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Sample records for hemophagocytic syndrome pitfalls

  1. Hemophagocytic syndrome in classic dengue fever

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    Sayantan Ray

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old previously healthy girl presented with persistent fever, headache, and jaundice. Rapid-test anti-dengue virus IgM antibody was positive but anti-dengue IgG was nonreactive, which is suggestive of primary dengue infection. There was clinical deterioration during empiric antibiotic and symptomatic therapy. Bone marrow examination demonstrated the presence of hemophagocytosis. Diagnosis of dengue fever with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was made according to the diagnostic criteria of the HLH 2004 protocol of the Histiocyte Society. The patient recovered with corticosteroid therapy. A review of literature revealed only a handful of case reports that showed the evidence that this syndrome is caused by dengue virus. Our patient is an interesting case of hemophagocytic syndrome associated with classic dengue fever and contributes an additional case to the existing literature on this topic. This case highlights the need for increased awareness even in infections not typically associated with hemophagocytic syndrome.

  2. Hemophagocytic syndrome secondary to tuberculosis at 24-week gestation.

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    Fernández, Alexandra Arteaga; de Velasco Pérez, David Fernández; Fournier, M C Jiménez; Moreno Del Prado, J C; Torras, B Paraíso; Cañete Palomo, M L

    2017-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome is a life-threatening disease characterized by the uncontrolled activation of macrophages, resulting in hemophagocytosis of blood cells in the bone marrow. A 20-year-old gravida at 23-week and 5-day gestation was admitted to hospital to evaluate fever up to 104°F of unknown origin, moderate cytopenia, and elevated levels of liver enzymes. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed hemophagocytic syndrome, and polymerase chain reaction came back positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Supportive care and tuberculosis treatment resulted in clinical improvement. At 27 weeks and 5 days, premature rupture of the membranes occurred, and because of the high probability of reactivating the hemophagocytic syndrome, a cesarean section was performed at 29-week and 2-day gestation. Hemophagocytic syndrome is an uncommon disease which rarely appears during pregnancy. Early diagnosis and treatment can save both maternal and fetal lives.

  3. Hemophagocytic syndrome secondary to tuberculosis at 24-week gestation

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    Alexandra Arteaga Fernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic syndrome is a life-threatening disease characterized by the uncontrolled activation of macrophages, resulting in hemophagocytosis of blood cells in the bone marrow. A 20-year-old gravida at 23-week and 5-day gestation was admitted to hospital to evaluate fever up to 104°F of unknown origin, moderate cytopenia, and elevated levels of liver enzymes. Bone marrow biopsy confirmed hemophagocytic syndrome, and polymerase chain reaction came back positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Supportive care and tuberculosis treatment resulted in clinical improvement. At 27 weeks and 5 days, premature rupture of the membranes occurred, and because of the high probability of reactivating the hemophagocytic syndrome, a cesarean section was performed at 29-week and 2-day gestation. Hemophagocytic syndrome is an uncommon disease which rarely appears during pregnancy. Early diagnosis and treatment can save both maternal and fetal lives.

  4. Secondary Hemophagocytic Syndrome Associated with Herpes Virus Infections

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    S. R. Rodionovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic syndrome is one of the complications of herpes virus infections. Here, we describe the case of a 8—year-old male with secondary hemophagocytic syndrome. The disease was diagnosed in the early stages. The patient received treatment with dexamethasone, intravenous immunoglobulin, which has led to a weakening of the ignition and the suppression of the disease with rapid treatment.

  5. Dengue infection associated hemophagocytic syndrome: Therapeutic interventions and outcome.

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    Wan Jamaludin, Wan Fariza; Periyasamy, Petrick; Wan Mat, Wan Rahiza; Abdul Wahid, S Fadilah

    2015-08-01

    Infection associated hemophagocytic syndrome is increasingly recognized as a potentially fatal complication of dengue fever. It should be suspected with prolonged fever beyond seven days associated with hepatosplenomegaly, hyperferritinemia, worsening cytopenias and development of multiorgan dysfunction. Surge of similar pro-inflammatory cytokines observed in dengue associated hemophagocytic syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction may indicate they are part of related inflammatory spectrum. A proportion of patients recovered with supportive therapy, however most required interventions with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin or chemotherapy. We report three cases of dengue associated IAHS with good outcome following early recognition and treatment with dexamethasone and intravenous immunoglobulin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. HEMOPHAGOCYTAL LYMPHOHISTIOCYTOSIS

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    M.A. Maschan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytal lymphohistiocytosis is a rare and frequently fatal disorder of immune response regulation, based on defects of cell cytotoxicity and hyper production of pro inflammatory cytokines. This disease is devided to genetically determinate types of hemophagocytal lymphohistiocytosis and secondary hemophagocytal syndromes, associated to infections, malignant neoplasm, autoimmune disease and immunodeficiency. The article gives a brief description of pathogenesis, clinical symptoms, and methods of hemophagocytal lymphohistiocytosis treatment.Key words: hemophagocytal lymphohistiocytosis, immunosuppression, ciclosporin A, etoposide, dexamethasone.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(3:66-75

  7. An Animal Model for Human EBV-Associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome

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    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Ohara, Nobuya; Teramoto, Norihiro; Onoda, Sachiyo; Chen, Hong-Li; Oka, Takashi; Kondo, Eisaku; Yoshino, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Yates, John; Akagi, Tadaatsu

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS) is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis. However, the animal model for EBV-AHS has not been developed. We reported the first animal model for EBV-AHS using rabbits infected with EBV-related herpesvirus of baboon (HVP). Eleven of 13 (85%) rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP-producing cells developed fatal lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) between 22 and 105 days after inoculation. LPD was also accompanied by hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) in nine of these 11 rabbits. The peroral spray of cell-free HVP induced the virus infection with increased anti-EBV-viral capsid antigen-IgG titers in three of five rabbits, and two of these three infected rabbits died of LPD with HPS. Autopsy revealed hepatosplenomegaly and swollen lymph nodes. Atypical lymphoid T cells expressing EBV-encoded small RNA-1 infiltrated diffusely in many organs, frequently involving the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. HVP-DNA was detected in the tissues and peripheral blood from the infected rabbits by polymerase chain reaction or Southern blot analysis. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed both HVP-EBNA1 and HVP-EBNA2 transcripts, suggesting latency type III infection. These data indicate that the high rate of rabbit LPD with HPS induction is caused by HVP. This system is useful for studying the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of human EBV-AHS. PMID:11290571

  8. Secondary Hemophagocytic Syndrome: The Importance of Clinical Suspicion

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    Cristina Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal disorder characterized by pathological immune activation associated with a primary familial disorder, genetic mutations, or occurring as a sporadic condition. The latter can be secondary to infections, malignancies, or autoimmune diseases. Clinically, patients present signs of severe inflammation, with unremitting fever, cytopenias, spleen enlargement, phagocytosis of bone marrow elements, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Increased suspicion is determinant to timely initiate treatment in an attempt to alter the natural history. The authors present three clinical cases of this syndrome, with a brief review of the diagnostic criteria and treatment.

  9. Rabbit Model for Human EBV-Associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome (HPS)

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    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Jin, Zaishun; Onoda, Sachiyo; Joko, Hiromasa; Teramoto, Norihiro; Ohara, Nobuya; Oda, Wakako; Tanaka, Takehiro; Liu, Yi-Xuan; Koirala, Tirtha Raj; Oka, Takashi; Kondo, Eisaku; Yoshino, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Akagi, Tadaatsu

    2003-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS) is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis or T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD). To elucidate the true nature of fatal LPD observed in Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-induced rabbit hemophagocytosis, reactive or neoplastic, we analyzed sequential development of HVP-induced rabbit LPD and their cell lines. All of the seven Japanese White rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP died of fatal LPD 18 to 27 days after inoculation. LPD was also accompanied by hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) in five of these seven rabbits. Sequential autopsy revealed splenomegaly and swollen lymph nodes, often accompanied by bleeding, which developed in the last week. Atypical lymphoid cells infiltrated many organs with a “starry sky” pattern, frequently involving the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. HVP-small RNA-1 expression in these lymphoid cells was clearly demonstrated by a newly developed in situ hybridization (ISH) system. HVP-ISH of immunomagnetically purified lymphoid cells from spleen or lymph nodes revealed HVP-EBER1+ cells in each CD4+, CD8+, or CD79a+ fraction. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. HVP-DNA was detected in the tissues and peripheral blood from the infected rabbits by PCR or Southern blot analysis. Clonality analysis of HVP-induced LPD by Southern blotting with TCR gene probe revealed polyclonal bands, suggesting polyclonal proliferation. Six IL-2-dependent rabbit T-cell lines were established from transplanted scid mouse tumors from LPD. These showed latency type I/II HVP infection and had normal karyotypes except for one line, and three of them showed tumorigenicity in nude mice. These data suggest that HVP-induced fatal LPD in rabbits is reactive polyclonally in nature. PMID:12707056

  10. An animal model for human EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome: herpesvirus papio frequently induces fatal lymphoproliferative disorders with hemophagocytic syndrome in rabbits.

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    Hayashi, K; Ohara, N; Teramoto, N; Onoda, S; Chen, H L; Oka, T; Kondo, E; Yoshino, T; Takahashi, K; Yates, J; Akagi, T

    2001-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS) is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis. However, the animal model for EBV-AHS has not been developed. We reported the first animal model for EBV-AHS using rabbits infected with EBV-related herpesvirus of baboon (HVP). Eleven of 13 (85%) rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP-producing cells developed fatal lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) between 22 and 105 days after inoculation. LPD was also accompanied by hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) in nine of these 11 rabbits. The peroral spray of cell-free HVP induced the virus infection with increased anti-EBV-viral capsid antigen-IgG titers in three of five rabbits, and two of these three infected rabbits died of LPD with HPS. Autopsy revealed hepatosplenomegaly and swollen lymph nodes. Atypical lymphoid T cells expressing EBV-encoded small RNA-1 infiltrated diffusely in many organs, frequently involving the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. HVP-DNA was detected in the tissues and peripheral blood from the infected rabbits by polymerase chain reaction or Southern blot analysis. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed both HVP-EBNA1 and HVP-EBNA2 transcripts, suggesting latency type III infection. These data indicate that the high rate of rabbit LPD with HPS induction is caused by HVP. This system is useful for studying the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of human EBV-AHS.

  11. An update on renal involvement in hemophagocytic syndrome (macrophage activation syndrome).

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    Esmaili, Haydarali; Mostafidi, Elmira; Mehramuz, Bahareh; Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Mohajel-Shoja, Mohammadali

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is mainly characterized by massive infiltration of bone marrow by activated macrophages and often presents with pancytopenia. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is also present with thrombocytopenia and renal involvement. Both conditions could coexist with each other and complicate the condition. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science with keywords relevant to; Hemophagocytic syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, interferon-gamma and thrombotic microangiopathy, have been searched. Viral infection, rheumatologic disease and malignancies are the main underlying causes for secondary HPS. calcineurin inhibitors and viral infections are also the main underlying causes of TMA in transplant recipients. In this review, we discussed a 39-year-old male who presented with pancytopenia and renal allograft dysfunction. With the diagnosis of HPS induced TMA his renal condition and pancytopenia improved after receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis therapy. HPS is an increasingly recognized disorder in the realm of different medical specialties. Renal involvement complicates the clinical picture of the disease, and this condition even is more complex in renal transplant recipients. We should consider the possibility of HPS in any renal transplant recipient with pancytopenia and allograft dysfunction. The combination of HPS with TMA future increases the complexity of the situation.

  12. A rare complication of CMV infection in Crohn's disease - hemophagocytic syndrome: a case report.

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    Pop, Corina Silvia; Becheanu, Gabriel; Calagiu, Dorina; Jantea, Petruţa-Violeta; Rădulescu, Dragoş Mihai; Pariza, George; Mavrodin, Carmen-Iuliana; Bold, Adriana; Costache, Adrian; Nemeş, Roxana Maria

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of CMV (cytomegalovirus) infection in a Crohn's disease patient, resulting in severe hemophagocytic syndrome and death. A 63-year-old man with a 10-year history of ileal and colonic Crohn's disease presented with general malaise, loss of appetite and weight loss over the last month. He was in clinical remission for two years, with maintenance therapy 5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA)-derived Mesalamine. The patient had no prior immunomodulators or suppressive treatment. A colonoscopy was performed and we found appearance suggestive of active Crohn's disease, confirmed by histopathological examination. A diagnosis of an exacerbation of Crohn's disease was established. Although the specific treatment was initiated, patient's general condition degraded progressively and diarrheal stools appeared, followed by an episode of massive gastrointestinal bleeding - hematochezia. We performed a new colonoscopy and the pathological examination revealed Crohn's ileocolitis with superimposed CMV infection. Despite the initiation of Ganciclovir alongside with other intensive care measures, he increasingly deteriorated and chest X-ray confirmed multilobar pneumonia. The occurrence of rapidly progressing pancytopenia and evidence for disseminated intravascular coagulopathy as well as hyperferritinemia, raised the suspicion of hemophagocytic syndrome confirmed by bone marrow aspiration. Hence, CMV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the context of recent corticotherapy for Crohn's disease was established. There is enough evidence that supports the gravity of the CMV infection in the case of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, especially the ones on immunomodulator treatment. The hemophagocytic syndrome reactively occurs in patients with infections in cases of immunodeficiency, displaying a hematological aspect of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

  13. Rubella associated with hemophagocytic syndrome. First report in a male and review of the literature

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    Makram Koubaa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of fever, skin rash and epistaxis. Physical examination revealed fever (39.5°C, generalized purpura, lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. Blood tests showed pancytopenia. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy showed hemophagocytosis with no evidence of malignant cells. Anti rubella IgM antibody were positif and the IgG titers increased from 16 to 50 UI/mL in 3 days. Therefore, he was diagnosed to have rubella-associated hemophagocytic syndrome. We report herein the first case in a man and the sixth case of rubella-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in the literature by search in Pub Med till March 2012.

  14. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) secondary to disseminated histoplasmosis in the setting of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

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    Asanad, Samuel; Cerk, Brendan; Ramirez, Veronica

    2018-06-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare and aggressive disease involving immune system over-activation leading to hemophagocytosis. HLH requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment initiation, especially in patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). We present a case of a middle-aged male with AIDS and renal failure, who developed HLH secondary to disseminated histoplasmosis. Etoposide chemotherapy as recommended by the HLH 2004 Guidelines was deferred and treatment focused instead on anti-fungal therapy. Anti-retroviral therapy followed thereafter.

  15. Secondary Hemophagocytic Syndrome Associated with Richter’s Transformation in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

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    Nura El-Haj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS is an extremely rare condition arising from the overactivation of one’s own immune system. It results in excessive inflammation and tissue destruction. Prompt initiation of treatment is warranted in either scenario in order to decrease mortality. Most cases are triggered by infectious agents, malignancy, or drugs. We describe the first case of a CLL patient presenting with HPS due to acquisition of EBV-related large cell lymphoma in the setting of profound immunodeficiency.

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Guillain-Barre Syndrome in a 16-Month-Old Child

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    Motohiro Matsui MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 16-month-old girl was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and transferred to our hospital on the 58th day of the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis after treatment failure according to the Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis-2004 protocol. On admission to our hospital, she had a flaccid paralysis of her lower limbs. Nerve conduction studies showed a acute motor axonal neuropathy, and a diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome was established. Intravenous immunoglobulin G was started on the 57th day of the Guillain-Barre syndrome. To date, her neurological recovery is incomplete. For hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, after treatment failure of THP-COP regimen (pirarubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone and 2 courses of ESCAP regimen (etoposide, prednisone, cytarabine, L-asparaginase, we are now in the process of coordinating unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, we report the youngest case of Guillain-Barre syndrome accompanied by Epstein-Barr virus hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Rapid progression of Guillain-Barre syndrome, the electrophysiological subtype of Guillain-Barre syndrome, and treatment delay possibly led to poor neurological outcome.

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Guillain-Barre Syndrome in a 16-Month-Old Child.

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    Matsui, Motohiro; Shimizu, Mariko; Ioi, Aya; Mayumi, Azusa; Higuchi, Kohei; Sawada, Akihisa; Sato, Maho; Yasui, Masahiro; Yanagihara, Keiko; Inoue, Masami

    2016-01-01

    A 16-month-old girl was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and transferred to our hospital on the 58th day of the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis after treatment failure according to the Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis-2004 protocol. On admission to our hospital, she had a flaccid paralysis of her lower limbs. Nerve conduction studies showed a acute motor axonal neuropathy, and a diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome was established. Intravenous immunoglobulin G was started on the 57th day of the Guillain-Barre syndrome. To date, her neurological recovery is incomplete. For hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, after treatment failure of THP-COP regimen (pirarubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone) and 2 courses of ESCAP regimen (etoposide, prednisone, cytarabine, L-asparaginase), we are now in the process of coordinating unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, we report the youngest case of Guillain-Barre syndrome accompanied by Epstein-Barr virus hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Rapid progression of Guillain-Barre syndrome, the electrophysiological subtype of Guillain-Barre syndrome, and treatment delay possibly led to poor neurological outcome.

  18. Reactive hemophagocytic syndromes in children with rheumatic diseases

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    Piotr Gietka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive haemophagocytic syndrome (RHPS, also calledmacrophage activation syndrome (MAS, is a serious complicationof viral, rheumatic and malignant diseases, thought to be causedby the excessive activation of T lymphocytes and macrophages.MAS is characterized by polyorgan involvement with typical features:non-remitting fever, hepatic enlargement, considerable loweringof blood cell count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR,elevation of serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT,serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT, lactate dehydrogenase(LDH and serum ferritin level, with hypofibrinogenemia. Themost characteristic feature is the presence of well differentiatedmacrophages, revealing an active haemophagocytosis in the bonemarrow aspirate. Because of rapid progression and fatal prognosisof the disease, prompt and immediate therapeutic intervention isvery important. Although there is no standardized treatment, commonlyapplied glucocorticoids (GCS, and cyclosporine A (CsA areused. The study was aimed to a general characteristics of pathogenicfactors, clinical picture, laboratory features and results oftreatment in 8 children with RHPS /MAS. Material and methods: The study included 8 children (5 girls and3 boys aged 3 to 16 years (mean age was 10 years and 3 monthshospitalized in the Clinic of Pediatrics at IPCZD and in the Departmentof Pediatric Rheumatology at the Institute of Rheumatology in Warsaw. The analysis covered potential etiological factors, consideringthe basic disease, clinical symptoms (Table II, results oflaboratory tests (Table III, including immunological tests, appliedtherapy. In 4 patients, systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritiswas accompanied by MAS, and in 2 patients it was the first manifestationof sJIA. In one patient, EBV infection was confirmed bythe polymerase chain reaction (case 1. In patient 3, PCR evaluationrevealed Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. Cytomegalovirus infectionwas also confirmed in case 4

  19. Primary EBV infection induces an expression profile distinct from other viruses but similar to hemophagocytic syndromes.

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    Samantha K Dunmire

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and establishes lifelong infection associated with cancer and autoimmune disease. To better understand immunity to EBV, we performed a prospective study of natural infection in healthy humans. Transcriptome analysis defined a striking and reproducible expression profile during acute infection but no lasting gene changes were apparent during latent infection. Comparing the EBV response profile to multiple other acute viral infections, including influenza A (influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human rhinovirus (HRV, attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV, and Dengue fever virus (DENV, revealed similarity only to DENV. The signature shared by EBV and DENV was also present in patients with hemophagocytic syndromes, suggesting these two viruses cause uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Interestingly, while EBV induced a strong type I interferon response, a subset of interferon induced genes, including MX1, HERC5, and OAS1, were not upregulated, suggesting a mechanism by which viral antagonism of immunity results in a profound inflammatory response. These data provide an important first description of the response to a natural herpesvirus infection in humans.

  20. Primary EBV Infection Induces an Expression Profile Distinct from Other Viruses but Similar to Hemophagocytic Syndromes

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    Dunmire, Samantha K.; Odumade, Oludare A.; Porter, Jean L.; Reyes-Genere, Juan; Schmeling, David O.; Bilgic, Hatice; Fan, Danhua; Baechler, Emily C.; Balfour, Henry H.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis and establishes lifelong infection associated with cancer and autoimmune disease. To better understand immunity to EBV, we performed a prospective study of natural infection in healthy humans. Transcriptome analysis defined a striking and reproducible expression profile during acute infection but no lasting gene changes were apparent during latent infection. Comparing the EBV response profile to multiple other acute viral infections, including influenza A (influenza), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human rhinovirus (HRV), attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV), and Dengue fever virus (DENV), revealed similarity only to DENV. The signature shared by EBV and DENV was also present in patients with hemophagocytic syndromes, suggesting these two viruses cause uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Interestingly, while EBV induced a strong type I interferon response, a subset of interferon induced genes, including MX1, HERC5, and OAS1, were not upregulated, suggesting a mechanism by which viral antagonism of immunity results in a profound inflammatory response. These data provide an important first description of the response to a natural herpesvirus infection in humans. PMID:24465555

  1. Infection Associated Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Sepsis Syndromes - A Tip of an Iceberg.

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    Agarwal, Arun; Agarwal, Aakanksha

    2017-10-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare, underdiagnosed, fatal and devastating hyperinflammatory syndrome that has gained increasing recognition over the past decade. Patients with HLH present with clinical and laboratory evidence of uncontrolled inflammation. Delay in diagnosis and management inevitably leads to a rapidly progressive and fatal course. In this case series, we present 7 cases of secondary HLH (sHLH) in adults with their presentation, course, and outcomes. We retrospectively looked at the 7 cases of secondary HLH who were diagnosed and managed in our institute between January 2013 and august 2015. Medical records were retrieved from medical records department and data analyzed and tabulated. The median age at diagnosis was 35 years (age range 26-72 years). Diagnosis was based on HLH 2004 diagnostic criteria. We report profile of 7 adult patients with sHLH. All patients had a short history of illness (<2 weeks) and presented uniformly with prolonged fever, bi or trilineage cytopenia and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS) at admission or developed MODS during the course of their illness. None of them had prediagnosed HLH. All patients fulfilled 5 to 6 of 8 criteria as per HLH 2014 diagnostic criteria. The median length of hospital stay was 12 days (range 7-50 days) and the median time to diagnosis was 5 days (range 3 to 21 days). Mortality was 57%. HLH is a rare and under-diagnosed clinical syndrome and is rapidly fatal if not diagnosed and managed timely. The cases reported in literature probably represent a tip of an iceberg of large number of undiagnosed cases mostly labeled as sepsis with MODS in critical care units. sHLH should be suspected in any patient who present with persistent and prolonged fever, transaminitis, cytopenia, and high serum Ferritin or dramatically rising serial serum Ferritin. Early diagnosis and prompt aggressive treatment are vital for patients' survival and favorable outcome.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-containing T-cell lymphoma presents with hemophagocytic syndrome mimicking malignant histiocytosis.

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    Su, I J; Hsu, Y H; Lin, M T; Cheng, A L; Wang, C H; Weiss, L M

    1993-09-15

    The previously designated malignant histiocytosis (MH) may include lymphoid neoplasms of T-cell lineage as well as patients with benign virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS). In this study, the association of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with T cell lymphomas which present with clinicopathologic features indistinguishable from malignant histiocytosis (MH) was investigated further. Four adult patients, three women and one man, were admitted because of fever, cutaneous lesions, hepatosplenomegaly, and jaundice. Laboratory examinations revealed pancytopenia, abnormal liver functions and coagulopathy. All patients ran a fulminant course terminating in a hemophagocytic syndrome within 1 month. Immunophenotypic study, Southern blot analysis, and in situ hybridization were performed on the specimens obtained from the four patients. The biopsy-necropsy specimens from skin, liver, spleen, and bone marrow showed infiltration of atypical large cells with reactive histiocytosis and florid hemophagocytosis activity. Based on the clinical and histologic findings, these cases would have been designated as MH by previous criteria. Immunophenotypic, Southern blot, and in situ hybridization studies, however, showed clonotypic proliferation of EBV genomes in the nuclei of the large atypical cells that expressed T-cell antigens. Therefore, these patients should be diagnosed as a recently described EBV-associated peripheral T-cell lymphoma (EBV-PTCL). EBV-PTCL may present with a fulminant hemophagocytic syndrome indistinguishable from the previously designated MH. This finding represents a step forward in our changing concept regarding MH, some of which only recently has been suggested to be of T-cell lymphoma origin. Differentiation from benign VAHS is clinically important. Features useful in this distinction are tabulated and discussed.

  3. Epstein-Barr virus-induced infectious mononucleosis after two separate episodes of virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome.

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    Ohno, Tatsuharu; Ueda, Yo; Kishimoto, Wataru; Arimoto-Miyamoto, Kazue; Takeoka, Tomoharu; Tsuji, Masaaki

    2009-01-01

    A 24-year-old man, who had suffered previous two episodes of non- Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) at the ages of 16 and 18, developed EBV-induced infectious mononucleosis. His antibody pattern to EBV highlighted the initial infection. The disease took a self-limited course without developing into HPS. No reactivation of EBV infection was noted over the following 6 years. The patient may have attained immune competency in adulthood, which was somehow impaired during his adolescence.

  4. A web-based delphi study for eliciting helpful criteria in the positive diagnosis of hemophagocytic syndrome in adult patients.

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    Hejblum, Gilles; Lambotte, Olivier; Galicier, Lionel; Coppo, Paul; Marzac, Christophe; Aumont, Cédric; Fardet, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of the reactive form of hemophagocytic syndrome in adults remains particularly difficult since none of the clinical or laboratory manifestations are specific. We undertook a study in order to elicit which features constitute helpful criteria for a positive diagnosis. In this Delphi study, the features investigated in the questionnaire and the experts invited to participate in the survey were issued from a bibliographic search. The questionnaire was iteratively proposed to experts via a web-based application with a feedback of the results observed at the preceding Delphi round. Experts were asked to label each investigated criterion in one of the following categories: absolutely required, important, of minor interest, or not assessable in the routine practice environment. A positive consensus was a priori defined as at least 75% answers observed in the categories absolutely required and important. The questionnaire investigated 26 criteria and 24 experts originating from 13 countries participated in the second and final Delphi round. A positive consensus was reached for the nine following criteria: unilineage cytopenia, bicytopenia, pancytopenia, presence of hemophagocytosis pictures on a bone marrow aspirate or on a tissue biopsy, high ferritin level, fever, organomegaly, presence of a predisposing underlying disease, and high level of lactate dehydrogenase. A negative consensus was reached for 13 criteria, and an absence of consensus was observed for 4 criteria. The study constitutes the first initiative to date for defining international guidelines devoted to the positive diagnosis of the reactive form of hemophagocytic syndrome.

  5. Spontaneous resolution of hemophagocytic syndrome associated with acute parvovirus B19 infection and concomitant Epstein-Barr virus reactivation in an otherwise healthy adult.

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    Larroche, C; Scieux, C; Honderlick, P; Piette, A M; Morinet, F; Blétry, O

    2002-10-01

    Reported here is the case of a patient who spontaneously recovered from hemophagocytic syndrome associated with acute B19 infection and concomitant Epstein-Barr virus reactivation. The previously healthy 37-year-old-man was hospitalized after 10 days of high fever, arthralgia and arthritis and was determined to have hemophagocytic syndrome. Immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) capsid antigen, early antigen and parvovirus B19 (B19) were found. B19 DNA and low-level EBV DNA were detected in bone marrow, serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The patient recovered spontaneously without any treatment. Two months later anti-B19 IgG antibodies were detected, while at 9-month follow-up, anti-B19 IgM antibodies were no longer detectable and B19 DNA had disappeared from serum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of spontaneous resolution of hemophagocytic syndrome associated with acute B19 infection and concomitant EBV reactivation in an otherwise healthy adult.

  6. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of carcinoid syndrome

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    Dorota Kaczmarska-Turek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background . Carcinoid syndrome (CS is a rare syndrome, most commonly associated with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN s of the small intestine. Carcinoid syndrome consists of diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, cutaneous flushing, teleangiectasias, bronchoconstriction and increased perspiration. Diagnosis of carcinoid syndrome remains a challenge and it is often delayed. Objectives . The aim of this study was to characterize patients with CS and define the most sensitive, primary diagnostic tools for CS . Material and methods. 26 consecutive patients admitted to the Department because of carcinoid-like symptoms. Diagnosis of CS was based on clinical findings and laboratory data (levels of 5-hydroxyindoloacetic acid. Diagnosis of NEN was based on laboratory findings, imaging studies (US , CT , Gallium-68-DOTA TATE PET -CT and histopathological analysis. CS due to NEN was diagnosed in 16 subjects (NEN –CS . Results . The most common symptoms in non-NEN were increased perspiration, flushes and diarrhea. CgA was elevated (40%; n = 4 in this group. However, elevated levels of 5-HIAA and liver lesions were not presented. In the NEN –CS symptoms were reported more often: flush (93.7%; n = 15, diarrhea (87.5%; n = 14, abdominal pain and teleangiectasis (81.2%; n = 13. Elevated CgA and 5-HIAA were noted in 87.5% (n = 14 and 81.2% (n = 13 respectively. US and CT revealed liver metastases in all patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 28.6 months. Conclusions . The combination of several symptoms of carcinoid syndrome and liver lesion in easily available abdominal imaging (US and/or CT should prompt physicians to quick referral to centres specialized in the diagnosis and treatment of NEN.

  7. Pitfalls in the diagnosis and management of Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Vivek; El Asmar, Nadine; Selman, Warren R; Arafah, Baha M

    2015-02-01

    Despite many recent advances, the management of patients with Cushing's disease continues to be challenging. Cushing's syndrome is a complex metabolic disorder that is a result of excess glucocorticoids. Excluding the exogenous causes, adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas account for nearly 70% of all cases of Cushing's syndrome. The suspicion, diagnosis, and differential diagnosis require a logical systematic approach with attention paid to key details at each investigational step. A diagnosis of endogenous Cushing's syndrome is usually suspected in patients with clinical symptoms and confirmed by using multiple biochemical tests. Each of the biochemical tests used to establish the diagnosis has limitations that need to be considered for proper interpretation. Although some tests determine the total daily urinary excretion of cortisol, many others rely on measurements of serum cortisol at baseline and after stimulation (e.g., after corticotropin-releasing hormone) or suppression (e.g., dexamethasone) with agents that influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Other tests (e.g., measurements of late-night salivary cortisol concentration) rely on alterations in the diurnal rhythm of cortisol secretion. Because more than 90% of the cortisol in the circulation is protein bound, any alteration in the binding proteins (transcortin and albumin) will automatically influence the measured level and confound the interpretation of stimulation and suppression data, which are the basis for establishing the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. Although measuring late-night salivary cortisol seems to be an excellent initial test for hypercortisolism, it may be confounded by poor sampling methods and contamination. Measurements of 24-hour urinary free-cortisol excretion could be misleading in the presence of some pathological and physiological conditions. Dexamethasone suppression tests can be affected by illnesses that alter the absorption of the drug (e

  8. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case series of a Brazilian institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Guimarães Rocha Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To describe the clinical and laboratory presentation of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in children treated at a referral institution.Methods:A retrospective descriptive study was carried out of seven children diagnosed with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis between 2010 and 2012. The criteria for diagnosis were those proposed by the Histiocyte Society. When indicated, immunochemotherapy was prescribed according to the HLH94 and HLH2004 protocols of the Histiocyte Society.Results:The patients' ages at diagnosis ranged from one month to nine years. All patients had splenomegaly, fever, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperferritinemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Bone marrow hemophagocytosis was detected in six patients. In six cases, infectious diseases triggered the syndrome. In two cases, associated with visceral leishmaniasis, remission was achieved after treatment of the underlying infection. Three patients, who had Epstein–Barr-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, required treatment with immunochemotherapy. They are alive and in remission; one patient had symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and another, who was suspected of having primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, entered into remission after bone marrow transplantation. Two deaths (28.6% occurred in patients with suspected primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis; one whose clinical picture was triggered by cytomegalovirus infection did not respond to immunochemotherapy and the other died before any specific treatment was provided.Conclusion:As reported before, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis has a multifaceted presentation with nonspecific signs and symptoms. In secondary forms, remission may be achieved by treating the underlying disease. In the primary forms, remission may be achieved with immunochemotherapy, but bone marrow transplantation is required for cure.

  9. Emergence of anti-red blood cell antibodies triggers red cell phagocytosis by activated macrophages in a rabbit model of Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Yao; Hsu, Mei-Chi; Lan, Bau-Shin; Hsiao, Guan-Chung; Chuang, Huai-Chia; Su, Ih-Jen

    2007-05-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is a fatal complication frequently associated with viral infections. In childhood HPS, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the major causative agent, and red blood cells (RBCs) are predominantly phagocytosed by macrophages. To investigate the mechanism of RBC phagocytosis triggered by EBV infection, we adopted a rabbit model of EBV-associated HPS previously established by using Herpesvirus papio (HVP). The kinetics of virus-host interaction was studied. Using flow cytometry, we detected the emergence of antibody-coated RBCs, as well as anti-platelet antibodies, at peak virus load period at weeks 3 to 4 after HVP injection, and the titers increased thereafter. The presence of anti-RBCs preceded RBC phagocytosis in tissues and predicted the full-blown development of HPS. The anti-RBC antibodies showed cross-reactivity with Paul-Bunnell heterophile antibodies. Preabsorption of the HVP-infected serum with control RBCs removed the majority of anti-RBC activities and remarkably reduced RBC phagocytosis. The RBC phagocytosis was specifically mediated via an Fc fragment of antibodies in the presence of macrophage activation. Therefore, the emergence of anti-RBC antibodies and the presence of macrophage activation are both essential in the development of HPS. Our observations in this animal model provide a potential mechanism for hemophagocytosis in EBV infection.

  10. Immunohistochemical Pitfalls: Common Mistakes in the Evaluation of Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markow, Michael; Chen, Wei; Frankel, Wendy L

    2017-12-01

    At least 15% of colorectal cancers diagnosed in the United States are deficient in mismatch repair mechanisms. Most of these are sporadic, but approximately 3% of colorectal cancers result from germline alterations in mismatch repair genes and represent Lynch syndrome. It is critical to identify patients with Lynch syndrome to institute appropriate screening and surveillance for patients and their families. Exclusion of Lynch syndrome in sporadic cases is equally important because it reduces anxiety for patients and prevents excessive spending on unnecessary surveillance. Immunohistochemistry is one of the most widely used screening tools for identifying patients with Lynch syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary sialoangiectasia - a diagnostic pitfall in Sjogren's syndrome - Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalk, WWI; Vissink, A; Spijkervet, FKL; Bootsma, H

    A case of primary sialoangiectasia, which in this case was initially misdiagnosed as Sjogren's syndrome, is described. Other diseases, including HIV infection, psoriatic arthritis, and acute parotitis, may cause glandular changes similar to the changes found in the syndrome. Therefore, sialography

  12. The amniotic band syndrome: antenatal sonographic diagnosis and potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, B S; Filly, R A; Callen, P W; Golbus, M S

    1985-05-01

    Amniotic band syndrome causes a variety of fetal malformations involving the limbs, craniofacial region, and trunk. Six prenatally diagnosed cases of amniotic band syndrome are discussed. The diagnosis was based on sonographic visualization of either amniotic sheets or bands associated with fetal deformation or deformities in nonembryologic distributions known to characterize the amniotic band syndrome. Seven additional cases are considered in which an aberrant sheet of tissue with a free edge was visualized within the amniotic cavity but no restriction of fetal motion or subsequent deformity was demonstrated.

  13. Rabbit model for human EBV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS): sequential autopsy analysis and characterization of IL-2-dependent cell lines established from herpesvirus papio-induced fatal rabbit lymphoproliferative diseases with HPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Jin, Zaishun; Onoda, Sachiyo; Joko, Hiromasa; Teramoto, Norihiro; Ohara, Nobuya; Oda, Wakako; Tanaka, Takehiro; Liu, Yi-Xuan; Koirala, Tirtha Raj; Oka, Takashi; Kondo, Eisaku; Yoshino, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Akagi, Tadaatsu

    2003-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS) is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis or T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD). To elucidate the true nature of fatal LPD observed in Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-induced rabbit hemophagocytosis, reactive or neoplastic, we analyzed sequential development of HVP-induced rabbit LPD and their cell lines. All of the seven Japanese White rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP died of fatal LPD 18 to 27 days after inoculation. LPD was also accompanied by hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) in five of these seven rabbits. Sequential autopsy revealed splenomegaly and swollen lymph nodes, often accompanied by bleeding, which developed in the last week. Atypical lymphoid cells infiltrated many organs with a "starry sky" pattern, frequently involving the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. HVP-small RNA-1 expression in these lymphoid cells was clearly demonstrated by a newly developed in situ hybridization (ISH) system. HVP-ISH of immunomagnetically purified lymphoid cells from spleen or lymph nodes revealed HVP-EBER1+ cells in each CD4+, CD8+, or CD79a+ fraction. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. HVP-DNA was detected in the tissues and peripheral blood from the infected rabbits by PCR or Southern blot analysis. Clonality analysis of HVP-induced LPD by Southern blotting with TCR gene probe revealed polyclonal bands, suggesting polyclonal proliferation. Six IL-2-dependent rabbit T-cell lines were established from transplanted scid mouse tumors from LPD. These showed latency type I/II HVP infection and had normal karyotypes except for one line, and three of them showed tumorigenicity in nude mice. These data suggest that HVP-induced fatal LPD in rabbits is reactive polyclonally in nature.

  14. Detecting insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome: purposes and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legro, Richard S; Castracane, V Daniel; Kauffman, Robert P

    2004-02-01

    Approximately 50% to 70% of all women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have some degree of insulin resistance, and this hormone insensitivity probably contributes to the hyperandrogenism that is responsible for the signs and symptoms of PCOS. Although uncertainty exists, early detection and treatment of insulin resistance in this population could ultimately reduce the incidence or severity of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Even if that proves to be the case, there are still several problems with our current approach to insulin sensitivity assessment in PCOS, including the apparent lack of consensus on what defines PCOS and "normal" insulin sensitivity, ethnic and genetic variability, the presence of other factors contributing to insulin resistance such as obesity, stress, and aging, and concern about whether simplified models of insulin sensitivity have the precision to predict treatment needs, responses, and future morbidity. Although the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique is the gold standard for measuring insulin sensitivity, it is too expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive to be of practical use in an office setting. Homeostatic measurements (fasting glucose/insulin ratio or homeostatic model assessment [HOMA] value) and minimal model tests (particularly the oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT]) represent the easiest office-based assessments of insulin resistance in the PCOS patient. The OGTT is probably the best simple, office-based method to assess women with PCOS because it provides information about both insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. The diagnosis of glucose intolerance holds greater prognostic and treatment implications. All obese women with PCOS should be screened for the presence of insulin resistance by looking for other stigmata of the insulin resistance syndrome such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, central obesity, and glucose intolerance.

  15. Imaging characteristics of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, Nancy E.; MacClain, Kenneth L.

    2003-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a nonmalignant disorder of immune regulation, with overproduction of cytokines and diminished immune surveillance. Symptoms are nonspecific and may affect multiple organs, including the central nervous system. Neuroimaging findings have been described in case reports and small series; body imaging findings have not been described extensively. To summarize findings of the most frequently performed imaging studies of the brain, chest and abdomen in patients with HLH. Retrospective review of chest radiographs and CT, abdominal ultrasound and CT, brain CT and MRI, skeletal surveys, and autopsy data. Twenty-five patients were diagnosed and treated for HLH at our institution over an 11-year period; 15 patients (60%) died. Common chest radiograph findings included alveolar-interstitial opacities with pleural effusions, often with rapid evolution and resolution. Hepatosplenomegaly, gallbladder wall thickening, hyperechoic kidneys and ascites were common abdominal findings, which resolved after therapy in some cases. Brain-imaging studies revealed nonspecific periventricular white-matter abnormalities, brain-volume loss and enlargement of extra-axial fluid spaces. Three infant cases, one with intracranial hemorrhage, one with multiple pathologic rib fractures and one with diaphyseal periosteal reaction involving multiple long bones on skeletal survey, raised suspicion of child abuse at presentation. Abuse was not substantiated in any case. Clinicians and radiologists should be aware of the radiographic manifestations of HLH, which are nonspecific and overlap with infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic disorders. Findings in the chest (similar to acute respiratory distress syndrome) and abdomen may progress rapidly and then regress with institution of appropriate anti-HLH therapy. CNS findings may be progressive. In some infants, initial imaging findings may mimic nonaccidental trauma. (orig.)

  16. Imaging characteristics of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, Nancy E. [E. B. Singleton Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Texas Children' s Hospital, 6621 Fannin Street, MC 2-2521, TX 77030, Houston (United States); MacClain, Kenneth L. [Texas Children' s Cancer Center, 6701 Fannin, Suite 1510, TX 77030, Houston (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a nonmalignant disorder of immune regulation, with overproduction of cytokines and diminished immune surveillance. Symptoms are nonspecific and may affect multiple organs, including the central nervous system. Neuroimaging findings have been described in case reports and small series; body imaging findings have not been described extensively. To summarize findings of the most frequently performed imaging studies of the brain, chest and abdomen in patients with HLH. Retrospective review of chest radiographs and CT, abdominal ultrasound and CT, brain CT and MRI, skeletal surveys, and autopsy data. Twenty-five patients were diagnosed and treated for HLH at our institution over an 11-year period; 15 patients (60%) died. Common chest radiograph findings included alveolar-interstitial opacities with pleural effusions, often with rapid evolution and resolution. Hepatosplenomegaly, gallbladder wall thickening, hyperechoic kidneys and ascites were common abdominal findings, which resolved after therapy in some cases. Brain-imaging studies revealed nonspecific periventricular white-matter abnormalities, brain-volume loss and enlargement of extra-axial fluid spaces. Three infant cases, one with intracranial hemorrhage, one with multiple pathologic rib fractures and one with diaphyseal periosteal reaction involving multiple long bones on skeletal survey, raised suspicion of child abuse at presentation. Abuse was not substantiated in any case. Clinicians and radiologists should be aware of the radiographic manifestations of HLH, which are nonspecific and overlap with infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic disorders. Findings in the chest (similar to acute respiratory distress syndrome) and abdomen may progress rapidly and then regress with institution of appropriate anti-HLH therapy. CNS findings may be progressive. In some infants, initial imaging findings may mimic nonaccidental trauma. (orig.)

  17. Therapeutic trials for a rabbit model of EBV-associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome (HPS): effects of vidarabine or CHOP, and development of Herpesvirus papio (HVP)-negative lymphomas surrounded by HVP-infected lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Joko, H; Koirala, T R; Onoda, S; Jin, Z-S; Munemasa, M; Ohara, N; Oda, W; Tanaka, T; Oka, T; Kondo, E; Yoshino, T; Takahashi, K; Yamada, M; Akagi, T

    2003-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (EBV-AHS), which is often associated with fatal infectious mononucleosis or T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD), is a distinct disease characterized by high mortality. Treatment of patients with EBV-AHS has proved challenging. To develop some therapeutic interventions for EBV-AHS, we examined the effectiveness of an antiviral agent (vidarabine) or chemotherapy (CHOP), using a rabbit model for EBV-AHS. Fourteen untreated rabbits were inoculated intravenously with cell-free virions of the EBV-like virus Herpesvirus papio (HVP). All of the rabbits died of HVP-associated (LPD) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) between 21 and 31 days after inoculation. Furthermore, three HVP-infected rabbits treated with vidarabine died between days 23 and 28 after inoculation, and their clinicopathological features were no different from those of untreated rabbits, indicating that this drug is not effective at all to treat HVP-induced rabbit LPD and HPS. Three of the infected rabbits that were treated with one course, with an incomplete set of three courses, or with three full courses of CHOP treatment died of HVP-induced LPD and HPS with a bleeding tendency and/or with opportunistic infections. They died on the 26th, 62nd and 105th day after virus inoculation, respectively. CHOP treatment transiently suppressed the HVP-induced LPD and contributed to the prolonged survival time of two infected rabbits. However, it did not remove all of the HVP-infected cells from the infected rabbits, and residual HVP-infected lymphocytes caused recurrences of rabbit LPD and HPS. The most interesting finding of this experiment was observed in the infected rabbit with the longest survival time of 105 days: HVP-negative lymphomas surrounded by HVP-induced LPD developed in the larynx and ileum of this rabbit, causing an obstruction of the lumen. We concluded that these were not secondary lymphomas caused by CHOP treatment, because no suspicious

  18. A case of recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia during remission associated with acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome due to human parvovirus B19 infection successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy with a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 47-year-old man diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in April 2011. He also had a congenital chromosomal abnormality, a balanced translocation. Treatment with prednisolone (PSL) 60 mg/day resulted in resolution of the AIHA, and the treatment was completed in November 2011. While the patient no longer had anemia, the direct and indirect Coombs tests remained positive. In May 2013, he developed recurrent AIHA associated with acute pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) caused by human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection. Tests for anti-erythropoietin and anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies were positive. Steroid pulse therapy resulted in resolution of the AIHA, PRCA, as well as HPS. The serum test for anti-erythropoietin antibodies also became negative after the treatment. However, although the serum was positive for anti-HPV B19 IgG antibodies, the patient continued to have a low CD4 lymphocyte count (CD4, B19 infection (HPV B19 DNA remained positive), suggesting the risk of recurrence and bone marrow failure.

  19. Neuromyelitis optica, atypical hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and heterozygous perforin A91V mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palterer, Boaz; Brugnolo, Francesca; Sieni, Elena; Barilaro, Alessandro; Parronchi, Paola

    2017-10-15

    Neuromyelitis optica is an autoimmune demyelinating inflammatory disease characterized by optic neuritis and myelitis with anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a severe systemic inflammatory syndrome that can present in a genetic primary form or secondarily to infective, neoplastic or autoimmune diseases. Our case discusses the first reported case of atypical late-onset hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in a patient with neuromyelitis optica, with multiple triggering factors and carrying the common A91V hypomorphic perforin mutation, that blurs the distinction between primary and secondary forms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fulminant hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis induced by pandemic A (H1N1 influenza: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wacrenier Agnès

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis induced by viral diseases is a well recognized entity. Severe forms of H5N1 influenza are known to be associated with symptoms very similar to a reactive hemophagocytic syndrome. We report a case of fulminant lymphohistiocytosis associated with the pandemic A (H1N1 variant. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian woman developed a syndrome of fatal hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis shortly after H1N1 influenza. Initial symptoms of the viral disease were unusual, with acute abdominal involvement. Our patient's course was complicated by diffuse skin rash and ileal ischemia. Our patient died of refractory shock and multi-organ failure. Skin, ileum and colon histology was consistent with an acute apoptosis combined with an increased cellular regeneration. Conclusions Influenza may be complicated by severe forms of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. To ensure early recognition and treatment, physicians should be aware of the possible induction of the syndrome by the novel H1N1 variant. The rapid occurrence of a multi-organ involvement with evocative biological features of macrophage activation should alert clinicians.

  1. Wolman disease in patients with familial hemophagocytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solaf Elsayed

    2015-09-26

    Sep 26, 2015 ... Marine Gil b ... many inborn errors of metabolism and lysosomal storage diseases in which hemophagocytic ... The diagnosis of secondary HLH is usually made in association with infection by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or para-.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: response to HLH-04 treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Martínez-Villegas, Octavio; Sánchez-Jara, Berenice; Martínez-Martell, María Angélica; Hernández-Sánchez, Beatriz; Loza-Santiaguillo, Paloma Del Rocío; Pedro-Matías, Eduardo; Arellano-Galindo, José

    Hemophagocytic syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, reactive histiocytosis or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) represent a group of diseases whose common thread is reactive or neoplastic mononuclear phagocytic system cells and dendritic cell proliferation. We present a case of an HLH probably associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in a 4-year-old male patient treated with HLH-04 protocol. Viral etiology in HLH is well accepted. In this case, clinical picture of HLH was assumed secondary to EBV infection because IgM serology at the time of clinical presentation was the only positive factor in the viral panel. Diagnosis of HLH is the critical first step to successful treatment. The earlier it is identified, the less the tissue damage and reduced risk of multiple organ failure, which favors treatment response. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in two Saudi siblings

    OpenAIRE

    Abbaker, Abdelakarim Ibrahim; Dammas, Ali Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH; or familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis [FEL]) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder more prevalent with parental consanguinity. There is aggressive proliferation of activated macrophages and histiocytes, which phagocytose red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets, leading to anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The exaggerated response of immune system in familial HLH can occur in the abs...

  4. Wolman disease in patients with familial hemophagocytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major signs and symptoms include hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, anemia, leucopenia or thrombocytopenias which resemble many inborn errors of metabolism and lysosomal storage diseases in which hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis has also been reported as a secondary association. Case reports: We report three ...

  5. Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae and low back pain: diagnostic pitfalls and management of Bertolotti's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida,Daniel Benzecry de; Mattei,Tobias Alécio; Sória,Marília Grando; Prandini,Mirto Nelso; Leal,André Giacomelli; Milano,Jerônimo Buzzeti; Ramina,Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bertolotti's syndrome is a spine disorder characterized by the occurrence of a congenital lumbar transverse mega-apophysis in a transitional vertebral body that usually articulates with the sacrum or the iliac bone. It has been considered a possible cause of low back pain. METHOD: We analyzed the cases of Bertolotti's syndrome that failed clinical treatment and reviewed the literature concerning this subject. RESULTS: Five patients in our series had severe low back pain due to the ...

  6. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weaknes...

  7. ANCA Vasculitis and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis following a Fecal Microbiota Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Amlani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old female with antisynthetase syndrome, a history of multiple recurrent infections, and documented previous negative titres for anti-neutrophil cystoplasmic antibody (ANCA suddenly developed a de novo MPO-ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis three weeks after a fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. Six months following her FMT and less than two weeks following treatment for urosepsis, she developed severe cholestasis, a markedly elevated ferritin and hypertriglyceridemia. An initial liver biopsy was suggestive of drug-induced liver injury and thus she was treated with supportive care. After she failed to improve, a second liver biopsy supported the diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. This case highlights difficulties surrounding the early diagnosis of HLH and also questions the role of FMT and/or recurrent infections as a trigger for ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  8. Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae and low back pain: diagnostic pitfalls and management of Bertolotti's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Daniel Benzecry de; Mattei, Tobias Alécio; Sória, Marília Grando; Prandini, Mirto Nelso; Leal, André Giacomelli; Milano, Jerônimo Buzzeti; Ramina, Ricardo

    2009-06-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome is a spine disorder characterized by the occurrence of a congenital lumbar transverse mega-apophysis in a transitional vertebral body that usually articulates with the sacrum or the iliac bone. It has been considered a possible cause of low back pain. We analyzed the cases of Bertolotti's syndrome that failed clinical treatment and reviewed the literature concerning this subject. Five patients in our series had severe low back pain due to the neo-articulation and two of them were successfully submitted to surgical resection of the transverse mega-apophysis. Taking into account the clinical and surgical experience acquired with these cases, we propose a diagnostic-therapeutic algorithm. There is still no consensus about the most appropriate therapy for Bertolotti's syndrome. In patients in whom the mega-apophysis itself may be the source of back pain, surgical resection may be a safe and effective procedure.

  9. Pitfall of Sipple's syndrome diagnosis by 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J.N.; Coutris, G.; Milhaud, G.

    1987-01-01

    In a patient apparently cured by surgery from bronchial carcinoid tumor, MIBG uptake occurred both in an adrenal glan and in thyroid nodules (cold with 131 I), suggesting the presence of a Sipple's syndrome (association of pheochromocytoma and medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, MCT), the more so since plasma calcitonin levels were markedly increased. Histological findings showed however that the tumoral tissues were neither pheochromocytoma nor MCT but rather a neuroendocrine metastatic tissue

  10. Williams-Beuren syndrome: pitfalls for diagnosis in limited resources setting

    OpenAIRE

    Lumaka, Aimé; Lukoo, Rita; Mubungu, Gerrye; Lumbala, Paul; Mbayabo, Gloire; Mupuala, Aimée; Lukusa-Tshilobo, Prosper; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Patients with Williams?Beuren Syndrome can be recognized clinically, given the characteristic dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and behavior. We report on a Congolese boy with typical WBS facial characteristics. He suffered meningitis and coma at the age of 2 years then subsequently presented with profound intellectual disability and atypical behavior. The WBS was only made at age 8.2 years and confirmed with FISH testing and microarray?CGH. The present report aims to...

  11. Williams-Beuren syndrome: pitfalls for diagnosis in limited resources setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumaka, Aimé; Lukoo, Rita; Mubungu, Gerrye; Lumbala, Paul; Mbayabo, Gloire; Mupuala, Aimée; Tshilobo, Prosper Lukusa; Devriendt, Koenraad

    2016-03-01

    Patients with Williams-Beuren Syndrome can be recognized clinically, given the characteristic dysmorphism, intellectual disability, and behavior. We report on a Congolese boy with typical WBS facial characteristics. He suffered meningitis and coma at the age of 2 years then subsequently presented with profound intellectual disability and atypical behavior. The WBS was only made at age 8.2 years and confirmed with FISH testing and microarray-CGH. The present report aims to warn clinicians that infections may associate and/or modify a genetic disease as this may be observed in developing countries given the prevalence of infectious diseases.

  12. Epstein–Barr Virus and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Marsh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein–Barr virus (EBV is a ubiquitous virus that infects nearly all people worldwide without serious sequela. However, for patients who have genetic diseases which predispose them to the development of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH, EBV infection is a life-threatening problem. As a part of a themed collection of articles on EBV infection and human primary immune deficiencies, we will review key concepts related to the understanding and treatment of HLH.

  13. Mycobacterium iranicum bacteremia and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean Lapierre, Simon; Toro, Alexandre; Drancourt, Michel

    2017-08-08

    Mycobacterium iranicum has recently been recognised as an opportunistic human pathogen. Although infectious conditions represent frequent triggers for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections are rarely associated with this entity. To this date, M. iranicum infection has never been reported in France, has never been associated with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and has never been found to be multi-resistant on standardized antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We report a case of a French Caucasian man with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in the context of M. iranicum bacteraemia and Hodgkin's disease. We review available data concerning M. iranicum antimycobacterial susceptibility testing and treatment outcomes. We also review the association between hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. Interpretation of M. iranicum positive cultures remains a clinical challenge and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections need to be considered in secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis differential diagnosis.

  14. Pitfalls and Rewards for Implementing Ocular Motor Testing in Acute Vestibular Syndrome: A Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrascu, Oana M; Torbati, Sam; Tighiouart, Mourad; Newman-Toker, David E; Song, Shlee S

    2017-03-01

    Isolated acute vestibular syndrome (iAVS) presentations to the emergency department (ED) pose management challenges, given the concerns for posterior circulation strokes. False-negative brain imaging may erroneously reassure clinicians, whereas HINTS-plus examination outperforms imaging to screen for strokes in iAVS. We studied the feasibility of implementing HINTS-plus testing in the ED, aiming to reduce neuroimaging in patients with iAVS. We launched an institutional Quality Improvement initiative, using DMAIC methodology. The outcome measures [proportion of iAVS subjects who had HINTS-plus examinations and underwent neuroimaging by computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI)] were compared before and after the established intervention. The intervention consisted of formal training for neurologists and emergency physicians on how to perform, document, and interpret HINTS-plus and implementation of novel iAVS management algorithm. Neuroimaging was not recommended if HINTS-plus suggested peripheral vestibular etiology. If a central process was suspected, brain MRI/MR angiogram was performed. Head CT was reserved only for thrombolytic time-window cases. In the first 2 months postimplementation, HINTS-plus testing performance by neurologists increased from 0% to 80% (P=0.007), and by ED providers from 0% to 9.09% (P=0.367). Head CT scans were reduced from 18.5% to 6.25%. Brain MRI use was reduced from 51.8% to 31.2%. About 60% of the iAVS subjects were discharged from the ED; none were readmitted or had another ED presentation in the ensuing 30 days. Implementation of HINTS-plus evaluation in the ED is valuable and feasible for neurologists, but challenging for emergency physicians. Future studies should determine the "dose-response" curve of educational interventions.

  15. An unusual presentation of galactosemia: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Afşin Kundak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a rare life-threatening condition. Uncontrolled proliferation of activated lymphocytes secreting high amounts of inflammatory cytokines seems to be the main pathogenesis. The diagnosis of HLH can often be difficult. It may presents in many forms such as fever of unknown origin, hepatitis, acute liver failure, and sepsis-like illness. Here we present a newborn galactosemia case presented with HLH. Close monitoring of the diagnostic criteria of HLH during the course of galactosemia-associated hemophagocytosis, both before and after dietary treatment, should be performed in order to fully determine if the triggering mechanism is infection or accumulation of metabolites.

  16. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Children: Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder in children that is characterized by persistent fever, splenomegaly with cytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Increased levels of various cytokines and soluble interleukin-2 receptor are biological markers of HLH. HLH can be classified into two major forms: primary and secondary. Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), a type of primary HLH, is an autosomal recessive disorder that typically occurs in infancy and can be classified into five different subtypes (FHL types 1–5). In Japan, >80% of patients with FHL have either PRF1 (FHL type 2) or UNC13D (FHL type 3) defects. FHL is considered to be a disorder of T-cell function because the activity of NK cells or cytotoxic T lymphocytes as target cells is usually impaired. Moreover, Epstein–Barr virus-associated HLH (EBV-HLH) is considered a major subtype of secondary HLH. Any genetic background could have an effect on the pathogenesis of secondary HLH because EBV-HLH is considered to be particularly prevalent in Asian countries. For primary HLH, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only accepted curative therapy, although cord blood transplantation with a reduced-conditioning regimen has been used with superior outcomes. For secondary HLH, including EBV-HLH, immunochemotherapy based on the HLH-2004 protocol has been used. In the near future, the entire mechanism of HLH should be clarified to establish less toxic therapies, including cell therapy and gene targeting therapy. PMID:27242976

  17. Neonatal-onset hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with primary dengue infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Nandi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-day-old baby presented with prolonged fever, petechial spots, hepatosplenomegaly, generalized lymphadenopathy, and pancytopenia. Investigations revealed positive anti-dengue virus IgM antibody, and bone marrow examination demonstrated the presence of hemophagocytes. The diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH was made according to HLH-2004 guidelines. HLH associated with primary dengue in an infant who was symptomatic from neonatal age has hitherto not been reported in the literature.

  18. Detection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and related bone marrow diseases, with emphasis on diagnostic pitfalls and caveats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sa A; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Stachurski, Dariusz; Anderson, Mary; Raza, Azra; Woda, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in the setting of aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome has been shown to have prognostic and therapeutic implications. However, the status of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in various categories of myelodysplastic syndrome and in other bone marrow disorders is not well-studied. By using multiparameter flow cytometry immunophenotypic analysis with antibodies specific for four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (CD55, CD59, CD16, CD66b) and performing an aerolysin lysis confirmatory test in representative cases, we assessed the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes in 110 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, 15 with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease, 5 with idiopathic myelofibrosis and 6 with acute myeloid leukemia. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes were detected in nine patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndrome who showed clinicopathological features of bone marrow failure, similar to aplastic anemia. All paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-positive cases demonstrated loss of the four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, with CD16(-)CD66b(-) clones being larger than those of CD55(-)CD59(-) (p<0.05). Altered glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expression secondary to granulocytic hypogranulation, immaturity, and/or immunophenotypic abnormalities was present in a substantial number of cases and diagnostically challenging. These results show that routine screening for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with an intrinsic bone marrow disease who show no clinical evidence of hemolysis has an appreciable yield in patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndromes. The recognition of diagnostic caveats and pitfalls associated with the underlying intrinsic bone marrow disease is essential in interpreting paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria testing correctly. In our experience, the CD

  19. EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disorder and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Patient with Severe Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jacob Kinross-Wright

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Epstein-Barr virus- (EBV- associated lymphoproliferative disease (LPD is a rare condition, usually occurring in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of EBV-associated LPD in a patient with severe celiac disease, the first report to describe this syndrome in a patient with this diagnosis. Case Summary. A 69-year-old Caucasian woman with recent diagnosis of celiac sprue presented to our hospital with persistent diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and fatigue despite adherence to gluten-free diet for a number of weeks prior to presentation. She underwent evaluation for occult malignancy and was found to have diffuse intra-abdominal mesenteric lymphadenopathy on CT scan. Biopsy of mesenteric nodes revealed an EBV positive, CD20 positive mixed lymphoproliferative process with T-cell predominance, but without a monoclonal cell population felt to be consistent with EBV-associated LPD. Bone marrow biopsy revealed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, complicating her course. She was treated with steroids and rituximab but continued to decline, eventually developing MSSA bacteremia and succumbing to her disease. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the constellation of celiac sprue, EBV-associated LPD, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Providers caring for patients with severe, uncontrolled celiac disease and adenopathy should consider EBV-associated LPD.

  20. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weakness...... and elevated plasma creatine kinase. Muscle biopsy showed massive inflammatory changes in some fascicles, while other fascicles were relatively spared. Clinical symptoms and biopsy changes resolved after immunosuppression and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Our results suggest that muscle...

  1. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis after EBV reactivation and ibrutinib treatment in relapsed/refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Cavallari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a rare syndrome characterized by ineffective T-cell and NK response. We report the clinical course of a patient with relapsed CLL who developed acute symptoms soon after starting ibrutinib. Hyperpyrexia, splenomegaly, hyperferritinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, cytopenias, and a typical cytokine pattern, i.e. high interleukin (IL−6, IL10 and IL18, were consistent with a diagnosis of HLH. Coexistent Epstein Barr virus reactivation was documented. Ibrutinib-induced impairment of NK degranulation, associated with EBV reactivation and CLL-related immunodeficiency may have contributed to the development of HLH in our patient.

  2. Typhoid Fever Complicated by Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non, Lemuel R; Patel, Rupa; Esmaeeli, Amir; Despotovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and rhabdomyolysis are rare complications of typhoid fever from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Herein, we describe the clinical features in a 21-year-old female from India who presented to the intensive care unit with fever, severe pancytopenia, and rhabdomyolysis. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  3. Spectrum of clinical presentations in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 5 patients with mutations in STXBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Entesarian, Miriam; Al-Herz, Waleed

    2010-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an often-fatal hyperinflammatory syndrome characterized by fever, hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, and in some cases hemophagocytosis. Here, we describe the mutation analysis, clinical presentation, and functional analysis of natural killer (NK) cells...... (FHL), the clinical findings included colitis, bleeding disorders, and hypogammaglobulinemia in approximately one-third of the patients. Laboratory analysis revealed impairment of NK-cell degranulation and cytotoxic capacity. Interleukin-2 stimulation of lymphocytes in vitro rescued the NK cell......-associated functional defects. In conclusion, familial HLH type 5 is associated with a spectrum of clinical symptoms, which may be a reflection of impaired expression and function of Munc18-2 also in cells other than cytotoxic lymphocytes. Mutations in STXBP2 should thus also be considered in patients with clinical...

  4. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis secondary to T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Devitt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening clinical syndrome characterized by dysregulation of the immune system. Impaired function of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells is often seen, and T-cell malignancies represent most cases of lymphoma-associated HLH. HLH associated with B-cell lymphoma is rare. We describe a case of a 30-year-old man who presented with fever, splenomegaly, and hyperferritinemia. Bone marrow biopsy revealed T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma, a rare, aggressive B-cell malignancy. This case highlights the interplay between a pro-inflammatory cytokine microenvironment and tumor-mediated immune suppression, and addresses the importance of accurately diagnosing these entities for appropriate clinical management.

  5. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis secondary to T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Katherine; Cerny, Jan; Switzer, Bradley; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Nath, Rajneesh; Yu, Hongbo; Woda, Bruce A; Chen, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening clinical syndrome characterized by dysregulation of the immune system. Impaired function of cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells is often seen, and T-cell malignancies represent most cases of lymphoma-associated HLH. HLH associated with B-cell lymphoma is rare. We describe a case of a 30-year-old man who presented with fever, splenomegaly, and hyperferritinemia. Bone marrow biopsy revealed T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma, a rare, aggressive B-cell malignancy. This case highlights the interplay between a pro-inflammatory cytokine microenvironment and tumor-mediated immune suppression, and addresses the importance of accurately diagnosing these entities for appropriate clinical management.

  6. Infantile Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Case of Chediak-Higashi Syndrome Caused by a Mutation in the LYST/CHS1 Gene Presenting With Delayed Umbilical Cord Detachment and Diarrhea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Agergaard, Charlotte N; Jakobsen, Marianne A

    2015-01-01

    A 2-month-old female infant, born to consanguineous parents, presented with infections in skin and upper respiratory tract. She was notable for delayed umbilical cord detachment, partial albinism, and neurological irritability. Giant granules were present in white blood cells. The intracellular...... in this severe phenotype of Chediak-Higashi syndrome was probably induced by rotaviral infection. Interestingly, the intracellular perforin content in CD8 T cells seems to correlate to the immune activation state of the patient. Late separation of the umbilical cord in concordance with clinical symptoms should...

  7. Genetic predisposition to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Report on 500 patients from the Italian registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetica, Valentina; Sieni, Elena; Pende, Daniela; Danesino, Cesare; De Fusco, Carmen; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Biondi, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Griffiths, Gillian M; Luzzatto, Lucio; Aricò, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease affecting mostly children but also adults and characterized by hyperinflammatory features. A subset of patients, referred to as having familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), have various underlying genetic abnormalities, the frequencies of which have not been systematically determined previously. This work aims to further our understanding of the pathogenic bases of this rare condition based on an analysis of our 25 years of experience. From our registry, we have analyzed a total of 500 unselected patients with HLH. Biallelic pathogenic mutations defining FHL were found in 171 (34%) patients; the proportion of FHL was much higher (64%) in patients given a diagnosis during the first year of life. Taken together, mutations of the genes PRF1 (FHL2) and UNC13D (FHL3) accounted for 70% of cases of FHL. Overall, a genetic diagnosis was possible in more than 90% of our patients with FHL. Perforin expression and the extent of degranulation have been more useful for diagnosing FHL than hemophagocytosis and the cytotoxicity assay. Of 281 (56%) patients classified as having "sporadic" HLH, 43 had monoallelic mutations in one of the FHL-defining genes. Given this gene dosage effect, FHL is not strictly recessive. We suggest that the clinical syndrome HLH generally results from the combined effects of an exogenous trigger and genetic predisposition. Within this combination, different weights of exogenous and genetic factors account for the wide disease spectrum that ranges from HLH secondary to severe infection to FHL. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic predisposition to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: Report on 500 patients from the Italian registry

    OpenAIRE

    Cetica, Valentina; Sieni, Elena; Pende, Daniela; Danesino, Cesare; De Fusco, Carmen; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Biondi, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Griffiths, Gillian M.; Luzzatto, Lucio; Aric?, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease affecting mostly children but also adults and characterized by hyperinflammatory features. A subset of patients, referred to as having familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL), have various underlying genetic abnormalities, the frequencies of which have not been systematically determined previously. Objective This work aims to further our understanding of the pathogenic bases of this ra...

  9. Neuroimaging of nonaccidental head trauma: pitfalls and controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, Sujan [University of Missouri-Kansas School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Obaldo, Ruby E. [The University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Walsh, Irene R. [The University of Missouri-Kansas City, Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Lowe, Lisa H. [The University of Missouri-Kansas City, Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Although certain neuroimaging appearances are highly suggestive of abuse, radiological findings are often nonspecific. The objective of this review is to discuss pitfalls, controversies, and mimics occurring in neuroimaging of nonaccidental head trauma in order to allow the reader to establish an increased level of comfort in distinguishing between nonaccidental and accidental head trauma. Specific topics discussed include risk factors, general biomechanics and imaging strategies in nonaccidental head trauma, followed by the characteristics of skull fractures, normal prominent tentorium and falx versus subdural hematoma, birth trauma versus nonaccidental head trauma, hyperacute versus acute on chronic subdural hematomas, expanded subarachnoid space versus subdural hemorrhage, controversy regarding subdural hematomas associated with benign enlarged subarachnoid spaces, controversy regarding hypoxia as a cause of subdural hematoma and/or retinal hemorrhages without trauma, controversy regarding the significance of retinal hemorrhages related to nonaccidental head trauma, controversy regarding the significance of subdural hematomas in general, and pitfalls of glutaric aciduria type 1 and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis mimicking nonaccidental head trauma. (orig.)

  10. Neuroimaging of nonaccidental head trauma: pitfalls and controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernando, Sujan; Obaldo, Ruby E.; Walsh, Irene R.; Lowe, Lisa H.

    2008-01-01

    Although certain neuroimaging appearances are highly suggestive of abuse, radiological findings are often nonspecific. The objective of this review is to discuss pitfalls, controversies, and mimics occurring in neuroimaging of nonaccidental head trauma in order to allow the reader to establish an increased level of comfort in distinguishing between nonaccidental and accidental head trauma. Specific topics discussed include risk factors, general biomechanics and imaging strategies in nonaccidental head trauma, followed by the characteristics of skull fractures, normal prominent tentorium and falx versus subdural hematoma, birth trauma versus nonaccidental head trauma, hyperacute versus acute on chronic subdural hematomas, expanded subarachnoid space versus subdural hemorrhage, controversy regarding subdural hematomas associated with benign enlarged subarachnoid spaces, controversy regarding hypoxia as a cause of subdural hematoma and/or retinal hemorrhages without trauma, controversy regarding the significance of retinal hemorrhages related to nonaccidental head trauma, controversy regarding the significance of subdural hematomas in general, and pitfalls of glutaric aciduria type 1 and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis mimicking nonaccidental head trauma. (orig.)

  11. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G. (ed.) [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  12. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  13. Spontaneous Escherichia coli Meningitis Associated with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous Escherichia coli meningitis has not been previously reported in association with hemophago-cytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. A previously healthy 72-year-old woman was admitted due to fever, nuchal rigidity, disturbed consciousness and splenomegaly. Anemia, thrombocytopenia and hyperfer-ritinemia developed on the 8th day of hospitalization. Cultures of cerebrospinal fluid and blood grew E. coli. Abundant macrophages overwhelmed erythrocytes in the bone marrow aspirate, confirming the presence of hemophagocytosis. E. coli meningitis was managed with a 40-day course of antibiotic treatment. However, the severity of anemia and thrombocytopenia progressed despite intensive transfusion therapy. The patient died of HLH on the 60th day of hospitalization.

  14. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a rare diagnosis, an even rarer opportunity to appraise our understanding of the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Marzagão Barbuto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome identified as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH poses a rather difficult challenge to the physician. HLH was initially described as a familial disorder,1 which was later associated with various genetic defects that affect the cytotoxic machinery of CD8+ T and NK cells,2 but it also occurs sporadically, usually prompted by infections, rheumatic disorders, or neoplasia.3 Although its diagnostic criteria are established, its clinical presentation overlaps with many different conditions, requiring an enhanced awareness of the attending physician in order to reach the diagnosis and to initiate treatment early enough.

  15. Pitfalls in liver imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Yuji; Saida, Yukihisa [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Localized, abnormal attenuation/intensity areas on unenhanced and/or enhanced study of CT/MR imaging do not necessarily correspond to tumors themselves or real tumor size. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of liver tumor are described dividing into enhanced study (vascular variants, vascular abnormalities, hyperplastic nodules, around the tumor, and miscellaneous) and unenhanced study (fatty change, focal spared area of diffuse fatty liver, and miscellaneous). (orig.)

  16. Pitfalls in liver imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itai, Yuji; Saida, Yukihisa

    2002-01-01

    Localized, abnormal attenuation/intensity areas on unenhanced and/or enhanced study of CT/MR imaging do not necessarily correspond to tumors themselves or real tumor size. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of liver tumor are described dividing into enhanced study (vascular variants, vascular abnormalities, hyperplastic nodules, around the tumor, and miscellaneous) and unenhanced study (fatty change, focal spared area of diffuse fatty liver, and miscellaneous). (orig.)

  17. Pitfalls in neck imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, S.B.; Phillips, C.D.; Cornett, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    CT and MR imaging have become effective imaging modalities in the evaluation of primary head and neck neoplasms. As radiologists have gained experience in head and neck imaging, certain pitfalls have become evident. Identification of pathologic lymph nodes is the critical element in staging neoplasms of the head and neck. The diagnosis of cervical lymphadenopathy may be complicated by confusion with normal structures, inadequate contrast opacification of vascular structures, and poor scanning technique. This paper illustrates these potential problem areas on both CT and MR images and offers the authors' approach to further evaluation in problem cases

  18. Dengue fever as a cause of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Noely; Bergara, Gabriel Heiser; Moura, Nathalie Bianchini Vieira; Cardoso, Débora Morais; Hirose, Maki; Ferronato, Angela Espósito; Pastorino, Antônio Carlos; Lo, Denise Swei; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is endemic in more than 100 countries in Southeast Asia, the Americas, the western Pacific, Africa and the eastern Mediterranean regions. The virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease is the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans and is a global and national public health concern in several countries. A seasonal pattern of dengue disease is consistently observed. The highest incidences usually correspond to the period of highest rainfall and humidity, providing suitable conditions for Aedes aegypti breeding and survival. In Brazil for instance it is from January to June. Dengue may cause marked changes in bone marrow that result in hypocellularity and, consequently, thrombocytopenia and leucopenia, along with an increase in hematocrit, which is secondary to capillary leakage. However, those abnormalities are usually self-limited, and do not warrant further investigations, such as a marrow biopsy or a myelogram. The occurrence of persistent reactive hemophagocytosis is uncommon and usually leads to serious adverse outcomes. The authors report the case of an 8-year old girl complaining of high-grade fever, malaise, headache, abdominal pain and a cutaneous rash. Laboratory examination revealed atypical lymphocytosis on peripheral blood count, hyperbilirrunemia, abnormal liver enzymes and clotting tests. Serology was positive for dengue. Because of the persistence of fever and laboratory examinations were consistent with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) a bone marrow aspiration was performed, which confirmed the presence of hemophagocytosis. Hence we report a rare presentation of dengue accompanied by self-limited HLH that hopefully evolve to favorable outcome.

  19. Wolman disease associated with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: attempts for an explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurisano, Roberta; Maiorana, Arianna; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Boldrini, Renata; Deodato, Federica

    2014-10-01

    The lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is the enzyme responsible of the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides within endo-lysosomes. Loss of enzyme activity leads to accumulation of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides in the lysosome of most tissues. The complete deficiency of LAL is responsible of Wolman disease (WD), a severe systemic disease manifesting in the first days of life with vomiting, diarrhea, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, jaundice, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening condition which may be genetically determined or secondary to infections, malignancies, immune deficiencies, and rheumatologic disorders. So far, some inborn errors of metabolism have been associated with HLH (e.g., lysinuric protein intolerance, Gaucher's disease), and it has been anecdotally described in three WD patients, without any specific pathogenetic hypothesis. Here, we report on a WD patient, showing clear clinical, biochemical, and histological features indicative of HLH. We discuss the pathophysiological role of cholesteryl ester-induced inflammasome activation in macrophages, leading to a secondary HLH. This case indicates that WD can cause secondary HLH and suggests that a careful metabolic workup should be performed when facing to a pediatric patient with HLH.

  20. CNS Involvement in Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis: CT and MR Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Woong

    2007-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder that is characterized by proliferation of benign histiocytes, and this commonly involves the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow and central nervous system (CNS). We report here on the CT and MR imaging findings in a case of CNS HLH that showed multiple ring enhancing masses mimicking abscess or another mass on the CT and MR imaging. emophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare disorder that is characterized by nonmalignant diffuse infiltration of multiple organs, including the central nervous system (CNS), by lymphocytes and histiocytes (1). Many radiologic reports describing diffuse white matter infiltrations, parenchymal atrophy and calcification have been published, but the characteristics of these findings remain non-specific, especially in immunocompromised patients. We present here a case of HLH in a 3-year-old boy who presented with multiple ring enhancing lesions involving the brain. In conclusion, although the CT and MRI findings of HLH with ring enhancing parenchymal lesions are nonspecific and mimic abscess, and especially in the immunosuppressed patients, increased diffusion at the center on DWI may be a finding of HLH to differentiate it from abscess, which has restricted diffusion at the center. However, the pathologic correlation with DWI according to the lesion stage certainly needs further study with a larger number of patients

  1. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis preceded by Kikuchi disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Gye-Yeon; Cho, Bin; Chung, Nak Gyun

    2008-01-01

    Kikuchi disease (KD) is a type of benign, self-limiting lymphadenitis, but it has also been associated with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). To date, only a few reports have suggested an association between HLH and KD. To report the imaging findings and clinical characteristics of KD accompanied by HLH in children. Five children with a prolonged fever and cervical lymphadenopathy were diagnosed as having HLH accompanied by KD. The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and the imaging findings in these children. The histology of excision biopsy samples of cervical lymph nodes in all children confirmed the diagnosis of KD. HLH was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy and laboratory criteria provided by the Histiocyte Society. The greatest dimension of the enlarged nodes ranged from 0.5 cm to 2.5 cm and the nodes were most frequently located at level V. CT scans visualized perinodal infiltrates in most of the affected cervical nodes (four of five children) and extracervical nodes (three of three children). On enhanced CT scans, nonenhancing necrosis within the affected cervical nodes was noted in three children. KD might be related to HLH in children. Systemic evaluations and follow-up of children with KD might help to identify HLH related to KD. (orig.)

  2. Presentation of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis due to a novel MUNC 13–4 mutation masked by partial therapeutic immunosuppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett Jackie P-D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a potentially fatal disease characterized by excessive macrophage and lymphocyte activity. Patients can be affected following immune activation after an oncologic, autoimmune or infectious trigger. An associated gene mutation may be found which impairs cytolytic lymphocyte function. We describe a pediatric case of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with a novel mutation of MUNC 13–4 whose diagnosis was confounded by concurrent immunosuppression. Clinical reassessment for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is necessary in persistently febrile patients with laboratory derangements in the setting of immunosuppressive agent exposure.

  3. Germline heterozygous variants in genes associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis as a cause of increased bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fager Ferrari, Marcus; Leinoe, Eva; Rossing, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is caused by biallelic variants in genes regulating granule secretion in cytotoxic lymphocytes. In FHL3-5, the affected genes UNC13D, STX11 and STXBP2 have further been shown to regulate the secretion of platelet granules, giving rise to compromised...

  4. Diagnosing XLP1 in patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazza, Raffaella; Tuberosa, Claudia; Cetica, Valentina; Falco, Michela; Parolini, Silvia; Grieve, Sam; Griffiths, Gillian M; Sieni, Elena; Marcenaro, Stefania; Micalizzi, Concetta; Montin, Davide; Fagioli, Franca; Moretta, Alessandro; Mingari, Maria C; Moretta, Lorenzo; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Bottino, Cristina; Aricò, Maurizio; Pende, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening, heterogeneous, hyperinflammmatory disorder. Prompt identification of inherited forms resulting from mutation in genes involved in cellular cytotoxicity can be crucial. X-linked lymphoproliferative disease 1 (XLP1), due to mutations in SH2D1A (Xq25) encoding signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein (SAP), may present with HLH. Defective SAP induces paradoxical inhibitory function of the 2B4 coreceptor and impaired natural killer (NK) (and T) cell response against EBV-infected cells. To characterize a cohort of patients with HLH and XLP1 for SAP expression and 2B4 function in lymphocytes, proposing a rapid diagnostic screening to direct mutation analysis. We set up rapid assays for 2B4 function (degranulation or (51)Cr-release) to be combined with intracellular SAP expression in peripheral blood NK cells. We studied 12 patients with confirmed mutation in SH2D1A and some family members. The combined phenotypic/functional assays allowed efficient and complete diagnostic evaluation of all patients with XLP1, thus directing mutation analysis and treatment. Nine cases were SAP(-), 2 expressed SAP with mean relative fluorescence intensity values below the range of healthy controls (SAP(dull)), and 1, carrying the R55L mutation, was SAP(+). NK cells from all patients showed inhibitory 2B4 function and defective killing of B-EBV cells. Carriers with SH2D1A mutations abolishing SAP expression and low percentage of SAP(+) cells showed neutral 2B4 function at the polyclonal NK cell level. Three novel SH2D1A mutations have been identified. Study of SAP expression is specific but may have insufficient sensitivity for screening XLP1 as a single tool. Combination with 2B4 functional assay allows identification of all cases. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  5. Thyroid ultrasonography: Pitfalls and techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seon hyeong; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Soo Jin; Kwak, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Thyroid ultrasonography (US) plays a key role in the diagnosis and management of thyroid-related diseases. The aim of this article was to illustrate various pitfalls that can occur in utilizing thyroid US and techniques to prevent them. In this article, we present cases demonstrating the common pitfalls associated with US equipment, performance, normal thyroid structures, misinterpretations, and surrounding structures. Knowledge of these areas is essential to avoid misdiagnosis or improper disease management.

  6. Avoiding pitfalls in molecular genetic testing: case studies of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization testing in the definitive diagnosis of Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluk, Michael Joseph; An, Yu; James, Philip; Coulter, David; Harris, David; Wu, Bai-Lin; Shen, Yiping

    2011-05-01

    The molecular testing options available for the diagnosis of genetic disorders are numerous and include a variety of different assay platforms. The consultative input of molecular pathologists and cytogeneticists, working closely with the ordering clinicians, is often important for definitive diagnosis. Herein, we describe two patients who had long histories of unexplained signs and symptoms with a high clinical suspicion of an underlying genetic etiology. Initial molecular testing in both cases was negative, but the application of high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization technology lead to definitive diagnosis in both cases. We summarize the clinical findings and molecular testing in each case, discuss the differential diagnoses, and review the clinical and pathological findings of Mowat-Wilson syndrome. This report highlights the importance for those involved in molecular testing to know the nature of the underlying genetic abnormalities associated with the suspected diagnosis, to recognize the limitations of each testing platform, and to persistently pursue repeat testing using high-resolution technologies when indicated. This concept is applicable to both germline and somatic molecular genetic testing. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High Level of Perforin Expression Is Required for Effective Correction of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne; Terrell, Catherine E.; Arumugam, Paritha; Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly; Jordan, Michael; Malik, Punam

    2016-01-01

    Perforin-1 mutations result in a potentially fatal hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) with heightened immune activation, hypercytokinemia, pancytopenia, and end-organ damage. At present, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is curative, but limited by donor availability and associated mortality, making gene therapy an attractive alternative approach for HLH. We reported that perforin expression driven by cellular promoters in lentiviral (LV) vectors resulted in significant, alb...

  8. Epstein-Barr virus induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilkumar Sankararaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP is a rare, often fatal genetic disorder characterized by extreme vulnerability to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. EBV-induced hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a known presentation in XLP. In EBV-induced HLH in XLP, the brain imaging findings in the acute phase include a non specific pattern. In this report, we highlight the magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings in a child with EBV induced HLH in XLP.

  9. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and Pelger-Huët anomaly associated with colchicine intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Malbora

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colchicine is frequently used in the treatment of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF. First symptoms of colchicine intoxication are gastrointestinal disturbances, such as abdominal cramps, diarrhea, pancytopenia and so on. Herein, we report a female FMF patient with pancytopenia and hemophagocytic lymphohitiocytosis (HLH, following colchicine intoxication for committing suicide. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a patient with HLH associated with colchicine intoxication.

  10. Parents' common pitfalls of discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoonchart, Chatree; Fangsa-ard, Thitiporn; Chaoaree, Supamit; Ketumarn, Panom; Kaewpornsawan, Titawee; Phatthrayuttawat, Sucheera

    2005-11-01

    Problems of discipline are common among parents. These may be the results of the parents' pitfalls in disciplining their children. To find out common pitfalls of parents in disciplining their children. Parents of students with ages ranged between 60-72 months old in Bangkok-Noi district, Bangkok, were selected by random sampling. Total number of 1947 children ages between 60-72 months were recruited. Parents of these children were interviewed with a questionnaire designed to probe into problems in child rearing. There hindered and fifty questionnaires were used for data analyses. Parents had high concerns about problems in discipline their children and needed support from professional personnel. They had limited knowledge and possessed lots of wrong attitude towards discipline. Common pitfalls on the topics were problems in, 1) limit setting 2) rewarding and punishment 3) supervision on children watching TV and bedtime routines. Parents of children with ages 60-72 months old in Bangkok-Noi district, Bangkok, had several common pitfalls in disciplining their children, including attitude, knowledge and practice.

  11. The pitfalls of container production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Bell

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes ten of the biggest “pitfalls” or challenges I have encountered in my experience growing southern pine seedlings in containers over the past 30 years. Learning from challenges is an important part of growing successful nursery operations.

  12. Iatrogenic T-Cell Lymphoma with Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocyotsis in a Patient with Long-Standing Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. A. Andrade

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of hematological malignancies, especially when exposed to immunosuppressive therapy. The mechanisms of lymphomagenesis remain poorly understood but factors implicated include high disease activity, exposure to antitumoral necrosis factor medications, and Epstein–Barr virus infection. Lymphoid malignancies of T-cell origin are uncommon in patients with rheumatoid arthirits. Clinical presentation with associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocyotsis is rare and confers a poor prognosis. This case report illustrates a case of a patient with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and an iatrogenic peripheral T-cell lymphoma with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis who achieved a complete response after intensive chemotherapy.

  13. Cannabidiol: promise and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Timothy E; Luebke, Adrienne; Gidal, Barry E

    2014-09-01

    Over the past few years, increasing public and political pressure has supported legalization of medical marijuana. One of the main thrusts in this effort has related to the treatment of refractory epilepsy-especially in children with Dravet syndrome-using cannabidiol (CBD). Despite initiatives in numerous states to at least legalize possession of CBD oil for treating epilepsy, little published evidence is available to prove or disprove the efficacy and safety of CBD in patients with epilepsy. This review highlights some of the basic science theory behind the use of CBD, summarizes published data on clinical use of CBD for epilepsy, and highlights issues related to the use of currently available CBD products. Cannabidiol is the major nonpsychoactive component of Cannabis sativa. Over the centuries, a number of medicinal preparations derived from C. sativa have been employed for a variety of disorders, including gout, rheumatism, malaria, pain, and fever. These preparations were widely employed as analgesics by Western medical practitioners in the 19(th) century (1). More recently, there is clinical evidence suggesting efficacy in HIV-associated neuropathic pain, as well as spasms associated with multiple sclerosis (1).

  14. Poor outcomes of chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in non-Japanese adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonke, Gabe S.; Ludwig, Inge; van Oosten, Hannah; Baars, Joke W.; Meijer, Ellen; Kater, Arnon P.; de Jong, Daphne

    2008-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection manifests as a combination of persistent infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms and high viral load in apparently immunocompetent patients. It is closely related to Epstein-Barr virus associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. These 2 abnormal

  15. Poor outcomes of chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in non-Japanese adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S. Sonke (Gabe); I. Ludwig (Inge); H. van Oosten (Hannah); J.W. Baars (Joke); E. Meijer (Ellen); A.P. Kater (Arnon); D. de Jong (Daphne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractChronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection manifests as a combination of persistent infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms and high viral load in apparently immunocompetent patients. It is closely related to Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. These 2

  16. Avoiding pitfalls in interdisciplinary education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, R. E.; Woods, P. J.; Ferreira, Ana Sofia

    2017-01-01

    education, illustrating approaches towards solutions using the Nordic Centre for Research on Marine Ecosystems and Resources under Climate Change (NorMER) research network as a case study. We provide insights and detailed examples of how to overcome some of the challenges of conducting interdisciplinary......As the world’s social-environmental problems increasingly extend across boundaries, both disciplinary and political, there is a growing need for interdisciplinarity, not only in research per se, but also in doctoral education. We present the common pitfalls of interdisciplinary research in doctoral...... research within doctoral studies that can be applied within any doctoral/postdoctoral education programme, and beyond. Results from a selfevaluation survey indicate that early-career workshops, annual meetings and research visits to other institutions were the most effective learning mechanisms, whereas...

  17. Etoposide-containing conditioning regimen reduces the occurrence of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis after SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, R; Tanaka, J; Hashino, S; Ota, S; Torimoto, Y; Kakinoki, Y; Yamamoto, S; Kurosawa, M; Hatakeyama, N; Haseyama, Y; Sakai, H; Sato, K; Fukuhara, T

    2014-02-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare life-threatening disease of severe hyperinflammation caused by uncontrolled proliferation of activated lymphocytes and macrophages that secrete high amounts of inflammatory cytokines. HLH occurring after SCT is difficult to diagnose. It is characterized by severe clinical manifestations and high mortality. Despite current therapeutic approaches, outcomes remain poor. We analyzed the incidence and risk factors of HLH after SCT and the response to treatment and prognosis of 554 patients with HLH after SCT. The cumulative incidence of HLH after SCT was 4.3% (24/554). Use of etoposide in the conditioning regimen was only factor that reduced HLH after SCT (P=0.027). All patients who received autologous transplantation were successfully treated. Patients with liver dysfunction (for example, high total bilirubin level, prolonged prothrombin time and high level of fibrinogen degradation products) had a poor response to treatment for HLH. Physicians should be cautious of HLH, while not using etoposide for conditioning regimen.

  18. Cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and undetermined autoimmune disorder: reconciling the puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Claudia; Jorini, Mauro; Carloni, Ines; Giangiacomi, Mirella; Cetica, Valentina; Aricò, Maurizio; de Benedictis, Fernando Maria

    2014-02-13

    Cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis is a rare disease, associated with either nonmalignant conditions or subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, and often also associated with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We report the case of a 11-year-old boy with a history of secondary HLH who, after a local trauma, developed a painful, indurated plaque over the right thigh associated with relapsing HLH. Histopathologic findings from skin biopsy specimens revealed significant lobular panniculitis with benign histiocytes showing hemophagocytosis. High-dose intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclosporine A treatment was highly effective. A genetic study after a new, relapsing episode of HLH revealed an heterozygous missense mutation on STX 11 gene inherited from the mother.

  19. A case of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis presenting as pyrexia of unknown origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a potentially fatal hyper inflammatory condition, which occurs as either primary (genetic or secondary (acquired due to impaired or absent function of natural killer cells and cytotoxic cells. Common secondary causes include viral and bacterial infections, autoimmune diseases, and hematological malignancies. Extensive phagocytosis of blood cells by histiocytes in bone marrow, spleen, liver and lymphnodes result in peripheral blood cytopenias, hepatosplenomegaly, and lymphadenopathy. We evaluated a case of pyrexia of unknown origin and found out that he fulfilled the criteria for diagnosing HLH. He was started on immunochemotherapy with etoposide, cyclosporine and steroids, but he succumbed to illness within 2 weeks of treatment. High index of suspicion is needed to diagnose HLH and prompt treatment on diagnosis can be lifesaving.

  20. Poor outcomes of chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in non-Japanese adult patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sonke, Gabe; Ludwig, Inge; Oosten, Hannah; Baars, Joke; Meijer, Ellen; Kater, Arnon; Jong, Daphne

    2008-01-01

    textabstractChronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection manifests as a combination of persistent infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms and high viral load in apparently immunocompetent patients. It is closely related to Epstein-Barr virus-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. These 2 abnormal Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases are seldom reported in individuals other than Japanese children and adolescents. We report a series of 2 adult non-Japanese patients with fatal chronic ac...

  1. Dengue death with evidence of hemophagocytic syndrome and dengue virus infection in the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Wong, Pooi-Fong; Rahim, Hafiz; Abd-Jamil, Juraina; Tan, Kim-Kee; Sulaiman, Syuhaida; Lum, Chai-See; Syed-Omar, Syarifah-Faridah; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2015-01-01

    HPS is a potentially life-threatening histiocytic disorder that has been described in various viral infections including dengue. Its involvement in severe and fatal dengue is probably more common but is presently under recognized. A 38-year-old female was admitted after 5 days of fever. She was deeply jaundiced, leukopenic and thrombocytopenic. Marked elevation of transaminases, hyperbilirubinemia and hypoalbuminemia were observed. She had deranged INR values and prolonged aPTT accompanied with hypofibrinogenemia. She also had splenomegaly. She was positive for dengue IgM. Five days later she became polyuric and CT brain image showed gross generalized cerebral edema. Her conditions deteriorated by day 9, became confused with GCS of 9/15. Her BMAT showed minimal histiocytes. Her serum ferritin level peaked at 13,670.00 µg/mL and her sCD163 and sCD25 values were markedly elevated at 4750.00 ng/mL and 4191.00 pg/mL, respectively. She succumbed to the disease on day 10 and examination of her tissues showed the presence of dengue virus genome in the bone marrow. It is described here, a case of fatal dengue with clinical features of HPS. Though BMAT results did not show the presence of macrophage hemophagocytosis, other laboratory features were consistent with HPS especially marked elevation of ferritin, sCD163 and sCD25. Detection of dengue virus in the patient's bone marrow, fifteen days after the onset of fever was also consistent with the suggestion that the HPS is associated with dengue virus infection. The findings highlight HPS as a possible complication leading to severe dengue and revealed persistent dengue virus infection of the bone marrow. Detection of HPS markers; ferritin, sCD163 and sCD25, therefore, should be considered for early recognition of HPS-associated dengue.

  2. Pitfalls in diagnostic gastrin measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F; Bardram, Linda; Hilsted, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Gastrin measurements are performed primarily for the diagnosis of gastrin-producing tumors, gastrinomas, which cause the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES). Gastrin circulates as several bioactive peptides, however, and the peptide pattern in gastrinoma patients often deviates from normal. Therefor...

  3. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis caused by primary Epstein-Barr virus in patient with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdis, Francesco; Tacci, Sara; Messina, Federico; Varcada, Massimo

    2013-11-27

    We present a case of a 19-year-old man with a 6-year history of Crohn's disease (CD), previously treated with 6-mercaptopurine, who was admitted to our department for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and subsequently developed a hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). HLH is a rare disease which causes phagocytosis of all bone marrow derived cells. It can be a primary form as a autosomic recessive disease, or a secondary form associated with a variety of infections; EBV is the most common, the one with poorer prognosis. The incidence of lymphoproliferative disorders was increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treated with thiopurines. Specific EBV-related clinical and virological management should be considered when treating a patient with IBD with immunosuppressive therapy. Moreover EBV infection in immunosuppressed patient can occur with more aggressive forms such as encephalitis and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Our case confirms what is described in the literature; patients with IBD, particularly patients with CD receiving thiopurine therapy, who present 5 d of fever and cervical lymphadenopathy or previous evidence of lymphopenia should be screened for HLH.

  4. Domestic dengue infection with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis successfully treated by early steroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshifuji, Kota; Oshina, Takahiro; Sonokawa, Saeko; Noguchi, Yuma; Suzuki, Sayaka; Tanaka, Keisuke; Kumagai, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    A 34-year-old man, working at a park in Tokyo, Japan, was repeatedly bitten by mosquitoes while cutting grass. He was hospitalized with sudden fever, fatigue, and weakness. He was eventually diagnosed with dengue virus infection, detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the genome and by the presence of nonstructural protein 1 in his peripheral blood. Symptomatic treatments such as acetaminophen for the fever were not effective. Moreover, peripheral blood examination showed drastically decreased white blood cells and platelets, as well as marked elevations of ferritin and soluble interleukin 2 receptor. Furthermore, bone marrow examination revealed increased macrophages with hemophagocytosis. Dengue infection with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) was ultimately diagnosed. Half-dose steroid pulse therapy for three days dramatically reduced his temperature, thereby ameliorating physical symptoms and restoring normal peripheral blood data. He was discharged 12 days after admission. Dengue infection with HLH is rare and this is the first report, to our knowledge, of domestic dengue infection with HLH in Japan. Early steroid therapy may be effective in such cases.

  5. Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this evaluation was to identify pitfalls in medical prescriptions of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in government healthcare facilities in Zambia. Design: This was a cross sectional and government healthcare facilities were conveniently sampled. Main outcome measures: Rate of compliance to ...

  6. Pearls and pitfalls in neural CGRP immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the pearls and pitfalls of calcitonin-gene related protein (CGRP) immunohistochemistry of the brain. PEARLS: In 1985, CGRP was first described in cerebral arteries using immunohistochemistry. Since then, cerebral CGRP (and, using novel antibodies, its receptor components) has...

  7. Pitfalls in �Biblical� leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Kessler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the pitfalls involved in writing a Christian handbook on leadership. By analysing some elements of the Rule of Benedict it is argued that it is impossible to write such a handbook without using non-Biblical sources. Moreover, there are typical pitfalls when authors attempt to develop a pure Biblical leadership theory. The first pitfall is typical of Christians representing Niebuhr�s type of �Christ against Culture�. As early as 1951, Niebuhr claimed that in the field of leadership in particular the radical exclusive Christians reintroduced rules from non-Christian cultures. Examples from the last decade support Niebuhr�s observation. The second pitfall, referred to as reconstruction, is typical of those authors who are open to secular sources but who seek to give Biblical evidence for their leadership theory. This pitfall is illustrated by analysing the process in which the secular concepts of transforming leadership and vision statements found their way into evangelical books on Christian leadership. Reconstruction typically consists of four steps: Perception (a secular model of leadership becomes popular, Acceptance (this model is examined and accepted for the context of the church Assimilation (it is claimed that leaders in the Bible worked exactly as described in the model, books are written about Biblical leadership, exemplifying the model. The secular source becomes obsolete. and Standardisation (this model of leadership is declared to be the Biblical norm for every Christian leader. I argue that step 3 is at least problematic and step 4 is a fatal error.

  8. Griscelli syndrome type 2: A rare and fatal syndrome in a South Indian boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rajyalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the MYO5A (GS1, RAB27A (GS2, and MLPH (GS3 genes, characterized by a common feature, partial albinism. The common variant of three, GS type 2, in addition, shows primary immunodeficiency which leads to recurrent infections and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. We, herewith, describe a case of GS type 2, in a 4-year-old male child who presented with chronic and recurrent fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and secondary neurological deterioration; highlighting the cytological and histopathological features of lymph nodes. Hair shaft examination of the child confirmed the diagnosis.

  9. Incidence and Risk Factors for Developing Dengue-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Puerto Rico, 2008 - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Esther M.; Pérez-Padilla, Janice; González, Liza; Poole-Smith, B. Katherine; Lebo, Emmaculate; Baker, Charlotte; Delorey, Mark J.; Torres-Velasquez, Brenda; Ochoa, Eduardo; Rivera-Garcia, Brenda; Díaz-Pinto, Hector; Clavell, Luis; Puig-Ramos, Anabel; Janka, Gritta E.; Tomashek, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare, potentially fatal disorder characterized by fever, pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and increased serum ferritin. HLH is being increasingly reported as a complication of dengue, a common tropical acute febrile illness. Methodology/Principal Findings After a cluster of pediatric dengue-associated HLH patients was identified during the 2012–2013 dengue epidemic in Puerto Rico, active surveillance and a case-control investigation was conducted at four referral hospitals to determine the incidence of HLH in children and identify risk factors for HLH following dengue. Patients with dengue-associated HLH (cases) were matched by month of illness onset and admission hospital to dengue patients that did not develop HLH (controls). During 2008–2013, a total of 33 HLH patients were identified, of which 22 (67%) were associated with dengue and 1 died (dengue-associated HLH case-fatality rate: 4.5%). Two patients with dengue-associated HLH had illness onset in 2009, none had illness onset during the 2010 dengue epidemic, and 20 had illness onset during the 2012–2013 epidemic. Frequency of infection with either dengue virus (DENV)-1 or DENV-4 did not differ between cases and controls. Cases were younger than controls (median age: 1 vs. 13 years, p dengue-associated HLH cases that was temporally associated with the 2012–2013 epidemic, most patients with dengue-associated HLH were infants and had higher morbidity than dengue inpatients. Physicians throughout the tropics should be aware of HLH as a potential complication of dengue, particularly in patients with anemia and severe liver injury. PMID:27556807

  10. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Unknown Underlying Hodgkin Lymphoma Presenting with a Cholestatic Pattern of Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Booth

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is an uncommon disease that often presents with nonspecific findings. A high index of suspicion is necessary to make a prompt diagnosis and prevent fatal disease. A 45-year-old man presented with fever, hypotension, abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Imaging showed hepatosplenomegaly and laboratory tests revealed pancytopenia, increased ferritin, and a cholestatic pattern of injury with elevated alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin. Due to a history of Crohn disease, systemic lupus erythematous, and rheumatoid arthritis, the patient was on immunosuppressants, including infliximab. After multiple negative cultures, persistent fever, and days of empiric broad spectrum antibiotics, our differential shifted to fever of unknown origin. A liver wedge biopsy revealed areas of sinusoidal dilatation with enlarged, activated macrophages containing erythrocytes and intracytoplasmic iron, consistent with hemophagocytosis due to HLH. The portal tracts showed mixed lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, a prominent bile ductular reaction, periportal fibrosis, and scattered large cells with occasional binucleation and prominent nucleoli. These cells stained positive for Epstein-Barr virus encoding region in situ hybridization, PAX5, CD15, and CD30, and hepatic involvement by classic Hodgkin lymphoma was diagnosed and determined to be the cause of the HLH and cholestatic pattern of injury. Simultaneously, a bone marrow biopsy showed diffuse involvement by Hodgkin lymphoma with a similar staining pattern. Aggressive treatment failed and the patient succumbed to multiorgan failure. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal disease, with nonspecific signs and symptoms, and should be considered in any patient presenting with fever and pancytopenia, especially if they are immune compromised.

  11. Splenectomy as a treatment for adults with relapsed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing-Shi, Wang; Yi-Ni, Wang; Lin, Wu; Zhao, Wang

    2015-05-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the clinical value of splenectomy as a treatment for relapsed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) of unknown cause in adults. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data from medical records of 19 adults with relapsed HLH of unknown cause treated with splenectomy in our institution from June 2007 to March 2014. To rule out possible underlying diseases, including infection, autoimmune disease, neoplasms, and primary HLH, the patients had undergone examinations including F18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, HLH-associated gene defects, and lymph node biopsies. Twelve patients (63.2%) achieved partial responses (PR), whereas seven patients (36.8%) had no response (NR) prior to splenectomy. Infection and hemorrhage were the main complications of splenectomy. Eighteen cases were evaluable after follow-up. Seven cases with histopathologic diagnoses of lymphoma had received chemotherapy, four of whom had achieved complete responses (CR), one PR, and two NR. Maintenance treatment was ceased 2 or 3 months after splenectomy in the other 11 cases, five of whom had CR, four PR, and two NR. Eleven of 18 cases (61.1%) survived with a median follow-up of 25 months (range 3-79 months) for survivors. Twelve- and 36-month progression-free survival rates were 48 and 24%, respectively; 12- and 36-month overall survival rates were 57 and 25%, respectively. Median survival time was 22 months. Our results indicate splenectomy may be an effective means of diagnosis and treatment of relapsed HLH of unknown cause. Further study is required to establish the mechanism and value of splenectomy in this disease.

  12. Outcomes of Children with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Given Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Chiara; Zecca, Marco; Fagioli, Franca; Rovelli, Attilio; Giardino, Stefano; Merli, Pietro; Porta, Fulvio; Aricò, Maurizio; Sieni, Elena; Basso, Giuseppe; Ripaldi, Mimmo; Favre, Claudio; Pillon, Marta; Marzollo, Antonio; Rabusin, Marco; Cesaro, Simone; Algeri, Mattia; Caniglia, Maurizio; Di Bartolomeo, Paolo; Ziino, Ottavio; Saglio, Francesco; Prete, Arcangelo; Locatelli, Franco

    2018-06-01

    We report on 109 patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) undergoing 126 procedures of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) between 2000 and 2014 in centers associated with the Italian Pediatric Hematology Oncology Association. Genetic diagnosis was FHL2 (32%), FHL3 (33%), or other defined disorders known to cause HLH (15%); in the remaining patients no genetic abnormality was found. Donor for first transplant was an HLA-matched sibling for 25 patients (23%), an unrelated donor for 73 (67%), and an HLA-partially matched family donor for 11 children (10%). Conditioning regimen was busulfan-based for 61 patients (56%), treosulfan-based for 21 (20%), and fludarabine-based for 26 children (24%). The 5-year probabilities of overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were 71% and 60%, respectively. Twenty-six patients (24%) died due to transplant-related causes, whereas 14 (13%) and 10 (9%) patients experienced graft rejection and/or relapse, respectively. Twelve of 14 children given a second HSCT after graft failure/relapse are alive and disease-free. Use of HLA-partially matched family donors was associated with higher risk of graft failure and thus with lower EFS (but not with lower OS) in multivariable analysis. Active disease at transplantation did not significantly affect prognosis. These data confirm that HSCT can cure most HLH patients, active disease not precluding successful transplantation. Because in HLH patients HLA-haploidentical HSCT performed through CD34 + cell positive selection was found to be associated with poor sustained engraftment of donor cells, innovative approaches able to guarantee a more robust engraftment are warranted in patients given this type of allograft. Copyright © 2018 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tax Multipliers: Pitfalls in Measurement and Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Riera-Crichton; Carlos A. Vegh; Guillermo Vuletin

    2012-01-01

    We contribute to the literature on tax multipliers by analyzing the pitfalls in identification and measurement of tax shocks. Our main focus is on disentangling the discussion regarding the identification of exogenous tax policy shocks (i.e., changes in tax policy that are not the result of policymakers responding to output fluctuations) from the discussion related to the measurement of tax policy (i.e., finding a tax policy variable under the direct control of the policymaker). For this purp...

  14. Applied statistics in ecology: common pitfalls and simple solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Ashley Steel; Maureen C. Kennedy; Patrick G. Cunningham; John S. Stanovick

    2013-01-01

    The most common statistical pitfalls in ecological research are those associated with data exploration, the logic of sampling and design, and the interpretation of statistical results. Although one can find published errors in calculations, the majority of statistical pitfalls result from incorrect logic or interpretation despite correct numerical calculations. There...

  15. The current landscape of pitfalls in Ontologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Keet, CM

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available 2Ontology Engineering Group, Departamento de Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Polite´cnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain keet@ukzn.ac.za, {mcsuarez,mpoveda}@fi.upm.es Keywords: Ontology Development : Ontology Quality : Pitfall Abstract: A growing... in Ontologies C. Maria Keet1, Mari Carmen Sua´rez-Figueroa2 and Marı´a Poveda-Villalo´n2 1School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, and UKZN/CSIR-Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research, Durban, South Africa...

  16. Genomics for paediatricians: promises and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Carrie Louise; Willoughby, Josh Matthew; Parker, Michael James

    2018-03-24

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in genetic technologies, evolving the field of genomics from genetics. This has huge diagnostic potential, as genomic testing increasingly becomes part of mainstream medicine. However, there are numerous potential pitfalls in the interpretation of genomic data. It is therefore essential that we educate clinicians more widely about the appropriate interpretation and utilisation of genomic testing. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  18. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  19. T Cell Depletion for Recipients of HLA Haploidentical Related Donor Stem Cell Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-29

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non Hodgkins Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH); Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (FLH); Viral-associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome (VAHS); X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease (XLP)

  20. Efficacy of Prompt Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in the Treatment of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Triggered by Uncontrolled Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan P. Fitzgerald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening, rapidly progressive hematologic disorder involving uncontrolled immune system activation. HLH has been associated with viral infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections. We report a case of a critically ill 30-year-old female who was hospitalized with HIV-associated HLH, with a CD4 count of 4 cells/mL and HIV viral load of 1,842,730 copies/mL. After ruling out other potential infectious causes of HLH, antiretroviral therapy (ART was initiated with darunavir, ritonavir, tenofovir, and emtricitabine. Within one week of initiation of ART, the patient began to improve clinically and hematologically and was stable enough for discharge from the hospital three weeks after starting therapy. This case suggests that treatment with ART in patients with HIV-associated HLH should be considered even in critically ill patients with low CD4 counts.

  1. Subtypes of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in Japan based on genetic and functional analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozo Nagai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL is a rare disease of infancy or early childhood. To clarify the incidence and subtypes of FHL in Japan, we performed genetic and functional analyses of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs in Japanese patients with FHL. DESIGN AND METHODS: Among the Japanese children with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH registered at our laboratory, those with more than one of the following findings were eligible for study entry under a diagnosis of FHL: positive for known genetic mutations, a family history of HLH, and impaired CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. Mutations of the newly identified causative gene for FHL5, STXBP2, and the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs in FHL patients, were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 31 FHL patients who satisfied the above criteria, PRF1 mutation was detected in 17 (FHL2 and UNC13D mutation was in 10 (FHL3. In 2 other patients, 3 novel mutations of STXBP2 gene were confirmed (FHL5. Finally, the remaining 2 were classified as having FHL with unknown genetic mutations. In all FHL patients, CTL-mediated cytotoxicity was low or deficient, and degranulation activity was also low or absent except FHL2 patients. In 2 patients with unknown genetic mutations, the cytotoxicity and degranulation activity of CTLs appeared to be deficient in one patient and moderately impaired in the other. CONCLUSIONS: FHL can be diagnosed and classified on the basis of CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, degranulation activity, and genetic analysis. Based on the data obtained from functional analysis of CTLs, other unknown gene(s responsible for FHL remain to be identified.

  2. Ultrasonography of the shoulder: pitfalls and variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, L.; Finlay, K.; Popowich, T.; Jurriaans, E.

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) of the shoulder, particularly the evaluation of the rotator cuff, is the most common examination of the musculoskeletal system performed in most practices. Despite this, it remains one of the most difficult examinations to learn. There are many pitfalls and errors that can occur initially, but once mastered, US of the rotator cuff is one of the best methods available for diagnosing rotator cuff disease. The literature reports a 91%-95% sensitivity and close to 90% specificity and accuracy in the assessment of both partial and full thickness tears. This compares favourably with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where a more recent study reported an 84% sensitivity, 97% specificity and an accuracy of 93% for combined partial and full thickness tears of the rotator cuff. Advantages of US include low cost, easy access, high degree of accuracy in expert hands, ease of comparison with the opposite side, dynamic real-time examination, ability to focus on the exact site of the patient's pain and graded compression availability. It is for these reasons that we hope to outline the various pitfalls and common errors that can occur during the examination in a systematic fashion. It must also be pointed out that computed tomographic arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography remain the investigations of choice for assessing labral disorders. (author)

  3. Pitfalls in multidetector row CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyneva, V.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:MDCT colonography is a reliable method for detection and identification of type of the colon lesions. At every step of the examination an error could be made and that would be lead to an incorrect diagnosis. Problems and pitfalls can be overcome with various useful techniques. The relatively clean and dry colon after careful preparation, allows avoiding problems of residual fluid and faeces. The knowledge about the structure and thickness characteristics of lesions of the colon and artefacts can to be useful in distinction of the polypoidal lesions from normal findings. The aim of this lecture is to describe common and less common pitfalls in CT colonography and to clarify features and CT criteria to distinction of organic formations from pseudo lesions. Inadequate preparation of the patient, weaknesses into the protocol, gaps and errors in interpretation are responsible for false positive and false negative results. The training which reduces the residual solids and liquid, marking, protocols elaboration and CAD allows achieving higher sensitivity and specificity. The 2D and 3D application techniques and solid knowledge about CT characteristic of the colon organic findings and pseudo lesions will reduce the rate of false positive results

  4. Association of Monoclonal Expansion of Epstein-Barr Virus-Negative CD158a+ NK Cells Secreting Large Amounts of Gamma Interferon with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Álvarez, María R.; Martínez-Sánchez, María V.; Salgado-Cecilia, María G.; Campillo, José A.; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Villar-Permuy, Florentina; Fuster, José L.; Bas, Águeda; Gil-Herrera, Juana; Muro, Manuel; García-Alonso, Ana M.; Álvarez-López, María R.; Minguela, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    We report the first case of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) induced by the monoclonal expansion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative NK cells. Consanguinity of the patient's parents made it necessary to discard familial HLH in the patient and her sister with identical HLA markers and demonstrate that no cause other than the expansion of NK cells, which secrete high levels of gamma interferon, was inducing HLH in this patient. PMID:19020108

  5. Primary Epstein–Barr virus infection and probable parvovirus B19 reactivation resulting in fulminant hepatitis and fulfilling five of eight criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Karrasch

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A case of primary Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection/parvovirus B19 reactivation fulfilling five of eight criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is presented. Despite two coinciding viral infections, massive splenomegaly, and fulminant hepatitis, the patient had a good clinical outcome, probably due to an early onset form of HLH with normal leukocyte count, normal natural killer (NK cell function, and a lack of hemophagocytosis.

  6. Primary Epstein-Barr virus infection and probable parvovirus B19 reactivation resulting in fulminant hepatitis and fulfilling five of eight criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrasch, Matthias; Felber, Jörg; Keller, Peter M; Kletta, Christine; Egerer, Renate; Bohnert, Jürgen; Hermann, Beate; Pfister, Wolfgang; Theis, Bernhard; Petersen, Iver; Stallmach, Andreas; Baier, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A case of primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection/parvovirus B19 reactivation fulfilling five of eight criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is presented. Despite two coinciding viral infections, massive splenomegaly, and fulminant hepatitis, the patient had a good clinical outcome, probably due to an early onset form of HLH with normal leukocyte count, normal natural killer (NK) cell function, and a lack of hemophagocytosis.

  7. Primary Epstein–Barr virus infection and probable parvovirus B19 reactivation resulting in fulminant hepatitis and fulfilling five of eight criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Karrasch, Matthias; Felber, Jörg; Keller, Peter M.; Kletta, Christine; Egerer, Renate; Bohnert, Jürgen; Hermann, Beate; Pfister, Wolfgang; Theis, Bernhard; Petersen, Iver; Stallmach, Andreas; Baier, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A case of primary Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection/parvovirus B19 reactivation fulfilling five of eight criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is presented. Despite two coinciding viral infections, massive splenomegaly, and fulminant hepatitis, the patient had a good clinical outcome, probably due to an early onset form of HLH with normal leukocyte count, normal natural killer (NK) cell function, and a lack of hemophagocytosis.

  8. Common pitfalls in preclinical cancer target validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelin, William G

    2017-07-01

    An alarming number of papers from laboratories nominating new cancer drug targets contain findings that cannot be reproduced by others or are simply not robust enough to justify drug discovery efforts. This problem probably has many causes, including an underappreciation of the danger of being misled by off-target effects when using pharmacological or genetic perturbants in complex biological assays. This danger is particularly acute when, as is often the case in cancer pharmacology, the biological phenotype being measured is a 'down' readout (such as decreased proliferation, decreased viability or decreased tumour growth) that could simply reflect a nonspecific loss of cellular fitness. These problems are compounded by multiple hypothesis testing, such as when candidate targets emerge from high-throughput screens that interrogate multiple targets in parallel, and by a publication and promotion system that preferentially rewards positive findings. In this Perspective, I outline some of the common pitfalls in preclinical cancer target identification and some potential approaches to mitigate them.

  9. Cross wavelet analysis: significance testing and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Maraun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a detailed evaluation of cross wavelet analysis of bivariate time series. We develop a statistical test for zero wavelet coherency based on Monte Carlo simulations. If at least one of the two processes considered is Gaussian white noise, an approximative formula for the critical value can be utilized. In a second part, typical pitfalls of wavelet cross spectra and wavelet coherency are discussed. The wavelet cross spectrum appears to be not suitable for significance testing the interrelation between two processes. Instead, one should rather apply wavelet coherency. Furthermore we investigate problems due to multiple testing. Based on these results, we show that coherency between ENSO and NAO is an artefact for most of the time from 1900 to 1995. However, during a distinct period from around 1920 to 1940, significant coherency between the two phenomena occurs.

  10. Potential pitfalls in the anorectal region during CT colonography: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-02-28

    Feb 28, 2017 ... smart phone or ... require further investigation and may require just a digital rectal ... pathology-related pitfalls (internal haemorrhoids, polyps, cancer, ... interpretation problems.12 It is preferable to use a small gauge (25 Fr.

  11. Pitfalls in CT diagnosis of appendicitis: pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shademan, Ashkan; Tappouni, Rafel F.R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high diagnostic accuracy of CT for appendicitis, numerous pitfalls exist that may result in a misdiagnosis. This pictorial review outlines the potential pitfalls in the CT diagnosis of appendicitis that includes atypical position of the appendix and coexisting pathologies. Various mimickers of appendicitis and clinical dilemmas will be highlighted. Upon completion, the reviewer should have an improved ability to recognise appendicitis mimickers and identify equivocal or atypical findings.

  12. Soluble hemoglobin-haptoglobin scavenger receptor CD163 as a lineage-specific marker in the reactive hemophagocytic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaer, Dominik J; Schleiffenbaum, Boris; Kurrer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    .1 mg/L), acute mononucleosis (median 8.2 mg/L), Leishmania infection (median 6.7 mg/L) and healthy controls (median 1.8 mg/L). Follow-up of patients with a relapsing course of the disease revealed close correlations of sCD163 with clinical disease activity, serum ferritin and other markers...

  13. Hypoalbuminaemia is an independent predictor for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in childhood Epstein-Barr virus-associated infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Ching; Chen, Jiann-Shiuh; Cheng, Chao-Neng; Yang, Yao-Jong

    2012-11-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a potentially fatal condition in children with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated infectious mononucleosis (IM). This study aimed to identify commonly available clinical and laboratory predictors that might help clinicians decide to perform the bone marrow and immunological tests for HLH in paediatric EBV-associated IM. A retrospective case-control study of patients aged 70% of patients) were fever, lymphadenopathy and hepatomegaly. In addition to the diagnostic criteria of HLH including fever, splenomegaly, cytopenia, hyperferritinaemia, hypertriglyceridemia and/or hypofibrinogenaemia, children with HLH had a significantly higher rate of prolonged fever >10 d, hepatomegaly, jaundice, general malaise, elevated aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminaemia compared to those with IM (all P < 0.01). Multiple logistic regression confirmed that hypoalbuminaemia (OR = 23.1, P = 0.01) was an independent predictor of paediatric HLH, with a high sensitivity (96%) and a good negative likelihood ratio (0.06) in patients with EBV-associated IM. Hypoalbuminaemia is a unique characteristic and potentially a valuable predictor for HLH in paediatric EBV-associated IM. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Immunologic difference between hypersensitivity to mosquito bite and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-I Lee

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening, virus-triggered immune disease. Hypersensitivity to mosquito bite (HMB, a presentation of Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus infection (CAEBV, may progress to HLH. This study aimed to investigate the immunologic difference between the HMB episodes and the HLH episodes associated with EBV infection. Immunologic changes of immunoglobulins, lymphocyte subsets, cytotoxicity, intracellular perforin and granzyme expressions, EBV virus load and known candidate genes for hereditary HLH were evaluated and compared. In 12 HLH episodes (12 patients and 14 HMB episodes (4 patients, there were both decreased percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ and increased memory CD4+ and activated (CD2+HLADR+ lymphocytes. In contrast to HMB episodes that had higher IgE levels and EBV virus load predominantly in NK cells, those HLH episodes with virus load predominantly in CD3+ lymphocyte had decreased perforin expression and cytotoxicity that were recovered in the convalescence period. However, there was neither significant difference of total virus load in these episodes nor candidate genetic mutations responsible for hereditary HLH. In conclusion, decreased perforin expression in the HLH episodes with predominant-CD3+ EBV virus load is distinct from those HMB episodes with predominant-NK EBV virus load. Whether the presence of non-elevated memory CD4+ cells or activated lymphocytes (CD2+HLADR+ increases the mortality rate in the HLH episodes remains to be further warranted through larger-scale studies.

  15. Core biopsies of the breast: Diagnostic pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Joshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide. In this review article, the authors compare and contrast the incidence of breast cancer, and the inherent differences in the United States (US and India in screening techniques used for diagnosing breast cancer. In spite of these differences, core biopsies of the breast are common for diagnosis of breast cancer in both countries. The authors describe "Best Practices" in the reporting and processing of core biopsies and in the analysis of estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (Her2/neu. The pitfalls in the diagnosis of fibroepithelial lesions of the breast on core biopsy are discussed, as also the significance of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast (PASH is discussed in core biopsy. In this review, the management and diagnosis of flat epithelial atypia and radiation atypia are elaborated and the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC in papillary lesions, phyllodes tumor, and complex sclerosing lesions (radial scars is illustrated. Rarer lesions such as mucinous and histiocytoid carcinoma are also discussed.

  16. Avoiding legal pitfalls in surrogacy arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Summer; Chilvers, Rebecca; Havemann, Dara; Phelps, John Y

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this article is to discuss the legal pitfalls that reproductive endocrinologists face when participating in gestational surrogacy contracts. This paper was composed using Westlaw and LexisNexis commercial legal search engines to perform a review of statutes and cases pertaining to gestational surrogacy. The search results demonstrated that in the absence of suitable preparation, there is significant potential for litigation while participating in gestational agreements. Providers caring for gestational carriers have been named as parties in lawsuits for failure to provide psychological screening, failure to screen for infectious disease and participation in gestational contracts that are not compliant with state law. There is great disparity in state laws and court rulings pertaining to gestational agreements. When legal disputes arise, individual state laws and court rulings are controlling over the Uniform Parentage Act. Likewise, recommendations by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine do not supersede state laws. The failure to abide by individual state laws unnecessarily exposes reproductive endocrinologists and their IVF facilities to potential litigation. In order to lessen exposure to litigation, an understanding of individual state legislation or historical court rulings is advised. Copyright © 2010 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Myasthenia Gravis: Unusual Presentations and Diagnostic Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolico, Carmelo; Parisi, Daniela; Portaro, Simona; Biasini, Fiammetta; Sinicropi, Stefano; Ciranni, Annamaria; Toscano, Antonio; Messina, Sonia; Musumeci, Olimpia; Vita, Giuseppe; Girlanda, Paolo

    2016-08-30

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder presenting with fluctuating, fatigable muscle weakness. Initial symptoms classically involve ocular and proximal limb muscles. Rarely, MG may onset with unusual features, so it can be misdiagnosed with other neuromuscular diseases. To describe unusual and atypical presentations of MG in a large cohort of patients, considering and discussing diagnostic difficulties and pitfalls. We report on 21 out of 508 MG patients, coming to our department in the last 27 years and presenting with atypical or unusual features. The diagnosis was achieved performing a careful clinical examination, a proper neurophysiological assessment, the neostigmine test, the AChR and MuSK antibodies assay and chest CT-scan. Patients with atypical/unusual MG onset were the 4.4% of all MG patients population. We describe seven different clinical categories: asymmetric distal upper limbs weakness, foot drop, isolated triceps brachii weakness and foot drop, post exertional axial weakness with dropped head, acute facial dyplegia, limb-girdle MG and MG with sudden lower limbs weakness and recurrent falls. Atypical and unusual presentations may increase the risk to misdiagnose or delay MG diagnosis. Isolated limb-girdle presentation is the most frequent atypical form in our series.

  18. Pitfalls in genetic testing: the story of missed SCN1A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djémié, Tania; Weckhuysen, Sarah; von Spiczak, Sarah; Carvill, Gemma L; Jaehn, Johanna; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Brilstra, Eva; Caglayan, Hande S; de Kovel, Carolien G; Depienne, Christel; Gaily, Eija; Gennaro, Elena; Giraldez, Beatriz G; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Guerrini, Renzo; Hämäläinen, Eija; Hartmann, Corinna; Hernandez-Hernandez, Laura; Hjalgrim, Helle; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R; Leu, Costin; Marini, Carla; McMahon, Jacinta M; Mei, Davide; Møller, Rikke S; Muhle, Hiltrud; Myers, Candace T; Nava, Caroline; Serratosa, Jose M; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Stephani, Ulrich; Striano, Pasquale; van Kempen, Marjan J A; Verbeek, Nienke E; Usluer, Sunay; Zara, Federico; Palotie, Aarno; Mefford, Heather C; Scheffer, Ingrid E; De Jonghe, Peter; Helbig, Ingo; Suls, Arvid

    2016-07-01

    Sanger sequencing, still the standard technique for genetic testing in most diagnostic laboratories and until recently widely used in research, is gradually being complemented by next-generation sequencing (NGS). No single mutation detection technique is however perfect in identifying all mutations. Therefore, we wondered to what extent inconsistencies between Sanger sequencing and NGS affect the molecular diagnosis of patients. Since mutations in SCN1A, the major gene implicated in epilepsy, are found in the majority of Dravet syndrome (DS) patients, we focused on missed SCN1A mutations. We sent out a survey to 16 genetic centers performing SCN1A testing. We collected data on 28 mutations initially missed using Sanger sequencing. All patients were falsely reported as SCN1A mutation-negative, both due to technical limitations and human errors. We illustrate the pitfalls of Sanger sequencing and most importantly provide evidence that SCN1A mutations are an even more frequent cause of DS than already anticipated.

  19. Rational manipulation of digital EEG: pearls and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Udaya

    2014-12-01

    The advent of digital EEG has provided greater flexibility and more opportunities in data analysis to optimize the diagnostic yield. Changing the filter settings, sensitivity, montages, and time-base are possible rational manipulations to achieve this goal. The options to use polygraphy, video, and quantification are additional useful features. Aliasing and loss of data are potential pitfalls in the use of digital EEG. This review illustrates some common clinical scenarios where rational manipulations can enhance the diagnostic EEG yield and potential pitfalls in the process.

  20. A case report of novel mutation in PRF1 gene, which causes familial autosomal recessive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Modarresi, Farzaneh; Farazi Fard, Mohammad Ali; Dastsooz, Hassan; Shakib Azad, Nader; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-05-03

    Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening immunodeficiency and multi-organ disease that affects people of all ages and ethnic groups. Common symptoms and signs of this disease are high fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and cytopenias. Familial form of HLH disease, which is an autosomal recessive hematological disorder is due to disease-causing mutations in several genes essential for NK and T-cell granule-mediated cytotoxic function. For an effective cytotoxic response from cytotoxic T lymphocyte or NK cell encountering an infected cell or tumor cell, different processes are required, including trafficking, docking, priming, membrane fusion, and entry of cytotoxic granules into the target cell leading to apoptosis. Therefore, genes involved in these steps play important roles in the pathogenesis of HLH disease which include PRF1, UNC13D (MUNC13-4), STX11, and STXBP2 (MUNC18-2). Here, we report a novel missense mutation in an 8-year-old boy suffered from hepatosplenomegaly, hepatitis, epilepsy and pancytopenia. The patient was born to a first-cousin parents with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify mutated gene in the proband, Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) utilizing next generation sequencing was used on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform on DNA sample from the patient. Results showed a novel deleterious homozygous missense mutation in PRF1 gene (NM_001083116: exon3: c. 1120 T > G, p.W374G) in the patient and then using Sanger sequencing it was confirmed in the proband and his parents. Since his parents were heterozygous for the identified mutation, autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance was confirmed in the family. Our study identified a rare new pathogenic missense mutation in PRF1 gene in patient with HLH disease and it is the first report of mutation in PRF1 in Iranian patients with this disease.

  1. Protection from inflammatory organ damage in a murine model of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis using treatment with IL-18 binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eChiossone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening condition due to the association of an infectious agent with lymphocyte cytotoxicity defects, either of congenital genetic origin in children or presumably acquired in adults. In HLH patients, an excess of lymphocyte or macrophage cytokines, such as IFN-γ and TNFα is present in serum. In animal models of the disease, IFN-γ and TNF-α have been shown to play a central pathogenic role. In humans, unusually high concentrations of IL-18, an inducer of IFN-γ and TNF-α have been reported, and are associated with an imbalance between IL-18 and its natural inhibitor IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP resulting in an excess of free IL-18. Here we studied whether IL-18BP could reduce disease severity in an animal model of HLH. Mouse cytomegalovirus infection in perforin-1 knock-out mice induced a lethal condition similar to human HLH characterized by cytopenia with marked inflammatory lesions in the liver and spleen as well as the presence of hemophagocytosis in bone marrow. IL-18BP treatment decreased hemophagocytosis and reversed liver as well as spleen damage. IL-18BP treatment also reduced both IFN-γ and TNF-α production by CD8+ T and NK cells, as well as Fas ligand expression on NK cell surface. These data suggest that IL-18BP is beneficial in an animal model of HLH and in combination with anti-infectious therapy may be a promising strategy to treat HLH patients.

  2. [The significance of pedigree genetic screening and rapid immunological parameters in the diagnosis of primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Wang, Y N; Wang, J S; Wu, L; Wei, N; Fu, L; Gao, Z; Chen, J H; Pei, R J; Wang, Z

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the significance of pedigree genetic screening and rapid immunological parameters in the diagnosis of primary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Four cases of primary HLH patients with PRF1, UNC13D and SH2D1A gene mutations were conducted pedigree investigation, including family genetic screening and detections of immunological parameters (NK cell activity, CD107a degranulation and expression of HLH related defective protein), to evaluate the significance of these different indicators in the diagnosis of primary HLH and explore their correlations. The DNA mutations of the four families included missense mutation c.T172C (p.S58P) and non- frameshift deletions c.1083_1094del (p.361_365del), missense mutation c.C1349T (p.T450M) and frameshift mutation c.1090_1091delCT (p.T364fsX93) in PRF1 gene, missense mutation c.G2588A (p.G863D) in UNC13D gene and hemizygous mutation c.32T>G (p.I11S) in SH2D1A gene. The patients and their family members presented decreased NK cell activities. Individuals who carried mutations of PRF1 gene and SH2D1A gene showed low expression of perforin (PRF1) and signaling lymphocytic activation molecule associated protein (SAP). And the patient with UNC13D gene mutation and his family member with identical mutation showed significant reducing cytotoxic degranulation function (expression of CD107a). Pedigree genetic screening and rapid detection of immunological parameters might play an important role in the diagnosis of primary HLH, and both of them had good consistency. As an efficient detection means, the rapid immunological detection indicators would provide reliable basis for the early diagnosis of the primary HLH.

  3. Pitfalls in magnetic resonance imaging of the hip; ``Pitfalls`` in der Kernspintomographie der Hueftgelenke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schedel, H [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universtaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Wicht, L [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universtaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Kern, A [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universtaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Vogl, T [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universtaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Felix, R [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universtaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    In the differential diagnosis of unspecific hip pain MRI becomes increasing importance. In particular it is useful in the diagnosis of avascular necrosis, primary and secondary bone tumors, osteomyelitis and synovial processes. According to the higher frequence of MR-examinations of the hip the number of nonpathological incidental findings rises. These `pitfalls` which were found in MRI of 152 patients with unspecific hip pain are demonstrated. Soft tissue penetrating cortical lesions of the femoral neck (herniation pit), physiological changes of bone marrow, synovial proliferation of the hip capsule, epiphyseal scares of the femoral head and the transient osteoporosis are some of the morphological changes of the hip, which may cause difficulties and misinterpretations in MRI of the hip. The knowledge of their radiological characteristics in MRI is important, especially in cases of unspecific hip pain. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Magnetresonanztomographie gewinnt bei der Differentialdiagnose unspezifischer Hueftbeschwerden zunehmend an Bedeutung. Vor allem die avaskulaere Hueftkopfnekrose, primaere und sekundaere Knochentumoren, Osteomyelitis und synoviale Prozesse lassen sich kernspintomographisch gut differenzieren. Durch den haeufigeren Einsatz der Kernspintomographie im Hueftbereich werden aber auch vermehrt morphologische Veraenderungen nichtpathologischer Genese gefunden, die als physiologische Normvarianten bzw. benigne Veraenderungen von pathologischen Befunden abzugrenzen sind. In dieser Arbeit werden die bei der kernspintomographischen Untersuchung von 152 Patienten mit unklaren Hueftschmerzen gefundenen `pitfalls` vorgestellt. Durch kortikale Defekte des Schenkelhalses penetrierendes Weichteilgewebe (herniation pit), physiologische Knochenmarksveraenderungen der Acetabulum- und Femurregion, synoviale Proliferationen der Hueftgelenkskapsel, epiphysaere Narben des Femurkopfes und die transitorische Osteoporose sind einige der morphologischen Veraenderungen im

  4. Capillary leak syndrome: etiologies, pathophysiology, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Eric; Khatri, Minesh; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2017-07-01

    In various human diseases, an increase in capillary permeability to proteins leads to the loss of protein-rich fluid from the intravascular to the interstitial space. Although sepsis is the disease most commonly associated with this phenomenon, many other diseases can lead to a "sepsis-like" syndrome with manifestations of diffuse pitting edema, exudative serous cavity effusions, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, hypotension, and, in some cases, hypovolemic shock with multiple-organ failure. The term capillary leak syndrome has been used to describe this constellation of disease manifestations associated with an increased capillary permeability to proteins. Diseases other than sepsis that can result in capillary leak syndrome include the idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome or Clarkson's disease, engraftment syndrome, differentiation syndrome, the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, autoimmune diseases, snakebite envenomation, and ricin poisoning. Drugs including some interleukins, some monoclonal antibodies, and gemcitabine can also cause capillary leak syndrome. Acute kidney injury is commonly seen in all of these diseases. In addition to hypotension, cytokines are likely to be important in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury in capillary leak syndrome. Fluid management is a critical part of the treatment of capillary leak syndrome; hypovolemia and hypotension can cause organ injury, whereas capillary leakage of administered fluid can worsen organ edema leading to progressive organ injury. The purpose of this article is to discuss the diseases other than sepsis that produce capillary leak and review their collective pathophysiology and treatment. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: Linear regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Aggarwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous article in this series, we explained correlation analysis which describes the strength of relationship between two continuous variables. In this article, we deal with linear regression analysis which predicts the value of one continuous variable from another. We also discuss the assumptions and pitfalls associated with this analysis.

  6. Medical Abortion in Primary Care : Pitfalls and Benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A. A.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    2009-01-01

    We describe jive pitfalls of medical abortion: ectopic pregnancy not terminated after misoprostol, but without negative side-effects; long-term vaginal blood loss with suspicious retained products which disappeared spontaneously; a patient with uterus myomatatosus with severe pain and retained

  7. Medical prescription pitfalls of uncomplicated urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1Michael Chilufya Sata School of Medicine, Copperbelt University, Ndola, Zambia. C. S. ABSTRACT. Objectives: The aim of this evaluation was to identify pitfalls in medical prescriptions of uncomplicated urinary ... competences such as principles of clinical pharmacology, knowledge, skill and critical. 1 judgement, among ...

  8. Pitfalls in diagnosing brain death in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffol, G.J.; Lansky, L.L.; Hughes, J.R.; Blend, M.J.; Pavel, D.G.; Kecskes, S.A.; Ortega, R.E.; Tan, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    A 3-year-old child with phenotypic trisomy 18 syndrome survived 26 days after a cardiopulmonary arrest, secondary to an acute viral illness. The child was deeply comatose. No barbiturates, other sedatives, or aminoglycoside antibiotics had been recently administered. The child was normothermic with adequate cardiovascular function. Brain stem function was absent, as assessed by testing of brain stem reflexes. Serial cerebral radionuclide angiograms (CRAG) documented intact cerebral blood flow while electrocerebral silence (ECS) was present on two consecutive EEG recordings within 24 hours. Preservation of intracranial circulation was confirmed by rapid rotational computed tomographic (CT) scans. Cranial CT scans also revealed communicating hydrocephalus, and bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhages. This unusual case illustrates discordance between apparent irreversible loss of cortical function as indicated by electrocerebral silence with preserved cerebral blood flow. The implications of these apparent paradoxical events will be discussed in the context of defining brain death in children

  9. Herpetological Monitoring Using a Pitfall Trapping Design in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert; Stokes, Drew; Rochester, Carlton; Brehme, Cheryl; Hathaway, Stacie; Case, Ted

    2008-01-01

    The steps necessary to conduct a pitfall trapping survey for small terrestrial vertebrates are presented. Descriptions of the materials needed and the methods to build trapping equipment from raw materials are discussed. Recommended data collection techniques are given along with suggested data fields. Animal specimen processing procedures, including toe- and scale-clipping, are described for lizards, snakes, frogs, and salamanders. Methods are presented for conducting vegetation surveys that can be used to classify the environment associated with each pitfall trap array. Techniques for data storage and presentation are given based on commonly use computer applications. As with any study, much consideration should be given to the study design and methods before beginning any data collection effort.

  10. Avoiding Pitfalls in the Statistical Analysis of Heterogeneous Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith-Anne W. Chapman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about tumors is usually obtained from a single assessment of a tumor sample, performed at some point in the course of the development and progression of the tumor, with patient characteristics being surrogates for natural history context. Differences between cells within individual tumors (intratumor heterogeneity and between tumors of different patients (intertumor heterogeneity may mean that a small sample is not representative of the tumor as a whole, particularly for solid tumors which are the focus of this paper. This issue is of increasing importance as high-throughput technologies generate large multi-feature data sets in the areas of genomics, proteomics, and image analysis. Three potential pitfalls in statistical analysis are discussed (sampling, cut-points, and validation and suggestions are made about how to avoid these pitfalls.

  11. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: Odds versus risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Priya; Aggarwal, Rakesh; Pramesh, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    In biomedical research, we are often interested in quantifying the relationship between an exposure and an outcome. “Odds” and “Risk” are the most common terms which are used as measures of association between variables. In this article, which is the fourth in the series of common pitfalls in statistical analysis, we explain the meaning of risk and odds and the difference between the two. PMID:26623395

  12. Importance and pitfalls of molecular analysis to parasite epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, Clare C

    2003-08-01

    Molecular tools are increasingly being used to address questions about parasite epidemiology. Parasites represent a diverse group and they might not fit traditional population genetic models. Testing hypotheses depends equally on correct sampling, appropriate tool and/or marker choice, appropriate analysis and careful interpretation. All methods of analysis make assumptions which, if violated, make the results invalid. Some guidelines to avoid common pitfalls are offered here.

  13. Using demographic data to better interpret pitfall trap catches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Matalin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of pitfall trapping are often interpreted as abundance in a particular habitat. At the same time, there are numerous cases of almost unrealistically high catches of ground beetles in seemingly unsuitable sites. The correlation of catches by pitfall trapping with the true distribution and abundance of Carabidae needs corroboration. During a full year survey in 2006/07 in the Lake Elton region (Volgograd Area, Russia, 175 species of ground beetles were trapped. Considering the differences in demographic structure of the local populations, and not their abundances, three groups of species were recognized: residents, migrants and sporadic. In residents, the demographic structure of local populations is complete, and their habitats can be considered “residential”. In migrants and sporadic species, the demographic structure of the local populations is incomplete, and their habitats can be considered “transit”. Residents interact both with their prey and with each other in a particular habitat. Sporadic species are hardly important to a carabid community because of their low abundances. The contribution of migrants to the structure of carabid communities is not apparent and requires additional research. Migrants and sporadic species represent a “labile” component in ground beetles communities, as opposed to a “stable” component, represented by residents. The variability of the labile component substantially limits our interpretation of species diversity in carabid communities. Thus, the criteria for determining the most abundant, or dominant species inevitably vary because the abundance of migrants in some cases can be one order of magnitude higher than that of residents. The results of pitfall trapping adequately reflect the state of carabid communities only in zonal habitats, while azonal and disturbed habitats are merely transit ones for many species of ground beetles. A study of the demographic structure of local

  14. Using demographic data to better interpret pitfall trap catches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalin, Andrey V; Makarov, Kirill V

    2011-01-01

    The results of pitfall trapping are often interpreted as abundance in a particular habitat. At the same time, there are numerous cases of almost unrealistically high catches of ground beetles in seemingly unsuitable sites. The correlation of catches by pitfall trapping with the true distribution and abundance of Carabidae needs corroboration. During a full year survey in 2006/07 in the Lake Elton region (Volgograd Area, Russia), 175 species of ground beetles were trapped. Considering the differences in demographic structure of the local populations, and not their abundances, three groups of species were recognized: residents, migrants and sporadic. In residents, the demographic structure of local populations is complete, and their habitats can be considered "residential". In migrants and sporadic species, the demographic structure of the local populations is incomplete, and their habitats can be considered "transit". Residents interact both with their prey and with each other in a particular habitat. Sporadic species are hardly important to a carabid community because of their low abundances. The contribution of migrants to the structure of carabid communities is not apparent and requires additional research. Migrants and sporadic species represent a "labile" component in ground beetles communities, as opposed to a "stable" component, represented by residents. The variability of the labile component substantially limits our interpretation of species diversity in carabid communities. Thus, the criteria for determining the most abundant, or dominant species inevitably vary because the abundance of migrants in some cases can be one order of magnitude higher than that of residents. The results of pitfall trapping adequately reflect the state of carabid communities only in zonal habitats, while azonal and disturbed habitats are merely transit ones for many species of ground beetles. A study of the demographic structure of local populations and assessment of the

  15. Advantages and pitfalls of South Africa-Angola strategic alliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Vogel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Owing to a shortage of South African research focusing on international strategic alliances, this study aimed to determine whether the advantages and pitfalls of international strategic alliances referred to in international business publications are also applicable to South African international strategic alliances. Design/Methodology/Approach: This was a formal, empirical study that targeted the 163 South African enterprises which were members of the South African-Angolan Chamber of Commerce in 2005 and 2006. Findings: The results identified joint ventures as the most prominent mode of entry when expanding into developing countries and, with few exceptions, the findings support the advantages and pitfalls of international strategic alliances identified in other international publications. Value of the research: A great deal of international management research over the years has been focused on the importance of strategic alliances as a mode of entry, as well as on the pitfalls experienced by alliance partners, particularly in developed countries. However, the lack of such research in Africa in general and South Africa in particular means that South African enterprises must base their entry mode selection on non-South African research findings, and although this sample size was small, the lack of other Africa-specific research makes this research significant. Implications: With South Africa being the largest source of FDI into the rest of Africa, the findings of this paper show that South African enterprises can attain the advantages associated with international strategic alliances when using this mode of entry into Africa. In terms of pitfalls, the findings highlight the need for multinational enterprises to pay specific attention to the role of governments when forming strategic alliances.

  16. The 253-kb inversion and deep intronic mutations in UNC13D are present in North American patients with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yaping; Johnson, Judith A; Connor, Jessica A; Valencia, C Alexander; Barasa, Nathaniel; Schubert, Jeffery; Husami, Ammar; Kissell, Diane; Zhang, Ge; Weirauch, Matthew T; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Zhang, Kejian

    2014-06-01

    The mutations in UNC13D are responsible for familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) type 3. A 253-kb inversion and two deep intronic mutations, c.118-308C > T and c.118-307G > A, in UNC13D were recently reported in European and Asian FHL3 patients. We sought to determine the prevalence of these three non-coding mutations in North American FHL patients and evaluate the significance of examining these new mutations in genetic testing. We performed DNA sequencing of UNC13D and targeted analysis of these three mutations in 1,709 North American patients with a suspected clinical diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The 253-kb inversion, intronic mutations c.118-308C > T and c.118-307G > A were found in 11, 15, and 4 patients, respectively, in which the genetic basis (bi-allelic mutations) explained 25 additional patients. Taken together with previously diagnosed FHL3 patients in our HLH patient registry, these three non-coding mutations were found in 31.6% (25/79) of the FHL3 patients. The 253-kb inversion, c.118-308C > T and c.118-307G > A accounted for 7.0%, 8.9%, and 1.3% of mutant alleles, respectively. Significantly, eight novel mutations in UNC13D are being reported in this study. To further evaluate the expression level of the newly reported intronic mutation c.118-307G > A, reverse transcription PCR and Western blot analysis revealed a significant reduction of both RNA and protein levels suggesting that the c.118-307G > A mutation affects transcription. These specified non-coding mutations were found in a significant number of North American patients and inclusion of them in mutation analysis will improve the molecular diagnosis of FHL3. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 and bone therapy: successes and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Bonnie; Kha, Tram; Tran, Sally; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-02-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), more specifically BMP-2, are being increasingly used in orthopaedic surgery due to advanced research into osteoinductive factors that may enhance and improve bone therapy. There are many areas in therapy that BMP-2 is being applied to, including dental treatment, open tibial fractures, cancer and spinal surgery. Within these areas of treatment, there are many reports of successes and pitfalls. This review explores the use of BMP-2 and its successes, pitfalls and future prospects in bone therapy. The PubMed database was consulted to compile this review. With successes in therapy, there were descriptions of a more rapid healing time with no signs of rejection or infection attributed to BMP-2 treatment. Pitfalls included BMP-2 'off-label' use, which lead to various adverse effects. Our search highlighted that optimising treatment with BMP-2 is a direction that many researchers are exploring, with areas of current research interest including concentration and dose of BMP-2, carrier type and delivery. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Methodological pitfalls in early detection studies–the NAPE Lecture 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svein, Friis; Tor Ketil, Larsen; Melle, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Identifies and discusses methodological pitfalls that may help explain why many questions around early detection (ED) and duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) are still unsolved. This paper concentrates on pitfalls in sampling, measurement, and data analyses. The main problems seem to be: (1) Sa...... to identify the pitfalls, and to estimate and discuss their influence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)...

  19. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of biallelic PMS2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelo, Marina; Milito, Daniela; Rhees, Jennifer; Roca, Enrique; Barugel, Miguel; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Moreira, Leticia; Leoz, Maria Liz; Carballal, Sabela; Ocaña, Teresa; Pellisé, Maria; Castells, Antoni; Boland, C Richard; Goel, Ajay; Balaguer, Francesc

    2015-09-01

    Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency (CMMR-D) syndrome is an inherited childhood cancer syndrome due to bi-allelic mutations in one of the four DNA mismatch repair genes involved in Lynch syndrome. The tumor spectrum of this syndrome includes hematological, brain and Lynch syndrome associated malignancies, with an increased risk of synchronous and metachronous cancers, and signs of Neurofibromatosis type-1 syndrome such as café-au-lait macules during the first three decades of life. Here, we report the first Argentinian patient with CMMR-D syndrome, focusing on her history of cancer and gastrointestinal manifestations, and the challenging molecular algorithm to finally reach her diagnosis.

  20. astrocytoma – diagnostic pitfalls. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Matyja

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs are the most frequent primary astroglial tumours affecting children and adolescents. They occur sporadically or in association with a genetically determined syndrome – neurofibromatosis type 1. Classic PA usually manifests as a well-circumscribed, often cystic, slowly growing tumour, which corresponds to WHO grade I. The majority of pilocytic tumours arise along the neuraxis, predominantly in the cerebellum. They are associated with favourable long-term outcome or spontaneous regression, even after incomplete resection. However, the behaviour and prognosis might also be related to tumour histology and location. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA represents a variant of classical PA with more invasive growth and increased risk of recurrences and dissemination. Typically, PAs exhibit distinct histology with biphasic architecture of loose, microcystic and compact, fibrillary areas. However, some tumours arise in an uncommon location and display heterogeneous histopathological appearance. The morphological pattern of PA can mimic some other glial neoplasms, including oligodendroglioma, pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, ependymoma or diffuse astrocytoma. Not infrequently, the advanced degenerative changes, including vascular fibrosis, and recent and old haemorrhages, may mimic vascular pathology. Sometimes, the neoplastic piloid tissue can resemble reactive gliosis, related to long-standing non neoplastic lesions. Not infrequently, PA exhibits histological features typical for anaplasia, including necrosis, mitoses and glomeruloid vascular proliferation that can suggest a diffuse high-grade glioma. However, even those PAs that lack distinct histological features of anaplasia can behave unpredictably, in a more aggressive manner, with leptomeningeal spreading. Genetic alterations resulting in aberrant signalling of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway have been considered to underlie the development of PAs. The most

  1. Lynch Syndrome: Female Genital Tract Cancer Diagnosis and Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Anne M; Longacre, Teri A

    2016-06-01

    Lynch syndrome is responsible for approximately 5% of endometrial cancers and 1% of ovarian cancers. The molecular basis for Lynch syndrome is a heritable functional deficiency in the DNA mismatch repair system, typically due to a germline mutation. This review discusses the rationales and relative merits of current Lynch syndrome screening tests for endometrial and ovarian cancers and provides pathologists with an informed algorithmic approach to Lynch syndrome testing in gynecologic cancers. Pitfalls in test interpretation and strategies to resolve discordant test results are presented. The potential role for next-generation sequencing panels in future screening efforts is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosis of hepatic iron overload: a family study illustrating pitfalls in diagnosing hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranz, Melanie; Talasz, Heribert; Graziadei, Ivo; Winder, Thomas; Sergi, Consolato; Bogner, Klaus; Vogel, Wolfgang; Zoller, Heinz

    2009-03-01

    Recent identification of genetic variants in iron storage disease has changed the classification system and diagnostic algorithms for hemochromatosis. Clinical diagnosis of the disease requires phenotypic evidence of iron overload because the commonly disease-associated HFE genotypes have an incomplete penetrance. Furthermore, approximately 20% of patients with a clinical diagnosis of hemochromatosis have no disease-associated genotype, which underlines the importance of clear phenotypic criteria of hemochromatosis. A diagnosis of hemochromatosis cannot be made even in patients with liver cirrhosis simply on the basis of genetic testing that indicates that iron overload is the cause of the disease and not its consequence. Proper diagnosis requires integration of clinical presentation, family history, and the results of biochemical and histopathologic tests. Here we propose a rational diagnostic algorithm for hepatic iron overload syndromes and illustrate potential pitfalls by presenting a family study in a pedigree with rare HFE variants (H63D and E168Q), in cis on the same chromosome. Although the clinical suspicion of hemochromatosis was confirmed by histology, chemical analysis of liver tissue revealed a normal hepatic iron concentration, which is compatible with the genetic finding of 1 normal and 1 doubly mutated allele. In conclusion, clinical suspicion of hemochromatosis and elevated serum iron parameters should prompt HFE genotyping for C282Y and H63D. Should they be uninformative, further genetic tests should be recommended only if iron overload in liver tissue has been confirmed chemically.

  3. Pathways, Pitfalls and Opportunities in Partnerships for Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David; Vanhill, Josefine; Wolf, Andreas

    The municipal solid waste management systems of many developing countries are commonly constrained by factors such as limited financial resources and poor governance, making it a difficult proposition to break with complex, entrenched and unsustainable technologies and systems. This paper...... some lessons in such partnership building: In Uganda and Denmark respectively, the World Wildlife Fund and the network-administrating organization access2innovation have attempted to mobilize stakeholders around improving the municipal solid waste system in the rural district capital of Kasese. Through...... a municipal solid waste system characterization and mapping exercise, some emergent lessons and guiding principles in partnership building point to both pitfalls and opportunities for designing sustainable pathways....

  4. Gallium uptake in myositis ossificans. Potential pitfalls in diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzman, L.; Lee, V.W.; Grant, P.

    1987-01-01

    Seven cases of gallium uptake in myositis ossificans are described. Gallium scans are done frequently in paraplegics, quadriplegics, and comatose patients to look for occult infection. It is important to be aware of possible gallium uptake in myositis ossificans, particularly in the extremities, which is frequent in these patients. Gallium uptake may be present prior to any abnormalities seen on plain films or CT scans. It is important to correlate roentgenograms with abnormal gallium scans, particularly in the extremities, to avoid potential pitfalls in diagnosis and prevent unnecessary antibiotic treatment. A bone scan should be obtained whenever possible, particularly when roentgenograms are negative, to confirm the diagnosis

  5. Pitfalls in VAR based return decompositions: A clarification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard; Tanggaard, Carsten

    in their analysis is not "cashflow news" but "inter- est rate news" which should not be zero. Consequently, in contrast to what Chen and Zhao claim, their decomposition does not serve as a valid caution against VAR based decompositions. Second, we point out that in order for VAR based decompositions to be valid......Based on Chen and Zhao's (2009) criticism of VAR based return de- compositions, we explain in detail the various limitations and pitfalls involved in such decompositions. First, we show that Chen and Zhao's interpretation of their excess bond return decomposition is wrong: the residual component...

  6. Cultural Diversity in Nursing Education: Perils, Pitfalls, and Pearls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Hedi; Schim, Stephanie; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2010-01-01

    Increasing diversity in the classroom challenges nursing educators to identify issues that complicate teaching (perils), analyze barriers for themselves and their students (pitfalls), and select new strategies for working with nontraditional students (pearls). This article identifies concerns arising from attitudes and values within nursing and common approaches to diversity education, and then discusses key issues in nursing education that relate to human nature, culture, faculty workload, and student demographics. Finally, some strategies are proposed for increasing the effectiveness of professional preparation with diverse students through a focus on culturally congruent education and development of faculty cultural competence. PMID:20143759

  7. The seven common pitfalls of customer service in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Rene T

    2015-01-01

    Operating simultaneously like a repair shop, prison, and hotel, hospitals are prone to seven common pitfalls in customer service. Patient care is often fragmented, inscrutable, inflexible, insensitive, reactive, myopic, and unsafe. Hospitals are vying to be more high-tech, rather than high-touch even though staff engagement with patients rather than facilities and equipment strongly influence patient satisfaction. Unless processes, policies, and people are made customer-centered, the high quality of the hospital's human and hardware resources will not translate into high patient satisfaction and patient loyalty.

  8. Architectural anthropology – potentials and pitfalls of mixing disciplines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    approaches to e.g. understand and involve users, clients and citizens. Several other disciplines currently also approach and embrace anthropological methods, and new sub-disciplines such as design anthropology, architectural anthropology, business anthropology and techno-anthropology have emerged...... these cross-disciplinary and applied settings, and how it may contribute to anthropology in general. Based on research and teaching in the field of architectural anthropology, the paper discuss the potentials and pitfalls of mixing approaches from the two disciplines using examples of architects’ approaches...

  9. The pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Naoki; Kodama, Takashi; Hatano, K.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows higher radiation dose to be focused to the target volumes while minimizing the dose to OAR. To start of clinical treatment in IMRTvwe must perform commissioning strictly than 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT). In this report, pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy were reviewed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) offsets and MLC transmissions are important parameters in commissioning of RTPS for IMRT. Correction of depth scaling and fluence scaling is necessary for dose measurement using solid phantom. (author)

  10. Social media and professional identity: Pitfalls and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, Andrew; Smithson, William Henry; Spain, Eimear

    2018-02-01

    Social media developments have completely changed how information is accessed and communicated. While great potential exists with these platforms, recent reports of online unprofessional behavior by doctors has threatened the medical professional identity; a matter of critical importance for clinicians and medical educators. This paper outlines a role for social media in facilitating support for clinicians and medical teachers; it will raise awareness of pitfalls and explain ethical and legal guidelines. An analysis of inappropriate behaviors and conflicting attitudes regarding what is acceptable in online posts, including the inter-generational contrast in online presence and perceptions of where the boundaries lie. Guidance documents are analyzed and potentially confusing and conflicting statements are identified and clarified. The authors believe that clinicians and medical students must follow ethical imperatives in both personal and professional spheres. It is essential that medical educational and professional bodies encourage clinicians to support one another and share information online while providing clear legal and ethical advice on maintaining standards and avoiding common pitfalls. Education on the responsible use of social media and associated risk awareness should be a priority for medical school curricula.

  11. Pitfalls of CITES Implementation in Nepal: A Policy Gap Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongol, Yogesh; Heinen, Joel T.

    2012-08-01

    Implementation of policy involves multiple agencies operating at multiple levels in facilitating processes and actions to accomplish desired results. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) was developed and implemented to regulate and control international wildlife trade, but violations of the agreement are widespread and growing worldwide, including in Nepal. This study attempts to understand how domestic CITES policies are translated into action and what effect actions and processes have on compliance. In doing so, this study provides insights into the implementation and enforcement pitfalls of national legislation that explain CITES violations in Nepal. Primarily, we used 26 key informants interviews to learn opinions of experts, and the grounded theory approach for further qualitative data analysis. In addition, we used Najman's (1995) policy implementation analysis framework to explain gaps. Many interrelated variables in the content of the policy, commitment and capacity of the agencies, the roles of clients and coalitions and contextual issues were observed. Variables that emerged suggest pitfalls in the regulatory policy represented by low probability of detection, arrest and punishment. Moreover, redistributive policies in buffer zones of protected areas are needed into perpetuity to benefit locals. Also, conservation organizations' support for building public and political salience is imperative.

  12. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines for rhabdomyosarcoma research: Utility and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley R.P. Hinson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite intergroup clinical trials conducted in Europe and North America, outcomes for high risk patients with this disease have not significantly improved in the last several decades, and survival of metastatic or relapsed disease remains extremely poor. Accrual into new clinical trials is slow and difficult, so in vitro cell line research and in vivo xenograft models present an attractive alternative for preclinical research for this cancer type. Currently, 30 commonly used human RMS cell lines exist, with differing origins, karyotypes, histologies, and methods of validation. Selecting an appropriate cell line for RMS research has important implications for outcomes. There are also potential pitfalls in using certain cell lines including contamination with murine stromal cells, cross-contamination between cell lines, discordance between the cell line and its associated original tumor, imposter cell lines, and nomenclature errors that result in the circulation of two or more presumed unique cell lines that are actually from the same origin. These pitfalls can be avoided by testing for species-specific isoenzymes, microarray analysis, assays for subtype-specific fusion products, and short tandem repeat analysis.

  13. Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines for Rhabdomyosarcoma Research: Utility and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Ashley R. P.; Jones, Rosanne; Crose, Lisa E. S.; Belyea, Brian C.; Barr, Frederic G.; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite intergroup clinical trials conducted in Europe and North America, outcomes for high risk patients with this disease have not significantly improved in the last several decades, and survival of metastatic or relapsed disease remains extremely poor. Accrual into new clinical trials is slow and difficult, so in vitro cell-line research and in vivo xenograft models present an attractive alternative for preclinical research for this cancer type. Currently, 30 commonly used human RMS cell lines exist, with differing origins, karyotypes, histologies, and methods of validation. Selecting an appropriate cell line for RMS research has important implications for outcomes. There are also potential pitfalls in using certain cell lines including contamination with murine stromal cells, cross-contamination between cell lines, discordance between the cell line and its associated original tumor, imposter cell lines, and nomenclature errors that result in the circulation of two or more presumed unique cell lines that are actually from the same origin. These pitfalls can be avoided by testing for species-specific isoenzymes, microarray analysis, assays for subtype-specific fusion products, and short tandem repeat analysis. PMID:23882450

  14. Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae and low back pain: diagnostic pitfalls and management of Bertolotti's syndrome Dor lombar associada à vértebra de transição lombossacra: dificuldades no diagnóstico e manejo da síndrome de Bertolotti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Benzecry de Almeida

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Bertolotti's syndrome is a spine disorder characterized by the occurrence of a congenital lumbar transverse mega-apophysis in a transitional vertebral body that usually articulates with the sacrum or the iliac bone. It has been considered a possible cause of low back pain. METHOD: We analyzed the cases of Bertolotti's syndrome that failed clinical treatment and reviewed the literature concerning this subject. RESULTS: Five patients in our series had severe low back pain due to the neo-articulation and two of them were successfully submitted to surgical resection of the transverse mega-apophysis. Taking into account the clinical and surgical experience acquired with these cases, we propose a diagnostic-therapeutic algorithm. CONCLUSION: There is still no consensus about the most appropriate therapy for Bertolotti's syndrome. In patients in whom the mega-apophysis itself may be the source of back pain, surgical resection may be a safe and effective procedure.OBJETIVO: A síndrome de Bertolotti é uma desordem congênita da coluna vertebral caracterizada pela ocorrência de uma mega-apófise transversa lombar em uma vértebra de aspecto transicional, que geralmente se articula com o sacro ou com o osso ilíaco. Tal síndrome tem sido considerada possível causa de dor lombar. MÉTODO: Análise dos casos de síndrome de Bertolotti que apresentavam dor lombar sem melhora com tratamento conservador e revisão dos artigos publicados. RESULTADOS: Foram revisados cinco pacientes que não apresentaram melhora com o tratamento clínico, sendo que dois foram submetidos à ressecção cirúrgica da mega-apófise transversa. Considerando a experiência adquirida com estes casos, os autores propõem um algoritmo para diagnóstico e tratamento da Síndrome de Bertolotti. CONCLUSÃO: Ainda não há consenso sobre qual é a terapia mais apropriada para a Síndrome de Bertolotti. Em pacientes em que a mega-apófise parece ser a origem da lombalgia, a

  15. Successful management of a complicated clinical crisis: A patient with left-sided endocarditis and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a rare case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peipei; Zeng, Hui; Zhou, Min; Ouyang, Jian; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Qiguo

    2017-12-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) secondary to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE)-related left-sided infectious endocarditis had never been reported before. In the last decade, daptomycin, a novel lipopeptide antibiotic, showed its excellent role in anti-Gram-positive bacteria, including soft tissue infection, bloodstream and deep tissueinfection. An Asian women under sever condition due to the cooccurrence of HLH and MRSE-related endocarditis while also be allergic to vancomycin. The patient was cured by high-dose daptomycin monotheraphy, HLH-2004 protocol and cardiothoracic surgery to remove the valve at last, and was obviously benefit from the endeavor of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) strategy. IE was made on March 27according to the modified Duke criteria. HLH was diagnosed too. The patient was cured by high-dose daptomycin monotheraphy, HLH-2004 protocol and cardiothoracic surgery to remove the valve at last, and was obviously benefit from the endeavor of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) strategy. The patient was healthy andstable when we published this case. This case proves high-dose daptomycin monotheraphy could be used as an effective alternative regimen for vancomycin in treating MRSE-related left-sided endocarditis and highlight the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management for HLH. Furthermore, our work suggests an MDT model as a practical strategy in managing similar clinical situation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural and functional analysis of perforin mutations in association with clinical data of familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 2 (FHL2) patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Omer; Gursoy, Attila; Gurgey, Aytemiz; Keskin, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Perforin plays a key role in the immune system via pore formation at the target cell membrane in the elimination of virus-infected and transformed cells. A vast number of observed mutations in perforin impair this mechanism resulting in a rare but fatal disease, familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 2 (FHL2). Here we report a comprehensive in silico structural analysis of a collection of 76 missense perforin mutations based on a proposed pore model. In our model, perforin monomers oligomerize having cyclic symmetry in consistent with previously found experimental constraints yet having flexibility in the size of the pore and the number of monomers involved. Clusters of the mutations on the model map to three distinct functional regions of the perforin. Calculated stability (free energy) changes show that the mutations mainly destabilize the protein structure, interestingly however, A91V polymorphism, leads to a more stable one. Structural characteristics of mutations help explain the severe functional consequences on perforin deficient patients. Our study provides a structural approach to the mutation effects on the perforin oligomerization and impaired cytotoxic function in FHL2 patients. PMID:23592409

  17. Where Lies the Fault in Diagnosing Dhat Syndrome among Females? Understanding through a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Singh, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Dhat syndrome is a culture-bound syndrome of South-East Asia, common in young men. However, similar entity has also been described in female patients who attribute their symptoms to nonpathological or physiological vaginal discharge. The current diagnostic system for psychiatric illnesses does not encompass Dhat syndrome in females, and so these group of patients receive alternative diagnoses such as somatoform disorder or depression. As a result of which the focus of unique Dhat syndrome-centered management gets weakened, affecting the clinical outcome. This case study focuses on the diagnostic dilemmas related to Dhat syndrome in females and pitfalls in the current diagnostic system.

  18. MRI in Glioma Immunotherapy: Evidence, Pitfalls, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Aquino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudophenomena, that is, imaging alterations due to therapy rather than tumor evolution, have an important impact on the management of glioma patients and the results of clinical trials. RANO (response assessment in neurooncology criteria, including conventional MRI (cMRI, addressed the issues of pseudoprogression after radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy and pseudoresponse during antiangiogenic therapy of glioblastomas (GBM and other gliomas. The development of cancer immunotherapy forced the identification of further relevant response criteria, summarized by the iRANO working group in 2015. In spite of this, the unequivocal definition of glioma progression by cMRI remains difficult particularly in the setting of immunotherapy approaches provided by checkpoint inhibitors and dendritic cells. Advanced MRI (aMRI may in principle address this unmet clinical need. Here, we discuss the potential contribution of different aMRI techniques and their indications and pitfalls in relation to biological and imaging features of glioma and immune system interactions.

  19. Probabilistic language models in cognitive neuroscience: Promises and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armeni, Kristijan; Willems, Roel M; Frank, Stefan L

    2017-12-01

    Cognitive neuroscientists of language comprehension study how neural computations relate to cognitive computations during comprehension. On the cognitive part of the equation, it is important that the computations and processing complexity are explicitly defined. Probabilistic language models can be used to give a computationally explicit account of language complexity during comprehension. Whereas such models have so far predominantly been evaluated against behavioral data, only recently have the models been used to explain neurobiological signals. Measures obtained from these models emphasize the probabilistic, information-processing view of language understanding and provide a set of tools that can be used for testing neural hypotheses about language comprehension. Here, we provide a cursory review of the theoretical foundations and example neuroimaging studies employing probabilistic language models. We highlight the advantages and potential pitfalls of this approach and indicate avenues for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Avoiding common pitfalls in qualitative data collection and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, K L; McComish, J F; Greenberg, R

    2000-09-01

    The subjective nature of qualitative research necessitates scrupulous scientific methods to ensure valid results. Although qualitative methods such as grounded theory, phenomenology, and ethnography yield rich data, consumers of research need to be able to trust the findings reported in such studies. Researchers are responsible for establishing the trustworthiness of qualitative research through a variety of ways. Specific challenges faced in the field can seriously threaten the dependability of the data. However, by minimizing potential errors that can occur when doing fieldwork, researchers can increase the trustworthiness of the study. The purpose of this article is to present three of the pitfalls that can occur in qualitative research during data collection and transcription: equipment failure, environmental hazards, and transcription errors. Specific strategies to minimize the risk for avoidable errors will be discussed.

  1. Ecoinformatics (Big Data) for Agricultural Entomology: Pitfalls, Progress, and Promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheim, Jay A; Gratton, Claudio

    2017-01-31

    Ecoinformatics, as defined in this review, is the use of preexisting data sets to address questions in ecology. We provide the first review of ecoinformatics methods in agricultural entomology. Ecoinformatics methods have been used to address the full range of questions studied by agricultural entomologists, enabled by the special opportunities associated with data sets, nearly all of which have been observational, that are larger and more diverse and that embrace larger spatial and temporal scales than most experimental studies do. We argue that ecoinformatics research methods and traditional, experimental research methods have strengths and weaknesses that are largely complementary. We address the important interpretational challenges associated with observational data sets, highlight common pitfalls, and propose some best practices for researchers using these methods. Ecoinformatics methods hold great promise as a vehicle for capitalizing on the explosion of data emanating from farmers, researchers, and the public, as novel sampling and sensing techniques are developed and digital data sharing becomes more widespread.

  2. Multi-criteria decision analysis: Limitations, pitfalls, and practical difficulties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kujawski, Edouard

    2003-02-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics women's figure skating competition is used as a case study to illustrate some of the limitations, pitfalls, and practical difficulties of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA). The paper compares several widely used models for synthesizing the multiple attributes into a single aggregate value. The various MCDA models can provide conflicting rankings of the alternatives for a common set of information even under states of certainty. Analysts involved in MCDA need to deal with the following challenging tasks: (1) selecting an appropriate analysis method, and (2) properly interpreting the results. An additional trap is the availability of software tools that implement specific MCDA models that can beguile the user with quantitative scores. These conclusions are independent of the decision domain and they should help foster better MCDA practices in many fields including systems engineering trade studies.

  3. The neuroaesthetics of prose fiction: pitfalls, parameters and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of neuroaesthetic studies on prose fiction. This is in contrast to the very many impressive studies that have been conducted in recent times on the neuroaesthetics of sister arts such as painting, music and dance. Why might this be the case, what are its causes and, of greatest importance, how can it best be resolved? In this article, the pitfalls, parameters and prospects of a neuroaesthetics of prose fiction will be explored. The article itself is part critical review, part methodological proposal and part opinion paper. Its aim is simple: to stimulate, excite and energize thinking in the discipline as to how prose fiction might be fully integrated in the canon of neuroaesthetics and to point to opportunities where neuroimaging studies on literary discourse processing might be conducted in collaborative work bringing humanists and scientists together.

  4. [Pitfalls in international comparisons of health data and indices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Z; Shani, M

    1991-05-01

    Comparison of published data and health indices from different countries with different health systems is subject to many pitfalls. Comparison of national expenditure for health care based on purchasing power of the currency may be misleading if the purchasing power of the health services is ignored. Comparisons may also be misleading if they ignore national geographic and demographic structures. Government and health authorities often quote different sets of data and use different terminology and definitions. This article stresses the disparity in the definition of medical manpower and points out differences relating to ratios of manpower to population and to per capita spending. Also addressed is the importance of the qualitative and value aspects of health systems not usually involved in comparison of international health indices. In conclusion, safety measures and precautions such as choosing the right index for the right purpose, adjustment of indices to the purchasing power parity of health, demographics, etc., should be used when conducting health care analyses.

  5. Clinical and Biochemical Pitfalls in the Diagnosis of Peroxisomal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouwer, Femke C C; Huffnagel, Irene C; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Waterham, Hans R; Wanders, Ronald J A; Engelen, Marc; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2016-08-01

    Peroxisomal disorders are a heterogeneous group of genetic metabolic disorders, caused by a defect in peroxisome biogenesis or a deficiency of a single peroxisomal enzyme. The peroxisomal disorders include the Zellweger spectrum disorders, the rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata spectrum disorders, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and multiple single enzyme deficiencies. There are several core phenotypes caused by peroxisomal dysfunction that clinicians can recognize. The diagnosis is suggested by biochemical testing in blood and urine and confirmed by functional assays in cultured skin fibroblasts, followed by mutation analysis. This review describes the phenotype of the main peroxisomal disorders and possible pitfalls in (laboratory) diagnosis to aid clinicians in the recognition of this group of diseases. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Big data in sleep medicine: prospects and pitfalls in phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Matt T; Russo, Kathryn; Gabbidon, Harriett; Smith, Tiaundra; Goparaju, Balaji; Westover, M Brandon

    2017-01-01

    Clinical polysomnography (PSG) databases are a rich resource in the era of “big data” analytics. We explore the uses and potential pitfalls of clinical data mining of PSG using statistical principles and analysis of clinical data from our sleep center. We performed retrospective analysis of self-reported and objective PSG data from adults who underwent overnight PSG (diagnostic tests, n=1835). Self-reported symptoms overlapped markedly between the two most common categories, insomnia and sleep apnea, with the majority reporting symptoms of both disorders. Standard clinical metrics routinely reported on objective data were analyzed for basic properties (missing values, distributions), pairwise correlations, and descriptive phenotyping. Of 41 continuous variables, including clinical and PSG derived, none passed testing for normality. Objective findings of sleep apnea and periodic limb movements were common, with 51% having an apnea–hypopnea index (AHI) >5 per hour and 25% having a leg movement index >15 per hour. Different visualization methods are shown for common variables to explore population distributions. Phenotyping methods based on clinical databases are discussed for sleep architecture, sleep apnea, and insomnia. Inferential pitfalls are discussed using the current dataset and case examples from the literature. The increasing availability of clinical databases for large-scale analytics holds important promise in sleep medicine, especially as it becomes increasingly important to demonstrate the utility of clinical testing methods in management of sleep disorders. Awareness of the strengths, as well as caution regarding the limitations, will maximize the productive use of big data analytics in sleep medicine. PMID:28243157

  7. Designing sensory-substitution devices: Principles, pitfalls and potential1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Árni; Moldoveanu, Alin; Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Balan, Oana; Spagnol, Simone; Valgeirsdóttir, Vigdís Vala; Unnthorsson, Rúnar

    2016-09-21

    An exciting possibility for compensating for loss of sensory function is to augment deficient senses by conveying missing information through an intact sense. Here we present an overview of techniques that have been developed for sensory substitution (SS) for the blind, through both touch and audition, with special emphasis on the importance of training for the use of such devices, while highlighting potential pitfalls in their design. One example of a pitfall is how conveying extra information about the environment risks sensory overload. Related to this, the limits of attentional capacity make it important to focus on key information and avoid redundancies. Also, differences in processing characteristics and bandwidth between sensory systems severely constrain the information that can be conveyed. Furthermore, perception is a continuous process and does not involve a snapshot of the environment. Design of sensory substitution devices therefore requires assessment of the nature of spatiotemporal continuity for the different senses. Basic psychophysical and neuroscientific research into representations of the environment and the most effective ways of conveying information should lead to better design of sensory substitution systems. Sensory substitution devices should emphasize usability, and should not interfere with other inter- or intramodal perceptual function. Devices should be task-focused since in many cases it may be impractical to convey too many aspects of the environment. Evidence for multisensory integration in the representation of the environment suggests that researchers should not limit themselves to a single modality in their design. Finally, we recommend active training on devices, especially since it allows for externalization, where proximal sensory stimulation is attributed to a distinct exterior object.

  8. Assessing Brain–Muscle Connectivity in Human Locomotion through Mobile Brain/Body Imaging: Opportunities, Pitfalls, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Gennaro

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of the cortical role during bipedalism has been a methodological challenge. While surface electroencephalography (EEG is capable of non-invasively measuring cortical activity during human locomotion, it is associated with movement artifacts obscuring cerebral sources of activity. Recently, statistical methods based on blind source separation revealed potential for resolving this issue, by segregating non-cerebral/artifactual from cerebral sources of activity. This step marked a new opportunity for the investigation of the brains’ role while moving and was tagged mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI. This methodology involves simultaneous mobile recording of brain activity with several other body behavioral variables (e.g., muscle activity and kinematics, through wireless recording wearable devices/sensors. Notably, several MoBI studies using EEG–EMG approaches recently showed that the brain is functionally connected to the muscles and active throughout the whole gait cycle and, thus, rejecting the long-lasting idea of a solely spinal-driven bipedalism. However, MoBI and brain/muscle connectivity assessments during human locomotion are still in their fledgling state of investigation. Mobile brain/body imaging approaches hint toward promising opportunities; however, there are some remaining pitfalls that need to be resolved before considering their routine clinical use. This article discusses several of these pitfalls and proposes research to address them. Examples relate to the validity, reliability, and reproducibility of this method in ecologically valid scenarios and in different populations. Furthermore, whether brain/muscle connectivity within the MoBI framework represents a potential biomarker in neuromuscular syndromes where gait disturbances are evident (e.g., age-related sarcopenia remains to be determined.

  9. Subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with polycythemia vera and factor V Leiden mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simsek, S; Verheesen, RV; Haagsma, EB; Lourens, J

    We describe a 48-year-old caucasian woman with a subacute Budd-Chiari syndrome attributed to the presence of polycythaemia vera, heterozygosity for the factor V Leiden mutation and the use of an oral contraceptive pill. Two diagnostic pitfalls were encountered. First, on CT scanning of the abdomen

  10. Post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis or an impostor: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsayan, Anant; Pateva, Irina; Cabral, Linda; Dalal, Jignesh; Abu-Arja, Rolla

    2018-03-25

    HLH occurring after HSCT is a relatively rare disease. Many conditions may mimic or trigger HLH in post-HSCT period (eg, cytokine release syndrome, engraftment syndrome, graft rejection/failure, acute graft-vs-host disease, infections systemic inflammatory response syndrome/sepsis, and thrombotic microangiopathy). Moreover, this period is usually marked by febrile illness, cytopenia, and a "cytokine storm" leading to elevation of inflammatory biomarkers like ferritin and sCD25. These parameters overlap with the diagnostic criteria for HLH. Such confounding factors make the management of post-HSCT HLH quite challenging. We illustrate this critical issue with case report of a patient who was diagnosed with HLH after allogeneic HSCT for tAML. He received MP and CsA for HLH but VP-16 was not administered due to fear of severe myelosuppression. Fortunately, he responded well to treatment and remains in remission to date. We recommend caution while using HLH-94/HLH-2004 guidelines for the diagnosis and management of post-HSCT HLH. In this article, we pinpoint these issues with a brief review of all the pediatric cases and clinical studies of post-HSCT HLH along with a critical evaluation of its various diagnostic criteria. Finally, based on the limitations of current diagnostic criteria, we suggest a need for formulating disease-specific diagnostic criteria for post-HSCT HLH. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Pitfalls in Persuasion: How Do Users Experience Persuasive Techniques in a Web Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerståhl, Katarina; Kotro, Tanja; Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila, Kaisa

    Persuasive technologies are designed by utilizing a variety of interactive techniques that are believed to promote target behaviors. This paper describes a field study in which the aim was to discover possible pitfalls of persuasion, i.e., situations in which persuasive techniques do not function as expected. The study investigated persuasive functionality of a web service targeting weight loss. A qualitative online questionnaire was distributed through the web service and a total of 291 responses were extracted for interpretative analysis. The Persuasive Systems Design model (PSD) was used for supporting systematic analysis of persuasive functionality. Pitfalls were identified through situations that evoked negative user experiences. The primary pitfalls discovered were associated with manual logging of eating and exercise behaviors, appropriateness of suggestions and source credibility issues related to social facilitation. These pitfalls, when recognized, can be addressed in design by applying functional and facilitative persuasive techniques in meaningful combinations.

  12. Limitations and pitfalls of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC (Tektrotyd) scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Ildikó; Barna, Sandor; Nagy, Gabor; Forgacs, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Tektrotyd kit was developed by Polatom company for 99mTc labeling to make an alternative tracer of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy available. Since 2005, 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide has been used in clinical imaging and achieved high impact in management of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. Knowing the limitations and pitfalls is essential to provide ac-curate diagnosis. Therefore, the potential pitfalls associated with the use of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC are reviewed on the basis of own experience. Data were analyzed of 310 patients who underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 99mTc-Tektrotyd. Pitfalls during radiolabeling process or acquisition can worsen the sensitivity of SRS (somatostatin receptor scintigraphy). Recognizing physi-ological and clinical pitfalls, the diagnostic accuracy will improve.

  13. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  14. Pitfalls in the MR diagnosis of primary malignant bone tumors; Pitfalls in der MR-Diagnostik primaer maligner Knochentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, T.R. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteologie; Imhof, H.; Breitenseher, M.J. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteologie]|[Wien Univ. (Austria). Einrichtung UOG Magnetic Resonanz; Dominkus, M. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria)

    1998-06-01

    MRI has gained an undisputed place in the evaluation of malignant bone tumors, not only for verifying results of conventional radiography and clarifying differential diagnoses; it has also become increasingly important for the assessment of the malignant/benign nature of the tumor, its growth rate, definition of adequate sites for biopsy, local preoperative staging, and evaluation of the response to chemotherapy. However, several pitfalls have to be observed regarding choice of technical parameters (coils, sequences, imaging planes), tissue differentiation, and tumor staging. When staging malignant tumors, critical aspects which have to be observed are tumor extension, integrity of the cortical bone, soft tissue components, infiltration of a joint or neurovascular bundle. The use of contrast agents provides important additional information but can also give rise to misinterpretations. Thus, all features of a tumor have to be observed in order to establish a final diagnosis. Particular difficulties can occur with the interpretation of MR images of osteomyelitis, osteoid osteoma, stress and insufficiency fractures, bone infarcts, myositis ossificans, hemangiomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei der Diagnostik von malignen Knochentumoren hat die MRT einen fixen Platz nicht nur in der Verifikation der Nativdiagnostik und der Differentialdiagnostik, sondern zunehmende Bedeutung bei der primaeren Beurteilung von Dignitaet und Wachstumsgeschwindigkeit, Definition einer geeigneten Biopsiestelle, beim lokoregionaeren, praeoperativen Staging und der Evaluation des Ansprechens auf Chemotherapie. Zahlreiche Pitfalls finden sich jedoch bei der Wahl der technischen Parameter (Spulen, Sequenzen, Schichtebenen), der Tumordifferenzierung und beim Staging von malignen Tumoren. Beim Staging sind die kritischen Punkte die Beurteilung von Tumorausdehnung, Integritaet der Kortikalis, Vorhandensein einer Weichteilkomponente, Infiltration eines Gelenks oder des

  15. Clinical characteristics and genetic analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a Japanese retrospective study by the Kyushu-Yamaguchi Children's Cancer Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritake, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Sachiyo; Nunoi, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Hideki; Suminoe, Aiko; Inada, Hiroko; Inagaki, Jiro; Yanai, Fumio; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Shimomura, Maiko; Itonaga, Nobuyoshi; Hotta, Noriko; Hidaka, Yasufumi; Ohara, Osamu; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Nakajima, Noriko; Okamura, Jun; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2014-07-01

    This present study sought to analyze acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) registered in Kyushu-Yamaguchi Children's Cancer Study Group studies conducted between 1996 and 2007. Four of 357 patients, including two of 318 patients with B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) and two of 39 of those with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), were identified. HLH was observed more frequently in the T-ALL patients than in the BCP-ALL patients (P = 0.061). The mean age of 13.0 years at the diagnosis of leukemia in the HLH + ALL group was significantly higher than the 6.05 years observed in the remaining ALL groups (P = 0.001). A female predisposition was noted, as all four patients were female (P = 0.043). In two of four patients, the leukemic cells exhibited deletions on the long arm of chromosome 6 (P = 0.003). Three patients suffered from HLH during maintenance therapy. Parvovirus B19 infection and cytomegalovirus reactivation were identified as causes of HLH in one and two patients, respectively. All four patients are currently in complete remission, although one developed relapse of leukemia after receiving maintenance therapy. Based on the genetic analyses, non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in UNC13D, syntaxin 11, and STXBP2 were identified in all patients. Clinicians should therefore be aware of the risk of HLH during maintenance therapy, especially in older T-ALL patients with SNPs in familial HLH causative genes.

  16. Clean Development Mechanism PDD Guidebook: Navigating the Pitfalls; 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-04-15

    This guidebook is designed to help readers navigate the pitfalls of preparing a Project Design Document (PDD) for Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects. This second edition also aims at helping project developers to navigate the pitfalls of preparing a Monitoring Report and be better prepared to face the verification process. The purpose of a PDD is to prepare project information for relevant stakeholders. These stakeholders include the investment community, the Designated Operating Entity (DOE) performing validation of the project, the CDM Executive Board (EB), the Designated National Authorities (DNA) of the involved countries and the local population. The PDD, together with the validation report and the approval letter of the DNA, are the basis for the registration of the project and its recognition as a credible CDM project. The PDD is about the project's design--that is, how the project intends to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions below those levels that would otherwise have been emitted1. Each and every CDM project is unique, from the project design to the application of even the simplest baseline methodology. Some of the projects submitted for validation may be very efficient in reducing emissions and score well in terms of economic, social and environmental benefits, but may still not qualify as CDM projects. Experience has shown that the information needed to judge the suitability of a project for the CDM is vast and can take months to assemble. Also, the time required to assemble relevant information increases with the number and diversity of stakeholders involved and the complexity of the information itself. The objective of the verification of emissions reduction is the review and ex post determination of the monitored emission reductions that have occurred during a specified verification period. The verification is about the project's reality--that is, how the project has been implemented as described in the registered PDD and is

  17. Clean development mechanism PDD guidebook: Navigating the pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamel, S. (ed.)

    2005-11-01

    This guidebook is designed to help readers navigate the pitfalls of preparing a Project Design Document (PDD) for Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects. The purpose of a PDD is to prepare project information for relevant stakeholders. These stakeholders include the investment community, the Designated Operating Entity (DOE) performing validation of the project, the CDM Executive Board (EB), the Designated National Authorities (DNA) of the involved countries and the local population. The PDD, together with the validation report and the approval letter of the DNA, are the basis for the registration of the project and its recognition as a credible CDM project. The PDD is about the project's design that is, how the project intends to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions below those levels that would otherwise have been emitted. Each and every CDM project is unique, from the project design to the application of even the simplest baseline methodology. Some of the projects submitted for validation may be very efficient in reducing emissions and score well in terms of economic, social and environmental benefits, but may still not qualify as CDM projects. Experience has shown that the information needed to judge a suitability of a project for the CDM is vast and can take months to assemble. Also, the time required to assemble relevant information increases with the number and diversity of stakeholders involved and the complexity of the information itself. This guidebook is based on a review of all PDDs submitted to DNV for validation. The advice given and the pitfalls described in this guidebook are, therefore, based on day-to-day, hands-on experience and real instances of mistakes made in submissions. In summary, then, this guidebook takes a practical stance: it is concerned with the practical issues of how to get projects through the validation process. It will help those submitting a PDD by: 1) Describing the most common and costly mistakes made in the process

  18. Options and pitfalls of normal tissues complication probability models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorr, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    impaired by accompanying (e. g. vascular) diseases or the life-style of the patient (lung/smoking, liver/alcohol consumption). All these pitfalls are (of course) considered by experienced radiation oncologists and medical physicists. However, less experienced users of DYH constraints may be less aware of these pitfalls, and may be confident with the 'numbers' they receive from NTCP modeling modules integrated in modern planning systems. In conclusion, DYH-based dose constraints, and even NTCP modeling can be regarded as (very) useful tools in assisting treatment planning, but should be used with some/great care.

  19. Workflow with pitfalls to derive a regional airborne magnetic compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brönner, Marco; Baykiev, Eldar; Ebbing, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Today, large scale magnetic maps are usually a patchwork of different airborne surveys from different size, different resolution and different years. Airborne magnetic acquisition is a fast and economic method to map and gain geological and tectonic information for large areas, onshore and offshore. Depending on the aim of a survey, acquisition parameters like altitude and profile distance are usually adjusted to match the purpose of investigation. The subsequent data processing commonly follows a standardized workflow comprising core-field subtraction and line leveling to yield a coherent crustal field magnetic grid for a survey area. The resulting data makes it possible to correlate with geological and tectonic features in the subsurface, which is of importance for e.g. oil and mineral exploration. Crustal scale magnetic interpretation and modeling demand regional compilation of magnetic data and the merger of adjacent magnetic surveys. These studies not only focus on shallower sources, reflected by short to intermediate magnetic wavelength anomalies, but also have a particular interest in the long wavelength deriving from deep seated sources. However, whilst the workflow to produce such a merger is supported by quite a few powerful routines, the resulting compilation contains several pitfalls and limitations, which were discussed before, but still are very little recognized. The maximum wavelength that can be resolved of each individual survey is directly related to the survey size and consequently a merger will contribute erroneous long-wavelength components in the magnetic data compilation. To minimize this problem and to homogenous the longer wavelengths, a first order approach is the combination of airborne and satellite magnetic data commonly combined with the compilation from airborne data, which is sufficient only under particular preconditions. A more advanced approach considers the gap in frequencies between airborne and satellite data, which motivated

  20. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  1. Surgical pitfalls with custom-made porous hydroxyapatite cranial implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zanotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cranioplasty implants are used primarily in cases of surgical cranial decompression following pathological elevations of intracranial pressure. Available bone substitutes include porous hydroxyapatite (HA and polymethylmethacrylate. Whichever material is used, however, prosthetic cranial implants are susceptible to intra- and postsurgical complications and even failure. The aim of this study was to investigate such occurrences in HA cranioplasty implants, seeking not only to determine the likely causes (whether correlated or not with the device itself but also, where possible, to suggest countermeasures. Methods: We analyzed information regarding failures or complications reported in postmarketing surveillance and clinical studies of patients treated worldwide with custom-made HA cranial implants (Custom Bone Service Fin-Ceramica Faenza, Italy in the period 1997-2013. Results: The two most common complications were implant fractures (84 cases, 2.9% of the total fitted and infections (51 cases, 1.77%. Conclusion: Although cranioplasties are superficial and not difficult types of surgery, and use of custom-made implants are often considered the "easy" option from a surgical perspective, these procedures are nonetheless plagued by potential pitfalls. If performed well they yield more than satisfactory results from the points of view of both the patient and surgeon, but lack of appropriate care can open the door to numerous potential sources of failure, which can compromise-even irreparably-the ability to heal.

  2. Pitfalls in the biological diagnosis of common hemoglobin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajcman, Henri; Moradkhani, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    In West-European countries, hemoglobin disorders are no more rare diseases. Programs for diagnosis of heterozygous carriers have been established to prevent cases with major sickle cell disease or thalassemias. These studies have been done essentially by high performance liquid chromatography on cation-exchange columns and electrophoresis (mostly capillary electrophoresis). They have been done through systematic population studies or premarital diagnosis. We describe in this work the frequent or rare pitfalls encountered, which led to false negative or positive diagnosis both in the field of sickle cell disease and thalassemias. In the absence of a well identified hemoglobin disorder in the proband's family, it is a rule that the use of a single test is insufficient to identify formally HbS. The presence of HbS could also be masked by another hemoglobin abnormality. The sole measurement of HbA2 level is insufficient to characterize a thalassemic trait: this level needs always to be interpreted considering RBC parameters and iron metabolic status. In difficult cases, the definitive answer may require a family study and/or a molecular genetic characterization.

  3. Pitfalls in the MR diagnosis of primary malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    MRI has gained an undisputed place in the evaluation of malignant bone tumors, not only for verifying results of conventional radiography and clarifying differential diagnoses; it has also become increasingly important for the assessment of the malignant/benign nature of the tumor, its growth rate, definition of adequate sites for biopsy, local preoperative staging, and evaluation of the response to chemotherapy. However, several pitfalls have to be observed regarding choice of technical parameters (coils, sequences, imaging planes), tissue differentiation, and tumor staging. When staging malignant tumors, critical aspects which have to be observed are tumor extension, integrity of the cortical bone, soft tissue components, infiltration of a joint or neurovascular bundle. The use of contrast agents provides important additional information but can also give rise to misinterpretations. Thus, all features of a tumor have to be observed in order to establish a final diagnosis. Particular difficulties can occur with the interpretation of MR images of osteomyelitis, osteoid osteoma, stress and insufficiency fractures, bone infarcts, myositis ossificans, hemangiomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts. (orig.) [de

  4. Planning Strabismus Surgery: How to Avoid Pitfalls and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroichane, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Good surgical results following strabismus surgery depend on several factors. In this article, detailed steps for planning strabismus surgery will be reviewed for basic horizontal strabismus surgery, vertical, and oblique muscle surgeries. The thought process behind each case will be presented to help in selecting the best surgical approach to optimize postoperative results. The surgical planning for strabismus will be developed with clinical examples from easy cases to more complex ones. Preoperative pictures of the ocular alignment are an integral part of planning surgery and help in documenting the strabismus before and after surgery. Three cases of strabismus cases will be reviewed with several key factors for planning surgery, including visual acuity, refractive error, potential for stereovision, and risk of postoperative diplopia. The most important factor is accurate orthoptic measurements. The surgical planning for each patient is detailed along with preoperative pictures. Strabismus surgery results can be improved by careful preoperative planning. The surgeon has the ability to discern potential pitfalls that can alter the surgical outcome. Surgical planning allows a dedicated time of reflection before surgery, foreseeing potential problems, and avoiding them during the surgery. © 2016 Board of regents of the University of Wisconsin System, American Orthoptic Journal, Volume 66, 2016, ISSN 0065-955X, E-ISSN 1553-4448.

  5. Exploring Qualitatively-Derived Concepts: Inductive—Deductive Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M. Morse

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytic induction is a sacred tenet of qualitative inquiry. 1 Therefore, when one begins a project focusing on concept of interest (rather than allowing the concepts to emerge from the data per se, how does one maintain a valid approach? When commencing inquiry with a chosen concept or phenomena of interest, rather than with a question from the data per se about what is going on, how does one control deductive tendencies to see what one desires to see and which threaten validity? Difficulties stem from the nature of induction itself – Is analytic induction an impossible operation in qualitative research, as Popper (1963/65 suggests? In this section, we first discuss Popper's concern, followed by a discussion of two major threats that may prevent an inductive approach in qualitative research.2 The first threat is the “pink elephant paradox;? the second is the avoidance of conceptual tunnel vision or, specifically, how does the researcher decontextualize the concept of interest from the surrounding context and thereby avoid the tendency to consider all data to be pertinent to the concept of interest? As we explore each of these pitfalls, and we present methodological strategies to maintain both the integrity of the concept and the integrity of the research.

  6. Osteoporotic Animal Models of Bone Healing: Advantages and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calciolari, Elena; Donos, Nikolaos; Mardas, Nikos

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the advantages and pitfalls of the available osteoporotic animal models of bone healing. A thorough literature search was performed in MEDLINE via OVID and EMBASE to identify animal studies investigating the effect of experimental osteoporosis on bone healing and bone regeneration. The osteotomy model in the proximal tibia is the most popular osseous defect model to study the bone healing process in osteoporotic-like conditions, although other well-characterized models, such as the post-extraction model, might be taken into consideration by future studies. The regenerative potential of osteoporotic bone and its response to biomaterials/regenerative techniques has not been clarified yet, and the critical size defect model might be an appropriate tool to serve this purpose. Since an ideal animal model for simulating osteoporosis does not exist, the type of bone remodeling, the animal lifespan, the age of peak bone mass, and the economic and ethical implications should be considered in our selection process. Furthermore, the influence of animal species, sex, age, and strain on the outcome measurement should be taken into account. In order to make future studies meaningful, standardized international guidelines for osteoporotic animal models of bone healing need to be set up.

  7. FDG-PET/CT in Skeletal Muscle: Pitfalls and Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-07-01

    FDG-PET/CT is an integral part of modern-day practice of medicine. By detecting increased cellular metabolism, FDG-PET/CT can help us detect infection, inflammatory disorders, or tumors, and also help us in prognostication of patients. However, one of the most important challenges is to correctly differentiate the abnormal uptake that is potentially pathologic from the physiological uptake. So while interpreting a PET/CT, one must be aware of normal biodistribution and different physiological variants of FDG uptake. Skeletal muscles constitute a large part of our body mass and one of the major users of glucose. Naturally, they are often the site of increased FDG uptake in a PET study. We as a nuclear medicine physician must be aware of all the pitfalls of increased skeletal muscle uptake to differentiate between physiological and pathologic causes. In this review, we have discussed the different causes and patterns of physiological FDG uptake in skeletal muscles. This knowledge of normal physiological variants of FDG uptake in the skeletal muscles is essential for differentiating pathologic uptake from the physiological ones. Also, we reviewed the role of FDG-PET/CT in various benign and malignant diseases involving skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimizing methods and dodging pitfalls in microbiome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dorothy; Hofstaedter, Casey E; Zhao, Chunyu; Mattei, Lisa; Tanes, Ceylan; Clarke, Erik; Lauder, Abigail; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Chehoud, Christel; Kelsen, Judith; Conrad, Máire; Collman, Ronald G; Baldassano, Robert; Bushman, Frederic D; Bittinger, Kyle

    2017-05-05

    Research on the human microbiome has yielded numerous insights into health and disease, but also has resulted in a wealth of experimental artifacts. Here, we present suggestions for optimizing experimental design and avoiding known pitfalls, organized in the typical order in which studies are carried out. We first review best practices in experimental design and introduce common confounders such as age, diet, antibiotic use, pet ownership, longitudinal instability, and microbial sharing during cohousing in animal studies. Typically, samples will need to be stored, so we provide data on best practices for several sample types. We then discuss design and analysis of positive and negative controls, which should always be run with experimental samples. We introduce a convenient set of non-biological DNA sequences that can be useful as positive controls for high-volume analysis. Careful analysis of negative and positive controls is particularly important in studies of samples with low microbial biomass, where contamination can comprise most or all of a sample. Lastly, we summarize approaches to enhancing experimental robustness by careful control of multiple comparisons and to comparing discovery and validation cohorts. We hope the experimental tactics summarized here will help researchers in this exciting field advance their studies efficiently while avoiding errors.

  9. Genetic testing in inherited polyposis syndromes - how and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G H; Payne, S J; Melville, A; Clark, S K

    2014-08-01

    There have been recent advances in genetic testing enabling accurate diagnosis of polyposis syndromes by identifying causative gene mutations, which is essential in the management of individuals with polyposis syndrome and predictive genetic testing of their extended families. There are some similarities in clinical presentation of various polyposis syndromes, which may pose a challenge to diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation of the main polyposis syndromes and the process of genetic testing, including the latest advancement and future of genetic testing. We aim to reiterate the importance of genetic testing in the management of polyposis syndromes, potential pitfalls associated with genetic testing and recommendations for healthcare professionals involved with the care of polyposis patients. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. The rainfall plot: its motivation, characteristics and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanska, Diana; Vodák, Daniel; Lund-Andersen, Christin; Salvatore, Stefania; Hovig, Eivind; Sandve, Geir Kjetil

    2017-05-18

    A visualization referred to as rainfall plot has recently gained popularity in genome data analysis. The plot is mostly used for illustrating the distribution of somatic cancer mutations along a reference genome, typically aiming to identify mutation hotspots. In general terms, the rainfall plot can be seen as a scatter plot showing the location of events on the x-axis versus the distance between consecutive events on the y-axis. Despite its frequent use, the motivation for applying this particular visualization and the appropriateness of its usage have never been critically addressed in detail. We show that the rainfall plot allows visual detection even for events occurring at high frequency over very short distances. In addition, event clustering at multiple scales may be detected as distinct horizontal bands in rainfall plots. At the same time, due to the limited size of standard figures, rainfall plots might suffer from inability to distinguish overlapping events, especially when multiple datasets are plotted in the same figure. We demonstrate the consequences of plot congestion, which results in obscured visual data interpretations. This work provides the first comprehensive survey of the characteristics and proper usage of rainfall plots. We find that the rainfall plot is able to convey a large amount of information without any need for parameterization or tuning. However, we also demonstrate how plot congestion and the use of a logarithmic y-axis may result in obscured visual data interpretations. To aid the productive utilization of rainfall plots, we demonstrate their characteristics and potential pitfalls using both simulated and real data, and provide a set of practical guidelines for their proper interpretation and usage.

  11. Drug targeting to tumors: principles, pitfalls and (pre-) clinical progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2012-07-20

    Many different systems and strategies have been evaluated for drug targeting to tumors over the years. Routinely used systems include liposomes, polymers, micelles, nanoparticles and antibodies, and examples of strategies are passive drug targeting, active drug targeting to cancer cells, active drug targeting to endothelial cells and triggered drug delivery. Significant progress has been made in this area of research both at the preclinical and at the clinical level, and a number of (primarily passively tumor-targeted) nanomedicine formulations have been approved for clinical use. Significant progress has also been made with regard to better understanding the (patho-) physiological principles of drug targeting to tumors. This has led to the identification of several important pitfalls in tumor-targeted drug delivery, including I) overinterpretation of the EPR effect; II) poor tumor and tissue penetration of nanomedicines; III) misunderstanding of the potential usefulness of active drug targeting; IV) irrational formulation design, based on materials which are too complex and not broadly applicable; V) insufficient incorporation of nanomedicine formulations in clinically relevant combination regimens; VI) negligence of the notion that the highest medical need relates to metastasis, and not to solid tumor treatment; VII) insufficient integration of non-invasive imaging techniques and theranostics, which could be used to personalize nanomedicine-based therapeutic interventions; and VIII) lack of (efficacy analyses in) proper animal models, which are physiologically more relevant and more predictive for the clinical situation. These insights strongly suggest that besides making ever more nanomedicine formulations, future efforts should also address some of the conceptual drawbacks of drug targeting to tumors, and that strategies should be developed to overcome these shortcomings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nano(Q)SAR: Challenges, pitfalls and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantra, Ratna; Oksel, Ceyda; Puzyn, Tomasz; Wang, Jian; Robinson, Kenneth N; Wang, Xue Z; Ma, Cai Y; Wilkins, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Regulation for nanomaterials is urgently needed, and the drive to adopt an intelligent testing strategy is evident. Such a strategy will not only provide economic benefits but will also reduce moral and ethical concerns arising from animal testing. For regulatory purposes, such an approach is promoted by REACH, particularly the use of quantitative structure-activity relationships [(Q)SAR] as a tool for the categorisation of compounds according to their physicochemical and toxicological properties. In addition to compounds, (Q)SAR has also been applied to nanomaterials in the form of nano(Q)SAR. Although (Q)SAR in chemicals is well established, nano(Q)SAR is still in early stages of development and its successful uptake is far from reality. This article aims to identify some of the pitfalls and challenges associated with nano-(Q)SARs in relation to the categorisation of nanomaterials. Our findings show clear gaps in the research framework that must be addressed if we are to have reliable predictions from such models. Three major barriers were identified: the need to improve quality of experimental data in which the models are developed from, the need to have practical guidelines for the development of the nano(Q)SAR models and the need to standardise and harmonise activities for the purpose of regulation. Of these three, the first, i.e. the need to improve data quality requires immediate attention, as it underpins activities associated with the latter two. It should be noted that the usefulness of data in the context of nano-(Q)SAR modelling is not only about the quantity of data but also about the quality, consistency and accessibility of those data.

  13. Orthotopic neobladder reconstrution: postoperative CT appearance, complications and potential pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su Lim; Jung, Seung Eun; Im, Yeon Soo; Lee, Jae Mun; Lee, Ji Youl; Yoon, Moon Soo; Hahn, Seong Tai [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-08-01

    To evaluate the postoperative CT appearance, complications and potential pitfalls of radical cystectomy with orthotopic neobladder reconstruction. We examined 46 patients [43 men and 3 women aged 34-72 (mean, 56.7) years] who had undergone neobladder reconstruction (ileocolic neobladder in 25 patients and ileal-W neobladder in 21). The CT scans were assessed in terms of their depiction of normal anatomy, namely the shape, location and internal architecture of the neobladder, the location of bladder bases, and the ureteral course. Early and late complications were also assessed. The characteristics of ileocolic neobadder were a right-side location, a lobulated outer margin, interal projections due to haustra or plication, a base in the retropubis, and right-side insertion of both ureters. In contrast, the characteristics of an ileal-W neobladder were a central location, an ovoid shape, nodular thickening at the ureteral insertion site, internal projections due to plication, and a retropubic bladder base. Early complications included hematoma with abscess formation (n=2), and postoperative peritonitis (n=1), while late complications were hydronephrosis due to stricture ar the ureteral anastomotic site (n=16), tumor recurrence at this site (n=1), distal ureteral stone (n=1), mucus urinary retention (n=1), incisional hernia (n=2), tumor recurrence in the pelvic side wall (n=1), carcinomatosis peritonei (n=1), and liver metastasis (n=2). A knowledge of normal anatomic changes is essential for the accurate interpretation of CT scans. CT is a useful modality of the evaluation of postoperative change and the complications occurring in patients who have undergone radial cystectomy with othotopic neobladder reconstruction.

  14. Strong transthyretin immunostaining: potential pitfall in cardiac amyloid typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoskar, Anjali A; Efebera, Yvonne; Hasan, Ayesha; Brodsky, Sergey; Nadasdy, Gyongyi; Dogan, Ahmet; Nadasdy, Tibor

    2011-11-01

    Although systemic amyloidosis commonly presents with renal disease, cardiac involvement usually determines the patient's prognosis. Cardiac involvement is seen in light chain amyloid and transthyretin amyloidosis. Distinguishing between these two is critical because prognosis and treatment differ. Our study demonstrates the unreliability of transthyretin immunostaining in subtyping cardiac amyloid. Between January 2003 and August 2010, we retrieved 229 native endomyocardial biopsies, of which 24 had amyloid. Immunohistochemistry for κ, λ, transthyretin, and serum amyloid A protein was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Staining was graded as weak (trace to 1+) or strong (2 to 3+). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic typing of microdissected amyloid material was performed on selected cases. Fifteen patients had monoclonal gammopathy/plasma cell dyscrasia with cardiac amyloid. Eight of them (53%) showed strong transthyretin staining in the cardiac amyloid deposits. MS was performed in 5 of these 8 biopsies, and all 5 biopsies revealed light chain amyloid-type amyloid. Two of these 5 light chain amyloid biopsies did not even have concomitant strong staining for the appropriate light chain. Among the 15 cases with plasma cell dyscrasia, only 7 biopsies showed strong staining for the corresponding monoclonal light chain. Strong, false-positive immunostaining for transthyretin in cardiac amyloid is a potential pitfall, augmented by the frequent lack of staining for immunoglobulin light chains. Therefore, the presence of amyloid in the cardiac biopsy should prompt a search for plasma cell dyscrasia irrespective of transthyretin staining. Confirmation with MS should be sought, particularly if there is any discrepancy between κ/λ staining and serum immunofixation results.

  15. Top ten pitfalls to avoid when performing musculoskeletal sonography: What you should know before entering the examination room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arend, Carlos Frederico

    2013-01-01

    Sonography has been used successfully to evaluate a number of musculoskeletal disorders. The method is operator dependent and familiarity with sonographic pitfalls greatly improves diagnostic accuracy and helps to optimize management. In this article, we discuss ten common pitfalls which can become a source of confusion and misdiagnosis in musculoskeletal sonography

  16. The frequency of A91V in the perforin gene and the effect of tumor necrosis factor-α promoter polymorphism on acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Okur

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Numerous acquired etiological factors, such as infections, malignancies, and collagen tissue disorders, are involved in the development of acquired hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (AHLH. Not everyone with the same etiological factors developments AHLH, which suggests the role of additional genetic or environmental predisposing factors that remain to be identified. Materials and Methods: Perforin gene A91V missense transition (C>T change at position 272 in exon 2 of the perforin gene and TNF-α gene promoter-1031 T>C nucleotide substitution are 2 candidate genetic predisposing factors due to their potential to alter inflammatory responses. In the present study these changes were investigated in healthy controls and AHLH patients.Results: A91V transition was observed in 7 of the 159 (4.4% controls. Among the 44 AHLH patients, 5 (11.3% were heterozygous and the difference in the frequency of A91V transition, although striking (odds ratio: 2.8, was not statistically significant (p=0.09. All A91V-positive patients had infection. TNF-α-1031 T>C polymorphism was examined in 164 healthy controls and 40 AHLH patients, and the CC risk-elevating genotype was noted in 7 (4.3% of the controls and 1 (2.5% of the AHLH patients. The frequency of C and T alleles was 22.5% (n=18 and 77.5% (n=62 among the AHLH patients, and 22% (n=72 and 78% (n=259 among the controls, respectively. There wasn’t a statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of allele frequencies (p>0.05.Conclusion: The present results indicate that compared to controls, A91V mutation was 2.8-fold more prevalent (according to the odds ratio in the AHLH patients. A91V mutation is not uncommon in the general population and increases the risk of AHLH in patients with an underlying condition, especially those with an underlying infection.

  17. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone ...

  18. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple lentigines syndrome; Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines ... Genetics Home Reference -- ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/noonan-syndrome-with-multiple-lentigines National Organization for Rare Disorders -- ...

  19. Spins, Stalls, and Shutdowns: Pitfalls of Qualitative Policing and Security Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy K. Lippert

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores key elements of qualitative research on policing and security agencies, including barriers encountered and strategies to prevent them. While it is oft-assumed that policing/security agencies are difficult to access due to their clandestine or bureaucratic nature, this article demonstrates this is not necessarily the case, as access was gained for three distinct qualitative research projects. Yet, access and subsequent research were not without pitfalls, which we term security spins, security stalls, and security shutdowns. We illustrate how each was encountered and argue these pitfalls are akin to researchers falling into risk categories, not unlike those used by policing/security agents in their work. Before concluding we discuss methodological strategies for scholars to avoid these pitfalls and to advance research that critically interrogates the immense policing/security realm. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1601108

  20. Variants and pitfalls on radioiodine scans in pediatric patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafa, Mohamed; Vali, Reza; Chan, Jeffrey; Omarkhail, Yusuaf; Shammas, Amer [University of Toronto, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Medical Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    Potentially false-positive findings on radioiodine scans in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma can mimic functioning thyroid tissue and functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue. Such false-positive findings comprise variants and pitfalls that can vary slightly in children as compared with adults. To determine the patterns and frequency of these potential false-positive findings on radioiodine scans in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We reviewed a total of 223 radioiodine scans from 53 pediatric patients (mean age 13.3 years, 37 girls) with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Focal or regional activity that likely did not represent functioning thyroid tissue or functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue were categorized as variants or pitfalls. The final diagnosis was confirmed by reviewing the concurrent and follow-up clinical data, correlative ultrasonography, CT scanning, serum thyroglobulin and antithyroglobulin antibody levels. We calculated the frequency of these variants and pitfalls from diagnostic and post-therapy radioiodine scans. The most common variant on the radioiodine scans was the thymic activity (24/223, 10.8%) followed by the cardiac activity (8/223, 3.6%). Salivary contamination and star artifact, caused by prominent thyroid remnant, were the most important observed pitfalls. Variants and pitfalls that mimic functioning thyroid tissue or functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue on radioiodine scan in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma are not infrequent, but they decrease in frequency on successive radioiodine scans. Potential false-positive findings can be minimized with proper knowledge of the common variants and pitfalls in children and correlation with clinical, laboratory and imaging data. (orig.)

  1. Whole body imaging in the abdominal cancer patient: pitfalls of PET-CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2012-02-01

    Proper interpretation of PET-CT images requires knowledge of the normal physiological distribution of the tracer, frequently encountered physiological variants, and benign pathological causes of FDG uptake that can be confused with a malignant neoplasm. In addition, not all malignant processes are associated with avid tracer uptake. A basic knowledge of the technique of image acquisition is also required to avoid pitfalls such as misregistration of anatomical and scintigraphic data. This article reviews these potential pitfalls as they apply to the abdomen and pelvis of patients with cancer.

  2. Applying Machine Learning to Facilitate Autism Diagnostics: Pitfalls and Promises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, Daniel; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Black, Matthew P.; Lee, Chi-Chun; Audhkhasi, Kartik; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning has immense potential to enhance diagnostic and intervention research in the behavioral sciences, and may be especially useful in investigations involving the highly prevalent and heterogeneous syndrome of autism spectrum disorder. However, use of machine learning in the absence of clinical domain expertise can be tenuous and lead…

  3. Predicting outcome from coma : man-in-the-barrel syndrome as potential pitfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, JW; Haaxma, R; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    The Glasgow coma scale motor score is often used in predicting outcome after hypoxic ischemic coma. Judicious care should be exerted when using this variable in predicting outcome in patients with coma following hypotension since borderzone infarction can obscure the clinical picture. We describe a

  4. Pitfalls in molecular analysis for mismatch repair deficiency in a family with biallelic pms2 germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenen, C H M; Geurts-Giele, W R R; Dubbink, H J; Reddingius, R; van den Ouweland, A M; Tops, C M J; van de Klift, H M; Kuipers, E J; van Leerdam, M E; Dinjens, W N M; Wagner, A

    2011-12-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 cause Lynch syndrome. Biallelic mutations in the MMR genes are associated with a childhood cancer syndrome [constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMR-D)]. This is predominantly characterized by hematological malignancies and tumors of the bowel and brain, often associated with signs of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Diagnostic strategies for selection of patients for MMR gene analysis include analysis of microsatellite instability (MSI) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of MMR proteins in tumor tissue. We report the clinical characterization and molecular analyses of tumor specimens from a family with biallelic PMS2 germline mutations. This illustrates the pitfalls of present molecular screening strategies. Tumor tissues of five family members were analyzed for MSI and IHC. MSI was observed in only one of the analyzed tissues. However, IHC analysis of brain tumor tissue of the index patient and his sister showed absence of PMS2 expression, and germline mutation analyses showed biallelic mutations in PMS2: p.Ser46IIe and p.Pro246fs. The same heterozygous mutations were confirmed in the father and mother, respectively. These data support the conclusion that in case of a clinical phenotype of CMMR-D, it is advisable to routinely combine MSI analysis with IHC analysis for the expression of MMR proteins. With inconclusive or conflicting results, germline mutation analysis of the MMR genes should be considered after thorough counselling of the patients and/or their relatives. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  6. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  7. Characterization of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 gene promoter variants and comparison of cellular gene expression profiles in Japanese patients with infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajoh, Masayuki; Hashida, Yumiko; Murakami, Masanao; Maeda, Akihiko; Sato, Tetsuya; Fujieda, Mikiya; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Daibata, Masanori

    2012-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genotypes can be distinguished based on gene sequence differences in EBV nuclear antigens 2, 3A, 3B, and 3C, and the BZLF1 promoter zone (Zp). EBV subtypes and BZLF1 Zp variants were examined in Japanese patients with infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. The results of EBV typing showed that samples of infectious mononucleosis, chronic active EBV infection, and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis all belonged to EBV type 1. However, sequencing analysis of BZLF1 Zp found three polymorphic Zp variants in the same samples. The Zp-P prototype and the Zp-V3 variant were both detected in infectious mononucleosis and chronic active EBV infection. Furthermore, a novel variant previously identified in Chinese children with infectious mononucleosis, Zp-V1, was also found in 3 of 18 samples of infectious mononucleosis, where it coexisted with the Zp-P prototype. This is the first evidence that the EBV variant distribution in Japanese patients resembles that found in other Asian patients. The expression levels of 29 chronic active EBV infection-associated cellular genes were also compared in the three EBV-related disorders, using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Two upregulated genes, RIPK2 and CDH9, were identified as common specific markers for chronic active EBV infection in both in vitro and in vivo studies. RIPK2 activates apoptosis and autophagy, and could be responsible for the pathogenesis of chronic active EBV infection. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  9. Pitfalls of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses in Imaging Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McInnes, Matthew D. F.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews of imaging research represent a tool to better understand test accuracy or the efficacy of interventions. Like any type of research, appropriate methods must be applied to optimize quality. The purpose of this review is to outline common pitfalls in performing systematic reviews

  10. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: "P" values, statistical significance and confidence intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Ranganathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the second part of a series on pitfalls in statistical analysis, we look at various ways in which a statistically significant study result can be expressed. We debunk some of the myths regarding the ′P′ value, explain the importance of ′confidence intervals′ and clarify the importance of including both values in a paper

  11. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: Understanding the properties of diagnostic tests - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Priya; Aggarwal, Rakesh

    2018-01-01

    In this article in our series on common pitfalls in statistical analysis, we look at some of the attributes of diagnostic tests (i.e., tests which are used to determine whether an individual does or does not have disease). The next article in this series will focus on further issues related to diagnostic tests.

  12. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: “P” values, statistical significance and confidence intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Priya; Pramesh, C. S.; Buyse, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In the second part of a series on pitfalls in statistical analysis, we look at various ways in which a statistically significant study result can be expressed. We debunk some of the myths regarding the ‘P’ value, explain the importance of ‘confidence intervals’ and clarify the importance of including both values in a paper PMID:25878958

  13. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: Absolute risk reduction, relative risk reduction, and number needed to treat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Priya; Pramesh, C. S.; Aggarwal, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    In the previous article in this series on common pitfalls in statistical analysis, we looked at the difference between risk and odds. Risk, which refers to the probability of occurrence of an event or outcome, can be defined in absolute or relative terms. Understanding what these measures represent is essential for the accurate interpretation of study results. PMID:26952180

  14. Diagnostic pitfalls associated with a large true posterior communicating artery aneurysm: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Seno, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Satoru; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2013-10-01

    True posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysm is an aneurysm that originates from the PCoA, and large or giant true PCoA aneurysms are rare. We report a case of a large true PCoA aneurysm successfully clipped after anterior clinoidectomy and discuss the diagnostic pitfalls associated with this rare clinical entity.

  15. Empathy and Social-Emotional Learning: Pitfalls and Touchstones for School-Based Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce; DesRoches, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This chapter identifies three common pitfalls in the use of the concept of empathy in formal social-emotional learning interventions: (1) not distinguishing between affective and cognitive empathy ("equivocation"); (2) overestimating the role of the imagination in empathizing ("Piaget's fallacy"); and (3) not accommodating the developmental and…

  16. Two new planthopper species (Hemiptera, Fulgoroidea, Caliscelidae) collected in pitfall traps in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmurova, Lucia; Webb, Michael D

    2016-08-22

    Two new species of planthoppers in the family Caliscelidae (Hemiptera: Fulgoroidea) are described from Zambia, i.e., Afronaso spinosa sp. n. and Calampocus zambiaensis sp. n. All specimens are flightless males and nearly all were collected from baited pitfall traps (except for one specimen collected from a yellow pan trap), suggesting that they live near to or on the ground.

  17. Benefits and Pitfalls: Simple Guidelines for the Use of Social Networking Tools in K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The article will outline a framework for the use of social networking tools in K-12 education framed around four thought provoking questions: 1) what are the benefits and pitfalls of using social networking tools in P-12 education, 2) how do we plan effectively for the use of social networking tool, 3) what role does professional development play…

  18. Diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver: Pitfalls in computed tomography diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, Y.H.; Dunn, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    The presence of a fatty liver often complicates the interpretation of abdominal computed tomography (CT). Abnormalities in or adjacent to the liver, including dilated bile ducts, liver masses and subphrenic collections, may be masked by the fatty liver. Furthermore, normal structures may simulate pathological conditions. Five cases are presented to illustrate some of these diagnostic pitfalls. (authors)

  19. Integration of Gamification into Course Design: A Noble Endeavor with Potential Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Russo, Deborah; Wiss, Andrew; Grabowski, Jeremiah

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we provide a commentary on the current state of gamification in higher education by reviewing the research literature, noting a lack of research focused on the design of gamified postsecondary courses. To address this issue, we discuss four potential pitfalls instructors may encounter when designing gamified learning activities.…

  20. Pitfalls and Promises: The Use of Secondary Data Analysis in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emma

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the use of secondary data analysis in educational research. It addresses some of the promises and potential pitfalls that influence its use and explores a possible role for the secondary analysis of numeric data in the "new" political arithmetic tradition of social research. Secondary data analysis is a relatively under-used…

  1. The uterine doughnut: Potential pitfall for technetium-99m gastrointestinal bleeding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swayne, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    A case of intense uterine hyperemia secondary to recent pregnancy, the so-called uterine doughnut sign, is presented as a potential pitfall in the evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding. Delayed imaging helped in evaluating the lack of serial change in appearance and the failure of progression of the scintigraphic abnormality

  2. Imaging patterns of hepatic steatosis on multidetector CT: Pearls and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kani, K.K., E-mail: khalatbarik@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Body Imaging, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Moshiri, M.; Cuevas, C.; Lee, J.H.; Mitsumori, L.M.; Kolokythas, O. [Department of Radiology, Body Imaging, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Fatty liver disease is an important cause of chronic liver disease in Western countries. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the diagnostic criteria and various morphological patterns of fatty liver disease on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with an emphasis on potential limitations and diagnostic pitfalls.

  3. The Pitfalls of Mobile Devices in Learning: A Different View and Implications for Pedagogical Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Yu-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Studies have been devoted to the design, implementation, and evaluation of mobile learning in practice. A common issue among students' responses toward this type of learning concerns the pitfalls of mobile devices, including small screen, limited input options, and low computational power. As a result, mobile devices are not always perceived by…

  4. Gabor Deconvolution as Preliminary Method to Reduce Pitfall in Deeper Target Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktariena, M.; Triyoso, W.

    2018-03-01

    Anelastic attenuation process during seismic wave propagation is the trigger of seismic non-stationary characteristic. An absorption and a scattering of energy are causing the seismic energy loss as the depth increasing. A series of thin reservoir layers found in the study area is located within Talang Akar Fm. Level, showing an indication of interpretation pitfall due to attenuation effect commonly occurred in deeper level seismic data. Attenuation effect greatly influences the seismic images of deeper target level, creating pitfalls in several aspect. Seismic amplitude in deeper target level often could not represent its real subsurface character due to a low amplitude value or a chaotic event nearing the Basement. Frequency wise, the decaying could be seen as the frequency content diminishing in deeper target. Meanwhile, seismic amplitude is the simple tool to point out Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator (DHI) in preliminary Geophysical study before a further advanced interpretation method applied. A quick-look of Post-Stack Seismic Data shows the reservoir associated with a bright spot DHI while another bigger bright spot body detected in the North East area near the field edge. A horizon slice confirms a possibility that the other bright spot zone has smaller delineation; an interpretation pitfall commonly occurs in deeper level of seismic. We evaluates this pitfall by applying Gabor Deconvolution to address the attenuation problem. Gabor Deconvolution forms a Partition of Unity to factorize the trace into smaller convolution window that could be processed as stationary packets. Gabor Deconvolution estimates both the magnitudes of source signature alongside its attenuation function. The enhanced seismic shows a better imaging in the pitfall area that previously detected as a vast bright spot zone. When the enhanced seismic is used for further advanced reprocessing process, the Seismic Impedance and Vp/Vs Ratio slices show a better reservoir delineation, in which the

  5. Temperature effects on pitfall catches of epigeal arthropods: a model and method for bias correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saska, Pavel; van der Werf, Wopke; Hemerik, Lia; Luff, Martin L; Hatten, Timothy D; Honek, Alois; Pocock, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Carabids and other epigeal arthropods make important contributions to biodiversity, food webs and biocontrol of invertebrate pests and weeds. Pitfall trapping is widely used for sampling carabid populations, but this technique yields biased estimates of abundance ('activity-density') because individual activity - which is affected by climatic factors - affects the rate of catch. To date, the impact of temperature on pitfall catches, while suspected to be large, has not been quantified, and no method is available to account for it. This lack of knowledge and the unavailability of a method for bias correction affect the confidence that can be placed on results of ecological field studies based on pitfall data.Here, we develop a simple model for the effect of temperature, assuming a constant proportional change in the rate of catch per °C change in temperature, r , consistent with an exponential Q 10 response to temperature. We fit this model to 38 time series of pitfall catches and accompanying temperature records from the literature, using first differences and other detrending methods to account for seasonality. We use meta-analysis to assess consistency of the estimated parameter r among studies.The mean rate of increase in total catch across data sets was 0·0863 ± 0·0058 per °C of maximum temperature and 0·0497 ± 0·0107 per °C of minimum temperature. Multiple regression analyses of 19 data sets showed that temperature is the key climatic variable affecting total catch. Relationships between temperature and catch were also identified at species level. Correction for temperature bias had substantial effects on seasonal trends of carabid catches. Synthesis and Applications . The effect of temperature on pitfall catches is shown here to be substantial and worthy of consideration when interpreting results of pitfall trapping. The exponential model can be used both for effect estimation and for bias correction of observed data. Correcting for temperature

  6. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  7. Aarskog syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarskog disease; Aarskog-Scott syndrome; AAS; Faciodigitogenital syndrome; Gaciogenital dysplasia ... Aarskog syndrome is a genetic disorder that is linked to the X chromosome. It affects mainly males, but females ...

  8. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  9. Cushing's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    宗, 友厚; 伊藤, 勇; 諏訪, 哲也; 武田, 純; MUNE, Tomoatsu

    2003-01-01

    Sixteen cases of verified Cushing's syndrome, and twelve cases of probable Cushing's syndrome were reviewed and data on them were compared with various reports on Cushing's syndrome in the literature.

  10. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  11. Immune reconstitution syndrome presenting as probable AIDS-related lymphoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen Charlotte B; Nielsen Susanne D; Mortensen Bo K; Helweg-Larsen Jannik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report an unusual case of HIV-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, presenting as suspected AIDS-related lymphoma. Symptoms, initial investigations including fine-needle biopsy and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan were highly compatible with high grade AIDS-related lymphoma, however subsequently IRIS was diagnosed. We discuss pitfalls in the interpretation of diagnostic results in ARL versus IRIS.

  12. The Pitfalls of Febrile Jaundice. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obreja Maria

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jaundice in sepsis is usually caused by cholestasis, and its onset can precede other manifestations of the infection. Inflammation-induced cholestasis is a common complication in patients with an extrahepatic infection or those with inflammatory processes. We describe the case of a 47 years old female who presented with low back pain and paravertebral muscular contracture. She subsequently developed a cholestatic syndrome with clinical manifestations such as jaundice, followed by fever and sepsis with multiple organ dysfunction. Initially labeled as biliary sepsis, the diagnosis was crucially reoriented as the blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus pyogenes and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings suggested spondylodiscitis as well as a paravertebral abscess.

  13. Pitfall in the Diagnosis of Diabetes Insipidus and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Sum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes insipidus (DI during pregnancy and the perinatal period is an uncommon medical problem characterized by polyuria and excessive thirst. Diagnosis of DI may be overlooked in the setting of pregnancy, a time when increased water intake and urine output are commonly reported. We report two cases: one of transient DI in a young woman during her third trimester of twin pregnancy in association with acute fatty liver and hypertension and one of postpartum DI secondary to Sheehan syndrome from rupture of a splenic artery aneurysm. These cases illustrate the spectrum with which DI related to pregnancy and delivery can present and highlight the difficulty in making the diagnosis since the symptoms are often initially overlooked.

  14. Diffusion-weighted MRI to assess response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: main interpretation pitfalls and their use for teaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Lahaye, Max J.; Maas, Monique [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heeswijk, Miriam M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Delli Pizzi, Andrea [Gabriele d' Annunzio University, SS. Annunziate Hospital, Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, Chieti (Italy); Elderen, Saskia G.C. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Andrade, Luisa [Hospitais da Universidade de Coimbra, Department of Radiology, Coimbra (Portugal); Peters, Nicky H.G.M.; Osinga-de Jong, Margreet [Zuyderland Medical Center, location Heerlen, Heerlen (Netherlands); Kint, Peter A.M. [Amphia Hospital, Department of Radiology, Breda (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ooms, Rik [Maxima Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Eindhoven-Veldhoven (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maastricht University, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bakers, Frans C.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maastricht University, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2017-10-15

    To establish the most common image interpretation pitfalls for non-expert readers using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to assess response to chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer and to explore the use of these pitfalls in an expert teaching setting. Two independent non-expert readers (R1 and R2) scored the restaging DW MRI scans (b1,000 DWI, in conjunction with ADC maps and T2-W MRI scans for anatomical reference) in 100 patients for the likelihood of a complete response versus residual tumour using a five-point confidence score. The readers received expert feedback and the final response outcome for each case. The supervising expert documented any potential interpretation errors/pitfalls discussed for each case to identify the most common pitfalls. The most common pitfalls were the interpretation of low signal on the ADC map, small susceptibility artefacts, T2 shine-through effects, suboptimal sequence angulation and collapsed rectal wall. Diagnostic performance (area under the ROC curve) was 0.78 (R1) and 0.77 (R2) in the first 50 patients and 0.85 (R1) and 0.85 (R2) in the final 50 patients. Five main image interpretation pitfalls were identified and used for teaching and feedback. Both readers achieved a good diagnostic performance with an AUC of 0.85. (orig.)

  15. Diffusion-weighted MRI to assess response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: main interpretation pitfalls and their use for teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Lahaye, Max J.; Maas, Monique; Heeswijk, Miriam M. van; Delli Pizzi, Andrea; Elderen, Saskia G.C. van; Andrade, Luisa; Peters, Nicky H.G.M.; Osinga-de Jong, Margreet; Kint, Peter A.M.; Bipat, Shandra; Ooms, Rik; Beets, Geerard L.; Bakers, Frans C.H.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2017-01-01

    To establish the most common image interpretation pitfalls for non-expert readers using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to assess response to chemoradiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer and to explore the use of these pitfalls in an expert teaching setting. Two independent non-expert readers (R1 and R2) scored the restaging DW MRI scans (b1,000 DWI, in conjunction with ADC maps and T2-W MRI scans for anatomical reference) in 100 patients for the likelihood of a complete response versus residual tumour using a five-point confidence score. The readers received expert feedback and the final response outcome for each case. The supervising expert documented any potential interpretation errors/pitfalls discussed for each case to identify the most common pitfalls. The most common pitfalls were the interpretation of low signal on the ADC map, small susceptibility artefacts, T2 shine-through effects, suboptimal sequence angulation and collapsed rectal wall. Diagnostic performance (area under the ROC curve) was 0.78 (R1) and 0.77 (R2) in the first 50 patients and 0.85 (R1) and 0.85 (R2) in the final 50 patients. Five main image interpretation pitfalls were identified and used for teaching and feedback. Both readers achieved a good diagnostic performance with an AUC of 0.85. (orig.)

  16. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 153. Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and other systemic complications of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  17. Diffusion-weighted MRI of the liver—Interpretative pearls and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culverwell, A.D.; Sheridan, M.B.; Guthrie, J.A.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) is an established technique in neuroradiology and more recently has emerged as a useful adjunct to various oncological applications of MRI. It has an expanding role in the evaluation of liver lesions, offers higher detection rates for small lesions, and can increase confidence in differentiating between benign and malignant lesions. Other applications include assessment of tumour response to therapy, differentiating tumour from bland thrombus, and assessment of liver fibrosis. DW sequences can be performed on most modern MRI machines with relative ease, in a short time period and without the need for contrast medium. DW MRI can be of value in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions but there are pitfalls, which can potentially cause interpretative difficulty. This article will review the rationale for DW MRI in liver imaging, demonstrate the clinical utility of the technique in a spectrum of hepatic diseases, and illustrate key interpretative pearls and pitfalls

  18. Complexities and potential pitfalls of clinical study design and data analysis in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patounakis, George; Hill, Micah J

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of the current review is to describe the common pitfalls in design and statistical analysis of reproductive medicine studies. It serves to guide both authors and reviewers toward reducing the incidence of spurious statistical results and erroneous conclusions. The large amount of data gathered in IVF cycles leads to problems with multiplicity, multicollinearity, and over fitting of regression models. Furthermore, the use of the word 'trend' to describe nonsignificant results has increased in recent years. Finally, methods to accurately account for female age in infertility research models are becoming more common and necessary. The pitfalls of study design and analysis reviewed provide a framework for authors and reviewers to approach clinical research in the field of reproductive medicine. By providing a more rigorous approach to study design and analysis, the literature in reproductive medicine will have more reliable conclusions that can stand the test of time.

  19. Potentials and pitfalls of the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringskou, Lea Thomsen; Gravesen, David Thore

    Our research offers a qualitative, in depth-perspective on the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools in Denmark. In our presentration we will, in a cross-cultural perspective, reappraise the roles of leisure-time pedagogues and discuss the potentials and pitfalls of the encou......Our research offers a qualitative, in depth-perspective on the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools in Denmark. In our presentration we will, in a cross-cultural perspective, reappraise the roles of leisure-time pedagogues and discuss the potentials and pitfalls...... of the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools. In 2014, the Danish Primary School was reformed. To a considerable extent, the reform can be understood in response to receding results in international tests (Knudsen 2010). The official aim of the reform is to challenge all pupils, regardless...... the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools?...

  20. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Nikdokht; Bruce, Dean; Chung, Christine B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis

  1. Miscellaneous conditions of the shoulder: Anatomical, clinical, and pictorial review emphasizing potential pitfalls in imaging diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Nikdokht [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); Bruce, Dean [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 West Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint including hydroxyapatite deposition disease, rotator cuff interval pathology, acromioclavicular joint pathology, glenohumeral osteoarthrosis, and synovial inflammatory processes, with specific emphasis on findings that have associated pitfalls in imaging diagnosis. The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of the above mentioned categories of pathology will be reviewed, followed in each section by a detailed pictorial review of the key imaging findings in each category including plain film, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings as applicable. Imaging challenges that relate to both diagnosis and characterization will be addressed with each type of pathology. The goal is that after reading this article, the reader will be able to recognize the key imaging findings in major categories of pathology affecting the shoulder joint and will become familiar with the potential pitfalls in their imaging diagnosis.

  2. Twinkling artifact on color Doppler ultrasound: an advantage or a pitfall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, Ebru; Atac, Gokce Kaan; Gundogdu, Sadi

    2016-07-01

    The twinkling artifact (TA) or color comet-tail artifact is characterized by a rapidly changing mixture of red and blue color Doppler signals. Even though many diseases and clinical conditions have been shown to produce this artifact, its source is not clearly understood yet. The TA may provide additional information to gray-scale ultrasound findings in several clinical situations. However, there may be pitfalls to keep in mind. We must first be aware of the TA to benefit from the advantages and avoid the pitfalls. In this review, we aim to give practicing radiologists an overview of the mechanisms and clinical applications of the TA by illustrating sample cases we have encountered.

  3. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: "No evidence of effect" versus "evidence of no effect"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Ranganathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the first in a series exploring common pitfalls in statistical analysis in biomedical research. The power of a clinical trial is the ability to find a difference between treatments, where such a difference exists. At the end of the study, the lack of difference between treatments does not mean that the treatments can be considered equivalent. The distinction between "no evidence of effect" and "evidence of no effect" needs to be understood.

  4. Self-administration of cocaine, cannabis and heroin in the human laboratory: benefits and pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    Haney, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review is to describe self-administration procedures for modeling addiction to cocaine, cannabis and heroin in the human laboratory, the benefits and pitfalls of the approach, and the methodological issues unique to each drug. In addition, the predictive validity of the model for testing treatment medications will be addressed. The results show that all three drugs of abuse are reliably and robustly self-administered by non-treatment-seeking research volunteers. In terms...

  5. Venous intravasation: a potential pitfall of confirmatory hysterosalpingogram following essure hysteroscopic sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Michael C; Shim, John J

    2012-09-01

    Indications for hysterosalpingography (HSG) include evaluation of infertility, spontaneous abortions, postoperative evaluation of tubal ligation, pre-myomectomy evaluation, and more recently, evaluation of tubal occlusion after placement of the Essure Permanent Birth Control System. Here we report a case of venous intravasation during a routine post-Essure HSG, a phenomenon in which contrast transits from the uterine cavity, through the myometrium, and directly into draining pelvic veins. Venous intravasation is a potential pitfall in interpretation of HSGs.

  6. CT pulmonary angiography of adult pulmonary vascular diseases: Technical considerations and interpretive pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: bedros.taslakian@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NY (United States); Latson, Larry A., E-mail: larry.latson@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NY (United States); Truong, Mylene T., E-mail: mtruong@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX (United States); Aaltonen, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Aaltonen@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NY (United States); Shiau, Maria C., E-mail: Maria.Shiau@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NY (United States); Girvin, Francis, E-mail: Francis.Girvin@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NY (United States); Alpert, Jeffrey B., E-mail: Jeffrey.Alpert@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NY (United States); Wickstrom, Maj, E-mail: Maj.Wickstrom@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NY (United States); Ko, Jane P., E-mail: Jane.Ko@nyumc.org [Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • CTPA plays a key role in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases. • Improvements in CT technology have improved visualization of pulmonary arteries. • Knowledge of the technical pitfalls is essential for accurate diagnosis. • Dual energy CT imaging enables parenchymal iodine evaluation. • An awareness of the entities affecting the pulmonary arteries is important. - Abstract: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become the primary imaging modality for evaluating the pulmonary arteries. Although pulmonary embolism is the primary indication for CTPA, various pulmonary vascular abnormalities can be detected in adults. Knowledge of these disease entities and understanding technical pitfalls that can occur when performing CTPA are essential to enable accurate diagnosis and allow timely management. This review will cover a spectrum of acquired abnormalities including pulmonary embolism due to thrombus and foreign bodies, primary and metastatic tumor involving the pulmonary arteries, pulmonary hypertension, as well as pulmonary artery aneurysms and stenoses. Additionally, methods to overcome technical pitfalls and interventional treatment options will be addressed.

  7. CT pulmonary angiography of adult pulmonary vascular diseases: Technical considerations and interpretive pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taslakian, Bedros; Latson, Larry A.; Truong, Mylene T.; Aaltonen, Eric; Shiau, Maria C.; Girvin, Francis; Alpert, Jeffrey B.; Wickstrom, Maj; Ko, Jane P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CTPA plays a key role in the evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases. • Improvements in CT technology have improved visualization of pulmonary arteries. • Knowledge of the technical pitfalls is essential for accurate diagnosis. • Dual energy CT imaging enables parenchymal iodine evaluation. • An awareness of the entities affecting the pulmonary arteries is important. - Abstract: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become the primary imaging modality for evaluating the pulmonary arteries. Although pulmonary embolism is the primary indication for CTPA, various pulmonary vascular abnormalities can be detected in adults. Knowledge of these disease entities and understanding technical pitfalls that can occur when performing CTPA are essential to enable accurate diagnosis and allow timely management. This review will cover a spectrum of acquired abnormalities including pulmonary embolism due to thrombus and foreign bodies, primary and metastatic tumor involving the pulmonary arteries, pulmonary hypertension, as well as pulmonary artery aneurysms and stenoses. Additionally, methods to overcome technical pitfalls and interventional treatment options will be addressed.

  8. Dual-energy CT for the evaluation of urinary calculi: Image interpretation, pitfalls and stone mimics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepperson, M.A.; Cernigliaro, J.G.; Sella, D.; Ibrahim, E.; Thiel, D.D.; Leng, S.; Haley, W.E.

    2013-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with a reported prevalence between 4% and 20% in developed countries. Determination of urinary calculi composition is a key factor in preoperative evaluation, treatment, and stone recurrence prevention. Prior to the introduction of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT), available methods for determining urinary stone composition were only available after stone extraction, and thereby unable to aid in optimized stone management prior to intervention. DECT utilizes the attenuation difference produced by two different x-ray energy spectra to quantify urinary calculi composition as uric acid or non-uric acid (with likely further classification in the future) while still providing the information attained with a conventional CT. Knowledge of DECT imaging pitfalls and stone mimics is important, as the added benefit of dual-energy analysis is the determination of stone composition, which in turn affects all aspects of stone management. This review briefly describes DECT principles, scanner types and acquisition protocols for the evaluation of urinary calculi as they relate to imaging pitfalls (inconsistent characterization of small stones, small dual-energy field of view, and mischaracterization from surrounding material) and stone mimics (drainage devices) that may adversely impact clinical decisions. We utilize our clinical experience from scanning over 1200 patients with this new imaging technique to present clinically relevant examples of imaging pitfalls and possible mechanisms for resolution

  9. Short overview of PSA quantification methods, pitfalls on the road from approximate to exact results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banov, Reni; Simic, Zdenko; Sterc, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Over time the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) models have become an invaluable companion in the identification and understanding of key nuclear power plant (NPP) vulnerabilities. PSA is an effective tool for this purpose as it assists plant management to target resources where the largest benefit for plant safety can be obtained. PSA has quickly become an established technique to numerically quantify risk measures in nuclear power plants. As complexity of PSA models increases, the computational approaches become more or less feasible. The various computational approaches can be basically classified in two major groups: approximate and exact (BDD based) methods. In recent time modern commercially available PSA tools started to provide both methods for PSA model quantification. Besides availability of both methods in proven PSA tools the usage must still be taken carefully since there are many pitfalls which can drive to wrong conclusions and prevent efficient usage of PSA tool. For example, typical pitfalls involve the usage of higher precision approximation methods and getting a less precise result, or mixing minimal cuts and prime implicants in the exact computation method. The exact methods are sensitive to selected computational paths in which case a simple human assisted rearrangement may help and even switch from computationally non-feasible to feasible methods. Further improvements to exact method are possible and desirable which opens space for a new research. In this paper we will show how these pitfalls may be detected and how carefully actions must be done especially when working with large PSA models. (authors)

  10. Pitfalls associated with open reduction and internal fixation of fractured ribs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarani, Babak; Schulte, Leah; Diaz, Jose J

    2015-12-01

    Rib fracture is exceedingly common and remains a leading cause of death in patients with chest injury. Probability of death increases by 19% with each broken rib, and the probability of death increases further with age. Treatment is centered on pain control and early mobilization to provide adequate pulmonary hygiene. Multimodality interventions, such as incentive spirometry, postural changes, and coughing, are pivotal in minimizing the risk of pneumonia and death. Recently, many studies have found mortality benefit to operation fixation (ORIF) of ribs in select patients. However, this procedure remains underutilized partly due to lack of familiarity with its technique and pitfalls by trauma surgeons, in particular. Whereas there are publications on operative technique, there are no studies describing pitfalls associated with this procedure. The purpose of this paper is to describe pitfalls on the technical aspects of ORIF of the ribs based on the medical literature where possible and based on our experience in instances where peer reviewed evidence is lacking. The paper is not meant to serve as a protocol for managing rib fractures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Active Search on Carcasses versus Pitfall Traps: a Comparison of Sampling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, N I; Camina, R; Visciarelli, E C; Centeno, N D

    2016-04-01

    The study of insect succession in cadavers and the classification of arthropods have mostly been done by placing a carcass in a cage, protected from vertebrate scavengers, which is then visited periodically. An alternative is to use specific traps. Few studies on carrion ecology and forensic entomology involving the carcasses of large vertebrates have employed pitfall traps. The aims of this study were to compare both sampling methods (active search on a carcass and pitfall trapping) for each coleopteran family, and to establish whether there is a discrepancy (underestimation and/or overestimation) in the presence of each family by either method. A great discrepancy was found for almost all families with some of them being more abundant in samples obtained through active search on carcasses and others in samples from traps, whereas two families did not show any bias towards a given sampling method. The fact that families may be underestimated or overestimated by the type of sampling technique highlights the importance of combining both methods, active search on carcasses and pitfall traps, in order to obtain more complete information on decomposition, carrion habitat and cadaveric families or species. Furthermore, a hypothesis advanced on the reasons for the underestimation by either sampling method showing biases towards certain families. Information about the sampling techniques indicating which would be more appropriate to detect or find a particular family is provided.

  12. The Three Pitfalls of Sustainable City: A Conceptual Framework for Evaluating the Theory-Practice Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Saiu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades the environmental, economic and social crisis and the challenges and possibilities offered by new technologies have become the drivers of plans and projects for sustainable cities. In the face of a wide experimentation, the aim of this paper is to answer the question: what progress is implemented by the goal of sustainable city? To this end, I hold it is important point at the watershed between the declared intended goals of the projects realized to date and the results on the ground. To analyze this discrepancy, I have identified a common theory-practice gap in the form of the three pitfalls of sustainable city, which bring about economic and ethical conflicts and risks creating socio-spatial utopias. The three pitfalls are: (1 the idea of the city as a business; (2 the oversimplification of urban complexity; (3 the quest for the ideal community. This conceptual framework has two purposes. First, it helps to systematize the existing literature on the sustainable city project, focusing on few selected issues. Second, it offers a project evaluation framework, useful both for the management of resources and for the planning of urban space. To pinpoint these pitfalls in projects for sustainable cities could allow us to adopt a holistic approach to the city project and practice.

  13. Promises, pitfalls and practicalities of prenatal whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Sunayna; Wou, Karen; Vora, Neeta; Van der Veyver, Ignatia B; Wapner, Ronald; Chitty, Lyn S

    2018-01-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnosis provides information for pregnancy and perinatal decision-making and management. In several small series, prenatal whole exome sequencing (WES) approaches have identified genetic diagnoses when conventional tests (karyotype and microarray) were not diagnostic. Here, we review published prenatal WES studies and recent conference abstracts. Thirty-one studies were identified, with diagnostic rates in series of five or more fetuses varying between 6.2% and 80%. Differences in inclusion criteria and trio versus singleton approaches to sequencing largely account for the wide range of diagnostic rates. The data suggest that diagnostic yields will be greater in fetuses with multiple anomalies or in cases preselected following genetic review. Beyond its ability to improve diagnostic rates, we explore the potential of WES to improve understanding of prenatal presentations of genetic disorders and lethal fetal syndromes. We discuss prenatal phenotyping limitations, counselling challenges regarding variants of uncertain significance, incidental and secondary findings, and technical problems in WES. We review the practical, ethical, social and economic issues that must be considered before prenatal WES could become part of routine testing. Finally, we reflect upon the potential future of prenatal genetic diagnosis, including a move towards whole genome sequencing and non-invasive whole exome and whole genome testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Pitfalls in diagnosing limbic encephalitis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerling, F; Blümcke, I; Stefan, H

    2008-11-01

    The syndrome of limbic encephalitis (LE) is characterized by subacute onset of temporal lobe epilepsy, loss of short-term memory, cognitive confusion and psychiatric symptoms. We report a patient with pharmacoresistant epilepsy who underwent presurgical video-electroencephalogram (EEG)-monitoring with normal psychiatric and neuropsychological findings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a hyperintense lesion within the right amygdala but no contrast enhancement. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis and positive oligoclonal bands, but all tests for neurotropic viruses or borrelia antibodies were negative. Presurgical evaluation identified a right mesiotemporal focus. As a tumour was the most likely differential diagnosis, we performed selective amygdalohippocampectomy of the right hemisphere. Subsequent histopathological examination revealed the surprising diagnosis of LE. As a consequence, tumour screening was initiated and a testicular carcinoma with high anti-Ma2-antibody titres was detected. Following surgical and chemotherapeutical treatment, the patient was seizure-free and Ma2-antibodies decreased below detection limits. Conclusion - This case report highlights that LE has to be considered even in patients with atypical clinical presentation, i.e. without neuropsychological deficits, if CSF analysis reveals an inflammatory response. When LE is diagnosed, extensive tumour search is mandatory to detect and treat the paraneoplastic origin of LE. Therapeutic strategies of LE include surgical treatment as well as early immunosuppression.

  15. PARTIAL OCULOCUTANEOUS ALBINISM AND IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROMES: TEN YEARS EXPERIENCE FROM A SINGLE CENTER IN TURKEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiroglu, T; Akar, H H; Unal, E; Chiang, S C; Schlums, H; Tesi, B; Ozkars, M Y; Karakukcu, M

    2016-01-01

    Partial oculocutaneous albinism and immunodeficiency (OCA-ID) diseases are autosomal recessive syndromes characterized by partial hypopigmentation and recurrent infections. Moreover, some OCA-ID syndromes confer susceptibility to develop a life-threatening hyperinflammatory condition called hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We investigated the genetic, clinical and immunological characteristics of 20 OCA patients. Herein, we present the clinical and immunological characteristics of 20 OCA patients who referred to the Department of Pediatric Immunology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty in Kayseri, Turkey between 2004 and 2014. Of the 20 OCA patients, 7 fulfilled diagnostic criteria for HLH, 9 showed defective functions of CD8 T cells and natural killer cells, and 8 received a definitive molecular diagnosis. Among the patients, we also report a patient diagnosed with two different genetic defects, in TYR and JAK3 genes, causing, respectively, OCA and ID. Our results illustrate the variability of clinical presentations and disease severity in OCA-ID patients, with consequent challenges in diagnosing and treating these patients.

  16. Two Novel Mutations Identified in an African-American Child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Morrone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, coagulopathy and late-onset, progressive neurological dysfunction. It also has an “accelerated phase” characterized by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. The disease is caused by mutations in the CHS1/LYST gene located on chromosome 1, which affects lysosome morphology and function. We report the case of an African-American child with CHS in Case. This 16-month old African-American girl presented with fever and lethargy. The proband had pale skin compared to her parents, with light brown eyes, silvery hair and massive hepatosplenomegaly. Her laboratory evaluation was remarkable for pancytopenia, high serum ferritin and an elevated LDH. Bone marrow aspirate revealed large inclusions in granulocytes and erythrophagocytosis consistent with HLH. Genetic evaluation revealed two novel nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene: c.3622C>T (p.Q1208X and c.11002G>T (p.E3668X. Conclusions. Our patient is one of the few cases of CHS reported in the African American population. We identified 2 nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene, the first mutation analysis published of an African-American child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome. These two mutations predict a severe phenotype and thus identification of these mutations has an important clinical significance in CHS.

  17. Behind a mask: tricks, pitfalls, and prejudices for noninvasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    It is difficult to exactly date the beginning of mechanical ventilation, but there are no doubts that noninvasive ventilation (NIV) was the first method of ventilatory support in clinical practice. The technique had a sudden increase in popularity, so that it is now considered, according to criteria of evidence-based medicine, the first-line treatment for an episode of acute respiratory failure in 4 pathologies (the Fabulous Four): COPD exacerbation, cardiogenic pulmonary edema, pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients, and in the weaning of extubated COPD patients. The so-called emerging applications are those for which the evidence has not achieved level A, mainly because the number or sample size of the published studies does not allow conclusive meta-analysis. These emerging applications are the post-surgical period, palliation of dyspnea, asthma attack, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and to prevent extubation failure. Potentially "risky business" uses include for respiratory failure from pandemic diseases and ARDS, where probably the "secret" for success is early use. Healthcare is rich in evidence-based innovations, yet even when such innovations are implemented successfully in one location, they often disseminate slowly, if at all, so their clinical use remains limited and heterogeneous. The low rate of NIV use in some hospitals relates to lack of knowledge about or experience with NIV, insufficient confidence in the technique, lack of NIV equipment, and inadequate funding. But NIV use has been increasing around the world, thanks partly to improved technologies. The skill and confidence of clinicians in NIV have improved with time and experience, but NIV is and should remain a team effort, rather than the property of a single local "champion," because, overall, NIV is beautiful!

  18. [Pitfalls in hypertension management--misjudgements in diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholze, J; Rautenberg, B; Hansen, A

    2002-11-08

    A 71-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, diabetes type 2, peripheral vascular disease and Sjögren's syndrome presented with progressive weakness, dizziness, insomnia, palpitations and headache. These symptoms did not improve by changing her antihypertensive treatment. The patient's general condition was quite normal and there were no signs of acute or chronic cardiopulmonary decompensation. Besides arterial hypertension, she also had an elevated body mass index, dyslipoproteinemia, microalbuminuria, diabetic metabolism, left ventricular hypertrophy with signs of an abnormal diastolic cardiac function as well as atherosclerotic lesions (in both carotid arteries) which were identified as the patient's cardiovascular risk factors. Ambulant blood pressure monitoring revealed decreasing BP values for a period of 5 hrs after drug intake but, subsequently, severe hypertensive values (up to 220 mmHg systolic) without adequate decrease at night. Moreover, a hyperkinetic regulation of her circulation was demonstrated by hemodynamic monitoring and assessment of the autonomic nervous system. By changing drug treatment, i. e. administration of an anti-adrenergic calcium antagonist of the non-dihydropyridine type combined with an ACE inhibitor and a diuretic, respectively, (both given in fixed combinations) led to the normalization of the blood pressure and pulse rate as well as an improvement of the patient's condition. This case emphasizes the importance of ambulant blood pressure monitoring and an assessment of the heart rate in individually adapted antihypertensive drug therapy. The application of metabolically neutral fixed drug combinations with special regard to associated diseases, organ protection and the patient's compliance resulted in normotensive blood pressure values and an improvement of the quality of life.

  19. Laboratory Assays in Evaluation of Lynch Syndrome in Patients with Endometrial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Bojana; Broaddus, Russell R

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the main tissue testing modalities for Lynch Syndrome in the pathology laboratory, such as immunohistochemistry and PCR based analyses, and discusses their routine application, interpretation pitfalls, and troubleshooting of common technical performance issues. Discrepancies between laboratory and genetic testing may arise, and are examined in the context of the complexity of molecular abnormalities associated with Lynch Syndrome. The merits of targeted versus universal screening in a changing healthcare climate are addressed. In the absence of comprehensive screening programs, specific tumor topography and histological features that may prompt pathologist-initiated molecular tumor testing are outlined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pitfalls in the ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ato D

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dai Ato Gakujutsu Shien Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan Background: The ankle-brachial index (ABI and pulse wave velocity (PWV are indices of atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. The Japan-made measuring devices of those indices have spread widely because of their convenience and the significance of the parameters. However, studies that comprehensively discuss the various pitfalls in using these indices are not available.Methods: This study presents several representative pitfalls in using the ABI and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV by showing the result sheets of the device, “the Vascular Profiler”. Furthermore, some considerations when utilizing these indices in the future are also discussed.Results: Several diseases such as arteriosclerosis obliterans (ASO, arterial calcification in the lower limb, arterial stenosis in the right upper-limb, aortic valve diseases, arterial stenosis in the upper-limb of the contralateral side of the hemodialysis access, are the representative pitfalls when evaluating ABI and baPWV. Moreover, a measurement error is found to actually exist. Furthermore, same phenomena are considered most likely to occur when using other similar indices and devices.Conclusion: The ABI and baPWV are the useful and significant biomarkers. Nevertheless, caution is sometimes necessary when interpreting them. Moreover, rigorous patient exclusion criteria should be considered when using those indices in the severely conditioned patient population. And the results of this study can be applied to enhance the literacy using other indices, such as the cardio-ankle vascular index and other similar devices. Keywords: ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, peripheral arterial disease, aortic valve disease, hemodialysis

  1. Imaging Spectrum and Pitfalls of (11)C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomography in a Series of Patients with Intracranial Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kimiteru; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kubota, Kazoo

    2016-01-01

    (11)C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of (11)C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological (11)C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during (11)C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of (11)C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of (11)C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses.

  2. Imaging spectrum and pitfalls of 11C-methionine position emission tomography in a series of patients with intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kimiteru; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kubota, Kazoo

    2016-01-01

    11 C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of 11 C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological 11 C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during 11 C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of 11 C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of 11 C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses

  3. Illusory consolidation of the left lower lobe: A pitfall of portable radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylak, C.J.; Litteton, J.T.; Lighter, M.D.; Zurizch, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    A frequent finding on a portable chest radiography is obscuration of the left hemidiaphragm. Experimental evidence based on radiography of a frozen unembalmed human chest phantom corroborated the hypothesis that this finding can be the result of tube angulation. Clinical examples are provided that supplement the experimental evidence. To avoid this potential pitfall it is essential that the patient be imaged in a position which will ensure that the hemidiaphragm is tangent to the beam. To do otherwise can mislead, creating the false impression of disease in the left lower lobe or pleural space

  4. Going single but not solo with podocytes: potentials, limitations, and pitfalls of single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Mario

    2017-11-01

    Single-cell RNA-sequence (RNA-seq) is a widely used tool to study biological questions in single cells. The discussed study identified 92 genes being predominantly expressed in podocytes based on a 5-fold higher expression compared with endothelial and mesangial cells. In addition to technical pitfalls, the question that is discussed in this commentary is whether results of a single-cell RNAseq study are able to deliver expression data that truly characterize a podocyte. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PET kinetic analysis --pitfalls and a solution for the Logan plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Naganawa, Mika; Shidahara, Miho; Ikoma, Yoko; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The Logan plot is a widely used algorithm for the quantitative analysis of neuroreceptors using PET because it is easy to use and simple to implement. The Logan plot is also suitable for receptor imaging because its algorithm is fast. However, use of the Logan plot, and interpretation of the formed receptor images should be regarded with caution, because noise in PET data causes bias in the Logan plot estimates. In this paper, we describe the basic concept of the Logan plot in detail and introduce three algorithms for the Logan plot. By comparing these algorithms, we demonstrate the pitfalls of the Logan plot and discuss the solution.

  6. Can artificial parthenogenesis sidestep ethical pitfalls in human therapeutic cloning? An historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangerau, H

    2005-01-01

    The aim of regenerative medicine is to reconstruct tissue that has been lost or pathologically altered. Therapeutic cloning seems to offer a method of achieving this aim; however, the ethical debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning is highly controversial. Artificial parthenogenesis—obtaining embryos from unfertilised eggs—seems to offer a way to sidestep these ethical pitfalls. Jacques Loeb (1859–1924), the founding father of artificial parthogenesis, faced negative public opinion when he published his research in 1899. His research, the public's response to his findings, and his ethical foundations serve as an historical argument both for the communication of science and compromise in biological research. PMID:16319240

  7. Retroperitoneal Inflammatory Liposarcoma in a Patient with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report Highlighting Diagnostic Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy S. Lim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Well differentiated liposarcoma (WDLS is the commonest subtype of liposarcoma. Recognised subtypes of WDLSs are lipoma-like, sclerosing, spindle cell and inflammatory. The inflammatory variant of WDLS also known as “lymphocyte-rich liposarcoma” is rare. We present a case of inflammatory WDLS occurring in the retroperitoneum, in a patient with a past history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We outline the histological features, discuss the differential diagnoses and highlight the diagnostic pitfalls in interpretation of this lesion on fine needle biopsy.

  8. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy using Transforaminal Endoscopic Spine System technique: Pitfalls that a beginner should avoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Angoules, Antonios G; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2017-12-18

    Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy (TPED) is a minimally invasive technique mainly used for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation from a lateral approach. Performed under local anesthesia, TPED has been proven to be a safe and effective technique which has been also associated with shorter rehabilitation period, reduced blood loss, trauma, and scar tissue compared to conventional procedures. However, the procedure should be performed by a spine surgeon experienced in the specific technique and capable of recognizing or avoiding various challenging conditions. In this review, pitfalls that a novice surgeon has to be mindful of, are reported and analyzed.

  9. MR spectroscopy in children: protocols and pitfalls in non-tumorous brain pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jacques F. [University Children' s Hospital Basel (UKBB), Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) delivers information about cell content and metabolism in a noninvasive manner. The diagnostic strength of MRS lies in its evaluation of pathologies in combination with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRS in children has been most widely used to evaluate brain conditions like tumors, infections, metabolic diseases or learning disabilities and especially in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. This article reviews some basic theoretical considerations, routine procedures, protocols and pitfalls and will illustrate the range of spectrum alterations occurring in some non-tumorous pediatric brain pathologies. (orig.)

  10. History of Science as Interdisciplinary Education in American Colleges: Its Origins, Advantages, and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Viterbo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Before 1950, history of science did not exist as an independent academic branch, but was instead pursued by practitioners across various humanities and scientific disciplines. After professionalization, traces of its prehistory as a cross-disciplinary area of interest bound to an interdisciplinary, educational philosophy have remained. This essay outlines the development of history of science as an interdisciplinary academic field, and argues that it constitutes an obvious choice for inclusion in an interdisciplinary academic program, provided faculty and administrators learn how best to manage its advantages and pitfalls.

  11. Pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of oncologic PET/CT of the chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Capobianco, Julia; Oliveira, Marco Antonio Conde de, E-mail: gustavo.meirelles@grupofleury.com.br [Grupo Fleury, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    PET/CT is widely used for the evaluation of patients with thoracic malignancies. Although the levels of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake are usually high in neoplastic diseases, they can also be physiological, due to artifacts. In addition, FDG uptake can occur in benign conditions such as infectious, inflammatory, and iatrogenic lesions. Furthermore, some malignant tumors, such as adenocarcinoma in situ (formerly known as bronchoalveolar carcinoma) and carcinoid tumors, may not show FDG uptake. Here, we illustrate the main pitfalls and artifacts in the interpretation of the results of oncologic PET/CT of the chest, outlining strategies for avoiding misinterpretation. (author)

  12. MR spectroscopy in children: protocols and pitfalls in non-tumorous brain pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Jacques F.

    2016-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) delivers information about cell content and metabolism in a noninvasive manner. The diagnostic strength of MRS lies in its evaluation of pathologies in combination with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRS in children has been most widely used to evaluate brain conditions like tumors, infections, metabolic diseases or learning disabilities and especially in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. This article reviews some basic theoretical considerations, routine procedures, protocols and pitfalls and will illustrate the range of spectrum alterations occurring in some non-tumorous pediatric brain pathologies. (orig.)

  13. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  14. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  15. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  16. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  17. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  18. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis (RP; also known as Caplan syndrome) is swelling (inflammation) and scarring of the ... avoid exposure to inorganic dust. Alternative Names RP; Caplan syndrome; Pneumoconiosis - rheumatoid; Silicosis - rheumatoid pneumoconiosis; Coal worker's ...

  19. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  20. Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado Junior, C.W.; Bresser, A.; Cerri, G.G.; Habr-Gama, A.; Pinotti, H.W.; Magalhaes, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of familiar poliposis of colon related to a right mandibular osteoma is reported (this association is usually called Gardner's syndrome). Radiologic pictures ae shown and some commentaries about this syndrome concerning the treatment are made. (author) [pt

  1. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ... have also been reported. × Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ...

  2. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  3. Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000308.htm Bartter syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bartter syndrome is a group of rare conditions that affect ...

  4. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other possible long-term consequences of the syndrome. Children with Pendred syndrome should start early treatment to gain communication skills, such as learning sign language or cued speech or learning to ...

  5. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad program of basic and clinical research on all types of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome. Study of the genetic defects responsible for Dravet syndrome and related ... Publications Definition Dravet ...

  6. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome increases as a woman gets older. Down syndrome cannot be cured. Early treatment programs can help improve skills. They may include ... occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many ... Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of ...

  7. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  8. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) × Definition Aicardi syndrome is a rare genetic ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) View Full Definition Treatment There is no ...

  9. Dravets syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy and early childhood. Most cases of Dravet syndrome seem to be due to a genetic defect causing the sodium channel to malfunction. We describe the main features of the syndrome. This epilepsy is medically intractable, but we call attention...... to the fact that some medications are of benefit and some could exacerbate the condition. Early recognition of the syndrome including by genetic testing could possibly improve outcome and reduce the need for other specialized investigations. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Feb-22...

  10. A tutorial review of functional connectivity analysis methods and their interpretational pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre M Bastos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oscillatory neuronal activity may provide a mechanism for dynamic network coordination. Rhythmic neuronal interactions can be quantified using multiple metrics, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. This tutorial will review and summarize current analysis methods used in the field of invasive and non-invasive electrophysiology to study the dynamic connections between neuronal populations. First, we review metrics for functional connectivity, including coherence, phase synchronization, phase-slope index, and Granger causality, with the specific aim to provide an intuition for how these metrics work, as well as their quantitative definition. Next, we highlight a number of interpretational caveats and common pitfalls that can arise when performing functional connectivity analysis, including the common reference problem, the signal to noise ratio problem, the volume conduction problem, the common input problem, and the trial sample size bias problem. These pitfalls will be illustrated by presenting a set of MATLAB-scripts, which can be executed by the reader to simulate each of these potential problems. We discuss of how these issues can be addressed using current methods.

  11. Logistic regression modelling: procedures and pitfalls in developing and interpreting prediction models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Šarlija

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sheds light on the most common issues related to applying logistic regression in prediction models for company growth. The purpose of the paper is 1 to provide a detailed demonstration of the steps in developing a growth prediction model based on logistic regression analysis, 2 to discuss common pitfalls and methodological errors in developing a model, and 3 to provide solutions and possible ways of overcoming these issues. Special attention is devoted to the question of satisfying logistic regression assumptions, selecting and defining dependent and independent variables, using classification tables and ROC curves, for reporting model strength, interpreting odds ratios as effect measures and evaluating performance of the prediction model. Development of a logistic regression model in this paper focuses on a prediction model of company growth. The analysis is based on predominantly financial data from a sample of 1471 small and medium-sized Croatian companies active between 2009 and 2014. The financial data is presented in the form of financial ratios divided into nine main groups depicting following areas of business: liquidity, leverage, activity, profitability, research and development, investing and export. The growth prediction model indicates aspects of a business critical for achieving high growth. In that respect, the contribution of this paper is twofold. First, methodological, in terms of pointing out pitfalls and potential solutions in logistic regression modelling, and secondly, theoretical, in terms of identifying factors responsible for high growth of small and medium-sized companies.

  12. Pitfalls in penetrating thoracic trauma (lessons we learned the hard way...).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degiannis, Elias; Zinn, Richard Joseph

    2008-10-01

    The majority of patients with penetrating thoracic trauma are managed non-operatively. Those requiring surgery usually go to theater with physiological instability. The critical condition of these patients coupled with the rarity of penetrating thoracic trauma in most European countries makes their surgical management challenging for the occasional trauma surgeon, who is usually trained as a general surgeon. Most general surgeons have a general knowledge of basic cardiothoracic operative surgery, knowledge originating from their training years and possibly enhanced by reading operative surgery textbooks. Unfortunately, the details included in most of these books are not extensive enough to provide him with enough armamentaria to tackle the difficult case. In this anatomical region, their operative dexterity and knowledge cannot be compared to that of their cardiothoracic colleagues, something that is taken for granted in their cardiothoracic trauma textbooks. Techniques that are considered basic and easy by the cardiothoracic surgeons can be unfamiliar and difficult to general surgeons. Knowing the danger points and the pitfalls that will be encountered in cardiothoracic trauma surgery will help them to avoid intraoperative errors and improve patient outcome. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight the commonly encountered pitfalls by trauma surgeons operating on penetrating trauma to the chest.

  13. Elevation of CD16+CD56+ NK-cells and down-regulation of serum interleukin-21 (IL-21) and IL-1α after splenectomy in relapsed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingshi; Han, Wei; Gao, Zhuo; Wang, Yini; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Jia; Lai, Wenyuan; Wang, Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Encouraging progress has been made in application of splenectomy in the treatment of relapsed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) of unknown cause. The aim was to determine the roles of lymphocyte subpopulations and inflammatory cytokines in splenectomy. We retrospectively analyzed changes in lymphocyte subpopulations and levels of inflammatory cytokines at different time-points before and after splenectomy in the patients with relapsed HLH of unknown cause, as well as the correlations between these changes and the disease prognosis. During the period from June 2006 to June 2016, we enrolled 107 patients with relapsed HLH of unknown cause, of whom 29 were treated with splenectomy. Among the 29 patients, 7 cases were non-Hodgkin lymphomas based on spleen pathology, 1 case withdrew and the remaining 21 non-lymphoma cases were available for analysis. Results showed a significant increase in both percentage of CD16 + CD56 + NK cells (P = 0.003) and NK cell activity (P = 0.028) at 24 wk after splenectomy compared to their baseline pre-surgery levels. We also examined seven patients for the changes in cytokine levels before and after splenectomy and found that IL-21 and IL-1α decreased at 4 wk after splenectomy (P splenectomy had significantly longer survival (P = 0.001) compared to the 24 patients with relapsed HLH of unknown cause who were also determined as NR but not treated by splenectomy. Splenectomy can improve clinical symptoms and survival of patients with relapsed HLH of unknown cause. The mechanism is likely related to the changes in percent NK cells and cytokines (IL-21 and IL-1α) after surgery.

  14. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, Sarah; Banks, Taylor A

    2015-01-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction. To increase awareness of the potential for recurrence in patients with a history of DRESS syndrome and provide a brief review of the clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management of this disease process. The authors selected and reviewed salient articles on the topic and incorporated pertinent information from the patient's clinical course. A case of recurrent DRESS triggered by a structurally unrelated drug is presented, followed by discussion of the clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management. Clinical pearls and pitfalls are emphasized for the practicing allergist, clinical immunologist, and fellow-in-training. The most important steps in the treatment of this condition are the identification and removal of the offending agent. Providers should be aware of the potential for recurrent DRESS and recognize the importance of prompt management.

  15. Sonography of the neonatal spine: part 1, Normal anatomy, imaging pitfalls, and variations that may simulate disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Lisa H; Johanek, Andrew J; Moore, Charlotte W

    2007-03-01

    Our objective is to discuss neonatal spine sonography with emphasis on imaging pitfalls and normal variants that may simulate disease and to distinguish them from true spinal disorders. Sonography of the neonatal spine is now accepted as a highly sensitive, readily available screening study that can be used to evaluate various anomalies of the lumbar spine in most infants younger than 4 months.

  16. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  17. Refeeding syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, Padmini; Dash, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal medical condition that may affect malnourished patients in response to an inappropriately rapid overfeeding. This commonly occurs following the institution of nutritional support, especially parenteral or enteral nutrition. The most characteristic pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome relates to the rapid consumption of phosphate after glucose intake and subsequent hypophosphatemia. Refeeding syndrome can manifest as either metabolic changes (hypokala...

  18. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  19. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contain aspirin. Some hospitals and medical facilities conduct newborn screenings for fatty acid oxidation disorders to determine which children are at greater risk of developing Reye's syndrome. ...

  20. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, the French ... immediately. What's Life Like for Teens With Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome affects people differently, so life is not ...

  1. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most common inherited ... FAQ Top of page Additional Resources For Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome [nlm.nih.gov] From Medline Plus Marfan ...

  2. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  3. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Usher Syndrome What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher syndrome ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  4. Limitations and pitfalls of climate change impact analysis on urban rainfall extremes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, P.; Olsson, J.; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    Under the umbrella of the IWA/IAHR Joint Committee on Urban Drainage, the International Working Group on Urban Rainfall (IGUR) has reviewed existing methodologies for the analysis of long-term historical and future trends in urban rainfall extremes and their effects on urban drainage systems, due...... to anthropogenic climate change. Current practices have several limitations and pitfalls, which are important to be considered by trend or climate change impact modellers and users of trend/impact results. Climate change may well be the driver that ensures that changes in urban drainage paradigms are identified...... and suitable solutions implemented. Design and optimization of urban drainage infrastructure considering climate change impacts and co-optimizing with other objectives will become ever more important to keep our cities liveable into the future....

  5. Regressive research: The pitfalls of post hoc data selection in the study of unconscious mental processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, David R

    2017-06-01

    Many studies of unconscious processing involve comparing a performance measure (e.g., some assessment of perception or memory) with an awareness measure (such as a verbal report or a forced-choice response) taken either concurrently or separately. Unconscious processing is inferred when above-chance performance is combined with null awareness. Often, however, aggregate awareness is better than chance, and data analysis therefore employs a form of extreme group analysis focusing post hoc on participants, trials, or items where awareness is absent or at chance. The pitfalls of this analytic approach are described with particular reference to recent research on implicit learning and subliminal perception. Because of regression to the mean, the approach can mislead researchers into erroneous conclusions concerning unconscious influences on behavior. Recommendations are made about future use of post hoc selection in research on unconscious cognition.

  6. Is NF-kappaB a good target for cancer therapy? Hopes and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Véronique; Karin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription factors have a key role in many physiological processes such as innate and adaptive immune responses, cell proliferation, cell death, and inflammation. It has become clear that aberrant regulation of NF-kappaB and the signalling pathways that control its activity are involved in cancer development and progression, as well as in resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This article discusses recent evidence from cancer genetics and cancer genome studies that support the involvement of NF-kappaB in human cancer, particularly in multiple myeloma. The therapeutic potential and benefit of targeting NF-kappaB in cancer, and the possible complications and pitfalls of such an approach, are explored.

  7. Processing of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) at DOE's Fernald Site: Success and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luken, D.W.; Brettschneider, D.J.; Heck, R.P. III; White, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    After 36 years of operation, uranium production at the Department of Energy Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was halted in 1989. Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate (UNH) had been produced during the uranium refining. In June 1991, DOE determined the UNH to be a mixed hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. A UNH Neutralization Project began processing UNH stored in stainless steel tanks located in various areas within the Fernald Plant 2/3 Complex. It was discovered that the valves, flanges, and other fittings of the UNH storage tanks were leaking. This made processing the UNH a high priority and Comprehensive, Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Removal Action No. 20, Stabilization of UNH Inventories, was initiated. This report presents the successes and pitfalls of the cleanup of UNH

  8. Possible pitfalls in the search for uranium deposits using lake sediments and lake waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinson, A.A.; Bland, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    The organic-rich sediments from the centres of Canadian lakes are a valuable sampling medium in the search for uranium. However, because of the young age of hydromorphically transported uranium in these sediments, which must post-date the last period of glaciation, there has been insufficient time for the isotope 214 Bi to reach equilibrium with its ancestor 238 U. This results in equivalent uranium (eU) values significantly lower than actual uranium values determined by fluorometry or delayed neutron activation analysis. Radiometric ( 226 Ra) analyses of 12 centre-lake sediments from Seahorse Lake, Saskatchewan illustrate the potential pitfalls which may be encountered using gamma-ray spectrometry, as only 3-8% of the actual uranium present in most of the samples would have been detected. (author)

  9. Methods and pitfalls of measuring thermal preference and tolerance in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Agustín; Rusch, Travis W

    2017-08-01

    Understanding methodological and biological sources of bias during the measurement of thermal parameters is essential for the advancement of thermal biology. For more than a century, studies on lizards have deepened our understanding of thermal ecophysiology, employing multiple methods to measure thermal preferences and tolerances. We reviewed 129 articles concerned with measuring preferred body temperature (PBT), voluntary thermal tolerance, and critical temperatures of lizards to offer: a) an overview of the methods used to measure and report these parameters, b) a summary of the methodological and biological factors affecting thermal preference and tolerance, c) recommendations to avoid identified pitfalls, and d) directions for continued progress in our application and understanding of these thermal parameters. We emphasize the need for more methodological and comparative studies. Lastly, we urge researchers to provide more detailed methodological descriptions and suggest ways to make their raw data more informative to increase the utility of thermal biology studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. THE PITFALLS OF THE BLUE OCEAN STRATEGY IMPLICATIONS OF “THE SIX PATHS FRAMEWORK”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Peter; Saghaug, Kristin Margrethe; Clemmensen, Suberia

    The Blue Ocean Strategy (Kim & Mauborgne 2005) has been one of the most important analytical techniques related to the area of innovation and new business model (BM) innovation since 2005. Today many consultancies and managers responsible for innovation use the Blue Ocean framework as one...... of their top 5 innovation tools. Addressing the Blue Ocean framework’s tools, this paper will accentuate the importance of using the Six Paths framework carefully when generating new business models. It is important to understand The Six Paths frame work’s foundation – value. This paper address the questions......: What does it mean to innovate values related to the Six Paths framework? and What are the implications, challenges and pitfalls of the Blue Ocean Strategy’s Six Paths frame work – related to exploring and developing the values inherent in the company, when pursuing to create a new market?...

  11. Private Protected Areas as policy instruments to tackle environmental challenges: discussing potentialities and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Iannuzzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protected Areas owned and managed by private actors are expected to have a relevant role in nature conservation policy as an additional tool to public-run protected sites. By reducing natural habitats destruction and degradation, well designed and well governed private protected areas (PPAs can have a key role in tackling two intertwined global threats: biodiversity loss and climate change. In this article we will present PPAs diffusion in Europe basing on data collected from the European Common Database on Nationally Designated Areas. In addition, an assessment framework will be proposed, with the purpose of contributing to a broader understanding of PPAs potentialities and pitfalls. The main challenges for PPAs effectiveness deal with their geographical distribution and their ability to provide strong and stable legal structures for private protection, assuring adequate and inclusive governance.

  12. Conducting interdisciplinary research to promote healthy and safe employment in health care: promises and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatin, Craig; Galizzi, Monica; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Mawn, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Due to the complexity of human health, emphasis is increasingly being placed on the need for and conduct of multidisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary health research. Yet many academic and research organizations--and the discipline-specific associations and journals--may not yet be prepared to adopt changes necessary to optimally support interdisciplinary work. This article presents an ongoing interdisciplinary research project's efforts to investigate mechanisms and pathways that lead to occupational health disparities among healthcare workers. It describes the promises and pitfalls encountered during the research,and outlines effective strategies that emerged as a result. Lessons learned include: conflict resolution regarding theoretical and methodological differences; establishing a sense of intellectual ownership of the research, as well as guidelines for multiple authorship; and development and utilization of protocols, communication systems, and tools. This experience suggests a need for the establishment of supportive structures and processes to promote successful interdisciplinary research.

  13. Promises and Pitfalls of Computer-Supported Mindfulness: Exploring a Situated Mobile Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Vacca

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer-supported mindfulness (CSM is a burgeoning area filled with varied approaches such as mobile apps and EEG headbands. However, many of the approaches focus on providing meditation guidance. The ubiquity of mobile devices may provide new opportunities to support mindfulness practices that are more situated in everyday life. In this paper, a new situated mindfulness approach is explored through a specific mobile app design. Through an experimental design, the approach is compared to traditional audio-based mindfulness meditation, and a mind wandering control, over a one-week period. The study demonstrates the viability for a situated mobile mindfulness approach to induce mindfulness states. However, phenomenological aspects of the situated mobile approach suggest both promises and pitfalls for computer-supported mindfulness using a situated approach.

  14. Genetic Contributions to Clinical Pain and Analgesia: Avoiding Pitfalls in Genetic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungsuk; Clark, David; Dionne, Raymond A.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of human variations in pain is critical to elucidating the molecular basis of pain sensitivity, variable responses to analgesic drugs, and, ultimately, to individualized treatment of pain and improved public health. With the help of recently accumulated knowledge and advanced technologies, pain researchers hope to gain insight into genetic mechanisms of pain and eventually apply this knowledge to pain treatment. Perspective We critically reviewed the published literature to examine the strength of evidence supporting genetic influences on clinical and human experimental pain. Based on this evidence and the experience of false associations that have occurred in other related disciplines, we provide recommendations for avoiding pitfalls in pain genetic research. PMID:19559388

  15. Secreted pitfall-trap fluid of carnivorous Nepenthes plants is unsuitable for microbial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Franziska; Rott, Matthias; Rottloff, Sandy; Paetz, Christian; Hilke, Ines; Raessler, Michael; Mithöfer, Axel

    2013-03-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes possess modified leaves that form pitfall traps in order to capture prey, mainly arthropods, to make additional nutrients available for the plant. These pitchers contain a digestive fluid due to the presence of hydrolytic enzymes. In this study, the composition of the digestive fluid was further analysed with regard to mineral nutrients and low molecular-weight compounds. A potential contribution of microbes to the composition of pitcher fluid was investigated. Fluids from closed pitchers were harvested and analysed for mineral nutrients using analytical techniques based on ion-chromatography and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. Secondary metabolites were identified by a combination of LC-MS and NMR. The presence of bacteria in the pitcher fluid was investigated by PCR of 16S-rRNA genes. Growth analyses of bacteria and yeast were performed in vitro with harvested pitcher fluid and in vivo within pitchers with injected microbes. The pitcher fluid from closed pitchers was found to be primarily an approx. 25-mm KCl solution, which is free of bacteria and unsuitable for microbial growth probably due to the lack of essential mineral nutrients such as phosphate and inorganic nitrogen. The fluid also contained antimicrobial naphthoquinones, plumbagin and 7-methyl-juglone, and defensive proteins such as the thaumatin-like protein. Challenging with bacteria or yeast caused bactericide as well as fungistatic properties in the fluid. Our results reveal that Nepenthes pitcher fluids represent a dynamic system that is able to react to the presence of microbes. The secreted liquid of closed and freshly opened Nepenthes pitchers is exclusively plant-derived. It is unsuitable to serve as an environment for microbial growth. Thus, Nepenthes plants can avoid and control, at least to some extent, the microbial colonization of their pitfall traps and, thereby, reduce the need to vie with microbes for the prey

  16. Overcoming pitfalls: Results from a mandatory peer review process for written examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Kyle John; El Hajj, Maguy S; El-Bashir, Marwa; Mraiche, Fatima

    2018-04-01

    Written assessments are essential components of higher education practices. However, faculty members encounter common pitfalls when designing questions intended to evaluate student-learning outcomes. The objective of this project was to determine the impact of a mandatory examination peer review process on question accuracy, alignment with learning objectives, use of best practices in question design, and language/grammar. A mandatory peer review process was implemented for all midterm (before phase) and final (after phase) examinations. Peer review occurred by two reviewers and followed a pre-defined guidance document. Non-punitive feedback given to faculty members served as the intervention. Frequencies of flagged questions according to guidance categories were compared between phases. A total of 21 midterm and 21 final exam reviews were included in the analysis. A total of 637 questions were reviewed across all midterms and 1003 questions were reviewed across all finals. Few questions were flagged for accuracy and alignment with learning outcomes. The median total proportion of questions flagged for best practices was significantly lower for final exams versus midterm exams (15.8 vs. 6.45%, p = 0.014). The intervention did not influence language and grammar errors (9.68 vs. 10.0% of questions flagged before and after, respectively, p = 0.305). A non-punitive peer review process for written examinations can overcome pitfalls in exam creation and improve best practices in question writing. The peer-review process had a substantial effect at flagging language/grammar errors but error rate did not differ between midterm and final exams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Postural instability in subjects with parkinson’s disease undergoing different sensory pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Thaís Cardoso Da

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Previous research has reported postural instability in subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, there are still doubts about the effect of sensory stimuli on one’s balance. In this study, we further investigated the stabilometric measures of individuals with PD, analysing the impact of different sensory stimuli on the outcomes. Methods. The total of 26 participants (13 with PD and 13 matched control peers were submitted to 8 sensorimotor dynamics differing in relation to support base (30 cm vs. 10 cm, feet in parallel vs. feet in semi-tandem position, contact surface (foam vs. no foam, and visual conditions (eyes open vs. eyes closed. The measures used to assess one’s balance were body position in space, area of support base, and velocity of postural control. The variables involved the anterior-posterior and the mediolateral axes. Participants with PD were evaluated during the off medication state. Mann-Whitney U test and Friedman’s test were applied to carry out inter- and intra-group comparisons. Significance was set at 5%. Results. Cross-sectional analyses illustrated that tasks with sensory pitfalls impacted postural stability to a larger extent in PD subjects. The differences were found in anterior-posterior body position, area of support base, anterior-posterior velocity, and mediolateral velocity. Complementary analyses confirmed considerable instability on balance when support bases were small and visual information was absent (p < 0.05. Conclusions. The current results confirm worse postural stability response in subjects with PD and highlight that the interference of the sensory pitfalls is notable when individuals are off medication.

  18. Paleomagnetism Onboard the IODP Research Vessel JOIDES Resolution: Recent Advances, Best Practices, and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, G. D.; Morris, A.; Musgrave, R. J.; Zhao, X., , prof; Clement, B. M.; Evans, H. F.; Hastedt, M.; Houpt, D.; Mills, B.; Novak, B.; Petronotis, K. E.

    2017-12-01

    One of the largest openly available paleomagnetism databases is derived from paleomagnetic data acquired continuously along drill cores collected by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) and its predecessors. The bulk of data are magnetic remanences measured using superconducting rock magnetometers (SRMs) with automated track systems and in-line alternating field (AF) demagnetization units produced by 2G Enterprises. Our goal in this study is to (1) report on the new SRM that was installed onboard the JOIDES Resolution in December 2016 prior to the start of IODP Expedition 366, (2) consider best practices that may aid shipboard scientists in collecting high quality data, and (3) discuss common pitfalls associated with using an SRM in the shipboard environment to measure a diverse range of lithologies collected in metal core barrels that pass through a relatively strongly magnetized drill string. From a series of tests conducted on the new SRM during a June 11-13, 2017 port call, our main conclusion was that the new magnetometer is functioning as designed. While overall its capabilities are comparable to the previous magnetometer, the new SRM does have several significant advances, including better flux counting, which allows more strongly magnetized rocks to be measured accurately. It also performs AF demagnetizations at high fields (up to 80 mT) without imparting spurious anhysteretic magnetizations, which was a common problem in the old SRM. A worrisome observation, and one that has been made in many shore-based labs, is that devices that emit radio-frequency electromagnetic waves, like actively transmitting cell phones, interfere significantly with SRM measurements. This pitfall will likely have to be addressed on all forthcoming cruises unless better electromagnetic shielding for the SQUID sensors can be found.

  19. Potential pitfalls of steatopygia on bone imaging using Tc99m MDP and role of SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgazzar, H; Elsaid, M; Omar, A; Al-Maskery, IB

    2004-01-01

    Body habbitus influence the quality of bone scintigraphy. Steatopygia (steato: fat, pygia: buttocks) may affect the quality of bone scan since it may lead to diagnostic pitfalls. Objective: The objective of this prospective study is to evaluate the effects of steatopygia on the appearance of the lumbar spine on bone scan and the role of SPECT in overcoming fat attenuation artifact if present. Method: Bone scintigraphy, including whole body bone scan, spot views and SPECT of the lumber spine, using a dual head gamma camera, were performed on thirty adult obese patients (13 males, 17 females) with an average weight of 90 kg. referred to the department for routine bone scan. Each patient was injected intravenously with 0.25 mCi/kg (9.25 Mbq of Tc-99m MDP, and their weight and height of each patient were recorded. Whole body scan was performed using 256 X 1024 matrix size and 8 min/meter speed. SPECT was performed using 128 X 128 matrix size, 20 second-32 projections and elliptical orbit around the lumbar spine. Spot views were acquired using 256X256 matrix size for 1000 Kcounts. Results: Twenty patients (67%) (6 males, 14 females) showed steatopygia with attenuation at the lower lumber vertebrae. Diminished uptake in the lower lumbar spine and edge effect artifacts were noted on planar images mimicking abnormalities. SPECT, especially in the sagittal axis, resolved these artifacts. Conclusion: Steatopygia should be considered in the interpretation of bone scans of obese patients to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. Adding SPECT of the lumber spine to the planar imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy in obese patients by overcoming the steatopygia effect seen on whole body and spot planar images. (authors)

  20. Seckel syndrome: an overdiagnosed syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, E; Pembrey, M

    1985-01-01

    Five children in whom a diagnosis of Seckel syndrome had previously been made were re-examined in the genetic unit. One child had classical Seckel syndrome, a sib pair had the features of the syndrome with less severe short stature, and in two children the diagnosis was not confirmed. Seckel syndrome is only one of a group of low birth weight microcephalic dwarfism and careful attention should be paid to fulfillment of the major criteria defined by Seckel before the diagnosis is made. There r...

  1. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  2. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  3. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. × Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, ...

  4. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...

  5. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  6. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  7. Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid ris...

  8. Potential Pitfalls on the (99m)Tc-Mebrofenin Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy in a Patient with Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maestri Brittain, Jane; Borgwardt, Lise

    2016-01-01

    the first years of life. Kasai portoenterostomy restores bile flow and delay the progressive liver damage thereby postponing liver transplantation. An early diagnosis is of most importance to ensure the effectiveness of the operation. The (99m)Tc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy is part...... of BA. Laparotomy with antegrade cholangiography is then performed giving the final diagnosis when the remains of the obliterated biliary tree are revealed in the case of BA. We present a case demonstrating some of the challenges of interpreting the (99m)Tc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy...... in an infant with BASM and stress the importance that the (99m)Tc-Mebrofenin hepatobiliary scintigraphy is part of a spectrum of imaging modalities in diagnosing BA....

  9. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ground-foraging ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae and rainfall effect on pitfall trapping in a deciduous thorn woodland (Caatinga, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francyregis A Nunes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The semi-arid Caatinga is the fourth largest biome of Brazil, which biota still remains one of the most poorly known, especially with regard to invertebrate groups. In this study, a ground-foraging ant assemblage was surveyed during one year and the effect of rainfall on pitfall trapping was assessed. The study was performed in an area located in the municipality of Pentecoste (3º48’ S - 39º20’ W, in the State of Ceará. A 200m transect with 20 equidistant sampling points was established. Transect sampling was performed once a month during 12 months, over the period August 2008-August 2009. At each sampling point, a pitfall trap partially filled with a mixture of ethanol and monoethylene glycol was placed at the beginning of each month and remained in the field for seven days. 39 species belonging to six subfamilies and 19 genera, plus two unidentified species, were collected, with Pheidole (10 spp. and Camponotus (8 spp. being the taxa with the most species. 23 species were frequent, being found in more than 50% of the 12 transect samplings. Five species had an intermediate frequency (25 to 50%, while 13 were relatively infrequent (less than 25%. Most of the species (22 showed low occurrence, being found in less than 10% of the 240 samples (20 samples each month, during 12 months. Only five species were collected in more than 50% of the samples, those species being also responsible for most of the total abundance (number of captured individuals of all species observed each month. The speciesaccumulation curves (observed and estimated indicated that sampling sufficiency was attained, and that about 92% of the estimated ground-foraging ant fauna had been collected. 40 and 29 species were collected in the dry and rainy season, respectively, with monthly species richness ranging from 13 to 28. The total ant abundance showed a drastic decrease during the rainy season, and a negative linear correlation was found between rainfall and total ant

  11. Characterizing cardiovascular risk in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: more than the sum of its parts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alice Y; Wild, Robert A

    2009-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a condition of irregular menses and androgen excess, is the most common endocrinopathy of young women. Insulin resistance is a well-established feature among many women with PCOS, even in the nonobese. Therefore, it is not surprising that PCOS is frequently associated with cardiovascular risk factors and the metabolic syndrome. However, it is not known whether PCOS is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular (CV) events or whether CV risk is attributable to associated risk factors. We review previous studies on CV risk and disease in women with PCOS, describing the pitfalls and challenges in ascribing CV risk to PCOS. Women with PCOS might be partly reassured that their relative risk approximates that of the metabolic syndrome (RR 1.5) and also strongly counseled at the individual level about the greatest potential threat to their CV health, the development of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Imaging spectrum and pitfalls of ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in patients with tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kimiteru; Morooka, Miyako; Minamimoto, Ryogo; Miyata, Yoko; Okasaki, Momoko; Kubota, Kazuo

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most prominant diseases frequently causing false positive lesions in oncologic surveys using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), since TB granulomas are composed of activated macrophages and lymphocytes with high affinity for glucose. These pitfalls of (18)F-FDG PET/CT are important for radiologists. Being familiar with (18)F-FDG images of TB could assist in preventing unfavorable clinical results based on misdiagnoses. In addition, (18)F-FDG PET/CT has the advantage of being able to screen the whole body, and can clearly detect harboring TB lesions as high uptake foci. This article details the spectrum and pitfalls of (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in TB.

  13. Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area.

  14. Cowden syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prakash S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with variable expressions that result mainly from mutation in the PTEN gene on arm 10q. It is characterized by multiple hamartomatous neoplasms of the skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, bones, CNS, eyes, and genitourinary tract. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here we present a case of Cowden syndrome in a 14-year-old female patient with the chief complaint of multiple oral papillomatous lesions.

  15. Costello syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukara J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome is a rare, distinctive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, characterized by soft, loose skin with deep palmar and plantar creases, loose joints, distinctive coarse facial features and skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. The affected patients have a predisposition to develop malignancy, developmental delays and mental retardation. Recently, a 7-year-old male child born to normal nonconsanguineous parents presented to us with abnormal facial features, arrhythmia, mitral valve dysfunction and growth retardation. His cutaneous examination revealed lax and pigmented skin over hands and feet with deep creases, acanthosis nigricans and short curly hairs. Its differentiation from other syndromes with similar clinical features is discussed in this article.

  16. Common pitfalls in statistical analysis: “No evidence of effect” versus “evidence of no effect”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Priya; Pramesh, C. S.; Buyse, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This article is the first in a series exploring common pitfalls in statistical analysis in biomedical research. The power of a clinical trial is the ability to find a difference between treatments, where such a difference exists. At the end of the study, the lack of difference between treatments does not mean that the treatments can be considered equivalent. The distinction between “no evidence of effect” and “evidence of no effect” needs to be understood. PMID:25657905

  17. A time-sorting pitfall trap and temperature datalogger for the sampling of surface-active arthropods

    OpenAIRE

    McMunn, Marshall S.

    2017-01-01

    Nearly all arthropods display consistent patterns of activity according to time of day. These patterns of activity often limit the extent of animal co-occurrence in space and time. Quantifying when particular species are active and how activity varies with environmental conditions is difficult without the use of automated devices due to the need for continuous monitoring. Time-sorting pitfall traps passively collect active arthropods into containers with known beginning and end sample times. ...

  18. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now What Is Reye’s Syndrome? ...

  19. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Alagille Syndrome Back Alagille ...

  20. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure to begin sexual changes expected during puberty Sexual development that "stalls" during teenage years Early end to menstrual cycles not due to pregnancy For most women with Turner syndrome, inability to ...

  1. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  2. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  3. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  4. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  5. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crowding, and osteoporosis (brittle bones). Because of their physical conditions, health concerns, and infertility, some girls and women with TS may have low self- esteem, anxiety, or depression. How is Turner syndrome diagnosed? Physical features may ...

  6. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person cured of Cushing’s syndrome might have some memory loss and slight mental decline. But the change is ... Categories: Family Health, Infants and Toddlers, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: acth, adenomas, hormone, sickness September ...

  7. Levator Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse (See ... out other painful rectal conditions (such as thrombosed hemorrhoids , fissures , or abscesses ). The physical examination is often ...

  8. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs and symptoms may differ, based on age, gender and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  9. Gilbert's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not know you have the condition until it's discovered by accident, such as when a blood test ... chemotherapy drug Some protease inhibitors used to treat HIV If you have Gilbert's syndrome, talk to your ...

  10. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  11. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are unable to move their eyes back and forth. Decreased numbers of muscle fibers have been reported. Deformities of the tongue, jaw, and limbs, such ...

  12. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network of...

  13. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy for seizures is usually necessary. Physical and occupational therapies, communication therapy, and behavioral therapies are important in allowing individuals with Angelman syndrome to reach their maximum developmental potential. × Treatment There ...

  14. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CEP290 . View Full Definition Treatment Treatment for Joubert syndrome is symptomatic and supportive. Infant stimulation and physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal breathing ...

  15. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swallow. Some babies will be born with glaucoma, retinal degeneration, and impaired hearing. Jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding also may occur. Treatment There is no cure for Zellweger syndrome, nor ...

  16. Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood — typically with an artificial kidney machine (dialyzer). Chronic kidney disease. Nephrotic syndrome may cause your ... opportunities Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. " ...

  17. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are more often affected than girls. View Full Definition Treatment Antiepileptic drugs are used to control seizures, but are unfortunately ... Other therapies are symptomatic and supportive. × ... Definition Ohtahara syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by ...

  18. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  19. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro,Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento,Luiz Augusto; Oliveira,Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  20. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart......, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...

  1. Pendred's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, M.I.; Cheema, I.A.; Qasim, G.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Pendred's syndrome in three siblings of a consanguineous marriage, belonging to Rahimyar Khan. The children presented with deafmutism and goiters. The investigations included scintigram, perchlorate discharge test and audiometery. The perchlorate discharge was positive in index case. Bilateral sensorineural hearing defect was detected on Pure Tone Average (PTA) audiometry. Meticulous clinical and laboratory evaluation is mandatory for the detection of rare disorders like Pendred's syndrome. (author)

  2. Satellite Remote Sensing of Particulate Matter Air Quality: Progress, Potential and Pitfalls (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite Remote Sensing of Particulate Matter Air Quality: Progress, Potential and Pitfalls Abstract. Fine or respirable particles with particle aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) affect visibility, change cloud properties, reflect and absorb incoming solar radiation, affect human health and are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. These particles are injected into the atmosphere either as primary emissions or form into the atmosphere by gas to particle conversion. There are various sources of PM2.5 including emissions from automobiles, industrial exhaust, and agricultural fires. In 2006, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) made the standards stringent by changing the 24-hr averaged PM2.5 mass values from 65µgm-3 to 35µgm-3. This was primarily based on epidemiological studies that showed the long term health benefits of making the PM2.5 standards stringent. Typically PM2.5 mass concentration is measured from surface monitors and in the United States there are nearly 1000 such filter based daily and 600 contiguous stations managed by federal, state, local, and tribal agencies. Worldwide, there are few PM2.5 ground monitors since they are expensive to purchase, maintain and operate. Satellite remote sensing therefore provides a viable method for monitoring PM2.5 from space. Although, there are several hundred satellites currently in orbit and not all of them are suited for PM2.5 air quality assessments. Typically multi-spectral reflected solar radiation measurements from space-borne sensors are converted to aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a measure of the column (surface to top of atmosphere) integrated extinction (absorption plus scattering). This column AOD (usually at 550 nm) is often converted to PM2.5 mass near the ground using various techniques. In this presentation we discuss the progress over the last decade on assessing PM2.5 from satellites; outline the potential and discuss the various pitfalls that one encounters. We

  3. Diagnostic pitfalls in Parkinson's disease: case report Dificuldades diagnósticas na doença de Parkinson: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Augusto Sekeff-Sallem

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. In 80% of cases, the disorder begins with upper limb resting tremor. However, there are some presenting atypical features that make the diagnosis even more difficult and intriguing. The disorder can have its onset below 40 years old, characterizing early-onset parkinsonism, which differential diagnosis possibilities are varied. Atypical presentations include a pure akinetic-rigid syndrome, the initial manifestations occurring in the lower limbs, and pain as the most important or sole manifestation. These atypical features are unusual, but can be seen in clinical practice. We present a 37 years old woman with early-onset parkinsonism beginning with an akinetic-rigid syndrome in the lower limbs whose first symptom was left leg pain, which diagnosis was made after 4 years of onset and after 16 referrals to several experts in different fields. We discuss these atypical features and the diagnostic pitfalls in PD.A doença de Parkinson (DP caracteriza-se pela tríade de tremor, rigidez e bradicinesia. Em cerca de 80% dos casos inicia-se com tremor em membros superiores. Entretanto, certas atipias na apresentação desta entidade tornam seu diagnóstico ainda mais desafiador. A doença pode iniciar-se abaixo dos 40 anos de idade, caracterizando o parkinsonismo de início precoce. Apresentações atípicas incluem uma síndrome rígido-acinética pura, as manifestações inaugurais ocorrendo em membros inferiores, e uma síndrome dolorosa podendo ser um sintoma inicial proeminente ou o único sintoma. Estas atipias, apesar de infreqüentes, são encontradas na prática clínica diária. Discutimos estas características atípicas ao apresentarmos uma paciente de 37 anos com quadro rígido-acinético de instalação precoce, iniciado em membros inferiores, cujo sintoma predominante era dor, cujo diagnóstico somente foi feito após 4 anos do início e após 16 avalia

  4. [Poland's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, R; Sasiadek, M

    2000-08-01

    Poland's syndrome consists of the variable clinical features, but always includes unilateral aplasia of the chest wall muscles and ipsilateral anomalies of upper extremity. The incidence of Poland's syndrome, reported by different authors ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:100,000 and is observed more frequently in males than in females with the right side of the body affected more often than the left. The etiology of this syndrome is still discussed. However most of described cases were sporadic, rare familial incidence of Poland's syndrome were also presented. Therefore different etiologic factors of the Poland's syndrome are taken into account: genetic, vascular compromise during early stages of embriogenesis but also teratogenic effect of environmental xenobiotics (e.g. cigarette smoking by pregnant women). The authors present also the case of 20-years old man with inherited bilateral syndactyly with the right side aplasia of major pectoralis muscle and face asymmetry. The familial history was negative in respect to the features, associated with Poland's syndrome.

  5. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Also known as What Is Metabolic syndrome ... metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Risk Factors A Large Waistline Having a large ...

  6. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the signs and symptoms of Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Marfan syndrome is different from Loeys-Dietz syndrome in that the gene mutation which causes Marfan syndrome is in fibrillin-1 (FBN-1), a protein ...

  7. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  8. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the hormone ...

  9. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs Basic information for topics, such as " ... been diagnosed with Turner syndrome. Now what? Is Turner syndrome inherited? Turner syndrome is usually not inherited, but ...

  10. Pitfalls in genetic testing: the story of missed SCN1A mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Jennings, Lawrence J.; Kirschmann, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the EuroEPINOMICS rare epilepsy syndromes Dravet working group performed whole-exome sequencing on 31 trios that had been reported negative for SCN1A mutations by Sanger sequencing.

  11. A review of the benefits and pitfalls of phantoms in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Graham; Hebard, Simon; Mitchell, Christopher H

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, so has the requirement for training tools to practice needle guidance skills and evaluate echogenic needles. Ethically, skills in ultrasound-guided needle placement should be gained in a phantom before performance of nerve blocks on patients in clinical practice. However, phantom technology is varied, and critical evaluation of the images is needed to understand their application to clinical use. Needle visibility depends on the echogenicity of the needle relative to the echogenicity of the tissue adjacent the needle. We demonstrate this point using images of echogenic and nonechogenic needles in 5 different phantoms at both shallow angles (20 degrees) and steep angles (45 degrees). The echogenicity of phantoms varies enormously, and this impacts on how needles are visualized. Water is anechoic, making all needles highly visible, but does not fix the needle to allow practice placement. Gelatin phantoms and Blue Phantoms provide tactile feedback but have very low background echogenicity, which greatly exaggerates needle visibility. This makes skill acquisition easier but can lead to false confidence in regard to clinical ability. Fresh-frozen cadavers retain much of the textural feel of live human tissue and are nearly as echogenic. Similar to clinical practice, this makes needles inserted at steep angles practically invisible, unless they are highly echogenic. This review describes the uses and pitfalls of phantoms that have been described or commercially produced. Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

  12. Comparative studies of social buffering: A consideration of approaches, terminology, and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Hennessy, Michael B

    2018-03-01

    KIYOKAWA, Y. and HENNESSY, M.B. Comparative studies of social buffering: A consideration of approaches, terminology, and pitfalls…NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV XXX-XXX, .- Over the past decades, there has been an increasing number of investigations of the impact of social variables on neural, endocrine, and immune outcomes. Among these are studies of "social buffering"-or the phenomenon by which affiliative social partners mitigate the response to stressors. Yet, as social buffering studies have become more commonplace, the variety of approaches taken, definitions employed, and divergent results obtained in different species can lead to confusion and miscommunication. The aim of the present paper, therefore, is to address terminology and approaches and to highlight potential pitfalls to the study of social buffering across nonhuman species. We review and categorize variables currently being employed in social buffering studies and provide an overview of responses measured, mediating sensory modalities and underlying mechanisms. It is our hope that the paper will be useful to those contemplating examination of social buffering in the context of their own research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Theory and Applications of Covalent Docking in Drug Discovery: Merits and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hezekiel Mathambo Kumalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available he present art of drug discovery and design of new drugs is based on suicidal irreversible inhibitors. Covalent inhibition is the strategy that is used to achieve irreversible inhibition. Irreversible inhibitors interact with their targets in a time-dependent fashion, and the reaction proceeds to completion rather than to equilibrium. Covalent inhibitors possessed some significant advantages over non-covalent inhibitors such as covalent warheads can target rare, non-conserved residue of a particular target protein and thus led to development of highly selective inhibitors, covalent inhibitors can be effective in targeting proteins with shallow binding cleavage which will led to development of novel inhibitors with increased potency than non-covalent inhibitors. Several computational approaches have been developed to simulate covalent interactions; however, this is still a challenging area to explore. Covalent molecular docking has been recently implemented in the computer-aided drug design workflows to describe covalent interactions between inhibitors and biological targets. In this review we highlight: (i covalent interactions in biomolecular systems; (ii the mathematical framework of covalent molecular docking; (iii implementation of covalent docking protocol in drug design workflows; (iv applications covalent docking: case studies and (v shortcomings and future perspectives of covalent docking. To the best of our knowledge; this review is the first account that highlights different aspects of covalent docking with its merits and pitfalls. We believe that the method and applications highlighted in this study will help future efforts towards the design of irreversible inhibitors.

  14. Benefits and Pitfalls of Using HTML5 APIs for Online Experiments and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Garaizar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The most recent advances in the architecture of the Web allow using it as an excellent platform to deliver experiments and simulations over the Internet. However, there are still some challenges related to the animations’ accuracy, to user input collection or to real-time communications that have to be accomplished to properly port native application- based experiments and simulations to the Web. The limitations of the standards preceding HTML5 have forced web developers to embed non-HTML objects using a wide range of non-standard plugins and causing an extremely fragmented execution environment where features must be implemented several times in different programming languages to guarantee full compliance with every user-agent. As HTML5 provides a standard -yet fully-featured- environment to develop and execute applications, web user-agents are now more similar to application players than to simple Internet browsers. In this paper we analyze the benefits and pitfalls of these new Application Programming Interfaces (APIs, providing examples of both good and bad instances of research-related use.

  15. Use of ephippial morphology to assess richness of anomopods: potentials and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc DE MEESTER

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton species richness is typically assessed through analysis of active community samples. These samples ought to be collected at many different locations in the lake and at multiple occasions throughout the year so as to cover the spatial and temporal heterogeneity in active community structure. A number of studies have shown that high numbers of species can be retrieved with a limited effort through hatching of dormant eggs isolated from lake sediments. However, dormant eggs of different species differ in their propensities to hatch, resulting in biased assessments of species composition, abundance and richness. In this paper, we explore the potentials and pitfalls of a third method to assess cladoceran species richness. For twenty European lakes, we identified the number of ephippium morphotypes in sediment samples taken on a single occasion. The morphotype richness was well correlated with species richness as assessed through hatching of dormant forms and through analysis of active community samples covering a six month period. However, not all species had a species-specific ephippial morphotype, consequently resulting in an underestimation of true species richness.

  16. The doctor in claims for work injuries and ill health--legal pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, See-Muah; Sng, Judy; Koh, David

    2009-08-01

    Occupational health work is currently undertaken by the specialist and the non-specialist physician alike. The work scope can vary from medical assessments of individual workers to health risk assessment at the workplace. The scope of the latter will include evaluation of exposures, hazards, risks and its management to control these risks. Much of the case law governing legal disputes over industrial safety and health have involved the employers. Over the years, the actions brought forth by workers have resulted in a formidable volume of case law based on statutes and on the common law of negligence in tort. Disputes over the assessment of workers' health or workplace health risks to the extent that it is a failure to discharge a reasonable standard of care, may result in the doctor being a defendant. Measures to prevent these legal pitfalls include communication with employers about the causative link of the illness suffered to workplace factors and the clarity of contractual obligations undertaken with regard to workplace health risk assessment.

  17. SU-F-P-04: Implementation of Dose Monitoring Software: Successes and Pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Och, J [Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: to successfully install a dose monitoring software (DMS) application to assist in CT protocol and dose management. Methods: Upon selecting the DMS, we began our implementation of the application. A working group composed of Medical Physics, Radiology Administration, Information Technology, and CT technologists was formed. On-site training in the application was supplied by the vendor. The decision was made to apply the process for all the CT protocols on all platforms at all facilities. Protocols were painstakingly mapped to the correct masters, and the system went ‘live’. Results: We are routinely using DMS as a tool in our Clinical Performance CT QA program. It is useful in determining the effectiveness of revisions to existing protocols, and establishing performance baselines for new units. However, the implementation was not without difficulty. We identified several pitfalls and obstacles which frustrated progress. Including: Training deficiencies, Nomenclature problems, Communication, DICOM variability. Conclusion: Dose monitoring software can be a potent tool for QA. However, implementation of the program can be problematic and requires planning, organization and commitment.

  18. Pathways and pitfalls of implementing the use of woodfuels in Germany's bioenergy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Thiel, Andreas; Bens, Oliver; Huettl, Reinhard F.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an empirical study on the use of woody biomass for energy supply in Germany and the federal state of Brandenburg. It aims to explain the role forestry enterprises have for bioenergy provision in this area. The 'Institutions of Sustainability' framework is used as an analytical tool to investigate the role of private and public actors in these transactions, respectively, in the governance structures they are subject to. Empirical evidence was gathered by in-depth interviews with actors from forestry and bioenergy practice. Triggered by favorable governance structures, i.e. strong support by national and regional policies, rising prices for fossil energy sources, and co-operation of committed individuals and groups, a new bioenergy industry has been successfully established. However, the forestry sector has so far been just a marginal fuel supplier for this industry. The study identifies pitfalls impeding a broad implementation of wood-energy supply in forestry: not cost-covering prices offered by the bioenergy sector, lacking market transparency and security of supply, lacking mobilization of forest wood, and a preference among forest managers to sell products to the wood-processing industry. In terms of the Institutions of Sustainability the properties of transactions (asset specificities, uncertainties, separability), characteristics of actors (values, rationality) and governance structures (long-term contractual obligations elsewhere) are decisive in explaining the current form of transaction. (author)

  19. A double-edged sword: Benefits and pitfalls of heterogeneous punishment in evolutionary inspection games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-06-01

    As a simple model for criminal behavior, the traditional two-strategy inspection game yields counterintuitive results that fail to describe empirical data. The latter shows that crime is often recurrent, and that crime rates do not respond linearly to mitigation attempts. A more apt model entails ordinary people who neither commit nor sanction crime as the third strategy besides the criminals and punishers. Since ordinary people free-ride on the sanctioning efforts of punishers, they may introduce cyclic dominance that enables the coexistence of all three competing strategies. In this setup ordinary individuals become the biggest impediment to crime abatement. We therefore also consider heterogeneous punisher strategies, which seek to reduce their investment into fighting crime in order to attain a more competitive payoff. We show that this diversity of punishment leads to an explosion of complexity in the system, where the benefits and pitfalls of criminal behavior are revealed in the most unexpected ways. Due to the raise and fall of different alliances no less than six consecutive phase transitions occur in dependence on solely the temptation to succumb to criminal behavior, leading the population from ordinary people-dominated across punisher-dominated to crime-dominated phases, yet always failing to abolish crime completely.

  20. Perils, pitfalls, and benefits of a surgeon as a health system employee: the contracting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graebner, Nancy K

    2011-06-01

    One would be hard pressed today to find a general surgeon or subspecialty-trained general surgeon who has not been approached by a health system to discuss employment. The majority of physicians find these initial discussions with a hospital administrator daunting at best regardless of whether they are just finishing residency or fellowship training or have had many successful years of private practice under their belt. Just as real estate has the mantra of "location, location, location," I would suggest that physician employment by a health system should have the mantra of "relationship, relationship, relationship." The following tips provide guidance on how to better understand the potential perils, pitfalls, and benefits of specific content sections of a standard template employment agreement between a health system and a physician. Physicians should review, understand, and be ready to engage in dialogue with the hospital administrator before involving attorneys. My experience is that if the dialogue begins with the attorneys representing each party, the opportunity to fully develop a partnership relationship between the parties is either lost or at minimum severely delayed in its development.

  1. Deregulation of allopathic prescription and medical practice in India: Benefits and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the background of debates on Universal Health Coverage, skill transfer from the medical practice license holders to other health-care providers such as nurse practitioner has become a global norm. In India, where the world's largest numbers of medical graduates are produced, this discussion is expanding to extremes and serious suggestions are coming forward for the development of legal framework for allowing dentists, homeopaths, pharmacists, and half duration trained doctors; permission to issue allopathic prescription. Allopathic medical prescription. It is noteworthy that this discussion only pertains to the pharmaceutical products retailed through “allopathic medical prescriptions.” A prescription is not only advice for patient's recovery but it also is a legitimate order for the sale of controlled drugs and pharmaceutical product; thereby functions as a regulatory tool for consumption of pharmaceutical products at retail level. Who is ultimately going to benefit from this prescription deregulation? This editorial explores benefits and pitfalls of prescription and medical practice deregulation.

  2. Orthopedic surgery-related benign uptake on FDG-PET. Case examples and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical procedures often create some special postoperative complications, which may demonstrate abnormally increased or focal uptake for an extended period of time on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-CT images. The distinction of normal from pathologic, benign from malignant uptake is very important to minimize the number of false positive results. To date, very little data have been published regarding surgical-related benign musculoskeletal uptake on PET-CT imaging. In this paper, we present to the readers some case examples of FDG PET-CT imaging for postoperative fracture, infection or osteomyelitis, metallic implants, aggressive bone edge, heterotopic ossification, granuloma and neuroma. We also discuss potential pitfalls to recognize these orthopedic surgery-related complications and identify benign nature of increased FDG uptake. In all cases, the patient's medical and surgical history would be of paramount importance to the radiologists/nuclear medicine physicians who interprets the scan. It is also crucial to carefully correlate FDG uptake with the anatomy on the co-registered CT images in all transaxial, coronal and sagittal views in order to identify the location and pattern of uptake. (author)

  3. Scape goats, silver bullets, and other pitfalls in the path to sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Webster

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws from 'The Lathe of Heaven' by Ursula Le Guin to highlight some of the most likely pitfalls on the political road to a sustainable planet. Through the literary device of dreams that can change the world, Le Guin explores how the individual’s egoistic desire to save humanity can be twisted by the limitations of our psyche and our society, turning an already uncomfortable future Earth into a devastated planet. It is a stinging critique of answers handed down from above, and a call to action for those of us who just get by here below. Her story warns of the ancient “road to hell”, paved and trodden by would be saviors with the best intentions but also points to the license that public apathy provides to the powerful when the costs of environmental harm are borne by the powerless. These disconnects, combined with cycles of rationalization, silver bullet mentalities, and the tendency to scapegoat others for negative side effects, can all derail sustainability transitions. 'Lathe' provides an allegorical assessment of this process, but much more study is needed to fully understand and regulate the resulting governance treadmill.

  4. ABDUCENS NERVE PALSY AND THROMBOSIS OF THE CEREBRAL VEINS AND SINUSES - A DIAGNOSTIC PITFALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J. Tzoukeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses is an infrequent cerebrovascular disorder. Because the highly variable symptoms, recent neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnosis. Abducens nerve palsy as a focal neurological deficit is a rare clinical manifestation in these patients. We present two cases with sudden onset of diplopia and headache. Case 1: A 3-year old girl with B cell lymphoblastic leukemia developed bilateral abducens deficit and bilateral optic disc edema after treatment including L-asparaginase. Thrombosis of the right jugular vein, sagittal and right sigmoid sinuses was visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Symptoms gradually resolved after treatment with enoxiparine and MRV demonstrated recanalization.Case 2: A 75-year old female with medical history of arterial hypertension presented with headache and sudden left abduction deficit. Computerized tomography (CT scan was normal. MRI and MRV revealed aging brain and disruption of venous flow at the left internal jugular vein, suspecting thrombosis. Extracranial colour duplex sonography and CT angiography proved haemodinamic equivalent of left internal jugular vein thrombosis due to sclerotic pathology of aortic arch.Our first case illustrates the role of improved neuroimaging techniques as the best method for diagnosis of cerebral veins and sinuses thrombosis, presenting with abducens nerve palsy. With second case the potential neuroimaging pitfalls concerning the accurate diagnosis of these cerebrovascular disorders with neuro-ophthalmologic manifestation are discussed.

  5. Emerging therapies for gait disability and balance impairment: promises and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, Walter; Nieuwhof, Freek; Hasmann, Sandra E; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2013-09-15

    Therapeutic management of gait and balance impairment during aging and neurodegeneration has long been a neglected topic. This has changed considerably during recent years, for several reasons: (1) an increasing recognition that gait and balance deficits are among the most relevant determinants of an impaired quality of life and increased mortality for affected individuals; (2) the arrival of new technology, which has allowed for new insights into the anatomy and functional (dis)integrity of gait and balance circuits; and (3) based in part on these improved insights, the development of new, more specific treatment strategies in the field of pharmacotherapy, deep brain surgery, and physiotherapy. The initial experience with these emerging treatments is encouraging, although much work remains to be done. The objective of this narrative review is to discuss several promising developments in the field of gait and balance treatment. We also address several pitfalls that can potentially hinder a fast and efficient continuation of this vital progress. Important issues that should be considered in future research include a clear differentiation between gait and balance as two distinctive targets for treatment and recognition of compensatory mechanisms as a separate target for therapeutic intervention. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  6. Pediatric cervical spine in emergency: radiographic features of normal anatomy, variants and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, Omar; Berthier, Emeline; Loisel, Didier; Aube, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Injuries of the cervical spine are uncommon in children. The distribution of injuries, when they do occur, differs according to age. Young children aged less than 8 years usually have upper cervical injuries because of the anatomic and biomechanical properties of their immature spine, whereas older children, whose biomechanics more closely resemble those of adults, are prone to lower cervical injuries. In all cases, the pediatric cervical spine has distinct radiographic features, making the emergency radiological analysis of it difficult. Such features as hypermobility between C2 and C3, pseudospread of the atlas on the axis, pseudosubluxation, the absence of lordosis, anterior wedging of vertebral bodies, pseudowidening of prevertebral soft tissue and incomplete ossification of synchondrosis can be mistaken for traumatic injuries. The interpretation of a plain radiograph of the pediatric cervical spine following trauma must take into account the age of the child, the location of the injury and the mechanism of trauma. Comprehensive knowledge of the specific anatomy and biomechanics of the childhood spine is essential for the diagnosis of suspected cervical spine injury. With it, the physician can, on one hand, differentiate normal physes or synchondroses from pathological fractures or ligamentous disruptions and, on the other, identify any possible congenital anomalies that may also be mistaken for injury. Thus, in the present work, we discuss normal radiological features of the pediatric cervical spine, variants that may be encountered and pitfalls that must be avoided when interpreting plain radiographs taken in an emergency setting following trauma. (orig.)

  7. Autoantibodies in a Three-Year-Old Girl with Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Pouladfar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral leishmaniasis (VL, a life-threatening parasitic infection, is endemic in the Mediterranean region. Diagnosis of VL is based on epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory findings. However, sometimes, clinical features and laboratory findings overlap with those of autoimmune diseases. In some cases, autoantibodies are detected in patients with VL and this could be a potential diagnostic pitfall. In this study, we have reported on a three-year-old girl from a VL-endemic area in Iran, who presented with prolonged fever and splenomegaly. Bone marrow examination, serologic tests, and the molecular PCR assay were performed; however, results were inconclusive. The levels of anti-double stranded DNA, cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody, and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody were elevated and, at the end, splenic biopsy was performed. The splenic tissue PCR test detected the DNA of Leishmania infantum. The patient’s condition improved with anti-Leishmania therapy, and the autoantibodies disappeared within the following four months. Clinical presentations and laboratory findings of VL and autoimmune diseases may overlap in some patients.

  8. Pediatric cervical spine in emergency: radiographic features of normal anatomy, variants and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Omar; Berthier, Emeline; Loisel, Didier; Aubé, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    Injuries of the cervical spine are uncommon in children. The distribution of injuries, when they do occur, differs according to age. Young children aged less than 8 years usually have upper cervical injuries because of the anatomic and biomechanical properties of their immature spine, whereas older children, whose biomechanics more closely resemble those of adults, are prone to lower cervical injuries. In all cases, the pediatric cervical spine has distinct radiographic features, making the emergency radiological analysis of it difficult. Such features as hypermobility between C2 and C3, pseudospread of the atlas on the axis, pseudosubluxation, the absence of lordosis, anterior wedging of vertebral bodies, pseudowidening of prevertebral soft tissue and incomplete ossification of synchondrosis can be mistaken for traumatic injuries. The interpretation of a plain radiograph of the pediatric cervical spine following trauma must take into account the age of the child, the location of the injury and the mechanism of trauma. Comprehensive knowledge of the specific anatomy and biomechanics of the childhood spine is essential for the diagnosis of suspected cervical spine injury. With it, the physician can, on one hand, differentiate normal physes or synchondroses from pathological fractures or ligamentous disruptions and, on the other, identify any possible congenital anomalies that may also be mistaken for injury. Thus, in the present work, we discuss normal radiological features of the pediatric cervical spine, variants that may be encountered and pitfalls that must be avoided when interpreting plain radiographs taken in an emergency setting following trauma.

  9. Pediatric cervical spine in emergency: radiographic features of normal anatomy, variants and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, Omar; Berthier, Emeline; Loisel, Didier; Aube, Christophe [University Hospital of Angers, Department of Radiology, Angers (France)

    2016-12-15

    Injuries of the cervical spine are uncommon in children. The distribution of injuries, when they do occur, differs according to age. Young children aged less than 8 years usually have upper cervical injuries because of the anatomic and biomechanical properties of their immature spine, whereas older children, whose biomechanics more closely resemble those of adults, are prone to lower cervical injuries. In all cases, the pediatric cervical spine has distinct radiographic features, making the emergency radiological analysis of it difficult. Such features as hypermobility between C2 and C3, pseudospread of the atlas on the axis, pseudosubluxation, the absence of lordosis, anterior wedging of vertebral bodies, pseudowidening of prevertebral soft tissue and incomplete ossification of synchondrosis can be mistaken for traumatic injuries. The interpretation of a plain radiograph of the pediatric cervical spine following trauma must take into account the age of the child, the location of the injury and the mechanism of trauma. Comprehensive knowledge of the specific anatomy and biomechanics of the childhood spine is essential for the diagnosis of suspected cervical spine injury. With it, the physician can, on one hand, differentiate normal physes or synchondroses from pathological fractures or ligamentous disruptions and, on the other, identify any possible congenital anomalies that may also be mistaken for injury. Thus, in the present work, we discuss normal radiological features of the pediatric cervical spine, variants that may be encountered and pitfalls that must be avoided when interpreting plain radiographs taken in an emergency setting following trauma. (orig.)

  10. The same analysis approach: Practical protection against the pitfalls of novel neuroimaging analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgen, Kai; Hebart, Martin N; Allefeld, Carsten; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2017-12-27

    Standard neuroimaging data analysis based on traditional principles of experimental design, modelling, and statistical inference is increasingly complemented by novel analysis methods, driven e.g. by machine learning methods. While these novel approaches provide new insights into neuroimaging data, they often have unexpected properties, generating a growing literature on possible pitfalls. We propose to meet this challenge by adopting a habit of systematic testing of experimental design, analysis procedures, and statistical inference. Specifically, we suggest to apply the analysis method used for experimental data also to aspects of the experimental design, simulated confounds, simulated null data, and control data. We stress the importance of keeping the analysis method the same in main and test analyses, because only this way possible confounds and unexpected properties can be reliably detected and avoided. We describe and discuss this Same Analysis Approach in detail, and demonstrate it in two worked examples using multivariate decoding. With these examples, we reveal two sources of error: A mismatch between counterbalancing (crossover designs) and cross-validation which leads to systematic below-chance accuracies, and linear decoding of a nonlinear effect, a difference in variance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Randomized controlled trials in dentistry: common pitfalls and how to avoid them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Lynch, Christopher D; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2014-08-01

    Clinical trials are used to appraise the effectiveness of clinical interventions throughout medicine and dentistry. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are established as the optimal primary design and are published with increasing frequency within the biomedical sciences, including dentistry. This review outlines common pitfalls associated with the conduct of randomized controlled trials in dentistry. Common failings in RCT design leading to various types of bias including selection, performance, detection and attrition bias are discussed in this review. Moreover, methods of minimizing and eliminating bias are presented to ensure that maximal benefit is derived from RCTs within dentistry. Well-designed RCTs have both upstream and downstream uses acting as a template for development and populating systematic reviews to permit more precise estimates of treatment efficacy and effectiveness. However, there is increasing awareness of waste in clinical research, whereby resource-intensive studies fail to provide a commensurate level of scientific evidence. Waste may stem either from inappropriate design or from inadequate reporting of RCTs; the importance of robust conduct of RCTs within dentistry is clear. Optimal reporting of randomized controlled trials within dentistry is necessary to ensure that trials are reliable and valid. Common shortcomings leading to important forms or bias are discussed and approaches to minimizing these issues are outlined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neonatal hemochromatosis and patent ductus venosus: clinical course and diagnostic pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Andy; Paltiel, Harriet J.; Sena, Laureen M.; Kim, Heung Bae; Fishman, Steven J.; Alomari, Ahmad I.

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a rare metabolic disorder characterized by excessive iron deposition within the liver leading to hepatic failure and portal hypertension. We describe the clinical course and imaging findings in three infants with neonatal hemochromatosis associated with patent ductus venosus. We paid special attention to the diagnostic challenges encountered in these patients in order to emphasize some of the potential diagnostic pitfalls. We conducted a comprehensive search of our radiology database of the last 10 years (1999-2008) for the keywords ''neonatal hemochromatosis.'' Medical records and imaging studies of various modalities were reviewed. Three neonates were found to have neonatal hemochromatosis; all of them were associated with patent ductus venosus. Two of these patients were referred to our tertiary center for embolization of an inaccurately diagnosed hepatic vascular malformation. Two patients underwent successful liver transplantation and one died shortly after referral. The awareness and inclusion of neonatal hemochromatosis in the differential diagnosis of newborns with liver failure and patent ductus venosus has critical treatment implications. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in local staging of endometrial carcinoma: diagnostic performance, pitfalls, and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandrino, Franco; La Paglia, Ernesto; Musante, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in local staging of endometrial carcinoma, and to review the results and pitfalls described in the literature. Thirty women with a histological diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Unenhanced T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced Ti-weighted sequences were obtained. Hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy was performed in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy were calculated for the detection of deep myometrial and cervical infiltration. For deep myometrial infiltration T2-weighted sequences reached a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 76%, PPV of 73%, NVP of 87%, and accuracy of 80%, while contrast-enhanced scans reached a sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 80%, PPV of 82%, NPV of 89%, and accuracy of 85%. For cervical infiltration T2-weighted sequences reached a sensitivity of 75%, specificity of 88%, PPV of 50%, NPV of 96%, and accuracy of 87%, while contrast-enhanced scans reached a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 94%, PPV of 75%, NPV of 100%, and accuracy of 95%. Unenhanced and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance allows accurate assessment of myometrial and cervical infiltration. Information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can define prognosis and management.

  14. Review. Promises, pitfalls and challenges of genomic selection in breeding programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez-Escriche, N.; Gonzalez-Recio, O.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this work was to review the main challenges and pitfalls of the implementation of genomic selection in the breeding programs of different livestock species. Genomic selection is now one of the main challenges in animal breeding and genetics. Its application could considerably increase the genetic gain in traits of interest. However, the success of its practical implementation depends on the selection scheme characteristics, and these must be studied for each particular case. In dairy cattle, especially in Holsteins, genomic selection is a reality. However, in other livestock species (beef cattle, small ruminants, monogastrics and fish) genomic selection has mainly been used experimentally. The main limitation for its implementation in the mentioned livestock species is the high geno typing costs compared to the low selection value of the candidate. Nevertheless, nowadays the possibility of using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips of low density to make genomic selection applications economically feasible is under study. Economic studies may optimize the benefits of genomic selection (GS) to include new traits in the breeding goals. It is evident that genomic selection offers great potential; however, a suitable geno typing strategy and recording system for each case is needed in order to properly exploit it. (Author) 50 refs.

  15. Data Science Careers: A Sampling of Successful Strategies, Pitfalls, and Persistent Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, K. I.; Duerr, R.; Wyborn, L. A.; Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    Data Scientists do not have a single career trajectory or preparatory pathway. Successful data scientists have come from domain sciences, computer science, library science, and other diverse fields. They have worked up from entry-level staff positions, have started as academics with doctoral degrees, and have established themselves as management professionals. They have positions in government, industry, academia, and NGO's, and their responsibilities range from highly specialized, to generalists, to high-level leadership. This presents a potentially confusing landscape for students interested in the field: how to decide among the varied options to have the best chance at fulfilling employment? What are the mistakes to avoid? Many established data scientist, both old-timers and early career professionals, expressed interest in presenting in this session but were unable to justify using their one AGU abstract for something other than their funded projects. As the session chairs we interviewed them, plus our extended network of colleagues, to ask for their best advice on what was most critical to their success in their current position, what pitfalls to avoid, what ongoing challenges they see, and what advice they would give themselves, if they could do it all over again starting now. Here we consolidate those interviews with our own perspectives to present some of the common themes and standout advice.

  16. Soft Tissue Tumor Immunohistochemistry Update: Illustrative Examples of Diagnostic Pearls to Avoid Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shi; Henderson-Jackson, Evita; Qian, Xiaohua; Bui, Marilyn M

    2017-08-01

    - Current 2013 World Health Organization classification of tumors of soft tissue arranges these tumors into 12 groups according to their histogenesis. Tumor behavior is classified as benign, intermediate (locally aggressive), intermediate (rarely metastasizing), and malignant. In our practice, a general approach to reaching a definitive diagnosis of soft tissue tumors is to first evaluate clinicoradiologic, histomorphologic, and cytomorphologic features of the tumor to generate some pertinent differential diagnoses. These include the potential line of histogenesis and whether the tumor is benign or malignant, and low or high grade. Although molecular/genetic testing is increasingly finding its applications in characterizing soft tissue tumors, currently immunohistochemistry still not only plays an indispensable role in defining tumor histogenesis, but also serves as a surrogate for underlining molecular/genetic alterations. Objective- To provide an overview focusing on the current concepts in the classification and diagnosis of soft tissue tumors, incorporating immunohistochemistry. This article uses examples to discuss how to use the traditional and new immunohistochemical markers for the diagnosis of soft tissue tumors. Practical diagnostic pearls, summary tables, and figures are used to show how to avoid diagnostic pitfalls. - Data were obtained from pertinent peer-reviewed English-language literature and the authors' first-hand experience as bone and soft tissue pathologists. - -The ultimate goal for a pathologist is to render a specific diagnosis that provides diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic information to guide patient care. Immunohistochemistry is integral to the diagnosis and management of soft tissue tumors.

  17. [Genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities in the clinical laboratory--pitfalls and screening approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hideki; Ogawa, Tomomi; Note, Rhougou; Hayashi, Shirou; Ueno, Tomohiro; Harada, Kenu; Uji, Yoshinori; Kitajima, Isao

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities are increasingly recognized as critically important in the clinical genetic diagnostics. It is reported that approximately 10% of pathogenic mutations causing human inherited diseases are splicing mutations. Nonetheless, it is still difficult to identify splicing abnormalities in routine genetic diagnostic settings. Here, we studied two different kinds of cases with splicing abnormalities. The first case is a protein S deficiency. Nucleotide analyses revealed that the proband had a previously reported G to C substitution in the invariant AG dinucleotide at the splicing acceptor site of intronl/exon2, which produces multiple splicing abnormalities resulting in protein S deficiency. The second case is an antithrombin (AT) deficiency. This proband had a previously reported G to A substitution, at nucleotide position 9788 in intron 4, 14 bp in front of exon 5, which created a de novo exon 5 splice site and resulted in AT deficiency. From a practical standpoint, we discussed the pitfalls, attentions, and screening approaches in genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities. Due to the difficulty with full-length sequence analysis of introns, and the lack of RNA samples, splicing mutations may escape identification. Although current genetic testing remains to be improved, to screen for splicing abnormalities more efficiently, it is significant to use an appropriate combination of various approaches such as DNA and/or RNA samples, splicing mutation databases, bioinformatic tools to detect splice sites and cis-regulatory elements, and in vitro and/or in vivo experimentally methods as needed.

  18. Pitfalls in lung cancer molecular pathology: how to limit them in routine practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, M; Hofman, P

    2012-01-01

    New treatment options in advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) targeting activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations and other genetic alterations demonstrated the clinical significance of the molecular features of specific subsets of tumors. Therefore, the development of personalized medicine has stimulated the routine integration into pathology departments of somatic mutation testing. However, clinical mutation testing must be optimized and standardized with regard to histological profile, type of samples, pre-analytical steps, methodology and result reporting. Routine molecular testing in NSCLC is currently moving beyond EGFR mutational analysis. Recent progress of targeted therapies will require molecular testing for a wide panel of mutations for a personalized molecular diagnosis. As a consequence, efficient testing of multiple molecular abnormalities is an urgent requirement in thoracic oncology. Moreover, increasingly limited tumor sample becomes a major challenge for molecular pathology. Continuous efforts should be made for safe, effective and specific molecular analyses. This must be based on close collaboration between the departments involved in the management of lung cancer. In this review we explored the practical issues and pitfalls surrounding the routine implementation of molecular testing in NSCLC in a pathology laboratory.

  19. A double-edged sword: Benefits and pitfalls of heterogeneous punishment in evolutionary inspection games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž; Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-06-05

    As a simple model for criminal behavior, the traditional two-strategy inspection game yields counterintuitive results that fail to describe empirical data. The latter shows that crime is often recurrent, and that crime rates do not respond linearly to mitigation attempts. A more apt model entails ordinary people who neither commit nor sanction crime as the third strategy besides the criminals and punishers. Since ordinary people free-ride on the sanctioning efforts of punishers, they may introduce cyclic dominance that enables the coexistence of all three competing strategies. In this setup ordinary individuals become the biggest impediment to crime abatement. We therefore also consider heterogeneous punisher strategies, which seek to reduce their investment into fighting crime in order to attain a more competitive payoff. We show that this diversity of punishment leads to an explosion of complexity in the system, where the benefits and pitfalls of criminal behavior are revealed in the most unexpected ways. Due to the raise and fall of different alliances no less than six consecutive phase transitions occur in dependence on solely the temptation to succumb to criminal behavior, leading the population from ordinary people-dominated across punisher-dominated to crime-dominated phases, yet always failing to abolish crime completely.

  20. Abdomen after a Puestow procedure: postoperative CT appearance, complications, and potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, K S; Paulson, E K; Frederick, M G; Keogan, M T; Pappas, T N

    1997-06-01

    To evaluate the postoperative computed tomographic (CT) appearance, complications, and potential pitfalls after a Puestow procedure (lateral side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy). Forty CT examinations were performed after the Puestow procedure in 20 patients. Images were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists. The pancreaticojejunal anastomosis was identified at 30 examinations and was immediately anterior to the pancreatic body or tail. The anastomosis contained fluid or gas on 11 scans and oral contrast material on four scans. On 15 scans, the anastomosis appeared as collapsed bowel without gas, fluid, or oral contrast material. The Roux-en-Y loop was identified on 28 (70%) scans and contained fluid or gas on 16 scans and oral contrast material on six scans. The Roux-en-Y loop appeared as collapsed bowel on six scans. When the anastomosis or Roux-en-Y loop contained fluid and gas, the appearance mimicked that of a pancreatic or parapancreatic abscess. Peripancreatic stranding was present on 28 scans and was due to either ongoing pancreatitis or postoperative change. Complications included 15 transient fluid collections, three abscesses, four pseudocysts, one hematoma, and one small-bowel and Roux-en-Y obstruction. Knowledge of the anatomy after a Puestow procedure is essential for accurate interpretation of CT scans.

  1. Aesthetic rhinoplasty plus brow, eyelid and conchal surgery: pitfalls - complications - prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubisch, Wolfgang; Dacho, Andreas

    2013-12-13

    Within the last years aesthetic surgery enjoys greater popularity and acceptance. One of the most frequently asked operations has been the aesthetic rhinoplasty. Hardly any other field of surgery is exposed to such a critical analysis than aesthetic rhinoplasty because the results are so obvious. According to the "International Society of Aesthetic Surgery" (ISAPS) over 980,000 cosmetic rhinoplasties have been performed in 2010. This corresponds to 10.4% of all registered aesthetic procedures worldwide. Complications can not be eliminated in such a large number of nasal operations. Five to 15% of all patients re-consult a doctor for a revision because they are much dissatisfied with their final rhinoplasty result. Findings of the tip followed by functional problems and irregularities of the nasal dorsum are named most frequently. The responsible rhinosurgeon has to take into account all anatomical and physiological details and to consider ethical and psychological aspects in the pre-selection and postoperative care of the patient. Aesthetic surgeons should be acquainted with terms and definitions like body image, dysmorphophobia or Thersites complex. Acronyms, like "SIMON" or "SYLVIA", support the physician additionally to analyze and assess the patient. The following article describes the most frequent faults, complications and pitfalls after aesthetic rhinoplasty listed by the anatomical structure. Results will be analyzed and strategies and techniques will be suggested to correct the faults and to prevent them in the future. Furthermore psychologic, social and psychiatric aspects will be discussed and handling with aesthetic patients explained.

  2. Neonatal hemochromatosis and patent ductus venosus: clinical course and diagnostic pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Andy; Paltiel, Harriet J.; Sena, Laureen M. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kim, Heung Bae; Fishman, Steven J. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Alomari, Ahmad I. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a rare metabolic disorder characterized by excessive iron deposition within the liver leading to hepatic failure and portal hypertension. We describe the clinical course and imaging findings in three infants with neonatal hemochromatosis associated with patent ductus venosus. We paid special attention to the diagnostic challenges encountered in these patients in order to emphasize some of the potential diagnostic pitfalls. We conducted a comprehensive search of our radiology database of the last 10 years (1999-2008) for the keywords ''neonatal hemochromatosis.'' Medical records and imaging studies of various modalities were reviewed. Three neonates were found to have neonatal hemochromatosis; all of them were associated with patent ductus venosus. Two of these patients were referred to our tertiary center for embolization of an inaccurately diagnosed hepatic vascular malformation. Two patients underwent successful liver transplantation and one died shortly after referral. The awareness and inclusion of neonatal hemochromatosis in the differential diagnosis of newborns with liver failure and patent ductus venosus has critical treatment implications. (orig.)

  3. Use of automated medication adherence monitoring in bipolar disorder research: pitfalls, pragmatics, and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jennifer B; Sams, Johnny; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Cassidy, Kristin A; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-04-01

    Medication nonadherence occurs in 20-60% of persons with bipolar disorder (BD) and is associated with serious negative outcomes, including relapse, hospitalization, incarceration, suicide and high healthcare costs. Various strategies have been developed to measure adherence in BD. This descriptive paper summarizes challenges and workable strategies using electronic medication monitoring in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) in patients with BD. Descriptive data from 57 nonadherent individuals with BD enrolled in a prospective RCT evaluating a novel customized adherence intervention versus control were analyzed. Analyses focused on whole group data and did not assess intervention effects. Adherence was assessed with the self-reported Tablets Routine Questionnaire and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). The majority of participants were women (74%), African American (69%), with type I BD (77%). Practical limitations of MEMS included misuse in conjunction with pill minders, polypharmacy, cost, failure to bring to research visits, losing the device, and the device impacting baseline measurement. The advantages were more precise measurement, less biased recall, and collecting data from past time periods for missed interim visits. Automated devices such as MEMS can assist investigators in evaluating adherence in patients with BD. Knowing the anticipated pitfalls allows study teams to implement preemptive procedures for successful implementation in BD adherence studies and can help pave the way for future refinements as automated adherence assessment technologies become more sophisticated and readily available.

  4. Pitfalls and potential of particle swarm optimization for contemporary spatial forest planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Y.; Bettinger, P.; Cieszewski, C.; Wang, W.

    2012-07-01

    We describe here an example of applying particle swarm optimization (PSO) a population-based heuristic technique to maximize the net present value of a contemporary southern United States forest plan that includes spatial constraints (green-up and adjacency) and wood flow constraints. When initiated with randomly defined feasible initial conditions, and tuned with some appropriate modifications, the PSO algorithm gradually converged upon its final solution and provided reasonable objective function values. However, only 86% of the global optimal value could be achieved using the modified PSO heuristic. The results of this study suggest that under random-start initial population conditions the PSO heuristic may have rather limited application to forest planning problems with economic objectives, wood-flow constraints, and spatial considerations. Pitfalls include the need to modify the structure of PSO to both address spatial constraints and to repair particles, and the need to modify some of the basic assumptions of PSO to better address contemporary forest planning problems. Our results, and hence our contributions, are contrary to earlier work that illustrated the impressive potential of PSO when applied to stand-level forest planning problems or when applied to a high quality initial population. (Author) 46 refs.

  5. Pitfalls in the diagnosis and management of inguinal lymphogranuloma venereum: important lessons from a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Emerentiana Veronica; de Vrieze, Nynke Hesselina Neeltje; de Meij, Arjan; de Vries, Henry John C

    2014-06-01

    Current lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) guidelines mainly focus on anorectal infections. Inguinal LGV infections have been rare in the current epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM), but might require a different approach not yet recommended in current guidelines for the treatment and diagnosis of LGV. We describe 4 inguinal LGV cases. Three MSM developed inguinal LGV infection several weeks after a previous consultation, of which two had received azithromycin after being notified for LGV. Three failed the recommended 21 days doxycycline treatment. These inguinal LGV cases highlight 3 pitfalls in the current standard management of LGV: (1) Urethral chlamydia infections in MSM can be caused by LGV biovars that in contrast to non-LGV biovars require prolonged antibiotic therapy. (2) The recommended one gram azithromycin contact treatment seems insufficient to prevent established infections. (3) Inguinal LGV may require prolonged courses of doxycycline, exceeding the currently advised 21 days regimen. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Climate change mitigation: potential benefits and pitfalls of enhanced rock weathering in tropical agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David P; Lim, Felix; James, Rachael H; Pearce, Christopher R; Scholes, Julie; Freckleton, Robert P; Beerling, David J

    2017-04-01

    Restricting future global temperature increase to 2°C or less requires the adoption of negative emissions technologies for carbon capture and storage. We review the potential for deployment of enhanced weathering (EW), via the application of crushed reactive silicate rocks (such as basalt), on over 680 million hectares of tropical agricultural and tree plantations to offset fossil fuel CO 2 emissions. Warm tropical climates and productive crops will substantially enhance weathering rates, with potential co-benefits including decreased soil acidification and increased phosphorus supply promoting higher crop yields sparing forest for conservation, and reduced cultural eutrophication. Potential pitfalls include the impacts of mining operations on deforestation, producing the energy to crush and transport silicates and the erosion of silicates into rivers and coral reefs that increases inorganic turbidity, sedimentation and pH, with unknown impacts for biodiversity. We identify nine priority research areas for untapping the potential of EW in the tropics, including effectiveness of tropical agriculture at EW for major crops in relation to particle sizes and soil types, impacts on human health, and effects on farmland, adjacent forest and stream-water biodiversity. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  9. Nutcracker syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to highlight the symptoms of the Nutcracker Syndrome (NCS), the methods of clinical investigations and the importance of differential diagnosis. Introduction: The NCS refers to left renal vein entrapment caused by abnormal branching patterns of the superior mesenteric artery from the aorta. 1,2 Clinical case presentation: A 27 years old female presented to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal discomfort, bloating, loose bowel motions and irregular micro-haematuria. The radiologist's report indicated the findings from computed tomography examination to be consistent with anterior NCS. Discussion: In most of the NCS cases the clinical symptoms are non-specific. 3 The syndrome is caused by a vascular disorder, but its clinical manifestation can relate to a wide range of abdominal, urological, endovascular or gynaecological pathologies. 4 Conclusion: Nutcracker Syndrome is a relatively rare disease and underdiagnosed may lead to left renal vein thrombosis

  10. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  11. Usher Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fakin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of 3–6/100.000 and is the most common syndrome that affects vision and hearing. Three subtypes are distinguished on the basis of different degree of hearing loss. All patients develop retinitis pigmentosa with night vision difficulties and constriction of visual field, and ultimately a decline in visual acuity and color vision. Future holds promise for gene therapy. We present a patient with typical clinical picture of Usher syndrome, who started noticing night vision problems at age 13. At age 25 he was operated on for posterior cortical cataracts. At age 34 he has only 5–10° of visual field remaining with 1.0 visual acuity in both eyes. Fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed a typical hyperautofluorescent ring on the border between normal and affected retina.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  13. Efficacy of Pitfall Trapping, Winkler and Berlese Extraction Methods for Measuring Ground-Dwelling Arthropods in Moist-Deciduous Forests in the Western Ghats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabu, Thomas K.; Shiju, Raj T.

    2010-01-01

    The present study provides data to decide on the most appropriate method for sampling of ground-dwelling arthropods measured in a moist-deciduous forest in the Western Ghats in South India. The abundance of ground-dwelling arthropods was compared among large numbers of samples obtained using pitfall trapping, Berlese and Winkler extraction methods. Highest abundance and frequency of most of the represented taxa indicated pitfall trapping as the ideal method for sampling of ground-dwelling arthropods. However, with possible bias towards surface-active taxa, pitfall-trapping data is inappropriate for quantitative studies, and Berlese extraction is the better alternative. Berlese extraction is the better method for quantitative measurements than the other two methods, whereas pitfall trapping would be appropriate for qualitative measurements. A comparison of the Berlese and Winkler extraction data shows that in a quantitative multigroup approach, Winkler extraction was inferior to Berlese extraction because the total number of arthropods caught was the lowest; and many of the taxa that were caught from an identical sample via Berlese extraction method were not caught. Significantly a greater frequency and higher abundance of arthropods belonging to Orthoptera, Blattaria, and Diptera occurred in pitfall-trapped samples and Psocoptera and Acariformes in Berlese-extracted samples than that were obtained in the other two methods, indicating that both methods are useful, one complementing the other, eliminating a chance for possible under-representation of taxa in quantitative studies. PMID:20673122

  14. Eagle's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares, Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira, Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo, Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical. PMID:25992033

  15. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  16. A perspective on "cure" for Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Angus John; Abdala Sheikh, Ana Paula

    2018-04-02

    The reversal of the Rett syndrome disease process in the Mecp2 mouse model of Guy et al. (2007) has motivated families and researchers to work on this condition. The reversibility in adult mice suggests that there is potentially much to be gained from rational treatments applied to patients of any age. However, it may be difficult to strike the right balance between enthusiasm on the one hand and realism on the other. One effect of this has been a fragmentation of the "Rett syndrome community" with some groups giving priority to work aimed at a cure while fewer resources are devoted to medical or therapy-based interventions to enhance the quality of life of affected patients or provide support for their families.Several possible therapeutic approaches are under development that, it is claimed and hoped, may lead to a "cure" for patients with Rett syndrome. While all have a rationale, there are potential obstacles to each being both safe and effective. Furthermore, any strategy that succeeded in restoring normal levels of MECP2 gene expression throughout the brain carries potential pitfalls, so that it will be of crucial importance to introduce any clinical trials of such therapies with great care.Expectations of families for a radical, rational treatment should not be inflated beyond a cautious optimism. This is particularly because affected patients with us now may not be able to reap the full benefits of a "cure". Thus, interventions aimed at enhancing the quality of life of affected patients should not be forgone and their importance should not be minimised.

  17. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wadan, Ali H.; Al-Saai, Azan S.; Abdoulgafour, Mohamed; Al-Absi, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  18. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  19. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  20. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, Deepika; Gothi, Rajesh; Rajan, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  1. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  2. Fenton's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, E.; Albasini, V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report two recent cases of Fenton's syndrome, a very rare carpal fracture-dislocation. After some anatomophysiopathological considerations and a review of the literature, a wider nosographic frame is proposed in which the entity of the dislocation of the head of capitate bone is not essential. According to both the literature and personal findings, the authors remark that this syndrome is always found in the presence of two morphological variants of the distal radioulnar joint. Finally, the authors stress the importance of a corect diagnosis of this lesion to avoid unnecessary attempts of reduction

  3. Reiter's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, S S; Fernandez, J C; Dhurandhar, M W; Fernandez, R J

    1979-01-01

    A case of Reiter's syndrome occurring in a young mate aged 20 years having extensive skin lesions of keratoderina blenoffhagica is presented along with a review of literature. Although urethritis was absent, other clinical and histopathological features of the cutaneous lesions led us to the diagnosis. The-possible relationship of postural psoriasis to Reiter's syndrome is discussed. Failure of the patient to respond satisfactorily to steroids, antibiotics etc, prompted the use of rnethotrexate in the case. The result was dramatic, as the patient completely recovered within ten days of starting treatment.

  4. Larsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahbubul Islam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Larsen syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by congenital dislocation of multiple joints along with other anomalies of heart, face, hands and bones. Larsen syndrome was first described in 1950 by Larsen, Schottstaedt and Bost. In the present report, we describe a 10 year old girl who presented with mid facial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, bilateral talipes equinovarus and high arched feet. On examination, she had short stature (HAZ -3.5 SD with hyperextension of knee joint, fixed flexion of elbow joint. Awareness of this condition and associated complications may help in management and follow up of these patients. 

  5. Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanua, J.A.; Lopez, J.M.; Recondo, J.A.; Garcia, J.M.; Gaztanaga, R.

    1998-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  6. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  7. Meigs' Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.; Khaskheli, M.; Farooq, S.

    2006-01-01

    Meigs' syndrome is a rare clinical condition commonly considered to be associated with malignant ovarian tumour. A case of unmarried female is presented who came with a slowly increasing abdominal mass. Clinical and ultrasonic investigations revealed a mobile, solid right adenexal tumour in the lower abdomen, along with ascites and pleural effusion of the right lung. The level of CA 125 was also raised. Diagnosis of Meigs' syndrome was confirmed after surgical intervention. The tumour was successfully removed and pleural effusion disappeared 15 days after the intervention. Cytomorphologic study of both the tumour and ascitic fluid was negative for malignancy. (author)

  8. [Elsberg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristine Esbjerg; Knudsen, Troels Bygum

    2013-12-16

    A syndrome involving acute urinary retention in combination with sacral radiculitis and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis was first described by the American neurosurgeon Charles Elsberg in 1931. In many instances the aetiology is herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivation from sensory neurons. In this case report we present a 34-year-old pregnant woman with previous undiagnosed sensory lumbosacral symptoms. She was hospitalized with HSV-2 meningitis and lumbosacral radiculitis but no genital rash. A week after the onset of symptoms she developed acute urinary retention, thus indicating Elsberg syndrome.

  9. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  10. PAX8 Expression in Solitary Fibrous Tumor: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, David; Gordetsky, Jennifer; Siegal, Gene P; Prieto-Granada, Carlos N; Wei, Shi; Stevens, Todd M

    2017-07-26

    PAX8 is used as a diagnostic aid in classifying retroperitoneal (RP) spindle cell tumors. PAX8 positivity in a spindled RP tumor is typically associated with sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma (SRCC). However, PAX8 expression in solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), a tumor not uncommon to the RP, has not been extensively studied. We investigated the expression of PAX8 in SFTs and other spindle cell RP tumors. We collected 30 SFT, 23 SRCC, 11 gastrointestinal stromal tumors, 2 synovial sarcomas, 6 dedifferentiated liposarcomas (DDLS), 4 well differentiated liposarcomas (WDLS), and select other tumors. We identified nuclear PAX8 expression in 13 of 30 (43%) SFT, 0 of 6 (0%) DDLS, and 1 of 4 (25%) WDLS. Twenty-eight of 30 (93%) SFT, 0 of 23 (0%) SRCC, 2 of 6 (33%) DDLS, and 1 of 4 (25%) WDLS showed nuclear STAT6 expression. All gastrointestinal stromal tumors were negative for both PAX8 and STAT6. Of the 13 SFT showing PAX8 expression, 8 showed diffuse expression and 5 expressed PAX8 focally. Extrapleural SFTs were more likely to express PAX8 compared with pleural SFTs (10/13; 77% vs. 3/17; 18%, respectively; P=0.00117). Twenty of 23 (87%) SRCC expressed PAX8; the sarcomatoid component of all 23 SRCC was negative for STAT6. Of the other spindle cell tumors studied, 1 of 2 synovial sarcomas and 1 of 2 histiocytic sarcomas showed PAX8 expression. Pathologists should be aware of the potential pitfall of the relatively frequent expression of PAX8 by SFT and STAT6 expression in liposarcoma. PAX8 expression by a spindle cell lesion of RP would not allow distinction between SFT, SRCC, or sclerosing liposarcoma by itself. A STAT6/PAX8 phenotype excludes SRCC.

  11. Potential pitfalls when denoising resting state fMRI data using nuisance regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Molly G; Tench, Christopher R; Murphy, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    In resting state fMRI, it is necessary to remove signal variance associated with noise sources, leaving cleaned fMRI time-series that more accurately reflect the underlying intrinsic brain fluctuations of interest. This is commonly achieved through nuisance regression, in which the fit is calculated of a noise model of head motion and physiological processes to the fMRI data in a General Linear Model, and the "cleaned" residuals of this fit are used in further analysis. We examine the statistical assumptions and requirements of the General Linear Model, and whether these are met during nuisance regression of resting state fMRI data. Using toy examples and real data we show how pre-whitening, temporal filtering and temporal shifting of regressors impact model fit. Based on our own observations, existing literature, and statistical theory, we make the following recommendations when employing nuisance regression: pre-whitening should be applied to achieve valid statistical inference of the noise model fit parameters; temporal filtering should be incorporated into the noise model to best account for changes in degrees of freedom; temporal shifting of regressors, although merited, should be achieved via optimisation and validation of a single temporal shift. We encourage all readers to make simple, practical changes to their fMRI denoising pipeline, and to regularly assess the appropriateness of the noise model used. By negotiating the potential pitfalls described in this paper, and by clearly reporting the details of nuisance regression in future manuscripts, we hope that the field will achieve more accurate and precise noise models for cleaning the resting state fMRI time-series. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Value of CT angiography in anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke: Imaging findings, pearls, and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Sarah, E-mail: drsarahpower@gmail.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: sineadmcevoy@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Cunningham, Jane, E-mail: janecunningham0708@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Ti, Joanna P., E-mail: joannapearlyti@gmail.com [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Looby, Seamus, E-mail: seamuslooby@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); O' Hare, Alan, E-mail: alanohare@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Williams, David, E-mail: davidwilliams@rcsi.ie [Department of Geriatrics and Stroke Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Brennan, Paul, E-mail: paulbrennan@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Thornton, John, E-mail: johnthornton@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuroradiology, Beaumont Hospital, P.O. Box 1297, Beaumont Rd, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Site of occlusion determines potential collateralization routes and impacts outcome. • Multifocality of arterial occlusion is common, seen in approximately 20% of cases. • ICA false occlusion sign can be seen in setting of ICA stenosis or carotid T occlusion. • False patency sign: hyperdense thrombus/calcified occlusive plaque misinterpreted as patent vessel. • Additional abnormalities on CTA may infer stroke mechanism or alter decision making. - Abstract: Hyperacute stroke imaging is playing an increasingly important role in determining management decisions in acute stroke patients, particularly patients with large vessel occlusive stroke who may benefit from endovascular intervention. CT angiography (CTA) is an important tool in the work-up of the acute stroke patient. It reliably detects large occlusive thrombi in proximal cerebral arteries and is a quick and highly accurate method in identifying candidates for endovascular stroke treatment. In this article we review the imaging findings on CTA in acute large vessel occlusive stroke using a pictorial case based approach. We retrospectively reviewed CTA studies in 48 patients presenting with acute anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke who were brought for intra-arterial acute stroke intervention. We discuss and illustrate patterns of proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, collateralization to the occluded territory, as well as reviewing some important pearls, pitfalls and teaching points in CTA assessment of the acute stroke patient. Performed from the level of the aortic arch CTA also gives valuable information regarding the state of other vessels in the acute stroke patient, identifying additional significant vascular stenoses or occlusions, and as we illustrate, can demonstrate other clinically significant findings which may impact on patient management and outcome.

  13. Pitfalls and important issues in testing reliability using intraclass correlation coefficients in orthopaedic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Jaebong; Chung, Chin Youb; Ahn, Soyeon; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Hui Jong; Park, Moon Seok

    2012-06-01

    Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) provide a statistical means of testing the reliability. However, their interpretation is not well documented in the orthopedic field. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of ICCs in the orthopedic literature and to demonstrate pitfalls regarding their use. First, orthopedic articles that used ICCs were retrieved from the Pubmed database, and journal demography, ICC models and concurrent statistics used were evaluated. Second, reliability test was performed on three common physical examinations in cerebral palsy, namely, the Thomas test, the Staheli test, and popliteal angle measurement. Thirty patients were assessed by three orthopedic surgeons to explore the statistical methods testing reliability. Third, the factors affecting the ICC values were examined by simulating the data sets based on the physical examination data where the ranges, slopes, and interobserver variability were modified. Of the 92 orthopedic articles identified, 58 articles (63%) did not clarify the ICC model used, and only 5 articles (5%) described all models, types, and measures. In reliability testing, although the popliteal angle showed a larger mean absolute difference than the Thomas test and the Staheli test, the ICC of popliteal angle was higher, which was believed to be contrary to the context of measurement. In addition, the ICC values were affected by the model, type, and measures used. In simulated data sets, the ICC showed higher values when the range of data sets were larger, the slopes of the data sets were parallel, and the interobserver variability was smaller. Care should be taken when interpreting the absolute ICC values, i.e., a higher ICC does not necessarily mean less variability because the ICC values can also be affected by various factors. The authors recommend that researchers clarify ICC models used and ICC values are interpreted in the context of measurement.

  14. Normal skeletal development and imaging pitfalls of the calcaneal apophysis: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Ignacio [Musculoskeletal Research Fellow at NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Diagnostico Dr. Enrique Rossi, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rosenberg, Zehava [NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zember, Jonathan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Heel pain in children and secondary MR imaging (MRI) of the hindfoot have been increasing in incidence. Our purpose is to illustrate the, previously unreported, MRI stages in development of the posterior calcaneal apophysis, with attention to imaging pitfalls. This should aid in distinguishing normal growth from true disease. Consecutive ankle MRIs in children <18 years, from 2008-2014, were subdivided into 0≤5, 5≤10, 10≤15 and 15≤18 age groups and retrospectively reviewed for development of the calcaneal apophysis. 204 ankle MRI studies in 188 children were identified. 40 studies were excluded with final cohort of 164 studies in 154 patients (82 boys, 72 girls). The calcaneal apophysis was cartilaginous until age 5. Foci of decreased as well as increased signal were embedded in cartilage, prior to ossification. Early, secondary ossification centers appeared in plantar third of the apophysis in 100 % of children by age 7. Increased T2 signal in the ossifications was seen in 30 % of children. Apohyseal fusion began at 12 and was complete in 78 % of 14≤15 year olds and in 88 % of 15≤18 year olds. Curvilinear low signal in the ossification centers, paralleling, but distinguished from growth plate, and not be confused with fracture line, was common. Development of the posterior calcaneus follows a unique sequence. Apophyseal fusion occurs earlier than reported in the literature. Familiarity with this maturation pattern, in particular the apophyseal increased T2 signal and the linear low signal paralleling the growth plate, will avoid misinterpreting it for pathology. (orig.)

  15. The Power and Pitfalls of Big Data Research in Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Consumer's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Amie; Delcher, Chris; Valenzuela, Chelsea; Wang, Xi; Zhu, Yanmin; Roussos-Ross, Dikea; Brown, Joshua D

    2017-11-01

    Research in obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) increasingly relies on "big data" and observational study designs. There is a gap in practitioner-relevant guides to interpret and critique such research. This guide is an introduction to interpreting research using observational data and provides explanations and context for related terminology. In addition, it serves as a guide for critiquing OB/GYN studies that use observational data by outlining how to assess common pitfalls of experimental and observational study designs. Lastly, the piece provides a compendium of observational data resources commonly used within OB/GYN research. Review of literature was conducted for the collection of definitions and examples of terminology related to observational data research. Data resources were collected via Web search and researcher recommendations. Next, each data resource was reviewed and analyzed for content and accessibility. Contents of data resources were organized into summary tables and matched to relevant literature examples. We identified 26 observational data resources frequently used in secondary analysis for OB/GYN research. Cost, accessibility considerations for software/hardware capabilities, and contents of each data resource varied substantially. Observational data sources can provide researchers with a variety of options in tackling their research questions related to OB/GYN practice, patient health outcomes, trends in utilization of medications/procedures, or prevalence estimates of disease states. Insurance claims data resources are useful for population-level prevalence estimates and utilization trends, whereas electronic health record-derived data and patient survey data may be more useful for exploring patient behaviors and trends in practice.

  16. Hair Analysis in Forensic Toxicology: An Updated Review with a Special Focus on Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintz, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    The detection of drugs in hair analysis has progressively emerged as a consequence of the enhanced sensitivity of analytical techniques used in forensic toxicology; a greater advantage in using this matrix with respect to classical ones (i.e. urine and blood) is an easier and non-invasive sample collection, even when the careful supervision of law enforcement officers is required to avoid the risk that the sample may be adulterated or replaced. Moreover, according to the length of the hair, the history of drug exposure can be retrospectively monitored from few weeks up to months or years since sample collection. Through a detailed revision of the existent literature, this manuscript provides information on the proper sample collection, preparation and analysis, as well as pitfalls in forensic hair analysis, and summarizes the wide range of application of this technology, including excessive alcohol drinking, doping, child abuse, and offences linked to drug use. Verification of history of psychotropic drugs, alcohol and doping agents use by hair analysis, hair testing for driving license regranting and drug facilitated crimes, and testing for drugs in hair of children have been reviewed together with recent trends in hair contamination and possibility to disclose use of new psychoactive substances by hair analysis. Hair analysis in forensic toxicology has been quickly emerged and improved in recent years; a deeper knowledge of advantages and limitations of this unique matrix is necessary for a better use in forensic caseworks. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Evaluating and interpreting cross-taxon congruence: Potential pitfalls and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioria, Margherita; Bacaro, Giovanni; Feehan, John

    2011-05-01

    Characterizing the relationship between different taxonomic groups is critical to identify potential surrogates for biodiversity. Previous studies have shown that cross-taxa relationships are generally weak and/or inconsistent. The difficulties in finding predictive patterns have often been attributed to the spatial and temporal scales of these studies and on the differences in the measure used to evaluate such relationships (species richness versus composition). However, the choice of the analytical approach used to evaluate cross-taxon congruence inevitably represents a major source of variation. Here, we described the use of a range of methods that can be used to comprehensively assess cross-taxa relationships. To do so, we used data for two taxonomic groups, wetland plants and water beetles, collected from 54 farmland ponds in Ireland. Specifically, we used the Pearson correlation and rarefaction curves to analyse patterns in species richness, while Mantel tests, Procrustes analysis, and co-correspondence analysis were used to evaluate congruence in species composition. We compared the results of these analyses and we described some of the potential pitfalls associated with the use of each of these statistical approaches. Cross-taxon congruence was moderate to strong, depending on the choice of the analytical approach, on the nature of the response variable, and on local and environmental conditions. Our findings indicate that multiple approaches and measures of community structure are required for a comprehensive assessment of cross-taxa relationships. In particular, we showed that selection of surrogate taxa in conservation planning should not be based on a single statistic expressing the degree of correlation in species richness or composition. Potential solutions to the analytical issues associated with the assessment of cross-taxon congruence are provided and the implications of our findings in the selection of surrogates for biodiversity are discussed.

  18. Potential and pitfalls of eukaryotic metagenome skimming: a test case for lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greshake, Bastian; Zehr, Simonida; Dal Grande, Francesco; Meiser, Anjuli; Schmitt, Imke; Ebersberger, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    Whole-genome shotgun sequencing of multispecies communities using only a single library layout is commonly used to assess taxonomic and functional diversity of microbial assemblages. Here, we investigate to what extent such metagenome skimming approaches are applicable for in-depth genomic characterizations of eukaryotic communities, for example lichens. We address how to best assemble a particular eukaryotic metagenome skimming data, what pitfalls can occur, and what genome quality can be expected from these data. To facilitate a project-specific benchmarking, we introduce the concept of twin sets, simulated data resembling the outcome of a particular metagenome sequencing study. We show that the quality of genome reconstructions depends essentially on assembler choice. Individual tools, including the metagenome assemblers Omega and MetaVelvet, are surprisingly sensitive to low and uneven coverages. In combination with the routine of assembly parameter choice to optimize the assembly N50 size, these tools can preclude an entire genome from the assembly. In contrast, MIRA, an all-purpose overlap assembler, and SPAdes, a multisized de Bruijn graph assembler, facilitate a comprehensive view on the individual genomes across a wide range of coverage ratios. Testing assemblers on a real-world metagenome skimming data from the lichen Lasallia pustulata demonstrates the applicability of twin sets for guiding method selection. Furthermore, it reveals that the assembly outcome for the photobiont Trebouxia sp. falls behind the a priori expectation given the simulations. Although the underlying reasons remain still unclear, this highlights that further studies on this organism require special attention during sequence data generation and downstream analysis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Pitfalls of establishing DNA barcoding systems in protists: the cryptophyceae as a test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoef-Emden, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a preferrably short and highly variable region of DNA supposed to facilitate a rapid identification of species. In many protistan lineages, a lack of species-specific morphological characters hampers an identification of species by light or electron microscopy, and difficulties to perform mating experiments in laboratory cultures also do not allow for an identification of biological species. Thus, testing candidate barcode markers as well as establishment of accurately working species identification systems are more challenging than in multicellular organisms. In cryptic species complexes the performance of a potential barcode marker can not be monitored using morphological characters as a feedback, but an inappropriate choice of DNA region may result in artifactual species trees for several reasons. Therefore a priori knowledge of the systematics of a group is required. In addition to identification of known species, methods for an automatic delimitation of species with DNA barcodes have been proposed. The Cryptophyceae provide a mixture of systematically well characterized as well as badly characterized groups and are used in this study to test the suitability of some of the methods for protists. As species identification method the performance of blast in searches against badly to well-sampled reference databases has been tested with COI-5P and 5'-partial LSU rDNA (domains A to D of the nuclear LSU rRNA gene). In addition the performance of two different methods for automatic species delimitation, fixed thresholds of genetic divergence and the general mixed Yule-coalescent model (GMYC), have been examined. The study demonstrates some pitfalls of barcoding methods that have to be taken care of. Also a best-practice approach towards establishing a DNA barcode system in protists is proposed.

  20. Pitfalls of establishing DNA barcoding systems in protists: the cryptophyceae as a test case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hoef-Emden

    Full Text Available A DNA barcode is a preferrably short and highly variable region of DNA supposed to facilitate a rapid identification of species. In many protistan lineages, a lack of species-specific morphological characters hampers an identification of species by light or electron microscopy, and difficulties to perform mating experiments in laboratory cultures also do not allow for an identification of biological species. Thus, testing candidate barcode markers as well as establishment of accurately working species identification systems are more challenging than in multicellular organisms. In cryptic species complexes the performance of a potential barcode marker can not be monitored using morphological characters as a feedback, but an inappropriate choice of DNA region may result in artifactual species trees for several reasons. Therefore a priori knowledge of the systematics of a group is required. In addition to identification of known species, methods for an automatic delimitation of species with DNA barcodes have been proposed. The Cryptophyceae provide a mixture of systematically well characterized as well as badly characterized groups and are used in this study to test the suitability of some of the methods for protists. As species identification method the performance of blast in searches against badly to well-sampled reference databases has been tested with COI-5P and 5'-partial LSU rDNA (domains A to D of the nuclear LSU rRNA gene. In addition the performance of two different methods for automatic species delimitation, fixed thresholds of genetic divergence and the general mixed Yule-coalescent model (GMYC, have been examined. The study demonstrates some pitfalls of barcoding methods that have to be taken care of. Also a best-practice approach towards establishing a DNA barcode system in protists is proposed.

  1. Value of CT angiography in anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke: Imaging findings, pearls, and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Sarah; McEvoy, Sinead H.; Cunningham, Jane; Ti, Joanna P.; Looby, Seamus; O'Hare, Alan; Williams, David; Brennan, Paul; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Site of occlusion determines potential collateralization routes and impacts outcome. • Multifocality of arterial occlusion is common, seen in approximately 20% of cases. • ICA false occlusion sign can be seen in setting of ICA stenosis or carotid T occlusion. • False patency sign: hyperdense thrombus/calcified occlusive plaque misinterpreted as patent vessel. • Additional abnormalities on CTA may infer stroke mechanism or alter decision making. - Abstract: Hyperacute stroke imaging is playing an increasingly important role in determining management decisions in acute stroke patients, particularly patients with large vessel occlusive stroke who may benefit from endovascular intervention. CT angiography (CTA) is an important tool in the work-up of the acute stroke patient. It reliably detects large occlusive thrombi in proximal cerebral arteries and is a quick and highly accurate method in identifying candidates for endovascular stroke treatment. In this article we review the imaging findings on CTA in acute large vessel occlusive stroke using a pictorial case based approach. We retrospectively reviewed CTA studies in 48 patients presenting with acute anterior circulation large vessel occlusive stroke who were brought for intra-arterial acute stroke intervention. We discuss and illustrate patterns of proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, collateralization to the occluded territory, as well as reviewing some important pearls, pitfalls and teaching points in CTA assessment of the acute stroke patient. Performed from the level of the aortic arch CTA also gives valuable information regarding the state of other vessels in the acute stroke patient, identifying additional significant vascular stenoses or occlusions, and as we illustrate, can demonstrate other clinically significant findings which may impact on patient management and outcome

  2. Benefits, pitfalls and risks of phytotherapy in clinical practice in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laccourreye, O; Werner, A; Laccourreye, L; Bonfils, P

    2017-04-01

    To elucidate the benefits, pitfalls and risks of phytotherapy in the clinical practice of otorhinolaryngology. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched using the following keywords: phytotherapy, phytomedicine, herbs, otology, rhinology, laryngology, otitis, rhinitis, laryngitis and otorhinolaryngology. Seventy-two articles (18 prospective randomized studies, 4 Cochrane analyses, 4 meta-analysis and 15 reviews of the literature) devoted to clinical studies were analyzed. Articles devoted to in vitro or animal studies, biochemical analyses or case reports (including fewer than 10 patients) and articles dealing with honey, aromatherapy or minerals were excluded. Per os ginkgo biloba has no indications in tinnitus, presbycusis or anosmia following viral rhinitis. Traditional Asian medicine has no proven benefit in sudden deafness or laryngeal papillomatosis. Per os mistletoe extracts associated to conventional treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma does not increase 5-year survival. Extracts of various herbs, notably echinacea, eucalyptus, petasites hybridus, pelargonium sidoides, rosemary, spirulina and thyme, show superiority over placebo for rhinosinusitis and allergic rhinitis, as does gingko biloba for selected vertigo. There have been encouraging preliminary results for intratumoral injection of mistletoe in head and neck carcinoma and acupoint herbal patching for allergic rhinitis. Herb intake should be screened for in case of certain unexplained symptoms such as epistaxis, headache or dizziness, or signs suggesting allergy. Phytotherapy should be interrupted ahead of surgery and/or chemotherapy. Scientific proof of the benefit of phytotherapy in otorhinolaryngology remains to be established but, given its widespread use and the reported data, knowledge of this form of treatment needs to be developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Pitfalls of Establishing DNA Barcoding Systems in Protists: The Cryptophyceae as a Test Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoef-Emden, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a preferrably short and highly variable region of DNA supposed to facilitate a rapid identification of species. In many protistan lineages, a lack of species-specific morphological characters hampers an identification of species by light or electron microscopy, and difficulties to perform mating experiments in laboratory cultures also do not allow for an identification of biological species. Thus, testing candidate barcode markers as well as establishment of accurately working species identification systems are more challenging than in multicellular organisms. In cryptic species complexes the performance of a potential barcode marker can not be monitored using morphological characters as a feedback, but an inappropriate choice of DNA region may result in artifactual species trees for several reasons. Therefore a priori knowledge of the systematics of a group is required. In addition to identification of known species, methods for an automatic delimitation of species with DNA barcodes have been proposed. The Cryptophyceae provide a mixture of systematically well characterized as well as badly characterized groups and are used in this study to test the suitability of some of the methods for protists. As species identification method the performance of blast in searches against badly to well-sampled reference databases has been tested with COI-5P and 5′-partial LSU rDNA (domains A to D of the nuclear LSU rRNA gene). In addition the performance of two different methods for automatic species delimitation, fixed thresholds of genetic divergence and the general mixed Yule-coalescent model (GMYC), have been examined. The study demonstrates some pitfalls of barcoding methods that have to be taken care of. Also a best-practice approach towards establishing a DNA barcode system in protists is proposed. PMID:22970104

  4. Drug supply indicators: Pitfalls and possibilities for improvements to assist comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Nicola; Cunningham, Andrew; Groshkova, Teodora; Royuela, Luis; Sedefov, Roumen

    2018-06-01

    Interventions to tackle the supply of drugs are seen as standard components of illicit drug policies. Therefore drug market-related administrative data, such as seizures, price, purity and drug-related offending, are used in most countries for policy monitoring and assessment of the drug situation. International agencies, such as the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) and the UN Office of Drugs and Crime, also monitor and report on the drug situation cross-nationally and therefore seek to collect and make available key data in a uniform manner from the countries they cover. However, these data are not primarily collected for this purpose, which makes interpretation and comparative analysis difficult. Examples of limitations of these data sources include: the extent to which they reflect operational priorities rather than market changes; question marks over the robustness of and consistency in data collection methods, and issues around the timeliness of data availability. Such problems are compounded by cultural, social and contextual differences between countries. Making sense of such data is therefore challenging and extreme care needs to be taken using it. Nevertheless, these data provide an important window on a hidden area, so improving the quality of the data collected and expanding its scope should be a priority for those seeking to understand or monitor drug markets and supply reduction. In addition to highlighting some of the potential pitfalls in using supply indicators for comparative analysis, this paper presents a selection of options for improvements based on the current EMCDDA programme of work to improve their supply-related monitoring and analysis. The conceptual framework developed to steer this work may have wider application. Adopting this approach has the potential to provide a richer picture of drug markets, at both national and international levels, and make it easier to compare data between countries. Copyright

  5. Normal skeletal development and imaging pitfalls of the calcaneal apophysis: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Ignacio; Rosenberg, Zehava; Zember, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Heel pain in children and secondary MR imaging (MRI) of the hindfoot have been increasing in incidence. Our purpose is to illustrate the, previously unreported, MRI stages in development of the posterior calcaneal apophysis, with attention to imaging pitfalls. This should aid in distinguishing normal growth from true disease. Consecutive ankle MRIs in children <18 years, from 2008-2014, were subdivided into 0≤5, 5≤10, 10≤15 and 15≤18 age groups and retrospectively reviewed for development of the calcaneal apophysis. 204 ankle MRI studies in 188 children were identified. 40 studies were excluded with final cohort of 164 studies in 154 patients (82 boys, 72 girls). The calcaneal apophysis was cartilaginous until age 5. Foci of decreased as well as increased signal were embedded in cartilage, prior to ossification. Early, secondary ossification centers appeared in plantar third of the apophysis in 100 % of children by age 7. Increased T2 signal in the ossifications was seen in 30 % of children. Apohyseal fusion began at 12 and was complete in 78 % of 14≤15 year olds and in 88 % of 15≤18 year olds. Curvilinear low signal in the ossification centers, paralleling, but distinguished from growth plate, and not be confused with fracture line, was common. Development of the posterior calcaneus follows a unique sequence. Apophyseal fusion occurs earlier than reported in the literature. Familiarity with this maturation pattern, in particular the apophyseal increased T2 signal and the linear low signal paralleling the growth plate, will avoid misinterpreting it for pathology. (orig.)

  6. Single Subject Prediction of Brain Disorders in Neuroimaging: Promises and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Plis, Sergey; Sui, Jing; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging-based single subject prediction of brain disorders has gained increasing attention in recent years. Using a variety of neuroimaging modalities such as structural, functional and diffusion MRI, along with machine learning techniques, hundreds of studies have been carried out for accurate classification of patients with heterogeneous mental and neurodegenerative disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. More than 500 studies have been published during the past quarter century on single subject prediction focused on a multiple brain disorders. In the first part of this study, we provide a survey of more than 200 reports in this field with a focus on schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), depressive disorders, autism spectrum disease (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Detailed information about those studies such as sample size, type and number of extracted features and reported accuracy are summarized and discussed. To our knowledge, this is by far the most comprehensive review of neuroimaging-based single subject prediction of brain disorders. In the second part, we present our opinion on major pitfalls of those studies from a machine learning point of view. Common biases are discussed and suggestions are provided. Moreover, emerging trends such as decentralized data sharing, multimodal brain imaging, differential diagnosis, disease subtype classification and deep learning are also discussed. Based on this survey, there are extensive evidences showing the great potential of neuroimaging data for single subject prediction of various disorders. However, the main bottleneck of this exciting field is still the limited sample size, which could be potentially addressed by modern data sharing models such as the ones discussed in this paper. Emerging big data technologies and advanced data-intensive machine learning methodologies such as deep learning have coincided with an increasing need

  7. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and/or ...... LS in this day and age appears to be low, however the syndrome is difficult to recognize, and still requires the full attention of the clinician.......This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and....../or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  8. Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Baldini, Chiara; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bowman, Simon J.; Jonsson, Roland; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy; Theander, Elke; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SjS) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the exocrine glands (mainly the salivary and lacrimal glands) and results in the severe dryness of mucosal surfaces, principally in the mouth and eyes. This disease predominantly affects middle-aged women, but can also be

  9. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss of interest in normal play Delayed speech development or loss of previously acquired speech abilities Problem behavior or marked mood swings Any clear loss of previously gained milestones in gross motor or fine motor skills Causes Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. ...

  10. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  11. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can usually resume their normal activities. In some cases, exercise regimens may need to be modified in order to reduce the likelihood of recurrence or worsening. Clinical Trials Throughout the U.S. ... Definition Piriformis syndrome is a rare neuromuscular disorder that ...

  12. Hellp syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A 24 years old female presented with hypertension, haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia in an unconscious state after undergoing an emergency caesarian section. A diagnosis of HELLP syndrome was made on the above findings. Patient made an uneventful recovery with conservative management. A brief review of the literature is included along with the case report. (author)

  13. Kartagener's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, D K; Ganguly, K C; Alam, S; Hossain, A; Sarker, U K; Das, B K; Haque, M J

    2009-01-01

    Kartagener's Syndrome or Immotile Cilia Syndrome, a variant of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defect in the tiny hair like structure, the cilia lining the respiratory tract (upper and lower), sinuses, eustachian tubes, middle ear and fallopian tubes. Here electron microscopy shows abnormal arrangement of ciliary tubules and patients with Kartagener's syndrome has an absence of dynein arms at the base of the cilia. The inability of cilia to move results in inadequate clearance of bacteria from the air passages, resulting in an increased risk of infection and causing bronchiectasis. Another result of ciliary immobility is infertility. A 60 years old lady was diagnosed as a case of Kartagener's syndrome. She had history of chronic cough for 20 years, irregular fever for 20 years and occasional shortness of breath for 5 years. Relevant investigations revealed dextrocardia, situs inversus, bilateral maxillary sinusitis with non pneumatised frontal sinus and bronchiectasis. She was treated with low concentration oxygen inhalation, antibiotic, bronchodilator, chest physiotherapy including postural drainage, vitamins and other supportive treatment.

  14. Carraro syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, H.; Schwarz, R.

    1980-07-01

    The report concerns a girl aged 9 1/2 years who was deaf and dumb and had marked shortening of the calves with deformities of the feet and bilateral, congenital hypoplasia of the tibiae. This syndrome was first described by Carraro in 1931, but there have been no further reports since then.

  15. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  16. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3] Kamath BM, Loomes KM, Piccoli DA. Medical management of Alagille syndrome. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2010;50(6): ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  17. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neoplastic agents), exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome com prises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital ...

  18. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  19. Crest syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, B.; Roedl, W.

    1988-01-01

    If a patient has peri- and intra-articular calcinosis, as well as acro-osteolysis and esophageal hypomotility, and rheumatic symptoms, Crest syndrome should be considered as a manifestation of progressive systemic sclerosis. In connection with relevant symptoms on the skin and visceral involvement, radiological studies offer the possibility of classifying progressive systemic sclerosis more accurately. (orig.) [de

  20. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  1. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can treat many of its symptoms. Thanks to new research and treatments, people with Marfan syndrome who are diagnosed early ... This helps doctors stay on top of any new problems. Doctors might also ... or kids with amblyopia or strabismus will probably need to wear glasses. ...

  2. Kartagener's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    presenting with recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections, sinusitis or bronchiectasis. Inability to diagnose this condition may subject the patient to unnecessary and repeated hospital admissions, investigations and treatment failure. KEY WORDS: Kartagener's syndrome, primary cilliary dyskinesia, situs inversus, ...

  3. Imaging spectrum and pitfalls of {sup 11}C-methionine position emission tomography in a series of patients with intracranial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Kimiteru [Dept. of Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital and Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Integrative Brain Imaging Center, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo (Japan); Kubota, Kazoo [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    {sup 11}C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of {sup 11}C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological {sup 11}C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during {sup 11}C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of {sup 11}C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of {sup 11}C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses.

  4. Overview, practical tips and potential pitfalls of using automatic exposure control in CT: Siemens care dose 4D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederberg, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Today, computed tomography (CT) systems routinely use automatic exposure control (AEC), which modulates the tube current. However, for optimal use, there are several aspects of an AEC system that need to be considered. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the Siemens CARE Dose 4D AEC system, discuss practical tips and demonstrate potential pitfalls. Two adult anthropomorphic phantoms were examined using two different Siemens CT systems. When optimising the CT radiation dose and image quality, the projection angle of the localiser, patient centring, protocol selection, scanning direction and the use of protective devices requires special attention. (authors)

  5. From the RSNA refresher courses: US of the rotator cuff: pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.C.M.; Jager, G.J.; Blickman, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  6. From the RSNA refresher courses - US of the rotator cuff : Pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Matthieu J. C. M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Blickman, Johan G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  7. Synergistic defects of novo FAS and homozygous UNC13D leading to autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease: A 10-year-old Chinese boy case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hao; Ma, Jie; Chen, Zhenping; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Runhui

    2018-06-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) usually presents in childhood with fever, nonmalignant splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy along with hemocytopenia. This case report describes a 10-year-old boy presenting with signs of autoimmune disease, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and resistant hemocytopenia. Sirolimus controlled the relapsed thrombocytopenia after splenectomy. Sequencing of the FAS gene identified two spontaneous heterozygous mutations (c.234 T > G, p.D78E) (c.236dupA, p.P80Tfs*26). The boy's homozygous missense variation (c.2588G > A, p.G863D) (rs140184929) in UNC13D gene had been identified as being related to familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). TCRαβ + CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells (markers of ALPS) were not significantly increased from the outset. Elevated cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α decreased to normal levels after splenectomy whereas IL-10 remained high. Immunological analysis of the patient revealed a marked depletion of forkhead-box P3 + expressing regulatory T cells (Treg) and Th17 cells. The obtained data demonstrate that mutations to FAS and UNC13D which result in overwhelming T-cell and macrophage activation, one associated with inhibited Treg cell development and a severe ALPS-like symptom. Therefore, we propose that variations of UND13D may be a risk factor of ALPS development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome and Common Variable Immunodeficiency May Not Be Differentiated by SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4 Genes Sequence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Gulez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP is a rare, inherited immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent episodes of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, hypogammaglobulinemia, and/or lymphomas. Recently, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP/BIRC4 gene defects, in families with XLP but without SH2D1A gene defects, has been defined. The distinction from primary immunodeficiencies with a defined genetic cause is mandatory. A six-year-old male patient was admitted with the complaints of persistent general lymphadenopathy, for two years had fever, bilateral cervical multiple microlymphadenopathy, hepatic/splenic enlargement with laboratory findings as decreased serum immunoglobulins, negative EBV VCA IgM (viral capsid antigen and anti-EBV EA (antibody to early D antigen, positive EBV VCA IgG (viral capsid antigen and EBV EBNA (antibody to nuclear antigen. SH2D1A gene analysis was negative. XIAP/BIRC4 sequencing revealed two novel single nucleotide variants (exon 7, 1978G > A, and 1996T > A in the 3′UTR of the gene in both patient and mother which were not disease causing. XIAP protein expression was found to be normal. The clinical and laboratory resemblance, no gene mutations, and normal XIAP protein expression led us to think that there may be another responsible gene for XLP. The patient will to be followed up as CVID until he presents new diagnostic signs or until the identification of a new gene.

  9. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Associated with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Wu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: HLH is a disease with high fatality. Whenever there is a degree of clinical suspicion for HLH, etoposide-based chemotherapy should be started as soon as possible, and the underlying causes of the disease should be treated. We report this patient with NPC and HLH, which can be associated with either EBV or NPC. We treated both etiologies, and the patient's symptoms and liver function improved. The interactions between EBV, NPC, and HLH are interesting and merit further investigation.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymphohistiocytosis. Haematologica. 2010 Apr;95(4):538-41. doi: 10.3324/haematol.2009.019562. Citation on PubMed ... Clin Immunol. 2011 Dec;11(6):512-6. doi: 10.1097/ACI.0b013e32834c22f5. Review. Citation on PubMed ...

  11. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is functional renal failure that occurs with advanced liver failure. HRS is considered the most severe complication of cirrhosis. Type 1 HRS develops due to severe reduction of effective circulating volume results in hemodynamic dysfunction. Type 1 HRS is characterized by acute renal failure and rapid deterioration in the function of other organs. It can ocur spontaneously or in the setting of a precipitating event. Type 2 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, which is characterized by slowly progressive renal failure and refractory ascites. Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for both type. The most suitable and ldquo;bridge treatments and rdquo; or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 106-113

  12. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  13. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  14. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  15. PRKAR1A-negative familial Cushing's syndrome: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lee Ling; Kitan, Normayah; Paramasivam, Sharmila Sunita; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Ibrahim, Luqman; Chan, Siew Pheng; Tan, Alexander Tong Boon; Vethakkan, Shireene Ratna

    2015-12-01

    Determining the etiology of Cushing's syndrome is very challenging to endocrinologists, with most of the difficulty arising from subtype differentiation of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome. We present the pitfalls of evaluating a rare cause of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome in the transition period between adolescence and adulthood. A sibling pair with familial isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease is described. The index case, a 20-year-old Chinese woman, presented with premenopausal osteoporosis with T12 compression fracture and young hypertension. Biochemical analysis confirmed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome (elevated 0800 h plasma cortisol 808 nmol/L with suppressed adrenocorticotropic hormone level Cushing's syndrome at age 18 years, with typical cushingoid habitus, but no osteoporosis or hypertension. His adrenal computed tomographic scans showed micronodularities over bilateral adrenal glands. He was successfully treated with bilateral adrenalectomy. Screening for Carney's complex and PRKAR1A gene mutation was negative. Signs and symptoms of Cushing's syndrome resolved after bilateral adrenalectomy for both patients. They were placed on lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy and long-term surveillance for Carney's complex. The cases of these two patients illustrate the difficulties involved in diagnosing primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, a variant of adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome that is managed with bilateral adrenalectomy. A high index of suspicion for this disease is needed, especially in adolescents with adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent Cushing's syndrome who have a significant family history, features of Carney's complex, and no resolution of Cushing's syndrome after unilateral adrenalectomy. Patients with primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease can either have

  16. Paraneoplastiske syndromer

    OpenAIRE

    Røsbekk, Stein Helge

    2007-01-01

    During the last 50 years it has become clear that malignant tumours can induce symptoms unrelated to the mechanical effects of the primary tumour itself or its metastasis. Today, the name Paraneoplastic syndrome is given to those symptom complexes that may affect the blood cells, electrolytes, coagulation system, muscle, skin, nerve and the endocrine system. Endocrine symptoms were first recognised, and different hormones were isolated from the tumour tissue. However, tumour derived hormones ...

  17. Caroli's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numan, F; Cokyueksel, O; Camuscu, S; Demir, K; Dueren, M

    1986-07-01

    In 1958 Caroli described the syndrome of congenital, either segmental or involving the entire bile duct system, saccular extensions of the intrahepatic bile ducts. He differentiated between two types of this disease pattern. The first form concerns pure cystic dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts, whereas the second one is combined with hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension. Both types are characterised by cystic dilatations in the kidneys and in the extrahepatic bile ducts, pancreas and spleen.

  18. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  19. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  20. [PHACES syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo Azcárate, J; Bernabeu-Wittel, J; Fernández-Pineda, I; Conejo-Mir, M D; Tuduri Limousin, I; Aspiazu Salinas, D A; de Agustín Asensio, J C

    2010-04-01

    PHACES syndrome associates a segmental facial hemangioma with cerebral malformations, aortic branches/cranial arteries anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies or ventral wall defects. The aim of this study is to analyze our experience with this syndrome. Retrospective study of the cases seen at our unit in the last year. We treat 4 cases; 3 girls and 1 child. Besides the segmental hemangioma they presented: 3 vascular cerebral malformations; 2 structural cardiopathies; 2 cerebral malformations, 1 microftalmia. We did not find ventral wall defects. A case received treatment with two cycles of metilprednisolone i.v. and oral prednisone, with favourable course; two cases received initial treatment with oral prednisone continued of oral propanolol in rising pattern up to 2 mg/kg/day, Obtaining both the detention of the tumour growth and regression of the lesion, with very good tolerance. A 7-year-old patient has been treated with colouring pulse laser for her residual lesions. When we see a segmental facial hemangioma we must perform a wide diagnostic study in order to discard a PHACES syndrome. Multidisciplinar approach to the patient by a wide expert's group gets an earlier diagnose and improves the outcome. Propranolol is a promising therapeutic alternative.