2 prepared in our laboratory was added. After incubation in room temperature for 2 hours, diluted plasma samples and HRP-conjugated goat anti-human IgG were added successively, finally A490 were recorded. The threshold was set as the mean value>3 SD more than control. The results showed that the alloantibodies against FVIII were found in 56 patients (40%) by ELISA, and 82.1% (46/56) of this kind of alloantibody could interact with the C domain of FVIII. It is concluded that C domain of FVIII is one of the primary binding sites for the alloantibodies against FVIII in Chinese patients with hemophilia A.

  14. Characterization of Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Mediated Human Factor VIII Gene Therapy in Hemophilia A Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Jenny A; Wang, Qiang; Reicherter, Amanda L; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Tipper, Christopher H; Clark, K Reed; Wadsworth, Samuel; Wang, Lili; Wilson, James M

    2017-05-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are promising vehicles for hemophilia gene therapy, with favorable clinical trial data seen in the treatment of hemophilia B. In an effort to optimize the expression of human coagulation factor VIII (hFVIII) for the treatment of hemophilia A, an extensive study was performed with numerous combinations of liver-specific promoter and enhancer elements with a codon-optimized hFVIII transgene. After generating 42 variants of three reduced-size promoters and three small enhancers, transgene cassettes were packaged within a single AAV capsid, AAVrh10, to eliminate performance differences due to the capsid type. Each hFVIII vector was administered to FVIII knockout (KO) mice at a dose of 10(10) genome copies (GC) per mouse. Criteria for distinguishing the performance of the different enhancer/promoter combinations were established prior to the initiation of the studies. These criteria included prominently the level of hFVIII activity (0.12-2.12 IU/mL) and the pattern of development of anti-hFVIII antibodies. In order to evaluate the impact of capsid on hFVIII expression and antibody formation, one of the enhancer and promoter combinations that exhibited high hFVIII immunogenicity was evaluated using AAV8, AAV9, AAVrh10, AAVhu37, and AAVrh64R1 capsids. The capsids subdivided into two groups: those that generated anti-hFVIII antibodies in ≤20% of mice (AAV8 and AAV9), and those that generated anti-hFVIII antibodies in >20% of mice (AAVrh10, AAVhu37, and AAVrh64R1). The results of this study, which entailed extensive vector optimization and in vivo testing, demonstrate the significant impact that transcriptional control elements and capsid can have on vector performance.

  15. Whole-exome sequencing to identify genetic risk variants underlying inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Marcin M; Blighe, Kevin; Lotta, Luca A; Pappalardo, Emanuela; Garagiola, Isabella; Mancini, Ilaria; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Fasulo, Maria Rosaria; Santagostino, Elena; Peyvandi, Flora

    2016-06-09

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is the most problematic and costly complication of FVIII replacement therapy that affects up to 30% of previously untreated patients with severe hemophilia A. The development of inhibitors is a multifactorial complication involving environmental and genetic factors. Among the latter, F8 gene mutations, ethnicity, family history of inhibitors, and polymorphisms affecting genes involved in the immune response have been previously investigated. To identify novel genetic elements underling the risk of inhibitor development in patients with severe hemophilia A, we applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) and data analysis in a selected group of 26 Italian patients with (n = 17) and without (n = 9) inhibitors. WES revealed several rare, damaging variants in immunoregulatory genes as novel candidate mutations. A case-control association analysis using Cochran-Armitage and Fisher's exact statistical tests identified 1364 statistically significant variants. Hierarchical clustering of these genetic variants showed 2 distinct patterns of homozygous variants with a protective or harmful role in inhibitor development. When looking solely at coding variants, a total of 28 nonsynonymous variants were identified and replicated in 53 inhibitor-positive and 174 inhibitor-negative Italian severe hemophilia A patients using a TaqMan genotyping assay. The genotyping results revealed 10 variants showing estimated odds ratios in the same direction as in the discovery phase and confirmed the association of the rs3754689 missense variant (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.36-0.94; P = .028) in a highly conserved haplotype region surrounding the LCT locus on chromosome 2q21 with inhibitor development. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Targeting factor VIII expression to platelets for hemophilia A gene therapy does not induce an apparent thrombotic risk in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, C K; Mattson, J G; Weiler, H; Shi, Q; Montgomery, R R

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Platelet-Factor (F) VIII gene therapy is a promising treatment in hemophilia A. This study aims to evaluate if platelet-FVIII expression would increase the risk for thrombosis. Targeting FVIII expression to platelets does not induce or elevate thrombosis risk. Platelets expressing FVIII are neither hyper-activated nor hyper-responsive. Background Targeting factor (F) VIII expression to platelets is a promising gene therapy approach for hemophilia A, and is successful even in the presence of inhibitors. It is well known that platelets play important roles not only in hemostasis, but also in thrombosis and inflammation. Objective To evaluate whether platelet-FVIII expression might increase thrombotic risk and thereby compromise the safety of this approach. Methods In this study, platelet-FVIII-expressing transgenic mice were examined either in steady-state conditions or under prothrombotic conditions induced by inflammation or the FV Leiden mutation. Native whole blood thrombin generation assay, rotational thromboelastometry analysis and ferric chloride-induced vessel injury were used to evaluate the hemostatic properties. Various parameters associated with thrombosis risk, including D-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, fibrinogen, tissue fibrin deposition, platelet activation status and activatability, and platelet-leukocyte aggregates, were assessed. Results We generated a new line of transgenic mice that expressed 30-fold higher levels of platelet-expressed FVIII than are therapeutically required to restore hemostasis in hemophilic mice. Under both steady-state conditions and prothrombotic conditions induced by lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation or the FV Leiden mutation, supratherapeutic levels of platelet-expressed FVIII did not appear to be thrombogenic. Furthermore, FVIII-expressing platelets were neither hyperactivated nor hyperactivatable upon agonist activation. Conclusion We conclude that, in mice, more than 30-fold higher levels of

  17. Critical appraisal of the role of recombinant activated factor VII in the treatment of hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampaiwan Chuansumrit

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ampaiwan Chuansumrit1, Pantep Angchaisuksiri2, Nongnuch Sirachainan11Departments of Pediatrics and 2Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University,  Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: Hemophilia patients with inhibitors faced the constraint of inadequate treatment for several years before the era of recombinant factor VIIa (rFVII. Initially, rFVIIa was used in the compassionate-use programs. After a worldwide license was issued, more than 1.5 million doses were administered. Bleeding of joints and muscles was controlled effectively by means of an early home treatment program, with either a standard dose of 90 μg/kg every 2 to 3 hours for a few doses or a single dose of 270 μg/kg. For more serious bleeding episodes or minor surgery, an initial dose of 90 μg/kg was given every 2 hours for 24 to 48 hours followed by increased intervals of 3 to 6 hours according to the severity of bleeding and efficacy of bleeding control. In cases of major surgery such as orthopedic procedures, the same regimen can be applied except for a higher initial dose of 120 to 180 μg/kg. However, increasing the dose should be considered if there are unexpected bleeding complications since the half-life and clearance of rFVIIa differ between individuals. In addition, prophylaxis is administered to a small number of patients. Finally, the reported thromboembolic events found in hemophilia patients with inhibitors receiving rFVIIa are extremely low, much less than 1%.Keywords: bleeding disorder, hemophilia, inhibitor, NovoSeven, recombinant factor VIIa

  18. Factor VIII (F8) inversions in severe hemophilia A: Male germ cell origin and diagnosis with RT-PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonarakis, S.E. [Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)]|[Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rossiter, J.P. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Young, M. [Geneva Medical School (Switzerland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Factor VIII (F8) gene, which is defective in hemophilia A, is located in the most telomeric megabase of Xq. Inversions due to intrachromosomal homologous recombination between mispaired copies of gene A located within intron 22 of the gene and about 500 kb telomeric to it account for nearly half of the cases of severe hemophilia A. We hypothesized that pairing of Xq with its homolog inhibits the inversion process, and that therefore the event originates predominantly in male germ cells. In all 21 informative cases in which the inversion originated in a maternal grandparent, DNA polymorphism analysis using markers within or very closely linked to F8, determined that it occurred in the male germline. In addition, all but one of 56 mothers of sporadic cases due to inversions were carriers. The data indicate that the F8 gene inversions leading to severe hemophilia A occur almost exclusively in male germ cells. The mean age of maternal grandfathers at the birth of their carrier daughters was 29.9 years (13 cases), i.e. not different from the mean paternal age in the general population, supporting the hypothesis that the inversions occur in meiosis. The inversions can be diagnosed by Southern blot analysis. For more rapid diagnosis we have used RT-PCR of RNA ectopically expressed in blood. Oligonucleotides were used to PCR amplify, after the initial RT reaction of RNA samples using random hexamers, either the normal transcript (F8 exons 21 to 24;312 bp product) or the novel abnormal transcript that is generated after the inversion. Both type 1 and 2 inversions can be recognized in affecteds and carriers by the presence of the diagnostic PcR product of 248 bp. Correct diagnoses were made in samples from 6 patients and 2 carriers with type 1 inversions, 2 patients and 2 carriers with type 2 inversions and 5 normal controls.

  19. Portal vein thrombosis in a patient with HCV cirrhosis and combined hemophilia A and thrombophilia V Leiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Eleftheriadis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nikos Eleftheriadis, Pantelis MakrisHemostatic Unit of The First Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotles University of Thessaloniki, GreeceAbstract: The relation of hemophilia A with thrombophilia V Leiden is extremely rare in the literature. Furthermore, hemophiliac patients have an increased risk of severe life-threatening hemorrhage, blood transfusions, and therefore hepatitis transmission, mainly hepatitis C (HCV.Aims and methods: We present a 54-year-old male with a 5-year history of decompensated liver cirrhosis on the grounds of HCV hepatitis, hemophilia A, and thrombophilia V Leiden. He was admitted to our department because of severe abdominal distension, resembling ‘tense ascites’ despite the use of diuretics. Clinical examination showed shifting dullness and a protuberant abdomen, while hematological and blood chemistry results revealed thrombopenia (platelets: 77000/mL and hypoalbuminemia. Repeated abdominal paracentesis (under factor VIII administration failed to remove ascitic fluid, while abdominal echosonography and computed tomography revealed severe edema of mesenterium and intraabdominal viscus and the absence of free ascitic fluid, atrophic cirrhotic liver, and splenomegaly. Moreover, abdominal doppler echosonography revealed signs of portal hypertension, previous portal vein thrombosis, and revascularization of the portal vein. Gastroscopy showed esophageal varices grade II, without signs of bleeding. A-FP and all other laboratory examinations were normal.Results: Our patient was intravenously treated with albumine and diuretics (furosemide with mild improvement of his abdominal distension. During his hospitalization he presented an episode of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and hepatic encephalopathy, which were successfully treated with lactulose clysmas and ciprofloxacine. He was discharged in a good general condition.Conclusion: According to our case we consider the false clinical

  20. Successful Renal Replacement Therapy for a Patient with Severe Hemophilia after Surgical Treatment of Intracranial Hemorrhage and Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Kato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old Japanese male with severe hemophilia A was developed end-stage renal failure. He was placed on combination therapy with peritoneal dialysis (PD and hemodialysis (HD. Eight months later, he developed a hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. After emergency surgery, he was managed with PD without HD to avoid cerebral edema. One month later, his renal replacement therapy was switched to HD (three times a week from PD, since a ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter was placed to treat his hydrocephalus. HD could be performed safety without anticoagulant agents on condition that factor VIII is given after every HD.

  1. Direct Puncture Embolization of Scalp Arteriovenous Malformation in a Patient with Severe Hemophilia A: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Eui Jong [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bong Jin [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keon Ha [Dept. of Radiology, Samsug Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    We present a case of scalp arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in a patient with severe hemophilia A. The 22-year-old man presented with a pulsatile right parietal scalp mass. Digital subtraction angiography revealed an AVM in the right parietal scalp, supplied by superficial temporal and occipital arteries that drained into multiple venous structures. We successfully performed direct puncture embolization followed by surgical resection of the scalp AVM in conjunction with supplemental infusion of coagulation factor VIII before, during and after the embolization and the operation.

  2. Factor VIII gene variants and inhibitor risk in African American hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Devi; Ettinger, Ruth A; Nakaya Fletcher, Shelley; James, Eddie A; Liu, Maochang; Barrett, John C; Withycombe, Janice; Matthews, Dana C; Epstein, Melinda S; Hughes, Richard J; Pratt, Kathleen P

    2015-08-13

    African American hemophilia A (HA) patients experience a higher incidence of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies ("inhibitors") vis-à-vis white patients. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs) in the F8 gene encoding FVIII-H484, FVIII-E1241, and FVIII-V2238 are more prevalent in African Americans. This study tested the hypothesis that immune responses to these sites provoke inhibitors. Blood samples were obtained from 174 African American and 198 white HA subjects and their F8 gene sequences determined. Major histocompatibility complex class II binding and T-cell recognition of polymorphic sequences were evaluated using quantitative binding assays and HLA-DRB1 tetramers. Peptides corresponding to 4 common ns-SNPs showed limited binding to 11 HLA-DRB1 proteins. CD4 T cells from 22 subjects treated with FVIII products having sequences at residues FVIII-484, 1241, and 2238 differing from those of putative proteins encoded by their F8 genes did not show high-avidity tetramer binding, whereas positive-control staining of tetanus-specific CD4 T cells was routinely successful. African Americans with an intron-22 inversion mutation showed a 2-3 times-higher inhibitor incidence than whites with the same mutation (odds ratio = 2.3 [1.1-5.0, P = .04]), but this did not correlate with any of the ns-SNPs. We conclude that immune responses to "sequence-mismatched" FVIII products are unlikely to contribute appreciably to the inhibitor incidence in African Americans.

  3. Next generation FIX muteins with FVIII-independent activity for alternative treatment of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade-Lyssy, P; Abriss, D; Milanov, P; Ungerer, C; Königs, C; Seifried, E; Schüttrumpf, J

    2014-11-01

    FVIII neutralizing antibodies are the main complication of substitution therapy in hemophilia A (HA); auto-antibodies against FVIII causing acquired HA can also occur. Treatment of inhibitor patients remains challenging because prophylactic treatment with existing FVIII bypassing agents, all based on constitutively active coagulation factors, is difficult due to their short half-life. To generate zymogenic FIX variants with FVIII-independent activity for gene- and protein-based therapy for HA. Modifications were introduced into FIX based on current knowledge of FIX structure and FVIII-independent function followed by random screening. Activity, thrombin generation and FX activation by FIX mutants were characterized in the presence and absence of FVIII. Phenotype correction of promising candidates was assessed by the tail-clip assay in FVIII-knockout mice. About 1600 clones were screened and three mutations (L6F, S102N and E185D) identified, which improved FVIII-independent activity in combination with our previously described variant FIX-ITV. By systematic combination of all mutations, six FIX mutants with the desired bypassing activity were designed. Candidate mutants FIX-IDAV and FIX-FIAV demonstrated the most efficient thrombin generation in FVIII-deficient plasma and had considerably increased activities towards FX in the absence of FVIII, in that they showed an up to 5-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Expression of FIX-IDAV in FVIII knockout mice reduced blood loss after the tail-clip assay, even in the presence of neutralizing FVIII antibodies. Activatable bioengineered FIX molecules (as opposed to pre-activated coagulation factors) with FVIII-independent activity might be a promising tool for improving HA treatment, especially for patients with inhibitors. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Therapeutic efficacy in a hemophilia B model using a biosynthetic mRNA liver depot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, F; Guild, B; Karve, S; Smith, L; Love, K; Dorkin, J R; Kauffman, K J; Zhang, J; Yahalom, B; Anderson, D G; Heartlein, M W

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based gene therapy has considerable therapeutic potential, but the challenges associated with delivery continue to limit progress. Messenger RNA (mRNA) has the potential to provide for transient production of therapeutic proteins, without the need for nuclear delivery and without the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Here we describe the sustained delivery of therapeutic proteins in vivo in both rodents and non-human primates via nanoparticle-formulated mRNA. Nanoparticles formulated with lipids and lipid-like materials were developed for delivery of two separate mRNA transcripts encoding either human erythropoietin (hEPO) or factor IX (hFIX) protein. Dose-dependent protein production was observed for each mRNA construct. Upon delivery of hEPO mRNA in mice, serum EPO protein levels reached several orders of magnitude (>125 000-fold) over normal physiological values. Further, an increase in hematocrit (Hct) was established, demonstrating that the exogenous mRNA-derived protein maintained normal activity. The capacity of producing EPO in non-human primates via delivery of formulated mRNA was also demonstrated as elevated EPO protein levels were observed over a 72-h time course. Exemplifying the possible broad utility of mRNA drugs, therapeutically relevant amounts of human FIX (hFIX) protein were achieved upon a single intravenous dose of hFIX mRNA-loaded lipid nanoparticles in mice. In addition, therapeutic value was established within a hemophilia B (FIX knockout (KO)) mouse model by demonstrating a marked reduction in Hct loss following injury (incision) to FIX KO mice. PMID:27356951

  5. Concurrent influenza vaccination reduces anti-FVIII antibody responses in murine hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jesse D; Moorehead, Paul C; Sponagle, Kate; Steinitz, Katharina N; Reipert, Birgit M; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-06-30

    Inflammatory signals such as pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns have been hypothesized as risk factors for the initiation of the anti-factor VIII (FVIII) immune response seen in 25% to 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A (HA). In these young patients, vaccines may be coincidentally administered in close proximity with initial exposure to FVIII, thereby providing a source of such stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of 3 vaccines commonly used in pediatric patients on FVIII immunogenicity in a humanized HA murine model with variable tolerance to recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII). Mice vaccinated intramuscularly against the influenza vaccine prior to multiple infusions of rhFVIII exhibited a decreased incidence of rhFVIII-specific neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Similar findings were observed with the addition of an adjuvant. Upon exposure to media from influenza- or FVIII-stimulated lymph node or splenic lymphocytes, naïve CD4(+) lymphocytes preferentially migrated toward media from influenza-stimulated cells, indicating that antigen competition, by means of lymphocyte recruitment to the immunization site, is a potential mechanism for the observed decrease in FVIII immunogenicity. We also observed no differences in incidence or titer of rhFVIII-specific antibodies and inhibitors in mice exposed to the live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine regardless of route of administration. Together, our results suggest that concomitant FVIII exposure and vaccination against influenza does not increase the risk of inhibitor formation and may in fact decrease anti-FVIII immune responses. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Proteasome Inhibitors Enhance Gene Delivery by AAV Virus Vectors Expressing Large Genomes in Hemophilia Mouse and Dog Models: A Strategy for Broad Clinical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Paul E; Lothrop, Clinton D; Sun, Junjiang; Hirsch, Matthew L; Kafri, Tal; Kantor, Boris; Sarkar, Rita; Tillson, D Michael; Elia, Joseph R; Samulski, R Jude

    2010-01-01

    Delivery of genes that are larger than the wild-type adeno-associated virus (AAV) 4,681 nucleotide genome is inefficient using AAV vectors. We previously demonstrated in vitro that concurrent proteasome inhibitor (PI) treatment improves transduction by AAV vectors encoding oversized transgenes. In this study, an AAV vector with a 5.6 kilobase (kb) factor VIII expression cassette was used to test the effect of an US Food and Drug Administration–approved PI (bortezomib) treatment concurrent with vector delivery in vivo. Intrahepatic vector delivery resulted in factor VIII expression that persisted for >1 year in hemophilia mice. Single-dose bortezomib given with AAV2 or AAV8 factor VIII vector enhanced expression on average ~600 and ~300%, respectively. Moreover, coadministration of AAV8.canineFVIII (1 × 1013 vg/kg) and bortezomib in hemophilia A dogs (n = 4) resulted in normalization of the whole blood clotting time (WBCT) and 90% reduction in hemorrhages for >32 months compared to untreated hemophilia A dogs (n = 3) or dogs administered vector alone (n = 3). Demonstration of long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A dogs with combination adjuvant bortezomib and AAV vector expressing the oversized transgene establishes preclinical studies that support testing in humans and provides a working paradigm to facilitate a significant expansion of therapeutic targets for human gene therapy. PMID:20700109

  7. Endogenous factor VIII synthesis from the intron 22-inverted F8 locus may modulate the immunogenicity of replacement therapy for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gouri Shankar; Yanover, Chen; Miller-Jenkins, Lisa M; Garfield, Susan; Cole, Shelley A; Curran, Joanne E; Moses, Eric K; Rydz, Natalia; Simhadri, Vijaya; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Lillicrap, David; Viel, Kevin R; Przytycka, Teresa M; Pierce, Glenn F; Howard, Tom E; Sauna, Zuben E

    2013-10-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) to replacement factor VIII (FVIII, either plasma derived or recombinant) impair the effective management of hemophilia A. Individuals with hemophilia A due to major deletions of the FVIII gene (F8) lack antigenically cross-reactive material in their plasma ("CRM-negative"), and the prevalence of inhibitors in these individuals may be as high as 90%. Conversely, individuals with hemophilia A caused by F8 missense mutations are CRM-positive, and their overall prevalence of inhibitors is hemophilia A) have been grouped with the former on the basis of their genetic defect and CRM-negative status. However, only ∼20% of these individuals develop inhibitors. Here we demonstrate that the levels of F8 mRNA and intracellular FVIII protein in B lymphoblastoid cells and liver biopsies from individuals with the intron 22 inversion are comparable to those in healthy controls. These results support the hypothesis that most individuals with the intron 22 inversion are tolerized to FVIII and thus do not develop inhibitors. Furthermore, we developed a new pharmacogenetic algorithm that permits the stratification of inhibitor risk for individuals and subpopulations by predicting the immunogenicity of replacement FVIII using, as input, the number of putative T cell epitopes in the infused protein and the competence of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules to present such epitopes. This algorithm showed statistically significant accuracy in predicting the presence of inhibitors in 25 unrelated individuals with the intron 22 inversion.

  8. Transient blockade of the inducible costimulator pathway generates long-term tolerance to factor VIII after nonviral gene transfer into hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Baowei; Ye, Peiqing; Blazar, Bruce R; Freeman, Gordon J; Rawlings, David J; Ochs, Hans D; Miao, Carol H

    2008-09-01

    Formation of inhibitory antibodies is a common problem encountered in clinical treatment for hemophilia. Human factor VIII (hFVIII) plasmid gene therapy in hemophilia A mice also leads to strong humoral responses. We demonstrate that short-term therapy with an anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody to transiently block the inducible costimulator/inducible costimulator ligand (ICOS/ICOSL) signaling pathway led to sustained tolerance to hFVIII in hFVIII plasmid-treated hemophilia A mice and allowed persistent, high-level FVIII functional activity (100%-300% of normal). Anti-ICOS treatment resulted in depletion of ICOS(+)CD4(+) T cells and activation of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes. CD4(+) T cells from anti-ICOS-treated mice did not proliferate in response to hFVIII stimulation and produced high levels of regulatory cytokines, including interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta. Moreover, CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs from tolerized mice adoptively transferred dominant tolerance in syngeneic hFVIII plasmid-treated hemophilia A mice and reduced the production of antibodies against FVIII. Anti-ICOS-treated mice tolerized to hFVIII generated normal primary and secondary antibody responses after immunization with the T-dependent antigen, bacteriophage Phix 174, indicating maintenance of immune competency. Our data indicate that transient anti-ICOS monoclonal antibody treatment represents a novel single-agent immunomodulatory strategy to overcome the immune responses against transgene product after gene therapy.

  9. Proteasome inhibitors enhance gene delivery by AAV virus vectors expressing large genomes in hemophilia mouse and dog models: a strategy for broad clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Paul E; Lothrop, Clinton D; Sun, Junjiang; Hirsch, Matthew L; Kafri, Tal; Kantor, Boris; Sarkar, Rita; Tillson, D Michael; Elia, Joseph R; Samulski, R Jude

    2010-11-01

    Delivery of genes that are larger than the wild-type adeno-associated virus (AAV) 4,681 nucleotide genome is inefficient using AAV vectors. We previously demonstrated in vitro that concurrent proteasome inhibitor (PI) treatment improves transduction by AAV vectors encoding oversized transgenes. In this study, an AAV vector with a 5.6 kilobase (kb) factor VIII expression cassette was used to test the effect of an US Food and Drug Administration-approved PI (bortezomib) treatment concurrent with vector delivery in vivo. Intrahepatic vector delivery resulted in factor VIII expression that persisted for >1 year in hemophilia mice. Single-dose bortezomib given with AAV2 or AAV8 factor VIII vector enhanced expression on average ~600 and ~300%, respectively. Moreover, coadministration of AAV8.canineFVIII (1 × 10(13) vg/kg) and bortezomib in hemophilia A dogs (n = 4) resulted in normalization of the whole blood clotting time (WBCT) and 90% reduction in hemorrhages for >32 months compared to untreated hemophilia A dogs (n = 3) or dogs administered vector alone (n = 3). Demonstration of long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A dogs with combination adjuvant bortezomib and AAV vector expressing the oversized transgene establishes preclinical studies that support testing in humans and provides a working paradigm to facilitate a significant expansion of therapeutic targets for human gene therapy.

  10. Early eradication of factor VIII inhibitor in patients with congenital hemophilia A by immune tolerance induction with a high dose of immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Yoko; Furue, Aya; Kagawa, Reiko; Chijimatsu, Ikue; Tomioka, Keita; Shimomura, Maiko; Imanaka, Yusuke; Nishimura, Shiho; Saito, Satoshi; Miki, Mizuka; Ono, Atsushi; Konishi, Nakao; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao

    2016-04-01

    The production of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibodies is a serious problem in patients with hemophilia A. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the only strategy proven to eradicate persistent inhibitors and has been shown to be successful in 70 % of patients with hemophilia A. However, a minority of hemophilia patients present life-long inhibitors. To eliminate such inhibitors, we designed an intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) strategy in combination with high dose recombinant FVIII for ITI in hemophilia A children with inhibitors. Four previously untreated patients produced inhibitors within 16 exposures to FVIII. The peak inhibitor titers in these patients ranged from 3 to 14 BU/mL. The patients received ITI combined with IVIG within 1.5 months after the inhibitors were detected. All patients showed a negative titer for inhibitors by 28 days, with no anamnestic responses. The recovery of FVIII in the plasma concentration was normalized within three months after initiation of ITI. An additional course of IVIG administration led to induction of complete tolerance by 20 months after initiation of ITI therapy in all patients. ITI treatment with high-dose FVIII combined with IVIG may be effective for the early elimination of inhibitors.

  11. Acquired hemophilia in the patient suffering from rheumatoid arthritis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobiecki, Arkadiusz; Pasiarski, Marcin; Hus, Iwona; Sokołowska, Bożena; Wątek, Marzena

    2013-12-01

    Acquired hemophilia is a severe bleeding diathesis caused by autoantibodies against a coagulation factor VIII (FVIII inhibitor). Massive bleeding diathesis, often life threatening are observed in almost 90% of patients. In 50-60% of cases, inhibitor emerges spontaneously. However, there are some conditions like pregnancy, puerperium, autoimmune disorders or cancers that seem to induce acquired hemophilia. We report a case of a 49-year-old woman suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for several years, who was diagnosed with acquired hemophilia in September 2011. The patient had been treated by steroids and leflunomide during the last few months. At the time of diagnosis, diffuse bruising of the forearms and the trunk was observed. The patient was treated with recombinant activated factor VII, and the first-line immunosuppressive therapy was introduced (cyclophosphamide and prednisone). We observed the elimination of symptoms and the disappearance of diathesis. Significant reduction of the titer of inhibitor was achieved, but only partial remission was obtained. It lasted until the beginning of December 2011, when the titer of the inhibitor increased again and massive bleeding to the left lower limb occurred. It was necessary to administer recombinant factor VIIa together with the second-line immunosuppressive therapy based on the Budapest protocol. The rapid reduction of the diathesis and improvement of the patient's general condition was achieved as previously. However, still there was no complete remission. After 2 weeks of treatment, the titer of inhibitor diminished, and factor VIII activity increased slightly. Because of RA, the patient was treated with methylprednisolone in maintenance doses during the next few weeks. Unfortunately, after over a month, the increase of inhibitor titer and the decrease of FVIII level were observed again. Some bruises appeared. It was necessary to increase doses of corticosteroids to therapeutic levels and add cyclophosphamide

  12. Recombinant factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) fusion protein reduces immunogenicity and induces tolerance in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Liu, Tongyao; Drager, Douglas; Patarroyo-White, Susannah; Chhabra, Ekta Seth; Peters, Robert; Josephson, Neil; Lillicrap, David; Blumberg, Richard S; Pierce, Glenn F; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-03-01

    Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies is a major complication of FVIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A. We investigated the immune response to recombinant human factor VIII Fc (rFVIIIFc) in comparison to BDD-rFVIII and full-length rFVIII (FL-rFVIII) in hemophilia A mice. Repeated administration of therapeutically relevant doses of rFVIIIFc in these mice resulted in significantly lower antibody responses to rFVIII compared to BDD-rFVIII and FL-rFVIII and reduced antibody production upon subsequent challenge with high doses of rFVIIIFc. The induction of a tolerogenic response by rFVIIIFc was associated with higher percentage of regulatory T-cells, a lower percentage of pro-inflammatory splenic T-cells, and up-regulation of tolerogenic cytokines and markers. Disruption of Fc interactions with either FcRn or Fcγ receptors diminished tolerance induction, suggesting the involvement of these pathways. These results indicate that rFVIIIFc reduces immunogenicity and imparts tolerance to rFVIII demonstrating that recombinant therapeutic proteins may be modified to influence immunogenicity and facilitate tolerance.

  13. Overexpression of factor VIII after AAV delivery is transiently associated with cellular stress in hemophilia A mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Lange

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Factor VIII (FVIII is a large glycoprotein that is challenging to express both in vitro and in vivo. Several studies suggest that high levels of FVIII expression can lead to cellular stress. After gene transfer, transgene expression is restricted to a subset of cells and the increased FVIII load per cell may impact activation of the unfolded protein response. We sought to determine whether increased FVIII expression in mice after adeno-associated viral liver gene transfer would affect the unfolded protein response and/or immune response to the transgene. The FVIII gene was delivered as B-domain deleted single chain or two chain (light and heavy chains at a range of doses in hemophilia A mice. A correlation between FVIII expression and anti-FVIII antibody titers was observed. Analysis of key components of the unfolded protein response, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP, and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, showed transient unfolded protein response activation in the single chain treated group expressing >200% of FVIII but not after two chain delivery. These studies suggest that supraphysiological single chain FVIII expression may increase the likelihood of a cellular stress response but does not alter liver function. These data are in agreement with the observed long-term expression of FVIII at therapeutic levels after adeno-associated viral delivery in hemophilia A dogs without evidence of cellular toxicity.

  14. Neonatal helper-dependent adenoviral vector gene therapy mediates correction of hemophilia A and tolerance to human factor VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuhong; Cela, Racel G; Suzuki, Masataka; Lee, Brendan; Lipshutz, Gerald S

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal gene therapy is a promising strategy for treating a number of congenital diseases diagnosed shortly after birth as expression of therapeutic proteins during postnatal life may limit the pathologic consequences and result in a potential "cure." Hemophilia A is often complicated by the development of antibodies to recombinant protein resulting in treatment failure. Neonatal administration of vectors may avoid inhibitory antibody formation to factor VIII (FVIII) by taking advantage of immune immaturity. A helper-dependent adenoviral vector expressing human factor VIII was administered i.v. to neonatal hemophilia A knockout mice. Three days later, mice produced high levels of FVIII. Levels declined rapidly with animal growth to 5 wk of age with stable factor VIII expression thereafter to >1 y of age. Decline in factor VIII expression was not related to cell-mediated or humoral responses with lack of development of antibodies to capsid or human factor VIII proteins. Subsequent readministration and augmentation of expression was possible as operational tolerance was established to factor VIII without development of inhibitors; however, protective immunity to adenovirus remained.

  15. Expression of human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells: Toward somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shounan Yao; Wilson, J.M.; Nabel, E.G.; Kurachi, Sumiko; Hachiya, H.L.; Kurachi, Kotoku (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-09-15

    In aiming to develop a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B, the authors expressed and characterized human factor IX in rat capillary endothelial cells (CECs). Moloney murine leukemia virus-derived retrovirus vectors that contain human factor IX cDNA linked to heterologous promoters and the neomycin-resistant gene were constructed and employed to prepare recombinant retroviruses. Rat CECs and NIH 3T3 cells infected with these viruses were selected with the neomycin analogue, G418 sulfate, and tested for expression of factor IX. A construct with the factor IX cDNA under direct control by long terminal repeat gave the highest level of expression as quantitated by immunoassays as well as clotting activity assays. A single RNA transcript of 4.4 kilobases predicted by the construct and a recombinant factor IX were found. The recombinant human factor IX produced showed full clotting activity, demonstrating that CECs have an efficient mechanism for posttranslational modifications, including {gamma}-carboxylation, essential for its biological activity. These results, in addition to other properties of the endothelium, including large number of cells, accessibility, and direct contact with the circulating blood, suggest that CECs can serve as an efficient drug delivery vehicle producing factor IX in a somatic gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  16. Overexpression of factor VIII after AAV delivery is transiently associated with cellular stress in hemophilia A mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Amy M; Altynova, Ekaterina S; Nguyen, Giang N; Sabatino, Denise E

    2016-01-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) is a large glycoprotein that is challenging to express both in vitro and in vivo. Several studies suggest that high levels of FVIII expression can lead to cellular stress. After gene transfer, transgene expression is restricted to a subset of cells and the increased FVIII load per cell may impact activation of the unfolded protein response. We sought to determine whether increased FVIII expression in mice after adeno-associated viral liver gene transfer would affect the unfolded protein response and/or immune response to the transgene. The FVIII gene was delivered as B-domain deleted single chain or two chain (light and heavy chains) at a range of doses in hemophilia A mice. A correlation between FVIII expression and anti-FVIII antibody titers was observed. Analysis of key components of the unfolded protein response, binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), showed transient unfolded protein response activation in the single chain treated group expressing >200% of FVIII but not after two chain delivery. These studies suggest that supraphysiological single chain FVIII expression may increase the likelihood of a cellular stress response but does not alter liver function. These data are in agreement with the observed long-term expression of FVIII at therapeutic levels after adeno-associated viral delivery in hemophilia A dogs without evidence of cellular toxicity. PMID:27738645

  17. Partial correction of a severe molecular defect in hemophilia A, because of errors during expression of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, M.; Antonarakis, S.E. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Inaba, Hiroshi [Tokyo Medical College (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Although the molecular defect in patients in a Japanese family with mild to moderately severe hemophilia A was a deletion of a single nucleotide T within an A{sub 8}TA{sub 2} sequence of exon 14 of the factor VIII gene, the severity of the clinical phenotype did not correspond to that expected of a frameshift mutation. A small amount of functional factor VIII protein was detected in the patient`s plasma. Analysis of DNA and RNA molecules from normal and affected individuals and in vitro transcription/translation suggested a partial correction of the molecular defect, because of the following: (i) DNA replication/RNA transcription errors resulting in restoration of the reading frame and/or (ii) {open_quotes}ribosomal frameshifting{close_quotes} resulting in the production of normal factor VIII polypeptide and, thus, in a milder than expected hemophilia A. All of these mechanisms probably were promoted by the longer run of adenines, A{sub 10} instead of A{sub 8}TA{sub 2}, after the delT. Errors in the complex steps of gene expression therefore may partially correct a severe frameshift defect and ameliorate an expected severe phenotype. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  18. The important role of von Willebrand factor in platelet-derived FVIII gene therapy for murine hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Q; Schroeder, J A; Kuether, E L; Montgomery, R R

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that targeting FVIII expression to platelets results in FVIII storage together with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in platelet α-granules and that platelet-derived FVIII (2bF8) corrects the murine hemophilia A phenotype even in the presence of high-titer anti-FVIII inhibitory antibodies (inhibitors). To explore how VWF has an impact on platelet gene therapy for hemophilia A with inhibitors. 2bF8 transgenic mice in the FVIII(-/-) background (2bF8(tg+/-) F8(-/-) ) with varying VWF phenotypes were used in this study. Animals were analyzed by VWF ELISA, FVIII activity assay, Bethesda assay and tail clip survival test. Only 18% of 2bF8(tg+/-) F8(-/-) VWF(-/-) animals, in which VWF was deficient, survived the tail clip challenge with inhibitor titers of 3-8000 BU mL(-1) . In contrast, 82% of 2bF8(tg+/-) F8(-/-) VWF(+/+) mice, which had normal VWF levels, survived tail clipping with inhibitor titers of 10-50,000 BU mL(-1) . All 2bF8(tg+/-) F8(-/-) VWF(-/-) mice without inhibitors survived tail clipping and no VWF(-/-) F8(-/-) mice survived this challenge. Because VWF is synthesized by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes and is distributed in both plasma and platelets in peripheral blood, we further investigated the effect of each compartment of VWF on platelet-FVIII gene therapy for hemophilia A with inhibitors. In the presence of inhibitors, 42% of animals survived tail clipping in the group with plasma-VWF and 50% survived in the platelet-VWF group. VWF is essential for platelet gene therapy for hemophilia A with inhibitors. Both platelet-VWF and plasma-VWF are required for optimal platelet-derived FVIII gene therapy for hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitors. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Lentivirus-mediated platelet gene therapy of murine hemophilia A with pre-existing anti-factor VIII immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuether, E L; Schroeder, J A; Fahs, S A; Cooley, B C; Chen, Y; Montgomery, R R; Wilcox, D A; Shi, Q

    2012-08-01

    The development of inhibitory antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against exogenous factor VIII in a significant subset of patients with hemophilia A remains a persistent challenge to the efficacy of protein replacement therapy. Our previous studies using the transgenic approach provided proof-of-principle that platelet-specific expression could be successful in treating hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies. To investigate a clinically translatable approach for platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors. Platelet FVIII expression in preimmunized FVIII(null) mice was introduced by transplantation of lentivirus-transduced bone marrow or enriched hematopoietic stem cells. FVIII expression was determined with a chromogenic assay. The transgene copy number per cell was quantitated with real-time PCR. Inhibitor titer was measured with the Bethesda assay. Phenotypic correction was assessed by the tail clipping assay and an electrolytically induced venous injury model. Integration sites were analyzed with linear amplification-mediated PCR. Therapeutic levels of platelet FVIII expression were sustained in the long term without evoking an anti-FVIII memory response in the transduced preimmunized recipients. The tail clip survival test and the electrolytic injury model confirmed that hemostasis was improved in the treated animals. Sequential bone marrow transplants showed sustained platelet FVIII expression resulting in phenotypic correction in preimmunized secondary and tertiary recipients. Lentivirus-mediated platelet-specific gene transfer improves hemostasis in mice with hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors, indicating that this approach may be a promising strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A even in the high-risk setting of pre-existing inhibitory antibodies. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  20. Efficacy of standard prophylaxis versus on-demand treatment with bayer's sucrose-formulated recombinant FVIII (rFVIII-FS) in Chinese children with severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongqiang; Xiao, Juan; Yang, Renchi; Wu, Runhui; Hu, Yu; Beckmann, Horst; Wu, Junde; Hou, Qingsong; Sun, Jing

    2017-07-20

    In China, care of patients with severe hemophilia primarily involves insufficient dosing of on-demand treatment and secondary low-dose prophylaxis (10 IU/kg 2× /wk). We sought to evaluate 3× /wk, standard-dose prophylaxis with sucrose-formulated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII-FS; Bayer) compared with on-demand treatment in Chinese children with severe hemophilia A. Children and adolescents aged 2-16 years with severe hemophilia A, no inhibitors, and no prophylaxis for >6 consecutive months before study entry were eligible for this 24-week, interventional, sequential-treatment study. Patients received rFVIII-FS on demand for 12 weeks followed by a 12-week prophylaxis period (25 IU/kg 3× /wk). The primary efficacy endpoint was comparison of the annualized bleeding rate (ABR) of all bleeds in the prophylaxis versus on-demand phase. Additional variables included ABR of joint bleeds, school attendance/activity, daily activity, and hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS). Thirty patients (median age, 12 years) were treated and analyzed. Compared with on-demand treatment, prophylaxis reduced median (quartile [Q1; Q3]) ABR of all bleeds (57.5 [44.5; 73.9] vs 0 [0; 4.0]) and joint bleeds (34.5 [26.1; 56.5] vs 0 [0; 4.0]). Median (range) total HJHS improved after both the prophylaxis and on-demand phases (8.0 [0-48.0] and 11.0 [0-55.0], respectively) compared with baseline (16.0 [0-56.0]). School attendance/activity and daily activity improved with prophylaxis versus on demand. No inhibitors or treatment-related adverse events were reported. In this first prospective, standard-dose, secondary prophylaxis study in China, rFVIII-FS prophylaxis reduced bleeding and improved health outcomes versus on-demand treatment in children with severe hemophilia A.

  1. A Budget Impact Model of Hemophilia Bypassing Agent Prophylaxis Relative to Recombinant Factor VIIa On-Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Darshan A; Oladapo, Abiola O; Epstein, Joshua D; Novack, Aaron R; Neufeld, Ellis J; Hay, Joel W

    2016-02-01

    Hemophilia patients use factor-clotting concentrates (factor VIII for hemophilia A and factor IX for hemophilia B) for improved blood clotting. These products are used to prevent or stop bleeding episodes. However, some hemophilia patients develop inhibitors (i.e., the patient's immune system develops antibodies against these factor concentrates). Hence, these patients do not respond well to the factor concentrates. A majority of hemophilia patients with inhibitors are managed on-demand with the following bypassing agents: recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) and activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC). The recently published U.S. registries Dosing Observational Study in Hemophilia (DOSE) and Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society (HTRS) reported higher rFVIIa on-demand use for bleed management than previously described. To estimate aPCC and rFVIIa prophylaxis costs relative to rFVIIa on-demand treatment cost based on rFVIIa doses reported in U.S. registries. A literature-based cost model was developed assuming a base case on-demand annual bleed rate (ABR) of 28.7 per inhibitor patient, which was taken from a randomized phase 3 clinical trial. The doses for rFVIIa on-demand were taken from the median dose per bleed reported by the DOSE and HTRS registries. Model inputs for aPCC and rFVIIa prophylaxis (i.e., dosing and efficacy) were derived from respective randomized clinical trials. Cost analysis was from the U.S. payer perspective, and only direct drug costs were considered. The drug cost was based on the Medicare Part B 2014 average sale price (ASP). Two-way sensitivity and threshold analyses were performed by simultaneously varying on-demand ABR, prophylaxis efficacy, and unit drug cost. In addition to studying relative costs associated with on-demand and prophylaxis treatments, relative cost per bleeding episode avoided were also calculated for aPCC and rFVIIa prophylaxis treatments. The prophylaxis efficacy reported in the trials were used to

  2. Hemofilia A adquirida associada à artrite reumatoide Acquired hemophilia associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Freire

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O aparecimento do anticorpo contra fator VIII é um fenômeno bem estabelecido na hemofilia A, ocorrendo em 5 a 15% dos pacientes hemofílicos dos Estados Unidos, Inglaterra, Suécia e França. Nos pacientes não-hemofílicos o seu aparecimento é raro, podendo ocorrer em indivíduos saudáveis, principalmente idosos e mulheres no puerpério, pacientes com neoplasia maligna ou doenças autoimunes, como lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, artrite reumatoide e síndrome de Sjögren. Descrevemos o caso de uma paciente de 64 anos de idade, portadora de artrite reumatoide soropositiva há 23 anos, que há 10 dias desenvolveu equimoses e hematomas progressivos cuja investigação foi compatível com a presença de anticorpo contra fator VIII. Foi instituída terapia com metilprednisolona, ciclofosfamida endovenosa, imunoglobulina e reposição de complexo protrombínico, com remissão do quadro hemorrágico e negativação do anticorpo contra o fator VIII. Concluímos com esse caso que, apesar de ser rara, a presença de inibidores adquiridos do fator VIII deve ser pesquisada quando pacientes portadores de doença autoimune desenvolvem manifestações hemorrágicas associadas ao prolongamento do TTPA com TAP e contagem plaquetária normais.The occurrence of the antibody against factor VIII is a well-known phenomenon in hemophilia A, occuring in 5 to 15% of the hemophilic patients in the United States, England, Sweden and France. The development of factor VIII in non-hemophilic patients is rare and may occur in healthy individuals, mostly elderly and women in postpartum period, and in patients with malignant neoplasia or autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren's syndrome. We described the case of a 64-year-old female patient who has had seropositive rheumatoid arthritis for 23 years and presented with a ten-day history of progressive ecchymosis. Therapy with methylprednisolone, intravenous

  3. Novel factor VIII variants with a modified furin cleavage site improve the efficacy of gene therapy for hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, G N; George, L A; Siner, J I; Davidson, R J; Zander, C B; Zheng, X L; Arruda, V R; Camire, R M; Sabatino, D E

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Factor (F) VIII is an inefficiently expressed protein. Furin deletion FVIII variants were purified and characterized using in vitro and in vivo assays. These minimally modified novel FVIII variants have enhanced function. These variants provide a strategy for increasing FVIII expression in hemophilia A gene therapy. Background The major challenge for developing gene-based therapies for hemophilia A is that human factor VIII (hFVIII) has intrinsic properties that result in inefficient biosynthesis. During intracellular processing, hFVIII is predominantly cleaved at a paired basic amino acid cleaving enzyme (PACE) or furin cleavage site to yield a heterodimer that is the major form of secreted protein. Previous studies with B-domain-deleted (BDD) canine FVIII and hFVIII-R1645H, both differing from hFVIII by a single amino acid at this site, suggested that these proteins are secreted mainly in a single polypeptide chain (SC) form and exhibit enhanced function. Objective We hypothesized that deletion(s) of the furin site modulates FVIII biology and may enhance its function. Methods A series of recombinant hFVIII-furin deletion variants were introduced into hFVIII-BDD [Δ1645, 1645-46(Δ2), 1645-47(Δ3), 1645-48(Δ4), or Δ1648] and characterized. Results In vitro, recombinant purified Δ3 and Δ4 were primarily SC and, interestingly, had 2-fold higher procoagulant activity compared with FVIII-BDD. In vivo, the variants also have improved hemostatic function. After adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector delivery, the expression of these variants is 2-4-fold higher than hFVIII-BDD. Protein challenges of each variant in mice tolerant to hFVIII-BDD showed no anti-FVIII immune response. Conclusions These data suggest that the furin deletion hFVIII variants are superior to hFVIII-BDD without increased immunogenicity. In the setting of gene-based therapeutics, these novel variants provide a unique strategy to increase FVIII expression, thus lowering the vector dose, a

  4. Study on the Efficacy and Safety of Xueyou Mixture (血友合剂) in Treating Hemophilia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shan-xi; JIANG Lin; LIU Yi-guo; HE Yue-qin; LIANG Xin; KONG Wei-wei; CHEN Jing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Xueyou Mixture (血友合剂, XYM) on blood coagulation factors and its safety in treating hemophilia. Methods: To the randomly selected 65 inpatients of hemophilia, XYM was administered accompanied with intravenous dripping of liver cell growth factor 60-100 mg once a day to protect the liver, with no blood products like concentrated Ⅷ and FⅨ factors or blood plasma given. The treatment lasted for 3 weeks. The short-term efficacy and adverse reactions were observed. The long-term efficacy in patients was observed in a follow-up study of 6-12 months after they were discharged from the hospital but continuously took XYM orally. Results: The short-term markedly effective rate in the patients was 95.38% (62/65). After they were treated for 3 weeks, the level of FⅧ factor activity increased in 56 patients of type A from (3.32 ± 2.21) % to (4.18 ± 2.23) %, and in 9 of type B from (4.92 ± 1.81) % to (5.64 ± 1.96) %. Compared with that before treatment, the difference was significant in both of them (P<0.01). No obvious adverse reaction was found in the treatment period.The follow-up study showed that in 22 patients of type A, the FⅧ factor activity ratio increased from (3.25±2.11) % to (6.31 ±2.16) %, (8.36±1.05) %, and (16.38±2.71) % in the 2nd, 3rd and 6th month after discharge respectively, all showing significant difference to that before treatment (P<0.01); and in 4 patients of type B, it increased from (4.15 ± 2.26) % to 7.8% and 11.6% (mean value) in the 2nd and 6th month respectively. Conclusion: XYM could raise the activity of factors Ⅷ and Ⅸ in patients with hemophilia, and the degree of the rise is related with the duration of the therapy, with no obvious adverse reaction, which strikes out a new path and new train of thinking for the treatment of the disease by nonblood preparation.

  5. Modulating immunogenicity of factor IX by fusion to an immunoglobulin Fc domain: a study using a hemophilia B mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, D; Lagassé, H A D; Burch, E; Strome, S; Tan, S; Jiang, H; Sauna, Z E; Golding, B

    2017-04-01

    Essentials Fc-fusion increases a therapeutic's half-life, but FcγR interactions may impact immunogenicity. Species-specific Fc-FcγR interactions allow for mechanistic in vivo studies using mouse models. Fc fusion modulates the immune response to factor IX in hemophilia B mice by eliciting Th1 bias. This model could inform future studies of IgE-associated anaphylaxis in hemophilia B patients. Background Fc fusion is a platform technology used to increase the circulating half-life of protein and peptide therapeutics. However, there are potential immunological consequences with this approach, such as changes in the molecule's immunogenicity as well as possible interactions with a repertoire of Fc receptors (FcR) that can modulate immune responses. Objectives/Methods Using a mouse hemophilia B (HB) model, we compared the immune responses to infusions of recombinant human factor IX (hFIX) and hFIX fused to mouse IgG2a-Fc (hFIX-mFc). The mFc was employed to allow species-specific Fc-FcγR interactions. Results Although treatment with hFIX-mFc altered the early development of anti-FIX IgG, no significant differences in anti-FIX antibody titers were observed at the end of the treatment regimen (5 weeks) or upon anamnestic response (5 months). However, treatment with hFIX-mFc elicited higher FIX-neutralizing antibody levels and resulted in reduced IgE titers compared with the hFIX-treated group. Additionally, differences in plasma cytokine levels and in vitro CD4(+) T-cell responses suggest that whereas hFIX treatment triggered a Th2-biased immune response, hFIX-mFc treatment induced Th1-biased CD4(+) T cells. We also show that hFIX-mFc bound to soluble FcγRs and engaged with FcγRs on different cell types, which may impact antigen presentation. Conclusions These studies provide a model system to study how Fc-fusion proteins may affect immune mechanisms. We used this model to demonstrate a plausible mechanism by which Fc fusion may modulate the IgE response to hFIX. This

  6. 血友病A/B的基因诊断%The genetic diagnosis of hemophilia A and B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鸿利

    2006-01-01

    @@ 血友病(hemophilia)分为血友病A、B两型.血友病A是由凝血因子Ⅷ(FⅧ)基因缺陷导致血浆FⅧ含量减少或功能异常所致;血友病B是由凝血因子Ⅸ(factor Ⅸ,FⅨ)基因缺陷导致血浆FⅨ含量减少或功能异常所致.两型血友病都是X染色体性连锁隐性遗传病,临床上是以自发性或轻微外伤后出血难止为特征的出血性疾病.

  7. Sustained and therapeutic levels of human factor IX in hemophilia B mice implanted with microcapsules: key role of encapsulated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianping; Vargas, Andrew Gómez; Ofosu, Frederick A; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2006-03-01

    A gene therapy delivery system based on microcapsules enclosing recombinant cells engineered to secrete a therapeutic protein was explored in this study. In order to prevent immune rejection of the delivered cells, they were enclosed in non-antigenic biocompatible alginate microcapsules prior to being implanted intraperitoneally into mice. We have shown that encapsulated C2C12 myoblasts can temporarily deliver therapeutic levels of factor IX (FIX) in mice, but the C2C12 myoblasts elicited an immune response to FIX. In this study we report the use of mouse fetal G8 myoblasts secreting hFIX in hemophilia mice. Mouse G8 myoblasts were transduced with MFG-FIX vector. A pool of recombinant G8 myoblasts secreting approximately 1500 ng hFIX/10(6) cells/24 h in vitro were enclosed in biocompatible alginate microcapsules and implanted intraperitoneally into immunocompetent C57BL/6 and hemophilic mice. Circulating levels of hFIX in treated mice reached approximately 400 ng/ml for at least 120 days (end of experiment). Interestingly, mice treated with encapsulated G8 myoblasts did not develop anti-hFIX antibodies. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) of plasmas obtained from treated hemophilic mice was reduced from 107 to 82 sec on day 60 post-treatment, and whole blood clotting time (WBCT) was also corrected from 7-9 min before treatment to 3-5 min following microcapsule implantation. Further, mice were protected against bleeding following major trauma. Thus, the FIX delivery in vivo was biologically active. Our findings suggest that the type of cells encapsulated play a key role in the generation of immune responses against the transgene. Further, a judicious selection of encapsulated cells is critical for achieving sustained gene expression. Our findings support the feasibility of encapsulated G8 myoblasts as a gene therapy approach for hemophilia B.

  8. Generation of an optimized lentiviral vector encoding a high-expression factor VIII transgene for gene therapy of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J M; Denning, G; Doering, C B; Spencer, H T

    2013-06-01

    We previously compared the expression of several human factor VIII (fVIII) transgene variants and demonstrated the superior expression properties of B domain-deleted porcine fVIII. Subsequently, a hybrid human/porcine fVIII molecule (HP-fVIII) comprising 91% human amino-acid sequence was engineered to maintain the high-expression characteristics of porcine fVIII. The bioengineered construct then was used effectively to treat knockout mice with hemophilia A. In the current study, we focused on optimizing self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vector systems by analyzing the efficacy of various lentiviral components in terms of virus production, transduction efficiency and transgene expression. Specifically, three parameters were evaluated: (1) the woodchuck hepatitis post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE), (2) HIV versus SIV viral vector systems and (3) various internal promoters. The inclusion of a WPRE sequence had negligible effects on viral production and HP-fVIII expression. HIV and SIV vectors were compared and found to be similar with respect to transduction efficiency in both K562s and HEK-293T cells. However, there was an enhanced expression of HP-fVIII by the SIV system, which was evident in both K562 and BHK-M cell lines. To further compare expression of HP-fVIII from an SIV-based lentiviral system, we constructed expression vectors containing the high expression transgene and a human elongation factor-1 alpha, cytomegalovirus (CMV) or phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. Expression was significantly greater from the CMV promoter, which also yielded therapeutic levels of HP-fVIII in hemophilia A mice. Based on these studies, an optimized vector contains the HP-fVIII transgene driven by a CMV internal promoter within a SIV-based lentiviral backbone lacking a WPRE.

  9. Acquired hemophilia as the cause of life-threatening hemorrhage in a 94-year-old man: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchard Elizabeth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acquired factor VIII deficiency is a rare entity that can lead to severe and life-threatening bleeding. We describe a case of severe bleeding from the tongue secondary to acquired hemophilia and discuss treatment options, including aminocaproic acid and recombinant factor VIII, which have not been widely reported in the literature for the management of such patients. Case presentation A 94-year-old Caucasian man presented to our institution with diffuse bruising and extensive bleeding from the tongue secondary to mechanical trauma. He had no prior history of bleeding and his medical history was unremarkable except for dementia and hypertension. Coagulation studies revealed a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and a mixing study was consistent with the presence of an inhibitor. Quantitative assays revealed a reduced level of factor VIII activity (1% and the presence of a factor VIII inhibitor, measured at seven Bethesda units, in the serum. Oral prednisone therapy (60mg/day was given. He also received intravenous aminocaproic acid and human concentrate of factor VIII (Humate-P and topical anti-thrombolytic agents (100 units of topical thrombin cream. His hospital course was prolonged because of persistent bleeding and the development of profuse melena. He required eight units of packed red blood cells for transfusion. Hospitalization was also complicated by bradycardia of unclear etiology, which started after infusion of aminocaproic acid. His activated partial thromboplastin time gradually normalized. He was discharged to a rehabilitation facility three weeks later with improving symptoms, stable hematocrit and resolving bruises. Conclusions Clinicians should suspect a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia in older patients with unexplained persistent and profound bleeding from uncommon soft tissues, including the tongue. Use of factor VIII (Humate-P and aminocaproic acid can be useful in this coagulopathy but

  10. A patient with hypereosinophilic syndrome that manifested with acquired hemophilia and elevated IgG4: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagao Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hypereosinophilic syndrome is defined as a prolonged state (more than six months of eosinophilia (greater than 1500 cells/μL, without an apparent etiology and with end-organ damage. Hypereosinophilic syndrome can cause coagulation abnormalities. Among hypereosinophilic syndrome types, the lymphocytic variant (lymphocytic hypereosinophilic syndrome is derived from a monoclonal proliferation of T lymphocytes. Here, we describe the case of a patient with lymphocytic hypereosinophilic syndrome who presented with a coagulation abnormality. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such report including a detailed clinical picture and temporal cytokine profile. Case presentation A 77-year-old Japanese man presented to our facility with massive hematuria and hypereosinophilia (greater than 2600 cells/μl. His eosinophilia first appeared five years earlier when he developed femoral artery occlusion. He manifested with multiple hematomas and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. His IgG4 level was remarkably elevated (greater than 2000 mg/dL. Polymerase chain reaction tests of peripheral blood and bone marrow identified lymphocytic hypereosinophilic syndrome. His prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time was found to be due to acquired hemophilia. Glucocorticoids suppressed both the hypereosinophilia and coagulation abnormality. However, tapering of glucocorticoids led to a relapse of the coagulation abnormality alone, without eosinophilia. Tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-5, and/or eotaxin-3 may have caused the hypereosinophilia, and interleukin-10 was correlated with the coagulation abnormality. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case in which lymphocytic hypereosinophilic syndrome and IgG4-related disease have overlapped. In addition, our patient is only the second case of hypereosinophilic disease that manifested with acquired hemophilia. Our patient relapsed with the

  11. Extrahepatic sources of factor VIII potentially contribute to the coagulation cascade correcting the bleeding phenotype of mice with hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolini, Diego; Merlin, Simone; Feola, Maria; Ranaldo, Gabriella; Amoruso, Angela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zaffaroni, Mauro; Ferrero, Alessandro; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Valente, Guido; Gupta, Sanjeev; Prat, Maria; Follenzi, Antonia

    2015-07-01

    A large fraction of factor VIII in blood originates from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells although extrahepatic sources also contribute to plasma factor VIII levels. Identification of cell-types other than endothelial cells with the capacity to synthesize and release factor VIII will be helpful for therapeutic approaches in hemophilia A. Recent cell therapy and bone marrow transplantation studies indicated that Küpffer cells, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells could synthesize factor VIII in sufficient amount to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in hemophilic mice. To further establish the role of blood cells in expressing factor VIII, we studied various types of mouse and human hematopoietic cells. We identified factor VIII in cells isolated from peripheral and cord blood, as well as bone marrow. Co-staining for cell type-specific markers verified that factor VIII was expressed in monocytes, macrophages and megakaryocytes. We additionally verified that factor VIII was expressed in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and endothelial cells elsewhere, e.g., in the spleen, lungs and kidneys. Factor VIII was well expressed in sinusoidal endothelial cells and Küpffer cells isolated from human liver, whereas by comparison isolated human hepatocytes expressed factor VIII at very low levels. After transplantation of CD34(+) human cord blood cells into NOD/SCIDγNull-hemophilia A mice, fluorescence activated cell sorting of peripheral blood showed >40% donor cells engrafted in the majority of mice. In these animals, plasma factor VIII activity 12 weeks after cell transplantation was up to 5% and nine of 12 mice survived after a tail clip-assay. In conclusion, hematopoietic cells, in addition to endothelial cells, express and secrete factor VIII: this information should offer further opportunities for understanding mechanisms of factor VIII synthesis and replenishment.

  12. Severe hemophilia A in a female by cryptic translocation: Order and orientation of factor VIII within Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migeon, B.R.; McGinniss, M.J.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Axelman, J.; Stasiowski, B.A.; Youssoufian, H.; Kearns, W.G.; Chung, A.; Pearson, P.L.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Muneer, R.S. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The authors report studies of a female with severe hemophilia A resulting from a complex de novo translocation of chromosomes X and 17 (46,X,t(X; 17)). Somatic cell hybrids containing the normal X, the der(X), or the der(17) were analyzed for coagulation factor VIII (F8C) sequences using Southern blots and polymerase chain reaction. The normal X, always late replicating, contains a normal F8C gene, whereas the der(X) has no F8C sequences. The der(17) chromosome containing Xq24-Xq28 carries a functional G6PD locus and a deleted F8C allele that lacks exons 1--15. Also, it lacks the DXYS64-X locus, situated between the F8C locus and the Xq telomere. These results indicate that a cryptic breakpoint within Xq28 deleted the 5[prime] end of F8C, but left the more proximal G6PD locus intact on the der(17)chromosome. As the deleted segment includes the 5[prime] half of F8C as well as the subtelomeric DXYS64 locus, F8C must be oriented on the chromosome with its 5[prime] region closest to the telomere. Therefore, the order of these loci is Xcen-G6PD-3[prime]F8C-5[prime]F8C-DXYS64-Xqtel. The analysis of somatic cell hybrids has elucidated the true nature of the F8C mutation in the pro-band, revealing a more complex rearrangement (three chromosomes involved) than that expected from cytogenetic analysis, chromosome painting, and Southern blots. A 900-kb segment within Xq28 has been translocated to another autosome. Hemophilia A in this heterozygous female is due to the decapitation of the F8C gene on the der(17) and inactivation of the intact allele on the normal X. 27 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Evaluation of von Willebrand factor phenotypes and genotypes in Hemophilia A patients with and without identified F8 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brian; Rice, Anne S.; De Staercke, Christine; Eyster, M. Elaine; Yaish, Hassan M.; Knoll, Christine M.; Bean, Christopher J.; Miller, Connie H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in factor VIII (FVIII). von Willebrand disease (VWD) is characterized by a quantitative or qualitative defect in von Willebrand Factor (VWF). Patients with VWD with severely low VWF or VWD Type 2N (VWD2N), a VWD subtype distinguished by defective VWF binding to FVIII, may have reduced FVIII levels secondary to their VWD. These patients superficially resemble patients with HA, and pose a potential for misdiagnosis. Objectives Investigate the unexplained cause of bleeding in HA patients without known FVIII mutations by assessing plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), FVIII binding capacities, and VWF genotypes. Patients/Methods Thirty-seven of 1027 patients with HA studied as part of the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study lacked identifiable F8 mutations. These patients (cases) and 73 patients with identified F8 mutations (controls) were evaluated for VWF:Ag, patient's VWF capacity to bind FVIII (VWF:FVIIIB), and VWF sequence. Results Four cases had VWF:Ag <3 IU/dL and VWF mutations consistent with Type3 VWD. Six cases and one control were heterozygous for mutations previously reported to cause Type1 VWD (VWD1) (n=5 cases and 1 control) or predicted to be deleterious by Polyphen2 and SIFT prediction tools (n=1 case). One control had VWF:Ag <30 IU/dl, and seven patients (4 cases and 3 controls), including two cases who were heterozygous for a known VWD2N mutation, had reduced VWF:FVIIIB. Conclusions These data emphasize that some patients diagnosed with HA require VWF assessments in order to achieve a comprehensive diagnosis and an optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25780857

  14. Cohort Profile Update: The GAZEL Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Marcel; Leclerc, Annette; Zins, Marie

    2015-02-01

    The original GAZEL cohort was composed of 20 625 employees of the French national gas and electricity companies (15 011 male employees then aged 40 to 50 years and 5614 women between 35 and 50 years old) at its inception in 1989. A Cohort Profile article was published in 2007. By the end of 2013, participants were aged 60-75, and almost all of them retired during follow-up. Accordingly, the main focus of research in the past decade was devoted to the study of the persistent, long-term effects of occupational exposures after retirement; of the transition between professionally active life and retirement; and on determinants of early ageing. Accordingly, in addition to the health, behavioural and social data collected yearly since the beginning of the follow-up, new data were thus collected on cognitive complaints, cognitive and physical functioning, limitations in daily activities, time use and social relationships of retirees. This update presents the main findings of research within the GAZEL Cohort Study during the past 7 years. Any research group, in France or elsewhere, can submit a research proposal to work on the GAZEL cohort. To do this, interested researchers should contact one of the principal investigators of the GAZEL Cohort Study.

  15. Reliability of patient-reported outcome instruments in US adults with hemophilia: the Pain, Functional Impairment and Quality of life (P-FiQ study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempton CL

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Christine L Kempton,1 Michael Wang,2 Michael Recht,3 Anne Neff,4 Amy D Shapiro,5 Amit Soni,6 Roshni Kulkarni,7 Tyler W Buckner,2 Katharine Batt,8 Neeraj N Iyer,9 David L Cooper9 1Departments of Pediatrics and Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA; 3The Hemophilia Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 4Hematology and Medical Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA; 5Indiana Hemophilia & Thrombosis Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 6Center for Inherited Blood Disorders and CHOC Children’s Hospital/UC Irvine, Orange, CA, USA; 7MSU Center for Bleeding and Clotting Disorders, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA; 8Hematology and Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 9Clinical, Medical and Regulatory Affairs, Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, NJ, USA Background: Hemophilia is marked by frequent joint bleeding, resulting in pain and functional impairment.Objective: This study aimed to assess the reliability of five patient-reported outcome (PRO instruments in people with hemophilia (PWH in a non-bleeding state.Methods: Adult male PWH of any severity and inhibitor status, with a history of joint pain or bleeding, completed a pain history and five PRO instruments (EQ-5D-5L, Brief Pain Inventory v2 [BPI], International Physical Activity Questionnaire [IPAQ], Short Form 36 Health Survey v2 [SF-36v2], and Hemophilia Activities List [HAL] during their routine comprehensive care visit. Patients were approached to complete the PRO instruments again at the end of their visit while in a similar non-bleeding state. Concordance of individual questionnaire items and correlation between domain scores were assessed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC.Results: Participants completing the retest (n=164 had a median age of 33.9 years. Median time for

  16. Clinical management of intracranial hemorrhage in patients with hemophilia A%A型血友病合并颅内出血的临床救治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵东升; 张世明; 蒋永进; 杜朝亮; 王跃胜

    2010-01-01

    @@ 血友病(hemophilia)是一组遗传性凝血活酶生成障碍引起的出血性疾病,约占先天性出血性疾病的88%.在我国血友病中,A型血友病(hemophilia A, HA)约占80%.出血可发生在任何部位,而颅内出血(intracranial hemorrhage, ICH)极少见.自2001年3月至2006年7月我们收治HA合并ICH 11例,结合相关文献分析总结如下.

  17. Bibliometric analysis of Chinese literatures about hemophilia care research%血友病护理研究中文文献计量学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵华; 段志光

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To know about the research status of Chinese literatures in the field of hemophilia care,so as to provide references for targetedly improving hemophilia care research in China.Methods:Chinese literatures about hemophilia care research were retrieved from China National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKI),China ac-ademic journal network publication database and Wanfang Data knowledge service platform,and were analyzed in statistical methods.Results:422 researchers published 207 papers totally,31.401% by sole authors.Coopera-tive research was limited in the same organization,lack of cross regional and interdisciplinary integration.Most researchers and institutions were from provincial hemophilia treatment centers,and six institutions of Hemo-philia Treatment Centers Collaborative Network of China were the main research forces.5.314% of the papers had been funded primarily by provincial、civic and school foundations.Nursing research had been published on 43 kinds of journals,44.186% of them were nursing journals.Research hotspots focused on the field of “bleeding”,“comprehensive care”and “home care”.Conclusion:The overall strength of domestic hemophilia care research was weaker and should increase investment in policy support and scientific research of hemophilia care research, strengthen domestic and international exchanges and cooperation,promote interdisciplinary research,and accel-erate the setting of hemophilia nurse positions in our country.%[目的]了解血友病护理领域中文文献的研究状况,为有针对性地提高我国血友病护理研究提供参考依据。[方法]采用文献计量学方法,检索中国知网(CNKI)和万方数据知识服务平台,对国内血友病护理研究中文文献进行统计分析。[结果]422名研究人员共发文207篇,31.401%为独著,合作研究局限在同一机构,缺乏跨地区及学科间的交叉融合;血友病护理研究人员及机构多来自省级血友病诊疗中心,以中

  18. Anti-CD20 as the B cells targeting agent in the combined therapy to modulate anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A inhibitor mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lien eLiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutralizing antibody formation against transgene products can represent a major complication following gene therapy with treatment of genetic diseases, such as hemophilia A. Although successful approaches have been developed to prevent the formation of anti-factor VIII (FVIII antibodies, innovative strategies to overcome pre-existing anti-FVIII immune responses in FVIII-primed subjects are still lacking. Anti-FVIII neutralizing antibodies circulate for long periods in part due to persistence of memory B cells. Anti-CD20 targets a variety of B cells (pre-B cells to mature/memory cells; therefore, we investigated the impact of B cell depletion on anti-FVIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice using anti-CD20 combined with regulatory T (Treg cell expansion using IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin. We found that anti-CD20 alone can partially modulate anti-FVIII immune responses in both unprimed and FVIII-primed hemophilia A mice. Moreover, in mice treated with anti-CD20 + IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + rapamycin + FVIII, anti-FVIII antibody titers were significantly reduced in comparison to mice treated with regimens targeting only B or T cells. In addition, titers remained low after a second challenge with FVIII plasmid . Treg cells and activation markers were transiently and significantly increased in the groups treated with IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes ; however,significant B cell depletion was obtained in anti-CD20-treated groups. Importantly, both FVIII-specific antibody-secreting cells and memory B cells were significantly reduced in mice treated with combination therapy. This study demonstrates that a combination regimen is highly promising as a treatment option for modulating anti-FVIII antibodies and facilitating induction of long-term tolerance to FVIII in hemophilia A mice.

  19. [Relationship between factor VIII inhibitor development and polymorphisms of TNFα and CTLA-4 gene in Chinese Han patients with hemophilia A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu-lu; Yu, Zi-qiang; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Li-juan; Su, Jian; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Chang-geng

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the potential association between factor VIII inhibitor development and polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-308 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated protein-4 gene in Chinese Han patients with hemophilia A (HA). The single base change polymorphism in TNF-α and CTLA-4 gene was analyzed in 140 Chinese Han patients with hemophilia A who have been treated with plasma-derived FVIII concentrates and 108 normal controls by using PCR-restrictive fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). All of the HA patients' plasma samples were measured by modified-Nijmegen assay simultaneously. In HA patients, G/G genotype, G/A genotype and A/A genotype were detected in 118 (84.3%), 18 (12.8%) and 4 cases (2.9%) respectively; C/C genotype, C/T genotype and T/T genotype were detected in 108 (77.2%), 30 (21.4%) and 2 cases (1.4%) respectively. The difference in the genotype frequencies between HA patients and controls was nonsignificant (P > 0.05). Patients who were carriers of homozygotes for A allele had a higher risk of inhibitor development compared with those who were not (OR = 7.519, 95% CI = 3.168 - 17.844). Severe HA patients who were carriers of homozygotes for A allele had a higher risk of inhibitor development compared with those who were not (OR = 8.163, 95% CI = 2.521 - 26.434). There was no statistical difference in the risk of inhibitor development between the patients who were carriers or not (OR = 1.586, 95% CI = 0.729 - 3.450). TNF-α-308 gene polymorphism is significantly associated with inhibitor development in Chinese Han patients with severe hemophilia A. TNF-α gene may be a useful marker and potential modulator of the immune response to replacement therapy for hemophilia A patients.

  20. Characterization of three abnormal factor IX variants (Bm Lake Elsinore, Long Beach, and Los Angeles) of hemophilia-B. Evidence for defects affecting the latent catalytic site.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Usharani; Warn-Cramer, B J; Kasper, C K; BAJAJ, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Abnormal factor IX variant proteins were isolated from the plasmas of three unrelated severe hemophilia-B families that had been previously shown to contain functionally impaired molecules immunologically similar to normal factor IX. The families studied were: (1) a patient with markedly prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Bm Lake Elsinore (IXBmLE); (b) three patients (brothers) with moderately prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Long Beach (IXLB); ...

  1. Evaluation of transfusion-related complications along with estimation of inhibitors in patients with hemophilia: A pilot study from a single center

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: Apart from inhibitor development in patients with hemophilia (PWH) the old problems of blood borne viral infections and red cell alloimmunization still persist in PWH from developing countries. This study was planned to detect the presence of inhibitors in our PWH and to determine the presence of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI) markers and clinically significant red cell alloantibodies in these patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred fourteen PWH were screened for va...

  2. 56例血友病A牙龈出血的治疗与护理%Treatment and Nursing in the Gum Bleeding of Patients with Hemophilia A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕彬; 孙桂芝; 刘建云; 王峰; 丁培芳

    2003-01-01

    总结56例血友病A(hemophilia,HA)患者牙龈出血的治疗和护理.结果表明:及时补充足量的凝血因子Ⅷ(FⅧ)制剂,局部使用纤维结合蛋白(fibronectin,FN)制剂,合理的专科护理,能够使HA患者的牙龈出血得到有效控制.

  3. Effect of whole body vibration training on quadriceps strength, bone mineral density, and functional capacity in children with hemophilia: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shamy, S

    2017-06-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of whole body vibration training on quadriceps strength, bone mineral density, and functional capacity in children with hemophilia. Thirty children with hemophilia with age ranging from 9 to 13 years were selected and randomly assigned to either the study group that received whole body vibration training (30-40 Hz, 2-4 mm of peak-to-peak vertical plate displacement for 15 minutes/day, 3 days/week/ 12 weeks) plus the conventional physical therapy program or the control group that performed a conventional physical therapy program only. Outcomes included quadriceps strength, bone mineral density, and the functional capacity. Children in the study group showed a significant improvement in all outcomes compared with the control group. The quadriceps peak torque after treatment was 70.26 and 56.46 Nm for the study and control group, respectively (p⟨0.001). The lumbar spine bone mineral density after treatment was 0.85 and 0.72 g/cm(2) for the study and control group, respectively (p⟨0.001). The functional capacity after treatment was 325 and 290 m for the study and control group, respectively (p=0.006). Whole body vibration training is an effective modality in increasing quadriceps strength, bone mineral density, and functional capacity in children with hemophilia.

  4. A MicroRNA-regulated and GP64-pseudotyped Lentiviral Vector Mediates Stable Expression of FVIII in a Murine Model of Hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideto; Hegadorn, Carol; Ozelo, Margareth; Burnett, Erin; Tuttle, Angie; Labelle, Andrea; McCray, Paul B; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, Brian; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective to use gene therapy to provide sustained, therapeutic levels of factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A is compromised by the emergence of inhibitory antibodies that prevent FVIII from performing its essential function as a cofactor for factor IX (FIX). FVIII appears to be more immunogenic than FIX and an immune response is associated more frequently with FVIII than FIX gene therapy strategies. We have evaluated a modified lentiviral delivery strategy that facilitates liver-restricted transgene expression and prevents off-target expression in hematopoietic cells by incorporating microRNA (miRNA) target sequences. In contrast to outcomes using this strategy to deliver FIX, this modified delivery strategy was in and of itself insufficient to prevent an anti-FVIII immune response in treated hemophilia A mice. However, pseudotyping the lentivirus with the GP64 envelope glycoprotein, in conjunction with a liver-restricted promoter and a miRNA-regulated FVIII transgene resulted in sustained, therapeutic levels of FVIII. These modifications to the lentiviral delivery system effectively restricted FVIII transgene expression to the liver. Plasma levels of FVIII could be increased to around 9% that of normal levels when macrophages were depleted prior to treating the hemophilia A mice with the modified lentiviral FVIII delivery system. PMID:21285959

  5. Delivery of full-length factor VIII using a piggyBac transposon vector to correct a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideto Matsui

    Full Text Available Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice. piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII.

  6. Delivery of full-length factor VIII using a piggyBac transposon vector to correct a mouse model of hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideto; Fujimoto, Naoko; Sasakawa, Noriko; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Shima, Midori; Yamanaka, Shinya; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Viral vectors have been used for hemophilia A gene therapy. However, due to its large size, full-length Factor VIII (FVIII) cDNA has not been successfully delivered using conventional viral vectors. Moreover, viral vectors may pose safety risks, e.g., adverse immunological reactions or virus-mediated cytotoxicity. Here, we took advantages of the non-viral vector gene delivery system based on piggyBac DNA transposon to transfer the full-length FVIII cDNA, for the purpose of treating hemophilia A. We tested the efficiency of this new vector system in human 293T cells and iPS cells, and confirmed the expression of the full-length FVIII in culture media using activity-sensitive coagulation assays. Hydrodynamic injection of the piggyBac vectors into hemophilia A mice temporally treated with an immunosuppressant resulted in stable production of circulating FVIII for over 300 days without development of anti-FVIII antibodies. Furthermore, tail-clip assay revealed significant improvement of blood coagulation time in the treated mice. piggyBac transposon vectors can facilitate the long-term expression of therapeutic transgenes in vitro and in vivo. This novel gene transfer strategy should provide safe and efficient delivery of FVIII.

  7. The Effectiveness of a New Hemostatic Agent (Ankaferd Blood Stopper for the Control of Bleeding following Tooth Extraction in Hemophilia: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı Oğuz Kazancıoğlu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the hemostatic efficacy of a new local hemostatic agent, Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS, for the control of bleeding following tooth extraction in hemophiliacs. Materials and Methods: Simple tooth extractions were performed in 27 hemophilia A patients. In the treatment group (n=17 local hemostasis was achieved via application of ABS to the extraction sockets, whereas in the control group (n=10 local hemostasis was achieved via direct packing with gauze. Results: In all, 57 (21 primary and 36 permanent teeth extractions were performed in 27 hemophilia A patients. There were no significant differences in age or factor VIII level distribution between the 2 groups (p>0.05. The most significant clinical difference between the groups was associated with the use of ABS; those in the treatment group had significantly shorter duration of bleeding (p=0.002. Conclusion: This is the first study to evaluate the efficacy of ABS for the control of bleeding following tooth extraction in hemophiliacs. ABS can be considered an alternative local hemostatic agent for reducing clotting factor concentrates in hemophilia patients.

  8. Status of Research in Gene Diagnosis in Patients with Hemophilia%血友病基因诊断的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鸿利; 储海燕; 王学锋

    2002-01-01

    @@ 血友病(hemophilia)分为血友病A(hemophilia A, HA)和血友病B(hemophilia B, HB)两型.我国大陆血友病的发病率缺乏详细的统计资料.据邵宗鸿的综合报道,我国血友病的发病率低于西方国家(平均5~10/105),为2.27~2.84/105,其中血友病A为1.95~2.40/105,血友病B为0.32~0.44/105.据我国11所大型医院截止1999年底统计,血友病共计4 655例,其中血友病A3999例(占86%),血友病B656例(占14%).另据我国台湾省截止2000年3月统计,血友病A 362例(占86%),血友病B59例(占14%).本文就我国血友病基因诊断的研究现状作一简述.

  9. Advancements in Researches on Vectors of the Gene Therapy for Hemophilia A%血友病A基因治疗载体研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晴; 颜景斌; 曾溢滔

    2011-01-01

    血友病A是X染色体隐性遗传出血性疾病.其发病原因是患者血液中先天缺乏凝血因子F Ⅷ.用于血友病A基因治疗研究的载体有病毒载体和非病毒载体,目前研究较多的是病毒载体,主要有逆转录病毒载体和慢病毒载体,腺病毒载体及腺相关病毒载体等.非病毒载体主要有质粒、脂质体、转座子等.文章拟对血友病A基因治疗各载体的特点和研究进展作一综述.%Hemophilia A is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by a congenital deficiency of clotting factor VDI in patients' blood. The vectors applied in researches on the gene therapy for hemophilia A include viral vectors and nonviral vectors. Recently, more researches have been done in the development of viral vectors system, such as retrovirus vectors, lentivirus vectors, adenovirus vectors, and adeno-associated vectors. Nonviral vectors mainly include plasmids, lipofectamine, transposon, etc. This article will review the progress in researches on the vectors of gene therapy for hemophilia A.

  10. Continuing improvement of genetic diagnosis strategy of hemophilia%不断完善血友病的基因诊断体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学锋; 王鸿利

    2008-01-01

    The genetic diagnosis of hemophilia is a basic method for preventing the birth of hemophilia patients and a basic way for realizing the aim of aristogenesis.Direct and indirect genetic diagnosis is a basic strategy for screening of hemophilia;while in indirect genetic diagnosis,more attention should be paid on the information given by the intro-genetic sites combined with the extra-genetic sites.%血友病的基因诊断是预防血友病患者出生,实现优生优育的根本措施.综合使用直接和间接基因诊断措施是血友病基因诊断的基本策略;在进行间接基因诊断时,应该重视选择基因内位点和多个基因外位点联合提供的信息.

  11. Massive adrenal vein aneurysm mimicking an adrenal tumor in a patient with hemophilia A: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sleightholm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visceral venous aneurysms are exceedingly rare, and until now, there have been no reports of this phenomenon in the adrenal vasculature. This report details the first adrenal venous aneurysm reported in the literature. The aneurysm presented as an 18-cm mass that was initially suspected to be a hematoma or tumor on the basis of the complex medical history of the patient, which included hemophilia A and testicular cancer. After surgical excision, pathologic examination confirmed this mass to be a 15.9-cm adrenal vein aneurysm, the largest aneurysm of any type or location recorded in the medical literature. Case presentation A 58-year-old caucasian male with hemophilia A presented to the emergency room of another institution with abdominal pain, blood in the stool, and a history of diverticulosis and symptomatic hemorrhoids. A large, left-sided adrenal mass was detected by computed tomography, and because of the patient’s hemophilia A and imaging consistent with a hemorrhagic mass, a hematoma was initially suspected. The patient was transferred to our institution, monitored for further bleeding with a stable hospital course, and discharged from the hospital under close monitoring. After 7–8 weeks with no change in the size of the mass, concerns grew regarding increasing symptoms of both satiety and mass effects from the large anomaly, as well as about the patient’s complicated medical history, which also included cancer. Surgical excision was recommended because of the concerns about increasing symptoms and the possibility of a malignancy. Correction and maintenance of factor VIII levels were incorporated pre-, intra-, and postoperatively, and en bloc surgical resection was performed to minimize bleeding and provide oncologic extirpation of the mass. A bowling ball-sized mass was removed, and careful pathologic examination revealed the mass to be a venous adrenal aneurysm. After a brief hospital stay, the patient made a

  12. A common G10430A mutation (Gly 60 Ser) in the factor IX gene describes the presence of moderate and mild hemophilia B in the majority of the Gujarati population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Leera; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2007-05-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked recessively inherited bleeding disorder afflicting humans across all socio-economic as well as racial groups. A wide range of mutations showing high heterogeneity has been reported in different populations. Thus, it has been difficult to adopt a cost-effective strategy for the genetic diagnosis of hemophilia B families. We report the presence of a common G10430A mutation in exon d of the factor IX gene, wherein the highly conserved Gly 60 residue of the first epidermal growth like domain was changed to Ser in 22 out of 22 moderately severe to mild hemophilia B patients originating from Gujarat. None of the eight Gujarati severe hemophilia B patients, 30 normal Gujarati men, and 20 moderately severe to mild hemophilia B patients belonging to other communities showed the presence of this mutation. This mutation occurred in the same haplotype background thereby suggesting a 'founder effect.' The direct detection of this G10430A mutation can be used for accurate carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in mild to moderate factor-IX-deficient patients belonging to the Gujarat state of western India.

  13. Plasma Level of TFPI and its Significance in Patients with Hemophilia%血友病患者组织因子途径抑制物(TFPI)水平的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡理明; 叶玲丽; 谢炳寿; 朱森勇; 陈萍; 林素仙

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the plasma level of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and its significance in patients with hemophilia. Methods Plasma level of TFPI was measured by ELISA in 65 patients with hemophilia (54 with hemophilia A, 11 with hemophilia B) , which were not treated by factor replacement therapy during taking blood samples except 3 cases. Results Plasma level of TFPI in patients with hemophilia and on healthy controls were 96. 90 ±24. 06 ng/ml and 85. 17 ± 12. 62 ng/ml respectively ( P 0.05(P=0.537).血友病A、B之间TFPI水平无差异.结论 血友病患者TFPI水平明显高于正常对照.表明血友病出血机制除与因子Ⅷ、Ⅸ水平相关之外,尚与TFPI水平增高、凝血酶生成的负调节增强密切相关.提示抑制TFPI活性水平,有助于制止血友病出血.

  14. Use of Bcl I diction in screening of hemophilia A carriers%Bcl I位点在血友病A携带者检测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康建民; 杨林花; 郭志萍; 贾红芳

    2011-01-01

    目的 探索一种更简便、更特异的方法用于血友病A的基因诊断.方法 采用聚合酶链反应-限制性片断多态性方法对8个血友病A家系进行Bcl I位点检测.结果 Bcl I位点杂合率为24%(4/17).可以为其中3个血友病A家系提供诊断信息,信息率为3/8.结论 Bcl I位点为血友病A基因多态性遗传标志之一,用于血友病A基因诊断有较大价值.%Objective To explore a much simpler and more specific method for genetic diagnosis of hemophilia A. Methods Detection of Bcl I locus was performed in 8 hemophilia A families using polymerase chain reaction-re - strict fragment length polymorphism. Results The homozygote rate was 24% ( 4/17). Bcl I locus could provide diag nostic information for 3 hemophilia A families, with the information rate being 3/8. Conclusion Bcl I locus, one of the gene polymorphic genetic markers of hemophilia A, is of favorably great value for hemophilia A gene diagnosis.

  15. [International cohort studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, W; Pigeot, I

    2012-06-01

    Among observational studies, cohort studies, i.e. longitudinal observations of selected population groups, provide the highest possible evidence of a causal association between specific risk factors (exposure) and the occurrence of disease in populations. Besides the fact that many exposures cannot be investigated in experimental designs, cohort studies have the advantage over randomized clinical trials that they are conducted in free living populations and not in restrictive, clinical settings. In this paper we describe the aims and features of international cohorts that have been selected because of their impact, their size or their endpoints. We do not only present the study designs and survey instruments used but we also highlight some of the most important results gained by these studies. Most of these prospective studies investigated common chronic diseases in the elderly, such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular or neurodegenerative diseases, osteoporosis and ophthalmologic disorders. Newer cohorts and recent reassessments of existing cohorts almost always include the collection and storage of biological samples. In recent years technological developments allowed the implementation of cutting edge measurement procedures, such as imaging techniques for phenotyping. Finally, we discuss on the one hand whether these designs can be transferred to the German situation and on the other hand to what degree the results obtained from foreign cohorts can be generalized for the German population. We conclude with recommendations for future cohort studies.

  16. Construct validity of patient-reported outcome instruments in US adults with hemophilia: results from the Pain, Functional Impairment, and Quality of life (P-FiQ study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batt K

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Katharine Batt,1 Michael Recht,2 David L Cooper,3 Neeraj N Iyer,3 Christine L Kempton4 1Hematology and Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 2The Hemophilia Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, 3Novo Nordisk Inc., Plainsboro, NJ, 4Departments of Pediatrics and Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Background: People with hemophilia (PWH experience frequent joint bleeding, resulting in pain and functional impairment. Generic and disease-specific patient-reported outcome (PRO instruments have been used in clinical studies, but rarely in the comprehensive hemophilia care setting. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess construct validity of PRO instruments measuring pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life in US PWH with a history of joint pain/bleeding. Methods: Adult male PWH completed 4 PRO instruments (EQ-5D-5L with visual analog scale, Brief Pain Inventory v2 Short Form [BPI], SF-36v2, Hemophilia Activities List [HAL] and underwent a musculoskeletal examination (Hemophilia Joint Health Score v2.1 [HJHS]. Construct validity between index and domain scores was evaluated by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient. Results: A total of 381 PWH were enrolled. EQ-5D-5L Mobility correlated with BPI, SF-36v2, and HAL domains related to pain, physical function, and activity of the lower extremities. EQ-5D-5L Self-Care correlated only with HAL Self-Care. EQ-5D-5L Usual Activities correlated with BPI Pain Interference and domains within SF-36v2 and HAL related to pain and physical function/activities (particularly those involving the lower extremities. EQ-5D-5L Pain/Discomfort correlated with Bodily Pain and Physical Summary on SF-36v2, HAL Overall Activity, and all BPI pain domains. EQ-5D-5L Anxiety/Depression correlated with social/emotional/mental aspects of SF-36v2. On BPI, most pain domains correlated with Bodily

  17. Genética comunitária e hemofilia em uma população brasileira Community genetics and hemophilia in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Maria Caio

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A hemofilia é uma doença hemorrágica importante no Brasil, afetando cerca de um em cada dez mil indivíduos do sexo masculino. A autopercepção do portador a respeito da hemofilia e a sua interação com a comunidade são relevantes na abordagem clínica dessa doença. Nós investigamos vários aspectos sociais, psicológicos e comunitários da hemofilia em uma população brasileira (Campinas, São Paulo. Entrevistamos trinta portadores adultos da hemofilia, uma amostra-controle composta por 73 de seus irmãos normais do sexo masculino e 641 indivíduos da comunidade. A integração comunitária dos portadores da hemofilia mostrou-se afetada apenas nos aspectos sócio-econômicos, sem alteração no que diz respeito ao casamento, à procriação e à aquisição de melhores níveis educacionais. Observaram-se entre os portadores da hemofilia altos níveis de auto-rotulação, acompanhados de depressão, ansiedade e insegurança. A comunidade apresentou uma alta freqüência de completo desconhecimento a respeito da hemofilia (49%, demonstrando contra os hemofílicos os preconceitos normalmente observados contra os portadores de doenças contagiosas, como a AIDS. O trabalho sugere a estruturação de programa comunitário, visando à melhor adequação psicossocial dos portadores da hemofilia.Hemophilia is an important hemorrhagic disease in Brazil, affecting about 1 out of every 10,000 males. Patient's self-perception of hemophilia and interaction with the community are relevant to the clinical management of this disease. We investigated several social, psychological, and community aspects of hemophilia in a Brazilian population (Campinas, São Paulo State, interviewing 30 hemophiliac males, a control sample comprised of 73 non-hemophiliac brothers, and 641 individuals from the community. According to our results, more severe social disability in the hemophiliac patient was related to economic factors, mainly unemployment; however, no

  18. Cohort Profile Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Ahlström, Magnus Glindvad; Obel, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The DHCS is a cohort of all HIV-infected individuals seen in one of the eight Danish HIV centres after 31 December 1994. Here we update the 2009 cohort profile emphasizing the development of the cohort. Every 12-24 months, DHCS is linked with the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) in order...... of Causes of Death, the Danish National Prescription Registry, the Attainment Register and the Integrated Database for Labour Market Research to get information on vital status, migration, cancer, hospital contacts, causes of death, dispensed prescriptions, education and employment. Using this design, rates...

  19. Potentiation of thrombin generation in hemophilia A plasma by coagulation factor VIII and characterization of antibody-specific inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavya S Doshi

    Full Text Available Development of inhibitory antibodies to coagulation factor VIII (fVIII is the primary obstacle to the treatment of hemophilia A in the developed world. This adverse reaction occurs in 20-30% of persons with severe hemophilia A treated with fVIII-replacement products and is characterized by the development of a humoral and neutralizing immune response to fVIII. Patients with inhibitory anti-fVIII antibodies are treated with bypassing agents including recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa. However, some patients display poor hemostatic response to bypass therapy and improved treatment options are needed. Recently, we demonstrated that fVIII inhibitors display widely variable kinetics of inhibition that correlate with their respective target epitopes. Thus, it was hypothesized that for antibodies that display slow rates of inhibition, supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII would result in improved thrombin generation and be predictive of clinical responses to this novel treatment regimen. In order to test this hypothesis, 10 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs with non-overlapping epitopes spanning fVIII, differential inhibition titers, and inhibition kinetics were studied using a thrombin generation assay. Of the 3 MAbs with high inhibitory titers, only the one with fast and complete (classically defined as "type I" kinetics displayed significant inhibition of thrombin generation with no improvement upon supplementation of rfVIIa with fVIII. The other two MAbs that displayed incomplete (classically defined as "type II" inhibition did not suppress the potentiation of thrombin generation by fVIII. All antibodies that did not completely inhibit fVIII activity demonstrated potentiation of thrombin generation by the addition of fVIII as compared to rfVIIa alone. In conclusion, fVIII alone or in combination with rfVIIa corrects the thrombin generation defect produced by the majority of anti-fVIII MAbs better than single agent rfVIIa. Therefore, combined f

  20. Hemofilia adquirida en el postparto. Presentación de un caso Postpartum Acquired Hemophilia. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenisey Quintero Méndez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Las hemorragias del periparto son la principal causa de morbilidad materna extremadamente grave y de muerte materna en Cuba y en el mundo. La hemofilia A adquirida es un trastorno hemorrágico poco frecuente, caracterizado por la presencia de anticuerpos contra el factor VIII (FVIII circulante. Se presenta el caso de una gestante de 36 años de edad, con embarazo a término, que tiene parto eutócico y presenta manifestaciones hemorrágicas en el postparto inmediato, secundarias a hematoma de la rafia que requiere de hemoterapia. Luego presenta hematoma del miembro superior derecho secundario a accidente vascular que requiere de reparo quirúrgico. La evolución tórpida del puerperio, caracterizada por hemorragia mantenida por la rafia y por el brazo intervenido, hace sospechar la presencia de un trastorno hematológico. Se constata una disminución del factor FVIII, que implica el diagnóstico de hemofilia A adquirida, se impone tratamiento con concentrado de factor VIIa recombinante (FVIIar y ciclofosfamida. La evolución posterior fue favorable, la paciente se egresa sin secuelas.Periparturient hemorrhages are the leading cause of extremely serious maternal morbidity and maternal death in Cuba and the world. Acquired Hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder characterized by the presence of antibodies against circulating factor VIII (FVIII. We present the case of a 36 years old pregnant woman with term pregnancy and vaginal delivery that suffers from hemorrhagic manifestations in the immediate postpartum secondary to raffia hematoma, requiring blood transfusion. Then she presents a bruise in the right upper limb secondary to stroke that requires surgical repair. The postpartum torpid evolution characterized by sustained bleeding raffia and the surgically treated arm, makes us suspect of the presence of a blood disorder. We observed a decrease in the FVIII factor, which involves the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia and requires treatment with

  1. Cancer Epidemiology Cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohort studies are fundamental for epidemiological research by helping researchers better understand the etiology of cancer and provide insights into the key determinants of this disease and its outcomes.

  2. 1970 British Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Brown

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The 1970 British Cohort Study (BCS70 is one of Britain’s world famous national longitudinal birth cohort studies, three of which are run by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies at the Institute of Education, University of London.  BCS70 follows the lives of more than 17,000 people born in England, Scotland and Wales in a single week of 1970. Over the course of cohort members lives, the BCS70 has collected information on health, physical, educational and social development, and economic circumstances among other factors. Since the birth survey in 1970, there have been nine ‘sweeps’ of all cohort members at ages 5, 10, 16, 26, 30, 34, 38 and most recently at 42. Data has been collected from a number of different sources (the midwife present at birth, parents of the cohort members, head and class teachers, school health service personnel and the cohort members themselves. The data has been collected in a variety of ways including via paper and electronic questionnaires, clinical records, medical examinations, physical measurements, tests of ability, educational assessments and diaries. The majority of BCS70 survey data can be accessed by bona fide researchers through the UK Data Service at the University of Essex.

  3. Impact of physiotherapy on the functional status of elbow and knee joints and quality of life in patients with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojna, Dorota; Anwajler, Joanna; Mladzka, Irena; Ostrowska, Bozena; Skolimowski, Tadeusz

    2006-06-30

    Background. The objective of our research was to assess the impact of physiotherapy on the frequency of intraarticular and intramuscular hemorrhages and on elbow and knee joint function, in hemophilic patients. Material and methods. We examined 22 boys, 6-14 years of age, suffering from hemophilia A. The research program included patient history in respect to intraarticular hemorrhages in elbows and knees before therapy, observation of intra-articular bleeding during physiotherapy, goniometric measurements of the range of movement in the elbow and knee, measurement of the circumference of the arm, forearm, thigh and calf, and momentum dynamometric measurements of the relative and absolute force of the flexors and extensors of the lower leg at the knee joints and of the forearm at the elbow joints, in static conditions. The treatment program included deficit coagulant agent replacement therapy, physiotherapy, and kinesitherapy. Results. The physiotherapy program we applied resulted in a considerable improvement in mobility, as well as increased muscle strength and mass. Conclusions. Our research showed that, due to the application of the appropriate replacement treatment, there was a decrease in the frequency and size of intraarticular hemorrhages, despite intense rehabilitation and physical activity.

  4. Efficacy and safety of long-term prophylaxis in severe hemophilia A dogs following liver gene therapy using AAV vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Denise E; Lange, Amy M; Altynova, Ekaterina S; Sarkar, Rita; Zhou, Shangzhen; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Franck, Helen G; Nichols, Timothy C; Arruda, Valder R; Kazazian, Haig H

    2011-03-01

    Developing adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia A (HA) has been challenging due to the large size of the factor VIII (FVIII) complementary DNA and the concern for the development of inhibitory antibodies to FVIII in HA patients. Here, we perform a systematic study in HA dogs by delivering a canine FVIII (cFVIII) transgene either as a single chain or two chains in an AAV vector. An optimized cFVIII single chain delivered using AAV serotype 8 (AAV8) by peripheral vein injection resulted in a dose-response with sustained expression of FVIII up to 7% (n = 4). Five HA dogs administered two-chain delivery using either AAV8 or AAV9 via the portal vein expressed long-term, vector dose-dependent levels of FVIII activity (up to 10%). In the two-chain approach, circulating cFVIII antigen levels were more than fivefold higher than activity. Notably, no long-term immune response to FVIII was observed in any of the dogs (1/9 dogs had a transient inhibitor). Long-term follow-up of the dogs showed a remarkable reduction (>90%) of bleeding episodes in a combined total of 24 years of observation. These data demonstrate that both approaches are safe and achieve dose-dependent therapeutic levels of FVIII expression, which supports translational studies of AAV-mediated delivery for HA.

  5. In situ genetic correction of F8 intron 22 inversion in hemophilia A patient-specific iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Hu, Zhiqing; Li, Zhuo; Pang, Jialun; Feng, Mai; Hu, Xuyun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin-Peng, Siyuan; Liu, Bo; Chen, Fangping; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2016-01-08

    Nearly half of severe Hemophilia A (HA) cases are caused by F8 intron 22 inversion (Inv22). This 0.6-Mb inversion splits the 186-kb F8 into two parts with opposite transcription directions. The inverted 5' part (141 kb) preserves the first 22 exons that are driven by the intrinsic F8 promoter, leading to a truncated F8 transcript due to the lack of the last 627 bp coding sequence of exons 23-26. Here we describe an in situ genetic correction of Inv22 in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). By using TALENs, the 627 bp sequence plus a polyA signal was precisely targeted at the junction of exon 22 and intron 22 via homologous recombination (HR) with high targeting efficiencies of 62.5% and 52.9%. The gene-corrected iPSCs retained a normal karyotype following removal of drug selection cassette using a Cre-LoxP system. Importantly, both F8 transcription and FVIII secretion were rescued in the candidate cell types for HA gene therapy including endothelial cells (ECs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from the gene-corrected iPSCs. This is the first report of an efficient in situ genetic correction of the large inversion mutation using a strategy of targeted gene addition.

  6. Immune Modulatory Cell Therapy for Hemophilia B Based on CD20-Targeted Lentiviral Gene Transfer to Primary B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene-modified B cells expressing immunoglobulin G (IgG fusion proteins have been shown to induce tolerance in several autoimmune and other disease models. However, lack of a vector suitable for gene transfer to human B cells has been an obstacle for translation of this approach. To overcome this hurdle, we developed an IgG-human factor IX (hFIX lentiviral fusion construct that was targeted to specifically transduce cells expressing human CD20 (hCD20. Receptor-specific retargeting by mutating envelope glycoproteins of measles virus (MV-lentiviral vector (LV and addition of a single-chain variable fragment specific for hCD20 resulted in gene delivery into primary human and transgenic hCD20 mouse B cells with high specificity. Notably, this protocol neither required nor induced activation of the B cells, as confirmed by minimal activation of inflammatory cytokines. Using this strategy, we were able to demonstrate induction of humoral tolerance, resulting in suppression of antibody formation against hFIX in a mouse model of hemophilia B (HB. In conclusion, transduction of receptor-specific retargeted LV into resting B cells is a promising method to develop B cell therapies for antigen-specific tolerance induction in human disease.

  7. Peripheral transvenular delivery of adeno-associated viral vectors to skeletal muscle as a novel therapy for hemophilia B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Valder R.; Stedman, Hansell H.; Haurigot, Virginia; Buchlis, George; Baila, Stefano; Favaro, Patricia; Chen, Yifeng; Franck, Helen G.; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J. Fraser; Couto, Linda B.; Jiang, Haiyan; Pierce, Glenn F.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Mingozzi, Federico; Nichols, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Muscle represents an important tissue target for adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene transfer of the factor IX (FIX) gene in hemophilia B (HB) subjects with advanced liver disease. Previous studies of direct intramuscular administration of an AAV-FIX vector in humans showed limited efficacy. Here we adapted an intravascular delivery system of AAV vectors encoding the FIX transgene to skeletal muscle of HB dogs. The procedure, performed under transient immunosuppression (IS), resulted in widespread transduction of muscle and sustained, dose-dependent therapeutic levels of canine FIX transgene up to 10-fold higher than those obtained by intramuscular delivery. Correction of bleeding time correlated clinically with a dramatic reduction of spontaneous bleeding episodes. None of the dogs (n = 14) receiving the AAV vector under transient IS developed inhibitory antibodies to canine FIX; transient inhibitor was detected after vector delivery without IS. The use of AAV serotypes with high tropism for muscle and low susceptibility to anti-AAV2 antibodies allowed for efficient vector administration in naive dogs and in the presence of low- but not high-titer anti-AAV2 antibodies. Collectively, these results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach for treatment of HB and highlight the importance of IS to prevent immune responses to the FIX transgene product. PMID:20335222

  8. Haemophilia care in China: achievements of a decade of World Federation of Hemophilia treatment centre twinning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, M-C; Luke, K-H

    2008-09-01

    The World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) began its involvement in China in 1993, supporting Chinese haemophilia centre twinning programmes in 1997. Although only three Chinese centres were in a twinning relationship (Tianjin/Calgary 1997-2004, Guangzhou/Ottawa 2000-2006, Shanghai/Ottawa, Calgary 2002-2007), WFH helped establish a collaborative network of six Chinese centres (Tianjin, Guangzhou, Shanghai, Beijing, Hefei, Jinan) in 2004. These network centres, in collaboration with haemophilia patients, shared and coordinated several successful ongoing priority projects (Registry, Nursing, Laboratory Diagnosis, Physiotherapy and Prophylaxis). A number of physicians, nurses and technologists have received WFH fellowships for training internationally. They are becoming haemophilia-care leaders and are key personnel working towards comprehensive care in China. National and regional workshops/conferences in addition to educational material development have been successful in reaching out to healthcare professionals and persons with haemophilia across the country. Key elements of success include the enthusiasm and commitment of the Chinese professionals and patient leaders in their desire to advance haemophilia care and their commitment to work collaboratively in a coordinated manner. They are beginning to gain national and international recognition and are launching outreach education and care programmes to cover other parts of China. WFH is now transitioning support in China from a twinning program to country programme (Global Alliance for Progress). Haemophilia work in China is still in the beginning, but there is now a solid foundation for future progress.

  9. Peripheral transvenular delivery of adeno-associated viral vectors to skeletal muscle as a novel therapy for hemophilia B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Valder R; Stedman, Hansell H; Haurigot, Virginia; Buchlis, George; Baila, Stefano; Favaro, Patricia; Chen, Yifeng; Franck, Helen G; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Couto, Linda B; Jiang, Haiyan; Pierce, Glenn F; Bellinger, Dwight A; Mingozzi, Federico; Nichols, Timothy C; High, Katherine A

    2010-06-10

    Muscle represents an important tissue target for adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene transfer of the factor IX (FIX) gene in hemophilia B (HB) subjects with advanced liver disease. Previous studies of direct intramuscular administration of an AAV-FIX vector in humans showed limited efficacy. Here we adapted an intravascular delivery system of AAV vectors encoding the FIX transgene to skeletal muscle of HB dogs. The procedure, performed under transient immunosuppression (IS), resulted in widespread transduction of muscle and sustained, dose-dependent therapeutic levels of canine FIX transgene up to 10-fold higher than those obtained by intramuscular delivery. Correction of bleeding time correlated clinically with a dramatic reduction of spontaneous bleeding episodes. None of the dogs (n = 14) receiving the AAV vector under transient IS developed inhibitory antibodies to canine FIX; transient inhibitor was detected after vector delivery without IS. The use of AAV serotypes with high tropism for muscle and low susceptibility to anti-AAV2 antibodies allowed for efficient vector administration in naive dogs and in the presence of low- but not high-titer anti-AAV2 antibodies. Collectively, these results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach for treatment of HB and highlight the importance of IS to prevent immune responses to the FIX transgene product.

  10. Clinical utility and patient perspectives on the use of extended half-life rFIXFc in the management of hemophilia B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguelino MG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Maricel G Miguelino, Jerry S Powell Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: Hemophilia B is an X-linked genetic disease caused by mutation of the gene for coagulation protein factor IX (FIX, with an incidence of approximately once every 30,000 male births in all populations and ethnic groups. When severe, the disease leads to spontaneous life threatening bleeding episodes. When untreated, most patients die from bleeding complications before 25 years of age. Current therapy requires frequent intravenous infusions of therapeutic recombinant or plasma-derived protein concentrates containing FIX. Most patients administer the infusions at home every few days, and must limit their physical activities to avoid abnormal bleeding when the FIX activity levels are below normal. After completing the pivotal Phase III clinical trial, a new therapeutic FIX preparation that has been engineered for an extended half-life in circulation, received regulatory approval in March 2014 in Canada and the US. This new FIX represents a major therapeutic advance for patients with hemophilia B. The half-life is prolonged due to fusion of the native FIX molecule with the normal constant region of immunoglobulin G. This fusion molecule then follows the normal immunoglobulin recirculation pathways through endothelial cells, resulting in prolonged times in circulation. In the clinical trials, over 150 patients successfully used eftrenonacog alfa regularly for more than 1 year to prevent spontaneous bleeding, to successfully treat any bleeding episodes, and to provide effective coagulation for major surgery. All infusions were well tolerated and effective, with no inhibitors detected and no safety concerns. This promising therapy should allow patients to use fewer infusions to maintain appropriate FIX activity levels in all clinical settings. Keywords: factor IX, hemophilia B, prophylaxis, genetic

  11. Platelet gene therapy corrects the hemophilic phenotype in immunocompromised hemophilia A mice transplanted with genetically manipulated human cord blood stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qizhen; Kuether, Erin L; Chen, Yingyu; Schroeder, Jocelyn A; Fahs, Scot A; Montgomery, Robert R

    2014-01-16

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that platelet FVIII (2bF8) gene therapy can improve hemostasis in hemophilia A mice, even in the presence of inhibitory antibodies, but none of our studies has targeted human cells. Here, we evaluated the feasibility for lentivirus (LV)-mediated human platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A. Human platelet FVIII expression was introduced by 2bF8LV-mediated transduction of human cord blood (hCB) CD34(+) cells followed by xenotransplantation into immunocompromised NSG mice or NSG mice in an FVIII(null) background (NSGF8KO). Platelet FVIII was detected in all recipients that received 2bF8LV-transduced hCB cells as long as human platelet chimerism persisted. All NSGF8KO recipients (n = 7) that received 2bF8LV-transduced hCB cells survived tail clipping if animals had greater than 2% of platelets derived from 2bF8LV-transduced hCB cells, whereas 5 of 7 survived when human platelets were 0.3% to 2%. Whole blood clotting time analysis confirmed that hemostasis was improved in NSGF8KO mice that received 2bF8LV-transduced hCB cells. We demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of 2bF8LV gene delivery to human hematopoietic stem cells to introduce FVIII expression in human platelets and that human platelet-derived FVIII can improve hemostasis in hemophilia A.

  12. Research Progress of for Non-viral Gene Therapy for Hemophilia%血友病非病毒载体基因治疗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶娟; 许正新

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency of functional clotting factors in the blood plasma. Hemophilia is well suited for gene therapy since it is due to a single gene defect and the therapeutic window is relatively broad and gene therapy perhaps is the only way to cure this disease. Non-viral vector is expected to dominate the trend of gene therapy due to its higher safety. Non-viral vector mainly includes site-specific integration vector system,naked plasmid,transposon and artificial chromosome; vector delivery system mainly includes: targeted nanoparticles, oral-delivered nanoparticles, and high-pressure tail vein injection and electroporation. Here is to make a summary of the progress in hemophilia treatment from the perspective of non-viral vectors and vector delivery system.%血友病是由于凝血因子的缺陷而导致的血液凝血功能的降低,是一类遗传背景明确且临床特点突出的疾病,基因治疗可能是血友病的唯一希望,非病毒载体因其安全性较高而有逐步发展成为基因治疗研究重点的趋势.非病毒载体主要包括定点整合载体系统、裸质粒、转座子和人工染色体,载体传递系统主要包括靶向纳米微粒、口腔传递型纳米微粒、高压尾静脉注射和电穿孔.在此总结了非病毒载体及载体传递系统两方面阐释治疗血友病的进展.

  13. 血友病合并颅内出血的临床治疗探讨%Hemophilia complicated with intracerebral hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕乃武; 王红梅; 张轶斌; 刘福庆; 贾锐

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the treatment for hemophilia complicated with intracerebral hemorrhage.Methods 20 patients with hemophilia complicated with intracranial hemorrhage were selected as study objects and were retrospectively analyzed and were followed up.Results 1 patient died at hospital.11 patients can already basicly care themselves.4 patients got hemiplegia.4 patients got secondary intracranial bleeding and ended up mental disorders, among which 1 complicated with hemiplegia.Before and after the diagnosis of hemophilia, there were statistical differences in intracranial bleeding between children ≤1, 3-6, and ≥6 years old (P < 0.05).Conclusion Alternative therapy, such as fresh frozen plasma injection, and antihypertensive drugs, such as mannitol, glucocorticoid, etc.lowering the patient's intracranial pressure, and injecting hemostatic aromatic acid can effectively treat hemophilia complicated with intracranial hemorrhage.Attention should be clinically paid on the patient's mental problems.%目的 探讨血友病合并颅内出血的临床治疗.方法 选取20例血友病患者合并颅内出血患者为研究对象,采用回顾性分析方法,进行随访.结果 1例患者在院内抢救无效死亡,11例患者生活基本自理,4例患者出现偏瘫,4例患者出现二次颅内出血,最终出现精神障碍,其中1例患者合并偏瘫.诊断血友病前后颅内出血情况在≤1岁、3~6岁、≥6岁区间上差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 采用新鲜冷冻血浆注射等进行替代治疗,并采用一些降压药物如甘露醇、糖皮质激素等药物,降低患者的颅内压水平,并注射止血芳酸,可以有效治疗血友病合并颅内出血疾病,在临床治疗上应该注重患者的精神问题.

  14. Determination of platelet aggregation rate in hemophilia patients and its significance%血友病血小板聚集率测定及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世一; 徐酉华

    2004-01-01

    血友病(hemophilia)是一组遗传性凝血功能障碍性疾病,包括血友病甲、血友病乙及血友病丙。血友病的发病率为5~10/10万人群。血友病患者的血小板聚集功能研究甚少。现将48例血友病患者的血小板聚集率测定结果进行分析报告如下。

  15. Nigeria (A Cohort Analysis)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The international movement against female circumcision gained momentum in the past two decades. Although recent studies report ... Affecting the Health of Women and Children, Ogun State Chapter, Abeokuta, Ogun State .... cohort effect in trends or provided plausible ... and other international rights movements drew.

  16. Desenvolvimento de inibidores do fator VIII na hemofilia A Development of factor VIII inhibitors in hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Chaves

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A hemofilia A é uma coagulopatia genética com herança recessiva ligada ao cromossomo X que afeta 1-2 a cada 10 mil indivíduos do sexo masculino nascidos vivos. Estes indivíduos têm baixas concentrações ou ausência do fator VIII (FVIII da coagulação no plasma e apresentam quadros hemorrágicos leves, moderados e graves, dependendo da atividade de FVIII circulante. Estes pacientes necessitam de constante reposição proteica e aproximadamente 30% deles desenvolvem aloanticorpos contra a proteína exógena. A síntese dos anticorpos anti-FVIII é iniciada quando o FVIII exógeno é endocitado por células apresentadoras de antígeno, degradado e apresentado às células T CD4+ na forma de peptídeos ligados a moléculas do complexo maior de histocompatibilidade (MHC de classe II. Alguns fatores de risco (paciente/tratamento podem ser relacionados ao desenvolvimento desta resposta imune. Neste contexto, as mutações no gene do FVIII e polimorfismos em genes envolvidos na resposta imune são candidatos moleculares como determinantes imunogenéticos na predisposição para o desenvolvimento de inibidores. Por não ser completamente entendido e controlado, o desenvolvimento desta resposta imune contra o FVIII constitui o maior problema decorrente do tratamento de indivíduos portadores de hemofilia A e faz-se necessária busca de opções que visem minimizar suas ações deletérias. Algumas alternativas de tratamento têm se mostrado eficazes no tratamento (anti-CD20, plasmaférese, concentrado de complexo protrombínico (PCCs, concentrado de complexo protrombínico ativado (APCCs, fator VII humano ativado, mas a retirada ou neutralização específica dos inibidores de FVIII ainda não foram alcançadas.Hemophilia A, which affects 1-2:10,000 live-born male neonates, is a genetic coagulopathy with recessive inheritance linked to the X chromosome. These individuals have low concentrations or no coagulation factor VIII (FVIII in the plasma

  17. A Polymorphism in the IL-5 Gene is Associated with Inhibitor Development in Severe Hemophilia A Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnanç Değer Fidancı

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A severe complication in the replacement therapy of hemophilia A (HA patients is the development of alloantibodies (inhibitors against factor VIII, which neutralizes the substituted factor. The primary genetic risk factors influencing the development of inhibitors are F8 gene mutations. Interleukins and cytokines that are involved in the regulation of B-lymphocyte development are other possible targets as genetic risk factors. This study assesses the possible involvement of 9 selected single nucleotide gene polymorphisms (SNPs with interleukins (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, and interferon gamma (IFN-γ in inhibitor development in severely affected HA patients carrying a null mutation in the F8 gene. METHODS: A total of 173 HA patients were screened for intron 22 inversion and null mutations (nonsense and deletions. Genotyping of a total of 9 SNPs in genes IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-β1, and IFN-γ in 103 patients and 100 healthy individuals was carried out. RESULTS: An association analysis between 42 inhibitor (+ and 61 inhibitor (- patients showed a significant association with the T allele of rs2069812 in the IL-5 gene promoter and patients with inhibitors (p=0.0251. The TT genotype was also significantly associated with this group with a p-value of 0.0082, odds ratio of about 7, and confidence interval of over 90%, suggesting that it is the recessive susceptibility allele and that the C allele is the dominant protective allele. CONCLUSION: The lack of other variants in the IL-5 gene of patients and controls suggests that rs2069812 may be a regulatory SNP and may have a role in B-lymphocyte development, constituting a genetic risk factor in antibody development.

  18. The mesenchymal stem cells derived from transgenic mice carrying human coagulation factor VIII can correct phenotype in hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Gong, Xiuli; Gong, Zhijuan; Ren, Xiaoyie; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-12-20

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by coagulant factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency. Previous studies showed that introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified by FVIII-expressing retrovirus may result in phenotypic correction of HA animals. This study aimed at the investigation of an alternative gene therapy strategy that may lead to sustained FVIII transgene expression in HA mice. B-domain-deleted human FVIII (hFVIIIBD) vector was microinjected into single-cell embryos of wild-type mice to generate a transgenic mouse line, from which hFVIIIBD-MSCs were isolated, followed by transplantation into HA mice. RT-PCR and real-time PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of hFVIIIBD in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. Immunohistochemistry showed the presence of hFVIIIBD positive staining in multi-organs of recipient HA mice. ELISA indicated that plasma hFVIIIBD level in recipient mice reached its peak (77 ng/mL) at the 3rd week after implantation, and achieved sustained expression during the 5-week observation period. Plasma FVIII activities of recipient HA mice increased from 0% to 32% after hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplantation. APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) value decreased in hFVIIIBD-MSCs transplanted HA mice compared with untreated HA mice (45.5 s vs. 91.3 s). Our study demonstrated an effective phenotypic correction in HA mice using genetically modified MSCs from hFVIIIBD transgenic mice. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Therapeutic and routine prophylactic properties of rFactor VIII Fc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) in hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, Pratima; Fosbury, Emma; Riddell, Anne; Mathias, Mary

    2016-01-01

    rFVIIIFc (efraloctocog alfa, Eloctate®) is an extended half-life (EHL) factor VIII licensed for use in patients with hemophilia A for prophylaxis and treatment of bleeding and surgical episodes. Pharmacokinetic studies in adults have shown a mean 1.5-fold increase in half-life compared to full-length factor VIII. When compared to adults, the half-life is decreased by 8% in adolescents between 12 and 17 years, by 18% in children 6 to <12 years, and by 33% in children between the ages of 2 and <6 years. There is a considerable interindividual variation in the prolongation of the half-life particularly in children and across the age groups, the range extending from no increase to a 2.5-fold increase. In addition to age, von willebrand factor (VWF) antigen level has demonstrated a significant impact on rFVIIIFc half-life, with higher VWF levels associated with greater prolongation of half-life. The pivotal and pediatric clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of rFVIIIFc for use in regular prophylaxis and in management of bleeds and surgery. In these studies, just under half the participants showed a zero annualized bleed rate (ABR), and the median ABR (1.6 in the pivotal study for the individualized prophylaxis arm) showed a further decrease in the extension study. On average, the patients required fewer infusions (reduced by at least a third), and the mean weekly consumption seems to be in keeping with standard recombinant factor VIII. EHL rFVIIIFc has made decreased infusion frequency a possibility. However, the interindividual variability in dose and infusion frequency highlights the need for a personalized approach based on individual patient’s half-life and/or response to treatment. PMID:27695377

  20. Somatic mosaicism in families with hemophilia B: 11% of germline mutations originate within a few cell divisions post-fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoell, A.; Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previous molecular estimates of mosaicism in the dystrophin and other genes generally have focused on the transmission of the mutated allele to two or more children by an individual without the mutation in leukocyte DNA. We have analyzed 414 families with hemophilia B by direct genomic sequencing and haplotype analysis, and have deduced the origin of mutation in 56 families. There was no origin individual who transmitted a mutant allele to more than one child. However, somatic mosaicism was detected by sequence analysis of four origin individuals (3{female} and 1{male}). The sensitivity of this analysis is typically one part in ten. In one additional female who had close to a 50:50 ratio of mutant to normal alleles, three of four noncarrier daughters inherited the haplotype associated with the mutant allele. This highlights a caveat in molecular analysis: a presumptive carrier in a family with sporadic disease does not necessarily have a 50% probability of transmitting the mutant allele to her offspring. After eliminating those families in which mosaicism could not be detected because of a total gene deletion or absence of DNA from a deduced origin individual, 5 of 43 origin individuals exhibited somatic mosaicism at a level that reflects a mutation within the first few cell divisions after fertilization. In one patient, analysis of cervical scrapings and buccal mucosa confirm the generalized distribution of somatic mutation. Are the first few cell divisions post-fertilization highly mutagenic, or do mutations at later divisions also give rise to somatic mosaicism? To address this question, DNA from origin individuals are being analyzed to detect somatic mosaicism at a sensitivity of 1:1000. Single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) has been utilized in eight families to date and no mosaicism has been detected. When the remaining 30 samples are analyzed, it will be possible to compare the frequency of somatic mosaicism at 0.1-10% with that of {ge}10%.

  1. Molecular Analysis of Factor VIII and Factor IX Genes in Hemophilia Patients: Identification of Novel Mutations and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A.; Taher, Mohiuddin M.; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Athar, Mohammed; Bogari, Neda M.; Abalkhail, Halah A.; Owaidah, Tarek MA.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemophilias A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders caused by mutations in the factor VIII and factor IX genes, respectively. Our objective was to identify the spectrum of mutations of the factor VIII and factor IX genes in Saudi Arabian population and determine the genotype and phenotype correlations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Methods For genotyping, blood samples from Saudi Arabian patients were collected, and the genomic DNA was amplified, and then sequenced by Sanger method. For molecular simulations, we have used softwares such as CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Macromolecular Mechanics; http://www.charmm-gui.org) and GROMACS. In addition, the secondary structure was determined based on the solvent accessibility for the confirmation of the protein stability at the site of mutation. Results Six mutations (three novel and three known) were identified in factor VIII gene, and six mutations (one novel and five known) were identified in factor IX gene. The factor VIII novel mutations identified were c.99G>T, p. (W33C) in exon 1, c.2138 DelA, p. (N713Tfs*9) in eon14, also a novel mutation at splicing acceptor site of exon 23 c.6430 - 1G>A. In factor IX, we found a novel mutation c.855G>C, p. (E285D) in exon 8. These novel mutations were not reported in any factor VIII or factor IX databases previously. The deleterious effects of these novel mutations were confirmed by PolyPhen2 and SIFT programs. Conclusion The protein functional and structural studies and the models built in this work would be appropriate for predicting the effects of deleterious amino acid substitutions causing these genetic disorders. These findings are useful for genetic counseling in the case of consanguineous marriages which is more common in the Saudi Arabia. PMID:28270892

  2. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: The sex ratio varies with the type of mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Bottema, C.D.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)); Cohen, M.P. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); Sexauer, C.L. (Children' s Hospital, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, the authors report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by them, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. 62 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  3. Antibody response to recombinant human coagulation factor VIII in a new rat model of severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, K M; Søndergaard, H; Skov, S; Weldingh, K N; Tranholm, M; Wiinberg, B

    2016-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies toward FVIII replacement therapy (inhibitors) are the most serious treatment-related complication in hemophilia A (HA). A rat model of severe HA (F8(-/-) ) has recently been developed, but an immunological characterization is needed to determine the value of using the model for research into inhibitor development. Characterize the antibody response towards recombinant human coagulation factor VIII (rhFVIII) in the HA rat, following a human prophylactic dosing regimen. Two identical studies were performed, which included a total of 17 homozygous HA rats (F8(-/-) , 0% FVIII activity), 12 heterozygous rats (F8(+/-) ), and 12 wild-type (F8(+/+) ) rats. All rats received intravenous injections of rhFVIII at 50 IU kg(-1) twice weekly for 4 weeks. Predosing blood samples were analyzed for binding and neutralizing anti-rhFVIII antibodies at weeks 1-7. In both studies, antibodies developed after 4-6 administrations of rhFVIII, and neutralizing antibodies reached levels similar to human patients (range 1-111 BU, median 6.0 BU) at the end of the study. There was no significant difference between the two studies or between genotypes in time to response or levels reached for binding and neutralizing antibodies. Interestingly, early spontaneous bleeds were associated with a faster antibody response. Following intravenous administration of human FVIII, according to a clinical prophylaxis regimen, a robust and reproducible antibody response is seen in this HA rat model, suggesting that the model is useful for intervention studies with the aim of suppressing, delaying, or preventing the inhibitor response. Also, bleeds seem to have an adjuvant effect on the immune response. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    An alliance of several large-scale prospective cohort studies of children to pool data and biospecimens from individual cohorts to study various modifiable and genetic factors in relation to cancer risk

  5. F8 gene mutation profile in Indian hemophilia A patients: Identification of 23 novel mutations and factor VIII inhibitor risk association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Patricia; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2016-04-01

    'FVIII inhibitors', especially in severe hemophilia A (HA) patients, is a serious adverse effect that complicates their clinical management. Many genetic and non-genetic risk factors have been proposed for FVIII inhibitor development, diverse in different population groups. This is the first study in Indian hemophiliacs that analyzes inhibitor risk in relation to the complete F8 mutation profile, in a case-control study that included 145 Indian severe HA patients, i.e. 69 inhibitor positive (with 18 inhibitor concordant/discordant family members), and 58 inhibitor negative patients, after informed consent. While 53.54% (68/127) index cases were positive for intron 22 or intron 1 inversions, 55 causative F8 mutations were detected in the 59 inversion negative patients, of which 23 were novel mutations (in 24 patients) and 32 were reported earlier (in 35 patients). A higher incidence of mutations, in the C1 and C2 domains in inhibitor positive patients, and in the A1 domain in inhibitor negative patients was observed, though not significantly different. The study suggests that large F8 rearrangements (significantly higher in the inhibitor positive patients) pose the highest risk, while missense mutations (significantly higher in the inhibitor negative patients) pose the lowest risk of inhibitor development in Indian hemophilia A patients.

  6. Suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII in a murine model of hemophilia A by oral delivery of antigens bioencapsulated in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Alexandra; Su, Jin; Lin, Shina; Wang, Xiaomei; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2014-09-04

    Hemophilia A is the X-linked bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). To address serious complications of inhibitory antibody formation in current replacement therapy, we created tobacco transplastomic lines expressing FVIII antigens, heavy chain (HC) and C2, fused with the transmucosal carrier, cholera toxin B subunit. Cholera toxin B-HC and cholera toxin B-C2 fusion proteins expressed up to 80 or 370 µg/g in fresh leaves, assembled into pentameric forms, and bound to GM1 receptors. Protection of FVIII antigen through bioencapsulation in plant cells and oral delivery to the gut immune system was confirmed by immunostaining. Feeding of HC/C2 mixture substantially suppressed T helper cell responses and inhibitor formation against FVIII in mice of 2 different strain backgrounds with hemophilia A. Prolonged oral delivery was required to control inhibitor formation long-term. Substantial reduction of inhibitor titers in preimmune mice demonstrated that the protocol could also reverse inhibitor formation. Gene expression and flow cytometry analyses showed upregulation of immune suppressive cytokines (transforming growth factor β and interleukin 10). Adoptive transfer experiments confirmed an active suppression mechanism and revealed induction of CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells that potently suppressed anti-FVIII formation. In sum, these data support plant cell-based oral tolerance for suppression of inhibitor formation against FVIII. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.R. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA) Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Darlington, G. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA)); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  8. Muscle injection of rAAV/mFIX to secrete clotting factor IX corrects the hemorrhagic tendencies in hemophilia B mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立; 陈浩明; 陆华中; 吴小兵; 卢大儒; 邱信芳; 薛京伦

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant AAV particles of high titer (>1013 virus genome/mL) were prepared according to the rHSV/AAV helper virus method. After intramuscular injection of viral vectors in the hind limb, a sustained elevated level (>370 ng/mL) of murine FIX expression in the plasma of hemophilia B mouse was detected and persisted for more than 350 days. The biological activity reached 30% of normal levels, and bleeding symptoms in the treated mice were significantly alleviated. No anti-FIX antibody (inhibitor) was detected, though anti-AAV antibodies were found at a very low level after single injection. Repeated injection with rAAV/mFIX led to a variation in anti-AAV antibody levels between the two groups which had received different doses. Results from tissue analysis confirmed the skeletal muscle as the origin for circulating functional mFIX. Our results suggest that AAV-mediated gene transfer offers a promising method of gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  9. Surgical Treatment of an Infected Nonunion of the Middle Third of the Femur Associated with Femoral Shortening in a Hemophilia Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Salduz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of nonunion and limb length discrepancy has remained a constant challenge in hemophilic patients. In this study, we aimed to present the treatment of femur infected nonunion and limb length discrepancy in a twenty-seven-year-old patient with hemophilia type A. A 27-year-old male patient with hemophilia type A referred to our institution for the treatment of right femur infected nonunion and 10 cm shortness of the femur. Resection of the nonunion site and bone-to-bone fixation with autologous bone grafting were performed. Compression to the pseudoarthrosis site and distraction from new osteotomy site were applied with the unilateral external fixator. Union was achieved, and 6 cm lengthening was obtained according to the initial length. Patient was followed up for 7 years. After this treatment, the patient is able to walk with full weight bearing on the affected extremity with 4 cm shortening which is compensated by the heel lift. The results of this case indicate that limb lengthening and treatment of nonunion with the external fixation could be reliable and effective method for hemophilic patients.

  10. Successful immune tolerance induction with low-dose coagulation factor VIII in a patient with hemophilia A from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Yilmaz; Ersin, Toret; Yesim, Oymak; Hilkay, Karapinar Tuba; Dilek, Ince; Gulcihan, Ozek; Ahmet, Koc

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitor development is the most frequent and serious complication of the treatment in patients with hemophilia. Immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the only option of treatment for the eradication of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitor. We would like to present our case with hemophilia whose FVIII inhibitor eradication was done by a low-dose ITI regimen. Our patient has been applied on-demand therapy until 8 years of age. Secondary prophylaxis was began because of having hemophilic arthropathy. A low titer of FVIII inhibitor (4.2 BU/ml) was detected in the fifth month of the prophylaxis. The peak inhibitor titer of patient was 4.6 BU/ml, and there was no decrease in inhibitor titer in the follow-up duration. The low-dose ITI (50 IU/kg, 3 days a week) was started. His inhibitor level was detected negative and the recovery test was ameliorated in the 15th of the ITI therapy. High-dose regimen ITI could not be given particularly in developing countries such as Turkey in view of the high cost of treatment. Patients who had good risk factors might be successfully treated by using low-dose ITI regimen as effective as high-dose ITI regimen.

  11. Bleeding management of special sites for hemophilia patients%血友病特定出血部位的治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴润晖

    2013-01-01

    As one of congenital bleeding diseases,the bleeding is the most important manifestation in hemophilia patients.The most common bleeding sites are joints and muscles,the most life-threatening bleedings are intracranial hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage,and some special sites (like eye,throat) are also very important.The correct identification and appropriate management for the bleeding episode are the most important issues for the reduction of modality and morbidity and the improvement of their life quality improvement.In this review,we will discuss the management of several special sites in hemophilia patients.%血友病作为先天遗传性出血性疾病,出血为其主要表现.最常见的出血部位为关节、肌肉.颅内出血、消化道出血将危及生命,而特殊部位(如眼部、咽喉部等)出血也十分重要.对血友病患儿出血的正确识别和恰当治疗至关重要,将减少致死致残,提高患儿生活质量.本文介绍血友病患儿的几个特定部位的出血治疗.

  12. Efficient transfer and expression of human clotting factor ⅨX cDNA in neonatal hemophilia B mice mediated by VSV-G pseudotyped retrovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of in vivo gene therapy for hemophilia B by VSV-G pseudotyped retroviral vector was introduced. The novel packaging cell line 293GPG was used to produce VSV-G/G1NaBAIX pseudotyped virus with the highest titers up to 8.5 × 10s cfu @ mL-1. In contrast to the conventional retrovirus, VSV-G pseudotyped virus was more resistant to inactivation by serum complements (P<0.001).Our results also demonstrated that VSV-G pseudotyped virus was more stable in neonatal mice serum than in adult mice serum (P<0.01). After intraperitoneal injection of different doses of virus, hFIX antigen was detected and lasted for more than 120 d, the highest level reached (72.5±6.1)ng@ mL-1. Moreover, the functional activity was improved to some extent in all hFIX-treated mice, the most remarkable improvement was observed in the mice treated with higher dose of virus whose clotting activity increased to (3.4 ±1.5) %and APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) reducedto (43.2 ± 7.2) s. The anti-hFIX antibody was not detected by the method of Bethesda, no germ line transmission and any side effects associated with gene transfer were found. Our results indicated that neonatal gene therapy for hemophilia B mice by VSV-G pseudotyped retrovirus is promising.``

  13. First analysis of 10-year trends in national factor concentrates usage in haemophilia: data from CHARMS, the Canadian Hemophilia Assessment and Resource Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, A N; Chan, A K C; Webert, K E; Heddle, N; Ritchie, B; St-Louis, J; Teitel, J; Lillicrap, D; Iorio, A; Walker, I

    2014-07-01

    The Canadian Hemophilia Assessment and Resource Management System (CHARMS) tracks factor concentrates (FC) from the sole suppliers, Canadian Blood Services (CBS) and Hema-Quebec (HQ), to hospitals and to patients' homes. Patients FC infusion data are entered into CHARMS at Canadian Hemophilia Treatment Centres (HTCs) then exported to the national database (CentrePoint). From 2000 to 2009, 2260 registered haemophilia A or B patients received FVIII (1,009,097,765 IU) and FIX (272,406,859 IU). Over 91% of FVIII and over 84% of FIX was infused at home. Utilization of FVIII progressively increased; this was accounted for by an increase in the number of patients treated (r = 0.97; P < 0.001), there being a linear relationship between the increase in utilization and the increase in number of patients treated (P < 0.001). There was also a correlation with the annual amount used per patient (r = 0.95; P < 0.001). Utilization of FIX did not increase over time. The highest proportional utilization of both FVIII and FIX was for prophylaxis, and this proportion progressively increased being, in year 10 (2009), 77% and 66% for FVIII and FIX respectively. The proportion used for bleeding remained steady; in year 10 that proportion was 14% for FVIII and 26% for FIX, the use per patient for bleeding decreasing. The HTC-based CHARMS tracking system is essential, in Canada, for analysing indications for infusion, for predicting utilization and planning for future needs.

  14. Quality of life in haemophilia A: Hemophilia Utilization Group Study Va (HUGS-Va).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, J-L; Zhou, Z-Y; Doctor, J N; Wu, J; Ullman, M M; Ross, C; Riske, B; Parish, K L; Lou, M; Koerper, M A; Gwadry-Sridhar, F; Forsberg, A D; Curtis, R G; Johnson, K A

    2012-09-01

    This study describes health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of persons with haemophilia A in the United States (US) and determines associations between self-reported joint pain, motion limitation and clinically evaluated joint range of motion (ROM), and between HRQoL and ROM. As part of a 2-year cohort study, we collected baseline HRQoL using the SF-12 (adults) and PedsQL (children), along with self-ratings of joint pain and motion limitation, in persons with factor VIII deficiency recruited from six Haemophilia Treatment Centres (HTCs) in geographically diverse regions of the US. Clinically measured joint ROM measurements were collected from medical charts of a subset of participants. Adults (N = 156, mean age: 33.5 ± 12.6 years) had mean physical and mental component scores of 43.4 ± 10.7 and 50.9 ± 10.1, respectively. Children (N = 164, mean age: 9.7 ± 4.5 years) had mean total PedsQL, physical functioning, and psychosocial health scores of 85.9 ± 13.8, 89.5 ± 15.2, and 84.1 ± 15.3, respectively. Persons with more severe haemophilia and higher self-reported joint pain and motion limitation had poorer scores, particularly in the physical aspects of HRQoL. In adults, significant correlations (P < 0.01) were found between ROM measures and both self-reported measures. Except among those with severe disease, children and adults with haemophilia have HRQoL scores comparable with those of the healthy US population. The physical aspects of HRQoL in both adults and children with haemophilia A in the US decrease with increasing severity of illness. However, scores for mental aspects of HRQoL do not differ between severity groups. These findings are comparable with those from studies in European and Canadian haemophilia populations.

  15. Cohort profile: Shahroud Eye Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Akbar; Hashemi, Hassan; Shariati, Mohammad; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Yazdani, Kamran; Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Koohian, Hassan; Khademi, Mohammad Reza; Hodjatjalali, Kamran; Kheirkhah, Ahmad; Chaman, Reza; Malihi, Sarvenaz; Mirzaii, Mehdi; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    The Shahroud Eye Cohort Study was set up to determine the prevalence and incidence of visual impairment and major eye conditions in the 40-64-year-old population of Shahroud as a Middle Eastern population. The first phase of the study was conducted in 2009-10. Using random cluster sampling, 6311 Shahroud inhabitants were invited for ophthalmologic examinations; of these, 5190 participants completed phase 1 (participation rate of 82.2%). All participants were interviewed to collect data on participants' demographics, occupation status, socioeconomic status, history of smoking, and medical and ophthalmic history, as well as history of medication, and the quality and duration of their insurance. DNA and plasma samples, as well as four dots of whole blood were collected from participants. Extensive optometric and ophthalmologic examinations were performed for each participant, including lensometry of current glasses, testing near and far visual acuity; determining objective and subjective refraction; eye motility; cycloplegic refraction; colour vision test; slit-lamp biomicroscopy and intraocular pressure measurement; direct and indirect fundoscopy; perimetry test; ocular biometry; corneal topography; lens and fundus photography; and the Schirmer's (1008 participants) and tear breakup time tests (1013 participants). The study data are available for collaborative research at Noor Ophthalmology Research Center, Tehran, Iran.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of congenital hemophilia with inhibitors: A Latin American perspective Diagnóstico y tratamiento de la hemofilia congénita con inhibidores: Una perspectiva latinomericana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Pérez Bianco

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Committee of Latin America on the Therapeutics of Inhibitor Groups (CLOTTING is composed of a number of hemophilia specialists from Latin America. The group aims to encourage the adoption of a good standard of care for Latin American patients with hemophilia. The occurrence of inhibitors in patients with hemophilia poses clinical challenges, and it is estimated that between 1000 and 3 000 patients in Latin America are affected by hemophilia with inhibitors. There is an urgent need to establish a regional consensus and clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. We present an extensive review based on best current clinical practice and published literature, as seen from a Latin American perspective, taking into account the variable nature of hemophilia care available in the various countries in this Region.El Comité Latinoamericano sobre la Terapéutica de Personas con Inhibidores (CLOTTING está compuesto por un grupo de especialistas en hemofilia de Latinoamérica. El objetivo del grupo es promover la adopción de un estándar de tratamiento óptimo para los pacientes con hemofilia en Latinoamérica. La prevalencia de inhibidores en pacientes con hemofilia en Latinoamérica determina desafíos clínicos y se estima que de 1000 a 3000 pacientes en esta región están afectados con hemofilia e inhibidores. Existe una necesidad urgente de establecer un consenso regional y guías clínicas para el diagnóstico y tratamiento de estos pacientes. Nosotros presentamos una revisión exhaustiva basada en las mejores prácticas clínicas vigentes y en los datos publicados en la literatura, con una perspectiva latinoamericana, tomando en cuenta la variabilidad existente de los tratamientos de la hemofilia disponibles en los diferentes países de esta Región.

  17. The Danish Youth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Larsen, Mathilde; Riegels, Mette; Rod, Morten Hulvej

    2010-01-01

    income. Loss to follow-up was only associated with adolescents' higher probability of drinking and use of tobacco, and none of the other factors were associated with attrition. CONCLUSIONS: The participants in the Danish Youth Cohort represent a great variety of different groups of socio-demographic...... factors, although they differ from non-participants as regards a range of socio-demographic factors. This should be taken into account in future analyses....

  18. 唐山地区城乡血友病患者临床特征分析%Clinical Characteristics of Patients With Hemophilia in Tangshan Urban and Rural Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雒建镭; 谢燕燕; 张嵩; 杨美荣; 闫振宇; 陈乃耀

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics and the differences of patients with hemophilia in Tangshan urban and rural areas. Methods We enrolled 83 hemophiliac patients who received treatment in North China University of Science and Technology Affiliated Hospital from May 2010 to June 2011. Survey was conducted when the patients were receiving treatment by a self - designed registration form of Tangshan Hemophiliac Patient Information Management Center which covered age,gender,family history of hemophilia, type of hemophilia, blood coagulation factor level, age at initial bleeding, diagnosis,and treatment, bleeding sites, joint deformity, replacement therapeutic products, detection of inhibitor, and whether the infection of HBV,HCV and HIV was combined. Results The 83 patients were all males aged 8 months to 71 years, with an average age of(19. 4 ± 11. 2). Among the patients,48(57. 8% )patients were from urban area and 35(42. 2% ) patients were from rural area,and 75(90. 4% )patients were with hemophilia A and 8(9. 6% )patients were with hemophilia B. The number of patients with mild,medium and severe hemophilia was 13(15. 7% ),45(54. 2% )and 25(30. 1% ) respectively. As for bleeding sites,the number of patients with joint bleeding,muscle bleeding,subcutaneous hematoma, hematuresis and gum bleeding was 30 ( 36. 2% ), 24 ( 28. 9% ), 18 ( 21. 7% ), 7 ( 8. 4% ), and 4 ( 4. 8% ) respectively. As regards hemorrhage type,52 (62. 6% )patients had bleeding after injury and 31 ( 37. 4% )patients had spontaneous bleeding. The family history of positive hemophilia was 23. 0% ( 19 / 83 ) . The rate of positive hepatitis virus infection was 12. 0% (10 / 83),and no HIV infection cases were found. The incidence of joint deformity was 60. 2% (50 / 83) . With regards to the choice of alternative therapeutic products,64(77. 1% )patients used FⅧ and 7(8. 4% )patients used prothrombin complex,with cryoprecipitation and others used by 12(14. 5% ) patients. There were just

  19. A retrospective study of cytokine profiles changes in mice with FVIII inhibitor development after AAV mediated gene therapy in hemophilia A mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjiang; Yuan, Zhenhua; Abajas, Yasmina L; Szollosi, Dorreen E; Hu, Genlin; Hua, Baolai; Xiao, Xiao; Li, Chengwen

    2017-09-19

    The development of inhibitory autoantibodies to the infused clotting factor VIII is a major complication for severe hemophilia A management. Novel therapy options for hemophilia have significantly progressed in the last decade and a gene therapy cure for hemophilia is translating into reality. However, mechanistic studies of FVIII autoantibodies (FVIII inhibitors) have lagged behind and remain a challenge for both protein replacement and gene therapy. FVIII inhibitor formation is assumed to be a classical T cell-dependent immune response in which cytokines/chemokines play an important role. The study of cytokine profile changes during FVIII inhibitor development may be helpful to understand the mechanism of inhibitor development and to explore potential novel approaches that will minimize the risk. After FVIII-/- mice were treated with intravenous administration of an AAV8 vector encoding human FVIII, FVIII expression peaked at week 2 (W2), and FVIII inhibitor was thoroughly developed at week 8 (W8). W8 plasma that showed positive FVIII inhibitor, and W2 samples with negative FVIII inhibitor ("Anti-FVIII(+)"), were subjected to multiplex cytokines measurement, W8 and W2 samples were both negative for FVIII inhibitor ("Anti-FVIII(-)") as the control. In comparison to mice in the "Anti-FVIII(-)" group, the mice in group of "Anti-FVIII(+)", especially at higher titers, exhibited significantly elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines of IL-1, IL-6, IL-12p40, MCP-1, MIP-1, MIP-2, and TNFα. The anti-inflammatory cytokine of TGFβ was decreased at W2 in both groups. Multivariate analysis of the risk factors for FVIII inhibitor development showed peak FVIII activity at W2, IL-6 and TNFα at W8 were positively correlated with inhibitor formation, and age starting gene therapy was negatively correlated. Collectively, the elevated monocyte derived pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, together with the decreased anti-inflammatory cytokine of TGFβ at an early time point, may

  20. Co-Infection of the Hepatitis C Virus With Other Blood-Borne and Hepatotropic Viruses Among Hemophilia Patients in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska, Marta; Inglot, Malgorzata; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Rymer, Weronika; Zalewska, Malgorzata; Malyszczak, Krzysztof; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of HCV infection in people with hemophilia is substantially higher than that in the general population (63% - 98%). Multiple transfusions and substitutive therapy have also been linked to a high risk of HBV and HIV transmission. However, the prevalence of other blood-borne viral infections in this population is less well known. Objectives This study aimed to assess the prevalence of co-infection with HBV and other blood-borne viruses in Polish HCV-infected hemophiliacs. Methods Seventy-one individuals, the majority of whom were male (94.36%), who had congenital bleeding disorders (60 had hemophilia A, five had hemophilia B, and six had other factor deficiencies) and HCV infection, which was defined as the presence of positive anti-HCV antibodies, were included in this study. The study group was divided into two subgroups according to the year in which blood donors were first tested for HBsAg in Poland. The serological markers were screened using commercially available enzyme immunoassays according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The molecular tests were performed using real-time PCR technology with commercial assays according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Results The spontaneous elimination rate of HCV RNA was 29.6%. The HCV genotype 1 was detected in 28 patients (65.1%), genotype 2 in one patient (2.3%), genotype 3 in 11 patients (25.6%), genotype 4 in two patients (4.7%), and a mixed infection with genotypes 1 and 4 was detected in one person (2.3%). Fifty-three patients (74.6%) were anti-HBc positive. Among the seven HBsAg(+) patients, three individuals were HBV-DNA positive. No occult hepatitis B was detected. In six HBsAg positive patients, the HCV RNA was positive, while one patient was also infected with HIV. The prevalence rate of past infection with HAV in the study group was 30.9%, with a tendency for a higher prevalence in older patients. The prevalence of CMV and EBV infection was high and similar to that seen in

  1. Data Analysis Protocol for the Development and Evaluation of Population Pharmacokinetic Models for Incorporation Into the Web-Accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service - Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEneny-King, Alanna; Foster, Gary; Edginton, Andrea N

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in a specific clotting factor. This results in spontaneous bleeding episodes and eventual arthropathy. The mainstay of hemophilia treatment is prophylactic replacement of the missing factor, but an optimal regimen remains to be determined. Rather, individualized prophylaxis has been suggested to improve both patient safety and resource utilization. However, uptake of this approach has been hampered by the demanding sampling schedules and complex calculations required to obtain individual estimates of pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. The use of population pharmacokinetics (PopPK) can alleviate this burden by reducing the number of plasma samples required for accurate estimation, but few tools incorporating this approach are readily available to clinicians. Objective The Web-accessible Population Pharmacokinetic Service - Hemophilia (WAPPS-Hemo) project aims to bridge this gap by providing a Web-accessible service for the reliable estimation of individual PK parameters from only a few patient samples. This service is predicated on the development of validated brand-specific PopPK models. Methods We describe the data analysis plan for the development and evaluation of each PopPK model to be incorporated into the WAPPS-Hemo platform. The data sources and structure of the dataset are discussed first, followed by the procedures for handling both data below limit of quantification (BLQ) and absence of such BLQ data. Next, we outline the strategies for building the appropriate structural and covariate models, including the possible need for a process algorithm when PK behavior varies between subjects or significant covariates are not provided. Prior to use in a prospective manner, the models will undergo extensive evaluation using a variety of techniques such as diagnostic plots, bootstrap analysis and cross-validation. Finally, we describe the incorporation of a validated PopPK model into the

  2. Mutation, detection, prenatal testing, and delineation of the germline origin in a family with sporadic hemophilia B and no living hemophiliacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vielhaber, E.; Sommer, S.S. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States); Freedenberg, D. [Scott and White Clinic, Temple, TX (United States)

    1994-01-15

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked recessive disorder affecting 1 in 30,000 males. Determination of carrier status for at risk females can be done by utilizing indirect methods such as DNA sequencing. However, in most cases, reliable carrier testing is not possible without first analyzing the DNA from an affected male in the family to determine his haplotype/causative sequence change. In the case presented here, the only affected male in the family has been deceased for 25 years; no DNA was available from him. The sister (III-2) of the affected individual was a suspected carrier based on her factor IX coagulant (36%); she was pregnant with a male fetus, and requested prenatal testing. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  3. A DNA fragment from Xq21 replaces a deleted region containing the entire FVIII gene in a severe hemophilia A patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murru, S.; Casula, L.; Moi, P. [Insituto di Clinica e Biologia dell` Eta Evolutiva, Cagliari (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    In this paper the authors report the molecular characterization of a large deletion that removes the entire Factor VIII gene in a severe hemophilia A patient. Accurate DNA analysis of the breakpoint region revealed that a large DNA fragment replaced the 300-kb one, which was removed by the deletion. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the size of the inserted fragment is about 550 kb. In situ hybridization demonstrated that part of the inserted region normally maps to Xq21 and to the tip of the short arm of the Y chromosome (Yp). In this patient this locus is present both in Xq21 and in Xq28, in addition to the Yp, being thus duplicated in the X chromosome. Sequence analysis of the 3` breakpoint suggested that an illegitimate recombination is probably the cause of this complex rearrangement. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Anti-CD3 antibodies modulate anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice after factor VIII plasmid-mediated gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Baowei; Ye, Peiqing; Rawlings, David J; Ochs, Hans D; Miao, Carol H

    2009-11-12

    One major obstacle in gene therapy is the generation of immune responses directed against transgene product. Five consecutive anti-CD3 treatments concomitant with factor VIII (FVIII) plasmid injection prevented the formation of inhibitory antibodies against FVIII and achieved persistent, therapeutic levels of FVIII gene expression in treated hemophilia A mice. Repeated plasmid gene transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Anti-CD3 treatment significantly depleted both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, whereas increased transforming growth factor-beta levels in plasma and the frequency of both CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ and CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in the initial few weeks after treatment. Although prior depletion of CD4+CD25+ cells did not abrogate tolerance induction, adoptive transfer of CD4+ cells from tolerized mice at 6 weeks after treatment protected recipient mice from anti-FVIII immune responses. Anti-CD3-treated mice mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neo-antigens, indicating that anti-CD3 did not hamper the immune systems in the long term. Concomitant FVIII plasmid + anti-CD3 treatment induced long-term tolerance specific to FVIII via a mechanism involving the increase in transforming growth factor-beta levels and the generation of adaptive FVIII-specific CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells at the periphery. Furthermore, anti-CD3 can reduce the titers of preexisting anti-FVIII inhibitory antibodies in hemophilia A mice.

  5. The Odense Child Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhl, Henriette Boye; Jensen, Tina Kold; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance of the environment on the development of the fetus and infant throughout early life is increasingly recognised. To study such effects, biological samples and accurate data records are required. Based on multiple data collection from a healthy pregnant population......, the Odense Childhood Cohort (OCC) study aims to provide new information about the environmental impact on child health by sequential follow-up to 18 years of age among children born between 2010 and 2012. METHODS: A total of 2874 of 6707 pregnancies (43%) were recruited between January 2010 and December 2012...... provides material for in-depth analysis of environmental and genetic factors that are important for child health and disease. Registry data from non-participating women and infants are available which ensures a high degree of comparable data....

  6. Application of STR genetic marker system in the detection of hemophilia A carriers in Guangxi, China%STR遗传标记在广西地区血友病A携带者诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周峻荔; 韦红英; 吴华; 胡艳玲; 梁伟玲

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish a fast and simple genetic diagnosis technique based on a reliable, short tandem repeat (STR) genetic marker system for the detection of hemophilia A carriers in Guangxi, China. Methods Fluorescent PCR and + capillary electrophoresis were used for allele genotyping at three intragenic/extragenic STR loci (F81ntl3, DXS1073, and DXS9901) of FVIII gene in the members of 10 hemophilia A families in Guangxi, so as to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of the STR genetic marker system for detection of hemophilia A carriers. Then the STR genetic marker system was used to detect hemophilia A carriers among examinees. Results In the 10 hemophilia A families, 11 confirmed female carriers had the same allele fragment lengths at the three STR loci (F8Intl3, DXS1O73, and DXS9901) as the probands. Of the 8 females examined, 5 had allele fragments at the three STR loci (F8Intl3, DXS1073, and DXS9901) which were identical to those of the probands, and thus they were diagnosed as hemophilia A carriers. Conclusions Genetic analysis at the three STR loci (F8Intl3, DXS1073, and DXS9901) can be used to detect hemophilia A carriers rapidly and provide reliable basis for prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia A.%目的 建立理想的STR 遗传标记体系,对广西地区血友病A携带者进行快速简便的基因诊断.方法 选取广西地区10个血友病A家系作为研究对象,运用荧光PCR联合毛细管电泳的方法,对家系成员中FⅧ基因内外具有高度遗传性的3个STR位点F8Int13、DXS1073、DXS9901进行等位基因分型,评估该体系用于家系中血友病A携带者的诊断效率,并对待检者进行携带者诊查.结果 10个血友病A家系中,11例肯定女性携带者均含有与相应先证者完全一致的3个STR等位基因(F8Int13、DXS1073、DXS9901)片段长度;在待检的8例女性中,5例检出3个STR等位基因片段与相应家系中先证者完全相同,被诊断为血友病A携带者.结论 联合应用3

  7. A multifluorescent STR-PCR for prenatal gene diagnosis of hemophilia A carriers%多重荧光STR-PCR方法在血友病A携带者产前基因诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李少英; 马晓燕; 张慧敏; 王晓蔓; 黎青

    2011-01-01

    Objective To establish a reliable method for prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia A hy genetic linkage analysis. Method Multifluorescent STR-PCR method was used to analyze 50 normal females and 20 hemophilia A families. Result The heterozygote rate of DXS15 , DXS9901 , G6PD , DXS1073 , DXS1108 and F8Civs13 were 88% , 84% , 20o/e , 62% , 22% and 30%. Twenty hemophilia A carriers were successfully identified by these six STRs loci. Conclusion Multifluorescent STR-PCR is a convenient and efficient method for prenatal diagnosis of hemophilia A.%目的:通过血友病A家系遗传连锁分析,建立血友病A携带者产前诊断方法.方法:采用多重荧光STR-PCR方法对50例正常女性进行检测和20个血友病A家系进行连锁分析.结果:DXS15、DXS9901、G6PD、DXS1073、DXS1108和F8Civs13的杂合率分别为88%、84%、20%、62%、22%和30%;用这6个位点提供的遗传信息成功为20个血友病A携带者进行了产前诊断.结论:多重荧光STR-PCR方法是一种快速、简便、实用的血友病A产前诊断方法.

  8. Surgical treatment for hemophilia induced contracture of Achilles tendon%血友病性跟腱挛缩症的外科治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高鹏; 翁习生; 钱文伟; 李晔; 陈峰; 范彧

    2014-01-01

    背景:血友病性跟腱挛缩症是血友病的常见下肢合并症,可导致下肢不等长、活动受限等症状。在全面的围手术期凝血因子替代治疗下手术矫正跟腱挛缩可极大改善患者的生活质量。  目的:探讨外科治疗血友病性跟腱挛缩症的围术期处理方法、术式选择及疗效。  方法:回顾性分析1998年6月至2014年2月收治的血友病性跟腱挛缩患者15例(15足),均为男性;年龄18~41岁,平均24.6岁;左侧7例,右侧8例。其中甲型血友病11例,乙型血友病4例。病程11~84个月,平均30.2个月。术前根据美国矫形足踝协会(AOFAS)评分为(41.2±20.1)分,简明健康调查量表(SF-36量表)评分总分为(41.4±17.7)分。入院后行凝血因子预试验,制定围术期凝血因子替代治疗方案,均行跟腱Z型延长术。  结果:手术时间55~75 min,平均61 min;术中使用止血带,出血量均<20 ml,围术期均未输异体血。术后14例手术切口Ⅰ期愈合,1例伤口裂开,经换药后3周愈合。术后无感染、下肢深静脉血栓形成、神经损伤等并发症发生。患者均获得随访,随访时间为6个月~15年5个月,平均21个月。术后3个月及6个月随访时,AOFAS评分分别为(77.8±16.7)分和(79.8±12.5)分,SF-36量表评分分别为(73.6±13.8)分和(77.7±11.2)分,与术前相比均有统计学差异(P<0.05);术后3个月与术后6个月比较均无统计学差异(P>0.05)。  结论:手术治疗可以纠正血友病性跟腱挛缩患者的马蹄足畸形,改善足部负重及行走功能。术前行凝血因子预试验、围手术期行凝血因子替代治疗可降低术后大出血的发生率。%Background:Contracture of Achilles tendon is one of the common complications of hemophilia. It may result in leg length discrepancy and limitation of motion. The quality of life can effectively be

  9. Quality of life and related impact factors in children with hemophilia%血友病儿童生活质量及其影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖; 陈丽霞

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解血友病儿童的生活质量(QOL)及其可能的影响因素.方法:男性血友病患儿60例及其家长,均采用中文版儿童生活质量测定量表(PedsQL)4.0评价其QOL.结果:60例血友病患儿的PedsQL总分及各单项评分家长评分均高于儿童自评得分(均P<0.05).患儿QOL评分尤其是生理功能项的评分与患儿的年龄呈正相关(均P<0.05).结论:血友病患儿家长对其生活质量的满意度较患儿自身低;患儿年龄越大,生活质量尤其是生理功能下降越明显,应进行早期干预和充分治疗.%Objective:To investigate the quality of life (QOL) and related impact factors in children with hemophilia. Methods:Sixty boys with hemophilia and their householders were assessed by the Chinese pediatric quality of life inventory measurement models (PedsQL)4. 0. Results:The total and sub-item scores of PedsQL 4. 0 in the householders were significantly higher than in children with hemophilia (all P<0. 05). There was a positive correlation between ages of children and their scores of PedsQL4. 0,especially the scores of physical functioning (all P<0. 05). Conclusion:The satisfaction degree of the householders is lower than that of the children with hemophilia. The older the children are, the lower their QOL scores are, especially physical function. Children with hemophilia should be controlled earlier and treated sufficiently.

  10. 血友病男性患者与健康男性龈沟出血指数的比较%Comparison of sulcus bleeding index between male patients with hemophil-ia and healthy men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄劲

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference of sulcus bleeding index between male patients with hemophilia and healthy men,analyze the correlationshiip between hemorrhage and oral hygiene. Methods 120 male patients with hemophilia admitted into our hospital from May 2011 to March 2014 were selected as observation objects (hemophilia group),were divided into group of age less than 35 years old (n=67) and group of age more than 35 years old (n=53).30 healthy men for check-up at the same period were selected as control group.Sulcus bleeding index was examined and dental plaque and calculus index in hemophilia group was observed. Results The sulcus bleeding index in hemophilia group was 1.78±1.32,higher than 1.61±1.00 in the control group,the difference was significant (P35岁组(53例),以同期入院接受全口牙龈沟出血指数检查的30例健康男性体检者为对照组。对两组均进行全口牙龈沟出血指数检测,并观察血友病组菌斑指数、牙石指数。结果血友病男性患者齿龈沟出血指数为1.78±1.32,高于对照组的1.61±1.00,差异有统计学意义(P35岁患者组的齿龈沟出血指数,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。血友病患者的菌斑指数、牙石指数与齿龈沟出血指数呈正相关。结论血友病患者出血严重程度与年龄有关,注意口腔卫生能减少牙龈出血。

  11. 医护合作综合关怀团队在儿童血友病患者管理初探∗%Effect of Physician-Nurse Cooperation on the Comprehensive Care of Child Hemophilia Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢喜玲

    2016-01-01

    医护合作综合关怀团队是血友病患儿最为有效的一种管理方式。2010年该院成立医护合作综合关怀团队以来,对河南地区血友病患儿进行规范的管理、登记、就诊、治疗、健康教育等,为患儿及家长搭建交流平台,做好家庭护理宣教,协调团队成员之间工作组织与安排,极大地方便了患者就诊;该团队定期举办健康教育学习班,促进了预防性注射和家庭治疗的开展,通过对血友病患儿自我正确注射的健康教育,让其熟练掌握注射技能,有效保证治疗效果,减少并发症的发生,改善和提高血友病患儿的生活质量。满足患者自我护理需要,对患者适应现状、保持情绪稳定、调节心理平衡、回归家庭及社会具有重要意义。%The physician-nurse cooperation team is one of the most effective management approach to child hemophilia patients. The comprehensive care center of hemophilia in Henan Provincial People ’ s Hospital was founded in 2010 . Hemophilia patients from Henan Province registered in the center and managed by physician-nurse cooperation team. Besides the diagnosis and treatment, health education is another main job of Physician-Nurse cooperation team. The forms of health education include periodic meetings and classes. Hemophilia patients were taught how to do injection by themselves to reduce bleed-ing and complications and improve life quality. Physician-Nurse cooperation team can also work as the bridge between patients and their families, attention their social and psychological well being. In conclu-sion, cooperative behavior in Physician-Nurse cooperation team has great significance in helping hemo-philia patients to adapt their current situation, maintain emotional stability and psychological balance, re-turn to the family and the community.

  12. Comparison of sulcus bleeding index between hemophilia patients and healthy males%血友病男性患者与健康男性牙龈出血指数的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张京华; 李魁星; 李春; 孙丽丽; 何涛; 杨文东

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较血友病男性患者和健康男性龈沟出血指数的差异.方法 选择北京市北京协和医院血液科血友病门诊的100例男性血友病患者和北京某城区的100例健康男性进行全口牙龈沟出血指数检查.并检查100例血友病患者的茵斑指数和牙石指数.结果 血友病患者龈沟出血指数(1.79±1.27)显著高于健康男性组(1.65±1.14)(P<0.05).35岁及以上年龄组血友病患者(1.80±1.28)及健康男性龈淘出血指数(1.71±1.22)均显著高于35岁以下组(1.76±1.08,1.61±1.08)(P<0.05).血友病患者茵斑指数和牙石指数与龈沟出血指数中度相关.结论 血友病患者牙龈出血情况严重;牙龈出血与口腔卫生状况相关.%Objective To compare the differences of sulcus bleeding index between hemophilia patients and healthy males.Methods Data were derived from the survey of 100 hemophilia patients from Hematology Department of Peking Union Medical College Hospital and 100 healthy males from one district in Beijing.Sulcus bleeding index ( SBI) between them was evaluated for full mouth.Plaque index ( PLI) and calculus index ( CI) were evaluated for 100 hemophilia patients too.Results SBI of hemophilia patients ( 1.79 ± 1.27) was higher than that of the healthy males ( 1.65 ± 1.14) ( P < 0.05).SBI of hemophilia patients (1.80 ± 1.28) and healthy males ( 1.71 ± 1.22) above 35 years old were higher than those of the subjects (1.76 ± 1.08, 1.61 ±1.08) under 35 years old ( P <0.05).PLI and CI are moderately interrelated with SBI for hemophilia patients.Conclrrsion Cingival bleeding is rather severe in hemophilia patients, and it is interrelated with dental health situation.

  13. Prostate Cancer Biospecimen Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0062 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Biospecimen Cohort Study PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Bettina F. Drake, MPH, PhD CONTRACTING...1. REPORT DATE October 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate Cancer Biospecimen Cohort...goal of the study is development of a Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN) resource site with high quality and well-annotated urine, blood

  14. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  15. Cohort profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2014-06-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70,000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  17. Comparison of Clot-based, Chromogenic, and Fluorescence Assays for Measurement of Factor VIII Inhibitors in the U.S. Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Connie H.; Rice, Anne S.; Boylan, Brian; Shapiro, Amy D.; Lentz, Steven R.; Wicklund, Brian M.; Kelly, Fiona M.; Soucie, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Detection and validation of inhibitors (antibodies) to hemophilia treatment products are important for clinical care, evaluation of product safety, and assessment of population trends. Methods Centralized monitoring for factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors was conducted for patients in the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study using a previously reported modified Nijmegen-Bethesda clotting assay (NBA), a chromogenic Bethesda assay (CBA), and a novel fluorescence immunoassay (FLI). Results NBA and CBA were performed on 1005 specimens and FLI on 272 specimens. CBA was negative on 880/883 specimens (99.7%) with Nijmegen-Bethesda units (NBU)<0.5 and positive on 42/42 specimens (100%) with NBU≥2.0 and 43/80 specimens (53.8%) with NBU 0.5–1.9. Among specimens with positive NBA and negative CBA, 58.1% were FLI-negative, 12.9% had evidence of lupus anticoagulant, and 35.5% had non-time-dependent inhibition. CBA and FLI were positive on 72.4% and 100% of 1.0–1.9 NBU specimens and 43.1% and 50.0% of 0.5–0.9 NBU specimens. FLI detected antibodies in 98.0% of CBA-positive and 81.6% of NBA-positive specimens (P=0.004). Among 21 new inhibitors detected by NBA, 5 (23.8%) with 0.7–1.3 NBU did not react in CBA or FLI. Among previously positive patients with 0.5–1.9 NBU, 7/25 (28%) were not CBA or FLI positive. FLI was positive on 36/169 NBU-negative specimens (21.3%). Conclusions FVIII specificity could not be demonstrated by CBA or FLI for 26% of inhibitors of 0.5–1.9 NBU; such results must be interpreted with caution. Low titer inhibitors detected in clot-based assays should always be repeated, with consideration given to evaluating their reactivity with FVIII using more specific assays. PMID:23601690

  18. Detection of hemophilia a carriers in Azeri Turkish population of Iran: usefulness of HindIII and BclI markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharrami, Tamouchin; Derakhshan, Sima Mansoori; Pourfeizi, Abbas Ali H; Khaniani, Mahmoud Shekari

    2015-11-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an inherited X-linked coagulation disorder caused by the deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII). Linkage analysis is a common indirect method for the detection of female carriers in families with HA. In the current study, 173 patients from 30 unrelated families with HA were recruited from the Azeri Turkish population of northwest Iran and analyzed for BclI and HindIII markers by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. We investigated the potential of using these markers for the detection of mutation in carriers through linkage analysis, which would be of tremendous use in prenatal diagnosis. Among the tested women, 47% and 35% were found to be heterozygous for BclI and HindIII polymorphic markers, respectively. The BclI and HindIII markers were informative for the detection of 63% and 17% potential carriers, respectively, demonstrating the effectiveness of the BclI marker for the detection of HA carriers among the Azeri Turkish population.

  19. Exposure of FVIII in the Presence of Phosphatidyl Serine Reduces Generation of Memory B-Cells and Induces Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Hyporesponsiveness in Hemophilia A Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Radha; Davidowitz, Andrew; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2015-08-01

    A major complication of replacement therapy with Factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A (HA) is the development of unwanted immune responses. Previous studies showed that administration of FVIII in the presence of phosphatidyl serine (PS) reduced the development of anti-FVIII antibodies in HA mice. However, the impact of PS-mediated effects on immunological memory, such as generation of memory B-cells, is not clear. The effect of PS on memory B-cells was therefore investigated using adoptive transfer approach in FVIII(-/-) HA mice. Adoptive transfer of memory B-cells from a PS-FVIII-treated group to naïve mice followed by challenge of the recipient mice with FVIII showed a significantly reduced anti-FVIII antibody response in the recipient mice, compared with animals that received memory B-cells from free FVIII and FVIII-charge matched phosphatidyl glycerol (PG) group. The decrease in memory B-cell response is accompanied by an increase in FoxP3 expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Flow cytometry studies showed that the generation of Tregs is higher in PS-treated animals as compared with FVIII and FVIII-PG treated animals. The PS-mediated hyporesponsiveness was found to be antigen-specific. The PS-FVIII immunization showed hyporesponsiveness toward FVIII rechallenge but not against ovalbumin (OVA) rechallenge, an unrelated antigen. This demonstrates that PS reduces immunologic memory of FVIII and induces antigen-specific peripheral tolerance in HA mice.

  20. Efficient detection of factor IX mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography in Taiwanese hemophilia B patients, and the identification of two novel mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chin Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia B (HB is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by mutations in the clotting factor IX (FIX gene that result in FIX deficiency. Previous studies have shown a wide variation of FIX gene mutations in HB. Although the quality of life in HB has greatly improved mainly because of prophylactic replacement therapy with FIX concentrates, there exists a significant burden on affected families and the medical care system. Accurate detection of FIX gene mutations is critical for genetic counseling and disease prevention in HB. In this study, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC, which has proved to be a highly informative and practical means of detecting mutations, for the molecular diagnosis of our patients with HB. Ten Taiwanese families affected by HB were enrolled. We used the DHPLC technique followed by direct sequencing of suspected segments to detect FIX gene mutations. In all, 11 FIX gene mutations (8 point mutations, 2 small deletions/insertions, and 1 large deletion, including two novel mutations (exon6 c.687–695, del 9 mer and c.460–461, ins T were found. According to the HB pedigrees, 25% and 75% of our patients were defined as familial and sporadic HB cases, respectively. We show that DHPLC is a highly sensitive and cost-effective method for FIX gene analysis and can be used as a convenient system for disease prevention.

  1. Targeting of the human F8 at the multicopy rDNA locus in Hemophilia A patient-derived iPSCs using TALENickases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jialun; Wu, Yong; Li, Zhuo; Hu, Zhiqing; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Xuyun; Wang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xionghao; Zhou, Miaojin; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yanchi; Feng, Mai; Liang, Desheng

    2016-03-25

    Hemophilia A (HA) is a monogenic disease due to lack of the clotting factor VIII (FVIII). This deficiency may lead to spontaneous joint hemorrhages or life-threatening bleeding but there is no cure for HA until very recently. In this study, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with severe HA and used transcription activator-like effector nickases (TALENickases) to target the factor VIII gene (F8) at the multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus in HA-iPSCs, aiming to rescue the shortage of FVIII protein. The results revealed that more than one copy of the exogenous F8 could be integrated into the rDNA locus. Importantly, we detected exogenous F8 mRNA and FVIII protein in targeted HA-iPSCs. After they were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs), the exogenous FVIII protein was still detectable. Thus, it is showed that the multicopy rDNA locus could be utilized as an effective target site in patient-derived iPSCs for gene therapy. This strategy provides a novel iPSCs-based therapeutic option for HA and other monogenic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. O-phospho-l-serine mediates hyporesponsiveness toward FVIII in hemophilia A-murine model by inducing tolerogenic properties in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah, Anas M; Ramakrishnan, Radha; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V

    2014-11-01

    The clinical use of therapeutic proteins can be complicated by the development of anti-product antibodies. We have previously observed that O-phospho-l-serine (OPLS) reduced antibody response to FVIII in Hemophilia-A (HA) mice. However, the mechanism underlying this observation is not clear. We hypothesize that OPLS reduces immunogenicity by inducing tolerogenic properties in dendritic cells (DCs). We tested this hypothesis using in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo methods. Naive HA mice that were pre-exposed to FVIII in the presence of OPLS showed substantially lower antibody response following rechallenge with OPLS free FVIII as compared with dexamethasone-pretreated mice. Exposure of OPLS to bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) in culturing conditions resulted in an increase in the regulatory cytokine TGF-β and a decrease in proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL12p70. This was accompanied by a significant reduction in upregulation of costimulatory marker CD40, as measured by flow cytometry. Furthermore, ex vivo matured BMDCs in the presence of FVIII and OPLS failed to elicit a robust immune response in HA mice compared with FVIII-treated BMDCs. Our data suggest that OPLS modulates the immune response by altering the function and maturation of DCs, resulting in the induction of tolerogenic properties. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3457-3463, 2014.

  3. Acquired Hemophilia A May Be Associated with Ticagrelor Therapy in a 52-Year-Old Man After a Recent Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquino, Paola; Canaparo, Roberto; Capello, Tiziana; Deorsola, Barbara; Perazzolo, Laura; Marengo, Claudio; Serpe, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of a 52-year-old man who was hospitalized for right leg pain due to a relevant hemorrhagic effusion. He was on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT): acetylsalicylic acid and ticagrelor, a reversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. Signs, symptoms, and laboratory blood tests led to the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). Ticagrelor therapy-associated AHA was hypothesized due to the fact that, before adding this drug, all laboratory and clinical examinations were repeatedly normal. Prednisone and cyclophosphamide treatment was started without DAPT interruption due to the high risk of stent thrombosis. After 10 days, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time dropped from 107 to 49 seconds, the patient's factor VIII (FVIII) levels gradually normalized over the following few weeks, and FVIII inhibitor titer was negative. Recently, some reports have established a link between the development of AHA and treatment with clopidogrel, an irreversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a link between AHA and ticagrelor has been reported.

  4. Acquired Hemophilia A May Be Associated with Ticagrelor Therapy in a 52-Year-Old Man After a Recent Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquino, Paola; Canaparo, Roberto; Capello, Tiziana; Deorsola, Barbara; Perazzolo, Laura; Marengo, Claudio; Serpe, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of a 52-year-old man who was hospitalized for right leg pain due to a relevant hemorrhagic effusion. He was on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT): acetylsalicylic acid and ticagrelor, a reversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. Signs, symptoms, and laboratory blood tests led to the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). Ticagrelor therapy-associated AHA was hypothesized due to the fact that, before adding this drug, all laboratory and clinical examinations were repeatedly normal. Prednisone and cyclophosphamide treatment was started without DAPT interruption due to the high risk of stent thrombosis. After 10 days, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time dropped from 107 to 49 seconds, the patient’s factor VIII (FVIII) levels gradually normalized over the following few weeks, and FVIII inhibitor titer was negative. Recently, some reports have established a link between the development of AHA and treatment with clopidogrel, an irreversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a link between AHA and ticagrelor has been reported. PMID:27660505

  5. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S. [Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  6. Hemophilia and child abuse as possible causes of epidural hematoma: case report Hemofilia e abuso infantil como possíveis causas de hematoma extradural: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Campos Gomes Pinto

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Head trauma is an important consequence of child abuse. Specific pathophysiological mechanisms in child abuse are responsible for the ''whiplash shaken-baby syndrome'', which would favour the occurrence of intracranial hemorrhages. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a child who developed epidural hematoma following minor-intensity head trauma. Initial diagnosis of child abuse was made, but subsequent investigation led to the diagnosis of hemophilia A. CONCLUSION: Even though epidural hematoma is not closely associated with child abuse, this aethiology must always be considered when the reported trauma mechanism is out of proportion to the magnitude of the encountered lesions.INTRODUÇÃO: Traumatismo crânio-encefálico é importante conseqüência de abuso infantil. Mecanismos fisiopatológicos específicos do abuso infantil são responsáveis pela ''whiplash shaken-baby syndrome'', o que favoreceria o aparecimento de hemorragias intracranianas. RELATO DE CASO: Relatamos o caso de uma criança que desenvolveu hematoma extradural após trauma de pequena intensidade. Foi feito diagnóstico inicial de abuso infantil, mas investigações subseqüentes levaram ao diagnóstico de hemofilia A. CONCLUSÃO: Embora o hematoma extradural não esteja intimamente relacionado com abuso infantil, esta etiologia deve ser sempre considerada quando o mecanismo de trauma relatado estiver fora de proporção com as lesões encontradas.

  7. The dataset from administration of single or combined immunomodulation agents to modulate anti-FVIII antibody responses in FVIII plasmid or protein primed hemophilia A mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lien Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A mice with pre-existing inhibitory antibodies against factor VIII (FVIII were treated with single agents, AMD3100 and GCS-F, respectively. Inhibitor titers in treated mice and control HemA inhibitors mice were followed over time. Total B cells and plasma cells (PCs were characterized by flow cytometry. HemA inhibitor mice were then treated with a combination regimen of IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin and AMD3100. Finally, HemA inhibitor mice were treated with a new combination therapy using include IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes + Anti-CD20+AMD3100+G-CSF. The timeline of combination therapy was illustrated. Inhibitor titers following treatment in FVIII plasmid or protein induced inhibitor mice were evaluated overtime. A representative figure and gating strategies to characterize the subsets of Treg cells and B cells are presented. Please see http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cellimm.2016.01.005 [1] for interpretation and discussion of these data and results.

  8. Peri-operation treatment for patients with hemophilia A in children with intracranial malignant tumor:a report of 2 cases%2例小儿颅内恶性肿瘤合并血友病A的围手术期处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高阳旭; 张宏武; 沈笠雪; 刘宝富; 姚红新

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hemophilia A is aninherited bleeding disorder, lack of coagulation factorⅧ( FⅧ) , and if combined with intracranial malignant tumor, the operation risk is very high. Department of Pediatric Sur-gery in Peking University First Hospital used coagulation factor replacement therapy, succeeded in the operation of 2 cases of intracranial malignant tumor with hemophilia A in children, with no abnormal bleeding events. The establishment of the multi subject cooperation group before operation, good preoper-ative preparation, enough alternative factors, and close postoperative monitoring, are the key to the suc-cessful treatment.

  9. PCR-构象敏感凝胶电泳技术在血友病A基因分型诊断及携带者检测中的应用%Application studies on the gene diagnosis and carrier detection of hemophilia A by using polymerase chain reaction-conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David Lillicrap; 何国平; Jayne Leg-go; 刘雨生; 童先宏; 周桂香; 骆丽华

    2009-01-01

    a simple, rapid and low-cost method, possessing unique advantages in direct diagnosis of hemophilia A and carrier screening. It should have important application value in hemophilia diagnosis.%所有的HA家系(含散发)进行直接基因诊断,理论上可筛查新突变并明确其突变类型.该法简便、快速、成本低,在HA直接基因诊断及携带者筛查中优势独特,应具重要应用价值.

  10. Cohort profile: the Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordahl, Helene; Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur; Diderichsen, Finn; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Osler, Merete; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Prescott, Eva; Tjønneland, Anne; Lange, Theis; Keiding, Niels; Andersen, Per Kragh; Andersen, Ingelise

    2014-12-01

    The Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort study was established to determine pathways through which socioeconomic position affects morbidity and mortality, in particular common subtypes of cancer. Data from seven well-established cohort studies from Denmark were pooled. Combining these cohorts provided a unique opportunity to generate a large study population with long follow-up and sufficient statistical power to develop and apply new methods for quantification of the two basic mechanisms underlying social inequalities in cancer-mediation and interaction. The SIC cohort included 83 006 participants aged 20-98 years at baseline. A wide range of behavioural and biological risk factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, alcohol intake, hormone replacement therapy, body mass index, blood pressure and serum cholesterol were assessed by self-administered questionnaires, physical examinations and blood samples. All participants were followed up in nationwide demographic and healthcare registries. For those interested in collaboration, further details can be obtained by contacting the Steering Committee at the Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, at inan@sund.ku.dk.

  11. 215例血友病A患者因子Ⅷ抑制物形成的环境因素研究%Environmental factors for inhibitor formation of factor Ⅷ in 215 patients with hemophilia A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周璇; 孙竞; 李敏; 李文卿; 宋晓玲; 刘阳

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究中国血友病A患者因子Ⅷ(FⅧ)抑制物形成的环境因素.方法 监测215例血友病A患者在2年(2007年6月至2009年6月)的连续随访中,FⅧ抑制物发生、变化及转归,并对FⅧ抑制物形成的环境因素进行回顾性分析.结果 215例血友病A患者随访2年FⅧ抑制物累积发生率为11.6%(25/215).FⅧ抑制物形成的环境因素的多变量分析结果示:①输注原因中短期低剂量预防治疗比按需治疗形成FⅧ抑制物的风险低(OR=0.037,95%CI为 0.002~0.616); ②血友病越严重,累积暴露日越少,FⅧ抑制物形成风险越高;③发生严重出血事件是FⅧ抑制物形成的高危因素(OR=117.045,95%CI为19.333~708.617); ④输注形式和发生重大感染事件与FⅧ抑制物形成无关.结论 在中国目前治疗情况下,血友病患者 FⅧ抑制物的形成可能与血友病严重程度、输注原因(预防治疗或按需治疗)、累积暴露日和是否发生严重出血事件有关.%Objective To study the environmental factors for inhibitor formation of factor Ⅷ in 215 Chinese patients with hemophilia A. Methods Formation, change and transformation of factor Ⅷ were observed in 215 Chinese patients with hemophilia A during the 2-year follow-up period from June 2007 to June 2009. The environmental factors for inhibitor formation of factor Ⅷ were retrospectively analyzed. Results The cumulative incidence of hemophilia A in the 215 Chinese patients during the 2-year follow-up period was 11.6% (25/215). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk for inhibitor formation of factor Ⅷ was lower in short-term low-dose preventive treatment than in on-demand treatment (OR =0. 037, 95% CI =0. 002 -0.616). The higher the severity of hemophilia was, the less the cumulative exposure day was, and the greater the risk for the inhibitor formation of factor Ⅷ was. Severe bleeding episodes was a high risk factor for the inhibitor formation of factor Ⅷ ( OR = 117. 045

  12. 弥凝治疗儿童轻型血友病A的临床观察%Clinical efficacy of desmopressin in the treatment of mild hemophilia A in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白松婷; 卢洁; 盛光耀; 许松涛; 谢垒; 彭韶

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of desmopressin (DDAVP) on coagulation factor VI (FVI) and activated partial thromboplastin time ( APTT) in children with mild hemophilia A. Methods Eighteen children with mild hemophilia A were enrolled. DDAVP (0. 3 fig/kg-d) was injected intravenously for 5 days. Plasma FVI levels and APTT were measured before and after DDAVP treatment. Results In 16 of 18 children with mild hemophilia A, the bleeding symptoms, including the articular or musclar hematoma.were significantly alleviated as a result of DDAVP treatment. The plasma FVI levels increased significantly to (27 ±4)% and APTT was shortened to (66 ± 10)s 60 minutes after the first dose of DDAVP treatment. The plasma FVI remained at the levels of 25% -30% during 3-4 days of DDAVP treatment. Five days after DDAVP treatment, the plasma FVI levels decreased [(21 ±3)%], and APTT was prolonged when compared with 1-4 days of DDAVP treatment. Conclusions DDAVP treatment can increase plasma FVI levels and shorten APTT in children with mild hemophilia A. DDAVP is effective in the treatment of mild hemophilia A. The duration of DDAVP therapy for mild hemophilia A is recommended as 3 to 4 days. [ Chin J Contemp Pediatr, 2011, 13 (9) :715 -717]%目的 探讨1-去氨基-8-D-精氨酸加压素(DDAVP,商品名:弥凝)治疗对轻型血友病A患儿血浆凝血因子祖(FⅧ)、活化部分凝血活酶时间(APTT)的影响.方法 轻型血友病A患儿18例,用DDAVP静脉注射治疗(每日0.3 μg/kg),每24 h一次,连续用5次.观察患儿临床疗效,并于DDAVP注射前及注射后测定血浆FⅧ水平及APTP.结果 DDAVP治疗后,18例患儿中16例出血症状明显减轻,关节肌肉血肿肿痛减轻或消失.首日用药后60 min血浆FⅧ达(27±4)%,APTP时间缩短至(66±10)s; DDAVP治疗的第3~4日FⅧ水平维持在有效止血水平(25% ~30%);与前4日比较,第5日FⅧ浓度明显下降[(21 ±3)%],APTT也随之延长.结论 DDAVP可显著提高轻型血友病A患儿

  13. 注射用重组人凝血因子Ⅷ治疗血友病A的护理%The nursing for patients with hemophilia treated with recombinant coagulation factor Ⅷ for injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲君; 余菊; 吉承玲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the nursing methods and points for patients with hemophilia treated by recombinant coagulation factor VI for injection. Methods Seven patients with hemophilia were treated with 31 injections of recombinant coagulation factor VIE, as well as nursing interventions including psychological nursing, drug preparation, observation and health education. Results No adverse response was observed in the treatment of recombinant coagulation factor VBI for the 7 patients with hemophilia. Conclusion In use of recombinant coagulation factor VB for injection, we are able to strengthening the nursing for patients and drugs can help decrease the side effects and improve the patient's compliance and response.%目的 探讨注射用重组人凝血因子Ⅷ(拜科奇)治疗血友病A的护理方法和要点.方法 通过对7例血友病A患者31次使用注射用重组人凝血因子Ⅷ进行治疗时,予心理护理、药物配制、用药观察以及健康教育等护理干预.结果 7例血友病A患者31次使用注射用重组人凝血因子Ⅷ治疗,均未见不良反应.结论 在使用注射用重组人凝血因子Ⅷ治疗中,加强药物及患者的护理,可减少不良反应,提高患者的治疗依从性与治疗效果.

  14. Gene therapy for hemophilia B mediated by recombinant adeno-associated viral vector with hFIXR338A, a high catalytic activity mutation of human coagulation factor IX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆华中; 陈立; 王红卫; 伍志坚; 吴小兵; 王学峰; 王鸿利; 卢大儒; 邱信芳; 薛京伦

    2001-01-01

    A mutant human factor IX with arginine at 338 residual changed to alanine (hFIXR338A) by site-directed mutagenesis was introduced into AAV vectors, and a recombinant adeno-associ- ated viral vector containing hFIXR338A, prepared by rHSV/AAV hybrid helper virus system, was directly introduced to the hind leg muscle of factor IX knock out mice. The expression and the biological activity of human factor IX mutant, hFIXR338A, and the immune response against it in the treated mice were assayed and detected. The results showed that (i) the high-level expression of human factor IX mutant protein, hFIXR338A, has been detected in rAAV-hFIXR338A treated hemophilia B mice and lasted more than 15 weeks; (ii) the clotting activity of hFIXR338A in plasma is 34.2%± 5.23%, which is remarkably higher than that of (14.27% ± 3.4%) of wild type hFIX treated mice in the activated partial thromboplastin assay; (iii) immune response against factor IX R338A was absent, with no factor IX mutant protein (hFIXR338A) inhibitors development in the treated mice; and (iv) no local or systemic side-effects and toxicity associated with the gene transfer were found. It demonstrated the potential use of treating hemophilia B by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors with mutant hFIXR338A gene, an alternative strategy for hemophilia B gene therapy to wild-type human factor IX.

  15. 血友病A家系ST14位点多态性检测及分析%Detection and analysis of polymorphism of ST14 site in hemophilia A patients and their family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯大伟; 杨林花; 郭志萍

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨提高血友病A患者及家系成员的基因诊断及携带者检出诊断率的途径.方法 对3个血友病A家系17例进行ST14可变数目串联重复序列多态位点检测.结果 ST14位点等位基因片段介于700~1700 bp,以700 bp最多,占39%,杂合率为88%.2个血友病A家系可以用该位点提供诊断信息.结论 ST14多态位点用于血友病A携带者检测是一个特异性高、信息量大的分子诊断标志.%Objective To explore for an approach that improves the gene diagnosis and carrier detection rates for hemophilia A patients and their family members. Methods Polymorphism detection of ST14 variable number tan dem repeats (VNTR) was performed in 3 hemophilia A families, with 17 cases in total. Result At ST14 VNTR, allelic fragments ranged from 700 to 1700 bp in size, and mostly at 700 bp, counting for 39%, and the heterozygosity rate was 88%. Diagnosis information of 2 families was made according to this site. Conclusion ST14 polymorphic site is a molecular diagnosis marker with high specificity and vast information in carrier detection of hemophilia A.

  16. Cohort Influences in Older Marriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskew, Ron W.

    Cohort differentiation has been posited to crystallize around periods of social crises and to be most impactful on the young adults of a given socio-historical period. The two most prominent socio-historical events in the pasts of today's older married persons were the Great Depression of the 1930's and World War II. Older married couples were…

  17. Distribution of certain drug products by registered blood establishments and comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic treatment centers that qualify as health care entities; Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements and administrative procedures. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-09

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations to allow certain registered blood establishments and comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic treatment centers that are also health care entities to distribute certain drug products. The final rule amends limited provisions of the regulations implementing the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA). These regulations, among other things, restrict the sale, purchase, or trade of, or the offer to sell, purchase, or trade, prescription drugs purchased by hospitals and other health care entities.

  18. Analysis of Hepatitis B and C Virus after Injecting Blood Products to Patients with Hemophilia A%血友病A患者血制品治疗后HBV和HCV感染指标分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔智慧; 周实华; 龚萍; 龚亮

    2012-01-01

    目的 对血友病A患者替代治疗后血液传播乙型、丙型肝炎病毒(HBV、HCV)的感染指标进行检测.方法 对经本院确诊的35例血友病A患者采用酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA)检测抗-HCV、HBV六项指标.结果 35例血友病A患者的抗-HCV阳性率为88.6%,输血次数和输注血液制品为主的种类与患者抗-HCV阳性率有相关性(P<0.01).HBV六项指标检查,其中5例患者抗-HBe阳性(占14.3%),明显低于抗-HCV阳性率.结论 血友病A患者替代治疗输血次数越多,感染风险越大,而较少输注以冷沉淀为主的血液制品的患者,其感染风险相对较小,且目前HCV感染率明显高于HBV感染率.%Objective To investigate the infectious status of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) after injecting blood products in the patients with hemophilia A. Method The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to explore anti-HCV and HBV in 35 hemophilia A patients. Result In 35 hemophilia A patients investigated, the positive rates of anti-HCV were 88. 6%. Factors of statistical significance (P<0. 01) associated with the anti-HCV were as follows;the times of blood transfusion and the types of blood products. The positive rate of hepatitis B e-an-tibody(anti-Hbe)was 14. 3%. Conclusion Hemophilia A patients are at higher risk of HCV infection than HBV, the times of blood transfusion and the main type of cryofibrinogen are more,the rate of hepatitis virus infection is higher.

  19. 基于Web of Science的血友病护理研究文献计量分析%Bibliometric Analysis of Hemophilia Nursing Research Based on Web of Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵华; 段志光

    2016-01-01

    Objective To sum up the research overview of domestic and foreign researches on hemophilia nursing,and discuss the current status and the main problems,in order to provide a scientific basis for enhancing scientific research level in the field of hemophilia nursing.Methods Published articles about hemophilia nursing were retrieved by using bibliometrics method based on the Web of Science (WoS)database. Results WoS contained 85 papers collected from 26 countries,207 research institutions and 340 researchers were involved.The US,Britain and Canada were the main forces in hemophilia nursing research,China was not included.The research involved 26 subjects,including disease nursing,nursing education and community nursing.There were very few researchs involved transregional and interdisciplinary cooperation.The research on nursing was discontinuous without stable core author groups.Few papers were the funding projects,most funded by business foundations.Haemophilia was the main journal to publish the papers about hemophilia nursing,and the popular researchs were about quality of life,comprehensive care,risk factors,repressor and children.Conclusions Hemophilia nursing research is poor,and the research quality need to be improved.Government should put more efforts in supporting hemophilia nursing research and enhance the communication and cooperation between region and institutions,especially the interdisciplinary cooperation.The hemophilia nursing study in China is still not recognized internationally,there is a need to set hemophilia specialty nursing j ob,and explore the nursing pattern which consistent with national circumstances.%目的:全面分析全球血友病护理研究文献,探讨血友病护理研究发展状况及面临的主要问题,以进一步提升血友病护理研究水平.方法采用文献计量学方法,以 Web of ScienceTM (WoS)核心合集数据库作为数据检索源,对全球血友病护理研究文献进行统计分析.结果1965

  20. Generational cohorts and their attitudes toward advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Ernest Cyril de Run; Hiram Ting

    2013-01-01

    This research is aimed at determining the attitudes with regard to advertising from the perspective of generational cohorts in Sarawak. A two-phase of study was conducted to firstly identify generational cohorts in the state and, secondly, to investigate the attitude of each cohort to advertising. Utilizing theories of generations, a qualitative approach by means of personal interviews was used at the outset to identify external events which bring about the formation of cohorts. Accordingly, ...

  1. 血友病患者健康教育管理模式初探%A tentative study on health education management mode for hemophilia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吉承玲; 余菊; 吴玉梅; 顾健

    2012-01-01

    目的 帮助血友病患者养成健康的生活习惯,去除或减少影响健康及威胁生命的危险因素.方法 根据血友病患者的特征,制定个性化健康教育计划,用图、文、多媒体等形式长期反复强化教育内容,帮助患者和家属确定健康信念,建立健康行为.患者根据年龄阶段分为儿童组(n=13)、青少年组(n=19)和成人组(n=27),统计健康教育前后各组患者健康意识(问卷调查)、出血次数以及预防治疗情况.结果 教育后健康意识增强(P<0.01),接受预防治疗患者增加(P<0.01),教育后出血次数降低,生活质量提高(P<0.01).但随着教育间歇期的延长,儿童组及青少年组患者及家属掌握健康知识减少或淡忘,治疗的依从性下降(教育前后比较分别P<0.05和P<0.01).结论 健康教育管理能够促使血友病患者及家属建立正确的疾病预防意识、减少各种出血的发生,提高生活质量,值得临床推广应用.%Objective To help hemophilia patients form healthy lifestyle and avoid or decrease risks that affect health or threaten life. Methods Based on the characteristics of hemophilia patients,a personalized health education program was made. The program was designed to reinforce educational contents,determine health beliefs and establish healthy behaviors by means of pictures,documents,multimedia and other methods over a long period. According to their ages,the patients were divided into child group (n = 13),teenage group (n = 19) and adult group (n = 27). The health awareness (survey),bleeding counts and preventive and therapeutic measures before and after health education were investigated. Results After health education,the health awareness was enhanced (P<0.01),the number of patients who accepted preventive therapy increased (P<0. 01),bleeding counts were reduced and life quality was improved (P<0.01). However,with prolonged educational interval,mastery of health knowledge and treatment compliance

  2. Influence of factor VIII level and its inhibitor titer on the therapeutic response to corticosteroids alone in the management of acquired hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautier, Mathieu; de Boysson, Hubert; Creveuil, Christian; Repesse, Yohan; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Troussard, Xavier; Damaj, Gandhi L.; Bienvenu, Boris; Gautier, Philippe; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The treatment of acquired hemophilia (AH) involves discussing whether corticosteroids should be administered alone or combined with immunosuppressant drugs, which increase the risk of infection especially in elderly patients and/or those with autoimmunity or neoplastic diseases, who represent the target population of the disease. Prognostic factors highlighting adequate responses to corticosteroids alone must be identified for satisfactory clinical response and lower infectious risk. We aimed to evaluating the efficacy of corticosteroids alone in the management of AH depending on factor VIII (FVIII, ≥ or 20 Bethesda units per milliliter [BU/mL]) titer. We conducted a retrospective single-center study including 24 patients treated for AH with corticosteroids alone. Time to achieve partial remission (PR: absence of hemorrhage and FVIII levels >50 IU/dL) was significantly shorter in the FVIII ≥ 1 IU/dL group than in the FVIII  20 BU/mL group (15 [11–35] vs 41 [20–207] days, P = 0.003). In both subgroups, time to achieve complete remission (CR: negative INH and corticosteroids below 10 mg/d) was also significantly shorter than that observed in the opposite subgroups. INH titer, considered alone, did not affect the length of time to onset of PR or CR. CR and PR rates did not differ significantly depending on these variables. Our study suggests that in AH, patients with FVIII levels ≥1 IU/dL considered alone or combined with INH titer ≤20 BU/mL could be treated by corticosteroids alone, given that this subgroup of patients displayed faster therapeutic responses to this strategy. PMID:27902587

  3. Efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain: results of a phase 1/3 multicenter clinical trial in severe hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Stasyshyn, Oleksandra; Kosinova, Marina V.; Lepatan, Lynda Mae; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Boggio, Lisa N.; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes; Hellmann, Andrzej; Santagostino, Elena; Baker, Ross I.; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gill, Joan C.; P’Ng, Stephanie; Chowdary, Pratima; Escobar, Miguel A.; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Rusen, Luminita; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Blackman, Nicole; Limsakun, Tharin; Veldman, Alex; St. Ledger, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant VIII (rVIII)-SingleChain is a novel B-domain–truncated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII), comprised of covalently bonded factor VIII (FVIII) heavy and light chains. It was designed to have a higher binding affinity for von Willebrand factor (VWF). This phase 1/3 study investigated the efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain in the treatment of bleeding episodes, routine prophylaxis, and surgical prophylaxis. Participants were ≥12 years of age, with severe hemophilia A (endogenous FVIII <1%). The participants were allocated by the investigator to receive rVIII-SingleChain in either an on-demand or prophylaxis regimen. Of the 175 patients meeting study eligibility criteria, 173 were treated with rVIII-SingleChain, prophylactically (N = 146) or on-demand (N = 27). The total cumulative exposure was 14 306 exposure days (EDs), with 120 participants reaching ≥50 EDs and 52 participants having ≥100 EDs. Hemostatic efficacy was rated by the investigator as excellent or good in 93.8% of the 835 bleeds treated and assessed. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 2.4) and the median overall annualized bleeding rate (ABR) was 1.14 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 4.2). Surgical hemostasis was rated as excellent/good in 100% of major surgeries by the investigator. No participant developed FVIII inhibitors. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is a novel rFVIII molecule showing excellent hemostatic efficacy in surgery and in the control of bleeding events, low ABR in patients on prophylaxis, and a favorable safety profile in this large clinical study. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01486927. PMID:27330001

  4. Good manufacturing practice production of self-complementary serotype 8 adeno-associated viral vector for a hemophilia B clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allay, James A; Sleep, Susan; Long, Scott; Tillman, David M; Clark, Rob; Carney, Gael; Fagone, Paolo; McIntosh, Jenny H; Nienhuis, Arthur W; Davidoff, Andrew M; Nathwani, Amit C; Gray, John T

    2011-05-01

    To generate sufficient clinical-grade vector to support a phase I/II clinical trial of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-mediated factor IX (FIX) gene transfer for hemophilia B, we have developed a large-scale, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible method for vector production and purification. We used a 293T-based two-plasmid transient transfection system coupled with a three-column chromatography purification process to produce high-quality self-complementary AAV2/8 FIX clinical-grade vector. Two consecutive production campaigns using a total of 432 independent 10-stack culture chambers produced a total of ∼2 × 10(15) vector genomes (VG) by dot-blot hybridization. Benzonase-treated microfluidized lysates generated from pellets of transfected cells were purified by group separation on Sepharose beads followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The virus-containing fractions were further processed by gel filtration and ultrafiltration, using a 100-kDa membrane. The vector was formulated in phosphate-buffered saline plus 0.25% human serum albumin. Spectrophotometric analysis suggested ∼20% full particles, with only low quantities of nonviral proteins were visible on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A sensitive assay for the detection of replication-competent AAV was developed, which did reveal trace quantities of such contaminants in the final product. Additional studies have confirmed the long-term stability of the vector at -80°C for at least 24 months and for at least 24 hr formulated in the clinical diluent and stored at room temperature within intravenous bags. This material has been approved for use in clinical trials in the United States and the United Kingdom.

  5. Characterization of three abnormal factor IX variants (Bm Lake Elsinore, Long Beach, and Los Angeles) of hemophilia-B. Evidence for defects affecting the latent catalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, P; Warn-Cramer, B J; Kasper, C K; Bajaj, S P

    1985-01-01

    Abnormal factor IX variant proteins were isolated from the plasmas of three unrelated severe hemophilia-B families that had been previously shown to contain functionally impaired molecules immunologically similar to normal factor IX. The families studied were: (1) a patient with markedly prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Bm Lake Elsinore (IXBmLE); (b) three patients (brothers) with moderately prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Long Beach (IXLB); and (c) a patient with normal ox brain prothrombin time designated factor IX Los Angeles (IXLA). Each variant molecule comigrates with normal factor IX (IXN) both in the sodium dodecyl sulfate and in the nondenaturing alkaline gel electrophoresis. All three variant proteins are indistinguishable from IXN in their amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, carbohydrate distributions and number of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues. Each variant protein undergoes a similar pattern of cleavage by factor XIa/Ca2+ and by factor VIIa/Ca2+/tissue factor, and is activated at a rate similar to that observed for IXN. All of the three variant proteins also react with an anti-IXN monoclonal antibody that interferes with the binding of activated IXN(IXaN) to thrombin-treated factor VIIIC. However, in contrast to IXaN, the cleaved IXBmLE has negligible activity (approximately 0.2%), and cleaved forms of IXLA and IXLB have significantly reduced activity (approximately 5-6%) in binding to antithrombin-III/heparin, and in activating factor VII (plus Ca2+ and phospholipid) or factor X (plus Ca2+ and phospholipid) +/- factor VIII. These data, taken together, strongly indicate that the defect in these three variant proteins resides near or within the latent catalytic site. This results in virtually a complete loss of catalytic activity of the cleaved IXBmLE molecule and approximately 95% loss of catalytic activity of the cleaved IXLA and IXLB molecules.

  6. Genotyping of intron 22 inversion of factor VIII gene for diagnosis of hemophilia A by inverse-shifting polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tzu-Yu; Wang, Chun-Chi; Shih, Chi-Jen; Wu, Hui-Fen; Chiou, Shyh-Shin; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2014-09-01

    This is the first capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis for diagnosis of hemophilia A (HA). The intron 22 inversion of factor VIII gene (F8) causes 40-50 % of severe bleeding disorder of HA in all human populations. Consequently, identification of the disease-causing mutations is becoming increasingly important for accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. In this study, the key steps of inverse-shifting polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR) and of short-end injection capillary electrophoresis were used for more specific and rapid genotyping of intron 22 inversion of F8. In IS-PCR, three specific primers were used to amplify 512-bp amplicon for wild type and 584-bp amplicon for patients with intron 22 inversion. The capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) system was performed using 1× Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffer containing 0.3 % (w/v) polyethylene oxide (PEO). The PCR amplicons were electrokinetically injected at 10 kV for 10 s at a temperature of 25 °C. The optimal short-end injection CGE was applied to detect the F8 gene of HA patients and carriers within 5 min. Intron 22 inversion was indeed found on some HA patients (13/35, 37.1 %). All genotyping results showed good agreement with DNA sequencing method and long-distance polymerase chain reaction (LD-PCR). The IS-PCR combined with short-end injection CGE method was feasible and efficient for intron 22 inversion screening of F8 in the HA populations.

  7. Efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain: results of a phase 1/3 multicenter clinical trial in severe hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlangu, Johnny; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Stasyshyn, Oleksandra; Kosinova, Marina V; Lepatan, Lynda Mae; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Boggio, Lisa N; Klamroth, Robert; Oldenburg, Johannes; Hellmann, Andrzej; Santagostino, Elena; Baker, Ross I; Fischer, Kathelijn; Gill, Joan C; P'Ng, Stephanie; Chowdary, Pratima; Escobar, Miguel A; Khayat, Claudia Djambas; Rusen, Luminita; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Blackman, Nicole; Limsakun, Tharin; Veldman, Alex; St Ledger, Katie; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2016-08-04

    Recombinant VIII (rVIII)-SingleChain is a novel B-domain-truncated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII), comprised of covalently bonded factor VIII (FVIII) heavy and light chains. It was designed to have a higher binding affinity for von Willebrand factor (VWF). This phase 1/3 study investigated the efficacy and safety of rVIII-SingleChain in the treatment of bleeding episodes, routine prophylaxis, and surgical prophylaxis. Participants were ≥12 years of age, with severe hemophilia A (endogenous FVIII <1%). The participants were allocated by the investigator to receive rVIII-SingleChain in either an on-demand or prophylaxis regimen. Of the 175 patients meeting study eligibility criteria, 173 were treated with rVIII-SingleChain, prophylactically (N = 146) or on-demand (N = 27). The total cumulative exposure was 14 306 exposure days (EDs), with 120 participants reaching ≥50 EDs and 52 participants having ≥100 EDs. Hemostatic efficacy was rated by the investigator as excellent or good in 93.8% of the 835 bleeds treated and assessed. Across all prophylaxis regimens, the median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 2.4) and the median overall annualized bleeding rate (ABR) was 1.14 (Q1, Q3: 0.0, 4.2). Surgical hemostasis was rated as excellent/good in 100% of major surgeries by the investigator. No participant developed FVIII inhibitors. In conclusion, rVIII-SingleChain is a novel rFVIII molecule showing excellent hemostatic efficacy in surgery and in the control of bleeding events, low ABR in patients on prophylaxis, and a favorable safety profile in this large clinical study. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01486927.

  8. 甲型血友病基因携带者检出及产前诊断研究%Hemophilia A gene carriers detection and prenatal diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石红松; 李长钢; 尹艳; 王缨; 王纯

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨甲型血友病(hemophilia A,HA)型血友病基因携带者检出及产前诊断的准确性和诊断率.方法 12个HA家系66名成员和2名胎儿,采集外周血或脐血,采用FⅧ基因第13内含子的(CA)n重复多态性、第18内含子内Bcl-1位点和第22内含子内Xba-1位点的多态性连锁分析进行间接基因诊断和产前基因诊断.结果 12个HA家系筛查成功率为100%,12个HA家系中41名女性成员,其中27例确定为HA致病基因携带者,14名排除携带状态;对其中2个家系的2名胎儿进行产前诊断,1例诊断为血友病基因携带者,1例诊断为血友病患儿,建议终止妊娠.结论 联合采用上述3个多态位点可对HA家系作出快速、准确的基因诊断和产前基因诊断.

  9. Small ncRNA Expression-Profiling of Blood from Hemophilia A Patients Identifies miR-1246 as a Potential Regulator of Factor 8 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tewarit Sarachana

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A (HA is a bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of functional plasma clotting factor VIII (FVIII. Genetic mutations in the gene encoding FVIII (F8 have been extensively studied. Over a thousand different mutations have been reported in the F8 gene. These span a diverse range of mutation types, namely, missense, splice-site, deletions of single and multiple exons, inversions, etc. There is nonetheless evidence that other molecular mechanisms, in addition to mutations in the gene encoding the FVIII protein, may be involved in the pathobiology of HA. In this study, global small ncRNA expression profiling analysis of whole blood from HA patients, and controls, was performed using high-throughput ncRNA microarrays. Patients were further sub-divided into those that developed neutralizing-anti-FVIII antibodies (inhibitors and those that did not. Selected differentially expressed ncRNAs were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis. We identified several ncRNAs, and among them hsa-miR-1246 was significantly up-regulated in HA patients. In addition, miR-1246 showed a six-fold higher expression in HA patients without inhibitors. We have identified an miR-1246 target site in the noncoding region of F8 mRNA and were able to confirm the suppressory role of hsa-miR-1246 on F8 expression in a stable lymphoblastoid cell line expressing FVIII. These findings suggest several testable hypotheses vis-à-vis the role of nc-RNAs in the regulation of F8 expression. These hypotheses have not been exhaustively tested in this study as they require carefully curated clinical samples.

  10. Factor VIII brand and the incidence of factor VIII inhibitors in previously untreated UK children with severe hemophilia A, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Peter W; Palmer, Benedict P; Chalmers, Elizabeth A; Hart, Daniel P; Liesner, Ri; Rangarajan, Savita; Talks, Katherine; Williams, Michael; Hay, Charles R M

    2014-11-27

    The effect of recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) brand on inhibitor development was investigated in all 407 severe hemophilia A previously untreated patients born in the United Kingdom (UK) between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2011. Eighty-eight (22%) had been in the RODIN study. Information was extracted from the National Haemophilia Database. Because exposure days (EDs) were not known for some patients, time from first treatment was used as a surrogate for rFVIII exposure. An inhibitor developed in 118 (29%) patients, 60 high and 58 low titer, after a median (interquartile range) of 7.8 (3.3-13.5) months from first exposure and 16 (9-30) EDs. Of 128 patients treated with Kogenate Bayer/Helixate NexGen, 45 (35.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 27.4-43.8) developed an inhibitor compared with 42/172 (24.4%, 95% CI 18.6% to 31.4%) with Advate (P = .04). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (95% CI) for Kogenate Bayer/Helixate NexGen compared with Advate was 2.14 (1.12-4.10) (P = .02) for high titer and 1.75 (1.11-2.76) (P = .02) for all inhibitors. When excluding UK-RODIN patients, the adjusted HR (95% CI) for high-titer inhibitors was 2.00 (0.93-4.34) (P = .08). ReFacto AF was associated with a higher incidence of all, but not high-titer, inhibitors than Advate. These results will help inform debate around the relative immunogenicity and use of rFVIII brands.

  11. Characterization of the anti-factor VIII immunoglobulin profile in patients with hemophilia A by use of a fluorescence-based immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brian; Rice, Anne S.; Dunn, Amy L.; Tarantino, Michael D.; Brettler, Doreen B.; Barrett, John C.; Miller, Connie H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The development of neutralizing antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against factor VIII (FVIII) is a major complication associated with FVIII infusion therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A (HA). Previous studies have shown that a subset of HA patients and a low percentage of healthy individuals harbor non-neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies that do not elicit the clinical manifestations associated with inhibitor development. Objective Assess HA patients' anti-FVIII antibody profiles as potential predictors of clinical outcomes. Methods A fluorescence immunoassay (FLI) was used to detect anti-FVIII antibodies in 491 samples from 371 HA patients. Results Assessments of antibody profiles showed that the presence of anti-FVIII IgG1, IgG2, or IgG4 correlated qualitatively and quantitatively with the presence of a FVIII inhibitor as reported by the Nijmegen-Bethesda assay (NBA). Forty-eight patients with a negative inhibitor history contributed serial samples to the study, including seven patients who had negative NBA titers initially and later converted to NBA-positive. The FLI detected anti-FVIII IgG1 in five of those seven patients prior to their conversion to NBA-positive. Five of 15 serial-sample patients who had a negative inhibitor history and a positive anti-FVIII IgG1 later developed an inhibitor, compared to 2 of 33 patients with a negative inhibitor history without anti-FVIII IgG1. Conclusions These data provide a rationale for future studies designed both to monitor the dynamics of anti-FVIII antibody profiles in HA patients as a potential predictor of future inhibitor development and to assess the value of the anti-FVIII FLI as a supplement to traditional inhibitor testing. PMID:25354263

  12. The Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J; Melbye, M; Olsen, S F

    2001-01-01

    component causes that act early in life. Exposures in this period, which influence fetal growth, cell divisions, and organ functioning, may have long-lasting impact on health and disease susceptibility. METHODS: To investigate these issues the Danish National Birth Cohort (Better health for mother and child...... bank has been set up with blood taken from the mother twice during pregnancy and blood from the umbilical cord taken shortly after birth. Data collection started in 1996 and the project covered all regions in Denmark in 1999. By August 2000. a total of 60,000 pregnant women had been recruited...... to the study. It is expected that a large number of gene-environmental hypotheses need to be based on case-control analyses within a cohort like this....

  13. Advances in Gene Diagnosis and Prenatal Diagnosis of Hemophilia A%甲型血友病基因诊断及产前诊断的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈淑芬; 蒋玮莹

    2009-01-01

    Hemophilia A is the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disease, which attracts great at-tention. Because we lack of effective curing methods for this disease, gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis ofhemophilia A become extremely important. The gene diagnosis includes direct gene diagnosis and indirect link-age analysis. The techniques of prenatal diagnosis for the disease have developed rapidly in resent years. Wereview the update on the gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis for Hemophilia A.%甲型血友病是最常见的遗传性出血性疾病,受到了国内外研究者们的极大关注.由于此病尚无彻底根治方法,所以基因诊断及产前诊断显得尤为重要.基因诊断可分为直接基因诊断及间接连锁分析的方法;产前诊断的手段也在近年飞速发展.本文就直接基因诊断、间接连锁分析及产前诊断新技术这几方面的研究进展综述如下.

  14. Application of the intervention mode of family treatment and nursing behaviors on children hemophilia%家庭治疗和护理行为干预模式在血友病患儿中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦秀丽; 曾铁英; 叶天惠

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the applicable nursing intervention mode of family treatment and nursing for children with hemophilia which was appropriate for local hemophilia treatment center (HTC).Methods The nursing intervention group,which consisting of nurses,hemophilia patients aged 2 ~ 18 and their parents,discussed and summarized the problems in family treatment and nursing for children with hemophilia,through literature review and expert consultation,developed comprehensive nursing intervention measures,which including individualized coagulation factors injection training,hemophilia classes,children hemophilia families sodality and follow-up visiting of the family treatment and nursing behaviors.The effect of nursing intervention was judged through measuring and comparing the family treatment and nursing behaviors.Results After intervention,among 22 items of family treatment and nursing behaviors,19 items were significantly improved than that of no intervention ( x2=59.88,36.47,96.30,13.57,34.67,55.06,55.06,21.85,22.69,45.69,39.33,68.25,11.99,35.39,35.39,17.24,81.51,85.75,13.57,respectively; P<0.01 ).Before intervention,the incidence of "correctly record every bleeding and treatment" among the patients was 2 cases(3.85% ),while after intervention,that was 48 cases ( 92.31% ),and the incidence of "monthly report the bleeding and therapy nursing information to nurses" was raised from 5 cases (20%) to 52 cases ( 100% ) after intervention,and the difference was statistically significant (x2=81.51,85.75,respectively;P<0.01).Conclusions Comprehensive nursing intervention measures can improve the families' treatment and nursing behaviors of children with hemophilia and achieve the effective management of patients' information at the sam time,which is applicable for local hemophilia treatment center.%目的 探讨适合地方血友病诊疗中心开展的儿童血友病家庭治疗和护理行为的干预模式.方法 由血友病护士和2 ~18岁的血友

  15. 国外血友病家庭治疗和护理管理现状%Status of home treatment and nursing management for patients with hemophilia in foreign countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张迎红; 胡国强; 程红; 路兰; 徐晶; 李金萍

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarized the major progress of home treatment and nursing management in foreign countries in recent years,including recognition status of foreign home care, patient management. Patient assessment, information management and the patients needs for hemophilia knowledge, home treatment,home care and self - management were analyzed. Based on the previous analysis,it put forward the prospect of hemophilia home care services in China.%归纳了近年来国外家庭治疗和护理管理的主要进展,即国外家庭护理观点的演变、患者管理,分析了患者评估、资料管理、患者对血友病知识及对家庭治疗、护理和自我管理的需求.在此基础上,对我国血友病家庭治疗和护理的前景进行了展望.

  16. An investigation of HCV HIV and syphilis infection in hemophilia patients in Shandong, 2005-2011%山东省2005-2011年血友病患者HCV HIV和梅毒感染情况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪芹; 张心声; 朱海峰; 曹丹; 唐建华; 滕彬

    2012-01-01

    Objective To better understand the infection status of HCV, HIV and syphilis in hemophilia patients. Methods Serum HCV, HIV and Treponema pallidum, (TP) antibodies were measured by ELISA in 628 hemophilia patients and 2 474 voluntary blood donors. Results The positive rates of HCV, HIV and TP antibodies in 628 hemophilia patients were 9. 6% , 0. 6% and 0. 2% , respectively, and the overall infection rate was 10. 4% (65/628). The positive rates of HCV antibody in different age groups (0 - 19 years, 20 - 39 years and 40 - 77 years) were 3. 3% , 9. 8% and 20. 5%, respectively. The positive rates of HCV, HIV and TP antibodies in 2 474 voluntary blood donors were 0. 4 %, 0.0% and 0.2%, respectively, and the overall infection rate was 0. 6 % (15/2 474). Conclusion The positive rates of HCV and HIV antibodies in hemophilia patients were much higher than those in voluntary blood donors,the rate of HCV infection in hemophilia patients was closely correlated with age.%目的 了解山东省血友病患者丙型肝炎病毒(Hepatitis C virus,HCV)、人类免疫缺陷病毒(Human immunodeficiency virus,HIV)和梅毒螺旋体(Treponema pallidum,TP)的感染情况.方法 对2005-2011年山东省血友病诊疗中心确诊或治疗的628例血友病患者,采用酶联免疫吸附试验检测HCV、HIV和梅毒抗体,并根据年龄段进行分组,随机选择2 474例无偿献血者为正常对照.结果 628例血友病患者抗-HCV、抗-HIV和抗-TP的阳性率分别为9.6%(60/628)、0.6%(4/628)和0.2%(1/628),总感染率为10.4%(65/628).0~19岁、20~39岁、40~77岁年龄段患者抗-HCV阳性率分别为3.3%、9.8%和20.5%.2 474例无偿献血者抗-HCV、抗-HIV和抗-TP的阳性率分别为0.4%(11/2 474)、0和0.2%(4/2 474),总感染率为0.6%(15/2 474).结论 血友病患者抗-HCV和抗-HIV阳性率明显高于无偿献血者,HCV感染与年龄密切相关.

  17. Gene therapy for hemophilia B mediated by recombinant adeno-associated viral vector with hFIXR338A, a high catalytic activity mutation of human coagulation factor IX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Huazhong; (

    2001-01-01

    [1]Chang, J., Jin, J., Lollar, P. et al., Changing residue 338 in human factor IX from arginine to alanine causes an increase in catalytic activity, J. Bio. Chem., 1998, 273 (20): 12089-12094.[2]Lai, L., Chen, L., Zhou, H. et al., Clinical phenotype and genetic stability of factor IX gene knock out mice, J. Fudan Uni., 1999, 38 (4): 435-438.[3]Wu, Z. J., Wu, X. B., Hou, Y. D., Generation of a recombinant herps simplex virus which can provide packaging function for recombinant adeno-associated virus, Chinese Sci. Bull., 1999, 44 (8): 715-719.[4]Snyder, R. O., Miao, C. H., Patijn, G. A. et al., Persistent and therapeutic concentrations of human factor IX in mice after hepatic gene transfer of recombinant AAV vectors, Nat. Genet., 1997, 16 (3): 270-276.[5]Lai, L. H., Chen, L., Wang, J. M. et al., Skeletal muscle-specific expression of human blood coagulation factor IX rescues factor IX deficiency mouse by AAV-mediated gene transfer, Science in China, Ser. C, 1999, 42 (6): 628-634.[6]Snyder, R. O., Miao, C., Meuse, L. et al., Correction of hemophilia B in canine and murine models using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors, Nat. Med., 1999, 5 (1): 64-70.[7]Kung, S. H., Hagstrom, J. N., Cass, D. et al., Human factor IX corrects the bleeding diathesis of mice with hemophilia B, Blood, 1998, 91(3): 784-790.[8]Hirt, B., Selective extraction of polyoma DNA from infected mouse cell culture, J. Mol. Biol., 1967, 26: 365-369.[9]Sambrook, J., Fritsch, E., Maniatis, T., Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, 1989, 6, 20-21.[10]Chao, H., Samulski, R. J., Bellinger, D. A. et al., Persistent expression of canine factor IX in hemophilia B canines, Gene Ther., 1999, 6: 1695-1704.[11]Kaufman, R. J., Advances toward gene therapy for hemophilia at the millennium, Hum. Gene Ther., 1999, 10 (13): 2091-2107.[12]Lu, D. R., Zhou, J. M., Zheng, B. et al., Stage I clinical trial of gene

  18. A型血友病患儿家庭治疗护理状况回顾性调查分析%Current status of home care for children with hemophilia A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟小红

    2011-01-01

    目的 调查中国A型血友病4~18岁患儿家庭治疗和护理状况。方法 2006年、2010年两次对血友病家庭治疗和护理状况进行调查。结果 A型血友病患儿诊断年龄和治疗年龄晚于首次出血年龄;凝血因子用量不足;血友病性骨关节病患病率高;开展了家庭治疗的血友病患儿从55例上升到119例,血友病患儿及家庭对发病原因、遗传规律、出血严重程度的评估和正确服用止痛药物认知率分别从80.8%、78.5%、37.4%和48.4%上升到94.7%、94.1%、52.7%和85.5%;在开展家庭康复训练、保持治疗记录完整两方面没有明显改善。结论 A型血友病患儿诊断治疗延迟,凝血因子用量不足,骨关节病发病率高,家庭护理水平仍然有待于进一步提高。%Objective To investigate the current status of home care for children with hemophilia A. Methods Twice investigation was conducted with a self-designed questionnaire about the status of home care in children with hemophilia A in 2006 and 2010. Results The diagnosis confirming and initial treatment were implemented after initial hemorrhage in children with hemophilia A. Moreover, the dosage of coagulation factor was insufficient and the incidence of joint deformity was high. The number of hemophilia A children received family therapy increased from 55 in 2006 to 119 in 2010. The mastery rates of knowledge on the etiology,inheritance rule,assesment of bleeding and proper use of analgesics were improved from 80.8 percent,78.5 percent,37.4 percent,and 48.4 percent in 2006 to 94.7 percent,94.1 percent,52.7 percent,and 85.5 percent in 2010,respectively. The status of home rehabilitation training and the completeness of medical records was not unproved. Conclusion Delayed diagnosis and treatment,insufficient dosage of coagulation factor,and high incidence of joint deformity are prevalent in the children with hemophilia A. The level of family therapy and home care is still need to

  19. Determination and clinical application of overall haemostasis potential for patients with hemophilia A%血友病A患者总体止血能力检测及临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟皓; 刘永春; 张静; 纪昕

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the abnormal change of overall haemostasis potential (OHP), overall coagulation potential (OCP) and overall fibrinolytic potential (OFP) in patients with hemophilia A, and observe the correlation of FⅧ: C with OHP, OCP and OFP. Methods The OHP, OCP and OFP were determined in plasma with different FⅧ: C, and the correlation of FⅧ: C with OHP, OCP and OFP was analyzed by the statistical method of logistic regression and Pearson correlation. OHP, OCP and OFP in 38 hemophilia A patients and 50 healthy controls were determined, and the difference of OHP, OCP and OFP between the 2 groups were compared. Results The correlation indices (r2 ) between FⅧ: C and OHP, OCP and OFP were 0. 994 2, 0. 997 0 and 0.988 4 (P <0.01 ).The logistic regression equations were Y= 1.508 6 In(X) +2.842 5,Y=1.769 7 In(X) +5.793 2 and Y= -3.736 4 In(X) +43. 167. The correlation of FⅧ: C with OHF, OCP and OFP was logarithmic. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and OFP in hemophilia A group was higher than those in healthy controls( P <0.01 ), and OCP was lower than that in healthy controls ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusions OHP, OCP and OFP are well correlated with FⅧ: C in the patients with hemophilia A and could be new parameters for the screening of hemophilia A.%目的 探讨血友病A患者总体止血能力(OHP)、总体凝血能力(OCP)、总体纤溶能力(OFP)的异常改变,研究血浆FⅧ:C水平与OHP、OCP、OFP的相关性.方法 测定不同FⅧ:C血浆OHP、OCP及OFP,采用对数曲线回归分析及Pearson相关分析法分析血浆FⅧ:C水平与OHP、OCP、OFP的相关性.检测38例血友病A患者及50名健康体检者血浆OHP、OCP及OFP,比较2组间3个参数的差异.结果 FⅧ:C与OHP、OCP及OFP相关指数(r2)分别为:0.994 2、0.997 0、0.988 4,P<0.01;回归方程分别为:Y=1.508 6 ln(X)+2.842 5,Y=1.769 7 ln(X)+5.793 2,Y=-3.736 4 ln(X)+43.167,表明FⅧ:C与OHP、OCP、OFP呈对数相关.血友病患

  20. Riyadh Mother and Baby Multicenter Cohort Study: The Cohort Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayfaa Wahabi

    Full Text Available To assess the effects of non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity, on the mother and the infant.A multicentre cohort study was conducted in three hospitals in the city of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia. All Saudi women and their babies who delivered in participating hospitals were eligible for recruitment. Data on socio-demographic characteristics in addition to the maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy were collected. The cohort demographic profile was recorded and the prevalence of maternal conditions including gestational diabetes, pre-gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and obesity were estimated.The total number of women who delivered in participating hospitals during the study period was 16,012 of which 14,568 women participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 29 ± 5.9 years and over 40% were university graduates. Most of the participants were housewives, 70% were high or middle income and 22% were exposed to secondhand smoke. Of the total cohort, 24% were married to a first cousin. More than 68% of the participants were either overweight or obese. The preterm delivery rate was 9%, while 1.5% of the deliveries were postdate. The stillbirth rate was 13/1000 live birth. The prevalence of gestational diabetes was 24% and that of pre-gestational diabetes was 4.3%. The preeclampsia prevalence was 1.1%. The labour induction rate was 15.5% and the cesarean section rate was 25%.Pregnant women in Saudi Arabia have a unique demographic profile. The prevalence of obesity and diabetes in pregnancy are among the highest in the world.