WorldWideScience

Sample records for heme oxygenase induction

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by dieldrin in dopaminergic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Lee, Jung-Sup; Kim, Dae-Joong; Son, Jin H; Chun, Hong Sung

    2005-04-04

    We investigated the transcriptional events and signaling pathways involved in the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by dieldrin, an environmental risk factor of Parkinson's disease, in a dopaminergic neuronal cells (SN4741). Dieldrin exposure caused dose-dependent and time-dependent induction of heme oxygenase activity and HO-1 protein expression. Deletional and mutational analyses showed that the 5' distal enhancers, E1 and E2, mediate dieldrin-induced HO-1 gene transcription, and the AP-1 DNA binding sites in the E2 enhancer are critical for E2-mediated HO-1 gene activation. Furthermore, both the p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are utilized for HO-1 transcriptional activation by dieldrin. HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP IX reduced the expression of HO-1 but enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by dieldrin.

  2. Cellular iron depletion weakens induction of heme oxygenase-1 by cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chengzhi; Loo, George

    2011-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is an inducible cytoprotective gene, although its induction by environmental factors is not completely understood. This study aimed to ascertain if specific nutritive factors or related compounds influence heme oxygenase-1 expression. In HCT-116 cells, cadmium increased heme oxygenase-1 enzymatic activity. This effect of cadmium was weaker in cells made iron-deficient with the iron chelator, desferrioxamine, which was associated with repression of heme oxygenase-1 protein and mRNA expression. The repression by desferrioxamine of cadmium-induced heme oxygenase-1 upregulation was reversed upon iron replenishment of the cells. Additionally, it was found that thiol antioxidants inhibited the heme oxygenase-1 upregulation caused by cadmium and also by ethacrynic acid, which each decreased intracellular glutathione as did buthionine sulfoxamine. Interestingly, cadmium and ethacrynic acid increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and subsequent heme oxygenase-1 expression, but buthionine sulfoxamine did not. Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin, and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) inhibited cadmium-induced upregulation of heme oxygenase-1. Diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and inhibited NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase as well, whereas apocynin and Tiron did not. It is concluded that adequate amounts of iron, which at the atomic level can serve as the pivotal element of heme in NADPH oxidase, must be present in cells to permit what appears to be thiol redox-sensitive, NADPH oxidase-dependent upregulation of heme oxygenase-1. Thus, these findings are significant because they suggest that cells without adequate iron would be unable to fully express the stress gene, heme oxygenase-1, when confronted with the toxic metal, cadmium.

  3. Serum iron increases with acute induction of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostert, Volker; Nakayama, Akihiro; Austin, Lori M; Levander, Ximena A; Ferris, Christopher D; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F

    2007-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is induced by oxidative stress and protects against oxidant injury. We examined the effect of rapid induction of hepatic HO-1 on serum iron level. Serum iron was approximately doubled within 6 h when HO-1 was induced by phenobarbital treatment of selenium-deficient mice. Blocking heme synthesis with diethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (DDC) prevented the induction of HO-1 and the rise in serum iron. DDC did not block HO-1 induction by hemin. Inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin prevented a rise in serum iron that occurred following phorone treatment. These results indicate that heme synthesis or an exogenous source of heme is needed to allow induction of HO-1. Further, they link HO-1 induction with a rise in serum iron, suggesting that the iron resulting from catabolism of heme by HO-1 is released by the liver.

  4. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 inhibits the monocyte transmigration induced by mildly oxidized LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K; Navab, M; Leitinger, N; Fogelman, A M; Lusis, A J

    1997-09-01

    Heme catabolic processes produce the antioxidants biliverdin and bilirubin, as well as the potent prooxidant free iron. Since these products have opposing effects on oxidative stress, it is not clear whether heme catabolism promotes or inhibits inflammatory processes, including atherosclerotic lesion formation. Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of heme catabolism. We used cocultures of human aortic endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells to examine the possible role of HO in early atherosclerosis. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the inducible isoform of HO, was highly induced by mildly oxidized LDL, and augmented induction was observed with hemin pretreatment. This augmented HO-1 induction resulted in the reduction of monocyte chemotaxis in response to LDL oxidation. Conversely, inhibition of HO by a specific inhibitor, Sn-protoporphyrin IX, enhanced chemotaxis. Furthermore, pretreatment with biliverdin or bilirubin, the products of HO, reduced chemotaxis. Oxidized phospholipids in the mildly oxidized LDL appear to be responsible for HO-1 induction, since oxidized but not native arachidonic acid-containing phospholipids also induced HO-1. These results suggest that HO-1 induced by mildly oxidized LDL may protect against the induction of inflammatory responses in artery wall cells through the production of the antioxidants biliverdin and bilirubin.

  5. Induction of heme oxygenase 1 by nitrosative stress. A role for nitroxyl anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Patrick; Foresti, Roberta; Bains, Sandip K; Hoque, Martha; Green, Colin J; Motterlini, Roberto

    2002-10-25

    Nitric oxide and S-nitrosothiols modulate a variety of important physiological activities. In vascular cells, agents that release NO and donate nitrosonium cation (NO(+)), such as S-nitrosoglutathione, are potent inducers of the antioxidant protein heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) (Foresti, R., Clark, J. E., Green, C. J., and Motterlini, R. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 18411-18417; Motterlini, R., Foresti, R., Bassi, R., Calabrese, V., Clark, J. E., and Green, C. J. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 13613-13620). Here, we report that Angeli's salt (AS) (0.25-2 mm), a compound that releases nitroxyl anion (NO(-)) at physiological pH, induces HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, resulting in increased heme oxygenase activity in rat H9c2 cells. A time course analysis revealed that NO(-)-mediated HO-1 expression is transient and gradually disappears within 24 h, in accordance with the short half-life of AS at 37 degrees C (t(12) = 2.3 min). Interestingly, multiple additions of AS at lower concentrations (50 or 100 microm) over a period of time still promoted a significant increase in heme oxygenase activity. Experiments performed using a NO scavenger and the NO electrode confirmed that NO(-), not NO, is the species involved in HO-1 induction by AS; however, the effect on heme oxygenase activity can be amplified by accelerating the rate of NO(-) oxidation. N-Acetylcysteine almost completely abolished AS-mediated induction of HO-1, whereas a glutathione synthesis inhibitor (buthionine sulfoximine) significantly decreased heme oxygenase activation by AS, indicating that sulfydryl groups are crucial targets in the regulation of HO-1 expression by NO(-). We conclude that NO(-), in analogy with other reactive nitrogen species, is a potent inducer of heme oxygenase activity and HO-1 protein expression. These findings indicate that heme oxygenase can act both as a sensor to and target of redox-based mechanisms involving NO and extend our knowledge on

  6. Non-heme induction of heme oxygenase-1 does not alter cellular iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftel, Alex D; Kim, Sangwon F; Ponka, Prem

    2007-04-06

    The catabolism of heme is carried out by members of the heme oxygenase (HO) family. The products of heme catabolism by HO-1 are ferrous iron, biliverdin (subsequently converted to bilirubin), and carbon monoxide. In addition to its function in the recycling of hemoglobin iron, this microsomal enzyme has been shown to protect cells in various stress models. Implicit in the reports of HO-1 cytoprotection to date are its effects on the cellular handling of heme/iron. However, the limited amount of uncommitted heme in non-erythroid cells brings to question the source of substrate for this enzyme in non-hemolytic circumstances. In the present study, HO-1 was induced by either sodium arsenite (reactive oxygen species producer) or hemin or overexpressed in the murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW 264.7. Both of the inducers elicited an increase in active HO-1; however, only hemin exposure caused an increase in the synthesis rate of the iron storage protein, ferritin. This effect of hemin was the direct result of the liberation of iron from heme by HO. Cells stably overexpressing HO-1, although protected from oxidative stress, did not display elevated basal ferritin synthesis. However, these cells did exhibit an increase in ferritin synthesis, compared with untransfected controls, in response to hemin treatment, suggesting that heme levels, and not HO-1, limit cellular heme catabolism. Our results suggest that the protection of cells from oxidative insult afforded by HO-1 is not due to the catabolism of significant amounts of cellular heme as thought previously.

  7. Rapid induction of heme oxygenase 1 mRNA and protein by hyperthermia in rat brain: heme oxygenase 2 is not a heat shock protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Ewing, J F; Maines, M D

    1991-01-01

    Catalytic activity of heme oxygenase (heme, hydrogen-donor:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.99.3) isozymes, HO-1 and HO-2, permits production of physiologic isomers of bile pigments. In turn, bile pigments biliverdin and bilirubin are effective antioxidants in biological systems. In the rat brain we have identified only the HO-1 isozyme of heme oxygenase as a heat shock protein and defined hyperthermia as a stimulus that causes an increase in brain HO-1 protein. Exposure of male rats to 42 degr...

  8. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Can Halt and Even Reverse Renal Tubule-Interstitial Fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correa-Costa, Matheus; Semedo, Patricia; Monteiro, Ana Paula F. S.; Silva, Reinaldo C.; Pereira, Rafael L.; Goncalves, Giselle M.; Marcusso Marques, Georgia Daniela; Cenedeze, Marcos A.; Faleiros, Ana C. G.; Keller, Alexandre C.; Shimizu, Maria H. M.; Seguro, Antonio C.; Reis, Marlene A.; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro; Camara, Niels O. S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The tubule-interstitial fibrosis is the hallmark of progressive renal disease and is strongly associated with inflammation of this compartment. Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective molecule that has been shown to be beneficial in various models of renal injury. However, the role o

  9. Molecular mechanism and functional consequences of lansoprazole-mediated heme oxygenase-1 induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie Schulz-Geske; Kati Erdmann; Ronald J Wong; David K Stevenson; Henning Schr(o)der; Nina Grosser

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular mechanism and functional consequences of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) activation by lansoprazole in endothelial cells and macrophages.METHODS: Expression of HO-1 mRNA was analyzed by Northern blotting. Western blotting was used to determine the HO-1 and ferritin protein levels. NADPH-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was measured with lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. HO-1 promoter activity in mouse fibroblasts, stably transfected with a 15-kb HO-1 gene that drives expression of the reporter gene luciferase, was assessed using in vivo bioluminescence imaging.RESULTS: Lansoprazole increased HO-1 mRNA levels in endothelial cells and HO-1 protein levelsin macrophages. In addition, lansoprazole-induced ferritin protein levels in both cell systems. Moreover, induction of the antioxidant proteins HO-1 and ferritin by lansoprazole was followed by a decrease in NADPH-mediated ROS formation. The radical scavenging properties of lansoprazole were diminished in the presence of the HO inhibitor, chromium mesoporphyrin IX. Induction of HO-1 gene expression by lansoprazole was not related to oxidative stress or to the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. However, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of HO-1 mRNA and promoter activity.CONCLUSION: Activation of HO-1 and ferritin may account for the gastric protection of lansoprazole and is dependent on a pathway blocked by LY294002.

  10. Renal Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction with Hemin Augments Renal Hemodynamics, Renal Autoregulation, and Excretory Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fady T. Botros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenases (HO-1; HO-2 catalyze conversion of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin/bilirubin. To determine the effects of renal HO-1 induction on blood pressure and renal function, normal control rats (n=7 and hemin-treated rats (n=6 were studied. Renal clearance studies were performed on anesthetized rats to assess renal function; renal blood flow (RBF was measured using a transonic flow probe placed around the left renal artery. Hemin treatment significantly induced renal HO-1. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were not different (115±5 mmHg versus 112±4 mmHg and 331±16 versus 346±10 bpm. However, RBF was significantly higher (9.1±0.8 versus 7.0±0.5 mL/min/g, P<0.05, and renal vascular resistance was significantly lower (13.0±0.9 versus 16.6±1.4 [mmHg/(mL/min/g], P<0.05. Likewise, glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated (1.4±0.2 versus 1.0±0.1 mL/min/g, P<0.05, and urine flow and sodium excretion were also higher (18.9±3.9 versus 8.2±1.0 μL/min/g, P<0.05 and 1.9±0.6 versus 0.2±0.1 μmol/min/g, P<0.05, resp.. The plateau of the autoregulation relationship was elevated, and renal vascular responses to acute angiotensin II infusion were attenuated in hemin-treated rats reflecting the vasodilatory effect of HO-1 induction. We conclude that renal HO-1 induction augments renal function which may contribute to the antihypertensive effects of HO-1 induction observed in hypertension models.

  11. Hepatic steatosis prevents heme oxygenase-1 induction by isoflurane in the rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrick Stoll; Christian I Schwer; Ulrich Goebel; Hartmut Buerkle; Alexander Hoetzel; Rene Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the inductive effects of isoflurane (ISO) on hepatic heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in an animal model of hepatic steatosis.``METHODS: Lean (LEAN) and obese (FAT) Zucker rats were randomized into 4 groups: 1: LEAN + pentobar-bital sodium (PEN); 2: LEAN + ISO; 3: FAT + PEN; 4: FAT + ISO. The animals were mechanically ventilated for 6 h. In vitro analyses of liver tissue included determination of HO-1 mRNA and protein expression as well as measurement of HO enzyme activity and immuno-histochemical analyses.``RESULTS: Compared to PEN treatment, ISO administration profoundly induced hepatic HO-1 mRNA and protein expression and significantly increased HO enzyme activity in lean Zucker rats. In contrast, no difference in HO-1 gene expression was observed after ISO or PEN anesthesia in obese Zucker rats.``CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that ISO is an inducer of hepatic HO-1 gene expression in non-steatotic organs but failed to upregulate HO-1 in steatotic livers.

  12. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Attenuates Placental-Ischemia Induced Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Eric M.; Cockrell, Kathy; Aranay, Marietta; Csongradi, Eva; Stec, David E.; Granger, Joey P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies have reported that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) downregulates the angiostatic protein sFlt-1 from placental villous explants and that the HO-1 metabolites CO and bilirubin negatively regulates endothelin-1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although sFlt-1, ET-1, and ROS have been implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension during preeclampsia and in response to placental ischemia in pregnant rats, it is unknown whether chronic induction of HO-1 alters the hypertensive response to placental ischemia. The present study examined the hypothesis that HO-1 induction in a rat model of placental ischemia would beneficially affect blood pressure, angiogenic balance, superoxide, and ET-1 production in the ischemic placenta. To achieve this goal we examined the effects of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), an HO-1 inducer, in the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) placental ischemia model and in normal pregnant rats. In response to RUPP treatment, MAP increases 29mmHg (136 ± 7 vs. 106 ± 5 mmHg) which is significantly attenuated by CoPP (118 ± 5 mmHg). While RUPP treatment causes placental sFlt-1/VEGF ratios to alter significantly to an angiostatic balance (1 ± 0.1 vs 1.27 ± 0.2,), treatment with CoPP causes a significant shift in the ratio to an angiogenic balance (0.68 ± 0.1). Placental superoxide increased in RUPP (952.5 ± 278.8 vs 243.9 ± 70.5 RLU/min/mg), but was significantly attenuated by HO-1 induction (482.7 ± 117.4 RLU/min/mg). Also, preproendothelin message was significantly increased in RUPP, which was prevented by CoPP. These data indicate that HO-1, or its metabolites, are potential therapeutics for the treatment of preeclampsia. PMID:21383306

  13. L-Ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ya-Ni [Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jiz-Yuh [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Ching-Tien [Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chih-Hung [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lai, Chien-Cheng [Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jia-Yi, E-mail: jywang2010@tmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of L-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using the fluorochrome 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Besides the anti-oxidant effect, Vit. C also induces HO-1 expression in brain cells. ► Vit. C reduces METH neurotoxicity and ROS production by

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 induction improves cardiac function following myocardial ischemia by reducing oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Issan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress plays a key role in exacerbating diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a stress response protein, is cytoprotective, but its role in post myocardial infarction (MI and diabetes is not fully characterized. We aimed to investigate the protection and the mechanisms of HO-1 induction in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in diabetic mice subjected to LAD ligation. METHODS: In vitro: cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP prior to hypoxic stress. In vivo: CoPP treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subjected to LAD ligation for 2/24 h. Cardiac function, histology, biochemical damage markers and signaling pathways were measured. RESULTS: HO-1 induction lowered release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine phospho kinase (CK, decreased propidium iodide staining, improved cell morphology and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. In diabetic mice, Fractional Shortening (FS was lower than non-diabetic mice (35±1%vs.41±2, respectively p<0.05. CoPP-treated diabetic animals improved cardiac function (43±2% p<0.01, reduced CK, Troponin T levels and infarct size compared to non-treated diabetic mice (P<0.01, P<0.001, P<0.01 respectively. CoPP-enhanced HO-1 protein levels and reduced oxidative stress in diabetic animals, as indicated by the decrease in superoxide levels in cardiac tissues and plasma TNFα levels (p<0.05. The increased levels of HO-1 by CoPP treatment after LAD ligation led to a shift of the Bcl-2/bax ratio towards the antiapoptotic process (p<0.05. CoPP significantly increased the expression levels of pAKT and pGSK3β (p<0.05 in cardiomyocytes and in diabetic mice with MI. SnPP abolished CoPP's cardioprotective effects. CONCLUSIONS: HO-1 induction plays a role in cardioprotection against hypoxic damage in cardiomyocytes and in reducing post ischemic cardiac damage in the diabetic heart

  15. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Human Hepatocytes to Protect Them From Ethanol-induced Cytotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIE-GANG LIU; HONG YAN; WEN ZHANG; PING YAO; XI-PING ZHANG; XIU-FA SUN; ANDREAS K. NUSSLER

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between ethanol exposure and heme oxygenase (HO-1) in human hepatocytes in order to ascertain if induction of HO-1 can prevent ethanol induced cellular damage. Methods Dose-dependent (25-100 mmol/L) and time-dependent (0-24 h) ethanol exposure were used in the present study. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were detected by PT-PCR and Western blot respectively. HO-1 activity was indicated by bilirubin and Fe2+ formation. Cytotoxicity was investigated by means of lactate dehydrogenate (LDH) and aspartate transaminase (AST) level in culture supernatants, as well as the intracellular formation of malondialdehyde (MDA), cellular glutathione (GSH) status and CYP 2E1 activity. Results We first demonstrated a dose-dependent response between ethanol exposure and HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in human hepatocytes. We further observed a time-dependent increase of HO-1 mRNA expression using 100 mmol/L ethanol starting 30 minutes after ethanol exposure, reaching its maximum between 3 h and 9 h. Being similar to what had been demonstrated with the mRNA level, increased protein expression started at 6 h after ethanol exposure, and kept continuous elevated over 18 h. In addition, we found that ethanol exposure to hepatocytes markedly increased HO-1 enzyme activity in a time-dependent manner measured as bilirubin and Fe2+ formation in human hepatocytes. Our results clearly showed that ethanol exposure caused a significant increase of LDH, AST, and MDA levels, while the antioxidant GSH was time-dependently reduced. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pre-administration of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced HO-1 in human hepatocytes, and prevented an increase of MDA and a decrease of GSH. These effects could be partially reversed by zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an antagonist of HO-1 induction. Conclusion HO-1 expression in cells or organs could lead to new strategies for better prevention and treatment of ethanol-induced oxidative damage in human

  16. Ascorbic acid partly antagonizes resveratrol mediated heme oxygenase-1 but not paraoxonase-1 induction in cultured hepatocytes - role of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both resveratrol and vitamin C (ascorbic acid are frequently used in complementary and alternative medicine. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms for potential health benefits of resveratrol and its interactions with ascorbic acid. Methods The antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 were analysed for their mRNA and protein levels in HUH7 liver cells treated with 10 and 25 μmol/l resveratrol in the absence and presence of 100 and 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Additionally the transactivation of the transcription factor Nrf2 and paraoxonase-1 were determined by reporter gene assays. Results Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces the antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 in cultured hepatocytes. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by resveratrol was accompanied by an increase in Nrf2 transactivation. Resveratrol mediated Nrf2 transactivation as well as heme oxygenase-1 induction were partly antagonized by 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Conclusions Unlike heme oxygenase-1 (which is highly regulated by Nrf2 paraoxonase-1 (which exhibits fewer ARE/Nrf2 binding sites in its promoter induction by resveratrol was not counteracted by ascorbic acid. Addition of resveratrol to the cell culture medium produced relatively low levels of hydrogen peroxide which may be a positive hormetic redox-signal for Nrf2 dependent gene expression thereby driving heme oxygenase-1 induction. However, high concentrations of ascorbic acid manifold increased hydrogen peroxide production in the cell culture medium which may be a stress signal thereby disrupting the Nrf2 signalling pathway.

  17. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 by whisky congeners in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Nemoto, Asuka; Tanaka, Izumi; Koshimizu, Seiichi; Suwa, Yoshihide; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    It is expected that the production of the cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein in endothelial cells would reduce severity of vascular injuries, while phenolic compounds are known to induce HO-1 mRNA and protein in various cells. We investigated the activation of HO-1 by whisky, which contains various phenolic substances. The congeners of whisky stored from 4 to 18 y in oak barrels were shown to induce an increase of HO-1 protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while those of freshly distilled whisky spirit exhibited no activity. To determine the compounds with potent HO-1-inducing activity among the whisky congeners, several chemicals that had been reported to exist in whisky or oak barrels were screened, and coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde showed the activity. Thus, compounds that emerged in whisky during barrel storage induced cytoprotective protein, HO-1, in human endothelial cells.

  18. Differential induction of heme oxygenase and other stress proteins in cultured hippocampal astrocytes and neurons by inorganic lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Leigh; Ferguson, Charles; Luginbill, Deana; Kern, Marcey; Weingart, Adam; Audesirk, Gerald

    2004-07-01

    We examined the effects of exposure to inorganic lead (Pb2+) on the induction of stress proteins in cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes, with particular emphasis on the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In radiolabeled neuronal cultures, Pb2+ exposure had no significant effect on the synthesis of any protein at any concentration (up to 250 microM) or duration of exposure (up to 4 days). In radiolabeled astrocyte cultures, however, Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 100 microM; 1-4 days) increased synthesis of proteins with approximate molecular weights of 23, 32, 45, 57, 72, and 90 kDa. Immunoblot experiments showed that Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 10 microM, 1-14 days) induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes, but not in neurons; this is probably the 32-kDa protein. The other heme oxygenase isoform, HO-2, is present in both neurons and astrocytes, but is not inducible by Pb2+ at concentrations up to 100 microM. HO-1 can be induced by a variety of stimuli. We found that HO-1 induction in astrocytes is increased by combined exposure to Pb2+ and many other stresses, including heat, nitric oxide, H2O2, and superoxide. One of the stimuli that may induce HO-1 is oxidative stress. Lead exposure causes oxidative stress in many cell types, including astrocytes. Induction of HO-1 by Pb2+ is reduced by the hydroxyl radical scavengers dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and mannitol, but not by inhibitors of calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, protein kinase C, or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Therefore, we conclude that oxidative stress is an important mechanism by which Pb2+ induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes.

  19. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth Lanceta

    Full Text Available Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably intralysosomal iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment. Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity--CO and bilirubin--have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity.

  20. Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction and Organic Nitrate Therapy: Beneficial Effects on Endothelial Dysfunction, Nitrate Tolerance, and Vascular Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Daiber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic nitrates are a group of very effective anti-ischemic drugs. They are used for the treatment of patients with stable angina, acute myocardial infarction, and chronic congestive heart failure. A major therapeutic limitation inherent to organic nitrates is the development of tolerance, which occurs during chronic treatment with these agents, and this phenomenon is largely based on induction of oxidative stress with subsequent endothelial dysfunction. We therefore speculated that induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 could be an efficient strategy to overcome nitrate tolerance and the associated side effects. Indeed, we found that hemin cotreatment prevented the development of nitrate tolerance and vascular oxidative stress in response to chronic nitroglycerin therapy. Vice versa, pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN, a nitrate that was previously reported to be devoid of adverse side effects, displayed tolerance and oxidative stress when the HO-1 pathway was blocked pharmacologically or genetically by using HO-1+/– mice. Recently, we identified activation of Nrf2 and HuR as a principle mechanism of HO-1 induction by PETN. With the present paper, we present and discuss our recent and previous findings on the role of HO-1 for the prevention of nitroglycerin-induced nitrate tolerance and for the beneficial effects of PETN therapy.

  1. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 can halt and even reverse renal tubule-interstitial fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Correa-Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tubule-interstitial fibrosis is the hallmark of progressive renal disease and is strongly associated with inflammation of this compartment. Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a cytoprotective molecule that has been shown to be beneficial in various models of renal injury. However, the role of HO-1 in reversing an established renal scar has not yet been addressed. AIM: We explored the ability of HO-1 to halt and reverse the establishment of fibrosis in an experimental model of chronic renal disease. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley male rats were subjected to unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO and divided into two groups: non-treated and Hemin-treated. To study the prevention of fibrosis, animals were pre-treated with Hemin at days -2 and -1 prior to UUO. To investigate whether HO-1 could reverse established fibrosis, Hemin therapy was given at days 6 and 7 post-surgery. After 7 and/or 14 days, animals were sacrificed and blood, urine and kidney tissue samples were collected for analyses. Renal function was determined by assessing the serum creatinine, inulin clearance, proteinuria/creatininuria ratio and extent of albuminuria. Arterial blood pressure was measured and fibrosis was quantified by Picrosirius staining. Gene and protein expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic molecules, as well as HO-1 were performed. RESULTS: Pre-treatment with Hemin upregulated HO-1 expression and significantly reduced proteinuria, albuminuria, inflammation and pro-fibrotic protein and gene expressions in animals subjected to UUO. Interestingly, the delayed treatment with Hemin was also able to reduce renal dysfunction and to decrease the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules, all in association with significantly reduced levels of fibrosis-related molecules and collagen deposition. Finally, TGF-β protein production was significantly lower in Hemin-treated animals. CONCLUSION: Treatment with Hemin was able both to prevent the progression of fibrosis and

  2. Kidney injury and heme oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-xing MAI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available     Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is one of the main pathways to degrade heme in mammals, and the main degradation products are free iron (Fe2+, carbon monoxide (CO, and bilirubin. Heme plays an important role in promoting cell survival, circulation of intracellular substrates, and immune regulation. Previous studies suggest that HO-1 pathway is an important internal factor in determining the susceptibility and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI. The induction of HO-1 expression can attenuate the severity of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI, and the inhibition of HO-1 expression will aggravate IRI. The present article summarizes the latest advances in research abroad and at home on protective mechanism by which HO-1 prevents AKI to further deepen our understanding of the role of HO-1 in the treatment of AKI.   

  3. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 with Hemin Reduces Obesity-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation via Adipose Macrophage Phenotype Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai Hien Tu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose macrophages with the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype protect against obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, which elicits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, modulates macrophage phenotypes and thus is implicated in various inflammatory diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the HO-1 inducer, hemin, protects against obesity-induced adipose inflammation by inducing macrophages to switch to the M2 phenotype. HO-1 induction by hemin reduced the production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6 from cocultured adipocytes and macrophages by inhibiting the activation of inflammatory signaling molecules (JNK and NF-κB in both cell types. Hemin enhanced transcript levels of M2 macrophage marker genes (IL-4, Mrc1, and Clec10a in the cocultures, while reducing transcripts of M1 macrophage markers (CD274 and TNF-α. The protective effects of hemin on adipose inflammation and macrophage phenotype switching were confirmed in mice fed a high-fat diet, and these were associated with PPARγ upregulation and STAT6 activation. These findings suggest that induction of HO-1 with hemin protects against obesity-induced adipose inflammation through M2 macrophage phenotype switching, which is induced by the PPARγ and STAT6 pathway. HO-1 inducers such as hemin may be useful for preventing obesity-induced adipose inflammation.

  4. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 with hemin reduces obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation via adipose macrophage phenotype switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Thai Hien; Joe, Yeonsoo; Choi, Hye-Seon; Chung, Hun Taeg; Yu, Rina

    2014-01-01

    Adipose macrophages with the anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype protect against obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which elicits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, modulates macrophage phenotypes and thus is implicated in various inflammatory diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the HO-1 inducer, hemin, protects against obesity-induced adipose inflammation by inducing macrophages to switch to the M2 phenotype. HO-1 induction by hemin reduced the production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) from cocultured adipocytes and macrophages by inhibiting the activation of inflammatory signaling molecules (JNK and NF-κB) in both cell types. Hemin enhanced transcript levels of M2 macrophage marker genes (IL-4, Mrc1, and Clec10a) in the cocultures, while reducing transcripts of M1 macrophage markers (CD274 and TNF-α). The protective effects of hemin on adipose inflammation and macrophage phenotype switching were confirmed in mice fed a high-fat diet, and these were associated with PPARγ upregulation and STAT6 activation. These findings suggest that induction of HO-1 with hemin protects against obesity-induced adipose inflammation through M2 macrophage phenotype switching, which is induced by the PPARγ and STAT6 pathway. HO-1 inducers such as hemin may be useful for preventing obesity-induced adipose inflammation.

  5. DMF inhibits PDGF-BB induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation through induction of heme-oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamm Michael

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway wall remodelling is an important pathology of asthma. Growth factor induced airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC proliferation is thought to be the major cause of airway wall thickening in asthma. Earlier we reported that Dimethylfumarate (DMF inhibits platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB induced mitogen and stress activated kinase (MSK-1 and CREB activity as well as IL-6 secretion by ASMC. In addition, DMF altered intracellular glutathione levels and thereby reduced proliferation of other cell types. Methods We investigated the effect of DMF on PDGF-BB induced ASMC proliferation, on mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK activation; and on heme oxygenase (HO-1 expression. ASMC were pre-incubated for 1 hour with DMF and/or glutathione ethylester (GSH-OEt, SB203580, hemin, cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP, or siRNA specific to HO-1 before stimulation with PDGF-BB (10 ng/ml. Results PDGF-BB induced ASMC proliferation was inhibited in a dose-dependant manner by DMF. PDGF-BB induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, but not of JNK. DMF enhanced the PDGF-BB induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and there by up-regulated the expression of HO-1. HO-1 induction inhibited the proliferative effect of PDGF-BB. HO-1 expression was reversed by GSH-OEt, or p38 MAPK inhibition, or HO-1 siRNA, which all reversed the anti-proliferative effect of DMF. Conclusion Our data indicate that DMF inhibits ASMC proliferation by reducing the intracellular GSH level with subsequent activation of p38 MAPK and induction of HO-1. Thus, DMF might reduce ASMC and airway remodelling processes in asthma.

  6. Heme oxygenase: evolution, structure, and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Angela

    2002-08-01

    Heme oxygenase has evolved to carry out the oxidative cleavage of heme, a reaction essential in physiological processes as diverse as iron reutilization and cellular signaling in mammals, synthesis of essential light-harvesting pigments in cyanobacteria and higher plants, and the acquisition of iron by bacterial pathogens. In all of these processes, heme oxygenase has evolved a similar structural and mechanistic scaffold to function within seemingly diverse physiological pathways. The heme oxygenase reaction is catalytically distinct from that of other hemoproteins such as the cytochromes P450, peroxidases, and catalases, but shares a hemoprotein scaffold that has evolved to generate a distinct activated oxygen species. In the following review we discuss the evolution of the structural and functional properties of heme oxygenase in light of the recent crystal structures of the mammalian and bacterial enzymes.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Is Dependent on Oxidative Stress and Reflects Treatment Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neesha Rockwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is implicated in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis (TB and has been proposed as a biomarker of active disease. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb induces HO-1 as well as how its expression is affected by HIV-1 coinfection and successful antitubercular therapy (ATT are poorly understood. We found that HO-1 expression is markedly increased in rabbits, mice, and non-human primates during experimental Mtb infection and gradually decreased during ATT. In addition, we examined circulating concentrations of HO-1 in a cohort of 130 HIV-1 coinfected and uninfected pulmonary TB patients undergoing ATT to investigate changes in expression of this biomarker in relation to HIV-1 status, radiological disease severity, and treatment outcome. We found that plasma levels of HO-1 were elevated in untreated HIV-1 coinfected TB patients and correlated positively with HIV-1 viral load and negatively with CD4+ T cell count. In both HIV-1 coinfected and Mtb monoinfected patients, HO-1 levels were substantially reduced during successful TB treatment but not in those who experienced treatment failure or subsequently relapsed. To further delineate the molecular mechanisms involved in induction of HO-1 by Mtb, we performed a series of in vitro experiments using mouse and human macrophages. We found that Mtb-induced HO-1 expression requires NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species production induced by the early-secreted antigen ESAT-6, which in turn triggers nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NRF-2. These observations provide further insight into the utility of HO-1 as a biomarker of both disease and successful therapy in TB monoinfected and HIV-TB coinfected patients and reveal a previously undocumented pathway linking expression of the enzyme with oxidative stress.

  8. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression in mouse brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chuen-Mao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, an arachidonic acid metabolite converted by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, plays important roles in the regulation of endothelial functions in response to bacterial infection. The enzymatic activity of COX-2 can be down-regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 induction. However, the mechanisms underlying HO-1 modulating COX-2 protein expression are not known. Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the up-regulation of HO-1 regulates COX-2 expression induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an endotoxin produced by Gram negative bacteria, in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3 Methods Cultured bEnd.3 cells were used to investigate LPS-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. Cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP, an HO-1 inducer, infection with a recombinant adenovirus carried with HO-1 gene (Adv-HO-1, or zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, an HO-1 inhibitor was used to stimulate HO-1 induction or inhibit HO-1 activity. The expressions of COX-2 and HO-1 were evaluated by western blotting. PGE2 levels were detected by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Hemoglobin (a chelator of carbon monoxide, CO, one of metabolites of HO-1 and CO-RM2 (a CO releasing molecule were used to investigate the mechanisms of HO-1 regulating COX-2 expression. Results We found that LPS-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production were mediated through NF-κB (p65 via activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. LPS-induced COX-2 expression was inhibited by HO-1 induction by pretreatment with CoPP or infection with Adv-HO-1. This inhibitory effect of HO-1 was reversed by pretreatment with either ZnPP or hemoglobin. Pretreatment with CO-RM2 also inhibited TLR4/MyD88 complex formation, NF-κB (p65 activation, COX-2 expression, and PGE2 production induced by LPS. Conclusions We show here a novel inhibition of HO-1 on LPS-induced COX-2/PGE2 production in bEnd.3. Our results reinforce the emerging role of cerebral endothelium-derived HO-1

  9. Heme oxygenase-1, oxidation, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus A Araujo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process of the vascular wall characterized by the infiltration of lipids and inflammatory cells. Oxidative modifications of infiltrating low density lipoproteins and induction of oxidative stress play a major role in lipid retention in the vascular wall, uptake by macrophages and generation of foam cells, a hallmark of this disorder. The vasculature has a plethora of protective resources against oxidation and inflammation, many of them regulated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a Nrf2-regulated gene that plays a critical role in the prevention of vascular inflammation. It is the inducible isoform of heme oxygenase, responsible for the oxidative cleavage of heme groups leading to the generation of biliverdin, carbon monoxide and release of ferrous iron. HO-1 has important antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects in vascular cells, most of which play a significant role in the protection against atherogenesis. HO-1 may also be an important feature in macrophage differentiation and polarization to certain subtypes. The biological effects of HO-1 are largely attributable to its enzymatic activity, which can be conceived as a system with three arms of action, corresponding to its three enzymatic byproducts. HO-1 mediated vascular protection may be due to a combination of systemic and vascular local effects. It is usually expressed at low levels but can be highly upregulated in the presence of several proatherogenic stimuli. The HO-1 system is amenable for use in the development of new therapies, some of them currently under experimental and clinical trials. Interestingly, in contrast to the HO-1 antiatherogenic actions, the expression of its transcriptional regulator Nrf2 leads to proatherogenic effects instead. This article reviews the evidence that supports the antiatherogenic role of HO-1, potential pathways and mechanisms mediating

  10. The Induction of Heme Oxygenase 1 Decreases Painful Diabetic Neuropathy and Enhances the Antinociceptive Effects of Morphine in Diabetic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Castany

    Full Text Available Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus which is poorly controlled by conventional analgesics. This study investigates if treatment with an heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP, could modulate the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by diabetes and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine. In a diabetic mice model induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ, we evaluated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg of CoPP at several days after its administration. The antinociceptive actions produced by the systemic administration of morphine alone or combined with CoPP were also evaluated. In addition, the effects of CoPP treatment on the expression of HO-1, the microglial activation marker (CD11b/c, the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2 and μ-opioid receptors (MOR, were also assessed. Our results showed that the administration of 10 mg/kg of CoPP during 5 consecutive days completely blocked the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by diabetes. These effects are accompanied by the increased spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve protein levels of HO-1. In addition, the STZ-induced activation of microglia and overexpression of NOS2 in the spinal cord were inhibited by CoPP treatment. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effects of morphine were enhanced by CoPP treatment and reversed by the administration of an HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP. The spinal cord expression of MOR was also increased by CoPP treatment in diabetic mice. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that the induction of HO-1 attenuated STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine via inhibition of microglia activation and NOS2 overexpression as well as by increasing the spinal cord levels of MOR. This study proposes the administration of Co

  11. Targeting heme oxygenase-1 in vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, William

    2010-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) metabolizes heme to generate carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. Biliverdin is subsequently metabolized to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular disease. Pharmacological induction or gene transfer of HO-1 ameliorates vascular dysfunction in animal models of atherosclerosis, post-angioplasty restenosis, vein graft stenosis, thrombosis, myocardial infarction, and hypertension, while inhibition of HO-1 activity or gene deletion exacerbates these disorders. The vasoprotection afforded by HO-1 is largely attributable to its end products: CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These end products exert potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, and anti-thrombotic actions. In addition, CO and bile pigments act to preserve vascular homeostasis at sites of arterial injury by influencing the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or leukocytes. Several strategies are currently being developed to target HO-1 in vascular disease. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 by heme derivatives, dietary antioxidants, or currently available drugs, is a promising near-term approach, while HO-1 gene delivery is a long-term therapeutic goal. Direct administration of CO via inhalation or through the use of CO-releasing molecules and/or CO-sensitizing agents provides an attractive alternative approach in targeting HO-1. Furthermore, delivery of bile pigments, either alone or in combination with CO, presents another avenue for protecting against vascular disease. Since HO-1 and its products are potentially toxic, a major challenge will be to devise clinically effective therapeutic modalities that target HO-1 without causing any adverse effects.

  12. [Cardioprotective effect of heme oxygenase-1 induction by hemin on the isolated rat heart during ischemia--reperfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukoba, T V; Moĭbenko, O O; Kotsioruba, A V

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of both an inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO-1) and products of heme catabolism (carbon monoxide (CO), cardiac bilirubin and Fe2+) in protecting myocardium against post-ischemic myocardial dysfunction. Rat hearts were isolated and perfused according to the Langendorff technique to evaluate the recovery of myocardial function after total ischemia (20 min) and reperfusion (40 min) and production of reactive oxygen forms at a reperfusion phase. Ischemia/reperfusion caused impairment in myocardial function: left ventricular developing pressure (LVDP) was shown to be decreased, while end-diastolic pressure (EDP) and both coronary perfusion pressure and coronary resistance increased. Free oxygen radicals were generated at the reperfusion phase which led to injuries to cardiomyocytes and creatine kinase efflux into perfusate. We have found that upregulation of HO-1 by preliminary (24 h before ischemia) injections of 25 mg/kg hemin (i.p.) resulted in improving the myocardial function due to increasing the enzyme activity and forming the cardial bilirubine, while generation of reactive oxygen forms was inhibited, as well as the contents of creatine kinase reduced. As a result, impairment in cardiomyocytes diminished, and coronary vessels dilated to improve the functional parametres of the heart work.

  13. Characterization of the antioxidant properties of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN)-induction of the intrinsic antioxidative system heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Organic nitrates are among the oldest and yet most commonly employed drugs in the chronic therapy of coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. While they have long been used in clinical practise, our understanding of their mechanism of action and of their side effects remains incomplete. To date, the most commonly employed nitrates are isosorbide mononitrate (ISMN), isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN), and nitroglycerin (GTN). Another nitrate, pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), has long been employed in eastern European countries and is currently being reintroduced also in western countries. So far, PETN is the only organic nitrate in clinical use, which is devoid of induction of oxidative stress and related side-effects such as endothelial dysfunction and nitrate tolerance. Some of these effects are related to special pharmacokinetics of PETN, but upon chronic administration, PETN also induces antioxidative pathways at the genomic level, resulting in increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and ferritin, both possessing highly protective properties. There is good experimental evidence that at least part of the beneficial profile of long-term PETN treatment is based on activation of the heme oxygenase-1/ferritin system.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC (United States); Clouse, Kathleen A. [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wahl, Larry M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Development Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Viral Immunology Section, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  15. Analysis of Heme oxygenase isomers in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-ZhuLi; Wen-JunCui; Xue-HongZhang; Qing-XiangShen; JianWang; She

    2002-01-01

    AIM:To purify and identify heme oxygenase(HO) isomers which exist in rat liver,spleen and brain treated with hematin and phenylhydrazine and in untrated rat liver and to investigate the characteristics of HO isomers,to isolate and confirm the rat HO-1 cDNA that actually encodes HO-1 by expressing cDNA in monkey Kidney cells(COS-1 cells),to prepare the rat heme oxygenase-1(HO-1)mutant and to detect inhibition of HO-1 mutated enzyme.

  16. HEME OXYGENASE: ENZYME WITH FUNCTIONAL DIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhawat G. S.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years role of Heme oxygenase (HO has been considered in nearly all living system including plants, animals and other organisms. The common role of heme oxygenase is the degradation of heme, although there is a diversity of additional role of HO in organisms including iron acquisition, cellular signaling, defense against stress and biosynthesis during metabolism. Likewise, the function of HO is to provide cofactors for the photosynthetic apparatus in cyanobacteria. Heme concentration is variable in different plant species and found maximum in leguminous plant root nodules. Moreover HO has diverse isoforms in plant and animal systems. The review addressed important function of HO and focused on its functional diversity.

  17. Heme oxygenase-1: a metabolic nike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegiel, Barbara; Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C; Otterbein, Leo E

    2014-04-10

    Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer.

  18. Effect of prostaglandin-J(2) on VEGF synthesis depends on the induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowicz, Alicja; Huk, Ihor; Nigisch, Anneliese; Weigel, Günter; Weidinger, Franz; Dulak, Jozef

    2002-08-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that degrades heme to carbon monoxide, iron ions, and biliverdin. Its expression can be induced by 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)prostaglandin-J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)), a natural ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma transcription factor. In macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells, 15d-PGJ(2) up-regulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a fundamental regulator of angiogenesis. Here we investigated the involvement of HO-1 in the 15d-PGJ(2)-mediated regulation of VEGF production by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Resting HMEC-1 released approximately 20 pg/ml VEGF protein after 24 h of incubation. Treatment of cells with 15d-PGJ(2) (1-10 microM) significantly and dose-dependently increased the VEGF promoter activity, mRNA expression, and protein secretion. In the same cells, 15d-PGJ(2) potently induced the expression of HO-1 protein that correlated with HO-1 promoter activity. Activation of HO-1 with hemin or ectopic overexpression of HO-1 in HMEC-1 perfectly mimicked the effect of 15d-PGJ(2) and led to increased VEGF production. Importantly, the inhibition of the HO-1 pathway by tin protoporphyrin-IX significantly reduced the stimulatory effect of 15d-PGJ(2) on VEGF synthesis. Thus, we postulate that the up-regulation of VEGF expression in response to 15d-PGJ(2 )in HMEC-1 is mediated by the activation of HO-1.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal inflammation: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao; Fan, Wen-Guo; Li, Dong-Pei; Kung, Hsiangfu; Lin, Marie Cm

    2011-10-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system catalyzes heme to biologically active products: carbon monoxide, biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. A growing body of evidence indicates that HO-1 activation may play an important protective role in acute and chronic inflammation of gastrointestinal tract. This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiological significance of HO-1 induction and its possible roles in the gastrointestinal inflammation studied to date. The ability to upregulate HO-1 by pharmacological means or using gene therapy may offer therapeutic strategies for gastrointestinal inflammation in the future.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie; CM; Lin; Hsiangfu; Kung

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) system catabolizes heme into three products:carbon monoxide,biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron.It is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes.A great deal of data has demonstrated the roles of HO-1 in the formation,growth and metastasis of tumors.The interest in this system by investigators involved in gastrointestinal tumors is fairly recent,and few papers on HO-1 have touched upon this subject.This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiologic...

  1. Dioxygen reactivity of meso-hydroxylated hemes: intermediates in heme degradation process catalyzed by heme oxygenase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sankar Prasad Rath

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the only enzyme in mammals known to catalyse the physiological degradation of unwanted heme into biliverdin, Fe ion and CO. The process involves introduction of the hydroxyl group at one of its meso-positions as the first fundamental step of the heme cleavage process. It was also found that meso-amino heme undergoes similar ring-cleavage process while reacting with dioxygen in presence of pyridine as an axial ligand. The present paper briefly reviews the reactions of model meso-hydroxylated heme and its analogues with dioxygen, and their relevance in the heme degradation process.

  2. Rebamipide suppresses collagen-induced arthritis through reciprocal regulation of th17/treg cell differentiation and heme oxygenase 1 induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Su-Jin; Park, Jin-Sil; Woo, Yun-Ju; Lim, Mi-Ae; Kim, Sung-Min; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hee Jin; Lee, Weon Sun; Park, Sang-Hi; Jeong, Jeong-Hee; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Cho, Mi-La; Min, Jun-Ki

    2014-04-01

    Rebamipide, a gastroprotective agent, has the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen radicals. Increased oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We undertook this study to investigate the impact of rebamipide on the development of arthritis and the pathophysiologic mechanisms by which rebamipide attenuates arthritis severity in a murine model of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in DBA/1J mice. Anti-type II collagen antibody titers and interleukin-17 (IL-17) levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of transcription factors was analyzed by immunostaining and Western blotting. Frequencies of IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Rebamipide reduced the clinical arthritis score and severity of histologic inflammation and cartilage destruction in a dose-dependent manner. The joints isolated from rebamipide-treated mice with CIA showed decreased expression of nitrotyrosine, an oxidative stress marker. Rebamipide-treated mice showed lower circulating levels of type II collagen-specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a. Whereas the number of Th17 cells in spleens was decreased in rebamipide-treated mice with CIA, a significant increase in the number of Treg cells in spleens was observed. In vitro, rebamipide inhibited Th17 cell differentiation through STAT-3/retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor γt and reciprocally induced Treg cell differentiation through FoxP3. Rebamipide increased Nrf2 nuclear activities in murine CD4+ T cells and LBRM-33 murine T lymphoma cells. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the spleens was markedly increased in rebamipide-treated mice. The inhibitory effects of rebamipide on joint inflammation are associated with recovery from an imbalance between Th17 cells and Treg cells and with activation of an Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of

  3. Differential effects of heme oxygenase isoforms on heme mediation of endothelial intracellular adhesion molecule 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, F A; da Silva, J L; Farley, T; de Witte, T; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    1999-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), by catabolizing heme to bile pigments, down-regulates cellular hemoprotein, hemoglobin, and heme; the latter generates pro-oxidant products, including free radicals. Two HO isozymes, the products of distinct genes, have been described; HO-1 is the inducible isoform, whereas HO-2 is suggested to be constitutively expressed. We studied the inducing effect of several metal compounds (CoCl(2), stannic mesoporphyrin, and heme) on HO activity. Additionally, we studied HO-1 expression in experimental models of adhesion molecule expression produced by heme in endothelial cells, and the relationship of HO-1 expression to the induced adhesion molecules. Flow cytometry analysis showed that heme induces intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression in a concentration (10-100 microM)- and time (1-24 h)-dependent fashion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pretreatment with stannic mesoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO activity, caused a 2-fold increase in heme-induced ICAM-1 expression. In contrast, HO induction by CoCl(2) decreased heme-induced ICAM-1 expression by 33%. To examine the contribution of HO-1 and HO-2 to endothelial HO activity, specific antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) of each isoform were tested for their specificity to inhibit HO activity in cells exposed to heme. Endothelial cells exposed to heme elicited increased HO activity, which was prevented (70%) by HO-1 antisense ODNs. HO-2 antisense ODN inhibited heme-induced HO activity by 21%. Addition of HO-1 antisense ODNs prevented heme degradation and resulted in elevation of microsomal heme. Western blot analysis showed that HO-1 antisense ODNs selectively inhibited HO-1 protein and failed to inhibit HO-2 protein. Incubation of endothelial cells with HO-1 antisense enhanced heme-dependent increase of ICAM-1. In contrast, addition of HO-2 antisense to endothelial cells failed to increase adhesion molecules. The role of glutathione, an important antioxidant, was examined on heme

  4. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 in normal and malignant B lymphocytes by 15-deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 requires Nrf2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancos, Simona; Baglole, Carolyn J.; Rahman, Irfan; Phipps, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in response to oxidative stress and is believed to be a cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory enzyme. It is unknown whether normal or malignant human B lineage cells express HO-1. 15-deoxy-Δ12, 14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) is an interesting electrophilic lipid mediator able to increase oxidative stress in B cells. Here, we tested normal and malignant human B lineage cells for their ability to express HO-1 in response to 15d-PGJ2, as well as the signaling pathways required for HO-1 expression. 15d-PGJ2 potently induced HO-1 protein expression in normal and malignant B cells. Malignant B cells exhibited a greater induction of HO-1 protein compared to normal B lymphocytes. Using siRNA directed against the transcription factor Nrf2 and B cells isolated from Nrf2-deficient mice, we show that HO-1 induction by 15d-PGJ2 is dependent on Nrf2. These results show that, compared to normal B lymphocytes, malignant B cells have a greater capacity to increase their HO-1 protein levels in response to 15d-PGJ2. We speculate that the ability to highly express HO-1 by malignant B cells could confer a survival advantage. PMID:20064636

  5. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 in normal and malignant B lymphocytes by 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) requires Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancos, Simona; Baglole, Carolyn J; Rahman, Irfan; Phipps, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in response to oxidative stress and is believed to be a cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory enzyme. It is unknown whether normal or malignant human B-lineage cells express HO-1. 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) is an interesting electrophilic lipid mediator able to increase oxidative stress in B cells. Here, we tested normal and malignant human B-lineage cells for their ability to express HO-1 in response to 15d-PGJ(2), as well as the signaling pathways required for HO-1 expression. 15d-PGJ(2) potently induced HO-1 protein expression in normal and malignant B cells. Malignant B cells exhibited a greater induction of HO-1 protein compared to normal B lymphocytes. Using siRNA directed against the transcription factor Nrf2 and B cells isolated from Nrf2-deficient mice, we show that HO-1 induction by 15d-PGJ(2) is dependent on Nrf2. These results show that, compared to normal B lymphocytes, malignant B cells have a greater capacity to increase their HO-1 protein levels in response to 15d-PGJ(2). We speculate that the ability to highly express HO-1 by malignant B cells could confer a survival advantage.

  6. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 suppresses heat shock protein 90 and the proliferation of human breast cancer cells through its byproduct carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wen-Ying [Department of Pathology, Chi-Mei Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Chou [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Shih, Chwen-Ming; Lin, Chun-Mao; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Chen, Ku-Chung [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Wei, E-mail: cwlin@tmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is an oxidative stress-response enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme into bilirubin, ferric ion, and carbon monoxide (CO). Induction of HO-1 was reported to have antitumor activity; the inhibitory mechanism, however, is still unclear. In the present study, we found that treatment with [Ru(CO){sub 3}Cl{sub 2}]{sub 2} (RuCO), a CO-releasing compound, reduced the growth of human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Analysis of growth-related proteins showed that treatment with RuCO down-regulated cyclinD1, CDK4, and hTERT protein expressions. Interestingly, RuCO treatment resulted in opposite effects on wild-type and mutant p53 proteins. These results were similar to those of cells treated with geldanamycin (a heat shock protein (HSP)90 inhibitor), suggesting that RuCO might affect HSP90 activity. Moreover, RuCO induced mutant p53 protein destabilization accompanied by promotion of ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. The induction of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) showed consistent results, while the addition of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), an HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, diminished the RuCO-mediated effect. RuCO induction of HO-1 expression was reduced by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor (SB203580). Additionally, treatment with a chemopreventive compound, curcumin, induced HO-1 expression accompanied with reduction of HSP90 client protein expression. The induction of HO-1 by curcumin inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA)-elicited matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and tumor invasion. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence underlying HO-1's antitumor mechanism. CO, a byproduct of HO-1, suppresses HSP90 protein activity, and the induction of HO-1 may possess potential as a cancer therapeutic. - Highlights: • CO and HO-1 inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells. • CO and HO-1 attenuated HSP90 and its client proteins expression. • CO induced mutant p53 protein

  7. The heme-heme oxygenase system: a molecular switch in wound healing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Beurden, H.E. van; Hoff, J.W. Von den; Adema, G.J.; Figdor, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    When cells are injured they release their contents, resulting in a local accumulation of free heme proteins and heme. Here, we investigated the involvement of heme and its degrading enzyme heme oxygenase (HO) in the inflammatory process during wound healing. We observed that heme directly accumulate

  8. Isocyanides Inhibit Human Heme Oxygenases at the Verdoheme Stage†

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, John P.; Kandel, Sylvie; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of heme to generate biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In humans, heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is overexpressed in tumor tissues, where it helps to protect cancer cells from anticancer agents, while HOs in fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans, function as the primary means of iron acquisition. Thus, HO can be considered a potential therapeutic target for certain diseases. In this study, we have examined the equilibrium binding of three isocya...

  9. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 with hemin alleviates cisplatin-induced reproductive toxicity in male rats and enhances its cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeba, Gehan Hussein; Hamza, Alaaeldin Ahmed; Hassanin, Soha Osama

    2016-12-15

    Cisplatin-induced testicular damage is a major obstacle in the application of cisplatin as chemotherapeutic agent. However, it remains as one of the most widely employed anticancer agents in treating various solid tumors including prostate cancer. Since heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme with anti-oxidative stress, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities, we investigated the effects of up-regulation of HO-1 by hemin and its inhibition by zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP) on cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity in adult rats. Furthermore, the anticancer effect of hemin and ZnPP, with and without cisplatin, was evaluated on human prostate cancer cell line, PC3. Results of the animal study showed that hemin reversed cisplatin-induced perturbations in sperm characteristics, normalized serum testosterone level, and ameliorated cisplatin-induced alterations in testicular and epididymal weights, and restored normal testicular architecture. Moreover, hemin increased the expression and activity of HO-1 protein and prevented cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity by virtue of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This effect was evidenced by amelioration of testicular oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, reduced glutathione contents, and catalase activity) and inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide synthase expressions). In contrast, administration of ZnPP (HO-1 inhibitor) did not show significant improvement against cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity. Finally, in vitro analyses showed that, hemin augmented the anticancer efficacy of cisplatin, while ZnPP inhibited its apoptotic effect in PC3 cells. In conclusion, the induction of HO-1 represents a potential therapeutic approach to protect the testicular tissue from the detrimental effects of cisplatin without repressing, but rather augmenting, its cytotoxic effects on PC3 cells.

  10. Immunolocalization of heme oxygenase-1 in periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gayathri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of our study is an increasing evidence of involvement of antioxidant enzymes like heme oxygenase-1 in periodontal inflammation and their implication for treatment of chronic periodontitis.

  11. Ascorbic acid partly antagonizes resveratrol mediated heme oxygenase-1 but not paraoxonase-1 induction in cultured hepatocytes - role of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2

    OpenAIRE

    Hori Osamu; Hashida Koji; Döring Frank; Schmelzer Constance; Schrader Charlotte; Breckwoldt Dorothea; Boesch-Saadatmandi Christine; Wagner Anika E; Matsugo Seiichi; Rimbach Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Both resveratrol and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) are frequently used in complementary and alternative medicine. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms for potential health benefits of resveratrol and its interactions with ascorbic acid. Methods The antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 were analysed for their mRNA and protein levels in HUH7 liver cells treated with 10 and 25 μmol/l resveratrol in the absence and presence of 100 and 1000 μmo...

  12. The P. aeruginosa Heme Binding Protein PhuS is a Heme Oxygenase Titratable Regulator of Heme Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme utilization (Phu) system encodes several proteins involved in the acquisition of heme as an iron source. Once internalized heme is degraded by the iron-regulated heme oxygenase, HemO to biliverdin (BV) IXδ and β. In vitro studies have shown holo-PhuS transfers heme to the iron-regulated HemO. This protein-protein interaction is specific for HemO as PhuS does not interact with the α-regioselective heme oxygenase, BphO. Bacterial genetics and isotopic labeling...

  13. Src/STAT3-dependent heme oxygenase-1 induction mediates chemoresistance of breast cancer cells to doxorubicin by promoting autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qixing; Wang, Hongli; Hu, Yongliang; Hu, Meiru; Li, Xiaoguang; Aodengqimuge; Ma, Yuanfang; Wei, Changyuan; Song, Lun

    2015-08-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance in breast cancer, whether acquired or intrinsic, remains a major clinical obstacle. Thus, increasing tumor cell sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents will be helpful in improving the clinical management of breast cancer. In the present study, we found an induction of HO-1 expression in doxorubicin (DOX)-treated MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells, which showed insensitivity to DOX treatment. Knockdown HO-1 expression dramatically upregulated the incidence of MDA-MB-231 cell death under DOX treatment, indicating that HO-1 functions as a critical contributor to drug resistance in MDA-MB-231 cells. We further observed that DOX exposure induced a cytoprotective autophagic flux in MDA-MB-231 cells, which was dependent on HO-1 induction. Moreover, upregulation of HO-1 expression required the activation of both signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and its upstream regulator, protein kinase Src. Abrogating Src/STAT3 pathway activation attenuated HO-1 and autophagy induction, thus increasing the chemosensitivity of MDA-MB-231 cells. Therefore, we conclude that Src/STAT3-dependent HO-1 induction protects MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells from DOX-induced death through promoting autophagy. In the following study, we further demonstrated the contribution of Src/STAT3/HO-1/autophagy pathway activation to DOX resistance in another breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-468, which bears a similar phenotype to MDA-MB-231 cells. Therefore, activation of Src/STAT3/HO-1/autophagy signaling pathway might play a general role in protecting certain subtypes of breast cancer cells from DOX-induced cytotoxicity. Targeting this signaling event may provide a potential approach for overcoming DOX resistance in breast cancer therapeutics.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 against vascular insufficiency: roles of atherosclerotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazunobu

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), an enzyme essential for heme degradation, shows anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties via the production of bile pigments, carbon monoxide (CO) and ferritin induction under various pathophysiological conditions. A number of recent studies have shown biological effects of HO reaction in cardiovascular disorders. An inducible form of HO, HO-1, is induced by a variety of stresses such as oxidized lipoproteins, cytokines, hemodynamic changes, angiotensin II and nitric oxide (NO) in vascular wall. HO-1 induction seems to function as an adaptive response against these injurious stimuli. HO-1 induction in artery wall scavenges reactive oxygen species, which leads to the attenuation of monocyte adhesion and chemotaxis. HO-1 induction also reduces lipid peroxidation in plasma and artery wall. These properties of HO-1 suggest anti-atherogenic roles of this enzyme. In this review, roles of endothelial HO-1 expression and bilirubin in atherogenesis are also discussed. HO-1 also seems to play a significant role in restenosis after angioplasty, which is a major clinical problem associated with atherosclerosis. Recent progress in human HO-1 genetics supports these experimental results. This review aims to reaffirm current problems in the biological aspects of HO and suggest future research direction and clinical application.

  15. Nitric oxide inhibitor N omega -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester potentiates induction of heme oxygenase-1 in kidney ischemia/reperfusion model: a novel mechanism for regulation of the oxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Robert D; Wang, Xiaojun; Maines, Mahin D

    2003-07-01

    The biological significance of the heme oxygenase (HO) system's response to stress reflects functions of its products-CO and bile pigments. CO is a messenger molecule, whereas bile pigments are antioxidants and modulators of cell signaling. Presently, an unexpected mechanism for sustained suprainduction of renal HO-1 following ischemia/reperfusion injury is described. Inhibition of nitric-oxide synthase (NOS) activity by Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) at the resumption of reperfusion of rat kidney subjected to bilateral ischemia (30 min) was as effective as the most potent HO-1 inducer, the spin trap agent n-tert-butyl-alpha-phenyl nitrone (PBN), in causing sustained suprainduction of HO-1 mRNA. PBN forms stable radicals of oxygen and nitrogen. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, HO-1 mRNA measured approximately 30-fold that of the control in the presence of l-NAME treatment; in its absence, the transcript increased to only approximately 5-fold. At 4 h in the presence or absence of the l-NAME HO-1, mRNA was increased by approximately 30-fold. The transcript was translated to active protein as indicated by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and activity analyses. l-NAME was not effective given 1 h after resumption of reperfusion. Suprainduction was restricted to the kidney and not detected in the heart and aorta; ferritin expression in the kidney was not effected. It is reasoned that in tissue directly insulted by ischemia/reperfusion, increased production of NO radicals promotes the loss of HO-1 transcript. Because the absence of NO radicals and presence of PBN had a similar effect on HO-1, we propose that suprainduction of the gene is mainly caused by O2 radicals formed on reperfusion. Inhibition of NOS is potentially useful for sustained induction of HO-1 in organs that will be subjected to oxidative-stress insult.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide in pulmonary medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slebos, DJ; Ryter, SW; Choi, AMK

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible stress protein, confers cytoprotection against oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. In addition to its physiological role in heme degradation, HO-1 may influence a number of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and apoptosis. By virtue of anti-i

  17. Decreased Heme Oxygenase Activity in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkay Cataloglu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized with progressive im-pairment of cognitive functions. Heme oxygenase is an enzyme that degrades the heme molecule resulting in equimolar amounts of the carbon monoxide, ferrous iron, and bili-verdin. Up to now, heme oxygenase activity and its metabolic effects in Alzheimer's dis-ease have been investigated in so many studies; most of them were performed in post-mortem brain tissues of Alzheimer's disease patients or in animal models. Therefore, we aimed to investigate heme oxygenase activity in leukocytes of Alzheimer's disease pa-tients as a peripheral sample. Mean heme oxygenase activity was significantly lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease (0.53 +/- 0.32 nmol/h/mg protein compared to control sucjects (1.19 +/- 0.84 nmol/h/mg protein (p= 0.001. We think that reduction in leukocyte heme oxygenase activity may limit disease progression through preserving peripheral mitochondrial function by reducing the formation of free iron and carbon monoxide. [Dis Mol Med 2013; 1(2.000: 31-34

  18. Effects of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression and Cutaneous Wound Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Niels A. J.; Wever, Kimberley E.; Wong, Ronald J.; van Rheden, Rene E. M.; Vermeij, Eline A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Carels, Carine E. L.; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2017-01-01

    Skin wounds may lead to scar formation and impaired functionality. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) can induce the anti-inflammatory enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and protect against tissue injury. We aim to improve cutaneous wound repair by RIPC treatment via induction of HO-1. RIPC was

  19. Isoporphyrin Intermediate in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P.; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the α-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin π-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of α-meso-phenylheme-IX, α-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and α-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593–42604), only the α-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced α-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation. PMID:18487208

  20. Analysis of Heme oxygenase isomers in rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Wei Xia; Wen-Jun Cui; Xue-Hong Zhang; Qing-Xiang Shen; Jian Wang; Yun-Zhu Li; Shen-Nian Chen; Shan-Chang Yu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To purify and identify heme oxygenase (HO) isomers which exist in rat liver, spleen and brain treated with hematin and phenylhydrazine and in untreated rat liver and to investigate the characteristics of HO isomers, to isolate and confirm the rat HO-1 cDNA that actually encodes HO-1 by expressing cDNA in monkey kidney cells (COS-1 cells), to prepare the rat heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mutant and to detect inhibition of HO-1 mutated enzyme.METHODS: First, rat liver, spleen and brain microsomal fi-actions were purified by DEAE-Sephacel and hydroxylapatite. The characteristics including activity, immunity and inducibility of two isomers (HO-1 and HO-2), and their apparent molecular weight were measured by detecting enzymatic activities, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis, respectively. Second, plasmid pcDNA3HO1 containing native rat HO-1 cDNA and pcDNA3HO1D25 carrying mutated rat HO-1 cDNA (His25Ala) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. COS-1 cells transfected with pcDNA3HO1 and pcDNA3HO1D25 were collected and disrupted by sonication, the microsomes were prepared by ultracentrifugation. Third, the inhibition of rat HO-1 mutant was analyzed.RESULTS: Two isomers were purified and identified in treated rat liver, spleen, brain and untreated rat liver. HO-1 was the predominant form with a ratio of 2.0:1 and 3.2:1 of HO-1 and HO-2 in liver and spleen, respectively, but only the activity of HO-2 in the brain and untreated liver could be detected. The apparent molecular weights of HO-1 and HO-2 were about Mr 30 000 and Mr 36 000 under reducing conditions, respectively. The antiserum against liver HO-2 was employed in Western blotting analysis, the reactivity of HO-1 in the liver was not observed. The plasmid pcDNA3HO1 was highly expressed in endoplasmic reticulum of transfected COS-1 cells. The specific activity was ≈5-fold higher than that of the control. However, the enzyme activity of mutated HO-1 declined. While

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 deletion affects stress erythropoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-An Cao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Homeostatic erythropoiesis leads to the formation of mature red blood cells under non-stress conditions, and the production of new erythrocytes occurs as the need arises. In response to environmental stimuli, such as bone marrow transplantation, myelosuppression, or anemia, erythroid progenitors proliferate rapidly in a process referred to as stress erythropoiesis. We have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 deficiency leads to disrupted stress hematopoiesis. Here, we describe the specific effects of HO-1 deficiency on stress erythropoiesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a transplant model to induce stress conditions. In irradiated recipients that received hmox(+/- or hmox(+/+ bone marrow cells, we evaluated (i the erythrocyte parameters in the peripheral blood; (ii the staining intensity of CD71-, Ter119-, and CD49d-specific surface markers during erythroblast differentiation; (iii the patterns of histological iron staining; and (iv the number of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α. In the spleens of mice that received hmox(+/- cells, we show (i decreases in the proerythroblast, basophilic, and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations; (ii increases in the insoluble iron levels and decreases in the soluble iron levels; (iii increased numbers of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α; and (iv decreased levels of CD49d expression in the basophilic and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As reflected by effects on secreted and cell surface proteins, HO-1 deletion likely affects stress erythropoiesis through the retention of erythroblasts in the erythroblastic islands of the spleen. Thus, HO-1 may serve as a therapeutic target for controlling erythropoiesis, and the dysregulation of HO-1 may be a predisposing condition for hematologic diseases.

  2. Heme oxygenase effect on mesenchymal stem cells action on experimental Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Aziza, M T; Atta, H M; Samer, H; Ahmed, H H; Rashed, L A; Sabry, D; Abdel Raouf, E R; Alkaffas, Marwa Abdul Latif

    2013-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) enzyme inducer and inhibitor on Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in Alzheimer disease. 70 female albino rats were divided equally into 7 groups as follows: group 1: healthy control; group 2: Aluminium chloride induced Alzheimer disease; group 3: induced Alzheimer rats that received intravenous injection of MSCs; group 4: induced Alzheimer rats that received MSCs and HO inducer cobalt protoporphyrin; group 5: induced Alzheimer rats that received MSCs and HO inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin; group 6: induced Alzheimer rats that received HO inducer; group7: induced Alzheimer rats that received HO inhibitor. Brain tissue was collected for HO-1, seladin-1 gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, heme oxygenase activity, cholesterol estimation and histopathological examination. MSCs decreased the plaque lesions, heme oxygenase induction with stem cells also decreased plaque lesions however there was hemorrhage in the brain. Both heme oxygenase inducer alone or with stem cells increased seladin-1 expression and decreased cholesterol level. MSCs alone or with HO-1 induction exert a therapeutic effect against the brain lesion in Alzheimer's disease possibly through decreasing the brain cholesterol level and increasing seladin-1 gene expression.

  3. Hemin inhibits NO production by IL-1β-stimulated human astrocytes through induction of heme oxygenase-1 and reduction of p38 MAPK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wen S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme oxygenase (HO-1 has been shown to attenuate oxidative injury and reduce apoptosis. HO-1 can be induced by various stimuli released during cellular injury, such as heme. Deleterious free heme is degraded by HO-1 to carbon monoxide, iron and biliverdin, which have potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of HO-1 would inhibit production of the free radical (NO by interlukin (IL-1β-activated human astrocytes. Methods To measure NO production, inducible NO synthase (iNOS, HO-1 expression and mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase activation we used hemin as an HO-1 inducer and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP IX as an inhibitor of HO-1 activity in human astrocyte cultures prior to IL-1β exposure. Transfection of astrocyte cultures was performed using a pLEX expression vector carrying the human HO-1 sequence prior to IL-1β treatment. Supernatants of astrocyte cultures pretreated with inhibitors of p38 MAPK or MEK1/2 prior to IL-1β exposure were collected for NO assay. Results IL-1β treatment of astrocytes alone induced undetectable amounts of HO-1 protein by western blot. However, HO-1 mRNA expression was modestly up-regulated in response to IL-1β stimulation. Pretreatment with hemin alone substantially induced both HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and HO-1 mRNA expression was further enhanced when hemin was combined with IL-1β treatment. In contrast, IL-1β-induced iNOS mRNA expression and NO production were markedly inhibited by hemin treatment. When pretreated with SnPP, the inhibitory effect of hemin on IL-1β-induced NO production and iNOS expression was reversed, suggesting the involvement of HO-1. IL-1β-induced p38 MAPK activation, which is known to be required for NO production, was also down-regulated by hemin. Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that up-regulation of HO-1 in astrocytes is associated with down-regulation of i

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of xanthohumol involves heme oxygenase-1 induction via NRF2-ARE signaling in microglial BV2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ik-Soo; Lim, Juhee; Gal, Jiyeong; Kang, Jeen Chu; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Bok Yun; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2011-02-01

    Xanthohumol (2',4',4-trihydroxy-6'-methoxy-3'-prenylchalcone) is a major chalcone derivative isolated from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) commonly used in brewing due to its bitter flavors. Xanthohumol has anti-carcinogenic, free radical-scavenging, and anti-inflammatory activities, but its precise mechanisms are not clarified yet. The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) protein NRF2 is a key transcription factor mediating the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory responses in animals. Therefore, we tested whether xanthohumol exerts anti-inflammatory activity in mouse microglial BV2 cells via NRF2 signaling. Xanthohumol significantly inhibited the excessive production of inflammatory mediators NO, IL-1β, and TNF-α, and the activation of NF-κB signaling in LPS-induced stimulated BV2 cells. Xanthohumol up-regulated the transcription of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and increased the level of the endogenous antioxidant GSH. In addition, xanthohumol induced nuclear translocation of NRF2 and further activation of ARE promoter-related transcription. The anti-inflammatory response of xanthohumol was attenuated by transfection with NRF2 siRNA and in the presence of the HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, but not the NQO1 inhibitor, dicoumarol. Taken together, our study suggests that xanthohumol exerts anti-inflammatory activity through NRF2-ARE signaling and up-regulation of downstream HO-1, and could be an attractive candidate for the regulation of inflammatory responses in the brain.

  5. Involvement of Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction in the Cytoprotective and Immunomodulatory Activities of Viola patrinii in Murine Hippocampal and Microglia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of diseases that lead to injury of the central nervous system are caused by oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain. In this study, NNMBS275, consisting of the ethanol extract of Viola patrinii, showed potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity in murine hippocampal HT22 cells and BV2 microglia. NNMBS275 increased cellular resistance to oxidative injury caused by glutamate-induced neurotoxicity and reactive oxygen species generation in HT22 cells. In addition, the anti-inflammatory effects of NNMBS275 were demonstrated by the suppression of proinflammatory mediators, including proinflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Furthermore, we found that the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of NNMBS275 were linked to the upregulation of nuclear transcription factor-E2-related factor 2-dependent expression of heme oxygenase-1 in HT22 and BV2 cells. These results suggest that NNMBS275 possesses therapeutic potential against neurodegenerative diseases that are induced by oxidative stress and neuroinflammation.

  6. Actin Family Proteins in the Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complex Exhibit Functional Roles in the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 with Hemin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Akiyama, Yusuke; Katoh, Yasutake; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-ichi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear actin family proteins, comprising of actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), are essential functional components of the multiple chromatin remodeling complexes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is evolutionarily conserved and has roles in transcription, DNA replication and repair, consists of actin and actin-related proteins Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8. We generated Arp5 knockout (KO) and Arp8 KO cells from the human Nalm-6 pre-B cell line and used these KO cells to examine the roles of Arp5 and Arp8 in the transcriptional regulation mediated by the INO80 complex. In both of Arp5 KO and Arp8 KO cells, the oxidative stress-induced expression of HMOX1 gene, encoding for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was significantly impaired. Consistent with these observations, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that oxidative stress caused an increase in the binding of the INO80 complex to the regulatory sites of HMOX1 in wild-type cells. The binding of INO80 complex to chromatin was reduced in Arp8 KO cells compared to that in the wild-type cells. On the other hand, the binding of INO80 complex to chromatin in Arp5 KO cells was similar to that in the wild-type cells even under the oxidative stress condition. However, both remodeling of chromatin at the HMOX1 regulatory sites and binding of a transcriptional activator to these sites were impaired in Arp5 KO cells, indicating that Arp5 is required for the activation of the INO80 complex. Collectively, these results suggested that these nuclear Arps play indispensable roles in the function of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex. PMID:28270832

  7. Prevention by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, of indomethacin -induced small intestinal ulceration in rats through induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Y; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Tokioka, S; Murano, M; Kakimoto, K; Nishio, H; Umegaki, E; Takeuchi, K; Higuchi, K

    2010-06-01

    The effect of lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), on indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration was examined in rats, particularly in relation to heme oxygenase (HO)-1. The animals were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and killed 24 h later. Lansoprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) and omeprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) were given 30 min before the administration of indomethacin, while tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnPP: 30 mg/kg, i.v.), an inhibitor of HO-1, was injected 10 min before indomethacin or lansoprazole. Indomethacin produced hemorrhagic lesions in the small intestine, accompanied with an increase of mucosal invasion of enterobacteria, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the mucosa. Pretreatment with lansoprazole dose- dependently reduced the severity of the indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions, with suppression of the increased MPO activity, while omeprazole had no effect. Pretreatment with SnPP significantly exacerbated these intestinal lesions and almost totally abolished the protective effect of lansoprazole. The up-regulation of iNOS mRNA expression following indomethacin was suppressed by lansoprazole in a SnPP-inhibitable manner, although the enhanced enterobacterial invasion remained unaffected. The amount of HO-1 protein in the intestinal mucosa was significantly increased by lansoprazole but not by omeprazole. Prior administration of carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2; 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the severity of these lesions and the enhancement of mucosal iNOS mRNA expression induced in the small intestine by indomethacin. These results suggest that lansoprazole prevents indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration, and this effect is associated with inhibition of iNOS expression, through up-regulation of HO-1/CO production in the mucosa.

  8. Isocyanides Inhibit Human Heme Oxygenases at the Verdoheme Stage†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P.; Kandel, Sylvie; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of heme to generate biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In humans, heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is overexpressed in tumor tissues, where it helps to protect cancer cells from anticancer agents, while HOs in fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans, function as the primary means of iron acquisition. Thus, HO can be considered a potential therapeutic target for certain diseases. In this study, we have examined the equilibrium binding of three isocyanides; isopropyl, n-butyl, and benzyl, to the two major human HO isoforms (hHO-1 and hHO-2), Candida albicans HO (CaHmx1), and human cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 using electronic absorption spectroscopy. Isocyanides coordinate to both ferric and ferrous HO-bound heme, with tighter binding by the more hydrophobic isocyanides, and 200-300-fold tighter binding to the ferrous form. Benzyl isocyanide was the strongest ligand to ferrous heme in all the enzymes. Because the dissociation constants (KD) of the ligands for ferrous heme-hHO-1 were below the limit of accuracy for equilibrium titrations, stopped-flow kinetic experiments were used to measure the binding parameters of the isocyanides to ferrous hHO-1. Steady-state activity assays showed that benzyl isocyanide was the most potent uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to heme with a KI = 0.15 μM for hHO-1. Importantly, single turnover assays revealed that the reaction was completely stopped by coordination of the isocyanide to the verdoheme intermediate rather than to the ferric heme complex. Much tighter binding of the inhibitor to the verdoheme intermediate differentiates it from inhibition of, for example, CYP3A4 and offers a possible route to more selective inhibitor design. PMID:19694439

  9. Isocyanides inhibit human heme oxygenases at the verdoheme stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P; Kandel, Sylvie; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-09-22

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of heme to generate biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In humans, heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is overexpressed in tumor tissues, where it helps to protect cancer cells from anticancer agents, while HOs in fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans, function as the primary means of iron acquisition. Thus, HO can be considered a potential therapeutic target for certain diseases. In this study, we have examined the equilibrium binding of three isocyanides, isopropyl, n-butyl, and benzyl, to the two major human HO isoforms (hHO-1 and hHO-2), Candida albicans HO (CaHmx1), and human cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 using electronic absorption spectroscopy. Isocyanides coordinate to both ferric and ferrous HO-bound heme, with tighter binding by the more hydrophobic isocyanides and 200-300-fold tighter binding to the ferrous form. Benzyl isocyanide was the strongest ligand to ferrous heme in all the enzymes. Because the dissociation constants (KD) of the ligands for ferrous heme-hHO-1 were below the limit of accuracy for equilibrium titrations, stopped-flow kinetic experiments were used to measure the binding parameters of the isocyanides to ferrous hHO-1. Steady-state activity assays showed that benzyl isocyanide was the most potent uncompetitive inhibitor with respect to heme with a KI = 0.15 microM for hHO-1. Importantly, single turnover assays revealed that the reaction was completely stopped by coordination of the isocyanide to the verdoheme intermediate rather than to the ferric heme complex. Much tighter binding of the inhibitor to the verdoheme intermediate differentiates it from inhibition of, for example, CYP3A4 and offers a possible route to more selective inhibitor design.

  10. The heme oxygenase system and its functions in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, M D

    2000-05-01

    The heme oxygenase (HO) system was identified in the early 1970s as a distinct microsomal enzyme system that catalyzes formation of bile pigments (Maines and Kappas, 1974). Up to the early 1990s the system was considered only as a "molecular wrecking ball" (Lane, 1998) for degradation of the heme molecule and production of toxic waste products, CO and bile pigments. For those years, the HO system remained relatively unknown to the research community. In a rather short span of the past 10 years following the discovery of high levels of a second form of the enzyme, HO-2, in the brain, suggesting that "heme oxygenase in the brain has functions aside from heme degradation" (Sun et al., 1990); concomitant with finding that another toxic gas, NO, is a signal molecule for generation of cGMP (Ignarro et al., 1982), the system was propelled into main stream research. This propulsion was fueled by the realization of the multiple and diverse functions of heme degradation products. Heme oxygenase has now found relevance in all kinds of human pathophysiology ranging from stroke, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and malaria to transplantation and immune response. As it turns out, its potential benefits are mesmerizing investigators in diverse fields (Lane, 1998). The most recent findings with HO-2 being a hemoprotein and potentially an intracellular "sink" for NO (McCoubrey et al., 1997a; Ding et al., 1999), together with the discovery of the third form of the enzyme, HO-3 (McCoubrey et al., 1997b), are likely to insure the widespread interest in the enzyme system in the coming years. The present review is intended to highlight molecular properties of HO isozymes and their likely functions in the brain. Extended reviews of the system are found in Maines (1992, 1997).

  11. Heme Degradation by Heme Oxygenase Protects Mitochondria but Induces ER Stress via Formed Bilirubin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Müllebner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase (HO, in conjunction with biliverdin reductase, degrades heme to carbon monoxide, ferrous iron and bilirubin (BR; the latter is a potent antioxidant. The induced isoform HO-1 has evoked intense research interest, especially because it manifests anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects relieving acute cell stress. The mechanisms by which HO mediates the described effects are not completely clear. However, the degradation of heme, a strong pro-oxidant, and the generation of BR are considered to play key roles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of BR on vital functions of hepatocytes focusing on mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The affinity of BR to proteins is a known challenge for its exact quantification. We consider two major consequences of this affinity, namely possible analytical errors in the determination of HO activity, and biological effects of BR due to direct interaction with protein function. In order to overcome analytical bias we applied a polynomial correction accounting for the loss of BR due to its adsorption to proteins. To identify potential intracellular targets of BR we used an in vitro approach involving hepatocytes and isolated mitochondria. After verification that the hepatocytes possess HO activity at a similar level as liver tissue by using our improved post-extraction spectroscopic assay, we elucidated the effects of increased HO activity and the formed BR on mitochondrial function and the ER stress response. Our data show that BR may compromise cellular metabolism and proliferation via induction of ER stress. ER and mitochondria respond differently to elevated levels of BR and HO-activity. Mitochondria are susceptible to hemin, but active HO protects them against hemin-induced toxicity. BR at slightly elevated levels induces a stress response at the ER, resulting in a decreased proliferative and metabolic activity of hepatocytes. However, the proteins that are targeted

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of a higher plant heme oxygenase isoform-1 from Glycine max (soybean)--coordination structure of the heme complex and catabolism of heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohya, Tomohiko; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; Migita, Catharina T

    2006-12-01

    Heme oxygenase converts heme into biliverdin, CO, and free iron. In plants, as well as in cyanobacteria, heme oxygenase plays a particular role in the biosynthesis of photoreceptive pigments, such as phytochromobilins and phycobilins, supplying biliverdin IX(alpha) as a direct synthetic resource. In this study, a higher plant heme oxygenase, GmHO-1, of Glycine max (soybean), was prepared to evaluate the molecular features of its heme complex, the enzymatic activity, and the mechanism of heme conversion. The similarity in the amino acid sequence between GmHO-1 and heme oxygenases from other biological species is low, and GmHO-1 binds heme with 1 : 1 stoichiometry at His30; this position does not correspond to the proximal histidine of other heme oxygenases in their sequence alignments. The heme bound to GmHO-1, in the ferric high-spin state, exhibits an acid-base transition and is converted to biliverdin IX(alpha) in the presence of NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin, or ascorbate. During the heme conversion, an intermediate with an absorption maximum different from that of typical verdoheme-heme oxygenase or CO-verdoheme-heme oxygenase complexes was observed and was extracted as a bis-imidazole complex; it was identified as verdoheme. A myoglobin mutant, H64L, with high CO affinity trapped CO produced during the heme degradation. Thus, the mechanism of heme degradation by GmHO-1 appears to be similar to that of known heme oxygenases, despite the low sequence homology. The heme conversion by GmHO-1 is as fast as that by SynHO-1 in the presence of NADPH/ferredoxin reductase/ferredoxin, thereby suggesting that the latter is the physiologic electron-donating system.

  13. Natural heme oxygenase-1 inducers in hepatobiliary function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Li Volti; Raul Abella; Alessandro Frigiola; Fabio Galvano; David Sacerdoti; Claudia Di Giacomo; Maria Luisa Barcellona; Antonio Scacco; Paolo Murabito; Antonio Biondi; Francesco Basile; Diego Gazzolo

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological effects of natural antioxidants, their extracts or their major active components, have been reported in recent decades. Most of these compounds are characterized by a phenolic structure, similar to that of a-tocopherol, and present antioxidant proper-ties that have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Polyphenols may increase the capacity of endog-enous antioxidant defences and modulate the cellular redox state. Changes in the cellular redox state may have wide-ranging consequences for cellular growth and differentiation. The majority of in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far have attributed the protective effect of bioactive polyphenols to their chemical reac-tivity toward free radicals and their capacity to prevent the oxidation of important intracellular components. However, in recent years a possible novel aspect in the mode of action of these compounds has been sug-gested; that is, the ultimate stimulation of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is likely to account for the established and powerful antioxidant/anti-inflam-matory properties of these polyphenols. The products of the HO-catalyzed reaction, particularly carbon mon-oxide (CO) and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown to exert protective effects in several organs against oxidative and other noxious stimuli. In this context, it is interesting to note that induction of HO-1 expression by means of natural compounds contributes to protec-tion against liver damage in various experimental mod-els. The focus of this review is on the significance of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect the liver against various stressors in several pathological conditions.

  14. Reactive oxygen species and PI3K/Akt signaling play key roles in the induction of Nrf2-driven heme oxygenase-1 expression in sulforaphane-treated human mesothelioma MSTO-211H cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Jeong, Hyang-Yun; Kim, Yong-Bae; Lee, Yong-Jin; Won, Seong Youn; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Moon-Kyun; Nam, Hae-Seon; Lee, Sang-Han

    2012-02-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction plays cytoprotective roles against oxidative injury, apoptosis, and anticancer therapy; however, little is known about its regulation in human mesothelioma MSTO-211H cells. In this study, we investigated Nrf2/HO-1 induction in response to sulforaphane and determined the signaling pathways involved in this process. Sulforaphane treatment decreased cell viability and triggered a rapid and transient increase in the intracellular ROS levels. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented sulforaphane-induced cytotoxicity. Erk1/2 was activated within 1h of sulforaphane addition, whereas Akt phosphorylation was suppressed until the first 8h, and was then maintained at an elevated level until 72h, displaying a biphasic regulatory feature. Nrf2 protein levels in both nuclear and whole cell lysates were increased after sulforaphane treatment and were decreased by pretreatment with NAC, actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 system after sulforaphane treatment was suppressed by pretreatment with NAC or Ly294002, a PI3K inhibitor. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA decreased cell viability and attenuated sulforaphane-induced HO-1 up-regulation. Overall, our results indicate that ROS generation and/or activation of PI3K/Akt signaling regulate cell survival and Nrf2-driven HO-1 expression in sulforaphane-treated MSTO-211H cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide in pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible stress protein, confers cytoprotection against oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. In addition to its physiological role in heme degradation, HO-1 may influence a number of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and apoptosis. By virtue of anti-inflammatory effects, HO-1 limits tissue damage in response to proinflammatory stimuli and prevents allograft rejection after transplantation. The transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 responds to many agents, such as hypoxia, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. HO-1 and its constitutively expressed isozyme, heme oxygenase-2, catalyze the rate-limiting step in the conversion of heme to its metabolites, bilirubin IXalpha, ferrous iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). The mechanisms by which HO-1 provides protection most likely involve its enzymatic reaction products. Remarkably, administration of CO at low concentrations can substitute for HO-1 with respect to anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects, suggesting a role for CO as a key mediator of HO-1 function. Chronic, low-level, exogenous exposure to CO from cigarette smoking contributes to the importance of CO in pulmonary medicine. The implications of the HO-1/CO system in pulmonary diseases will be discussed in this review, with an emphasis on inflammatory states.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide in pulmonary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Augustine MK

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, an inducible stress protein, confers cytoprotection against oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. In addition to its physiological role in heme degradation, HO-1 may influence a number of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and apoptosis. By virtue of anti-inflammatory effects, HO-1 limits tissue damage in response to proinflammatory stimuli and prevents allograft rejection after transplantation. The transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 responds to many agents, such as hypoxia, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. HO-1 and its constitutively expressed isozyme, heme oxygenase-2, catalyze the rate-limiting step in the conversion of heme to its metabolites, bilirubin IXα, ferrous iron, and carbon monoxide (CO. The mechanisms by which HO-1 provides protection most likely involve its enzymatic reaction products. Remarkably, administration of CO at low concentrations can substitute for HO-1 with respect to anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects, suggesting a role for CO as a key mediator of HO-1 function. Chronic, low-level, exogenous exposure to CO from cigarette smoking contributes to the importance of CO in pulmonary medicine. The implications of the HO-1/CO system in pulmonary diseases will be discussed in this review, with an emphasis on inflammatory states.

  17. Cysteine-independent activation/inhibition of heme oxygenase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukomanovic, Dragic; Rahman, Mona N; Maines, Mahin D; Ozolinš, Terence Rs; Szarek, Walter A; Jia, Zongchao; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2016-03-01

    Reactive thiols of cysteine (cys) residues in proteins play a key role in transforming chemical reactivity into a biological response. The heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) isozyme contains two cys residues that have been implicated in binding of heme and also the regulation of its activity. In this paper, we address the question of a role for cys residues for the HO-2 inhibitors or activators designed in our laboratory. We tested the activity of full length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2) and its analog in which cys265 and cys282 were both replaced by alanine to determine the effect on activation by menadione (MD) and inhibition by QC-2350. Similar inhibition by QC-2350 and almost identical activation by MD was observed for both recombinant FL-hHO-2s. Our findings are interpreted to mean that thiols of FL-hHO-2s are not involved in HO-2 activation or inhibition by the compounds that have been designed and identified by us. Activation or inhibition of HO-2 by our compounds should be attributed to a mechanism other than altering binding affinity of HO-2 for heme through cys265 and cys282.

  18. Cysteine-independent activation/inhibition of heme oxygenase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragic Vukomanovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive thiols of cysteine (cys residues in proteins play a key role in transforming chemical reactivity into a biological response. The heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2 isozyme contains two cys residues that have been implicated in binding of heme and also the regulation of its activity. In this paper, we address the question of a role for cys residues for the HO-2 inhibitors or activators designed in our laboratory. We tested the activity of full length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2 and its analog in which cys265 and cys282 were both replaced by alanine to determine the effect on activation by menadione (MD and inhibition by QC-2350. Similar inhibition by QC-2350 and almost identical activation by MD was observed for both recombinant FL-hHO-2s. Our findings are interpreted to mean that thiols of FL-hHO-2s are not involved in HO-2 activation or inhibition by the compounds that have been designed and identified by us. Activation or inhibition of HO-2 by our compounds should be attributed to a mechanism other than altering binding affinity of HO-2 for heme through cys265 and cys282.

  19. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  20. In-Cell Enzymology To Probe His-Heme Ligation in Heme Oxygenase Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Paul A; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2016-08-30

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a ubiquitous enzyme with key roles in inflammation, cell signaling, heme disposal, and iron acquisition. HO catalyzes the oxidative conversion of heme to biliverdin (BV) using a conserved histidine to coordinate the iron atom of bound heme. This His-heme interaction has been regarded as being essential for enzyme activity, because His-to-Ala mutants fail to convert heme to biliverdin in vitro. We probed a panel of proximal His mutants of cyanobacterial, human, and plant HO enzymes using a live-cell activity assay based on heterologous co-expression in Escherichia coli of each HO mutant and a fluorescent biliverdin biosensor. In contrast to in vitro studies with purified proteins, we observed that multiple HO mutants retained significant activity within the intracellular environment of bacteria. X-ray crystallographic structures of human HO1 H25R with bound heme and additional functional studies suggest that HO mutant activity inside these cells does not involve heme ligation by a proximal amino acid. Our study reveals unexpected plasticity in the active site binding interactions with heme that can support HO activity within cells, suggests important contributions by the surrounding active site environment to HO catalysis, and can guide efforts to understand the evolution and divergence of HO function.

  1. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jung Yeom

    Full Text Available Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1, an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs. Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation.

  2. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Hye-Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation.

  3. Crystal structure of dimeric heme oxygenase-2 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in complex with heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugishima, Masakazu; Hagiwara, Yoshinori; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; Migita, Catharina T; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2005-03-22

    Phycobiliproteins, light-harvesting proteins in cyanobacteria, red algae, and cryptophytes, contain phycobilin pigments. Phycobilins are synthesized from biliverdin, which is produced by the oxidative cleavage of the heme porphyrin ring catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO). Two paralogs of ho (ho1 and ho2) have been identified in the genome of the cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The recombinant proteins of both paralogs (Syn HO-1 and Syn HO-2) possess in vitro heme degradation activity. We have determined the crystal structures of Syn HO-2 in complex with heme (heme-Syn HO-2) and its reduced and NO bound forms. The heme-Syn HO-2 crystal was a nonmerohedral twin, and detwinned diffraction data were used to refine the structure. Although heme-Syn HO-2 shares common folding with other HOs, the C-terminal segment is ordered and turns back to the heme-binding side. Gel-filtration chromatography analysis and molecular packing in the crystal indicate that heme-Syn HO-2 forms a homodimer, in which the C-terminal ordered segments interact with each other. Because Syn HO-2 is a monomer in the apo state, the dimeric interaction may aid in the selection of the reducing partner but likely does not interfere with heme binding. The heme iron is coordinated by a water molecule in the ferric form, but the distal water is absent in the ferrous form. In all of the Syn HO-2 structures, several water molecules form a hydrogen-bond network at the distal hemepocket, which is involved in HO activity. Upon NO binding, the side-chain conformation of Tyr 156 changes. Tyr 156 is located at the hydrophobic cluster, which interrupts the possible H(+) pathway from the molecular surface to the hemepocket. Thus, Tyr 156 may function as a H(+) shuttle by changing conformation.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease.

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency: the first autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Oda, Yoshio; Yachie, Akihiro; Koizumi, Shoichi; Nakanishi, Isao

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the first autopsy case of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 deficiency. A 6-year-old boy who presented with growth retardation; anemia; leukocytosis; thrombocytosis; coagulation abnormality; elevated levels of haptoglobin, ferritin, and heme in serum; a low serum bilirubin concentration; and hyperlipidemia was diagnosed as HO-1 deficient by gene analysis several months before death. Autopsy showed amyloid deposits in the liver and adrenal glands and mesangioproliferative glomerular changes in kidneys, in addition to an irregular distribution of foamy macrophages with iron pigments. Fatty streaks and fibrous plaques were noted in the aorta. Compared with HO-1--targeted mice, the present case seems to more severely involve endothelial cells and the reticuloendothelial system, resulting in intravascular hemolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and amyloidosis with a short survival. This contrasts to the predominant iron metabolic disorders of HO-1--targeted mice with a long survival.

  6. Developmental expression of heme oxygenase in the rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennery, Phyllis A; Lee, Christen S; Ford, Berendera S; Weng, Yi-Hao; Yang, Guang; Rodgers, Pamela A

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in the formation of bilirubin, is expressed in the lung and may serve as an antioxidant. This enzyme results in the formation of antioxidant bile pigments and the degradation of pro-oxidant heme. We wanted to evaluate the differences in expression of HO-1, the inducible form, and HO-2, the constitutive isoenzyme, during lung maturation and document whether lung HO expression was similar to that of other antioxidant enzymes. Lung total HO activity and HO-1 and HO-2 proteins as well as HO-1 and HO-2 mRNA were evaluated in animals from 16 d of gestation (e(16.5)) to 2 mo of age. Heme content was also evaluated because heme is the substrate of the reaction. HO-1 mRNA was maximal at e(19.5) and e(20.5), whereas HO-2 mRNA was not changed throughout maturation. Lung HO-1 protein was highest on the first days of life and lowest in adults, whereas HO-2 protein was maximally expressed at postnatal d 5 and then declined to reach adult values. As to HO activity, there was a prenatal peak at e(20.5), a second lesser peak at d 5, and thereafter a decline to adult values. Lung heme content was inversely correlated with HO activity or protein as the highest heme values were seen in adults with the lowest HO activity. In response to hyperoxia, HO-1 mRNA was induced only in the adult lungs. A better understanding of the maturational regulation of lung HO will define a role for HO in newborns at risk for oxygen toxicity.

  7. Human heme oxygenase oxidation of 5- and 15-phenylhemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Niemevz, Fernando; Lad, Latesh; Huang, Liusheng; Alvarez, Diego E; Buldain, Graciela; Poulos, Thomas L; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2004-10-08

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. Previous work indicated that electrophilic addition of the terminal oxygen of the ferric hydroperoxo complex to the alpha-meso-carbon gives 5-hydroxyheme. Earlier efforts to block this reaction with a 5-methyl substituent failed, as the reaction still gave biliverdin IXalpha. Surprisingly, a 15-methyl substituent caused exclusive cleavage at the gamma-meso-rather than at the normal, unsubstituted alpha-meso-carbon. No CO was formed in these reactions, but the fragment cleaved from the porphyrin eluded identification. We report here that hHO-1 cleaves 5-phenylheme to biliverdin IXalpha and oxidizes 15-phenylheme at the alpha-meso position to give 10-phenylbiliverdin IXalpha. The fragment extruded in the oxidation of 5-phenylheme is benzoic acid, one oxygen of which comes from O2 and the other from water. The 2.29- and 2.11-A crystal structures of the hHO-1 complexes with 1- and 15-phenylheme, respectively, show clear electron density for both the 5- and 15-phenyl rings in both molecules of the asymmetric unit. The overall structure of 15-phenylheme-hHO-1 is similar to that of heme-hHO-1 except for small changes in distal residues 141-150 and in the proximal Lys18 and Lys22. In the 5-phenylheme-hHO-1 structure, the phenyl-substituted heme occupies the same position as heme in the heme-HO-1 complex but the 5-phenyl substituent disrupts the rigid hydrophobic wall of residues Met34, Phe214, and residues 26-42 near the alpha-meso carbon. The results provide independent support for an electrophilic oxidation mechanism and support a role for stereochemical control of the reaction regiospecificity.

  8. Heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide: from metabolism to molecular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2009-09-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a ubiquitous inducible stress-response protein, serves a major metabolic function in heme turnover. HO activity cleaves heme to form biliverdin-IXalpha, carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Genetic experiments have revealed a central role for HO-1 in tissue homeostasis, protection against oxidative stress, and in the pathogenesis of disease. Four decades of research have witnessed not only progress in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation and function of this illustrious enzyme, but also have opened remarkable translational applications for HO-1 and its reaction products. CO, once regarded as a metabolic waste, can act as an endogenous mediator of cellular signaling and vascular function. Exogenous application of CO by inhalation or pharmacologic delivery can confer cytoprotection in preclinical models of lung/vascular injury and disease, based on anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative properties. The bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin, end products of heme degradation, have also shown potential as therapeutics in vascular disease based on anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities. Further translational and clinical trials research will unveil whether the HO-1 system or any of its reaction products can be successfully applied as molecular medicine in human disease.

  9. Lycopene inhibits cyclic strain-induced endothelin-1 expression through the suppression of reactive oxygen species generation and induction of heme oxygenase-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Li-Chin; Chao, Hung-Hsing; Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Tsai, Jen-Chen; Liu, Ju-Chi; Hong, Hong-Jye; Cheng, Tzu-Hurng; Chen, Jin-Jer

    2015-06-01

    Lycopene is the most potent active antioxidant among the major carotenoids, and its use has been associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a powerful vasopressor synthesized by endothelial cells and plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CVD. However, the direct effects of lycopene on vascular endothelial cells have not been fully described. This study investigated the effects of lycopene on cyclic strain-induced ET-1 gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and identified the signal transduction pathways that are involved in this process. Cultured HUVECs were exposed to cyclic strain (20% in length, 1 Hz) in the presence or absence of lycopene. Lycopene inhibited strain-induced ET-1 expression through the suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through attenuation of p22(phox) mRNA expression and NAD(P)H oxidase activity. Furthermore, lycopene inhibited strain-induced ET-1 secretion by reducing ROS-mediated extrace-llular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Conversely, lycopene treatment enhanced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene expression through the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, followed by induction of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation; in addition, HO-1 silencing partially inhibited the repressive effects of lycopene on strain-induced ET-1 expression. In summary, our study showed, for the first time, that lycopene inhibits cyclic strain-induced ET-1 gene expression through the suppression of ROS generation and induction of HO-1 in HUVECs. Therefore, this study provides new valuable insight into the molecular pathways that may contribute to the proposed beneficial effects of lycopene on the cardiovascular system.

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Seon-Jin; Chung, Su Wol

    2015-09-15

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death.

  11. Endogenous Estrogen-Mediated Heme Oxygenase Regulation in Experimental Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anikó Pósa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen deficiency is one of the main causes of age-associated diseases in the cardiovascular system. Female Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: pharmacologically ovariectomized, surgically ovariectomized, and 24-month-old intact aging animals were compared with a control group. The activity and expression of heme oxygenases (HO in the cardiac left ventricle, the concentrations of cardiac interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, the myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the cardiac left ventricle, and the effects of heme oxygenase blockade (by 24-hour and 1-hour pretreatment with tin-protoporphyrin IX, SnPP on the epinephrine and phentolamine-induced electrocardiogram ST segment changes in vivo were investigated. The cardiac HO activity and the expression of HO-1 and HO-2 were significantly decreased in the aged rats and after ovariectomy. Estrogen depletion was accompanied by significant increases in the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The aged and ovariectomized animals exhibited a significantly elevated MPO activity and a significant ST segment depression. After pretreatment with SnPP augmented ST segment changes were determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensitivity to cardiac ischemia in estrogen depletion models is associated with suppression of the activity and expression of the HO system and increases in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers.

  12. Genetic analyses of heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) in different forms of pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weis, S.; Jesinghaus, M.; Kovacs, P.; Schleinitz, D.; Schober, R.; Ruffert, C.; Herms, M.; Wittenburg, H.; Stumvoll, M.; Blüher, M.; Grützmann, R.; Schulz, H.U.; Keim, V.; Mössner, J.; Bugert, P.; Witt, H.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Krohn, K.; Rosendahl, J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) is the rate limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of inflammatory processes. In animal models the course of pancreatitis was ameliorated by up-regulation of HMOX1 expression. Additionally, carbon monoxide released during heme breakdown inhibited

  13. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 against inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, William

    2011-06-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the metabolism of free heme into equimolar amounts of ferrous iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin. Biliverdin is subsequently converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. HO-1 has recently been identified as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of vascular inflammatory disease, including atherosclerosis. HO-1 represses inflammation by removing the pro-inflammatory molecule heme and by generating CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These HO-1 reaction products are capable of blocking innate and adaptive immune responses by modifying the activation, differentiation, maturation, and/or polarization of numerous immune cells, including endothelial cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, mast cells, and platelets. These cellular actions by CO and bile pigments result in diminished leukocyte recruitment and infiltration, and pro-inflammatory mediator production within atherosclerotic lesions. This review highlights the mechanisms by which HO-1 suppresses vascular inflammation in atherosclerosis, and explores possible therapeutic modalities by which HO-1 and its reaction products can be employed to ameliorate vascular inflammatory disease.

  14. A Heme Oxygenase-1 Transducer Model of Degenerative and Developmental Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman M. Schipper

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In “stressed” astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders.

  15. Genotype and allele frequencies of heme oxygenase-1 promoter region in a Greek cohort

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eleni P. Katana; Lemonia G. Skoura; Zacharias G Scouras; Michail A. Daniilidis

    2011-01-01

    Background Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an enzyme,which catabolizes heme into carbon monoxide,biliverdin and free iron.The induction of this enzyme is an important cytoprotective mechanism,which occurs as an adaptive and beneficial response to a wide variety of oxidant stimuli.HO-1 inducibility is mainly modulated by a (GT)n polymorphism in the promoter region,and has been shown that short (S) repeats are associated with greater up-regulation of HO-1,compared with long (L) repeats.Methods In the present study,250 healthy Greek individuals have been screened in order to estimate the frequencies of (GT)n alleles in the HO-1 gene.Results Nineteen different alleles,ranging from 17 to 39 repeats,with (GT)23 and (GT)30 being the most common ones,were identified.Conclusion The possible role of this polymorphism in disease states is discussed.

  16. Heme oxygenase, inflammation, and fibrosis: the good, the bad, and the ugly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte M. S. Lundvig

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon injury, prolonged inflammation and oxidative stress may cause pathological wound healing and fibrosis, leading to formation of excessive scar tissue. Fibrogenesis can occur in most organs and tissues and may ultimately lead to organ dysfunction and failure. The underlying mechanisms of pathological wound healing still remains unclear, but are considered to have a multifactoral pathogenesis, and so far, no efficient anti-fibrotic therapies exists.Extra- and intracellular levels of free heme may be increased in a variety of pathological conditions due to heme-release from hemoproteins. Free heme possesses pro-inflammatory and oxidative effects, and may act as a danger signal, which counteracted by protein scavenging via various heme-binding proteins and by heme degradation. Heme is degraded by heme oxygenase (HO that exists as two isoforms: inducible HO-1 and constitutively expressed HO-2. This generates the effector molecules biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and free iron. HO deficiency in mouse and man leads to exaggerated inflammation upon insults, and still accumulating epidemiological and preclinical studies support the widely recognized notion of the cytoprotective, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects of the activity of the HO system and the generated effector molecules. In this review, we address the potential applications of targeted HO-1 induction or administration of its effector molecules as therapeutic targets in fibrotic and inflammatory conditions to counteract inflammatory and oxidative insults. This is shown in various clinically relevant conditions, such as hypertrophic scarring, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic pancreatitis, and chronic graft rejection in transplantation.

  17. Interaction of nitric oxide with human heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Lu, Shen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2003-01-24

    NO and CO may complement each other as signaling molecules in some physiological situations. We have examined the binding of NO to human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an enzyme that oxidizes heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron, to determine whether inhibition of hHO-1 by NO can contribute to the signaling interplay of NO and CO. An Fe(3+)-NO hHO-1-heme complex is formed with NO or the NO donors NOC9 or 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide.sodium salt. Resonance Raman spectroscopy shows that ferric hHO-1-heme forms a 6-coordinated, low spin complex with NO. The nu(N-O) vibration of this complex detected by Fourier transform IR is only 4 cm(-1) lower than that of the corresponding metmyoglobin (met-Mb) complex but is broader, suggesting a greater degree of ligand conformational freedom. The Fe(3+)-NO complex of hHO-1 is much more stable than that of met-Mb. Stopped-flow studies indicate that k(on) for formation of the hHO-1-heme Fe(3+)-NO complex is approximately 50-times faster, and k(off) 10 times slower, than for met-Mb, resulting in K(d) = 1.4 microm for NO. NO thus binds 500-fold more tightly to ferric hHO-1-heme than to met-Mb. The hHO-1 mutations E29A, G139A, D140A, S142A, G143A, G143F, and K179A/R183A do not significantly diminish the tight binding of NO, indicating that NO binding is not highly sensitive to mutations of residues that normally stabilize the distal water ligand. As expected from the K(d) value, the enzyme is reversibly inhibited upon exposure to pathologically, and possibly physiologically, relevant concentrations of NO. Inhibition of hHO-1 by NO may contribute to the pleiotropic responses to NO and CO.

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Promotes Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing-Ying; Wang, Guo-Guang; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Lu, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Ping-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ulcers are one of the most serious and costly chronic complications for diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress may play an important role in diabetes and its complications. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of heme oxygenase-1 on wound closure in diabetic rats. Diabetic wound model was prepared by making an incision with full thickness in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Wounds from diabetic rats were treated with 10% hemin ointment for 21 days. Increase of HO-1 protein expression enhanced anti-inflammation and antioxidant in diabetic rats. Furthermore, HO-1 increased the levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and expressions of CBS and CSE protein. In summary, HO-1 promoted the wound closure by augmenting anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and angiogenesis in diabetic rats.

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1 Promotes Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ying Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ulcers are one of the most serious and costly chronic complications for diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress may play an important role in diabetes and its complications. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of heme oxygenase-1 on wound closure in diabetic rats. Diabetic wound model was prepared by making an incision with full thickness in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Wounds from diabetic rats were treated with 10% hemin ointment for 21 days. Increase of HO-1 protein expression enhanced anti-inflammation and antioxidant in diabetic rats. Furthermore, HO-1 increased the levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and expressions of CBS and CSE protein. In summary, HO-1 promoted the wound closure by augmenting anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and angiogenesis in diabetic rats.

  20. Regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okinaga, S; Takahashi, K; Takeda, K; Yoshizawa, M; Fujita, H; Sasaki, H; Shibahara, S

    1996-06-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 is an essential enzyme in heme catabolism, and its human gene promoter contains a putative heat shock element (HHO-HSE). This study was designed to analyze the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress. The amounts of heme oxygenase-1 protein were not increased by heat shock (incubation at 42 degrees C) in human alveolar macrophages and in a human erythroblastic cell line, YN-1-0-A, whereas heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was noticeably induced. However, heat shock factor does bind in vitro to HHO-HSE and the synthetic HHO-HSE by itself is sufficient to confer the increase in the transient expression of a reporter gene upon heat shock. The deletion of the sequence, located downstream from HHO-HSE, resulted in the activation of a reporter gene by heat shock. These results suggest that HHO-HSE is potentially functional but is repressed in vivo. Interestingly, heat shock abolished the remarkable increase in the levels of heme oxygenase-1 mRNA in YN-1-0-A cells treated with hemin or cadmium, in which HSP70 mRNA was noticeably induced. Furthermore, transient expression assays showed that heat shock inhibits the cadmium-mediated activation of the heme oxygenase-1 promoter, whereas the HSP70 gene promoter was activated upon heat shock. Such regulation of heme oxygenase-1 under thermal stress may be of physiologic significance in erythroid cells.

  1. The non-canonical functions of the heme oxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanella, Luca; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Tibullo, Daniele; Forte, Stefano; Zappalà, Agata; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-10-18

    Heme oxygenase (HO) isoforms catalyze the conversion of heme to carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin with a concurrent release of iron, which can drive the synthesis of ferritin for iron sequestration. Most of the studies so far were directed at evaluating the protective effect of these enzymes because of their ability to generate antioxidant and antiapoptotic molecules such as CO and bilirubin. Recent evidences are suggesting that HO may possess other important physiological functions, which are not related to its enzymatic activity and for which we would like to introduce for the first time the term "non canonical functions". Recent evidence suggest that both HO isoforms may form protein-protein interactions (i.e. cytochrome P450, adiponectin, CD91) thus serving as chaperone-like protein. In addition, truncated HO-1 isoform was localized in the nuclear compartment under certain experimental conditions (i.e. excitotoxicity, hypoxia) regulating the activity of important nuclear transcription factors (i.e. Nrf2) and DNA repair. In the present review, we discuss three potential signaling mechanisms that we refer to as the non-canonical functions of the HO isoforms: protein-protein interaction, intracellular compartmentalization, and extracellular secretion. The aim of the present review is to describe each of this mechanism and all the aspects warranting additional studies in order to unravel all the functions of the HO system.

  2. Modulation of Antiviral Immunity by Heme Oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Janyra A; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective enzyme expressed in most cell types in the organism. Under several stress stimuli, HO-1 expression and activity is up-regulated to catalyze the rate-limiting enzymatic step of heme degradation into carbon monoxide, free iron, and biliverdin. Besides its effects on cell metabolism, HO-1 is also capable of modulating host innate and adaptive immune responses in response to sepsis, transplantation, and autoimmunity, and preventing oxidative damage associated with inflammation. In addition, recent studies have reported that HO-1 can exert a significant antiviral activity against a wide variety of viruses, including HIV, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, enterovirus 71, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, dengue virus, and Ebola virus, among others. Herein, we address the current understanding of the functional significance of HO-1 against a variety of viruses and its potential as a therapeutic strategy to prevent and control viral infections. Furthermore, we review the most important features of the immunoregulatory functions for this enzyme.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Pyo [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Pae, Hyun-Ock [Department of Immunology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Je Moon [Department of Opthalmology, Ulasn University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Son, Yong [Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hun-Taeg, E-mail: chung@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  4. Regulation of human heme oxygenase in endothelial cells by using sense and antisense retroviral constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, S; Yang, L; Abraham, N G; Kappas, A

    2001-10-09

    Our objective was to determine whether overexpression and underexpression of human heme oxygenase (HHO)-1 could be controlled on a long-term basis by introduction of the HO-1 gene in sense (S) and antisense (AS) orientation with an appropriate vector into endothelial cells. Retroviral vector (LXSN) containing viral long terminal repeat promoter-driven human HO-1 S (LSN-HHO-1) and LXSN vectors containing HHO-1 promoter (HOP)-controlled HHO-1 S and AS (LSN-HOP-HHO-1 and LSN-HOP-HHO-1-AS) sequences were constructed and used to transfect rat lung microvessel endothelial cells (RLMV cells) and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC-1 cells). RLMV cells transduced with HHO-1 S expressed human HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein associated with elevation in total HO activity compared with nontransduced cells. Vector-mediated expression of HHO-1 S or AS under control of HOP resulted in effective production of HO-1 or blocked induction of endogenous human HO-1 in HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Overexpression of HO-1 AS was associated with a long-term decrease (45%) of endogenous HO-1 protein and an increase (167%) in unmetabolized exogenous heme in HMEC-1 cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) production in HO-1 S- or AS-transduced HMEC-1 cells after heme treatment was increased (159%) or decreased (50%), respectively, compared with nontransduced cells. HO-2 protein levels did not change. These findings demonstrate that HHO-1 S and AS retroviral constructs are functional in enhancing and reducing HO activity, respectively, and thus can be used to regulate cellular heme levels, the activity of heme-dependent enzymes, and the rate of heme catabolism to CO and bilirubin.

  5. [Heme oxygenase and carbon monoxide in the physiology and pathology of the cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Jamroz, Anna; Borkowska, Ewelina

    2004-03-03

    Heme oxygenase (HO) degrades heme to carbon monoxide (CO), ferrous ions, and the bile pigment biliverdin, which is subsequently reduced to the other important bile pigment, bilirubin, by biliverdin reductase. Fe2+ liberated from the heme molecule upregulates ferritin production, and bile pigments are potent endogenous antioxidants. The HO enzyme exists in three isophorms: HO-1 is expressed at low levels under physiological conditions, but is induced by numerous factors, including oxidative stress, inflammation, nitric oxide, an elevated level of substrate, and hypoxia. HO-2 is a constitutive enzyme involved in the baseline production of CO in the cardiovascular and nervous systems, whereas HO-3 is also ubiquitously expressed, but possesses low catalytic activity. Like nitric oxide, CO activates soluble guanylate cyclase and elevates cGMP in target tissues, which dilates blood vessels. It also does this by directly activating potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, CO inhibits platelet aggregation and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, inhibits apoptosis, and stimulates angiogenesis. Both deficiency, and excess of HO-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. Induction of HO-1 attenuates atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Pharmacological and genetic induction of HO-1 as well as the delivery of exogenous CO are promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. In vitro Activation of heme oxygenase-2 by menadione and its analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukomanovic, Dragic; Rahman, Mona N; Bilokin, Yaroslav; Golub, Andriy G; Brien, James F; Szarek, Walter A; Jia, Zongchao; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2014-02-18

    Previously, we reported that menadione activated rat, native heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) and human recombinant heme oxygenase-2 selectively; it did not activate spleen, microsomal heme oxygenase-1. The purpose of this study was to explore some structure-activity relationships of this activation and the idea that redox properties may be an important aspect of menadione efficacy. Heme oxygenase activity was determined in vitro using rat spleen and brain microsomes as the sources of heme oxygenase-1 and -2, respectively, as well as recombinant, human heme oxygenase-2. Menadione analogs with bulky aliphatic groups at position-3, namely vitamins K1 and K2, were not able to activate HO-2. In contrast, several compounds with similar bulky but less lipophilic moieties at position-2 (and -3) were able to activate HO-2 many fold; these compounds included polar, rigid, furan-containing naphthoquinones, furan-benzoxazine naphthoquinones, 2-(aminophenylphenyl)-3-piperidin-1-yl naphthoquinones. To explore the idea that redox properties might be involved in menadione efficacy, we tested analogs such as 1,4-dimethoxy-2-methylnaphthalene, pentafluoromenadione, monohalogenated naphthoquinones, α-tetralone and 1,4-naphthoquinone. All of these compounds were inactive except for 1,4-naphthoquinone. Menadione activated full-length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2) as effectively as rat brain enzyme, but it did not activate rat spleen heme oxygenase. These observations are consistent with the idea that naphthoquinones such as menadione bind to a receptor in HO-2 and activate the enzyme through a mechanism that may involve redox properties.

  7. Heme Oxygenase 1 as a Therapeutic Target in Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam

    2017-04-01

    A common clinical condition, acute kidney injury (AKI) significantly influences morbidity and mortality, particularly in critically ill patients. The pathophysiology of AKI is complex and involves multiple pathways, including inflammation, autophagy, cell-cycle progression, and oxidative stress. Recent evidence suggests that a single insult to the kidney significantly enhances the propensity to develop chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the generation of effective therapies against AKI is timely. In this context, the cytoprotective effects of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in animal models of AKI are well documented. HO-1 modulates oxidative stress, autophagy, and inflammation and regulates the progression of cell cycle via direct and indirect mechanisms. These beneficial effects of HO-1 induction during AKI are mediated in part by the by-products of the HO reaction (iron, carbon monoxide, and bile pigments). This review highlights recent advances in the molecular mechanisms of HO-1-mediated cytoprotection and discusses the translational potential of HO-1 induction in AKI.

  8. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meseda, Clement A. [Division of Viral Products, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Srinivasan, Kumar [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wise, Jasen [Qiagen, Frederick, MD (United States); Catalano, Jennifer [Center for Tobacco Products, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  9. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyangshuk [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Medical Life Sciences, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Yong Soo [Department of Biological Science, College of Natural Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinseu, E-mail: jinpark@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 polymorphism is not associated with risk of colorectal cancer: a Danish prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Andersen, Vibeke; Christensen, Jane;

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Intake of red and processed meat confers risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We wanted to test whether heme in meat promotes carcinogenesis. Methods: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, HMOX1) A-413T (rs2071746) was assessed in a nested case–cohort study of 383 CRC cases and 763 randomly selected...

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 promoter polymorphisms and risk of spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Yang, Wei; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Zhao, Hui; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K; Shaw, Gary M

    2015-09-01

    Spina bifida is the most common form of neural tube defects (NTDs). Etiologies of NTDs are multifactorial, and oxidative stress is believed to play a key role in NTD development. Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, has multiple protective properties including mediating antioxidant processes, making it an ideal candidate for study. The inducible HO isoform (HO-1) has two functional genetic polymorphisms: (GT)n dinucleotide repeats and A(-413)T SNP (rs2071746), both of which can affect its promoter activity. However, no study has investigated a possible association between HO-1 genetic polymorphisms and risk of NTDs. This case-control study included 152 spina bifida cases (all myelomeningoceles) and 148 non-malformed controls obtained from the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program reflecting births during 1990 to 1999. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and amplified fragment length polymorphisms/restriction fragment length polymorphisms using genomic DNA extracted from archived newborn blood spots. Genotype and haplotype frequencies of two HO-1 promoter polymorphisms between cases and controls were compared. For (GT)n dinucleotide repeat lengths and the A(-413)T SNP, no significant differences in allele frequencies or genotypes were found. Linkage disequilibrium was observed between the HO-1 polymorphisms (D': 0.833); however, haplotype analyses did not show increased risk of spina bifida overall or by race/ethnicity. Although, an association was not found between HO-1 polymorphisms and risk of spina bifida, we speculate that the combined effect of low HO-1 expression and exposures to known environmental oxidative stressors (low folate status or diabetes), may overwhelm antioxidant defenses and increase risk of NTDs and warrants further study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1, a critical arbitrator of cell death pathways in lung injury and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Danielle; Lin, Ling; Choi, Augustine M K; Ryter, Stefan W

    2009-07-01

    Increases in cell death by programmed (i.e., apoptosis, autophagy) or nonprogrammed mechanisms (i.e., necrosis) occur during tissue injury and may contribute to the etiology of several pulmonary or vascular disease states. The low-molecular-weight stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers cytoprotection against cell death in various models of lung and vascular injury by inhibiting apoptosis, inflammation, and cell proliferation. HO-1 serves a vital metabolic function as the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation pathway and in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. The transcriptional induction of HO-1 occurs in response to multiple forms of chemical and physical cellular stress. The cytoprotective functions of HO-1 may be attributed to heme turnover, as well as to beneficial properties of its enzymatic reaction products: biliverdin-IXalpha, iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). Recent studies have demonstrated that HO-1 or CO inhibits stress-induced extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in vitro. A variety of signaling molecules have been implicated in the cytoprotection conferred by HO-1/CO, including autophagic proteins, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, nuclear factor-kappaB, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt, and others. Enhanced HO-1 expression or the pharmacological application of HO end-products affords protection in preclinical models of tissue injury, including experimental and transplant-associated ischemia/reperfusion injury, promising potential future therapeutic applications.

  13. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron [Y. Jiang, P.R. Ortiz de Montellano, Inorg. Chem. 47 (2008) 3480-3482 ], indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO-1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group.

  14. Therapeutic roles of heme oxygenase-1 in metabolic diseases: curcumin and resveratrol analogues as possible inducers of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yong; Lee, Ju Hwan; Chung, Hun-Taeg; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress), oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression.

  15. Therapeutic Roles of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Metabolic Diseases: Curcumin and Resveratrol Analogues as Possible Inducers of Heme Oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Son

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression.

  16. Degradation of heme in gram-negative bacteria: the product of the hemO gene of Neisseriae is a heme oxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W; Wilks, A; Stojiljkovic, I

    2000-12-01

    A full-length heme oxygenase gene from the gram-negative pathogen Neisseria meningitidis was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression of the enzyme yielded soluble catalytically active protein and caused accumulation of biliverdin within the E. coli cells. The purified HemO forms a 1:1 complex with heme and has a heme protein spectrum similar to that previously reported for the purified heme oxygenase (HmuO) from the gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae and for eukaryotic heme oxygenases. The overall sequence identity between HemO and these heme oxygenases is, however, low. In the presence of ascorbate or the human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase system, the heme-HemO complex is converted to ferric-biliverdin IXalpha and carbon monoxide as the final products. Homologs of the hemO gene were identified and characterized in six commensal Neisseria isolates, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flava, Neisseria polysacchareae, Neisseria kochii, and Neisseria cinerea. All HemO orthologs shared between 95 and 98% identity in amino acid sequences with functionally important residues being completely conserved. This is the first heme oxygenase identified in a gram-negative pathogen. The identification of HemO as a heme oxygenase provides further evidence that oxidative cleavage of the heme is the mechanism by which some bacteria acquire iron for further use.

  17. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes the persistence of Leishmania chagasi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Nívea F; Andrade, Bruno B; Feijó, Daniel F; Araújo-Santos, Théo; Carvalho, Graziele Q; Andrade, Daniela; Abánades, Daniel R; Melo, Enaldo V; Silva, Angela M; Brodskyn, Cláudia I; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina; Soares, Rodrigo P; Almeida, Roque P; Bozza, Marcelo T; Borges, Valéria M

    2012-05-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) remains a major public health problem worldwide. This disease is highly associated with chronic inflammation and a lack of the cellular immune responses against Leishmania. It is important to identify major factors driving the successful establishment of the Leishmania infection to develop better tools for the disease control. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a key enzyme triggered by cellular stress, and its role in VL has not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated the role of HO-1 in the infection by Leishmania infantum chagasi, the causative agent of VL cases in Brazil. We found that L. chagasi infection or lipophosphoglycan isolated from promastigotes triggered HO-1 production by murine macrophages. Interestingly, cobalt protoporphyrin IX, an HO-1 inductor, increased the parasite burden in both mouse and human-derived macrophages. Upon L. chagasi infection, macrophages from Hmox1 knockout mice presented significantly lower parasite loads when compared with those from wild-type mice. Furthermore, upregulation of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin IX diminished the production of TNF-α and reactive oxygen species by infected murine macrophages and increased Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase expression in human monocytes. Finally, patients with VL presented higher systemic concentrations of HO-1 than healthy individuals, and this increase of HO-1 was reduced after antileishmanial treatment, suggesting that HO-1 is associated with disease susceptibility. Our data argue that HO-1 has a critical role in the L. chagasi infection and is strongly associated with the inflammatory imbalance during VL. Manipulation of HO-1 pathways during VL could serve as an adjunctive therapeutic approach.

  18. Homologues of Neisserial Heme Oxygenase in Gram-Negative Bacteria: Degradation of Heme by the Product of the pigA Gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of heme to release iron is a mechanism by which some bacterial pathogens can utilize heme as an iron source. The pigA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shown to encode a heme oxygenase protein, which was identified in the genome sequence by its significant homology (37%) with HemO of Neisseria meningitidis. When the gene encoding the neisserial heme oxygenase, hemO, was replaced with pigA, we demonstrated that pigA could functionally replace hemO and allow for heme util...

  19. Impact of heme oxygenase-1 on cholesterol synthesis, cholesterol efflux and oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascalovici, Jacob R; Song, Wei; Vaya, Jacob; Khatib, Soliman; Fuhrman, Bianca; Aviram, Michael; Schipper, Hyman M

    2009-01-01

    Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and altered cholesterol (CH) metabolism are characteristic of Alzheimer-diseased neural tissues. The liver X receptor (LXR) is a molecular sensor of CH homeostasis. In the current study, we determined the effects of HO-1 over-expression and its byproducts iron (Fe(2+)), carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin on CH biosynthesis, CH efflux and oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia. HO-1/LXR interactions were also investigated in the context of CH efflux. hHO-1 over-expression for 3 days ( approximately 2-3-fold increase) resulted in a 30% increase in CH biosynthesis and a two-fold rise in CH efflux. Both effects were abrogated by the competitive HO inhibitor, tin mesoporphyrin. CO, released from administered CORM-3, significantly enhanced CH biosynthesis; a combination of CO and iron stimulated CH efflux. Free iron increased oxysterol formation three-fold. Co-treatment with LXR antagonists implicated LXR activation in the modulation of CH homeostasis by heme degradation products. In Alzheimer's disease and other neuropathological states, glial HO-1 induction may transduce ambient noxious stimuli (e.g. beta-amyloid) into altered patterns of glial CH homeostasis. As the latter may impact synaptic plasticity and neuronal repair, modulation of glial HO-1 expression (by pharmacological or other means) may confer neuroprotection in patients with degenerative brain disorders.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 in Alzheimer disease: a tribute to Moussa Youdim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Hyman M

    2011-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a 32 kDa stress protein mediating the degradation of heme to ferrous iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin/bilirubin, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and other aging-related neurodegenerative disorders. In AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), immunoreactive HO-1 protein is over-expressed in astrocytes and neurons of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex and co-localizes to neurofibrillary tangles, senile plaques and corpora amylacea. Astroglial induction of the Hmox1 gene by β-amyloid, pro-inflammatory cytokines and hydrogen peroxide promotes mitochondrial sequestration of non-transferrin iron and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergy failure amply documented in AD-affected neural tissues. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact cell survival and neuroplasticity in AD by modulating brain sterol/oxysterol metabolism and the degradation of tau by the proteasome. Suppression of glial HO-1 activity by pharmacological or other means may confer neuroprotection in AD by curtailing iron-mediated neurotoxicity.

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Heme Oxygenase-1/Carbon Monoxide in Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Constantin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase (HO, a catabolic enzyme, provides the rate-limiting step in the oxidative breakdown of heme, to generate carbon monoxide (CO, iron, and biliverdin-IXα. Induction of the inducible form, HO-1, in tissues is generally regarded as a protective mechanism. Over the last decade, considerable progress has been made in defining the therapeutic potential of HO-1 in a number of preclinical models of lung tissue injury and disease. Likewise, tissue-protective effects of CO, when applied at low concentration, have been observed in many of these models. Recent studies have expanded this concept to include chemical CO-releasing molecules (CORMs. Collectively, salutary effects of the HO-1/CO system have been demonstrated in lung inflammation/acute lung injury, lung and vascular transplantation, sepsis, and pulmonary hypertension models. The beneficial effects of HO-1/CO are conveyed in part through the inhibition or modulation of inflammatory, apoptotic, and proliferative processes. Recent advances, however, suggest that the regulation of autophagy and the preservation of mitochondrial homeostasis may serve as additional candidate mechanisms. Further preclinical and clinical trials are needed to ascertain the therapeutic potential of HO-1/CO in human clinical disease.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide: from basic science to therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Alam, Jawed; Choi, Augustine M K

    2006-04-01

    The heme oxygenases, which consist of constitutive and inducible isozymes (HO-1, HO-2), catalyze the rate-limiting step in the metabolic conversion of heme to the bile pigments (i.e., biliverdin and bilirubin) and thus constitute a major intracellular source of iron and carbon monoxide (CO). In recent years, endogenously produced CO has been shown to possess intriguing signaling properties affecting numerous critical cellular functions including but not limited to inflammation, cellular proliferation, and apoptotic cell death. The era of gaseous molecules in biomedical research and human diseases initiated with the discovery that the endothelial cell-derived relaxing factor was identical to the gaseous molecule nitric oxide (NO). The discovery that endogenously produced gaseous molecules such as NO and now CO can impart potent physiological and biological effector functions truly represented a paradigm shift and unraveled new avenues of intense investigations. This review covers the molecular and biochemical characterization of HOs, with a discussion on the mechanisms of signal transduction and gene regulation that mediate the induction of HO-1 by environmental stress. Furthermore, the current understanding of the functional significance of HO shall be discussed from the perspective of each of the metabolic by-products, with a special emphasis on CO. Finally, this presentation aspires to lay a foundation for potential future clinical applications of these systems.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide suppress the pathogenesis of experimental cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamplona, Ana; Ferreira, Ana; Balla, József; Jeney, Viktória; Balla, György; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Chora, Angelo; Rodrigues, Cristina D; Gregoire, Isabel Pombo; Cunha-Rodrigues, Margarida; Portugal, Silvia; Soares, Miguel P; Mota, Maria M

    2007-06-01

    Cerebral malaria claims more than 1 million lives per year. We report that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) prevents the development of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA upregulated HO-1 expression and activity and did not develop ECM. Deletion of Hmox1 and inhibition of HO activity increased ECM incidence to 83% and 78%, respectively. HO-1 upregulation was lower in infected C57BL/6 compared to BALB/c mice, and all infected C57BL/6 mice developed ECM (100% incidence). Pharmacological induction of HO-1 and exposure to the end-product of HO-1 activity, carbon monoxide (CO), reduced ECM incidence in C57BL/6 mice to 10% and 0%, respectively. Whereas neither HO-1 nor CO affected parasitemia, both prevented blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, brain microvasculature congestion and neuroinflammation, including CD8(+) T-cell brain sequestration. These effects were mediated by the binding of CO to hemoglobin, preventing hemoglobin oxidation and the generation of free heme, a molecule that triggers ECM pathogenesis.

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulates Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replication and Lung Pathogenesis during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Janyra A; León, Miguel A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Riquelme, Sebastían A; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Blancou, Phillipe; Simon, Thomas; Anegon, Ignacio; Lay, Margarita K; González, Pablo A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. The development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic antiviral drugs against hRSV is imperative to control the burden of disease in the susceptible population. In this study, we examined the effects of inducing the activity of the host enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on hRSV replication and pathogenesis on lung inflammation induced by this virus. Our results show that after hRSV infection, HO-1 induction with metalloporphyrin cobalt protoporphyrin IX significantly reduces the loss of body weight due to hRSV-induced disease. Further, HO-1 induction also decreased viral replication and lung inflammation, as evidenced by a reduced neutrophil infiltration into the airways, with diminished cytokine and chemokine production and reduced T cell function. Concomitantly, upon cobalt protoporphyrin IX treatment, there is a significant upregulation in the production of IFN-α/β mRNAs in the lungs. Furthermore, similar antiviral and protective effects occur by inducing the expression of human HO-1 in MHC class II(+) cells in transgenic mice. Finally, in vitro data suggest that HO-1 induction can modulate the susceptibility of cells, especially the airway epithelial cells, to hRSV infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Critical role of 5-lipoxygenase and heme oxygenase-1 in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogliato, Ariane R; Moor, Andrea N; Kesl, Shannon L; Guilherme, Rafael F; Georgii, Janaína L; Peters-Golden, Marc; Canetti, Claudio; Gould, Lisa J; Benjamim, Claudia F

    2014-05-01

    Lipid mediators derived from 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism can activate both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways, but their role in wound healing remains largely unexplored. In this study we show that 5-LO knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice exhibited faster wound healing than wild-type (WT) animals, and exhibited upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, HO-1 inhibition in 5-LO(-/-) mice abolished the beneficial effect observed. Despite the fact that 5-LO(-/-) mice exhibited faster healing, in in vitro assays both migration and proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) were inhibited by the 5-LO pharmacologic inhibitor AA861. No changes were observed in the expression of fibronectin, transforming growth factor (I and III), and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Interestingly, AA861 treatment significantly decreased ROS formation by stimulated fibroblasts. Similar to 5-LO(-/-) mice, induction of HO-1, but not superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2), was also observed in response to 5-LO (AA861) or 5-LO activating protein (MK886) inhibitors. HO-1 induction was independent of nuclear factor (erythroid derived-2) like2 (Nrf-2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) products, or lipoxin action. Taken together, our results show that 5-LO disruption improves wound healing and alters fibroblast function by an antioxidant mechanism based on HO-1 induction. Overexpression of HO-1 in wounds may facilitate early wound resolution.

  6. Clofibrate Induces Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression through a PPARα-Independent Mechanism in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Clofibrate, an established PPARα ligand, has recently been shown to have anticancer activity yet its mechanisms of action remain to be characterized. This study examined the effect of clofibrate on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 gene expression in A2780 (human ovarian cancer and DU145 (human prostate cancer cells. Methods and Results: We demonstrate that clofibrate induces HO-1 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction of HO-1 by clofibrate was detected at both mRNA and protein levels and the HO-1 gene promoter activity was also dramatically induced by clofibrate, indicating that clofibrate up-regulates HO-1 gene transcription. Surprisingly, the induction of HO-1 by clofibrate was mediated by the Nrf2 signaling pathway, not by the PPARα pathway. This was primarily demonstrated by siRNA knockdown of Nrf2 expression that significantly attenuated clofibrate-induced HO-1 gene transcription, and siRNA knockdown of PPARα that had no effect on clofibrate-induced HO-1 promoter activity. Furthermore, deletion of the antioxidant response elements (AREs in the HO-1 gene promoter diminished clofibrate-induced HO-1 transcription and deletion of the PPAR response elements (PPREs had no such effect. Likewise, application of PPARα antagonists had no effect on clofibrate-induced HO-1 expression. Conclusion: Clofibrate induces HO-1 gene expression in cancer cells through a PPARα-independent mechanism and the Nrf2 signaling pathway is indispensible for this induction.

  7. Zinc at Sub-Cytotoxic Concentrations Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xue

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effects of zinc on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression in human cancer cells. Methods/Results: Zinc at sub-cytotoxic concentrations (50-100 μM induces HO-1 expression in the MDA-MB-231 (human breast cancer and A2780 (human ovarian cancer cell lines in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction of HO-1 by zinc was detected after 4-6 hours of treatment, reached maximal level at 8 hours, and declined thereafter. Using a human HO-1 gene promoter reporter construct, we identified two antioxidant response elements (AREs that mediated the zinc-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription, indicating that the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 signaling pathway is involved in this event. This assumption was supported by the observations that knockdown of Nrf2 expression compromised the zinc-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription, and that zinc increased Nrf2 protein expression and the Nrf2 binding to the AREs. Additionally, we found that the zinc-induced HO-1 gene transcription can be enhanced by clioquinol, a zinc ionophore, and reversed by pretreatment with TPEN, a known zinc chelator, indicating that an increase in intracellular zinc levels is responsible for this induction. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that zinc at sub-cytotoxic concentrations induces HO-1 expression in human cancer cells. The biological significance of this induction merits further investigation.

  8. Catalytic inactive heme oxygenase-1 protein regulates its own expression in oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing S; Weis, Sebastian; Yang, Guang; Zhuang, Tiangang; Abate, Aida; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2008-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the degradation of heme and forms antioxidant bile pigments as well as the signaling molecule carbon monoxide. HO-1 is inducible in response to a variety of chemical and physical stress conditions to function as a cytoprotective molecule. Therefore, it is important to maintain the basal level of HO-1 expression even when substrate availability is limited. We hypothesized that the HO-1 protein itself could regulate its own expression in a positive feedback manner, and that this positive feedback was important in the HO-1 gene induction in response to oxidative stress. In cultured NIH 3T3 cells, transfection of HO-1 cDNA or intracellular delivery of pure HO-1 protein resulted in activation of a 15-kb HO-1 promoter upstream of luciferase as visualized by bioluminescent technology and increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. These effects were independent of HO activity because an enzymatically inactive mutant form of HO-1 similarly activated the HO-1 promoter and incubation with HO inhibitor metalloporphyrin SnPP did not affect the promoter activation. In addition, HO-1-specific siRNA significantly reduced hemin and cadmium chloride-mediated HO-1 induction. Furthermore, deletion analyses demonstrated that the E1 and E2 distal enhancers of the HO-1 promoter are required for this HO-1 autoregulation. These experiments document feed-forward autoregulation of HO-1 in oxidative stress and suggest that HO-1 protein has a role in the induction process. We speculate that this mechanism may be useful for maintaining HO-1 expression when substrate is limited and may also serve to up-regulate other genes to promote cytoprotection and to modulate cell proliferation.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1: redox regulation and role in the hepatic response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Bauer, Inge

    2002-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of the alpha-mesocarbon of Fe-protoporphyrin-IX yielding equimolar amounts of biliverdin-IXalpha, free divalent iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). Among the three isoenzymes cloned to date, only HO-1 can be induced by a variety of seemingly disparate stimuli, most of which are linked by their ability to provoke oxidative stress. Although constitutive expression of HO-1 in the liver is restricted to Kupffer cells, the gene is inducible in nonparenchymal as well as in parenchymal liver cells. HO-1 induction potentially confers protection against oxidative stress in a variety of experimental models, such as liver ischemia/reperfusion secondary to transplantation or hemorrhage/resuscitation. Induction of HO-1 may protect the cell against oxidative injury by (a) controlling intracellular levels of "free" heme (a prooxidant), (b) producing biliverdin (an antioxidant), (c) improving nutritive perfusion via CO release, and (d) fostering the synthesis of the Fe-binding protein ferritin. Although protective effects of up-regulation of the HO pathway--presumably through production of bile pigments and CO--have been reported for a variety of cells and tissues, including the liver, evidence suggests that the protective action might be restricted to a rather narrow threshold of overexpression. High levels of HO-1 may even sensitize the cell to oxidative stress, e.g., through release of reactive iron. Transcriptional activation of the HO-1 gene is an integral part of the cellular response to oxidative stress, but its induction seems to be neither exclusively cytoprotective nor exclusively cytotoxic.

  10. Rapid, convenient method for screening imidazole-containing compounds for heme oxygenase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, Jason Z; Rahman, Mona N; Roman, Gheorghe; Jia, Zongchao; Nakatsu, Kanji; Szarek, Walter A

    2011-01-01

    Sensitive assays for measuring heme oxygenase activity have been based on the gas-chromatographic detection of carbon monoxide using elaborate, expensive equipment. The present study describes a rapid and convenient method for screening imidazole-containing candidates for inhibitory activity against heme oxygenase using a plate reader, based on the spectroscopic evaluation of heme degradation. A PowerWave XS plate reader was used to monitor the absorbance (as a function of time) of heme bound to purified truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) in the individual wells of a standard 96-well plate (with or without the addition of a test compound). The degradation of heme by heme oxygenase-1 was initiated using l-ascorbic acid, and the collected relevant absorbance data were analyzed by three different methods to calculate the percent control activity occurring in wells containing test compounds relative to that occurring in control wells with no test compound present. In the cases of wells containing inhibitory compounds, significant shifts in λ(max) from 404 to near 412 nm were observed as well as a decrease in the rate of heme degradation relative to that of the control. Each of the three methods of data processing (overall percent drop in absorbance over 1.5h, initial rate of reaction determined over the first 5 min, and estimated pseudo first-order reaction rate constant determined over 1.5h) gave similar and reproducible results for percent control activity. The fastest and easiest method of data analysis was determined to be that using initial rates, involving data acquisition for only 5 min once reactions have been initiated using l-ascorbic acid. The results of the study demonstrate that this simple assay based on the spectroscopic detection of heme represents a rapid, convenient method to determine the relative inhibitory activity of candidate compounds, and is useful in quickly screening a series or library of compounds for heme oxygenase inhibition

  11. Rapamycin Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 in Liver but Inhibits Bile Flow Recovery after Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kist, Alwine; Wakkie, Joris; Madu, Max; Versteeg, Ruth; ten Berge, Judith; Nikolic, Andrej; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Porte, Robert J.; Padbury, Robert T. A.; Barritt, Greg J.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims. Rapamycin, which is employed in the management of patients undergoing liver surgery, induces the synthesis of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in some non-liver cell types. The aim was to investigate whether rapamycin can induce HO-1 expression in the liver, and to test the effects of rapamy

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 inhibits neuropathic pain in rats with diabetic mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Kong; Kang Liu; Lingxi Wu; Long Wang

    2012-01-01

    A diabetes mellitus model was established through single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin into rats.Seven days later,model rats were intraperitoneally administered zinc protoporphyrin,a heme oxygenase-1 inducer,and cobalt protoporphyrin,a heme oxygenase-1 inhibitor,once every two days,for 5 successive weeks.After administration,the paw withdrawal mechanical threshold of diabetic mellitus rats significantly decreased,the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerve thickened or showed vacuole defects,the number of spinal dorsal horn neurons reduced,some neurons degenerated and were necrotic,and heme oxygenase-1 was visible in the cytoplasm of spinal dorsal horn neurons.Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling demonstrated that the number of apoptotic neurons increased,which could be inhibited by cobalt protoporphyrin,however,zinc protoporphyrin led to an opposite effect.Our experimental findings indicate that heme oxygenase-1 attenuates neuropathic pain in diabetic mellitus rats through amelioration of peripheral neuropathy and inhibition of spinal dorsal horn neuron apoptosis.

  13. Dry powder inhalation of hemin to induce heme oxygenase expression in the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, G.S.; Brandsma, C.; Harpe, M.F.H.; Van Dam, G.M.; Slebos, D.J.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; de Boer, Anne; Frijlink, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate hemin as a powder for inhalation and to show proof of concept of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the lungs of mice by inhalation of hemin. Hemin was spray dried from a neutralized sodium hydroxide solution. The particle size distribution of the powder

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Stuart T; Midwinter, Robyn G; Coupland, Lucy A; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Chong, Beng H; Parish, Christopher R; Stocker, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119(+)-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119(+)-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes.

  15. Degradation of Heme in Gram-Negative Bacteria: the Product of the hemO Gene of Neisseriae Is a Heme Oxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    A full-length heme oxygenase gene from the gram-negative pathogen Neisseria meningitidis was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Expression of the enzyme yielded soluble catalytically active protein and caused accumulation of biliverdin within the E. coli cells. The purified HemO forms a 1:1 complex with heme and has a heme protein spectrum similar to that previously reported for the purified heme oxygenase (HmuO) from the gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae and for eukar...

  16. Orthodontic Forces Induce the Cytoprotective Enzyme Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttorp, Christiaan M; Xie, Rui; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Uijttenboogaart, Jasper Tom; Van Rheden, René; Maltha, Jaap C; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic forces disturb the microenvironment of the periodontal ligament (PDL), and induce craniofacial bone remodeling which is necessary for tooth movement. Unfortunately, orthodontic tooth movement is often hampered by ischemic injury and cell death within the PDL (hyalinization) and root resorption. Large inter-individual differences in hyalinization and root resorption have been observed, and may be explained by differential protection against hyalinization. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) forms an important protective mechanism by breaking down heme into the strong anti-oxidants biliverdin/bilirubin and the signaling molecule carbon monoxide. These versatile HO-1 products protect against ischemic and inflammatory injury. We postulate that orthodontic forces induce HO-1 expression in the PDL during experimental tooth movement. Twenty-five 6-week-old male Wistar rats were used in this study. The upper three molars at one side were moved mesially using a Nickel-Titanium coil spring, providing a continuous orthodontic force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as control. After 6, 12, 72, 96, and 120 h groups of rats were killed. On parasagittal sections immunohistochemical staining was performed for analysis of HO-1 expression and quantification of osteoclasts. Orthodontic force induced a significant time-dependent HO-1 expression in mononuclear cells within the PDL at both the apposition- and resorption side. Shortly after placement of the orthodontic appliance HO-1 expression was highly induced in PDL cells but dropped to control levels within 72 h. Some osteoclasts were also HO-1 positive but this induction was shown to be independent of time- and mechanical stress. It is tempting to speculate that differential induction of tissue protecting- and osteoclast activating genes in the PDL determine the level of bone resorption and hyalinization and, subsequently, "fast" and "slow" tooth movers during orthodontic treatment.

  17. Beneficial effect of prolonged heme oxygenase 1 activation in a rat model of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Collino

    2013-07-01

    We and others have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 induction by acute hemin administration exerts cardioprotective effects. Here, we developed a rat model of heart failure to investigate whether a long-term induction of HO-1 by chronic hemin administration exerted protective effects. Sprague Dawley rats that underwent permanent ligation of the left coronary artery were closely monitored for survival rate analysis and sacrificed on day 28 post-operation. Administration of hemin (4 mg/kg body weight every other day for 4 weeks induced a massive increase in HO-1 expression and activity, as shown by the increased levels of the two main metabolic products of heme degradation, bilirubin and carbon monoxide (CO. These effects were associated with significant improvement in survival and reduced the extension of myocardial damage. The ischemic hearts of the hemin-treated animals displayed reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis in comparison with the non-treated rats, as shown by the decreased levels of lipid peroxidation, free-radical-induced DNA damage, caspase-3 activity and Bax expression. Besides, chronic HO-1 activation suppressed the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, interleukin 1β (IL-1β production and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα production that were evoked by the ischemic injury, and increased the plasma level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Interestingly, HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX; 1 mg/kg lowered bilirubin and CO concentrations to control values, thus abolishing all the cardioprotective effects of hemin. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that chronic HO-1 activation by prolonged administration of hemin improves survival and exerts protective effects in a rat model of myocardial ischemia by exerting a potent antioxidant activity and disrupting multiple levels of the apoptotic and inflammatory cascade.

  18. Zinc Protoporphyrin Upregulates Heme Oxygenase-1 in PC-3 Cells via the Stress Response Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C. M. Kwok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP, a naturally occurring molecule formed in iron deficiency or lead poisoning, is a potent competitive inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1. It also regulates expression of HO-1 at the transcriptional level. However, the effect of ZnPP on HO-1 expression is controversial. It was shown to induce HO-1 expression in some cells, but suppress it in others. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of ZnPP on HO-1 expression in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Incubation of PC-3 cells with 10 μM ZnPP for 4 h showed only a slight induction of HO-1 mRNA and protein, but the induction was high after 16 h and was maintained through 48 h of incubation. Of all the known responsive elements in the HO-1 promoter, ZnPP activated mainly the stress response elements. Of the various protein kinase inhibitors and antioxidant tested, only Ro 31-8220 abrogated ZnPP-induced HO-1 expression, suggesting that activation of HO-1 gene by ZnPP may involve protein kinase C (PKC. The involvement of PKC α, β, δ, η, θ, and ζ isoforms was ruled out by the use of specific inhibitors. The isoform of PKC involved and participation of other transcription factors remain to be studied.

  19. Characterization of a heme oxygenase of Clostridium tetani and its possible role in oxygen tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Holger; Bauer, Rosalie; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2004-10-01

    In order to colonize mammalian wounds, the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium tetani must presumably cope with temporary oxic conditions. Therefore, the recently decoded genome sequence was searched for genes which could confer oxygen tolerance. A few identified systems such as superoxide dismutases and peroxidases are probably responsible for this protection against toxic oxygen species. Another system was detected, a heme oxygenase which could have a role in establishing or maintaining an anoxic microenvironment in the process of wound colonization. The hemT gene encoding the heme oxygenase is expressed in C. tetani, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. When overexpressed in Escherichia coli, the enzyme converts heme to biliverdin under strict oxic conditions.

  20. Inhibitory Effects of Benzaldehyde Derivatives from the Marine Fungus Eurotium sp. SF-5989 on Inflammatory Mediators via the Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Su Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two benzaldehyde derivatives, flavoglaucin (1 and isotetrahydro-auroglaucin (2, were isolated from the marine fungus Eurotium sp. SF-5989 through bioassay- and 1H NMR-guided investigation. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of these compounds in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 markedly inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production by suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 protein expression without affecting cell viability. We also demonstrated that the compounds reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Furthermore, compounds 1 and 2 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation by suppressing phosphorylation of IkappaB (IκB. These results indicated that the anti-inflammatory effects of these benzaldehyde derivatives in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages were due to the inactivation of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, compounds 1 and 2 induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression through the nuclear transcription factor-E2–related factor 2 (Nrf2 translocation. The inhibitory effects of compounds 1 and 2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and on NF-κB binding activity were reversed by HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP. Thus, the anti-inflammatory effects of compounds 1 and 2 also correlated with their ability of inducing HO-1 expression.

  1. Inhibitory effects of benzaldehyde derivatives from the marine fungus Eurotium sp. SF-5989 on inflammatory mediators via the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Su; Cui, Xiang; Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Sohn, Jae Hak; Yim, Joung Han; An, Ren-Bo; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2014-12-19

    Two benzaldehyde derivatives, flavoglaucin (1) and isotetrahydro-auroglaucin (2), were isolated from the marine fungus Eurotium sp. SF-5989 through bioassay- and 1H NMR-guided investigation. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of these compounds in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 markedly inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by suppressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression without affecting cell viability. We also demonstrated that the compounds reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, compounds 1 and 2 inhibited LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation by suppressing phosphorylation of IkappaB (IκB). These results indicated that the anti-inflammatory effects of these benzaldehyde derivatives in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages were due to the inactivation of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, compounds 1 and 2 induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression through the nuclear transcription factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) translocation. The inhibitory effects of compounds 1 and 2 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and on NF-κB binding activity were reversed by HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP). Thus, the anti-inflammatory effects of compounds 1 and 2 also correlated with their ability of inducing HO-1 expression.

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy in podocytes as a protective mechanism against high glucose-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Chenglong [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Zheng, Haining [Department of Hyperbaric Oxygen, Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command, Nanjing (China); Huang, Shanshan; You, Na; Xu, Jiarong; Ye, Xiaolong; Zhu, Qun; Feng, Yamin; You, Qiang; Miao, Heng [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Ding, Dafa, E-mail: dingdafa2004@aliyun.com [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Lu, Yibing, E-mail: luyibing2004@126.com [Department of Endocrinology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2015-10-01

    Injury and loss of podocytes play vital roles in diabetic nephropathy progression. Emerging evidence suggests autophagy, which is induced by multiple stressors including hyperglycemia, plays a protective role. Meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) possesses powerful anti-apoptotic properties. Therefore, we investigated the impact of autophagy on podocyte apoptosis under diabetic conditions and its association with HO-1. Mouse podocytes were cultured in vitro; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscopy and biochemical autophagic flux assays were used to measure the autophagy markers microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and beclin-1. LC3-II and beclin-1 expression peaked 12–24 h after exposing podocytes to high glucose. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or Beclin-1 siRNAs or Atg 5 siRNAs sensitized cells to apoptosis, suggesting autophagy is a survival mechanism. HO-1 inactivation inhibited autophagy, which aggravated podocyte injury in vitro. Hemin-induced autophagy also protected podocytes from hyperglycemia in vitro and was abrogated by HO-1 siRNA. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in hemin-treated and lower in HO-1 siRNA-treated podocytes. Suppression of AMPK activity reversed HO-1-mediated Beclin-1 upregulation and autophagy, indicating HO-1-mediated autophagy is AMPK dependent. These findings suggest HO-1 induction and regulation of autophagy are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • High glucose leads to increased autophagy in podocytes at an early stage. • The early autophagic response protects against high glucose-induced apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy and decreases high glucose -mediated apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 induces autophagy through the activation of AMPK.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1-derived carbon monoxide is an autocrine inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Kelly J; Reyna, Sylvia V; Chapman, Gary B; Ensenat, Diana; Liu, Xiao-ming; Wang, Hong; Schafer, Andrew I; Durante, William

    2002-06-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) generate carbon monoxide (CO) via the catabolism of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO). In the present study, we found that serum stimulated a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the levels of HO-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in vascular SMCs. The induction of HO-1 expression by serum was inhibited by actinomycin D or cycloheximide. In addition, serum stimulated HO activity, as reflected by an increase in the concentration of bilirubin in the culture media. Treatment of vascular SMCs with serum stimulated DNA synthesis and this was potentiated by the HO inhibitors, zinc and tin protoporphyrin-IX as well as by the CO scavenger, hemoglobin. The iron chelator desferrioxamine had no effect on DNA synthesis. However, exposure of vascular SMCs to exogenous CO inhibited serum-stimulated SMC proliferation and the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In addition, CO arrested SMCs at the G(1)/S transition phase of the cell cycle and selectively blocked the serum-stimulated expression of cyclin A mRNA and protein without affecting the expression of cyclin D1 and E. CO also inhibited the serum-stimulated activation of cyclin A-associated kinase activity and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity. These results demonstrate that serum stimulates HO-1 gene expression and CO synthesis. Furthermore, they show that CO acts in a negative feedback fashion to inhibit vascular SMC growth by regulating specific components of the cell cycle machinery. The capacity of vascular mitogens to induce CO synthesis may provide a novel mechanism by which these agents modulate cell growth.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 prevents non-alcoholic steatohepatitis through suppressing hepatocyte apoptosis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Na

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, has been reported to have potential antioxidant properties. However, the role of HO-1 on hepatocyte apoptosis remains unclear. We aim to elucidate the effects of HO-1 on oxidative stress related hepatocellular apoptosis in nutritional steatohepatitis in mice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were fed with methionine-choline deficient (MCD diet for four weeks to induce hepatic steatohepatitis. HO-1 chemical inducer (hemin, HO-1 chemical inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX and/or adenovirus carrying HO-1 gene (Ad-HO-1 were administered to mice, respectively. Hepatocyte apoptosis was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay, the mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis related genes were assayed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. Results Hepatocyte signs of oxidative related apoptotic injury were presented in mice fed with MCD diet for 4 weeks. Induction of HO-1 by hemin or Ad-HO-1 significantly attenuated the severity of liver histology, which was associated with decreased hepatic lipid peroxidation content, reduced number of apoptotic cells by TUNEL staining, down-regulated expression of pro-apoptosis related genes including Fas/FasL, Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9, reduced expression of cytochrome p4502E1 (CYP2E1, inhibited cytochrome c (Cyt-c release, and up-regulated expression of anti-apoptosis gene Bcl-2. Whereas, inhibition of HO-1 by ZnPP-IX caused oxidative stress related hepatic injury, which concomitant with increased number of TUNEL positive cells and up-regulated expression of pro-apoptosis related genes. Conclusions The present study provided evidences for the protective role of HO-1 in preventing nutritional steatohepatitis through suppressing hepatocyte apoptosis in mice.

  5. Heme-Oxygenase-1 Expression Contributes to the Immunoregulation Induced by Fasciola hepatica and Promotes Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasi, Paula; Rodríguez, Ernesto; da Costa, Valeria; Frigerio, Sofía; Brossard, Natalie; Noya, Verónica; Robello, Carlos; Anegón, Ignacio; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica, also known as the liver fluke, is a trematode that infects livestock and humans causing fasciolosis, a zoonotic disease of increasing importance due to its worldwide distribution and high economic losses. This parasite immunoregulates the host immune system by inducing a strong Th2 and regulatory T immune response by immunomodulating dendritic cell (DC) maturation and alternative activation of macrophages. In this paper, we show that F. hepatica infection in mice induces the upregulation of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of free heme that regulates the host inflammatory response. We show and characterize two different populations of antigen presenting cells that express HO-1 during infection in the peritoneum of infected animals. Cells that expressed high levels of HO-1 expressed intermediate levels of F4/80 but high expression of CD11c, CD38, TGFβ, and IL-10 suggesting that they correspond to regulatory DCs. On the other hand, cells expressing intermediate levels of HO-1 expressed high levels of F4/80, CD68, Ly6C, and FIZZ-1, indicating that they might correspond to alternatively activated macrophages. Furthermore, the pharmacological induction of HO-1 with the synthetic metalloporphyrin CoPP promoted F. hepatica infection increasing the clinical signs associated with the disease. In contrast, treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor SnPP protected mice from parasite infection, indicating that HO-1 plays an essential role during F. hepatica infection. Finally, HO-1 expression during F. hepatica infection was associated with TGFβ and IL-10 levels in liver and peritoneum, suggesting that HO-1 controls the expression of these immunoregulatory cytokines during infection favoring parasite survival in the host. These results contribute to the elucidation of the immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by F. hepatica in the host and provide alternative checkpoints to control fasciolosis. PMID:28798750

  6. Over-expression of heme oxygenase-1 promotes oxidative mitochondrial damage in rat astroglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Su, Haixiang; Song, Sisi; Paudel, Hemant K; Schipper, Hyman M

    2006-03-01

    Glial heme oxygenase-1 is over-expressed in the CNS of subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Up-regulation of HO-1 in rat astroglia has been shown to facilitate iron sequestration by the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether HO-1 induction promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress, assays for 8-epiPGF(2alpha) (ELISA), protein carbonyls (ELISA) and 8-OHdG (HPLC-EC) were used to quantify oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, respectively, in mitochondrial fractions and whole-cell compartments derived from cultured rat astroglia engineered to over-express human (h) HO-1 by transient transfection. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and the MTT assay, and cell proliferation was determined by [3H] thymidine incorporation and total cell counts. In rat astrocytes, hHO-1 over-expression (x 3 days) resulted in significant oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, partial growth arrest, and increased cell death. These effects were attenuated by incubation with 1 microM tin mesoporphyrin, a competitive HO inhibitor, or the iron chelator, deferoxamine. Up-regulation of HO-1 engenders oxidative mitochondrial injury in cultured rat astroglia. Heme-derived ferrous iron and carbon monoxide (CO) may mediate the oxidative modification of mitochondrial lipids, proteins and nucleic acids in these cells. Glial HO-1 hyperactivity may contribute to cellular oxidative stress, pathological iron deposition, and bioenergetic failure characteristic of degenerating and inflamed neural tissues and may constitute a rational target for therapeutic intervention in these conditions. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Heme-Oxygenase-1 Expression Contributes to the Immunoregulation Induced by Fasciola hepatica and Promotes Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carasi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fasciola hepatica, also known as the liver fluke, is a trematode that infects livestock and humans causing fasciolosis, a zoonotic disease of increasing importance due to its worldwide distribution and high economic losses. This parasite immunoregulates the host immune system by inducing a strong Th2 and regulatory T immune response by immunomodulating dendritic cell (DC maturation and alternative activation of macrophages. In this paper, we show that F. hepatica infection in mice induces the upregulation of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of free heme that regulates the host inflammatory response. We show and characterize two different populations of antigen presenting cells that express HO-1 during infection in the peritoneum of infected animals. Cells that expressed high levels of HO-1 expressed intermediate levels of F4/80 but high expression of CD11c, CD38, TGFβ, and IL-10 suggesting that they correspond to regulatory DCs. On the other hand, cells expressing intermediate levels of HO-1 expressed high levels of F4/80, CD68, Ly6C, and FIZZ-1, indicating that they might correspond to alternatively activated macrophages. Furthermore, the pharmacological induction of HO-1 with the synthetic metalloporphyrin CoPP promoted F. hepatica infection increasing the clinical signs associated with the disease. In contrast, treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor SnPP protected mice from parasite infection, indicating that HO-1 plays an essential role during F. hepatica infection. Finally, HO-1 expression during F. hepatica infection was associated with TGFβ and IL-10 levels in liver and peritoneum, suggesting that HO-1 controls the expression of these immunoregulatory cytokines during infection favoring parasite survival in the host. These results contribute to the elucidation of the immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by F. hepatica in the host and provide alternative checkpoints to control fasciolosis.

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Protect Against Heme-induced Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Dankers, A.C.A.; Summeren, F. van; Scharstuhl, A.; Heuvel, J.J. van den; Koenderink, J.B.; Pennings, S.W.C.; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2013-01-01

    Heme is the functional group of diverse hemoproteins and crucial for many cellular processes. However, heme is increasingly recognized as a culprit for a wide variety of pathologies, including sepsis, malaria, and kidney failure. Excess of free heme can be detrimental to tissues by mediating oxidati

  9. Oxidative stress suppression by luteolin-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Gui-bo; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Min [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China); Ye, Jing-xue [Jilin Agricultural University, No.2888, Xincheng Street, Changchun, 130021, Jilin (China); Si, Jian-yong [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China); Xu, Hui-bo [Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences of Jilin Province, Gongnongda road 1745, Changchun, 130021, Jiblin (China); Meng, Xiang-bao; Qin, Meng; Sun, Jing [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China); Wang, Hong-wei, E-mail: hwang@nju.edu.cn [Center for Translational Medicine and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Sun, Xiao-bo, E-mail: sunsubmit@163.com [Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substances and Resources Utilization of Chinese Herbal Medicine, Ministry of Education, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 100193 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Luteolin, a flavonoid that exhibits antioxidative properties, exerts myocardial protection effects. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of luteolin on myocardial injury protection and its possible mechanisms, a myocardial injury model was established with intragastric administration of 4 mg/kg isoproterenol (ISO) to male Sprague–Dawley rats (200–220 g) daily for 2 days. We found that pretreatment of luteolin (160, 80 and 40 mg/kg, i.g., respectively) daily for 15 days can prevent ISO-induced myocardial damage, including decrease of serum cardiac enzymes, improvement electrocardiography and heart vacuolation. Luteolin also improved the free radical scavenging and antioxidant potential, suggesting one possible mechanism of luteolin-induced cardio-protection is mediated by blocking the oxidative stress. To clarify the mechanisms, we performed the in vitro study by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})-induced cytotoxicty model in H9c2 cells. We found that luteolin pretreatment prevented apoptosis, increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and enhanced the binding of Nrf2 to the antioxidant response element, providing an adaptive survival response against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-derived oxidative cytotoxicity. The addition of Znpp, a selective HO-1 competitive inhibitor, reduced the cytoprotective ability of luteolin, indicating the vital role of HO-1 on these effects. Luteolin also activated Akt and ERK, whereas the addition of LY294002 and U0126, the pharmacologic inhibitors of PI3K and ERK, attenuated luteolin-induced HO-1 expression and cytoprotective effect. Taken together, the above findings suggest that luteolin protects against myocardial injury and enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity through the activation of Akt and ERK signal pathways that leads to Nrf2 activation, and subsequently HO-1 induction. -- Highlights: ► Luteolin prevents isoproterenol-induced myocardial damage.

  10. HEME OXYGENASE-1 UPREGULATED BY MELATONIN: POTENTIAL PROTECTION AGAINST BURN-INDUCED OXIDATIVE GASTRIC MUCOSAL INJURY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minka Hristova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is indoleamine hormone derived from L-tryptophan. Due to its lipophilic nature, it is accessible to every cell. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities thus protecting tissue injury. Heat shock proteins such as HSP32 known as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilatory properties and plays an important role in the protecting of tissues from several stresses. The aim of study is to investigate the expression of HO-1 in gastric mucosa and its connection with oxidative stress and melatonin mediated protection after thermal injury. On rats back, under anesthesia, third degree burn was applied involving 30% of total body surface area (TBSA. Melatonin (10 mg per kg body mass was injected i.p. immediately and 12 hours after thermal skin injury. We used tissue malondialdehyde (MDA, lipid peroxidation product, as a marker of oxidative stress. Gastric mucosa histopathology were observed on light microscopy and light immunohistochemistry investigating the HO-1 too. Results: The levels of MDA in gastric mucosa were elevated (p< 0.05. The HO-1 expression was significantly increased in rats with trauma. Melatonin inhibited elevation in lipid peroxidation product and augmented the increase in expression of HO-1 in the gastric mucosa. In conclusion, our data suggest that HO-1 induction following burn injury is an adaptive response protecting gastric mucosal against further oxidative damage. Melatonin increased the antioxidant capacity and restricted burn-induced oxidative damage in gastric mucosa and thus could be used therapeutically in organ protection.

  11. Effects of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression and Cutaneous Wound Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels A. J. Cremers

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Skin wounds may lead to scar formation and impaired functionality. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC can induce the anti-inflammatory enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and protect against tissue injury. We aim to improve cutaneous wound repair by RIPC treatment via induction of HO-1. RIPC was applied to HO-1-luc transgenic mice and HO-1 promoter activity and mRNA expression in skin and several other organs were determined in real-time. In parallel, RIPC was applied directly or 24h prior to excisional wounding in mice to investigate the early and late protective effects of RIPC on cutaneous wound repair, respectively. HO-1 promoter activity was significantly induced on the dorsal side and locally in the kidneys following RIPC treatment. Next, we investigated the origin of this RIPC-induced HO-1 promoter activity and demonstrated increased mRNA in the ligated muscle, heart and kidneys, but not in the skin. RIPC did not change HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in the wound 7 days after cutaneous injury. Both early and late RIPC did not accelerate wound closure nor affect collagen deposition. RIPC induces HO-1 expression in several organs, but not the skin, and did not improve excisional wound repair, suggesting that the skin is insensitive to RIPC-mediated protection.

  12. Effects of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression and Cutaneous Wound Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Niels A. J.; Wever, Kimberley E.; Wong, Ronald J.; van Rheden, René E. M.; Vermeij, Eline A.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Carels, Carine E.; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2017-01-01

    Skin wounds may lead to scar formation and impaired functionality. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) can induce the anti-inflammatory enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and protect against tissue injury. We aim to improve cutaneous wound repair by RIPC treatment via induction of HO-1. RIPC was applied to HO-1-luc transgenic mice and HO-1 promoter activity and mRNA expression in skin and several other organs were determined in real-time. In parallel, RIPC was applied directly or 24h prior to excisional wounding in mice to investigate the early and late protective effects of RIPC on cutaneous wound repair, respectively. HO-1 promoter activity was significantly induced on the dorsal side and locally in the kidneys following RIPC treatment. Next, we investigated the origin of this RIPC-induced HO-1 promoter activity and demonstrated increased mRNA in the ligated muscle, heart and kidneys, but not in the skin. RIPC did not change HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in the wound 7 days after cutaneous injury. Both early and late RIPC did not accelerate wound closure nor affect collagen deposition. RIPC induces HO-1 expression in several organs, but not the skin, and did not improve excisional wound repair, suggesting that the skin is insensitive to RIPC-mediated protection. PMID:28218659

  13. Propofol attenuation of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury involves heme oxygenase-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-hua WANG; Hai-yan ZHOU; Cong-cong CHEN; Xiu-lai ZHANG; Gang CHENG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To examine the protective effect of propofol in renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in this process. Methods:-Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: (i) sham-operated group; (ii) I/R group; and (iii) propofol group. Bilateral renal warm ischemia for 45 rain was performed. After 2, 6, and 24 h reperfusion, blood samples and kidneys were collected for assessment of renal injury, and HO-1 expressions were ana-lyzed by immunohistochemical analysis, RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: Blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels in the propofol group were sig-nificantly lower than that in the UR group at 24 h after reperfusion. The mean histological score by Paller's standard showed that propofol significantly attenu-ated renal I/R injury after 6 h reperfusion. Propofol increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels 2 h after repeffusion, whereas HO-1 expressions were present at exceedingly low levels in the I/R group and the sham-operated group at same time point. Propofol also markedly increased HO- 1 mRNA and protein levels than I/R at 6 and 24 h after reperfusion. Conclusion: These results suggest that propofol mitigates renal I/R injury in rats. This protection may be partly through the induc-tion of the HO- 1 expression.

  14. Dysfunction of the heme recycling system in heme oxygenase 1-deficient mice: effects on macrophage viability and tissue iron distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Eckhaus, Michael A; Ghosh, Manik C; Ollivierre-Wilson, Hayden; Rouault, Tracey A

    2010-12-23

    To better understand the tissue iron overload and anemia previously reported in a human patient and mice that lack heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), we studied iron distribution and pathology in HO-1(Hmox1)(-/-) mice. We found that resident splenic and liver macrophages were mostly absent in HO-1(-/-) mice. Erythrophagocytosis caused the death of HO-1(-/-) macrophages in in vitro experiments, supporting the hypothesis that HO-1(-/-) macrophages died of exposure to heme released on erythrophagocytosis. Rupture of HO-1(-/-) macrophages in vivo and release of nonmetabolized heme probably caused tissue inflammation. In the spleen, initial splenic enlargement progressed to red pulp fibrosis, atrophy, and functional hyposplenism in older mice, recapitulating the asplenia of an HO-1-deficient patient. We postulate that the failure of tissue macrophages to remove senescent erythrocytes led to intravascular hemolysis and increased expression of the heme and hemoglobin scavenger proteins, hemopexin and haptoglobin. Lack of macrophages expressing the haptoglobin receptor, CD163, diminished the ability of haptoglobin to neutralize circulating hemoglobin, and iron overload occurred in kidney proximal tubules, which were able to catabolize heme with HO-2. Thus, in HO-1(-/-) mammals, the reduced function and viability of erythrophagocytosing macrophages are the main causes of tissue damage and iron redistribution.

  15. The Potential Role of Hemopexin and Heme Oxygenase-1 Inducer in a Model of Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passainte S. Hassaan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Sepsis can evoke disseminated intravascular coagulation, resulting in multiple organ failure and death. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and hemopexin (HPx can mediate cytoprotective mechanisms against these deleterious effects. This study aims to determine a role for HO-1 and HPx in coagulopathy induced by septic inflammation and define whether they can enhance the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Materials and Methods. 48 healthy male albino rats were divided equally into 4 groups: control group: animals subjected to laparotomy and bowel manipulation; CLP group: severe sepsis induced by cecal ligation puncture (CLP; CLP + hemin group: animals received single intraperitoneal injection of hemin (50 µmol/kg 12 h before sepsis induction; CLP + HPx group: animals received single HPx dose (150 µg/rat, i.v. 30 min before sepsis induction. Survival rates were calculated. Prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT, and activated protein C (APC, liver HO-1, serum, and liver IL-10 levels were measured, 48 hrs after sepsis induction. Liver and lung were excised for histopathological examination. Results. Hemin and HPx administration upregulated liver HO-1 and IL-10. They prolonged PT, PTT and increased APC. They reduced the inflammatory infiltrate and thrombosis in liver and lung parenchyma. However, hemin was superior in controlling coagulopathy and HO-1 production, while HPx was more potent stimulant of IL-10 expression. Conclusions. Hemin and HPx have a potential beneficial effect in severe sepsis regarding coagulopathy and inflammation.

  16. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain induces a heme oxygenase dependent increase in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Karimi

    Full Text Available We investigated the consequences of feeding with a Lactobacillus species on the immune environment in GALT, and the role of dendritic cells and heme oxygenase-1 in mediating these responses. Feeding with a specific strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus induced a significant increase in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ functional regulatory T cells in GALT. This increase was greatest in the mesenteric lymph nodes and associated with a marked decrease in TNF and IFNγ production. Dendritic cell regulatory function and HO-1 expression was also increased. The increase in Foxp3+ T cells could be prevented by treatment with a heme oxygenase inhibitor. However, neither inhibition of heme oxygenase nor blockade of IL-10 and TGFβ prevented the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. In conclusion Lactobacillus feeding induced a tolerogenic environment in GALT. HO-1 was critical to the enhancement of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells while additional, as yet unknown, pathways were involved in the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by T cells.

  17. Protein levels of heme oxygenase-1 during reperfusion in human kidney transplants with delayed graft function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollinger, Robert; Kogler, Pamela; Biebl, Matthias; Sieb, Michael; Sucher, Robert; Bösmüller, Claudia; Troppmair, Jakob; Mark, Walter; Weiss, Helmut; Margreiter, Raimund

    2008-01-01

    Delayed graft function (DGF) as a consequence of ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is associated with a decrease in long-term allograft survival. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress responsive gene that is highly expressed in multiple pathological processes. The aim of our study was to analyze whether HO-1 protein levels in human kidney transplants during IRI correlate with the incidence of DGF. Kidney biopsies were obtained from 27 kidney allografts at two time points: at the end of cold storage and shortly after reperfusion. Samples were analyzed for HO-1 protein levels by Western blot. Heme oxygenase-1 protein levels were significantly higher in post-reperfusion biopsies (39.4 vs. 13.7 arbitrary units, p = 0.001). In pre-reperfusion biopsies no association was observed between HO-1 protein levels and DGF. In post-reperfusion biopsies, higher levels of HO-1 protein were measured in kidneys with DGF (53.7 vs. 36.2 arbitrary units, p = 0.064). DGF kidneys showed a significantly higher increase from pre- to post-reperfusion in HO-1 protein (42.0 vs. 18.7 arbitrary units, p = 0.025). Heme oxygenase-1 protein levels shortly after allograft reperfusion are closely related with initial graft function. Assessment thereof may be considered a valuable tool to predict DGF.

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 is involved in sodium hydrosulfide-induced lateral root formation in tomato seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tao; Li, Jiale; Cao, Zeyu; Chen, Meng; Shen, Wei; Huang, Liqin

    2014-06-01

    By using pharmacological and molecular approaches, we discovered the involvement of HO-1 in NaHS-induced lateral root formation in tomato seedlings. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) regulate various responses to abiotic stress and root development, but their involvement in the simultaneous regulation of plant lateral root (LR) formation is poorly understood. In this report, we observed that the exogenously applied H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and the HO-1 inducer hemin induce LR formation in tomato seedlings by triggering intracellular signaling events involving the induction of tomato HO-1 (SlHO-1), and the modulation of cell cycle regulatory genes, including the up-regulation of SlCDKA;1 and SlCYCA2;1, and simultaneous down-regulation of SlKRP2. The response of NaHS in the induction of LR formation was impaired by the potent inhibition of HO-1, which was further blocked when 50 % saturation of carbon monoxide (CO) aqueous solution, one of the catalytic by-products of HO-1, was added. Further molecular evidence revealed that the NaHS-modulated gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes was sensitive to the inhibition of HO-1 and reversed by cotreatment with CO. The impairment of LR density and length as well as lateral root primordia number, the decreased tomato HO-1 gene expression and HO activity caused by an H2S scavenger hypotaurine were partially rescued by the addition of NaHS, hemin and CO (in particular). Together, these results revealed that at least in our experimental conditions, HO-1 might be involved in NaHS-induced tomato LR formation. Additionally, the use of NaHS and hemin compounds in crop root organogenesis should be explored.

  19. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 and its metabolites affect pancreatic tumor growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuhn Philipp

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer (PaCa is a fatal human cancer due to its exceptional resistance to all current anticancer therapies. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is significantly overexpressed in PaCa and seems to play an important role in cancer resistance to anticancer treatment. The inhibition of HO-1 sensitized PaCa cells to chemo- and radiotherapy in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the effects of HO-1 and its metabolites biliverdin, carbon monoxide and iron on PaCa cells. PaCa cell lines with divergent HO-1 expression patterns were used in a murine orthotopic cancer model. HO-1 expression and activity was regulated by zinc (inhibition and cobalt (induction protoporphyrin. Furthermore, the influence of cellular HO-1 levels and its metabolites on effects of standard chemotherapy with gemcitabine was tested in vivo and in vitro. Results High HO-1 expression in PaCa cell lines was associated with increased chemoresistance in vitro. Chemoresistance to gemcitabine was increased during HO-1 induction in PaCa cells expressing low levels of HO-1. The inhibition of HO-1 activity in pancreatic tumors with high HO-1 boosted chemotherapeutic effects in vivo significantly. Furthermore, biliverdin and iron promoted PaCa resistance to chemotherapy. Consequently, specific iron chelation by desferrioxamine revealed profound anticancerous effects. Conclusion In summary, the inhibition of HO-1 and the chelation of iron in PaCa cells were associated with increased sensitivity and susceptibility of pancreatic tumors to chemotherapy in vivo. The metabolites biliverdin and iron seem to be involved in HO-1-mediated resistance to anticancer treatment. Therefore, HO-1 inhibition or direct interference with its metabolites may evolve new PaCa treatment strategies.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; DeAlmeida, Angela C; Litovsky, Silvio H; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2013-08-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (myosin heavy chain (MHC)-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice), with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed-stop signal. MHC-HO-1 mice overexpress HO-1 mRNA and the enzymatically active protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on 2 consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity, and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Oxidative Stress Is Related to the Deleterious Effects of Heme Oxygenase-1 in an In Vivo Neuroinflammatory Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Tronel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 induction is associated with beneficial or deleterious effects depending on the experimental conditions adopted and the neurodegenerative rodent models used. The present study aimed first to evaluate the effects of cerebral HO-1 induction in an in vivo rat model of neuroinflammation by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (QA and secondly to explore the role played by reactive oxygen species (ROS and free iron (Fe2+ derived from heme catabolism promoted by HO-1. Chronic I.P. treatment with the HO-1 inductor and substrate hemin was responsible for a significant dose-related increase of cerebral HO-1 production. Brain tissue loss, microglial activation, and neuronal death were significantly higher in rats receiving QA plus hemin (H-QA versus QA and controls. Significant increase of ROS production in H-QA rat brain was inhibited by the specific HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP which supports the idea that ROS level augmentation in hemin-treated animals is a direct consequence of HO-1 induction. The cerebral tissue loss and ROS level in hemin-treated rats receiving the iron chelator deferoxamine were significantly decreased, demonstrating the involvement of Fe2+in brain ROS production. Therefore, the deleterious effects of HO-1 expression in this in vivo neuroinflammatory model were linked to a hyperproduction of ROS, itself promoted by free iron liberation.

  3. Pharmacological Inhibition of Host Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection In Vivo by a Mechanism Dependent on T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Diego L.; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Amaral, Eduardo P.; Arora, Kriti; Chao, Alex; Mittereder, Lara R.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Goulding, Celia W.; Andrade, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress response antioxidant enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme released during inflammation. HO-1 expression is upregulated in both experimental and human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and in patients it is a biomarker of active disease. Whether the enzyme plays a protective versus pathogenic role in tuberculosis has been the subject of debate. To address this controversy, we administered tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX), a well-characterized HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, to mice during acute M. tuberculosis infection. These SnPPIX-treated animals displayed a substantial reduction in pulmonary bacterial loads comparable to that achieved following conventional antibiotic therapy. Moreover, when administered adjunctively with antimycobacterial drugs, the HO-1 inhibitor markedly enhanced and accelerated pathogen clearance. Interestingly, both the pulmonary induction of HO-1 expression and the efficacy of SnPPIX treatment in reducing bacterial burden were dependent on the presence of host T lymphocytes. Although M. tuberculosis expresses its own heme-degrading enzyme, SnPPIX failed to inhibit its enzymatic activity or significantly restrict bacterial growth in liquid culture. Together, the above findings reveal mammalian HO-1 as a potential target for host-directed monotherapy and adjunctive therapy of tuberculosis and identify the immune response as a critical regulator of this function.

  4. Pharmacological Inhibition of Host Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection In Vivo by a Mechanism Dependent on T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego L. Costa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a stress response antioxidant enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme released during inflammation. HO-1 expression is upregulated in both experimental and human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and in patients it is a biomarker of active disease. Whether the enzyme plays a protective versus pathogenic role in tuberculosis has been the subject of debate. To address this controversy, we administered tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX, a well-characterized HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, to mice during acute M. tuberculosis infection. These SnPPIX-treated animals displayed a substantial reduction in pulmonary bacterial loads comparable to that achieved following conventional antibiotic therapy. Moreover, when administered adjunctively with antimycobacterial drugs, the HO-1 inhibitor markedly enhanced and accelerated pathogen clearance. Interestingly, both the pulmonary induction of HO-1 expression and the efficacy of SnPPIX treatment in reducing bacterial burden were dependent on the presence of host T lymphocytes. Although M. tuberculosis expresses its own heme-degrading enzyme, SnPPIX failed to inhibit its enzymatic activity or significantly restrict bacterial growth in liquid culture. Together, the above findings reveal mammalian HO-1 as a potential target for host-directed monotherapy and adjunctive therapy of tuberculosis and identify the immune response as a critical regulator of this function.

  5. The Haptoglobin-CD163-Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway for Hemoglobin Scavenging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Haugbølle; Etzerodt, Anders; Svendsen, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The haptoglobin- (Hp-) CD163-heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is an efficient captor-receptor-enzyme system to circumvent the hemoglobin (Hb)/heme-induced toxicity during physiological and pathological hemolyses. In this pathway, Hb tightly binds to Hp leading to CD163-mediated uptake of the complex...... and put pressure on backup protecting systems such as the hemopexin-CD91-HO pathway. The Hp-CD163-HO-1 pathway proteins are regulated by the acute phase mediator interleukin-6 (IL-6), but other regulatory factors indicate that this upregulation is a counteracting anti-inflammatory response during...... inflammation. The heme metabolites including bilirubin converted from biliverdin have overall an anti-inflammatory effect and thus reinforce the anti-inflammatory efficacy of the Hp-CD163-HO-1 pathway. Future studies of animal models of inflammation should further define the importance of the pathway...

  6. Structure of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 heme oxygenase ChuS in complex with heme and enzymatic inactivation by mutation of the heme coordinating residue His-193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suits,M.; Jaffer, N.; Jia, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Heme oxygenases catalyze the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. For pathogenic microorganisms, heme uptake and degradation are critical mechanisms for iron acquisition that enable multiplication and survival within hosts they invade. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 heme oxygenase ChuS in complex with heme at 1.45 {angstrom} resolution. When compared with other heme oxygenases, ChuS has a unique fold, including structural repeats and a {beta}-sheet core. Not surprisingly, the mode of heme coordination by ChuS is also distinct, whereby heme is largely stabilized by residues from the C-terminal domain, assisted by a distant arginine from the N-terminal domain. Upon heme binding, there is no large conformational change beyond the fine tuning of a key histidine (His-193) residue. Most intriguingly, in contrast to other heme oxygenases, the propionic side chains of heme are orientated toward the protein core, exposing the {alpha}-meso carbon position where O{sub 2} is added during heme degradation. This unique orientation may facilitate presentation to an electron donor, explaining the significantly reduced concentration of ascorbic acid needed for the reaction. Based on the ChuS-heme structure, we converted the histidine residue responsible for axial coordination of the heme group to an asparagine residue (H193N), as well as converting a second histidine to an alanine residue (H73A) for comparison purposes. We employed spectral analysis and CO measurement by gas chromatography to analyze catalysis by ChuS, H193N, and H73A, demonstrating that His-193 is the key residue for the heme-degrading activity of ChuS.

  7. Remote ischemic preconditioning protects against liver ischemia-reperfusion injury via heme oxygenase-1-induced autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Growing evidence has linked autophagy to a protective role of preconditioning in liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is essential in limiting inflammation and preventing the apoptotic response to IR. We previously demonstrated that HO-1 is up-regulated in liver graft after remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC. The aim of this study was to confirm that RIPC protects against IR via HO-1-mediated autophagy. METHODS: RIPC was performed with regional ischemia of limbs before liver ischemia, and HO-1 activity was inhibited pre-operation. Autophagy was assessed by the expression of light chain 3-II (LC3-II. The HO-1/extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK/p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway was detected in an autophagy model and mineral oil-induced IR in vitro. RESULTS: In liver IR, the expression of LC3-II peaked 12-24 h after IR, and the ultrastructure revealed abundant autophagosomes in hepatocytes after IR. Autophagy was inhibited when HO-1 was inactivated, which we believe resulted in the aggravation of liver IR injury (IRI in vivo. Hemin-induced autophagy also protected rat hepatocytes from IRI in vitro, which was abrogated by HO-1 siRNA. Phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and ERK1/2 was up-regulated in hemin-pretreated liver cells and down-regulated after treatment with HO-1 siRNA. CONCLUSIONS: RIPC may protect the liver from IRI by induction of HO-1/p38-MAPK-dependent autophagy.

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 mRNA Expression in Egyptian Patients With Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer El-Sayed Abd El-Wahab

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic liver disease (CLD is a global medical problem. This disease is associated with increased hepatic oxidative stress. One of the antioxidant enzymes that protect cells against this stress is heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1.Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the mRNA expression of HO-1 in Egyptian patients with CLD and its relation to oxidative stress biomarkers.Patients and Methods: Levels of serum ferritin, carboxyhemoglobin, malondialdehyde (MDA, and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH were measured, and HO-1 mRNA expression was detected in 45 CLD patients (15 with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH], 15 with chronic hepatitis C, and 15 with liver cirrhosis and 15 healthy controls.Results: HO-1 mRNA expression was increased in patients with NASH, chronic hepatitis C, and liver cirrhosis compared to controls. The expression in cirrhotic patients was significantly higher than that in patients with NASH and chronic hepatitis C. Compared to controls, patients with NASH, chronic hepatitis C, and liver cirrhosis had higher levels of ferritin, carboxyhemoglobin, and MDA and lower levels of GSH. HO-1 mRNA expression was positively correlated with levels of carboxyhemoglobin, serum ferritin, and serum MDA and negatively correlated with levels of erythrocyte GSH in CLD patients.Conclusions: HO-1 mRNA expression was significantly increased in CLD patients, and the increase reflected the severity of the disease. The significant relationship between the increased HO-1 expression and oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with CLD suggests that HO-1 may play an important role in protecting the liver from oxidative stress-dependent damage. Therefore, induction of HO-1 could be a novel therapeutic option for CLD.

  9. Immunoprotective UVA (320-400 nm) irradiation upregulates heme oxygenase-1 in the dermis and epidermis of hairless mouse skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanson, Munif; Reeve, Vivienne E

    2004-04-01

    The induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by ultraviolet A (UVA) (320-400 nm) radiation provides a protective cellular defence against oxidative stress, and has been well demonstrated in cultured human skin fibroblasts, although keratinocytes were unreactive. The UVA responsiveness of HO-1 however, has not been confirmed in intact skin. Previously, we reported that UVA-inducible HO enzyme activity in mouse skin is protective against UVB-induced immunosuppression. This study identifies the induced HO isoform and its localization in mouse skin irradiated in vivo with such an immunoprotective UVA dose. We found that HO-1 mRNA was expressed in UVA-irradiated skin, but not in normal or UVB-irradiated skin, whereas constitutive HO-2 was always present. UVA-irradiated skin had increased HO enzyme activity and bilirubin content, and decreased heme content, consistent with HO-1 induction. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining localized HO-1 mRNA and protein to both epidermis and dermis, with strongest expression in basal keratinocytes and weaker expression in dermal fibroblast-like and other cells, in contrast with UVA-induced HO-1 in cultured human skin fibroblasts. This suggests that cultured skin cells may not fully represent skin functions in vivo, or that there may be inherent differences between human and hairless mouse skin HO-1 responses.

  10. Identification of heme oxygenase-1 stimulators by a convenient ELISA-based bilirubin quantification assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rücker, Hannelore; Amslinger, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has proven to be a useful tool for fighting inflammation. In order to identify new HO-1 inducers, an efficient screening method was developed which can provide new lead structures for drug research. We designed a simple ELISA-based HO-1 enzyme activity assay, which allows for the screening of 12 compounds in parallel in the setting of a 96-well plate. The well-established murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 is used and only about 26µg of protein from whole cell lysates is needed for the analysis of HO-1 activity. The quantification of HO-1 activity is based on an indirect ELISA using the specific anti-bilirubin antibody 24G7 to quantify directly bilirubin in the whole cell lysate, applying a horseradish peroxidase-tagged antibody together with ortho-phenylenediamine and H2O2 for detection. The bilirubin is produced on the action of HO enzymes by converting their substrate heme to biliverdin and additional recombinant biliverdin reductase together with NADPH at pH 7.4 in buffer. This sensitive assay allows for the detection of 0.57-82pmol bilirubin per sample in whole cell lysates. Twenty-three small molecules, mainly natural products with an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl unit such as polyphenols, including flavonoids and chalcones, terpenes, an isothiocyanate, and the drug oltipraz were tested at typically 6 or 24h incubation with RAW264.7 cells. The activity of known HO-1 inducers was confirmed, while the chalcones cardamonin, flavokawain A, calythropsin, 2',3,4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxychalcone (THMC), and 2',4'-dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxychalcone (DHDMC) were identified as new potent HO-1 inducers. The highest inductive power after 6h incubation was found at 10µM for DHDMC (6.1-fold), carnosol (3.9-fold), butein (3.1-fold), THMC (2.9-fold), and zerumbone (2.5-fold). Moreover, the time dependence of HO-1 protein production for DHDMC was compared to its enzyme activity, which was further evaluated in the presence of

  11. Adenoviral transfer of the heme oxygenase-1 gene protects striatal astrocytes from heme-mediated oxidative injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Jing; Chau, Lee-Young; Galunic, Nicholas; Regan, Raymond F

    2004-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in the CNS after hemorrhage, and may have an effect on injury to surrounding tissue. Hemin, the preferred substrate of HO, is a neurotoxin that is present in intracranial hematomas. In a prior study, we observed that HO inhibitors increased the vulnerability of cultured cortical astrocytes to heme-mediated oxidative injury. To investigate the effect of HO more specifically, we used an adenoviral vector encoding the human HO-1 gene to specifically increase HO-1 expression. Incubation with 100 MOI of the HO-1 adenovirus (Adv-HHO-1) for 24 h increased both HO-1 protein and HO activity; a control adenovirus lacking the HO-1 gene had no effect. Using a DNA probe that was specific for human HO-1, 80.5 +/- 7.2% of astrocytes were observed to be infected by in situ hybridization. The cell death produced by 30-60 microM hemin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with 100 MOI Adv-HHO-1, as assessed by LDH release, propidium iodide exclusion, and MTT reduction assay. The threefold increase in cell protein oxidation produced by hemin was also attenuated in cultures pretreated with Adv-HHO-1. These results support the hypothesis that HO-1 protects astrocytes from heme-mediated oxidative injury. Specifically increasing astrocytic HO-1 by gene transfer may have a beneficial effect on hemorrhagic CNS injury.

  12. Structure prediction and activity analysis of human heme oxygenase-1 and its mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Wei Xia; Wen-Pu Zhou; Wen-Jun Cui; Xue-Hong Zhang; Qing-Xiang Shen; Yun-Zhu Li; Shan-Chang Yu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To predict wild human heme oxygenase-1 (whHO-1)and hHO-1 His25Ala mutant (△hHO-1) structures, to clone and express them and analyze their activities.METHODS: Swiss-PdbViewer and Antheprot 5.0 were used for the prediction of structure diversity and physicalchemical changes between wild and mutant hHO-1. hHO1 His25Ala mutant cDNA was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two plasmids of E. coli DH5α. Expression products were purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography, and their activities were measured.RESULTS: rHO-1 had the structure of a helical fold with the heme sandwiched between heme-heme oxygenase1 helices. Bond angle, dihedral angle and chemical bond in the active pocket changed after Ala25 was replaced by His25, but Ala25 was still contacting the surface and the electrostatic potential of the active pocket was negative. The mutated enzyme kept binding activity to heme. Two vectors pBHO-1 and pBHO-1(M) were constructed and expressed. Ammonium sulphate precipitation and column chromatography yielded 3.6-fold and 30-fold higher purities of whHO-1, respectively. The activity of △hHO-1 was reduced 91.21% after mutation compared with whHO-1.CONCLUSION: Proximal His25 ligand is crucial for normal hHO-1 catalytic activity. △hHO-1 is deactivated by mutation but keeps the same binding site as whHO-1. △hHO-1 might be a potential inhibitor of whHO-1 for preventing neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  13. Structure prediction and activity analysis of human heme oxygenase-1 and its mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhen-Wei; Zhou, Wen-Pu; Cui, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Hong; Shen, Qing-Xiang; Li, Yun-Zhu; Yu, Shan-Chang

    2004-08-15

    To predict wild human heme oxygenase-1 (whHO-1) and hHO-1 His25Ala mutant (delta hHO-1) structures, to clone and express them and analyze their activities. Swiss-PdbViewer and Antheprot 5.0 were used for the prediction of structure diversity and physical-chemical changes between wild and mutant hHO-1. hHO-1 His25Ala mutant cDNA was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two plasmids of E. coli DH5alpha. Expression products were purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography, and their activities were measured. rHO-1 had the structure of a helical fold with the heme sandwiched between heme-heme oxygenase-1 helices. Bond angle, dihedral angle and chemical bond in the active pocket changed after Ala25 was replaced by His25, but Ala25 was still contacting the surface and the electrostatic potential of the active pocket was negative. The mutated enzyme kept binding activity to heme. Two vectors pBHO-1 and pBHO-1(M) were constructed and expressed. Ammonium sulphate precipitation and column chromatography yielded 3.6-fold and 30-fold higher purities of whHO-1, respectively. The activity of delta hHO-1 was reduced 91.21% after mutation compared with whHO-1. Proximal His25 ligand is crucial for normal hHO-1 catalytic activity. delta hHO-1 is deactivated by mutation but keeps the same binding site as whHO-1. delta hHO-1 might be a potential inhibitor of whHO-1 for preventing neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  14. Expression and activity analysis reveal that heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 is associated with blue egg formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z P; Liu, R F; Wang, A R; Li, J Y; Deng, X M

    2011-04-01

    Biliverdin is responsible for the coloration of blue eggs and is secreted onto the eggshell by the shell gland. Previous studies confirmed that a significant difference exists in biliverdin content between blue eggs and brown eggs, although the reasons are still unknown. Because the pigment is derived from oxidative degradation of heme catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO), this study compared heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 (HMOX1), the gene encoding HO expression and HO activity, in the shell glands of the Dongxiang blue-shelled chicken (n = 12) and the Dongxiang brown-shelled chicken (n = 12). Results showed that HMOX1 was highly expressed at the mRNA (1.58-fold; P 0.05). Taken together, these results show that blue egg formation is associated with high expression of HMOX1 in the shell gland of Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens, and suggest that differential expression of HMOX1 in the 2 groups of chickens is most likely to arise from an alteration in the trans-acting factor.

  15. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland); Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  16. Bach1-dependent and -independent Regulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Keratinocytes*

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Bach1 is a member of the basic leucine zipper transcription factor family, and the Bach1/small Maf heterodimer specifically represses transcriptional activity directed by the Maf recognition element (MARE). Because Bach1 is a repressor of the oxidative stress response, we examined the function(s) of Bach1 in keratinocytes subjected to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress induced by H2O2 led to an increase in MARE activity and expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible antioxidant defen...

  17. An Experimental Study on the Expression of Heme Oxygenase-2 mRNA in Hirschsprung's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱珉; 魏明发; 刘芳

    2002-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the relationship between the expression of heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) mRNA and the pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's disease (HD), total ribonucleic acid (RNA) was extracted in the aganglionic and ganglionic segments of colon respectively from 15 cases of HD. The single-stranded cDNA of HO-2 was synthesized and further amplified by reverse transcription-poly merase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of HO-2 mRNA was normal in ganglionic seg ments, but absent in aganglionic segments. It is concluded that the absence of HO-2 mRNA expres sion may be an important mechanism responsible for HD.

  18. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection. PMID:25450361

  19. X-ray Crystallography of A Metalloprotein: A Reaction Intermediate of Heme Oxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Masaki; Matsui, Toshitaka; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    X-ray crystallographic analysis of a metalloprotein requires knowing the electronic state of the metal center, if one wants to elucidate the exact function and/or reaction mechanism. As an example, we show our recent structural analysis of the heme oxygenase reaction intermediate which is involved in the third step of the heme degradation reaction. The reaction intermediate was crystallized under anaerobic condition, and the obtained crystals were frozen into liquid nitrogen. The absorption spectra of the single crystal before and after X-ray irradiation were compared with that of the frozen solution in 100 K cold nitrogen stream. The determined structure offers the first solid evidence for the presence of a water cluster in the distal pocket of this catalytically critical intermediate. This structure combined with the QM/MM calculation supports our proposal that the biliverdin is produced via Fe-OOH verdoheme intermediate.

  20. Expression of rat heme oxygenase in Escherichia coli as a catalytically active, full-length form that binds to bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K; Sato, M; Yoshida, T

    1991-11-15

    A plasmid, pKK-RHO, was constructed by incorporating the coding sequence of a cDNA for rat heme oxygenase into the expression vector pKK233-2. Escherichia coli strain XL1-blue transformed with pKK-RHO produced a catalytically active, full-length heme oxygenase. The 32-kDa native enzyme expressed, was localized in the bacterial membranes, possibly due to the spontaneous membrane-binding properties of a hydrophobic segment in its C-terminal region. During cultivation, a few degraded forms of heme oxygenase that had lost their membrane-associative properties appeared. Probably, some bacterial proteases cut the native heme oxygenase at sites near its C-terminus and so release hydrophilic peptides of heme oxygenase from the membranes. A 30-kDa polypeptide, one of the degraded forms of heme oxygenase, retained ability to accept electrons from NADPH--cytochrome P450 reductase and also activity for catalyzing breakdown of heme to biliverdin. The cultured cells were pale green. From them we extracted green pigment(s), of which the absorption spectrum closely resembled that of biliverdin, suggesting that a large amount of the endogenous heme of E. coli was actually degraded to biliverdin by the expressed heme oxygenase.

  1. Functional expression of human heme oxygenase-1 gene in renal structure of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Alvin I; Quan, Shou; Yang, Liming; Synghal, Arika; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-05-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO), by catabolizing heme to bile pigments, regulates the levels and activity of cellular hemoprotein and HO activity. We examined the effect of delivery of the human HO-1 gene on cellular heme in renal tissue using a retroviral vector. We used a single intracardiac injection of the concentrated infectious viral particles in 5-day-old spontaneously hypertensive rats; 25 were transduced with empty vector and 25 were transduced with the human HO-1 gene. Functional expression of human and rat HO-1 was measured after 2 and 4 weeks. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that human HO-1 mRNA was expressed as early as 2 weeks, with the highest levels in the kidney. Western blot analysis showed distribution of human HO-1 protein in rat kidney structures, predominantly in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle as well as in proximal tubules and preglomerular arterioles. These areas also demonstrated higher HO activity as measured by increased conversion of heme to bilirubin and carbon monoxide. Functional expression of the human HO-1 gene was associated with a decrease in blood pressure in 4- and 8-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats. Compared with nontransduced rats, human HO-1 gene overexpression in transduced rats was associated with a 35% decrease in urinary 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a potent vasoconstrictor and an inhibitor of tubular Na(+) transport, which may be related to the decrease in blood pressure.

  2. Structural characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 in complex with azole-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Roman, Gheorghe; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2010-03-01

    The development of inhibitors specific for heme oxygenases (HO) aims to provide powerful tools in understanding the HO system. Based on the lead structure (2S, 4S)-2-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-2-[(1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl]-4-[((4-aminophenyl)thio)methyl]-1,3-dioxolane (azalanstat, QC-1) we have synthesized structural modifications to develop novel and selective HO inhibitors. The structural study of human HO-1 (hHO-1) in complex with a select group of the inhibitors was initiated using X-ray crystallographic techniques. Comparison of the structures of four such compounds each in complex with hHO-1 revealed a common binding mode, despite having different structural fragments. The compounds bind to the distal side of heme through an azole "anchor" which coordinates with the heme iron. An expansion of the distal pocket, mainly due to distal helix flexibility, allows accommodation of the compounds without displacing heme or the critical Asp140 residue. Rather, binding displaces a catalytically critical water molecule and disrupts an ordered hydrogen-bond network involving Asp140. The presence of a triazole "anchor" may provide further stability via a hydrogen bond with the protein. A hydrophobic pocket acts to stabilize the region occupied by the phenyl or adamantanyl moieties of these compounds. Further, a secondary hydrophobic pocket is formed via "induced fit" to accommodate bulky substituents at the 4-position of the dioxolane ring. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of heme oxygenase activity in a library of four-helix bundle proteins: towards the de novo synthesis of functional heme proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Bernhard H; Drepper, Friedel; Sommerhalter, Monika; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Haehnel, Wolfgang

    2007-08-17

    Design and chemical synthesis of de novo heme proteins with enzymatic activity on cellulose membranes is described. 352 antiparallel four-helix bundle proteins with a single histidine for heme ligation were assembled from three different sets of short amphipathic helices on membrane-bound peptide templates. The templates were coupled by linkers to cellulose membranes of microplate format, which could be cleaved for control of intermediate and final products. The incorporation of heme and the heme oxygenase activity of the 352 proteins were monitored by measuring UV-visible spectra directly on the cellulose. The kinetics of the heme oxygenase reaction was studied by monitoring the decrease of the Soret band and the transient absorbance of verdoheme being an intermediate product in the formation of biliverdin. Four of the proteins covering a broad range of the enzymatic rate constants were selected and synthesized in solution for further characterization. Detailed studies by redox potentiometry, analytical ultracentrifugation, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy yielded information about the aggregation state of the proteins, the spin state and the putative coordination environment of the iron. The amount of five-coordinated high-spin iron and a positive reduction potential were found to promote the oxygenase activity of the proteins.

  4. Regiospecificity determinants of human heme oxygenase: differential NADPH- and ascorbate-dependent heme cleavage by the R183E mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Lad, Latesh; Poulos, Thomas L; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2005-01-28

    The ability of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) R183E mutant to oxidize heme in reactions supported by either NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase or ascorbic acid has been compared. The NADPH-dependent reaction, like that of wild-type hHO-1, yields exclusively biliverdin IXalpha. In contrast, the R183E mutant with ascorbic acid as the reductant produces biliverdin IXalpha (79 +/- 4%), IXdelta (19 +/- 3%), and a trace of IXbeta. In the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase, the yield of biliverdin IXdelta is decreased to 8 +/- 1% with a corresponding increase in biliverdin IXalpha. Spectroscopic analysis of the NADPH-dependent reaction shows that the R183E ferric biliverdin complex accumulates, because reduction of the iron, which is required for sequential iron and biliverdin release, is impaired. Reversal of the charge at position 183 makes reduction of the iron more difficult. The crystal structure of the R183E mutant, determined in the ferric and ferrous-NO bound forms, shows that the heme primarily adopts the same orientation as in wild-type hHO-1. The structure of the Fe(II).NO complex suggests that an altered active site hydrogen bonding network supports catalysis in the R183E mutant. Furthermore, Arg-183 contributes to the regiospecificity of the wild-type enzyme, but its contribution is not critical. The results indicate that the ascorbate-dependent reaction is subject to a lower degree of regiochemical control than the NADPH-dependent reaction. Ascorbate may be able to reduce the R183E ferric and ferrous dioxygen complexes in active site conformations that cannot be reduced by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase.

  5. A Novel, ;Double-Clamp; Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao (Queens)

    2012-08-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be {approx}15 times more potent (IC{sub 50} = 0.27{+-}0.07 {mu}M) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC{sub 50} = 4.0{+-}1.8 {mu}M). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This 'double-clamp' binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes Caco-2 cell proliferation and migration by targeting CTNND1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; LIU Yu-lin; CHEN Guang-xiang; CUI Bin; WANG Jin-shen; SHI Yu-long; LI Le-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can be induced by inflammatory cytokines,oxidation,ischemia,hypoxia,and endotoxins.As a "graft survival protective gene," HO-1 is a hot spot in organ transplantation research.However,the role of HO-1 gene expression in the function of human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2) cells has not been reported previously.Methods The role of HO-1 in the proliferation and migration of Caco-2 cells was analyzed using a stable HO-1 expression plasmid.We constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus plasmid containing the HO-1 gene,heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1),which was transfected into Caco-2 intestinal cells.We identified a number of target genes by global microarray analysis combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay.Results Our results showed that significant HO-1 upregulation was demonstrated in the Caco-2 cells after HO-1 transfection.Restoration of HO-1 expression promoted proliferation and invasion in vitro.The CTNND1 gene,a member of the armadillo protein family,was identified as a direct HO-1 target gene.Conclusion Overexpression of HO-1 promotes Caco-2 cell proliferation and migration by targeting the CTNND1 gene.

  7. A novel, "double-clamp" binding mode for human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona N Rahman

    Full Text Available The development of heme oxygenase (HO inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308. Using a carbon monoxide (CO formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC(50 = 0.27±0.07 µM than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC(50 = 4.0±1.8 µM. The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This "double-clamp" binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  8. A Novel, “Double-Clamp” Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC50 = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC50 = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This “double-clamp” binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  9. A novel, "double-clamp" binding mode for human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC(50) = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC(50) = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This "double-clamp" binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  10. Tyrosine oxidation in heme oxygenase: examination of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Valeriy V; Roth, Justine P

    2014-10-01

    Heme oxygenase is responsible for the degradation of a histidine-ligated ferric protoporphyrin IX (Por) to biliverdin, CO, and the free ferrous ion. Described here are studies of tyrosyl radical formation reactions that occur after oxidizing Fe(III)(Por) to Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) in human heme oxygenase isoform-1 (hHO-1) and the structurally homologous protein from Corynebacterium diphtheriae (cdHO). Site-directed mutagenesis on hHO-1 probes the reduction of Fe(IV)=O(Por(·+)) by tyrosine residues within 11 Å of the prosthetic group. In hHO-1, Y58· is implicated as the most likely site of oxidation, based on the pH and pD dependent kinetics. The absence of solvent deuterium isotope effects in basic solutions of hHO-1 and cdHO contrasts with the behavior of these proteins in the acidic solution, suggesting that long-range proton-coupled electron transfer predominates over electron transfer.

  11. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism is associated with genetic variation in heme oxygenase-1 in Blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Christopher J.; Boulet, Sheree L.; Ellingsen, Dorothy; Trau, Heidi; Ghaji, Nafisa; Hooper, W. Craig; Austin, Harland

    2015-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) affects as many as 1 in 1000 individuals in the United States. Although Blacks are disproportionately affected by VTE, few genetic risk factors have been identified in this population. The inducible heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene encodes a key cytoprotective enzyme with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticoagulant activity acting in the vascular system. A (GT)n microsatellite located in the promoter of the HMOX1 gene influences the level of response. Methods and Results Using the Genetic Attributes and Thrombosis Epidemiology (GATE) study, we examined the association between HMOX1 repeat length and VTE events in 883 Black and 927 White patients and matched controls. We found no association between HMOX1 genotypes and VTE in Whites. However, in Black patients, carrying two long (L) alleles (≥34 repeats) was significantly associated with provoked (odds ratio (OR) 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19–2.90) or recurrent (OR 3.13, 95% CI: 1.77–5.53) VTE events. Conclusions We have demonstrated for the first time an association between genetic variation in HMOX1, and VTE in Blacks. Our results support a key role for the heme oxygenase system in protecting patients at increased risk for thrombosis and suggest a potential mechanism for targeted screening and intervention. PMID:22959128

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expresion in Gastric Mucosa and Liver after Burns: Preliminary Immunohistochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganka Bekyarova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Generation of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM and oxidative stress are crucial in pathogenesis of thermal skin injury. Heat shock proteins such as HSP32 known as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilative properties and play an important role in the protecting of tissues from several stresses. In this immunohistochemical study, we have assessed the constitutive expression of HO-1 in normal gastric mucosa and liver and tested the hypothesis that its expression in these tissues is upregulated in thermal skin injury characterized by increased production of ROMs and other pro-inflammatory mediators. We used malondialdehyde (MDA as a marker of oxidative stress and tumor necrosis factor (TNF α as a marker of inflammatory response in burn rat model. Methods: HO-1 expression in formalin-fixed sections was assessed by peroxidase anti-peroxidase immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal rabbit anti-HO-1 as primary antibody. TNF-α in plasma was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit. Spectrometric method was used for plasma and tissue MDA assay. Results:Immunohistochemical staining revealed HO-1 expression in all groups. Staining scores for HO-1 in endothelial cells in both gastric mucosa and liver were increased with 32% (p <0.001 and 51 % (p< 0.001, compared to that of controls. The levels of MDA in the gastric mucosa were increased by 43% (p<0.05 and in liver in 126% (p<0.001. Plasma concentration of TNF α was also elevated by 111 % (p<0.001 and MDA level in plasma was increased by 37% (p<0.05. Conclusion: Our data suggest that HO-1 induction following burn is an adaptive response which can protect gastric mucosal and liver against further oxidative damage. HO-1 system may represent a target and an effective and cooperative strategy to intervene in the protection against inflammatory processes and oxidative tissue injury. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2013; 1(5.000: 246-251

  13. Carbon Monoxide and Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevent Intestinal Inflammation in Mice by Promoting Bacterial Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyiah, Joseph C.; Sheikh, Shehzad Z.; Maharshak, Nitsan; Steinbach, Erin C.; Russo, Steven M.; Kobayashi, Taku; Mackey, Lantz C.; Hansen, Jonathan J.; Moeser, Adam J.; Rawls, John F.; Borst, Luke B.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Plevy, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its metabolic by-product, carbon monoxide (CO), protect against intestinal inflammation in experimental models of colitis, but little is known about their intestinal immune mechanisms. We investigated the interactions among CO, HO-1, and the enteric microbiota in mice and zebrafish. METHODS Germ-free, wild-type, and Il10−/− mice and germ free zebrafish embryos were colonized with pathogen-free (SPF). Germ-free or SPF-raised wild-type and Il10−/− mice were given intraperitoneal injections of cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), which upregulates HO-1, the CO releasing molecule ALF186, or saline (control). Colitis was induced in wild-type mice housed in SPF conditions by infection with S. typhimurium. RESULTS In colons of germ-free, wild-type mice, SPF microbiota induced production of HO-1 via activation of Nrf2–, IL-10–, and toll-like receptor–dependent pathways; similar observations were made in zebrafish. SPF microbiota did not induce HO-1 in colons of germ-free Il10−/− mice. Administration of CoPP to Il10−/− mice before transition from germ-free to SPF conditions reduced their development of colitis. In Il10−/− mice, CO and CoPP reduced levels of enteric bacterial genomic DNA in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). In mice with S. typhimurium-induced enterocolitis, CoPP reduced the numbers of live S. typhimurium recovered from the lamina propria, MLN, spleen, and liver. Knockdown of HO-1 in mouse macrophages impaired their bactericidal activity against E. coli, E. faecalis, and S. typhimurium, whereas exposure to CO or overexpression of HO-1 increased their bactericidal activity. HO-1 induction and CO increased acidification of phagolysosomes. CONCLUSIONS Colonic HO-1 prevents colonic inflammation in mice. HO-1 is induced by the enteric microbiota and its homeostatic function is mediated, in part, by promoting bactericidal activities of macrophages. PMID:23266559

  14. 血红素氧合酶与血压%Heme Oxygenase and Blood Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彦; 贾友宏

    2011-01-01

    血红素氧台酶(Heme oxygenase,HO)是血红素代谢过程中的限速酶,可降解血红素生成一氧化碳(CO),胆绿素和铁.HO-1产生的血管保护作用大部分归因于它的代谢终产物所具有的抗炎、抗氧化、抗凋亡、抗血栓形成作用.此外,CO和胆汁酸还可通过影响血管平滑肌细胞、内皮细胞、内皮祖细胞和白细胞等的增殖、迁移、粘附,维持血管损伤后的稳态,避免管壁增生肥厚.本文综述了HO及其代谢产物对血压的影响.%Hcme oxygenasc (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme which could metabolize heme lo generate carbon monoxide (CO ), biliverdin and iron. Biliverdin is subsequently metabolized to billrubin by bilivcrdin rcductase . The vasoprotection afforded by HO-1 is largely attributable to its End products: CO and the bile pigments, biliverdin and bilirubin. These end products exert potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant. Anti-apoptotic. And antj-lhrombotic actions. In addition, CO and bile pigments act to preserve vascular homeostasis at sites of arterial injury by influencing the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs), cndothclial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, or leukocytes. The proliferation ,migration and adhesion of VSMCsplay a pivotal role in the development of hypertension. The article has focused not only on heme oxygenase itself but also its metabolic products as well as endogenous compounds involve in vast number of genetic and metabolic processes, that affect blood pres-

  15. ENDOGENOUS HEME OXYGENASE/CARBON MONOXIDE SYSTEM MEDIATES LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED INTUSSUSCEPTION IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the role of endogenous heme oxygenase (HO)/carbon monoxide (CO) system in regulating the process of intussusception (IN) induced by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats.Methods. IN model of rats were induced by lipopolysaccharide. HO activity was determined by the amount of bilirubin formation which was measured with a double-beam spectrophotometer, and HbCO formation was measured by CO-oximeter.Results. The results showed that LPS (10mg/kg) caused IN in up to 40% of the rats at 6h after treatment of LPS. The incidence of IN were significantly increased by 50% (P<0.05) and by 83.2%(P<0.01) in HO substrate(heme-L-lysinate)-treated rats and in exogenous CO-treated rats, respectively; but it was significantly decreased by 41.8%(P<0.05) after administration of ZnDPBG, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase (HO) activity. Furthermore, LPS increased HO activity, HbCO formation cGMP content within colic smooth muscle and the plasma level of cGMP, and these parameters were significantly elevated by 62.6%(P<0.01), 40.0%(P<0.01), 49.3%(P<0.05) and 38.9%(P<0.05), respectively, compared with LPS-non-IN rats.Conclusion. It is suggested that endogenous HO/CO system plays an important role in the process of IN induced by LPS, and inhibition of HO activity may decrease the formation of IN.

  16. Curcumin-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression prevents H2O2-induced cell death in wild type and heme oxygenase-2 knockout adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Niels A J; Lundvig, Ditte M S; van Dalen, Stephanie C M; Schelbergen, Rik F; van Lent, Peter L E M; Szarek, Walter A; Regan, Raymond F; Carels, Carine E; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2014-10-08

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration is a promising adjuvant therapy to treat tissue injury. However, MSC survival after administration is often hampered by oxidative stress at the site of injury. Heme oxygenase (HO) generates the cytoprotective effector molecules biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron/ferritin by breaking down heme. Since HO-activity mediates anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects, we hypothesized that modulation of the HO-system affects MSC survival. Adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) from wild type (WT) and HO-2 knockout (KO) mice were isolated and characterized with respect to ASC marker expression. In order to analyze potential modulatory effects of the HO-system on ASC survival, WT and HO-2 KO ASCs were pre-treated with HO-activity modulators, or downstream effector molecules biliverdin, bilirubin, and CO before co-exposure of ASCs to a toxic dose of H2O2. Surprisingly, sensitivity to H2O2-mediated cell death was similar in WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. However, pre-induction of HO-1 expression using curcumin increased ASC survival after H2O2 exposure in both WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. Simultaneous inhibition of HO-activity resulted in loss of curcumin-mediated protection. Co-treatment with glutathione precursor N-Acetylcysteine promoted ASC survival. However, co-incubation with HO-effector molecules bilirubin and biliverdin did not rescue from H2O2-mediated cell death, whereas co-exposure to CO-releasing molecules-2 (CORM-2) significantly increased cell survival, independently from HO-2 expression. Summarizing, our results show that curcumin protects via an HO-1 dependent mechanism against H2O2-mediated apoptosis, and likely through the generation of CO. HO-1 pre-induction or administration of CORMs may thus form an attractive strategy to improve MSC therapy.

  17. Curcumin-Induced Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Prevents H2O2-Induced Cell Death in Wild Type and Heme Oxygenase-2 Knockout Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels A. J. Cremers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC administration is a promising adjuvant therapy to treat tissue injury. However, MSC survival after administration is often hampered by oxidative stress at the site of injury. Heme oxygenase (HO generates the cytoprotective effector molecules biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide (CO and iron/ferritin by breaking down heme. Since HO-activity mediates anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects, we hypothesized that modulation of the HO-system affects MSC survival. Adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs from wild type (WT and HO-2 knockout (KO mice were isolated and characterized with respect to ASC marker expression. In order to analyze potential modulatory effects of the HO-system on ASC survival, WT and HO-2 KO ASCs were pre-treated with HO-activity modulators, or downstream effector molecules biliverdin, bilirubin, and CO before co-exposure of ASCs to a toxic dose of H2O2. Surprisingly, sensitivity to H2O2-mediated cell death was similar in WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. However, pre-induction of HO-1 expression using curcumin increased ASC survival after H2O2 exposure in both WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. Simultaneous inhibition of HO-activity resulted in loss of curcumin-mediated protection. Co-treatment with glutathione precursor N-Acetylcysteine promoted ASC survival. However, co-incubation with HO-effector molecules bilirubin and biliverdin did not rescue from H2O2-mediated cell death, whereas co-exposure to CO-releasing molecules-2 (CORM-2 significantly increased cell survival, independently from HO-2 expression. Summarizing, our results show that curcumin protects via an HO-1 dependent mechanism against H2O2-mediated apoptosis, and likely through the generation of CO. HO-1 pre-induction or administration of CORMs may thus form an attractive strategy to improve MSC therapy.

  18. Identification of an Escherichia coli O 157:H7 Heme Oxygenase with Tandem Functional Repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suits,M.; Pal, G.; Nakatsu, A.; Matte, A.; Cygler, M.; Jia, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HOs) catalyze the oxidation of heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO), and free iron. Iron acquisition is critical for invading microorganisms to enable survival and growth. Here we report the crystal structure of ChuS, which displays a previously uncharacterized fold and is unique compared with other characterized HOs. Despite only 19% sequence identity between the N- and C-terminal halves, these segments of ChuS represent a structural duplication, with a root-mean-square deviation of 2.1 {angstrom} between the two repeats. ChuS is capable of using ascorbic acid or cytochrome P450 reductase-NADPH as electron sources for heme oxygenation. CO detection confirmed that ChuS is a HO, and we have identified it in pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7. Based on sequence analysis, this HO is present in many bacteria, although not in the E. coli K-12 strain. The N- and C-terminal halves of ChuS are each a functional HO.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1: a provenance for cytoprotective pathways in the kidney and other tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, K A

    2006-08-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme, converting heme to biliverdin, during which iron is released and carbon monoxide (CO) is emitted; biliverdin is subsequently converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. At least two isozymes possess HO activity: HO-1 represents the isozyme induced by diverse stressors, including ischemia, nephrotoxins, cytokines, endotoxin, oxidants, and vasoactive substances; HO-2 is the constitutive, glucocorticoid-inducible isozyme. HO-1 is upregulated in the kidney in assorted conditions and diseases. Interest in HO is driven by the capacity of this system to protect the kidney against injury, a capacity likely reflecting, at least in part, the cytoprotective properties of its products: in relatively low concentrations, CO exerts vasorelaxant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects while bile pigments are antioxidant and anti-inflammatory metabolites. This article reviews the HO system and the extent to which it influences the function of the healthy kidney; it summarizes conditions and stimuli that elicit HO-1 in the kidney; and it explores the significance of renal expression of HO-1 as induced by ischemia, nephrotoxins, nephritides, transplantation, angiotensin II, and experimental diabetes. This review also points out the tissue specificity of the HO system, and the capacity of HO-1 to induce renal injury in certain settings. Studies of HO in other tissues are discussed insofar as they aid in elucidating the physiologic and pathophysiologic significance of the HO system in the kidney.

  20. Human heme oxygenase-1 gene transfer lowers blood pressure and promotes growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaawy, H E; Zhang, F; Nguyen, X; ElHosseiny, A; Nasjletti, A; Schwartzman, M; Dennery, P; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    2001-08-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, with release of free iron and carbon monoxide. Both heme and carbon monoxide have been implicated in the regulation of vascular tone. A retroviral vector containing human HO-1 cDNA (LSN-HHO-1) was constructed and subjected to purification and concentration of the viral particles to achieve 5x10(9) to 1x10(10) colony-forming units per milliliter. The ability of concentrated infectious viral particles to express human HO-1 (HHO-1) in vivo was tested. A single intracardiac injection of the concentrated infectious viral particles (expressing HHO-1) to 5-day-old spontaneously hypertensive rats resulted in functional expression of the HHO-1 gene and attenuation of the development of hypertension. Rats expressing HHO-1 showed a significant decrease in urinary excretion of a vasoconstrictor arachidonic acid metabolite and a reduction in myogenic responses to increased intraluminal pressure in isolated arterioles. Unexpectedly, HHO-1 chimeric rats showed a simultaneous significant proportionate increase in somatic growth. Thus, delivery of HHO-1 gene by retroviral vector attenuates the development of hypertension and promotes body growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  1. Spatiotemporal expression of heme oxygenase-1 detected by in vivo bioluminescence after hepatic ischemia in HO-1/luc mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Huawei; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Buis, Carlijn I.; Visser, Dorien S.; Hesselink, Jan Willem; Schuurs, Theo A.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Contag, Christopher H.; Porte, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been proposed as a critical mechanism protecting against cellular stress during liver transplantation, providing a potential target for new therapeutic interventions. We investigated the feasibility of in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) to noninvasively

  2. Alteration of the Regiospecificity of Human Heme Oxygenase-1 by Unseating of the Heme but not Disruption of the Distal Hydrogen Bonding Network†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Evans, John P.; Ogura, Hiroshi; La Mar, Gerd N.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Heme oxygenase regiospecifically oxidizes heme at the α-meso position to give biliverdin IXα, CO, and iron. The heme orientation within the active site, which is thought to determine the oxidation regiospecificity, is shown here for the human enzyme (hHO1) to be largely determined by interactions between the heme carboxylic acid groups and residues Arg183 and Lys18 but not Tyr134. Mutation of either Arg183 or Lys18 individually does not significantly alter the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent reaction regiochemistry, but partially shifts the oxidation to the β/δ-meso positions in the reaction supported by ascorbic acid. Mutation of Glu29 to a lysine, which places a positive charge where it can interact with a heme carboxyl if the heme rotates by ~90°, causes a slight loss of regiospecificity, but combined with the R183E and K18E mutations results primarily in β/δ-meso oxidation of the heme under all conditions. NMR analysis of heme binding to the triple K18E/E29K/R183E mutant confirms rotation of the heme in the active site. Kinetic studies demonstrate that mutations of Arg183 greatly impair the rate of the P450 reductase-dependent reaction, in accord with the earlier finding that Arg183 is involved in binding of the reductase to hHO1, but have little effect on the ascorbate reaction. Mutations of Asp140 and Tyr58 that disrupt the active site hydrogen bonding network, impair catalytic rates but do not influence the oxidation regiochemistry. The results indicate both that the oxidation regiochemistry is largely controlled by ionic interactions of the heme propionic acid groups with the protein and that shifts in regiospecificity involve rotation of the heme about an axis perpendicular to the heme plane. PMID:16388581

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 protects against Alzheimer's amyloid-β(1-42)-induced toxicity via carbon monoxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, N; Dallas, M; Al-Owais, M; Griffiths, H; Hooper, N; Scragg, J; Boyle, J; Peers, C

    2014-12-11

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible enzyme up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease, catabolises heme to biliverdin, Fe2+ and carbon monoxide (CO). CO can protect neurones from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting Kv2.1 channels, which mediates cellular K+ efflux as an early step in the apoptotic cascade. Since apoptosis contributes to the neuronal loss associated with amyloid β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in AD, we investigated the protective effects of HO-1 and CO against Aβ(1-42) toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells, employing cells stably transfected with empty vector or expressing the cellular prion protein, PrP(c), and rat primary hippocampal neurons. Aβ(1-42) (containing protofibrils) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability, attributable at least in part to induction of apoptosis, with the PrP(c)-expressing cells showing greater susceptibility to Aβ(1-42) toxicity. Pharmacological induction or genetic over-expression of HO-1 significantly ameliorated the effects of Aβ(1-42). The CO-donor CORM-2 protected cells against Aβ(1-42) toxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Electrophysiological studies revealed no differences in the outward current pre- and post-Aβ(1-42) treatment suggesting that K+ channel activity is unaffected in these cells. Instead, Aβ toxicity was reduced by the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and by the CaMKKII inhibitor, STO-609. Aβ also activated the downstream kinase, AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). CO prevented this activation of AMPK. Our findings indicate that HO-1 protects against Aβ toxicity via production of CO. Protection does not arise from inhibition of apoptosis-associated K+ efflux, but rather by inhibition of AMPK activation, which has been recently implicated in the toxic effects of Aβ. These data provide a novel, beneficial effect of CO which adds to its growing potential as a therapeutic agent.

  4. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 1A2-mediated metabolism and production of reactive oxygen species by heme oxygenase-1 in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, James R; Cawley, George F; Backes, Wayne L

    2011-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in most cell types by many forms of environmental stress and is believed to play a protective role in cells exposed to oxidative stress. Metabolism by cytochromes P450 (P450) is highly inefficient as the oxidation of substrate is associated with the production of varying proportions of hydrogen peroxide and/or superoxide. This study tests the hypothesis that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a protective role against oxidative stress by competing with P450 for binding to the common redox partner, the NADPH P450 reductase (CPR) and in the process, diminishing P450 metabolism and the associated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Liver microsomes were isolated from uninduced rats and rats that were treated with cadmium and/or β-napthoflavone (BNF) to induce HO-1 and/or CYP1A2. HO-1 induction was associated with slower rates of metabolism of the CYP1A2-specific substrate, 7-ethoxyresorufin. Furthermore, HO-1 induction also was associated with slower rates of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical production by microsomes from rats induced for CYP1A2. The inhibition associated with HO-1 induction was not dependent on the addition of heme to the microsomal incubations. The effects of HO-1 induction were less dramatic in the absence of substrate for CYP1A2, suggesting that the enzyme was more effective in inhibiting the CYP1A2-related activity than the CPR-related production of superoxide (that dismutates to form hydrogen peroxide).

  5. Heme oxygenase and angiogenic activity of endothelial cells: stimulation by carbon monoxide and inhibition by tin protoporphyrin-IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józkowicz, Alicja; Huk, Ihor; Nigisch, Anneliese; Weigel, Guenter; Dietrich, Wolf; Motterlini, Roberto; Dulak, Józef

    2003-04-01

    The activity of heme oxygenase enzymes (HOs) is responsible for the endogenous source of carbon monoxide (CO). Their activities can be inhibited by tin protoporphyrin-IX (SnPPIX). Recent data indicate the involvement of HOs in the regulation of angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the role of the HO pathway in the production and angiogenic activity of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in endothelial cells treated with SnPPIX, or cultured in the presence of a CO-releasing molecule (CO-RM). Addition of CO-RM or induction of HO-1 by hemin resulted in a threefold elevation in CO production in culture medium (up to 20.3 microg/L) and was associated with a 30% increase in VEGF synthesis. Much higher levels of CO (up to 60 microg/L) and a further increase in VEGF production (by 277%) were measured in cells treated with prostaglandin-J(2), a potent activator of HO-1. SnPPIX prevented the induction of CO generation and inhibited VEGF synthesis. Moreover, SnPPIX reduced the VEGF-elicited angiogenic activities of endothelial cells by decreasing their proliferation (by 26%), migration (by 46%), formation of tubes on Matrigel (by 48%), and outgrowth of capillaries from endothelial spheroids (by 30%). In contrast, overexpression of HO-1 or incubation of cells with CO-RM led to an increase in capillary sprouting. Thus, HO activity up-regulates VEGF production and augments the capability of endothelial cells to respond to exogenous stimulation.

  6. Heme oxygenase-2 gene deletion attenuates oxidative stress in neurons exposed to extracellular hemin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenisti-Zarom Luna

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemin, the oxidized form of heme, accumulates in intracranial hematomas and is a potent oxidant. Growing evidence suggests that it contributes to delayed injury to surrounding tissue, and that this process is affected by the heme oxygenase enzymes. In a prior study, heme oxygenase-2 gene deletion increased the vulnerability of cultured cortical astrocytes to hemin. The present study tested the effect of HO-2 gene deletion on protein oxidation, reactive oxygen species formation, and cell viability after mixed cortical neuron/astrocyte cultures were incubated with neurotoxic concentrations of hemin. Results Continuous exposure of wild-type cultures to 1–10 μM hemin for 14 h produced concentration-dependent neuronal death, as detected by both LDH release and fluorescence intensity after propidium iodide staining, with an EC50 of 1–2 μM; astrocytes were not injured by these low hemin concentrations. Cell death was consistently reduced by at least 60% in knockout cultures. Exposure to hemin for 4 hours, a time point that preceded cell lysis, increased protein oxidation in wild-type cultures, as detected by staining of immunoblots for protein carbonyl groups. At 10 μM hemin, carbonylation was increased 2.3-fold compared with control sister cultures subjected to medium exchanges only; this effect was reduced by about two-thirds in knockout cultures. Cellular reactive oxygen species, detected by fluorescence intensity after dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR staining, was markedly increased by hemin in wild-type cultures and was localized to neuronal cell bodies and processes. In contrast, DHR fluorescence intensity in knockout cultures did not differ from that of sham-washed controls. Neuronal death in wild-type cultures was almost completely prevented by the lipid-soluble iron chelator phenanthroline; deferoxamine had a weaker but significant effect. Conclusions These results suggest that HO-2 gene deletion protects neurons in mixed

  7. Heme oxygenase reveals its strategy for catalyzing three successive oxygenation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshitaka; Unno, Masaki; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2010-02-16

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is an enzyme that catalyzes the regiospecific conversion of heme to biliverdin IXalpha, CO, and free iron. In mammals, HO has a variety of physiological functions, including heme catabolism, iron homeostasis, antioxidant defense, cellular signaling, and O(2) sensing. The enzyme is also found in plants (producing light-harvesting pigments) and in some pathogenic bacteria, where it acquires iron from the host heme. The HO-catalyzed heme conversion proceeds through three successive oxygenations, a process that has attracted considerable attention because of its reaction mechanism and physiological importance. The HO reaction is unique in that all three O(2) activations are affected by the substrate itself. The first step is the regiospecific self-hydroxylation of the porphyrin alpha-meso carbon atom. The resulting alpha-meso-hydroxyheme reacts in the second step with another O(2) to yield verdoheme and CO. The third O(2) activation, by verdoheme, cleaves its porphyrin macrocycle to release biliverdin and free ferrous iron. In this Account, we provide an overview of our current understanding of the structural and biochemical properties of the complex self-oxidation reactions in HO catalysis. The first meso-hydroxylation is of particular interest because of its distinct contrast with O(2) activation by cytochrome P450. Although most heme enzymes oxidize exogenous substrates by high-valent oxo intermediates, HO was proposed to utilize the Fe-OOH intermediate for the self-hydroxylation. We have succeeded in preparing and characterizing the Fe-OOH species of HO at low temperature, and an analysis of its reaction, together with mutational and crystallographic studies, reveals that protonation of Fe-OOH by a distal water molecule is critical in promoting the unique self-hydroxylation. The second oxygenation is a rapid, spontaneous auto-oxidation of the reactive alpha-meso-hydroxyheme; its mechanism remains elusive, but the HO enzyme has been shown not to

  8. Positive and negative regulation of the human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Takahashi, Y; Ito, K; Nagano, T; Shibahara, S; Miura, T

    1999-10-28

    To elucidate the regulation of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene expression, we assessed approximately 4 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the hHO-1 gene for basal promoter activity and sequenced approximately 2 kb of the 5'-flanking region. A series of deletion mutants of the 5'-flanking region linked to the luciferase gene was constructed. Basal level expression of these constructs was tested in HepG2 human hepatoma cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. By measuring luciferase activity, which was transiently expressed in the transfected cells, we found a positive regulatory region at position -1976 to -1655 bp. This region functions in HepG2 cells but not in HeLa cells. A negative regulatory region was also found at position -981 to -412 bp that functions in both HepG2 cells and HeLa cells.

  9. Upregulation of human heme oxygenase gene expression by Ets-family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deramaudt, B M; Remy, P; Abraham, N G

    1999-03-01

    Overexpression of human heme oxygenase-1 has been shown to have the potential to promote EC proliferation and angiogenesis. Since Ets-family proteins have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis, we investigated the presence of ETS binding sites (EBS), GGAA/T, and ETS protein contributing to human HO-1 gene expression. Several chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs were examined in order to analyze the effect of ETS family proteins on the transduction of HO-1 in Xenopus oocytes and in microvessel endothelial cells. Heme oxygenase promoter activity was up-regulated by FLI-1ERGETS-1 protein(s). Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays demonstrated that the promoter region (-1500 to +19) contains positive and negative control elements and that all three members of the ETS protein family were responsible for the up-regulation of HHO-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), performed with nuclear extracts from endothelial cells overexpressing HHO-1 gene, and specific HHO-1 oligonucleotides probes containing putative EBS resulted in a specific and marked bandshift. Synergistic binding was observed in EMSA between AP-1 on the one hand, FLI-1, ERG, and ETS-1 protein on the other. Moreover, 5'-deletion analysis demonstrated the existence of a negative control element of HHO-1 expression located between positions -1500 and -120 on the HHO-1 promoter. The presence of regulatory sequences for transcription factors such as ETS-1, FLI-1, or ERG, whose activity is associated with cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation, and matrix metalloproteinase transduction, may be an indication of the important role that HO-1 may play in coronary collateral circulation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and hemoglobin-induced endothelial cell injuries.

  10. Kidney injury and heme oxygenase-1%血红素加氧酶-1与肾脏损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦海星; 陈立军; 陈彪; 游华; 张旭

    2012-01-01

    血红素加氧酶-1(HO-1)作为哺乳动物降解血红素的主要途径之一,其主要降解产物——一氧化碳(CO)、自由铁(Fe2+)和胆绿素——在促进细胞生存、细胞内物质循环及免疫调节中具有重要作用.既往研究提示血红素-HO-1通路是决定急性肾损伤(AKI)易感性及严重性的重要内在因素.诱导HO-1表达能够减轻肾脏缺血-再灌注损伤(IRI)的严重程度,而抑制HO-1的表达会加重IRI.本文综述了国内外有关HO-1在AKI诱导保护机制方面的最新研究进展,以便深入认识HO-1在AKI治疗中的作用.%Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-l) is one of the main pathways to degrade heme in mammals, and the main degradation products are free iron (Fe2+), carbon monoxide (CO), and bilirubin. Heme plays an important role in promoting cell survival, circulation of intracellular substrates, and immune regulation. Previous studies suggest that the heme-HO-1 pathway is an important internal factor in determining the susceptibility and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). The induction of HO-l expression can attenuate the severity of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), and the inhibition of HO-l expression will accentuate the injury of IRI. The present article summarizes the latest advances in research into HO-l regarding the protective mechanism on AKI conducted abroad and at home to learn more information about HO-l in the treatment of AKI.

  11. Activation of locus coeruleus heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway promoted an anxiolytic-like effect in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carvalho-Costa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway has been shown to play an important role in many physiological processes and is capable of altering nociception modulation in the nervous system by stimulating soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC. In the central nervous system, the locus coeruleus (LC is known to be a region that expresses the heme oxygenase enzyme (HO, which catalyzes the metabolism of heme to carbon monoxide (CO. Additionally, several lines of evidence have suggested that the LC can be involved in the modulation of emotional states such as fear and anxiety. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the activation of the heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway in the LC in the modulation of anxiety by using the elevated plus maze test (EPM and light-dark box test (LDB in rats. Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g (n=182. The results showed that the intra-LC microinjection of heme-lysinate (600 nmol, a substrate for the enzyme HO, increased the number of entries into the open arms and the percentage of time spent in open arms in the elevated plus maze test, indicating a decrease in anxiety. Additionally, in the LDB test, intra-LC administration of heme-lysinate promoted an increase on time spent in the light compartment of the box. The intracerebroventricular microinjection of guanylate cyclase, an sGC inhibitor followed by the intra-LC microinjection of the heme-lysinate blocked the anxiolytic-like reaction on the EPM test and LDB test. It can therefore be concluded that CO in the LC produced by the HO pathway and acting via cGMP plays an anxiolytic-like role in the LC of rats.

  12. Activation of locus coeruleus heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway promoted an anxiolytic-like effect in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Costa, P G; Branco, L G S; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2016-01-01

    The heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway has been shown to play an important role in many physiological processes and is capable of altering nociception modulation in the nervous system by stimulating soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). In the central nervous system, the locus coeruleus (LC) is known to be a region that expresses the heme oxygenase enzyme (HO), which catalyzes the metabolism of heme to carbon monoxide (CO). Additionally, several lines of evidence have suggested that the LC can be involved in the modulation of emotional states such as fear and anxiety. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the activation of the heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway in the LC in the modulation of anxiety by using the elevated plus maze test (EPM) and light-dark box test (LDB) in rats. Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g (n=182). The results showed that the intra-LC microinjection of heme-lysinate (600 nmol), a substrate for the enzyme HO, increased the number of entries into the open arms and the percentage of time spent in open arms in the elevated plus maze test, indicating a decrease in anxiety. Additionally, in the LDB test, intra-LC administration of heme-lysinate promoted an increase on time spent in the light compartment of the box. The intracerebroventricular microinjection of guanylate cyclase, an sGC inhibitor followed by the intra-LC microinjection of the heme-lysinate blocked the anxiolytic-like reaction on the EPM test and LDB test. It can therefore be concluded that CO in the LC produced by the HO pathway and acting via cGMP plays an anxiolytic-like role in the LC of rats.

  13. Implication for using heme methyl hyperfine shifts as indicators of heme seating as related to stereoselectivity in the catabolism of heme by heme oxygenase: in-plane heme versus axial his rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz; La Mar, Gerd N

    2008-01-08

    The triple mutant of the solubilized, 265-residue construct of human heme oxygenase, K18E/E29K/R183E-hHO, has been shown to redirect the exclusive alpha-regioselectivity of wild-type hHO to primarily beta,delta-selectivity in the cleavage of heme (Wang, J., Evans, J. P., Ogura, H., La Mar, G. N., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 61-73). The 1H NMR hyperfine shift pattern for the substrate and axial His CbetaH's and the substrate-protein contacts of the cyanide-inhibited protohemin and 2,4-dimethyldeuterohemin complexes of the triple mutant have been analyzed in detail and compared to data for the WT complex. It is shown that protein contacts for the major solution isomers for both substrates in the mutant dictate approximately 90 degrees in-plane clockwise rotation relative to that in the WT. The conventional interpretation of the pattern of substrate methyl hyperfine shifts, however, indicates substrate rotations of only approximately 50 degrees . This paradox is resolved by demonstrating that the axial His25 imidazole ring also rotates counterclockwise with respect to the protein matrix in the mutant relative to that in the WT. The axial His25 CbetaH hyperfine shifts are shown to serve as independent probes of the imidazole plane orientation relative to the protein matrix. The analysis indicates that the pattern of heme methyl hyperfine shifts cannot be used alone to determine the in-plane orientation of the substrate as it relates to the stereospecificity of heme cleavage, without explicit consideration of the orientation of the axial His imidazole plane relative to the protein matrix.

  14. Heme oxygenase attenuates angiotensin II-mediated superoxide production in cultured mouse thick ascending loop of Henle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Silvia; Patel, Bijal J; Parker, Lawson B; Vera, Trinity; Rimoldi, John M; Gadepalli, Rama S V; Drummond, Heather A; Stec, David E

    2008-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 induction can attenuate the development of angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent hypertension. However, the mechanism by which HO-1 lowers blood pressure is not clear. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that induction of HO-1 can reduce the ANG II-mediated increase in superoxide production in cultured thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) cells. Studies were performed on an immortalized cell line of mouse TALH (mTALH) cells. HO-1 was induced in cultured mTALH cells by treatment with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP, 10 microM) or hemin (50 microM) or by transfection with a plasmid containing the human HO-1 isoform. Treatment of mTALH cells with 10(-9) M ANG II increased dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence (an index of superoxide levels) from 35.5+/-5 to 136+/-18 relative fluorescence units (RFU)/microm2. Induction of HO-1 via CoPP, hemin, or overexpression of the human HO-1 isoform significantly reduced ANG II-induced DHE fluorescence to 64+/-5, 64+/-8, and 41+/-4 RFU/microm2, respectively. To determine which metabolite of HO-1 is responsible for reducing ANG II-mediated increases in superoxide production in mTALH cells, cells were preincubated with bilirubin or carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule (CORM)-A1 (each at 100 microM) before exposure to ANG II. DHE fluorescence averaged 80+/-7 RFU/microm2 after incubation with ANG II and was significantly decreased to 55+/-7 and 53+/-4 RFU/microm2 after pretreatment with bilirubin and CORM-A1. These results demonstrate that induction of HO-1 in mTALH cells reduces the levels of ANG II-mediated superoxide production through the production of both bilirubin and CO.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency leads to alteration of soluble guanylate cyclase redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allan W; Durante, William; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2010-10-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 knockout, H(mox)1(-/-), mice exhibit exacerbated vascular lesions after ischemia-reperfusion and mechanical injury. Surprisingly, we found no studies that reported contractile responses and sensitivity to vasorelaxants in H(mox)1(-/-) mice. The contractile responses [superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), from female H(mox)1(-/-) mice] exhibited increased sensitivity to phenylephrine (p mox)1(-/-) mice (p mox)1(-/-) than H(mox)1(+/+) mice (p mox)1(-/-) mesenteric and renal arteries also showed reduced relaxation (p mox)1(-/-) arteries were 15 times more sensitive to BAY 60-2770 (p mox)1(+/+) arteries. Pretreatment with 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[3,4-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an oxidizer of sGC, predictably shifted the BAY 60-2770 response of H(mox)1(+/+) to the left (p mox)1(-/-) arteries, indicating that much of sGC was oxidized/heme-free. Western analyses of sGC in SMA indicated that both α1 and β1 subunit levels were reduced to mox)1(+/+) level (p mox)1 plays a significant role in the maintenance of sGC in a reduced state, which is resistant to degradation and is sensitive to NO. This function may be especially important in reducing vascular damage during ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  16. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G. [Programa de Graduação em Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Branco, L.G.S. [Departamento de Morfologia, Fisiologia e Patologia Básica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leite-Panissi, C.R.A. [Programa de Graduação em Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Fisiologia e Patologia Básica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-19

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress.

  17. Amplifying the fluorescence of bilirubin enables the real-time detection of heme oxygenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemz, Roman; Mashreghi, Mir-Farzin; Spies, Claudia; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Kotsch, Katja

    2009-01-15

    Heme oxygenases (HO) are the rate-limiting enzymes in the degradation of heme to equimolar amounts of antioxidant bile pigments, the signaling molecule carbon monoxide, and ferric iron. The inducible form HO-1 confers protection on cells and tissues that mediates beneficial effects in many diseases. Consequently, measurement of the enzymatic activity is vital in the investigation of the regulatory role of HO. Here we report that the fluorescence characteristics of bilirubin in complex with serum albumin can be used for the real-time detection of HO activity in enzymatic kinetics measurements. We characterized the enzymatic activity of a truncated human HO-1 and measured the HO activity for various cell types and organs, in either the basal naive or the HO-1-induced state. The bilirubin-dependent increase in fluorescence over time monitored by this assay facilitates a very fast, sensitive, and reliable measurement of HO activity. Our approach offers the basis for a highly sensitive high-throughput screening, which provides, inter alia, the opportunity to discover new therapeutic HO-1-inducing agents.

  18. Hormonal fluctuations during the estrous cycle modulate Heme Oxygenase-1 expression in the uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Zenclussen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Deletion of the Heme Oxygenase-1 (Hmox1 locus in mice results in intrauterine lethality. The expression of the heme catabolyzing enzyme encoded by this gene, namely HO 1, is required to successfully support reproductive events. We have previously observed that HO-1 acts at several key events in reproduction ensuring pregnancy. HO-1 defines ovulation, positively influences implantation and placentation and ensures fetal growth and survival. Here, we embarked on a study aimed to determine whether hormonal changes during the estrous cycle in the mouse define HO-1 expression, thus influencing receptivity. We analyzed the serum levels of progesterone and estrogen by ELISA and HO-1 mRNA expression in uterus by real time RT-PCR at the metestrus, proestrus, estrus and diestrus phases of the estrous cycle. Further, we studied the HO-1 protein expression by Western Blot upon hormone addition to cultured uterine AN3 cells. We observed that HO-1 variations in uterine tissue correlated to changes in hormonal levels at different phases of the estrus cycle. In vitro, HO-1 protein levels in AN3 cells augmented after the addition of physiological concentrations of progesterone and estradiol, which confirmed our in vivo observations. Our data suggest an important role for hormones in HO-1 regulation in uterus that has a significant impact in receptivity and later on blastocyst implantation.

  19. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carvalho-Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO, which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO, participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group using the analgesia index (AI in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress.

  20. Heme oxygenase 1 defects lead to reduced chlorophyll in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lixia; Yang, Zonghui; Zeng, Xinhua; Gao, Jie; Liu, Jie; Yi, Bin; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong; Wen, Jing

    2017-04-01

    We previously described a Brassica napus chlorophyll-deficient mutant (ygl) with yellow-green seedling leaves and mapped the related gene, BnaC.YGL, to a 0.35 cM region. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this chlorophyll defect are still unknown. In this study, the BnaC07.HO1 gene (equivalent to BnaC.YGL) was isolated by the candidate gene approach, and its function was confirmed by genetic complementation. Comparative sequencing analysis suggested that BnaC07.HO1 was lost in the mutant, while a long noncoding-RNA was inserted into the promoter of the homologous gene BnaA07.HO1. This insert was widely present in B. napus cultivars and down-regulated BnaA07.HO1 expression. BnaC07.HO1 was highly expressed in the seedling leaves and encoded heme oxygenase 1, which was localized in the chloroplast. Biochemical analysis showed that BnaC07.HO1 can catalyze heme conversion to form biliverdin IXα. RNA-seq analysis revealed that the loss of BnaC07.HO1 impaired tetrapyrrole metabolism, especially chlorophyll biosynthesis. According, the levels of chlorophyll intermediates were reduced in the ygl mutant. In addition, gene expression in multiple pathways was affected in ygl. These findings provide molecular evidences for the basis of the yellow-green leaf phenotype and further insights into the crucial role of HO1 in B. napus.

  1. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A G

    2015-08-01

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS.We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls.The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs.The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population.

  3. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulates heme oxygenase-1 gene expression and carbon monoxide production in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, W; Peyton, K J; Schafer, A I

    1999-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) generate CO from the degradation of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Because platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) modulates various responses of VSMCs, we examined whether this peptide regulates the expression of HO-1 and the production of CO by rat aortic SMCs. Treatment of SMCs with PDGF resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein. Both actinomycin D and cycloheximide blocked PDGF-stimulated HO-1 mRNA and protein. In addition, PDGF stimulated the production of reactive oxygen species by SMCs. Both the PDGF-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species and the induction of HO-1 protein was inhibited by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Incubation of platelets with PDGF-treated SMCs resulted in a significant increase in platelet cGMP concentration that was reversed by treatment of SMCs with the HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX or by addition of the CO scavenger hemoglobin to platelets. In contrast, the nitric oxide inhibitor methyl-L-arginine did not block the stimulatory effect of PDGF-treated SMCs on platelet cGMP. Finally, incubation of SMCs with the releasate from collagen-activated platelets induced HO-1 protein expression that was blocked by a neutralizing antibody to PDGF. These results demonstrate that either administered exogenously or released by platelets, PDGF stimulates HO-1 gene expression and CO synthesis in vascular smooth muscle. The ability of PDGF to induce HO-1-catalyzed CO release by VSMCs may represent a novel mechanism by which this growth factor regulates vascular cell and platelet function.

  4. Heme oxygenase activity modulates vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulak, Jozef; Józkowicz, Alicja; Foresti, Roberta; Kasza, Aneta; Frick, Matthias; Huk, Ihor; Green, Colin J; Pachinger, Otmar; Weidinger, Franz; Motterlini, Roberto

    2002-04-01

    Hypoxia, cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO) stimulate the generation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in vascular tissue. HO-1 degrades heme to carbon monoxide (CO), iron, and biliverdin, the latter being reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. In the present study, we investigated the role of HO-1 in the modulation of VEGF synthesis in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In VSMC stimulated with cytokines, inhibition of NO production significantly, but not completely, reduced VEGF release. In contrast, inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX) totally prevented cytokine-induced increase in VEGF, despite an augmented synthesis of intracellular NO. Stimulation of HO-1 activity by hemin enhanced VEGF production; this effect was abrogated by blockade of the HO pathway. Similarly, VEGF synthesis induced by hypoxia was down-regulated by SnPPIX, but not by inhibitors of NO synthase. To elucidate further a direct involvement of HO-1 in the observed effects, we generated transfected cells that overexpressed the HO-1 gene. Notably, these cells synthesized significantly more VEGF protein than cells transfected with a control gene. Among the products of HO-1, biliverdin and bilirubin showed no effect, whereas iron ions inhibited VEGF synthesis. Exposure of cells to 1% CO resulted in a marked accumulation of VEGF (20-fold increase) over the basal level. Our data indicate that HO-1 activity influences the generation of VEGF in VSMC in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. As CO and iron, respectively the inducer and the inhibitor of VEGF synthesis, are concomitantly produced during the degradation of heme, these data indicate that HO by-products may differentially modulate VEGF production.

  5. Genetic analyses of heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 in different forms of pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 is the rate limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of inflammatory processes. In animal models the course of pancreatitis was ameliorated by up-regulation of HMOX1 expression. Additionally, carbon monoxide released during heme breakdown inhibited proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells and might thereby prevent the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP. Transcription of HMOX1 in humans is influenced by a GT-repeat located in the promoter. As such, HMOX1 variants might be of importance in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. METHODS: The GT-repeat and SNP rs2071746 were investigated with fluorescence labelled primers and by melting curve analysis in 285 patients with acute pancreatitis, 208 patients with alcoholic CP, 207 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and in 289 controls, respectively. GT-repeat analysis was extended to a total of 446 alcoholic CP patients. In addition, we performed DNA sequencing in 145 patients with alcoholic CP, 138 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and 151 controls. Exon 3 screening was extended to additional patients and controls. RESULTS: S- and L-alleles of the GT-repeat, genotypes and alleles of SNP rs2071746 and non-synonymous variants detected by sequencing were found with similar frequencies in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: Although functional data implicate a potential influence of HMOX1 variants on the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, we did not find any association. As rare non-synonymous HMOX1 variants were found in patients and controls, it is rather unlikely that they will have functional consequences essential for pancreatitis development.

  6. Cloning and characterization of a heme oxygenase-2 gene from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guang-Qing; Jin, Qi-Jiang; Lin, Yu-Ting; Feng, Jian-Fei; Nie, Li; Shen, Wen-Biao; Zheng, Tian-Qing

    2011-11-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO, EC 1.14.99.3) catalyzes the oxidation of heme and performs vital roles in plant development and stress responses. Two HO isozymes exist in plants. Between these, HO-1 is an oxidative stress-response protein, and HO-2 usually exhibited constitutive expression. Although alfalfa HO-1 gene (MsHO1) has been investigated previously, HO2 is still poorly understood. In this study, we report the cloning and characterization of HO2 gene, MsHO2, from alfalfa (Medica sativa L.). The full-length cDNA of MsHO2 contains an ORF of 870 bp and encodes for 290 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 33.3 kDa. Similar to MsHO1, MsHO2 also appears to have an N-terminal transit peptide sequence for chloroplast import. Many conserved residues in plant HO were also conserved in MsHO2. However, unlike HO-1, the conserved histidine (His) required for heme-iron binding and HO activity was replaced by tyrosine (Tyr) in MsHO2. Further biochemical activity analysis of purified mature MsHO2 showed no HO activity, suggesting that MsHO2 may not be a true HO in nature. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed its maximum expression in the germinating seeds. Importantly, the expression levels of MsHO2 were up-regulated under sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and H(2)O(2) (especially) treatment, respectively.

  7. Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: a possible implication for atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor; Nachtigal, Petr

    2013-11-01

    Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease.

  8. An association study between Heme oxygenase-1 genetic variants and Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Pedro; Martínez, Carmen; Pastor, Pau; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Luengo, Antonio; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) supplies brain tissues with nutrients, filters harmful compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream, and plays a key role in iron homeostasis in the human brain. Disruptions of the BBB are associated with several neurodegenerative conditions including Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress, iron deposition and mitochondrial impaired function are considered as risk factors for degeneration of the central nervous system. Heme oxygenase (HMOX) degrades heme ring to biliverdin, free ferrous iron and carbon monoxide being the rate-limiting activity in heme catabolism. The isoform HMOX1 is highly inducible in response to reactive oxygen species, which induce an increase in BBB permeability and impair its pathophysiology. Consequently, an over- expression of this enzyme may contribute to the marked iron deposition found in PD. We analyzed the HMOX1 SNPs rs2071746, rs2071747, and rs9282702, a microsatellite (GT)n polymorphism and copy number variations in 691 patients suffering from PD and 766 healthy control individuals. Copy number variations in the HMOX1 gene exist, but these do not seem to be associated with PD risk. In contrast two polymorphisms that modify the transcriptional activity of the gene, namely a VNTR (GT)n and the SNP rs2071746, are strongly associated with PD risk, particularly with the classic PD phenotype and with early onset of the disease. This study indicates that HMOX1 gene variants are associated to the risk of developing some forms of PD, thus adding new information that supports association of HMOX gene variations with PD risk. PMID:25309329

  9. Ozonation of Human Blood Induces a Remarkable Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 and Heat Stress Protein-70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velio Bocci

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-I (HO-1 has emerged as one of the most protective enzymes and its pleiotropic activities have been demonstrated in a variety of human pathologies. Unpublished observations have shown that HO-1 is induced after the infusion of ozonated blood into the respective donors, and many other experimental observations have demonstrated the efficacy of oxidizing agents. It appeared worthwhile to evaluate whether we could better define the activity of potential inducers such as hydrogen peroxide and ozonated human plasma. Human vascular endothelial cells at confluence were challenged with different concentrations of these inducers and the simultaneous production of nitric oxide (NO; and HO-1 was measured by either measuring nitrite, or bilirubin formation, or/and the immune reactivity of the protein by Western blot using a rabbit antihuman HO-1 and Hsp-70. The results show that production of both NO and HO-1 is fairly dose dependent but is particularly elevated using human plasma after transient exposure to a medium ozone concentration. At this concentration, there is also induction of Hsp-70. The results clarify another positive effect achievable by the use of ozone therapy.

  10. Inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 enhances the chemosensitivity of laryngeal squamous cell cancer Hep-2 cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xin; Song, Dong-mei; Niu, Ying-hao; Wang, Bao-shan

    2016-04-01

    It has been previously reported that cisplatin is a well-known anticancer drug being used against a wide range of malignancies including head and neck, ovarian and non-small cell lung carcinoma, and demonstrated its anticancer activity by reacting with DNA or changing cell structure, immune response, reactive oxygen species level (ROS). In this research we proved that cisplatin induced cell injuries and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in laryngeal squamous cell cancer Hep-2 cells through ROS generation. The induction of HO-1 clearly protected Hep-2 cells from cisplatin-induced cell death and ROS reaction, and the inhibitor of HO-1 enhanced the cell death and ROS generation induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, the HO-1 expression induced by cisplatin was strongly inhibited by the knockdown of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2), and the oxidative damages induced by cisplatin were significantly enhanced. Therefore, it may be concluded that the inhibition of HO-1 or the knockdown of Nrf-2 significantly enhanced cisplatin's anticancer effects on Hep-2 cells. In clinic, with the overexpression of HO-1 in laryngeal squamous cancer tissues, the combination of cisplatin with the inhibitor of HO-1 or Nrf-2 siRNA may act as a new method to the treatment of laryngeal squamous cancer.

  11. Iminoguanidines as Allosteric Inhibitors of the Iron-Regulated Heme Oxygenase (HemO) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic targets are required to combat multidrug resistant infections, such as the iron-regulated heme oxygenase (HemO) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, due to links between iron and virulence and dependence on heme as an iron source during infection. Herein we report the synthesis and activity of a series of iminoguanidine-based inhibitors of HemO. Compound 23 showed a binding affinity of 5.7 µM and an MIC50 of 52.3 µg/mL against P. aeruginosa PAO1. An in cellulo activity assay was develop...

  12. Effects of sericin on heme oxygenase-1 expression in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of type 2 diabetes mellitus rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihona Chen; Yaqiang He; Wenliang Fu; Jingfeng Xue

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that sericin effectively reduces blood glucose, and protects islet cells, as well as the gonads and kidneys. However, whether sericin improves diabetes mellitus-induced structural and functional problems in the central nervous system remains poorly understood. Rat models of type 2 diabetes mellitus were established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The present study observed histological changes in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, as well as heme oxygenase-1 expression, and explored sericin effects on the central nervous system in diabetic rats. Pathological damage to neural cells in the rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex was relieved following intragastric administration of sericin at a dose of 2.4 g/kg for 35 consecutive days. Heme oxygenase-1 protein and mRNA expressions were decreased in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of diabetes mellitus rats after sericin treatment. The results suggest that sericin plays a protective effect on the nervous system by decreasing the high expression of heme oxygenase-1 following diabetes mellitus.

  13. (GT)n Repeat Polymorphism in Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Correlates with Clinical Outcome after Myeloablative or Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køllgaard, Tania; Kornblit, Brian; Petersen, Jesper;

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a treatment for various hematologic diseases where efficacy of treatment is in part based on the graft versus tumour (GVT) activity of cells in the transplant. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme...

  14. Effects of Polyphenolic Derivatives on Heme Oxygenase-System in Metabolic Dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittala, Valeria; Vanella, Luca; Salerno, Loredana; Romeo, Giuseppe; Marrazzo, Agostino; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Sorrenti, Valeria

    2017-06-16

    The aim of this review is to summarize the effects of various naturally occurring polyphenols in the management of metabolic dysfunctions. This cluster of metabolic abnormalities comprises insulin resistance, increased levels of free fatty acids, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, hyperglycemia and hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) along with DM-induced complications. Most of them are included in the well-known metabolic syndrome (MS). These metabolic dysfunctions in turn are tightly associated to a high risk of development of cardiovascular diseases. Although molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of metabolic dysfunctions and related complications are not yet clear, it is widely recognized that they are associated to oxidative stress and chronic low-grade of inflammatory levels. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic references through the use of SciFinder. The database is provided by a division of ACS (American Chemical Society) and guarantees access to the world's most extensive and authoritative source of references. The search has been performed by using "heme oxygenase-1" as research topic and a subsequent refinement has been done by using inclusion/exclusion criteria. The quality of retrieved papers was evaluated on the basis of standard tools. From a careful review of the selected literature, of interest, the use of natural antioxidant polyphenols seems to be the ideal pharmacological treatment since they are endowed with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In particular, some polyphenols such as curcumin, quercetin, genistein, caffeic acid phenethyl ester are able to potently activate nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and related downstream expression of enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Indeed, an overexpression of HO-1 has demonstrated to play a beneficial role in metabolic diseases. The following review is intended to stimulate interest in the role of natural

  15. Methionine sulfoxide reductase B3 deficiency stimulates heme oxygenase-1 expression via ROS-dependent and Nrf2 activation pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Geun-Hee; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr

    2016-05-13

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase B3 (MsrB3), which is primarily found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is an important protein repair enzyme that stereospecifically reduces methionine-R-sulfoxide residues. We previously found that MsrB3 deficiency arrests the cell cycle at the G{sub 1}/S stage through up-regulation of p21 and p27. In this study, we report a critical role of MsrB3 in gene expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which has an anti-proliferative effect associated with p21 up-regulation. Depletion of MsrB3 elevated HO-1 expression in mammalian cells, whereas MsrB3 overexpression had no effect. MsrB3 deficiency increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly in the mitochondria. ER stress, which is associated with up-regulation of HO-1, was also induced by depletion of MsrB3. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine as an ROS scavenger reduced augmented HO-1 levels in MsrB3-depleted cells. MsrB3 deficiency activated Nrf2 transcription factor by enhancing its expression and nuclear import. The activation of Nrf2 induced by MsrB3 depletion was confirmed by increased expression levels of its other target genes, such as γ-glutamylcysteine ligase. Taken together, these data suggest that MsrB3 attenuates HO-1 induction by inhibiting ROS production, ER stress, and Nrf2 activation. -- Highlights: •MsrB3 depletion induces HO-1 expression. •MsrB3 deficiency increases cellular ROS and ER stress. •MsrB3 deficiency activates Nrf2 by increasing its expression and nuclear import. •MsrB3 attenuates HO-1 induction by inhibiting ROS production and Nrf2 activation.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated autophagy protects against pulmonary endothelial cell death and development of emphysema in cadmium-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surolia, Ranu; Karki, Suman; Kim, Hyunki; Yu, Zhihong; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Mirov, Sergey B; Carter, A Brent; Rowe, Steven M; Matalon, Sadis; Thannickal, Victor J; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena B

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary exposure to cadmium, a major component of cigarette smoke, has a dramatic impact on lung function and the development of emphysema. Cigarette smoke exposure induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we employed a truncated mouse model of emphysema by intratracheal instillation of cadmium (CdCl2) solution (0.025% per 1 mg/kg body wt) in HO-1(+/+), HO-1(-/-), and overexpressing humanized HO-1 bacterial artificial chromosome (hHO-1BAC) mice. We evaluated the role of HO-1 in cadmium-induced emphysema in mice by analyzing histopathology, micro-computed tomography scans, and lung function tests. CdCl2-exposed HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited more severe emphysema compared with HO-1(+/+) or hHO-1BAC mice. Loss of pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs) from the alveolar capillary membrane is recognized to be a target in emphysema. PECs from HO-1(+/+), HO-1(-/-), and hHO-1BAC were employed to define the underlying molecular mechanism for the protection from emphysema by HO-1. Electron microscopy, expression of autophagic markers (microtubule-associated protein 1B-light chain 3 II, autophagy protein 5, and Beclin1) and apoptotic marker (cleaved caspase 3) suggested induction of autophagy and apoptosis in PECs after CdCl2 treatment. CdCl2-treated HO-1(-/-) PECs exhibited downregulation of autophagic markers and significantly increased cleaved caspase 3 expression and activity (∼4-fold higher). Moreover, hHO-1BAC PECs demonstrated upregulated autophagy and absence of cleaved caspase 3 expression or activity. Pretreatment of HO-1(+/+) PECs with rapamycin induced autophagy and resulted in reduced cell death upon cadmium treatment. Induction of autophagy following CdCl2 treatment was found to be protective from apoptotic cell death. HO-1 induced protective autophagy in PECs and mitigated cadmium-induced emphysema. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase-1 inducing activities of lanostane triterpenes isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum in RAW264.7 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Solip [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-Do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nguyen, Van Thu [College of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan 712-702 (Korea, Republic of); Tae, Nara; Lee, Suhyun [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-Do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ryoo, Sungwoo [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-Do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byung-Sun [College of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan 712-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Hyung, E-mail: jhlee36@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-Do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a popular medicinal mushroom used in traditional medicine for preventing or treating a variety of diseases. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inducing effects of 12 lanostane triterpenes from G. lucidum in RAW264.7 cells. Of these, seven triterpenes, butyl lucidenateE{sub 2}, butyl lucidenateD{sub 2} (GT-2), butyl lucidenate P, butyl lucidenateQ, Ganoderiol F, methyl ganodenate J and butyl lucidenate N induced HO-1 expression and suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibiting HO-1 activity abrogated the inhibitory effects of these triterpenes on the production of NO in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, suggesting the involvement of HO-1 in the anti-inflammatory effects of these triterpenes. We further studied the anti-inflammatory and HO-1 inducing effects of GT-2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, did not suppress GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction; however, LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, blocked GT-2-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. GT-2 increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering RNA blocked GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction, suggesting that GT-2 induced HO-1 expression via the PI3K/AKT-Nrf2 pathway. Consistent with the notion that HO-1 has anti-inflammatory properties, GT-2 inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. These findings suggest that HO-1 inducing activities of these lanostane triterpenes may be important in the understanding of a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of G. lucidum. - Highlights: • The anti-inflammatory effects of selected triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum are demonstrated. • Heme oxygenase-1 induction is attributable to the anti-inflammatory properties of these

  18. Antioxidant role of heme oxygenase-1 in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soledad Gonzales; María Julia Pérez; Juan C Perazzo; María Luján Tomaro

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of bilirubin on the oxidative liver status and the activity and expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in rat liver injury induced by prehepatic portal hypertension.METHODS: Wistar male rats, weighing 200-250 g, were divided at random into two groups: one group with prehepatic portal hypertension (PH) induced by regulated prehepatic portal vein ligation (PPVL) and the other group corresponded to sham operated rats. Portal pressure, oxidative stress parameters, antioxidant enzymes,HO-1 activity and expression and hepatic sinusoidal vasodilatation were measured.RESULTS: In PPVL rats oxidative stress was evidenced by a marked increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content and a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. The activities of liver antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were also diminished while activity and expression of HO-1 were enhanced. Administration of bilirubin (5 μmol/kg body weight) 24 h before the end of the experiment entirely prevented ali these effects. Pretreatment with Sn-protoporphyrin Ⅸ (Sn-PPIX) (100 μg/kg body weight, i.p.),a potent inhibitor of HO, completely abolished the oxidative stress and provoked a slight decrease in liver GSH levels as well as an increase in lipid peroxidation. Besides,carbon monoxide, another heme catabolic product, induced a significant increase in sinusoidal hepatic areas in PPVL group. Pretreatment of PPVL rats with Sn-PPIX totally prevented this effect.CONCLUSION: These results suggest a beneficial role of HO-1 overexpression in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats.

  19. Role of the heme oxygenases in abnormalities of the mesenteric circulation in cirrhotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacerdoti, David; Abraham, Nader G; Oyekan, Adebayo O; Yang, Liming; Gatta, Angelo; McGiff, John C

    2004-02-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a product of heme metabolism by heme-oxygenase (HO), has biological actions similar to those of nitric oxide (NO). The role of CO in decreasing vascular responses to constrictor agents produced by experimental cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride was evaluated before and after inhibition of HO with tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) in the perfused superior mesenteric vasculature (SMV) of cirrhotic and normal rats and in normal rats transfected with the human HO-1 (HHO-1) gene. Perfusion pressure and vasoconstrictor responses of the SMV to KCl, phenylephrine (PE), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were decreased in cirrhotic rats. SnMP increased SMV perfusion pressure and restored the constrictor responses of the SMV to KCl, PE, and ET-1 in cirrhotic rats. The relative roles of NO and CO in producing hyporeactivity of the SMV to PE in cirrhotic rats were examined. Vasoconstrictor responses to PE were successively augmented by stepwise inhibition of CO and NO production, suggesting a complementary role for these gases in the regulation of reactivity of the SMV. Expression of constitutive but not of inducible HO (HO-1) was increased in the SMV of cirrhotic rats as was HO activity. Administration of adenovirus containing HHO-1 gene produced detection of HHO-1 RNA and increased HO activity in the SMV within 7 days. Rats transfected with HO-1 demonstrated reduction in both perfusion pressure and vasoconstrictor responses to PE in the SMV. We propose that HO is an essential component in mechanisms that modulate reactivity of the mesenteric circulation in experimental hepatic cirrhosis in rats.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (PHHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli.

  1. Astroglia overexpressing heme oxygenase-1 predispose co-cultured PC12 cells to oxidative injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Linyang; Song, Wei; Schipper, Hyman M

    2007-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and pathologic iron deposition in the substantia nigra pars compacta of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) remain unclear. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to ferrous iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin, is upregulated in affected PD astroglia and may contribute to abnormal mitochondrial iron sequestration in these cells. To determine whether glial HO-1 hyper-expression is toxic to neuronal compartments, we co-cultured dopaminergic PC12 cells atop monolayers of human (h) HO-1 transfected, sham-transfected, or non-transfected primary rat astroglia. We observed that PC12 cells grown atop hHO-1 transfected astrocytes, but not the astroglia themselves, were significantly more susceptible to dopamine (1 microM) + H(2)O(2) (1 microM)-induced death (assessed by nuclear ethidium monoazide bromide staining and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase immunofluorescence microscopy) relative to control preparations. In the experimental group, PC12 cell death was attenuated significantly by the administration of the HO inhibitor, SnMP (1.5 microM), the antioxidant, ascorbate (200 microM), or the iron chelators, deferoxamine (400 microM), and phenanthroline (100 microM). Exposure to conditioned media derived from HO-1 transfected astrocytes also augmented PC12 cell killing in response to dopamine (1 microM) + H(2)O(2) (1 microM) relative to control media. In PD brain, overexpression of HO-1 in nigral astroglia and accompanying iron liberation may facilitate the bioactivation of dopamine to neurotoxic free radical intermediates and predispose nearby neuronal constituents to oxidative damage. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Response to Wild Thyme Treatment Protects against Hypertension and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloradović, Zoran; Bugarski, Branko; Jovović, Đurđica; Vajić, Una-Jovana; Grujić-Milanović, Jelica

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is the most powerful contributor to the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and inverse correlation between consumption of polyphenol-rich foods or beverages and incidence of cardiovascular diseases gains more importance. Reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the development of hypertension. We found that wild thyme (a spice plant, rich in polyphenolic compounds) induced a significant decrease of blood pressure and vascular resistance in hypertensive rats. The inverse correlation between vascular resistance and plasma heme oxygenase-1 suggests that endogenous vasodilator carbon monoxide generated by heme oxidation could account for this normalization of blood pressure. Next product of heme oxidation, bilirubin (a chain-breaking antioxidant that acts as a lipid peroxyl radical scavenger), becomes significantly increased after wild thyme treatment and induces the reduction of plasma lipid peroxidation in hypertensive, but not in normotensive rats. The obtained results promote wild thyme as useful supplement for cardiovascular interventions.

  3. Isoporphyrin intermediate in heme oxygenase catalysis. Oxidation of alpha-meso-phenylheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John P; Niemevz, Fernando; Buldain, Graciela; de Montellano, Paul Ortiz

    2008-07-11

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the O2- and NADPH-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The first step involves regiospecific insertion of an oxygen atom at the alpha-meso carbon by a ferric hydroperoxide and is predicted to proceed via an isoporphyrin pi-cation intermediate. Here we report spectroscopic detection of a transient intermediate during oxidation by hHO-1 of alpha-meso-phenylheme-IX, alpha-meso-(p-methylphenyl)-mesoheme-III, and alpha-meso-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)-mesoheme-III. In agreement with previous experiments (Wang, J., Niemevz, F., Lad, L., Huang, L., Alvarez, D. E., Buldain, G., Poulos, T. L., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 42593-42604), only the alpha-biliverdin isomer is produced with concomitant formation of the corresponding benzoic acid. The transient intermediate observed in the NADPH-P450 reductase-catalyzed reaction accumulated when the reaction was supported by H2O2 and exhibited the absorption maxima at 435 and 930 nm characteristic of an isoporphyrin. Product analysis by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of the product generated with H2O2 identified it as an isoporphyrin that, on quenching, decayed to benzoylbiliverdin. In the presence of H218O2, one labeled oxygen atom was incorporated into these products. The hHO-1-isoporphyrin complexes were found to have half-lives of 1.7 and 2.4 h for the p-trifluoromethyl- and p-methyl-substituted phenylhemes, respectively. The addition of NADPH-P450 reductase to the H2O2-generated hHO-1-isoporphyrin complex produced alpha-biliverdin, confirming its role as a reaction intermediate. Identification of an isoporphyrin intermediate in the catalytic sequence of hHO-1, the first such intermediate observed in hemoprotein catalysis, completes our understanding of the critical first step of heme oxidation.

  4. Mangiferin regulates cognitive deficits and heme oxygenase-1 induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanyan; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Chengjie; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Yi; Wu, Jian; Wen, Xiangru; Liang, Chen; Ma, Kai; Li, Lei; Zhang, Xunbao; Shao, Xiaoping; Sun, Yafeng; Du, Yang; Song, Yuanjian

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence reveals that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can induce neuroinflammation, ultimately leading to cognitive deficits. Mangiferin, a natural glucoxilxanthone, is known to possess various biological activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of mangiferin on LPS-induced cognitive deficits and explore the underlying mechanisms. Brain injury was induced in mice via intraperitoneal LPS injection (1mg/kg) for five consecutive days. Mangiferin was orally pretreatmented (50mg/kg) for seven days and then treatmented (50mg/kg) for five days after LPS injection. The Morris water maze was used to detect changes in cognitive function. Immunohistochemical and immunoblotting were respectively performed to measure the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the hippocampus. The results showed that mangiferin can ameliorate cognitive deficits. Moreover, mangiferin decreased LPS-induced IL-6 production and increase HO-1 in the hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that mangiferin attenuates LPS-induced cognitive deficits, which may be potentially linked to modulating HO-1 in the hippocampus.

  5. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellner, Lars; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; van Rooijen, Nico; Dunn, Michael W; Abraham, Nader G; Schwartzman, Michal L

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-2 deficiency impairs wound healing and exacerbates inflammation following injury. We examine the impact of HO-2 deficiency on macrophage function and the contribution of macrophage HO-2 to inflammatory and repair responses to injury. Corneal epithelial debridement was performed in control and macrophage-depleted HO-2(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice and in bone marrow chimeras. Peritoneal macrophages were collected for determination of phagocytic activity and classically activated macrophage (M1)-alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Depletion of macrophages delayed corneal healing (13.2%) and increased neutrophil infiltration (54.1%) by day 4 in WT mice, whereas in HO-2(-/-) mice, it did not worsen the already impaired wound healing and exacerbated inflammation. HO-2(-/-) macrophages displayed an altered M1 phenotype with no significant expression of M2 or M2-like activated cells and a 31.3% reduction in phagocytic capacity that was restored by inducing HO-1 activity or supplementing biliverdin. Macrophage depletion had no effect, whereas adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow improved wound healing (34% on day 4) but did not resolve the exaggerated inflammatory response in HO-2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that HO-2-deficient macrophages are dysfunctional and that macrophage HO-2 is required for proper macrophage function but is insufficient to correct the impaired healing of the HO-2(-/-) cornea, suggesting that corneal epithelial expression of HO-2 is a key to resolution and repair in wound healing.

  6. Unconjugated bilirubin mediates heme oxygenase-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Li; Tian, Xiao Yu; Liu, Limei; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhang, Yang; Han, Quan-Bin; Ho, Hing-Man; Wang, Nanping; Wong, Siu Ling; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Jun; Ng, Chi-Fai; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts vasoprotective effects. Such benefit in diabetic vasculopathy, however, remains unclear. We hypothesize that bilirubin mediates HO-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetes. Diabetic db/db mice were treated with hemin (HO-1 inducer) for 2 weeks, and aortas were isolated for functional and molecular assays. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured in cultured endothelial cells. Hemin treatment augmented endothelium-dependent relaxations (EDRs) and elevated Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in db/db mouse aortas, which were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor SnMP or HO-1 silencing virus. Hemin treatment increased serum bilirubin, and ex vivo bilirubin treatment improved relaxations in diabetic mouse aortas, which was reversed by the Akt inhibitor. Biliverdin reductase silencing virus attenuated the effect of hemin. Chronic bilirubin treatment improved EDRs in db/db mouse aortas. Hemin and bilirubin reversed high glucose-induced reductions in Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. The effect of hemin but not bilirubin was inhibited by biliverdin reductase silencing virus. Furthermore, bilirubin augmented EDRs in renal arteries from diabetic patients. In summary, HO-1-induced restoration of endothelial function in diabetic mice is most likely mediated by bilirubin, which preserves NO bioavailability through the Akt/eNOS/NO cascade, suggesting bilirubin as a potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention of diabetic vasculopathy.

  7. Renal Inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1 Increases Blood Pressure in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Csongradi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that renal medullary heme oxygenase (HO acts as a buffer against Ang-II dependent hypertension. To test this hypothesis, renal medullary HO activity was blocked using QC-13, an imidazole-dioxolane HO-1 inhibitor, or SnMP, a classical porphyrin based HO inhibitor. HO inhibitors were infused via IRMI catheters throughout the study starting 3 days prior to implantation of an osmotic minipump which delivered Ang II or saline vehicle. MAP was increased by Ang II infusion and further increased by IRMI infusion of QC-13 or SnMP. MAP averaged 113±3, 120±7, 141±2, 153±2, and 154±3 mmHg in vehicle, vehicle + IRMI QC-13, Ang II, Ang II + IRMI QC-13, and Ang II + IRMI SnMP treated mice, respectively (n=6. Inhibition of renal medullary HO activity with QC-13 in Ang II infused mice was also associated with a significant increase in superoxide production as well as significant decreases in antioxidant enzymes catalase and MnSOD. These results demonstrate that renal inhibition of HO exacerbates Ang II dependent hypertension through a mechanism which is associated with increases in superoxide production and decreases in antioxidant enzymes.

  8. Role of heme oxygenase in inflammation, insulin-signalling, diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are chronic conditions associated with elevated oxidative/inflammatory activities with a continuum of tissue insults leading to more severe cardiometabolic and renal complications including myocardial infarction and end-stage-renal damage. A common denominator of these chronic conditions is the enhanced the levels of cytokines like tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL-6), IL-1beta and resistin, which in turn activates the c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NF-kappaB pathways, creating a vicious cycle that exacerbates insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes and related complications. Emerging evidence indicates that heme oxygenase (HO) inducers are endowed with potent anti-diabetic and insulin sensitizing effects besides their ability to suppress immune/inflammatory response. Importantly, the HO system abates inflammation through several mechanisms including the suppression of macrophage-infiltration and abrogation of oxidative/inflammatory transcription factors like NF-kappaB, JNK and activating protein-1. This review highlights the mechanisms by which the HO system potentiates insulin signalling, with particular emphasis on HO-mediated suppression of oxidative and inflammatory insults. The HO system could be explored in the search for novel remedies against cardiometabolic diseases and their complications.

  9. Role of Heme Oxygenase in Inflammation, Insulin-Signalling, Diabetes and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Fomusi Ndisang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and obesity are chronic conditions associated with elevated oxidative/inflammatory activities with a continuum of tissue insults leading to more severe cardiometabolic and renal complications including myocardial infarction and end-stage-renal damage. A common denominator of these chronic conditions is the enhanced the levels of cytokines like tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6, IL-1β and resistin, which in turn activates the c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK and NF-κB pathways, creating a vicious cycle that exacerbates insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes and related complications. Emerging evidence indicates that heme oxygenase (HO inducers are endowed with potent anti-diabetic and insulin sensitizing effects besides their ability to suppress immune/inflammatory response. Importantly, the HO system abates inflammation through several mechanisms including the suppression of macrophage-infiltration and abrogation of oxidative/inflammatory transcription factors like NF-κB, JNK and activating protein-1. This review highlights the mechanisms by which the HO system potentiates insulin signalling, with particular emphasis on HO-mediated suppression of oxidative and inflammatory insults. The HO system could be explored in the search for novel remedies against cardiometabolic diseases and their complications.

  10. Protection of rat islet viability following heme oxygenase-1 gene transfection via adenoviral vector in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Chen; Yongxiang Li; Weiping Dong; Yang Jiao; Jianming Tan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene transfection on the viability of cultured rat islets, and to explore the potential value of HO-1 gene in islet transplantation. Methods:Recombinant adenovirus vector containing human HO-1 gene(Ad-HO-1 ) or enhanced green fluorescent protein gene(Ad-EGFP) was generated by using AdEasy system respectively.The rat islets were transfected with Ad-HO-1, Ad-EGFP or blank vector and then cultured for 7 days. Transfection was confirmed by expression of EGFP and human HO-1 protein detected by fluorescence photographs and western blot, respectively. The insulin release upon different concentration of glucose stimulation was detected using insulin radioimmunoassay kit, and stimulation index (SI) was calculated. Glucose-stimulated insulin release was usedto assess islet viability. Results:Adenovirus vector successfully transferred HO-1 gene to rat islet cells in vitro, and the insulin release upon high level of glucose stimulation and stimulation index(SI) of Ad-HO-1-infected islets were significantly higher than those of Ad-EGFP-infected islets and control islets(P < 0.05).Conclusion: Adenovirus-mediated HO-1 gene transfection is a feasible strategy to confer cytoprotection and therefore protect the viability of cultured rat islets.

  11. Deltamethrin inhibits osteoclast differentiation via regulation of heme oxygenase-1 and NFATc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakai, Eiko; Fumimoto, Reiko; Yamaguchi, Yu; Fukuma, Yutaka; Nishishita, Kazuhisa; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2012-09-01

    Deltamethrin is a widely used pyrethroid pesticide. Although the cytotoxicity of deltamethrin has been reported, especially in neuronal cells, there is no information concerning the effects of deltamethrin on osteoclasts (OCLs). In this study, we showed that deltamethrin inhibited OCL differentiation in vitro. The effects of deltamethrin on OCL differentiation by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) were investigated in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) or the murine monocytic cell line RAW-D. Treatment with deltamethrin inhibited OCL formation and bone resorption and up-regulated expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an anti-oxidative stress enzyme. Deltamethrin also decreased the protein levels of nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic-1 (NFATc1), which is a master regulator for OCL differentiation, and concomitantly reduced the expression levels of Src and cathepsin K, which are transcriptionally regulated by NFATc1. The effects of deltamethrin on intracellular signaling during the OCL differentiation of BMMs indicated that deltamethrin-treated OCLs displayed impaired phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Jun N-terminal kinase, and Akt, and slightly delayed phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B alpha (IκBα) compared with untreated OCLs. Thus, deltamethrin possibly affects bone metabolism by inhibiting OCL differentiation.

  12. Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 protects smooth muscle cells against oxidative injury and inhibits cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Bao Hui; Chen, Li; An, Wei

    2002-06-01

    To investigate whether the expression of exogenous heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene within vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) could protect the cells from free radical attack and inhibit cell proliferation, we established an in vitro transfection of human HO-1 gene into rat VSMC mediated by a retroviral vector. The results showed that the profound expression of HO-1 protein as well as HO activity was 1.8- and 2.0-fold increased respectively in the transfected cells compared to the non-transfected ones. The treatment of VSMC with different concentrations of H2O2 led to the remarkable cell damage as indicated by survival rate and LDH leakage. However, the resistance of the HO-1 transfected VSMC against H2O2 was significantly raised. This protective effect was dramatically diminished when the transfected VSMC were pretreated with ZnPP-IX, a specific inhibitor of HO, for 24 h. In addition, we found that the growth potential of the transfected cells was significantly inhibited directly by increased activity of HO-1, and this effect might be related to decreased phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that the overexpression of introduced hHO-1 is potentially able to reduce the risk factors of atherosclerosis, partially due to its cellular protection against oxidative injury and to its inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation.

  13. Effects of combined mesenchymal stem cells and heme oxygenase-1 therapy on cardiac performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Chen, Honglei; Zhu, Chengang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Lin, Guosheng; Cao, Feng

    2008-10-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to repair the infarcted myocardium and improve cardiac function. However, this approach is limited by its poor viability after transplantation, and controversy still exists over the mechanism by which MSCs contribute to the tissue repair. The human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) was transfected into cultured MSCs using an adenoviral vector. 1 x 10(6) Ad-hHO-1-transfected MSCs (HO-1-MSCs) or Ad-Null-transfected MSCs (Null-MSCs) or PBS only (PBS group) were injected intramyocardially into rat hearts 1h after myocardial infarction. HO-1-MSCs survived in the infarcted myocardium, and expressed hHO-1 mRNA. The expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was significantly enhanced in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts. At the same time, there were significant reduction of TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta and IL-6 mRNA, and marked increase of IL-10 mRNA in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts. Moreover, a further downregulation of proapoptotic protein, Bax, and a marked increase in microvessel density were observed in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts. The infarct size and cardiac performance were also significantly improved in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts. The combined approach improves MSCs survival and is superior to MSCs injection alone.

  14. Overexpressed human heme Oxygenase-1 decreases adipogenesis in pigs and porcine adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-11-27

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC) are multipotent, which means they are able to differentiate into several lineages in vivo and in vitro under proper conditions. This indicates it is possible to determine the direction of differentiation of ADSC by controlling the microenvironment. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a type of antioxidant enzyme, attenuates adipogenicity and obesity. We produced transgenic pigs overexpressing human HO-1 (hHO-1-Tg), and found that these animals have little fatty tissue when autopsied. To determine whether overexpressed human HO-1 suppresses adipogenesis in pigs, we analyzed body weight increases of hHO-1-Tg pigs and wild type (WT) pigs of the same strain, and induced adipogenic differentiation of ADSC derived from WT and hHO-1-Tg pigs. The hHO-1-Tg pigs had lower body weights than WT pigs from 16 weeks of age until they died. In addition, hHO-1-Tg ADSC showed reduced adipogenic differentiation and expression of adipogenic molecular markers such as PPARγ and C/EBPα compared to WT ADSC. These results suggest that HO-1 overexpression reduces adipogenesis both in vivo and in vitro, which could support identification of therapeutic targets of obesity and related metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heme Oxygenase Contributes to Alleviate Salinity Damage in Glycine max L. Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Giannina Zilli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are frequently subjected to different kinds of stress, such as salinity and, like other organisms, they have evolved strategies for preventing and repairing cellular damage caused by salt stress. Glycine max L. plants were subjected to different NaCl concentrations (0–200 mM for 10 days. Treatments with 100 and 200 mM NaCl induced ion leakage and lipid peroxidation augmentation, loss in chlorophyll content, and accumulation of O2•- and H2O2. However, 50 mM NaCl did not modify these parameters, which remains similar to control values. Catalase, superoxide dismutase, and heme oxygenase (HO-1 activities and gene expressions were increased under 100 mM NaCl, while no differences were observed with respect to controls under 50 mM salt. Treatment with 200 mM NaCl caused a diminution in the enzyme activities and gene expressions. Results here reported let us conclude that HO also plays a leading role in the defense mechanisms against salinity.

  16. Sexual Dimorphism of Cardiovascular Ischemia Susceptibility Is Mediated by Heme Oxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anikó Pósa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the gender differences in heme-oxygenase (HO enzyme, which produces endogenous vascular protective carbon monoxide (CO. We studied (1 the activity and expression of HO enzymes in the left ventricle (LV and aorta, (2 basal increase in basal blood pressure provoked by arginine vasopressine (AVP in vivo, (3 the heart perfusion induced by AVP, (4 the ST segment depression provoked by adrenaline and 30 seconds later phentolamine, and (5 the aorta ring contraction induced by AVP in female and male Wistar rats. We found that HO activity and the expression of HO-1 and HO-2 were increased in female rat aorta and LV. We demonstrated that the basal blood pressure and administration of AVP provoked blood pressure response are increased in the males; the female myocardium was less sensitive towards angina. Both differences could be aggravated by the inhibition of HO. The aorta rings were more susceptible towards vasoconstriction by AVP in males; isolated heart perfusion decrease was higher in males. The HO inhibition aggravated the heart perfusion in both sexes. In conclusion, the increased HO activity and expression in females might play a role in the sexual dimorphism of cardiovascular ischemia susceptibility during the reproductive age.

  17. Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 protects smooth muscle cells against oxidative injury and inhibits cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To investigate whether the expression of exogenous heme oxygenase-1 (HO-l) gene within vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) could protect the cells from free radical attack and inhibit cell proliferation,we established an in vitro transfection of human HO-1 gene into rat VSMC mediated by a retroviral vector.The results showed that the profound expression of HO-1 protein as well as HO activity was 1.8- and 2.0-fold increased respectively in the transfected cells compared to the non-transfected ones. The treatment of VSMC with different concentrations of H2O2 led to the remarkable cell damage as indicated by survival rate and LDH leakage. However, the resistance of the HO-1 transfected VSMC against H2O2 was significantly raised. This protective effect was dramatically diminished when the transfected VSMC were pretreated with ZnPP-IX, a specific inhibitor of HO, for 24 h. In addition, we found that the growth potential of the transfected cells was significantly inhibited directly by increased activity of HO-l, and this effect might be related to decreased phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that the overexpression of introduced hHO-1 is potentially able to reduce the risk factors of atherosclerosis, partially due to its cellular protection against oxidative injury and to its inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation.

  18. The role of heme oxygenase-1 in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akitaka; Mori, Masaaki; Naruto, Takuya; Nakajima, Shoko; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2009-01-01

    We have determined the serum levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in 56 patients with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA) and compared these with serum HO-1 levels in healthy controls and patients with other pediatric rheumatic diseases. Serum HO-1 levels were measured by the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean serum HO-1 level in s-JIA patients during the active phase was 123.6 +/- 13.83 ng/ml, which was significantly higher than that in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (p-JIA), Kawasaki disease, systemic lupus erythematosus or mixed connective tissue disease (P < 0.0005). The serum levels of HO-1, cytokines and cytokine receptors in patients with s-JIA were also assessed at both the active and inactive phases. The serum HO-1 level in patients with s-JIA in the active phase was found to be significantly greater than that in patients with the disease in the inactive phase (P < 0.0001). An assessment of the relationships between serum HO-1 levels and other laboratory parameters or cytokines in patients with s-JIA did not reveal any strong correlations. These results suggest that the serum level of HO-1 may be a useful marker for the differential diagnosis of s-JIA. Further study will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism of HO-1 production and to clarify the role of HO-1 in the disease process.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 overexpression increases liver injury after bile duct ligation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Froh; Ronald G Thurman; Lars Conzelmann; Peter Walbrun; Susanne Netter; Reiner Wiest; Michael D Wheeler; Mark Lehnert; Takehiko Uesugi; Jurgen Scholmerich

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) against oxidant-induced injury caused by bile duct ligation (BDL).METHODS: Either cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a HO-1 inducer, or saline were injected intraperitoneally in male SD-rats. Three days later, BDL or sham-operations were performed. Rats were sacrificed 3 wk after BDL and livers were harvested for histology. Fibrosis was evaluated by sirius red staining and image analysis.Alpha-smooth muscular actin, which indicates activation of stellate cells, was detected by immunohistochemical staining, and cytokine and collagen- Ⅰα (Col- Ⅰα) mRNA expression was detected using RNase protection assays.RESULTS: Serum alanine transaminase increased 8-fold above normal levels one day after BDL. Surprisingly,enzyme release was not reduced in rats receiving CoPP.Liver fibrosis was evaluated 3 wk after BDL and the sirius red-positive area was found to be increased to about 7.8%. However, in CoPP pretreated rats sirius redpositive areas were increased to about 11.7% after BDL.Collagen- Ⅰα and TGF-β mRNA increased significantly by BDL. Again, this effect was increased by HO-1overexpression.CONCLUSION: Hepatic fibrosis due to BDL is not reduced by the HO-1 inducer CoPP. In contrast, HO-1overexpression increases liver injury in rats under conditions of experimental chronic cholestasis.

  20. Protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 on lung injury induced by erythrocyte instillation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Qing-feng; ZHOU Qiao-mei; ZENG Si; DOU Li-dong; JI Yong; ZENG Yin-ming

    2008-01-01

    Background Intratracheal instillation of blood induces self-repaired acute lung injury.However,the mechanism of repair has been unclear.Heme-oxygenase (HO)-1,which catalyzes heine breakdown,acts as an inducible defense against oxidative stress and plays an important role in inflammation.The objective of this study was to test the role of HO-1 in lung injury caused by intratracheal instillation of red cells.Methods Forty healthy,male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups:normal group,saline group,erythrocyte group,erythrocyte+zinc-protoporphyrin (ZnPP,HO-1 inhibitor) group and saline+ZnPP group.At 2 days after intratracheal instillation of red cells,lung tissues and lavage samples were isolated for biochemical determinations and histological measurements.Results Histological analysis revealed that administration of ZnPP worsened the acute lung injury induced by instilled erythrocytes.HO-1 was over-expressed in the erythrocyte group and in the erythrocyte+ZnPP group.Compared with the erythrocyte+ZnPP group,the levels of total protein,lactate dehydrogenase and tumor necrosis factor-α in the lavage were lower (P<0.01),while the level of interleukin-10 was higher in the erythrocyte group (P<0.01).Conclusion HO-1 protects against erythrocyte-induced inflammatory injury in lung.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter microsatellite polymorphism is associated with progressive atherosclerosis and incident cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlaner, Raimund; Willeit, Peter; Summerer, Monika; Santer, Peter; Egger, Georg; Kronenberg, Florian; Demetz, Egon; Weiss, Günter; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Witztum, Joseph L.; Willeit, Karin; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Haun, Margot; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Peters, Annette; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts cytoprotective effects in response to various cellular stressors. A variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter region has previously been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined this association prospectively in the general population. Approach and Results Incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death was registered between 1995 and 2010 in 812 participants of the Bruneck Study aged 45 to 84 years (49.4% males). Carotid atherosclerosis progression was quantified by high-resolution ultrasound. HO-1 VNTR length was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Subjects with ≥32 tandem repeats on both HO-1 alleles compared to the rest of the population (recessive trait) featured substantially increased CVD risk (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 5.45 (2.39, 12.42); PSAPHIR, and KORA prospective studies (HR [95% CI], 3.26 [1.50, 7.33]; P=0.0043). Conclusions This study found a strong association between the HO-1 VNTR polymorphism and CVD risk confined to subjects with a high number of repeats on both HO-1 alleles, and provides evidence for accelerated atherogenesis and decreased anti-oxidant defence in this vascular high-risk group. PMID:25359861

  2. Heme oxygenase-1-derived bilirubin protects endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meihua; Nitti, Mariapaola; Piras, Sabrina; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Traverso, Nicola; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Mann, Giovanni E

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia and diabetes are associated with endothelial cell dysfunction arising from enhanced oxidative injury, leading to the progression of diabetic vascular pathologies. The redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of antioxidant genes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), involved in cellular defenses against oxidative stress. We have investigated the pathways involved in high glucose-induced activation of HO-1 in endothelial cells and examined the molecular mechanisms underlying cytoprotection. Elevated d-glucose increased intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and HO-1 expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells, with no changes in cell viability. Superoxide scavenging and inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) abrogated upregulation of HO-1 expression by elevated glucose. Inhibition of HO-1 increased the sensitivity of endothelial cells to high glucose-mediated damage, while addition of bilirubin restored cell viability. Our findings establish that exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose leads to activation of endogenous antioxidant defense genes via the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Upregulation of HO-1 provides cytoprotection against high glucose-induced oxidative stress through the antioxidant properties of bilirubin. Modulation of the Nrf2 pathway in the early stages of diabetes may thus protect against sustained damage by hyperglycemia during progression of the disease.

  3. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression by dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA) through the AMPK–Nrf2 dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junghun; Kim, Sunyoung, E-mail: sunyoung@snu.ac.kr

    2014-11-15

    Oxidative stress is induced by the accumulation of free radicals, resulting in an imbalanced cellular redox state, which has been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA), a lignan compound isolated from Cucurbita moschata, has previously been reported to contain anti-adipogenic and anti-lipogenic effects on 3T3-L1 cells and primary MEFs (Abraham and Kappas, 2008). In this study, it was tested whether DHCA could affect the expression of HO-1, using Raw264.7 mouse macrophage cell line. DHCA increased the protein and RNA levels of HO-1 and upregulated its promoter activity. Data from transient transfection assays indicated that ARE located in the E1 region of the HO-1 promoter are important in this DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1 expression. DHCA was also shown to enhance the nuclear translocation and binding of Nrf2 to the respective DNA sequences. The upregulation of HO-1 expression by DHCA was also observed in primary macrophages derived from wild type animals, but not in those from Nrf2 KO mice. Effects of DHCA on HO-1 and Nrf2 were reduced when cells were treated with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C, but not by PI3K/Akt or MAPK inhibitors. Data from an experiment using a specific siRNA or chemical inhibitor for HO-1 suggested that the DHCA-mediated induction of the HO-1 protein could suppress the LPS-stimulated production of NO. Taken together, our data suggest that DHCA induces the expression of HO-1 by controlling its promoter activity through the AMPK–Nrf2 pathway, eventually leading to the reduction of NO production, and may thus have potential as an effective antioxidant. - Highlights: • Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DHCA) induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. • The AMPK–Nrf2 pathway is critically involved in the DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1. • DHCA increased the expression of HO-1, Gclc and Gclm in primary macrophages. • DHCA-mediated induction of HO-1 contributed to the suppression of NO production.

  4. Reduced caveolin-1 promotes hyper-inflammation due to abnormal heme oxygenase-1 localizationin LPS challenged macrophages with dysfunctional CFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping-Xia; Murray, Thomas S.; Villella, Valeria Rachela; Ferrari, Eleonora; Esposito, Speranza; D'Souza, Anthony; Raia, Valeria; Maiuri, Luigi; Krause, Diane S.; Egan, Marie E.; Bruscia, Emanuela M.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that TLR4 signaling is increased in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -stimulated Cystic Fibrosis (CF) macrophages (MΦs), contributing to the robust production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The heme oxygenase (HO-1)/carbon monoxide (CO) pathway modulates cellular redox status, inflammatory responses, and cell survival. The HO-1 enzyme, together with the scaffold protein caveolin 1 (CAV-1), also acts as a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling in MΦs. Here, we demonstrate that in LPS-challenged CF MΦs, HO-1 does not compartmentalize normally to the cell surface and instead accumulates intracellularly. The abnormal HO-1 localization in CF MΦs in response to LPS is due to decreased CAV-1 expression, which is controlled by the cellular oxidative state, and is required for HO-1 delivery to the cell surface. Overexpression of HO-1 or stimulating the pathway with CO-releasing molecules (CORM2)enhancesCAV-1 expression in CF MΦs, suggesting a positive-feed forward loop between HO-1/CO induction and CAV-1 expression. These manipulations reestablished HO-1 and CAV-1 cell surface localization in CF MΦ's. Consistent with restoration of HO-1/CAV-1 negative regulation of TLR4 signaling, genetic or pharmacological (CORM2)-induced enhancement of this pathway decreased the inflammatory response of CF MΦs and CF mice treated with LPS. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the counter-regulatory HO-1/CO pathway, which is critical in balancing and limiting the inflammatory response, is defective in CF MΦs through a CAV-1-dependent mechanism, exacerbating the CF MΦ's response to LPS. This pathway could be a potential target for therapeutic intervention for CF lung disease. PMID:23606537

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression in prostate cancer cells modulates the oxidative response in bone cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Ferrando

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of death among males. It is currently estimated that inflammatory responses are linked to 15-20% of all deaths from cancer worldwide. PCa is dominated by complications arising from metastasis to the bone where the tumor cells interact with the bone microenvironment impairing the balance between bone formation and degradation. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is not completely understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 counteracts oxidative damage and inflammation. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that HO-1 is implicated in PCa, demonstrating that endogenous HO-1 inhibits bone derived-prostate cancer cells proliferation, invasion and migration and decreases tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. The aim of this work was to analyze the impact of HO-1 modulated PCa cells on osteoblasts proliferation in vitro and on bone remodeling in vivo. Using a co-culture system of PC3 cells with primary mice osteoblasts (PMOs, we demonstrated that HO-1 pharmacological induction (hemin treatment abrogated the diminution of PMOs proliferation induced by PCa cells and decreased the expression of osteoclast-modulating factors in osteoblasts. No changes were detected in the expression of genes involved in osteoblasts differentiation. However, co-culture of hemin pre-treated PC3 cells (PC3 Hem with PMOs provoked an oxidative status and activated FoxO signaling in osteoblasts. The percentage of active osteoblasts positive for HO-1 increased in calvarias explants co-cultured with PC3 Hem cells. Nuclear HO-1 expression was detected in tumors generated by in vivo bone injection of HO-1 stable transfected PC3 (PC3HO-1 cells in the femur of SCID mice. These results suggest that HO-1 has the potential to modify the bone microenvironment impacting on PCa bone metastasis.

  6. Selegiline increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and the cytotoxicity produced by dopamine treatment of neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieder C.R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased dopamine catabolism may be associated with oxidative stress and neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of dopamine on the expression of heme oxygenase-1 and -2 (HO-1 and HO-2 in human neuroblastomas (SK-N-SH cell line and the effects of selegiline and antioxidants on this expression. Cells were kept with close control of pH and were incubated with varying concentrations of dopamine (0.1-100 µM for 24 h. HO-1 and HO-2 cDNA probes were prepared by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification. The mRNA expression of HO-1 and HO-2 was measured by Northern blot analysis. The levels of HO-1 mRNA increased after dopamine treatment, in a dose-dependent manner, in all cell lines studied, whereas levels of the two HO-2 transcripts did not. The HO-1 and HO-2 protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting. HO-1 protein was undetectable in untreated SK-N-SH cells and increased after treatment with dopamine. In contrast, the HO-2 protein (36 kDa was detected in untreated cells and the levels did not change as a result of treatment. alpha-Tocopherol (10-100 µM and ascorbic acid (100 µM did not attenuate the effects of dopamine. Selegiline (10 µM produced significant increase (P < 0.01 in the induction of HO-1 by dopamine (more than six times the control values. The increased expression of HO-1 following dopamine treatment indicates that dopamine produces oxidative stress in this cell line.

  7. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 on pulmonary function and structure in rats with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shi-bin; Duan, Zhi-jun; Li, Qing; Sun, Xiao-yu

    2011-03-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe vascular complication in lungs resulting in systemic hypoxemia in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. The underlying structural change in HPS is intrapulmonary vasodilation, which can lead to impaired oxygenation of pulmonary venous blood. It has been demonstrated that the heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide (HO-1/CO) system plays an important role in the control of vascular tone. The aim of this study was to further investigate the role of HO-1 in the pathogenesis of HPS in animal model. Totally 35 rats were divided into liver cirrhosis, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and sham groups. Biliary cirrhosis was established in the first three groups by bile duct ligation. Rats in the ZnPP and CoPP groups received once intraperitoneal injection of ZnPP and CoPP, respectively, 24 hours before sample collection. Expression of HO-1 mRNA in lung was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, while protein expression was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of liver cirrhosis and intrapulmonary vasodilation. Arterial blood gases, mean arterial pressure and portal vein pressure were also measured. Analysis of variance or Wilcoxon statistical methods were used to determine statistical significance. Compared with the sham group, the cirrhotic group demonstrated increased expression of pulmonary HO-1 mRNA and protein (P oxygen gradient (A-aPO2), mean arterial pressure, portal vein pressure (P portal vein pressure. Increased pulmonary HO-1 expression is an important contributor to the development of experimental HPS.

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 upregulation modulates tone and fibroelastic properties of internal anal sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Rattan, Satish

    2014-09-15

    A compromise in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) tone and fibroelastic properties (FEP) plays an important role in rectoanal incontinence. Herein, we examined the effects of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 upregulation on these IAS characteristics in young rats. We determined the effect of HO-1 upregulator hemin on HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions and on basal IAS tone and its FEP before and after HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX. For FEP, we determined the kinetics of the IAS smooth muscle responses, by the velocities of relaxation, and recovery of the IAS tone following 0 Ca(2+) and electrical field stimulation. To characterize the underlying signal transduction for these changes, we determined the effects of hemin on RhoA-associated kinase (RhoA)/Rho kinase (ROCK) II, myosin-binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase 1, fibronectin, and elastin expression levels. Hemin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein similar to the increases in the basal tone, and in the FEP of the IAS. Underlying mechanisms in the IAS characteristics are associated with increases in the genetic and translational expressions of RhoA/ROCKII, and elastin. Fibronectin expression levels on the other hand were found to be decreased following HO-1 upregulation. The results of our study show that the hemin/HO-1 system regulates the tone and FEP of IAS. The hemin/HO-1 system thus provides a potential target for the development of new interventions aimed at treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders, specifically the age-related IAS dysfunction.

  9. Nitric oxide synthase and heme oxygenase expressions in human liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beatrice J Goh; Bee Tee Tan; Wei Min Hon; Kang Hoe Lee; Hoon Eng Khoo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Portal hypertension is a common complication of liver cirrhosis. Intrahepatic pressure can be elevated in several ways. Abnormal architecture affecting the vasculature, an increase in vasoconstrictors and increased circulation from the splanchnic viscera into the portal system may all contribute. It follows that endogenous vasodilators may be able to alleviate the hypertension. We therefore aimed to investigate the levels of endogenous vasodilators, nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) through the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and heme oxygenase (HO).METHOD: Cirrhotic (n= 20) and non-cirrhotic (n = 20) livers were obtained from patients who had undergone surgery. The mRNA and protein expressions of the various isoforms of NOS and HO were examined using competitive PCR, Western Blot and immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: There was no significant change in either inducible NOS (iNOS) or neuronal NOS (nNOS) expressions while endothelial NOS (eNOS) was upregulated in cirrhotic livers. Concomitantly, caveolin-1, an established down-regulator of eNOS, was up-regulated.Inducible HO-1 and constitutive HO-2 were found to show increased expression in cirrhotic livers albeit in different localizations.CONCLUSION: The differences of NOS expression might be due to their differing roles in maintaining liver homeostasis and/or involvement in the pathology of cirrhosis. Sheer stress within the hypertensive liver may induce increased expression of eNOS. In turn, caveolin-1 is also increased. Whether this serves as a defense mechanism against further cirrhosis or is a consequence of cirrhosis, is yet unknown. The elevated expression of HO-1 and HO-2 suggest that CO may compensate in its role as a vasodilator albeit weakly. It is possible that CO and NO have parallel or coordinated functions within the liver and may work antagonistically in the pathophysiology of portal hypertension.

  10. Comparative transcriptional and translational analysis of heme oxygenase expression in response to sulfur mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent which reacts with nucleophilic groups on DNA, RNA and proteins. It is capable of inducing cellular toxicity and oxidative stress via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The accumulation of high amounts of the reactive species causes harmful effects such as DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, inflammation and apoptosis. Although SM (also known as mustard gas) and its derivatives are rapidly removed from the body, long-term damages are much more serious than the short-term effects and may be correlated with the subsequent changes occurred on the genome. In order to defend against oxidative properties of this toxic molecule, cells trigger several anti-oxidant pathways through up-regulating the corresponding genes. Enzymes like heme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase are the examples of such genes. These enzymes produce anti-oxidant substances that are able to scavenge the reactive species, alleviate their noxious effects and protect the cells. Following SM gas exposure, gene transcription (mRNA levels) of these enzymes are ramped up to help detoxify the cells. Yet, some studies have reported that the up-regulated transcription does not necessarily translate into higher protein expression levels. The exact reason why this phenomenon happens is not clear. Creation of mutations in the genome sequence may lead to protein structure changes. Phosphorylation or other post-translational alterations of proteins upon SM exposure are also considered as possible causes. In addition, alterations in some microRNAs responsible for regulating post-translation events may inhibit the expression of the anti-oxidant proteins in the poisoned cells at translational level.

  11. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Renal Interstitial Inflammation and Fibrosis Induced by Unilateral Ureter Obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    Full Text Available Renal fibrosis plays an important role in the onset and progression of chronic kidney diseases. Many studies have demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is involved in diverse biological processes as a cytoprotective molecule, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory effects. However, the mechanisms of HO-1 prevention in renal interstitial fibrosis remain unknown. In this study, HO-1 transgenic (TG mice were employed to investigate the effect of HO-1 on renal fibrosis using a unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO model and to explore the potential mechanisms. We found that HO-1 was adaptively upregulated in kidneys of both TG and wild type (WT mice after UUO. The levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein were increased in TG mice compared with WT mice under normal conditions. HO-1 expression was further enhanced after UUO and remained high during the entire experimental process. Renal interstitial fibrosis in the TG group was significantly attenuated compared with that in the WT group after UUO. Moreover, overexpression of HO-1 inhibited the loss of peritubular capillaries. In addition, UUO-induced activation and proliferation of myofibroblasts were suppressed by HO-1 overexpression. Furthermore, HO-1 restrained tubulointerstitial infiltration of macrophages and regulated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in UUO mice. We also found that high expression of HO-1 inhibited reactivation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which could play a crucial role in attenuating renal fibrosis. In conclusion, these data suggest that HO-1 prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis possibly by regulating the inflammatory response and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. This study provides evidence that augmentation of HO-1 levels may be a therapeutic strategy against renal interstitial fibrosis.

  12. Inhibition of effector antigen-specific T cells by intradermal administration of heme oxygenase-1 inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Thomas; Pogu, Julien; Rémy, Séverine; Brau, Frédéric; Pogu, Sylvie; Maquigneau, Maud; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Poirier, Nicolas; Vanhove, Bernard; Blancho, Gilles; Piaggio, Eliane; Anegon, Ignacio; Blancou, Philippe

    2017-03-22

    Developing protocols aimed at inhibiting effector T cells would be key for the treatment of T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases including type 1 autoimmune diabetes (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS). While heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inducers are clinically approved drugs for non-immune-related diseases, they do have immunosuppressive properties when administered systemically in rodents. Here we show that HO-1 inducers inhibit antigen-specific effector T cells when injected intradermally together with the T cell cognate antigens in mice. This phenomenon was observed in both a CD8(+) T cell-mediated model of T1D and in a CD4(+) T cell-dependent MS model. Intradermal injection of HO-1 inducers induced the recruitment of HO-1(+) monocyte-derived dendritic cell (MoDCs) exclusively to the lymph nodes (LN) draining the site of intradermal injection. After encountering HO-1(+)MoDCs, effector T-cells exhibited a lower velocity and a reduced ability to migrate towards chemokine gradients resulting in impaired accumulation to the inflamed organ. Intradermal co-injection of a clinically approved HO-1 inducer and a specific antigen to non-human primates also induced HO-1(+) MoDCs to accumulate in dermal draining LN and to suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity. Therefore, in both mice and non-human primates, HO-1 inducers delivered locally inhibited effector T-cells in an antigen-specific manner, paving the way for repositioning these drugs for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases.

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the progression of K/BxN serum transfer arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Brines

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is induced in many cell types as a defense mechanism against stress. We have investigated the possible role of endogenous HO-1 in the effector phase of arthritis using the K/BxN serum transfer model of arthritis in HO-1 heterozygous and homozygous knock-out mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arthritis was induced in C57/Black-6 xFVB (HO-1(+/+, HO-1(+/- and HO-1(-/- mice by intraperitoneal injection of 150 µl serum from arthritic K/BxN mice at days 0 and 2. Blood was collected and animals were sacrificed at day 10. Histological analysis was performed in ankle sections. The levels of inflammatory mediators were measured in serum and paw homogenates by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Multiplex technology. The incidence of arthritis was higher in HO-1(+/- and HO-1(-/- groups compared with HO-1(+/+. The inflammatory response was aggravated in HO-1(+/- mice as shown by arthritic score and the migration of inflammatory cells that could be related to the enhancement of CXCL-1 production. In addition, the HO-1(+/- group showed proteoglycan depletion significantly higher than HO-1(+/+ mice. Serum levels of matrix metalloproteinase-3, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 were increased in arthritic HO-1(-/- mice, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor and some cytokines such as interferon-γ showed a reduction compared to HO-1(+/+ or HO-1(+/- mice. In addition, down-regulated gene expression of ferritin, glutathione S-reductase A1 and superoxide dismutase-2 was observed in the livers of arthritic HO-1(+/- animals. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous HO-1 regulates the production of systemic and local inflammatory mediators and plays a protective role in K/BxN serum transfer arthritis.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 protects endothelial cells from the toxicity of air pollutant chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Akeem O; Zhang, Min; Dittmar, Michael; Lulla, Aaron; Araujo, Jesus A

    2015-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are a major component of diesel emissions, responsible for a large portion of their toxicity. In this study, we examined the toxic effects of DEPs on endothelial cells and the role of DEP-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) were treated with an organic extract of DEPs from an automobile engine (A-DEP) or a forklift engine (F-DEP) for 1 and 4h. ROS generation, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, expression of HO-1, inflammatory genes, cell adhesion molecules and unfolded protein respone (UPR) gene were assessed. HO-1 expression and/or activity were inhibited by siRNA or tin protoporphyrin (Sn PPIX) and enhanced by an expression plasmid or cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPPIX). Exposure to 25μg/ml of A-DEP and F-DEP significantly induced ROS production, cellular toxicity and greater levels of inflammatory and cellular adhesion molecules but to a different degree. Inhibition of HO-1 enzymatic activity with SnPPIX and silencing of the HO-1 gene by siRNA enhanced DEP-induced ROS production, further decreased cell viability and increased expression of inflammatory and cell adhesion molecules. On the other hand, overexpression of the HO-1 gene by a pcDNA 3.1D/V5-HO-1 plasmid significantly mitigated ROS production, increased cell survival and decreased the expression of inflammatory genes. HO-1 expression protected HMECs from DEP-induced prooxidative and proinflammatory effects. Modulation of HO-1 expression could potentially serve as a therapeutic target in an attempt to inhibit the cardiovascular effects of ambient PM.

  15. Reduction of bilirubin by targeting human heme oxygenase-1 through siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhen-Wei; Li, Chun-E; Jin, You-Xin; Shi, Yi; Xu, Li-Qing; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Li, Yun-Zhu; Yu, Shan-Chang; Zhang, Zi-Li

    2007-04-01

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical condition caused mainly by the increased production and decreased excretion of bilirubin. Current treatment is aimed at reducing the serum levels of bilirubin. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme that generates bilirubin. In this study we intended to suppress HO-1 using the RNA interference technique. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-A, -B, and -C were designed based on human HO-1 (hHO-1) mRNA sequences. siRNA was transfected into a human hepatic cell line (HL-7702). hHO-1 transcription and protein levels were then determined. In addition, the inhibitory effect of siRNA on hHO-1 was assessed in cells treated with hemin or transfected with an hHO-1 plasmid. siRNA-C showed the most potent suppressive effect on hHO-1. This inhibition is dose and time dependent. Compared with control, both hemin and hHO-1 plasmids up-regulated hHO-1 expression in HL-7702 cells. However, the up-regulation was significantly attenuated by siRNA-C. Furthermore, the decrease in hHO-1 activity was coincident with the suppression of its transcription. Finally, siRNA-C was shown to reduce hHO-1 enzymatic activity and bilirubin levels. Thus, this study provides a novel therapeutic rationale by blocking bilirubin formation via siRNA for preventing and treating neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin encephalopathy at an early clinical stage.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits postmyocardial infarct remodeling and restores ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Pachori, Alok S; Ward, Christopher A; Davis, J Paul; Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Kong, Deling; Zhang, Lunan; Murduck, Jared; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Perrella, Mark A; Pratt, Richard E; Dzau, Victor J; Melo, Luis G

    2006-02-01

    We reported previously that predelivery of the anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) to the heart by adeno associated virus (AAV) markedly reduces injury after acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, the effect of HO-1 gene delivery on postinfarction recovery has not been investigated. In the current study, we assessed the effect of HO-1 gene delivery on post-MI left ventricle (LV) remodeling and function using echocardiographic imaging and histomorphometric approaches. Two groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 4 x 10(11) particles of AAV-LacZ (control) or AAV-hHO-1 in the LV wall. Eight wk after gene transfer, the animals were subjected to 30 min of ischemia by ligation of left anterior descending artery (LAD) followed by reperfusion. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained in a blinded fashion prior and at 1.5 and 3 months after I/R. Ejection fraction (EF) was reduced by 13% and 40% in the HO-1 and LacZ groups, respectively at 1.5 months after MI. Three months after MI, EF recovered fully in the HO-1, but only partially in the LacZ-treated animals. Post-MI LV dimensions were markedly increased and the anterior wall was markedly thinned in the LacZ-treated animals compared with the HO-1-treated animals. Significant myocardial scarring and fibrosis were observed in the LacZ-group in association with elevated levels of interstitial collagen I and III and MMP-2 activity. Post-MI myofibroblast accumulation was reduced in the HO-1-treated animals, and retroviral overexpression of HO-1 reduced proliferation of isolated cardiac fibroblasts. Our data indicate that rAAV-HO-1 gene transfer markedly reduces fibrosis and ventricular remodeling and restores LV function and chamber dimensions after myocardial infarction.

  17. Protection from ischemic heart injury by a vigilant heme oxygenase-1 plasmid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao Liang; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Y Clare; Qian, Keping; Shen, Leping; Phillips, M Ian

    2004-04-01

    Although human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) could provide a useful approach for cellular protection in the ischemic heart, constitutive overexpression of hHO-1 may lead to unwanted side effects. To avoid this, we designed a hypoxia-regulated hHO-1 gene therapy system that can be switched on and off. This vigilant plasmid system is composed of myosin light chain-2v promoter and a gene switch that is based on an oxygen-dependent degradation domain from the hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha. The vector can sense ischemia and switch on the hHO-1 gene system, specifically in the heart. In an in vivo experiment, the vigilant hHO-1 plasmid or saline was injected intramyocardially into myocardial infarction mice or sham operation mice. After gene transfer, expression of hHO-1 was only detected in the ischemic heart treated with vigilant hHO-1 plasmids. Masson trichrome staining showed significantly fewer fibrotic areas in vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice compared with saline control (43.0%+/-4.8% versus 62.5%+/-3.3%, PhHO-1 expression in peri-infarct border areas, concomitant with higher Bcl-2 levels and lower Bax, Bak, and caspase 3 levels in the ischemic myocardium compared with saline control. By use of a cardiac catheter, heart from vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice showed improved recovery of contractile and diastolic performance after myocardial infarction compared with saline control. This study documents the beneficial regulation and therapeutic potential of vigilant plasmid-mediated hHO-1 gene transfer. This novel gene transfer strategy can provide cardiac-specific protection from future repeated bouts of ischemic injury.

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Mediates Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Coxsackievirus B3-Induced Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana N. Ursu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, which is suggested to play a role in defending the organism against oxidative stress-mediated injuries, can be induced by diverse factors including viruses and iron. As coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3-infected SWR/J mice susceptible for chronic myocarditis were found to have a significant iron incorporation and HO-1 upregulation in the myocardium, we aimed to investigate the molecular interplay between HO-1 expression and iron homeostasis in the outcome of viral myocarditis. Methods and Results: In susceptible SWR/J mice, but not in resistant C57BL/6 mice, we observed at later stages of CVB3 myocarditis significant iron deposits in macrophages and also in cardiomyocytes, which were spatially associated with oxidative stress, upregulation of HO-1 and caspase-3 activation. HO-1, which is also expressed in cultivated RAW 264.7 macrophages upon incubation with iron and/or CVB3, could be downregulated by inhibition of NO/iNOS using L-NAME. Moreover, specific inhibition of HO-1 by tin mesoporphyrin revealed a suppression of superoxide production in iron and/or CVB3-treated macrophages. The molecular relationship of HO-1 and caspase-3 activation was proven by downregulation with HO-1 siRNA in iron- and/or CVB3-treated cultivated cells. Importantly, iron was found to increase viral replication in vitro. Conclusion: These results indicate that HO-1 induces a paracrine signalling in macrophages via reactive oxygen species production, mediating apoptosis of heart muscle cells at later stages of myocarditis. Notably, in genetically susceptible mice iron potentiates the detrimental effects of CVB3 by the NO/HO-1 pathway, thus increasing cardiac pathogenicity.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 modulates degeneration of the intervertebral disc after puncture in Bach 1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Ryo; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Kamei, Naosuke; Nakamae, Toshio; Izumi, Bunichiro; Fujioka, Yuki; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2012-09-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration is considered to be a major feature of low back pain. Furthermore, oxidative stress has been shown to be an important factor in degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis and is considered a cause of intervertebral disc degeneration. The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between oxidative stress and intervertebral disc degeneration using Broad complex-Tramtrack-Bric-a-brac and cap'n'collar homology 1 deficient (Bach 1-/-) mice which highly express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 protects cells from oxidative stress. Caudal discs of 12-week-old and 1-year-old mice were evaluated as age-related models. Each group and period, 5 mice (a total of 20 mice, a total of 20 discs) were evaluated as age-related model. C9-C10 caudal discs in 12-week-old Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice were punctured using a 29-gauge needle as annulus puncture model. Each group and period, 5 mice (a total of 60 mice, a total of 60 discs) were evaluated. The progress of disc degeneration was evaluated at pre-puncture, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-puncture. Radiographic, histologic and immunohistologic analysis were performed to compare between Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice. In the age-related model, there were no significant differences between Bach 1-/- and wild-type mice radiologically and histologically. However, in the annulus puncture model, histological scoring revealed significant difference at 8 and 12 weeks post-puncture. The number of HO-1 positive cells was significantly greater in Bach 1-/- mice at every period. The apoptosis rate was significantly lower at 1 and 2 weeks post-puncture in Bach 1-/- mice. Oxidative stress prevention may avoid the degenerative process of the intervertebral disc after puncture, reducing the number of apoptosis cells. High HO-1 expression may also inhibit oxidative stress and delay the process of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  20. Heme oxygenase and the immune system in normal and pathological pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maide eOzen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal pregnancy is an immunotolerant state. Many factors, including environmental, socioeconomic, genetic, and immunologic changes by infection and/or other causes of inflammation, may contribute to inter-individual differences resulting in a normal or pathologic pregnancy. In particular, imbalances in the immune system can cause many pregnancy-related diseases, such as infertility, abortions, pre-eclampsia, and preterm labor, which result in maternal/fetal death, prematurity, or small-for-gestational age newborns. New findings imply that myeloid regulatory cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs may mediate immunotolerance during normal pregnancy. Effector T cells (Teffs have, in contrast, been implicated to cause adverse pregnancy outcomes. Furthermore, feto-maternal tolerance affects the developing fetus. It has been shown that the Treg/Teff balance affects litter size and adoptive transfer of pregnancy-induced Tregs can prevent fetal rejection in the mouse. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 has a protective role in many conditions through its anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, and anti-proliferative actions. HO-1 is highly expressed in the placenta and plays a role in angiogenesis and placental vascular development and in regulating vascular tone in pregnancy. In addition, HO-1 is a major regulator of immune homeostasis by mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive immune systems. Moreover, HO-1 can inhibit inflammation-induced phenotypic maturation of immune effector cells and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and promote anti-inflammatory cytokine production. HO-1 may also be associated with T-cell activation and can limit immune-based tissue injury by promoting Treg suppression of effector responses. Thus, HO-1 and its byproducts may protect against pregnancy complications by its immunomodulatory effects, and the regulation of HO-1 or its downstream effects has the potential to prevent or treat pregnancy complications and

  1. Transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 in pigs confers resistance against xenograft rejection during ex vivo perfusion of porcine kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Björn; Ramackers, Wolf; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Lemme, Erika; Hassel, Petra; Queisser, Anna-Lisa; Herrmann, Doris; Barg-Kues, Brigitte; Carnwath, Joseph W; Klose, Johannes; Tiede, Andreas; Friedrich, Lars; Baars, Wiebke; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Winkler, Michael; Niemann, Heiner

    2011-01-01

    The major immunological hurdle to successful porcine-to-human xenotransplantation is the acute vascular rejection (AVR), characterized by endothelial cell (EC) activation and perturbation of coagulation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its derivatives have anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory effects and protect against reactive oxygen species, rendering HO-1 a promising molecule to control AVR. Here, we report the production and characterization of pigs transgenic for human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) and demonstrate significant protection in porcine kidneys against xenograft rejection in ex vivo perfusion with human blood and transgenic porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) in a TNF-α-mediated apoptosis assay. Transgenic and non-transgenic PAEC were tested in a TNF-α-mediated apoptosis assay. Expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin) was measured by real-time PCR. hHO-1 transgenic porcine kidneys were perfused with pooled and diluted human AB blood in an ex vivo perfusion circuit. MHC class-II up-regulation after induction with IFN-γ was compared between wild-type and hHO-1 transgenic PAEC. Cloned hHO-1 transgenic pigs expressed hHO-1 in heart, kidney, liver, and in cultured ECs and fibroblasts. hHO-1 transgenic PAEC were protected against TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. Real-time PCR revealed reduced expression of adhesion molecules like ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. These effects could be abrogated by the incubation of transgenic PAECs with the specific HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphorine IX (Zn(II)PPIX, 20 μm). IFN-γ induced up-regulation of MHC class-II molecules was significantly reduced in PAECs from hHO-1 transgenic pigs. hHO-1 transgenic porcine kidneys could successfully be perfused with diluted human AB-pooled blood for a maximum of 240 min (with and without C1 inh), while in wild-type kidneys, blood flow ceased after ∼60 min. Elevated levels of d-Dimer and TAT were detected, but no significant consumption of fibrinogen and

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 suppresses the apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia cells via the JNK/c-JUN signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaojing; Fang, Qin; Chen, Shuya; Zhe, Nana; Chai, Qixiang; Yu, Meisheng; Zhang, Yaming; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Jishi

    2015-05-01

    There are few studies on the correlation between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that HO-1 was aberrantly overexpressed in the majority of AML patients, especially in patients with acute monocytic leukemia (M5) and leukocytosis, and inhibited the apoptosis of HL-60 and U937 cells. Moreover, silencing HO-1 prolonged the survival of xenograft mouse models. Further studies demonstrated that HO-1 suppressed the apoptosis of AML cells through activating the JNK/c-JUN signaling pathway. These data indicate a molecular role of HO-1 in inhibiting cell apoptosis, allowing it to be a potential target for treating AML.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of Argon are mediated via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heme-oxygenase-1 in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Felix; Kaufmann, Kai B; Coburn, Mark; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander; Roesslein, Martin; Biermann, Julia; Buerkle, Hartmut; Loop, Torsten; Goebel, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Retinal ischemia and reperfusion injuries (R-IRI) damage neuronal tissue permanently. Recently, we demonstrated that Argon exerts anti-apoptotic and protective properties. The molecular mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that Argon inhalation exert neuroprotective effects in rats retinal ganglion cells (RGC) via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heat-shock proteins. Inhalation of Argon (75 Vol%) was performed after R-IRI on the rats' left eyes for 1 h immediately or with delay. Retinal tissue was harvested after 24 h to analyze mRNA and protein expression of heat-shock proteins -70, -90 and heme-oxygenase-1, mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38, JNK, ERK-1/2) and histological changes. To analyze ERK dependent effects, the ERK inhibitor PD98059 was applicated prior to Argon inhalation. RGC count was analyzed 7 days after injury. Statistics were performed using anova. Argon significantly reduced the R-IRI-affected heat-shock protein expression (p ERK-1/2 expression (p ERK-1/2 before Argon inhalation resulted in significantly lower vital RGCs (p ERK-1/2 activation in Müller cells. We conclude, that Argon treatment protects R-IRI-induced apoptotic loss of RGC via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heme-oxygenase-1. We proposed the following possible mechanism for Argon-mediated neuroprotection: Argon exerts its protective effects via an induction of an ERK with subsequent suppression of the heat shock response. In conclusion, ischemia and reperfusion injuries and subsequent neuronal apoptosis are attenuated. These novel findings may open up new opportunities for Argon as a therapeutic option, especially since Argon is not toxic.

  4. Activation of heme oxygenase and consequent carbon monoxide formation inhibits the release of arginine vasopressin from rat hypothalamic explants. Molecular linkage between heme catabolism and neuroendocrine function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, C; Kostoglou-Athanassiou, I; Forsling, M L; Grossman, A B; Preziosi, P; Navarra, P; Minotti, G

    1997-10-15

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-catalyzed degradation of cellular heme moieties generates biliverdin and equimolar amounts of carbon monoxide (CO), which has been implicated as a possible modulator of neural function. Technical difficulties preclude direct measurements of CO within intact nervous tissues; hence, alternative procedures are needed to monitor the formation and possible biologic functions of this gas. In the present study rat hypothalamic explants were found to generate 114 +/- 5 or 127 +/- 11 pmol biliverdin/hypothalamus/1 h (n = 3) upon incubation with 1 or 10 microM hemin, respectively. Ten micromolar zinc-protoporphyrin IX (Zn-PP-IX), a known inhibitor of HO, significantly decreased the degradation of 10 microM hemin from 127 +/- 11 to 26 +/- 11 pmol biliverdin/hypothalamus/1 h (n = 3; P tin-mesoporphyrin IX, which is even more selective in inhibiting HO; it was also attenuated in the presence of the gaseous scavenger ferrous hemoglobin. Furthermore, the inhibition of AVP release could be reproduced by omitting hemin and by incubating hypothalami under CO, whereas treatment with biliverdin had no effect. This suggested that the release of AVP was suppressed by HO degradation of hemin, yielding CO as a modulator of hypothalamic function. These observations may be relevant to diseases characterized by inappropriate secretion of AVP and enzymatic disturbances affecting the synthesis of heme and the formation of CO through the HO pathway (e.g., acute intermittent porphyria or lead intoxication).

  5. Effects of surfactants on the contents of metallothionein, heme and hemoproteins and on the activities of heme oxygenase and drug-metabolizing enzymes in rats pretreated with phenobarbital or. beta. -naphthoflavone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariyoshi, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Hideki; Arizono, Koji (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic surfactants as major constituent of detergent products are widely used in consumer and industrial fields, and hence environmental and toxicological investigations of surfactants are numerous. In the previous study, the authors observed that intraperitoneal administration of surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium n-dodecylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) and polyoxyethyleneglycol nonylphenyl ether (Emulgen 913) to rats depressed the content of microsomal cytochrome P-450, while they enhanced markedly the activity of heme oxygenase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation. In addition, they noted an increase of metallothionein content in the liver of rats treated with LAS. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of surfactants on metallothionein, heme, hemoproteins, heme oxygenase and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver of rats pretreated with phenobarbital or {beta}-naphthoflavone.

  6. Dual control mechanism for heme oxygenase: tin(IV)-protoporphyrin potently inhibits enzyme activity while markedly increasing content of enzyme protein in liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Sardana, M K; Kappas, A

    1987-01-01

    Tin(IV)-protoporphyrin (Sn-protoporphyrin) potently inhibits heme degradation to bile pigments in vitro and in vivo, a property that confers upon this synthetic compound the ability to suppress a variety of experimentally induced and naturally occurring forms of jaundice in animals and humans. Utilizing rat liver heme oxygenase purified to homogeneity together with appropriate immunoquantitation techniques, we have demonstrated that Sn-protoporphyrin possesses the additional property of poten...

  7. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 on pulmonary function and structure in rats with liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Shi-bin; DUAN Zhi-jun; LI Qing; SUN Xiao-yu

    2011-01-01

    Background The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe vascular complication in lungs resulting in systemic hypoxemia in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. The underlying structural change in HPS is intrapulmonary vasodilation, which can lead to impaired oxygenation of pulmonary venous blood. It has been demonstrated that the heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide (HO-1/CO) system plays an important role in the control of vascular tone. The aim of this study was to further investigate the role of HO-1 in the pathogenesis of HPS in animal model.Methods Totally 35 rats were divided into liver cirrhosis, zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ (ZnPP), cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP)and sham groups. Biliary cirrhosis was established in the first three groups by bile duct ligation. Rats in the ZnPP and CoPP groups received once intraperitoneal injection of ZnPP and CoPP, respectively, 24 hours before sample collection.Expression of HO-1 mRNA in lung was detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, while protein expression was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of liver cirrhosis and intrapulmonary vasodilation. Arterial blood gases, mean arterial pressure and portal vein pressure were also measured. Analysis of variance or Wilcoxon statistical methods were used to determine statistical significance.Results Compared with the sham group, the cirrhotic group demonstrated increased expression of pulmonary HO-1 mRNA and protein (P<0.01). The level of arterial carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (A-aPO2),mean arterial pressure, portal vein pressure (P<0.05, respectively), and intrapulmonary vasodilation were also significantly increased. Compared with the cirrhotic group, CoPP treatment increased pulmonary HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, the level of A-aPO2 (P <0.05 respectively), COHb (P <0.01), and intrapulmonary vasodilation, while ZnPP treatment

  8. Regulation of heme oxygenase expression by alcohol,hypoxia and oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisa; Nicole; Gerjevic; Jonathan; Pascal; Chaky; Duygu; Dee; Harrison-Findik

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To study the effect of both acute and chronic alcohol exposure on heme oxygenases(HOs) in the brain,liver and duodenum.METHODS:Wild-type C57BL/6 mice,heterozygous Sod2 knockout mice,which exhibit attenuated manganese superoxide dismutase activity,and liver-specific ARNT knockout mice were used to investigate the role of alcohol-induced oxidative stress and hypoxia.For acute alcohol exposure,ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 1 wk.Mice were pair-fed with regular or ethanol-containing Lieber De Carli liquid diets for 4 wk for chronic alcohol studies.HO expression was analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting.RESULTS:Chronic alcohol exposure downregulated HO-1 expression in the brain but upregulated it in the duodenum of wild-type mice.It did not alter liver HO-1 expression,nor HO-2 expression in the brain,liver or duodenum.In contrast,acute alcohol exposure decreased both liver HO-1 and HO-2 expression,and HO-2 expression in the duodenum of wild-type mice.The decrease in liver HO-1 expression was abolished in ARNT+/-mice.Sod2+/-mice with acute alcohol exposure did not exhibit any changes in liver HO-1 and HO-2 expression or in brain HO-2 expression.However,alcohol inhibited brain HO-1 and duodenal HO-2 but increased duodenal HO-1 expression in Sod2+/-mice.Collectively,these findings indicate that acute and chronic alcohol exposure regulates HO expression in a tissue-specific manner.Chronic alcohol exposure alters brain and duodenal,but not liver HO expression.However,acute alcohol exposure inhibits liver HO-1 and HO-2,and also duodenal HO-2 expression.CONCLUSION:The inhibition of liver HO expression by acute alcohol-induced hypoxia may play a role in the early phases of alcoholic liver disease progression.

  9. Adenovirus-mediated heme oxygenase-1 gene transfer into rabbit ocular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, N G; da Silva, J L; Lavrovsky, Y; Stoltz, R A; Kappas, A; Dunn, M W; Schwartzman, M L

    1995-10-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress protein induced up to 100-fold within a few hours after exposure to oxidative stress, and it has been shown to counteract oxidative injury induced by ultraviolet light or free radicals. The current study was undertaken to determine whether the HO-1 gene can be introduced into adult rabbit ocular tissues by microinjection of a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus human HO-1 cDNA (Adv-HHO). Human HO-1 gene was used for transfection studies to differentiate endogenous from transfected HO. The purified Adv-HHO construct (10(8) pfu/ml) was mixed with lipofectamine and microinjected into the anterior chamber, vitreous cavity, and subretinal space of New Zealand rabbit eyes. After 2 weeks, total RNA was extracted from different ocular tissues, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed using specific human HO-1 primers, and amplification products were subjected to Southern hybridization. Transfection with the Adv-HHO construct into rabbit corneal epithelial cells in culture resulted in a functional expression of the human HO-1 gene; the human HO-1 mRNA was detected, and enzyme activity increased threefold. Human HO-1 mRNA was detected in the retina after microinjection of the Adv-HHO construct into the subretinal space. Microinjection into the vitreous resulted in HO-1 mRNA expression in the corneal endothelium, iris, lens, and retina; after intracameral injection of the Adv-HHO construct, human HO-1 mRNA was detected in corneal epithelium and endothelium, ciliary body, lens, and iris. Regardless of the injection site, transfected human HO-1 mRNA was undetectable in tissues outside the eye, that is, brain, liver, and kidney. These results demonstrated a tissue-selective functional transfer of the human HO-1 gene into rabbit ocular tissues in vivo. This technique may be a promising means for delivering HO-1 gene in vivo as a protective mechanism against oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of

  10. Febrile seizure, but not hyperthermia alone, induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 in rat cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorders. Approximately one third of children with a febrile seizure have recurrent events. The mechanism of FS remains unclear. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a member of the heat shock proteins family and can be induced in the brain by various stresses, including hyperthemia and seizure. This study aimed at investigating the changes of HO-1 in the cortex of rats after recurrent FS.Methods FS in rats was induced ten times, once every 2 days. In a bath of warm water, developing rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group (n=16) and warm water-treated group (n=50). The latter group was subdivided into hyperthermia group (n=19) and FS group (n=23). The expression and content of HO-1 mRNA in cortex were observed using in situ hybridization and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The content of HO-1 protein in cortex was measured using Western blotting. Results HO-1 mRNA expression of cortex neurons in FS group was markedly increased in comparison with those in hyperthermia and control groups (P=0.00), however, there was no statistic difference between hyperthermia group and control group (P=0.16). The relative amount of HO-1 mRNA in cortex in FS group was increased by 53.13% and 96% in comparison with those in hyperthermia group and control group respectively (P=0.00), but there was no obvious difference between the later two groups (P=0.051). Western blotting analysis showed that the HO-1 protein content in cortex in FS group was increased by 198% and 246% in comparison with those in hyperthermia group and control group respectively (P=0.00). There was no obvious difference in HO-1 protein content between the later two groups ( P=0.09).Conclusions Recurrent FS in rats can cause the increase of HO-1 mRNA and protein in cortex which may be involved in the mechanism of FS. The short-time recurrent hyperthermia can not induce the increase of HO-1 mRNA and protein.

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 protects endothelial cells from the toxicity of air pollutant chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawal, Akeem O.; Zhang, Min; Dittmar, Michael [Division of Cardiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, CHS 43-264, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lulla, Aaron [Division of Cardiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, CHS 43-264, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Molecular Toxicology Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Araujo, Jesus A., E-mail: JAraujo@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Cardiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, CHS 43-264, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Molecular Toxicology Interdepartmental Program, University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are a major component of diesel emissions, responsible for a large portion of their toxicity. In this study, we examined the toxic effects of DEPs on endothelial cells and the role of DEP-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) were treated with an organic extract of DEPs from an automobile engine (A-DEP) or a forklift engine (F-DEP) for 1 and 4 h. ROS generation, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, expression of HO-1, inflammatory genes, cell adhesion molecules and unfolded protein respone (UPR) gene were assessed. HO-1 expression and/or activity were inhibited by siRNA or tin protoporphyrin (Sn PPIX) and enhanced by an expression plasmid or cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPPIX). Exposure to 25 μg/ml of A-DEP and F-DEP significantly induced ROS production, cellular toxicity and greater levels of inflammatory and cellular adhesion molecules but to a different degree. Inhibition of HO-1 enzymatic activity with SnPPIX and silencing of the HO-1 gene by siRNA enhanced DEP-induced ROS production, further decreased cell viability and increased expression of inflammatory and cell adhesion molecules. On the other hand, overexpression of the HO-1 gene by a pcDNA 3.1D/V5-HO-1 plasmid significantly mitigated ROS production, increased cell survival and decreased the expression of inflammatory genes. HO-1 expression protected HMECs from DEP-induced prooxidative and proinflammatory effects. Modulation of HO-1 expression could potentially serve as a therapeutic target in an attempt to inhibit the cardiovascular effects of ambient PM. - Highlights: • We examined the role of HO-1 expression on diesel exhaust particle (DEP) in endothelial cells. • DEPs exert cytotoxic and inflammatory effects on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). • DEPs induce HO-1 expression in HMECs. • HO-1 protects against the oxidative stress induced by DEps. • HO-1 attenuates the proinflammatory effects

  12. Role of heme oxygenase-1 in demethylating effects on SKM-1 cells induced by decitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, R; Ma, D; Wang, P; Sun, J; Wang, J S; Fang, Q

    2015-12-22

    We evaluated the influence of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene inhibition in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell line SKM-1 on enhancement of the demethylating effects of decitabine on p15, and explored the possible mechanism. DNMT1 gene expression in SKM-1 cells was silenced by being transfected by a constructed siRNA with liposomes. The proliferation inhibition rates after drug treatment were detected by cell counting kit-8 assay. The apoptotic rates were detected by Annexin V/PI assay with flow cytometry. The expressions of p16, p15, TP73, CDH1, ESR1, and PDLIM4 mRNAs were detected by real-time PCR, and those of HO-1, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HDAC, and p15 proteins were measured by western blot. The degree of methylation of the p15 gene was analyzed by using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). CCK-8 assay showed that after HO-1 gene expression was inhibited; the proliferation rate of SKM-1 cells treated by decitabine (70.91 ± 0.05%) was significantly higher than that of the control group (53.67 ± 0.05%). Flow cytometry showed that the apoptotic rate of SKM- 1 cells treated by decitabine in combination with HO-1 expression inhibition (44.25 ± 0.05%) exceeded that of the cells treated by this drug alone (37.70 ± 0.05%). MSP showed that inhibiting HO-1 expression significantly increased the degree of methylation of the p15 gene. As suggested by western blot, the degree of methylation of the p15 protein was changed after decitabine treatment when the expression of the HO-1 protein was changed, being associated with the affected DNMT1 expression. Inhibited HO-1 expression attenuated the hypermethylation of CDKN2B by suppressing DNMT1, which was conducive to treatment by cooperating with decitabine. In conclusion, the findings of this study provide valuable experimental evidence for targeted MDS therapy, and a theoretical basis for further studies.

  13. Expression and characterization of truncated human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) and a fusion protein of hHO-1 with human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, A; Black, S M; Miller, W L; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1995-04-04

    A human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) gene without the sequence coding for the last 23 amino acids has been expressed in Escherichia coli behind the pho A promoter. The truncated enzyme is obtained in high yields as a soluble, catalytically-active protein, making it available for the first time for detailed mechanistic studies. The purified, truncated hHO-1/heme complex is spectroscopically indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme and converts heme to biliverdin when reconstituted with rat liver cytochrome P450 reductase. A self-sufficient heme oxygenase system has been obtained by fusing the truncated hHO-1 gene to the gene for human cytochrome P450 reductase without the sequence coding for the 20 amino acid membrane binding domain. Expression of the fusion protein in pCWori+ yields a protein that only requires NADPH for catalytic turnover. The failure of exogenous cytochrome P450 reductase to stimulate turnover and the insensitivity of the catalytic rate toward changes in ionic strength establish that electrons are transferred intramolecularly between the reductase and heme oxygenase domains of the fusion protein. The Vmax for the fusion protein is 2.5 times higher than that for the reconstituted system. Therefore, either the covalent tether does not interfere with normal docking and electron transfer between the flavin and heme domains or alternative but equally efficient electron transfer pathways are available that do not require specific docking.

  14. Involvement of Nrf2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression in anti-inflammatory action of chitosan oligosaccharides through MAPK activation in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyung, Jun-Ho; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Il Kim, Boo; Kim, Kyunghoi; Je, Jae-Young

    2016-12-15

    Chitosan and its derivatives have been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. It is also suggested that chitosan and its derivatives could be up-regulating heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in different models. However, the up-regulation of HO-1 by chitosan oligosaccharides (COS) remains unexplored in regard to anti-inflammatory action in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells). Treatment with COS induced HO-1 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, whereas the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was decreased. Pretreatment with ZnPP, a HO-1 inhibitor, reduced the COS-mediated anti-inflammatory action. HO-1 induction is mediated by activating the nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) using COS. Moreover, COS increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. However, specific inhibitors of ERK, JNK, and p38 reduced COS-mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Therefore, HO-1 induction also decreased in RAW264.7 cells. Collectively, COS exert an anti-inflammatory effect through Nrf2/MAPK-mediated HO-1 induction.

  15. Cadmium-induced heme oxygenase-1 gene expression is associated with the depletion of glutathione in the roots of Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiti; Fu, Guangqing; Wu, Honghong; Shen, Wenbiao

    2011-02-01

    Following previous findings that cadmium (Cd) induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) gene expression in alfalfa seedling roots, we now show that the decreased glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) contents, induction of HO-1 gene expression and its protein level by Cd was mimicked by a GSH depletor diethylmaleate (DEM). Meanwhile, above Cd- or DEM-induced decreased GSH content followed by HO-1 up-regulation could be strengthened or reversed differentially by the application of a selective inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis L: -buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO), or exogenous GSH and AsA, respectively. The antioxidative behavior of HO-1 induction was further confirmed by histochemical staining for the detection of loss of membrane integrity in a short period of treatment time. Additionally, the induction of HO-1 transcript was inhibited by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D (ActD) or protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (CX, especially). In contrast, the level of HO-2 transcript did not change upon various treatments. Together, above results suggested that Cd-induced up-regulation of HO-1 gene expression is associated with GSH depletion, which is at least existing transcriptional regulation level, thus leading to enhanced antioxidative capability transiently.

  16. Gold nanoparticles induce heme oxygenase-1 expression through Nrf2 activation and Bach1 export in human vascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai TH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tsung-Hsuan Lai,1–3 Jiunn-Min Shieh,4,5 Chih-Jen Tsou,1 Wen-Bin Wu11School of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Institute of Systems Biology and Bioinformatics, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taiwan; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan; 5Department of Recreation and Healthcare Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, TaiwanAbstract: It has been reported that increased levels and activity of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 protein ameliorate tissue injuries. In the present study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs on HO-1 protein expression in human vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The AuNPs induced HO-1 protein and mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction was reduced by the thiol-containing antioxidants, including N-acetylcysteine and glutathione, but not by the non-thiol-containing antioxidants and inhibitors that block the enzymes for intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. The AuNPs enhanced Nrf2 protein levels but did not affect Nrf2 mRNA expression. In response to the AuNP treatment, the cytosolic Nrf2 translocated to the nucleus, and, concomitantly, Bach1 exited the nucleus and its tyrosine phosphorylation increased. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the translocated Nrf2 bound to the antioxidant-response element located in the E2 enhancer region of the HO-1 gene promoter and acted as a transcription factor. Although N-acetylcysteine inhibited the AuNP-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, the AuNPs did not promote intracellular reactive oxygen species production or endoplasmic reticulum stress in the ECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 expression by RNA interference significantly inhibited AuNP-induced HO-1 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. In summary

  17. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 by isoflurane preconditioning during tolerance against neuronal injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qifang Li; Yesen Zhu; Hong Jiang; Hui Xu; Heping Liu

    2008-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. The HO-1 isozyme is induced by a variety of factors such as heat, heme, ischemia, and hydrogen peroxide. In recent years, mounting findings have suggested that HO-1 has a neuroprotective activity against ischemic injury. The neuroprotective role of isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, has been well documented, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved. Recently, isoflurane has been shown to up-regulate HO-1 in the liver. In this study,we show that isoflurane preconditioning promotes the survival of cultured ischemic hippocampal neurons by increasing the number of surviving neurons and their viability. Further study by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that isoflurane preconditioning significantly increases HO-1 expression in oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore,inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin partially abolishes isoflurane preconditioning's protective effect as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in OGD neurons.These findings indicated that the neuroprotective role of isoflurane preconditioning against OGD-induced injury might be associated with its role in up-regulating HO-1 in ischemic neurons.

  18. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 by isoflurane preconditioning during tolerance against neuronal injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qifang; Zhu, Yesen; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Hui; Liu, Heping

    2008-09-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. The HO-1 isozyme is induced by a variety of factors such as heat, heme, ischemia, and hydrogen peroxide. In recent years, mounting findings have suggested that HO-1 has a neuroprotective activity against ischemic injury. The neuroprotective role of isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, has been well documented, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved. Recently, isoflurane has been shown to up-regulate HO-1 in the liver. In this study, we show that isoflurane preconditioning promotes the survival of cultured ischemic hippocampal neurons by increasing the number of surviving neurons and their viability. Further study by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that isoflurane preconditioning significantly increases HO-1 expression in oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore, inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin partially abolishes isoflurane preconditioning's protective effect as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in OGD neurons. These findings indicated that the neuroprotective role of isoflurane preconditioning against OGD-induced injury might be associated with its role in up-regulating HO-1 in ischemic neurons.

  19. Comparison of the crystal structure and function to wild-type and His25Ala mutant human heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Pu; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Hong; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zi-Li; Xia, Zhen-Wei

    2009-03-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme metabolism. It regulates serum bilirubin level. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that the proximal residue histidine 25 (His25) plays a key role in hHO-1 activity. A highly purified hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was generated and crystallized with a new expression system. The crystal structure of the mutant was determined by X-ray diffraction technology and molecular replacement at the resolution of 2.8 A, and the model of hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was refined. The final crystallographic and free R factors were 0.245 and 0.283, respectively. The standard bond length deviation was 0.007 A, and the standard bond angle deviation was 1.3 degrees . The mutation of His25 to Ala led to an empty pocket underneath the ferric ion in the heme, leading to loss of binding iron ligand. Although this did not cause an overall structural change, the enzymatic activity of the mutant hHO-1 was reduced by 90%. By supplementing imidazole, the HO-1 activity was restored approximately 90% to its normal level. These data suggest that Ala25 remains unchanged in the structure compared to His25, but the important catalytic function of hHO-1 is lost. Thus, it appears that His25 is a crucial residue for proper hHO-1 catalysis.

  20. Atorvastatin prevents hypoxia-induced inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression but does not affect heme oxygenase-1 in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loboda, Agnieszka; Jazwa, Agnieszka; Jozkowicz, Alicj A.; Dorosz, Jerzy; Balla, Jozsef; Molema, Grietje; Dulak, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    Beneficial cardiovascular effects of statins, the inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, are particularly assigned to the modulation of inflammation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are listed among the crucial protective, anti-i

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of heme oxygenase-1 toward Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide in macrophages exposed to gomisins A, G, and J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Eun Yeon; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Sun Gun; Park, Da Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Kim, Young Hun; Seetharaman, Rajaseker; Choi, Young-Whan; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2011-12-01

    Periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory periodontal disease that develops from gingivitis, is caused by periodontal pathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis. Recent studies have focused on the antioxidant, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, anticarcinogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties of gomisins. However, the anti-inflammatory activities of gomisin plants through heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) signals remain poorly defined. We found that gomisins' anti-inflammatory activity occurs via the induction of HO-1 expression. Gomisins G and J inhibit the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 and also block nuclear factor-κB activation in Raw264.7 cells stimulated with P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine production is inhibited through the induction of HO-1 expression. HO-1 expression is induced by all gomisins, but their anti-inflammatory activity via HO-1 signaling is observed with gomisins G and J, and not A. We found that gomisins G and J extracted from Schisandria chinensis can inhibit the P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide induced-inflammatory responses in Raw264.7 cells.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta agonist attenuates nicotine suppression effect on human mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteogenesis and involves increased expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Liu, Jiayong; Bhat, Samerna; Benedict, Gregory; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Peterson, Stephen J; Ebraheim, Nabil A; Heck, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Smoking has long been associated with osteoporosis, decreased bone mineral density, increased risk of bone fracture, and increased health costs. Nicotine, the main component of cigarette smoke, has major negative effects on bone metabolism and skeletal remodeling in vivo. Although osteoblasts and osteoblast-like cells have been used extensively to study the impact of nicotine, few studies have been performed on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In this context, we examined the impact of nicotine on (a) hMSCs proliferation, (b) osteoblastic differentiation, (c) alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and (d) expression of canonical genes during differentiation of hMSCs. MSCs isolated from human bone marrow were treated with different concentrations (0, 0.1, 1 and 10 μM) of nicotine for 7 days. Nicotine caused a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation, decreased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression (p nicotine caused a dose-dependent decrease in alizarin red staining for calcium and staining for ALP. Induction of HO-1 by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta agonist (GW0742) prevented the effect of nicotine. Nicotine caused a dose-dependent reduction in the expression of BMP-2, a well-known marker for bone formation; however, this was prevented by GW0742 treatment. Therefore, induction of HO-1 prevents the deleterious effects of nicotine on osteogenesis in hMSC. This offers insight into both how nicotine affects bone remodeling and a therapeutic approach to prevent fracture and osteoporosis in smokers.

  3. Hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 inducer, improves aortic endothelial dysfunction in insulin resistant rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Under an insulin resistance(IR)state,overproduction of reactive oxygen species(ROS)may be playing a maior role in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction,hypertension and atherosclerosis.Recently,increasing attention has been drawn to the beneficial effects of heme oxygenase-1(HO-1)in the cardiovascular system.This study aimed to investigate the effects of HO-1 on vascular function of thoracic aorta in IR rats and demonstrate the probable mechanisms of HO-1 against endothelial dysfunction in IR states.Methods Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats fed with high-fat diet for 6 weeks and the IR models were validated with hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp test.Then the IR rat models (n=44) were further randomized into 3 subgroups,namely,the IR control group (n=26, in which 12 were sacrificed immediately and evaluated for all study measures),a hemin treated IR group (n=10) and a zinc protoporphyrin-Ⅸ (ZnPP-Ⅸ)treated IR group (n=8) that were fed with a high-fat diet.Rats with standardized chow diet were used as the normal control group (n=12). The rats in IR control group,hemin treated IR group and ZnPP-Ⅸ treated IR group were subsequently treated every other day with an intraperitoneal injection of normal saline,hemin (inducer of HO-1,30 μmol/kg) or ZnPP-Ⅸ (inhibitor of HO-1,10 μmol/kg) for 4 weeks.Rats in the normal control group remained on a standardized chow diet and were treated with intraperitoneal injections of normal saline every other day for 4 weeks.Systolic arterial blood pressure (SABP) was measured by tall-cuffed microphotoelectric plethysmography.The blood carbon monoxide (CO) was measured by blood gas analysis. The levels of nitric oxide (NO),inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS),endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS),blood glucose (BG),insulin,total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) in serum,and the levels of total antioxidant capacity (rAOC),maIondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the aorta were measured

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 gene delivery by Sleeping Beauty inhibits vascular stasis in a murine model of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, John D; Vineyard, Julie V; Bruzzone, Carol M; Chen, Chunsheng; Beckman, Joan D; Nguyen, Julia; Steer, Clifford J; Vercellotti, Gregory M

    2010-07-01

    Increases in heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and administration of heme degradation products CO and biliverdin inhibit vascular inflammation and vasoocclusion in mouse models of sickle cell disease (SCD). In this study, an albumin (alb) promoter-driven Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase plasmid with a wild-type rat hmox-1 (wt-HO-1) transposable element was delivered by hydrodynamic tail vein injections to SCD mice. Eight weeks after injection, SCD mice had three- to five-fold increases in HO-1 activity and protein expression in liver, similar to hemin-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated increased perinuclear HO-1 staining in hepatocytes. Messenger RNA transcription of the hmox-1 transgene in liver was confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (qRT-PCR RFLP) with no detectible transgene expression in other organs. The livers of all HO-1 overexpressing mice had activation of nuclear phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phospho-Akt, decreased nuclear expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65, and decreased soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in serum. Hypoxia-induced stasis, a characteristic of SCD, but not normal mice, was inhibited in dorsal skin fold chambers in wt-HO-1 SCD mice despite the absence of hmox-1 transgene expression in the skin suggesting distal effects of HO activity on the vasculature. No protective effects were seen in SCD mice injected with nonsense (ns-) rat hmox-1 that encodes carboxy-truncated HO-1 with little or no enzyme activity. We speculate that HO-1 gene delivery to the liver is beneficial in SCD mice by degrading pro-oxidative heme, releasing anti-inflammatory heme degradation products CO and biliverdin/bilirubin into circulation, activating cytoprotective pathways and inhibiting vascular stasis at sites distal to transgene expression.

  5. Heme oxygenase 1 transgenic mice as a model to study neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, Mahin D

    2002-01-01

    Bile pigments and CO are formed in the course of heme degradation by the isozymes and are biologically active moieties. In the course of heme degradation the chelated iron is also released. Heme and iron are prooxidants, whereas bile pigments are antioxidants. In addition, CO functions as a signal molecule and HO-2 may serve as an intracellular "sink" for NO. In the balance, the published data suggest that the HO system functions in cellular defense mechanisms. The methods described in this chapter can be used to assess the tissue/cell toxicity of chemicals in general, and as pertains to the defense activity of HO-1, specifically.

  6. 30 some years of heme oxygenase: from a "molecular wrecking ball" to a "mesmerizing" trigger of cellular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, Mahin D; Gibbs, Peter E M

    2005-12-09

    In the beginning, the microsomal HO system was presumed to be made of one isozymes, now known as HO-1, which was cytP450-dependent; and, was thought to be of physiological significance solely in the context of catalysis of hemoglobin heme to bile pigments and CO. A succession of discoveries including characterization of the system as an independent mono-oxygenase, identification of a second form, called HO-2, free radical quenching activity of bile pigments, analogous function of CO in cell signaling to NO, and characterization of the system as HSP32 cognates has led to such an impressive expansion in the number of reports dealing with the HO system that surpass anyone's expectation. This review is a compilation of certain older findings and recent events that together ensure placement of the HO system in the mainstream research for decades to come.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates cigarette smoke-induced restenosis after vascular angioplasty by attenuating inflammation in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Leng; Wang, Zhanqi; Yang, Genhuan; Li, Tianjia; Liu, Xinnong; Liu, Changwei

    2016-03-14

    Cigarette smoke is not only a profound independent risk factor of atherosclerosis, but also aggravates restenosis after vascular angioplasty. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an endogenous antioxidant and cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we investigated whether HO-1 upregulating by hemin, a potent HO-1 inducer, can protect against cigarette smoke-induced restenosis in rat's carotid arteries after balloon injury. Results showed that cigarette smoke exposure aggravated stenosis of the lumen, promoted infiltration of inflammatory cells, and induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules after balloon-induced carotid artery injury. HO-1 upregulating by hemin treatment reduced these effects of cigarette smoke, whereas the beneficial effects were abolished in the presence of Zincprotoporphyrin IX, an HO-1 inhibitor. To conclude, hemin has potential therapeutic applications in the restenosis prevention after the smokers' vascular angioplasty. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. D5 dopamine receptor decreases NADPH oxidase, reactive oxygen species and blood pressure via heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Quansheng; Yang, Yu; Villar, Van Anthony; Asico, Laureano; Jones, John E; Yu, Peiying; Li, Hewang; Weinman, Edward J; Eisner, Gilbert M; Jose, Pedro A

    2013-08-01

    D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) knock-out mice (D5(-/-)) have a higher blood pressure (BP) and higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) production than their D5R wild-type littermates (D5(+/+)). We tested the hypothesis that the high BP and increased ROS production in D5(-/-) mice may be caused by decreased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and activity. We found that renal HO-1 protein expression and HO enzyme activity were decreased (65 and 50%, respectively) in D5(-/-) relative to D5(+/+) mice. A 24 h of administration of hemin, an HO-1 inducer, increased HO-1 expression and HO activity (6.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively) and normalized the increased ROS production and BP in D5(-/-) mice. Expression of HO-1 protein and HO activity were increased (2.3- and 1.5-fold, respectively) in HEK cells that heterologously expressed human wild-type D5R (HEK-hD5R), but not the empty vector-transfected HEK-293 cells. Fenoldopam (Fen), a D5R agonist, increased HO activity (3 h), HO-1 protein expression, HO-1 and D5R colocalization and co-immunoprecipitation in HEK-hD5R cells. Cellular NADPH oxidase activity was decreased by 35% in HEK-hD5R that was abrogated with silencing of the heme oxygenase 1 gene (HMOX1). HMOX1 siRNA also impaired the ability of Fen to decrease NADPH oxidase activity in HEK-hD5R cells. In summary, the D5R positively regulates HO-1 through direct protein/protein interaction in the short-term and by increasing HO-1 protein expression in the long-term. The impaired D5R regulation of HO-1 and ROS production contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension in D5(-/-) mice.

  9. Role of heme oxygenase 1 in TNF/TNF receptor-mediated apoptosis after hepatic ischemia/reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Joo; Eum, Hyun-Ae; Billiar, Timothy R; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2013-04-01

    Hepatocellular apoptosis commonly occurs in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The binding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) to TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), which subsequently initiates a caspase cascade resulting in apoptosis. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) confers cytoprotection against cell death in I/R injury and inhibits stress-induced apoptotic pathways in vitro. This study investigated the role of HO-1 in modulating TNF/TNFR1-mediated cell death pathways in hepatic I/R injury. Rats were pretreated with hemin, an HO-1 inducer, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an HO-1 inhibitor, before undergoing hepatic I/R. Heme oxygenase 1 activity increased after reperfusion. Ischemia/reperfusion-induced hepatocellular apoptosis was attenuated by hemin, as determined by the caspase-3 and -8 activity assays and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling). Zinc protoporphyrin eliminated the cytoprotective effect of hemin. Hepatic TNFR1 protein expression was unchanged among the experimental groups, whereas mitochondrial TNFR1 protein increased after I/R. Ischemia/reperfusion increased the quantity of DISC components, including TRADD (TNFR1-associated death domain), FADD (Fas-associated death domain), and caspase-8, as well as the assembly of DISCs within the liver. In the mitochondrial fraction, TNFR1-associated caspase-8 was increased after I/R. These increases were attenuated by hemin; zinc protoporphyrin eliminated this effect. Our findings suggest that the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 are mediated by suppression of TNF/TNFR1-mediated apoptotic signaling, specifically by modulating apoptotic DISC formation and mitochondrial TNFR1 translocation during hepatic I/R.

  10. Hemo oxygenase-1 induction in vitro and in vivo can yield pancreas islet xenograft survival and improve islet function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi; SU Chang; ZHANG Zheng-yun; ZHANG Ming-jun; GU Wei-qiong; LI Xiao-ying; LI Hong-wei; ZHOU Guang-wen

    2011-01-01

    Background The induced expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in donor islets improves allograft survival.Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) could significantly enhance the expression of HO-1 mRNA and protein in rat islet safely.Our work was to study how to protect pancreatic islet xenograft by CoPP-induction.Methods Islet xenografts treated with CoPP-induction and CoPP+ Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) in vitro and in vivo were randomly transplanted into murine subrenal capsule; then the graft survival time was compared by blood glucose level and pathological examination and meanwhile the interferon γ (IFN-γ),tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-α),interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-1β level in serum and their mRNA and HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined.Results Islets with CoPP-induction under low- and high-glucose stimulation exhibited much higher insulin secretion compared with other three groups.CoPP-induction could increase higher expression of HO-1 (mRNA:3.33- and 76.09-fold in vitro and in vivo; protein:2.85- and 58.72-fold).The normoglycemia time in induction groups ((14.63±1.19) and (16.88+1.64) days) was significantly longer.The pathological examination showed less lymphocyte infiltration in induction groups.The IL-10 level and its mRNA in induction groups were significantly higher.Conclusions The HO-1 induced by CoPP would significantly improve function,prolong normoglycemia time and reduce lymphocyte infiltration.Meanwhile CoPP-induction in vivo had more beneficial effects than in vitro.Its mechanism could be related to immune-modulation of IL-10.

  11. Adaphostin toxicity in a sensitive non-small cell lung cancer model is mediated through Nrf2 signaling and heme oxygenase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monks Anne

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preclinical toxicity of adaphostin has been related to oxidative stress. This study investigated the regulatory mechanism underlying adaphostin induction of heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 which plays a significant role in modulation of drug-induced toxicity in the non-small cell lung cancer cell line model, NCI-H522. Methods The transcriptional response of NCI-H522 to adaphostin prominently involved oxidative stress genes, particularly HMOX1. Reactive oxygen species (ROS involvement was additionally established by generation of ROS prior to modulation of adaphostin-toxicity with antioxidants. To identify up-stream regulatory elements of HMOX1, immunofluorescence was used to evaluate nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, in the presence of adaphostin. The PI3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, was employed as a pharmacological inhibitor of this process. Results Generation of ROS provided a substantial foundation for the sensitivity of NCI-H522 to adaphostin. However, in contrast to leukemia cell lines, transcriptional response to oxidative stress was associated with induction of HMOX1, which was dependent on nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, Nrf2. Pretreatment of cells with wortmannin inhibited translocation of Nrf2 and induction of HMOX1. Wortmannin pretreatment was also able to diminish adaphostin induction of HMOX1, and as a consequence, enhance the toxicity of adaphostin to NCI-H522. Conclusions Adaphostin-induced oxidative stress in NCI-H522 was mediated through nuclear translocation of Nrf2 leading to upregulation of HMOX1. Inhibition of Nrf2 translocation by wortmannin inhibited this cytoprotective response, and enhanced the toxicity of adaphostin, suggesting that inhibitors of the PI3K pathway, such as wortmannin, might augment the antiproliferative effects of adaphostin in solid tumors that depend on the Nrf2/ARE pathway for protection against oxidative stress.

  12. Sofalcone, a gastric mucosa protective agent, increases vascular endothelial growth factor via the Nrf2-heme-oxygenase-1 dependent pathway in gastric epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Akiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Onda, Kenji, E-mail: knjond@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kawahara, Hirofumi; Uchiyama, Yuka; Nakayama, Hiroko; Omi, Takamasa; Nagaoka, Masayoshi [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Matsui, Hirofumi [Division of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Ten-nohdai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Hirano, Toshihiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Sofalcone increases HO-1 in gastric epithelial cells. {yields} The induction of HO-1 by sofalcone treatment follows the activation of Nrf2. {yields} The production of VEGF by sofalcone treatment is mediated by HO-1 induction. -- Abstract: Sofalcone, 2'-carboxymethoxy-4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-butenyloxy)chalcone, is an anti-ulcer agent that is classified as a gastric mucosa protective agent. Recent studies indicate heat shock proteins such as HSP32, also known as heme-oxygenase-1(HO-1), play important roles in protecting gastrointestinal tissues from several stresses. We have previously reported that sofalcone increases the expression of HO-1 in adipocytes and pre-adipocytes, although the effect of sofalcone on HO-1 induction in gastrointestinal tissues is not clear. In the current study, we investigated the effects of sofalcone on the expression of HO-1 and its functional role in rat gastric epithelial (RGM-1) cells. We found that sofalcone increased HO-1 expression in RGM-1 cells in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. The HO-1 induction was associated with the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) in RGM-1 cells. We also observed that sofalcone increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in the culture medium. Treatment of RGM-1 cells with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin-protoporphyrin), or HO-1 siRNA inhibited sofalcone-induced VEGF production, suggesting that the effect of sofalcone on VEGF expression is mediated by the HO-1 pathway. These results suggest that the gastroprotective effects of sofalcone are partly exerted via Nrf2-HO-1 activation followed by VEGF production.

  13. Myeloid heme oxygenase-1 haploinsufficiency reduces high fat diet-induced insulin resistance by affecting adipose macrophage infiltration in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Yuan Huang

    Full Text Available Increased adipose tissue macrophages contribute to obesity-induced metabolic syndrome. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a stress-inducible enzyme with potent anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic activities in macrophages. However, the role of macrophage HO-1 on obesity-induced adipose inflammation and metabolic syndrome remains unclear. Here we show that high-fat diet (HFD feeding in C57BL/6J mice induced HO-1 expression in the visceral adipose tissue, particularly the stromal vascular fraction. When the irradiated C57BL/6J mice reconstituted with wild-type or HO-1(+/- bone marrow were fed with HFD for over 24 weeks, the HO-1(+/- chimeras were protected from HFD-induced insulin resistance and this was associated with reduced adipose macrophage infiltration and angiogenesis, suggesting that HO-1 affects myeloid cell migration toward adipose tissue during obesity. In vivo and in vitro migration assays revealed that HO-1(+/- macrophages exhibited an impaired migration response. Chemoattractant-induced phosphorylation of p38 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK declined faster in HO-1(+/- macrophages. Further experiments demonstrated that carbon monoxide and bilirubin, the byproducts derived from heme degradation by HO-1, enhanced macrophage migration by increasing phosphorylation of p38 and FAK, respectively. These data disclose a novel role of hematopoietic cell HO-1 in promoting adipose macrophage infiltration and the development of insulin resistance during obesity.

  14. Heme oxygenase isoforms differ in their subcellular trafficking during hypoxia and are differentially modulated by cytochrome P450 reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Linnenbaum

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase (HO degrades heme in concert with NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR which donates electrons to the reaction. Earlier studies reveal the importance of the hydrophobic carboxy-terminus of HO-1 for anchorage to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER which facilitates the interaction with CPR. In addition, HO-1 has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the carboxy-terminus during hypoxia and subsequent translocation to the nucleus. Translocated nuclear HO-1 was demonstrated to alter binding of transcription factors and to alter gene expression. Little is known about the homologous membrane anchor of the HO-2 isoform. The current work is the first systematic analysis in a eukaryotic system that demonstrates the crucial role of the membrane anchor of HO-2 for localization at the endoplasmic reticulum, oligomerization and interaction with CPR. We show that although the carboxy-terminal deletion mutant of HO-2 is found in the nucleus, translocation of HO-2 to the nucleus does not occur under conditions of hypoxia. Thus, we demonstrate that proteolytic regulation and nuclear translocation under hypoxic conditions is specific for HO-1. In addition we show for the first time that CPR prevents this translocation and promotes oligomerization of HO-1. Based on these findings, CPR may modulate gene expression via the amount of nuclear HO-1. This is of particular relevance as CPR is a highly polymorphic gene and deficiency syndromes of CPR have been described in humans.

  15. Immunohistochemical localization of the antioxidant enzymes biliverdin reductase and heme oxygenase-2 in human and pig gastric fundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpaert, Erwin E; Timmermans, Jean Pierre; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2002-04-01

    The intrinsic antioxidant capacities of the bile pigments biliverdin and bilirubin are increasingly recognized since both heme degradation products can exert beneficial cytoprotective effects due to their scavenging of oxygen free radicals and interaction with antioxidant vitamins. Several studies have been published on the localization of the carbon monoxide producing enzyme heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2), which concomitantly generates biliverdin; histochemical data on the distribution of biliverdin reductase (BVR), converting biliverdin to bilirubin, are still very scarce in large mammals including humans. The present study revealed by means of immunohistochemistry the presence of BVR and HO-2 in mucosal epithelial cells and in the endothelium of intramural vessels of both human and porcine gastric fundus. In addition, co-labeling with the specific neural marker protein-gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) demonstrated that both BVR and HO-2 were present in all intrinsic nerve cell bodies of both submucous and myenteric plexuses, while double labeling with c-Kit antibody confirmed their presence in intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Our results substantiate the hypothesis that BVR, through the production of the potent antioxidant bilirubin, might be an essential component of normal physiologic gastrointestinal defense in man and pig.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1, a novel target for the treatment of diabetic complications: focus on diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Geeta; Nakkina, Vanaja; Kamble, Pallavi; Sharma, Shyam S

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a complex disorder induced by long standing diabetes. Many signaling pathways and transcription factors have been proposed to be involved in the development and progression of related processes. Years of research points to critical role of oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis in the pathogenesis of neuropathy in diabetes. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is heat-shock protein induced under conditions of different kinds of stress and has been implicated in cellular defense against oxidative stress. HO-1 degrades heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO) and free iron. Biliverdin and CO are gaining particular interest because these two have been found to mediate most of anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects of HO-1. Although extensively studied in different kinds of cancers and cardiovascular conditions, role of HO-1 in diabetic neuropathy is still under investigation. In this paper, we review the unique therapeutic potential of HO-1 and its role in mitigating various pathological processes that lead to diabetic neuropathy. This review also highlights the therapeutic approaches such as pharmacological and natural inducers of HO-1, gene delivery of HO-1 or its reaction products that in future, could lead to progression of HO-1 activators through the preclinical stages of drug development to clinical trials.

  17. Inhibition of replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by hemin is highly dependent on heme oxygenase-1, but independent of iron in MARC-145 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangliang; Xiao, Shuqi; Gao, Jintao; Liu, Meirui; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Ming; Zhao, Guangyin; Mo, Delin; Liu, Xiaohong; Chen, Yaosheng

    2014-05-01

    Current vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have failed to provide sustainable disease control, and development of new antiviral strategies is of great importance. The present study investigated the mechanism of the antiviral effect of hemin during PRRSV infection in MARC-145 cells. Hemin, a commercial preparation of heme, is used as an iron donor or heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inducer, and has been shown to provide antiviral activity in many studies. In the current study, the anti-PRRSV activity of hemin was identified through suppressing PRRSV propagation. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of hemin antiviral activity was estimated to be 32μM, and the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of hemin was found to be higher than 125μM. Further study showed that the antiviral activity of hemin is independent of iron. In addition, after treatment with Protoporphyrin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP) or Sn (IV) Protoporphyrin IX dichloride (SnPP), inhibitors of HO-1, the inhibition of viral replication by hemin was partially reversed. Additionally, it was confirmed that hemin and N-acetyl cysteine were able to significantly reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in MARC-145 cells infected with virus. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), however, did not produce a reduction in viral load or promote expression of HO-1. Taken together, these data indicate that the effect of hemin on the inhibition of PRRSV propagation via HO-1 induction, as well as the antiviral mechanism of HO-1, is not dependent on decreased levels of ROS. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that hemin had antiviral activity against PRRSV and may serve as a useful antiviral agent inhibiting PRRSV replication.

  18. Notopterygium forbesii boiss extract and its active constituents increase reactive species and heme oxygenase-1 in human fetal hepatocytes: mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Soon Yew; Wang, Huansong; Zhang, Wenxia; Halliwell, Barry

    2008-12-01

    Notopterygium forbesii Boiss (NF) has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of common cold and rheumatism. However, there has been limited research on the biological properties of NF, and the mechanisms of action remain unknown. Here, we aimed to study the mechanism of NF-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in human fetal hepatocytes (HFHs) and to identify the constituents responsible. Exposure of HFHs to NF causes oxidative stress with the accumulation of reactive species, which in turn leads to the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 transcription factor, and eventually increased levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein. The increases in reactive species and HO-1 protein are inhibited by agonists of glucocorticoid receptors (GR), such as RU28362, prednisolone, and dexamethasone, as well as by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor), suggesting a role of GR in NF-induced increases in reactive species and HO-1. Assay-guided fractionation of NF led to three active compounds, phenethyl ferulate, bergaptol, and isoimperatorin, that were found to increase oxidative stress and HO-1 protein levels in HFHs. The induction of HO-1 protein in response to moderate oxidative stress may explain some of the beneficial pharmacological effects of NF.

  19. Cordyceps sinensis Increases Hypoxia Tolerance by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1 and Metallothionein via Nrf2 Activation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinalini Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps sinensis, an edible mushroom growing in Himalayan regions, is widely recognized in traditional system of medicine. In the present study, we report the efficacy of Cordyceps sinensis in facilitating tolerance to hypoxia using A549 cell line as a model system. Treatment with aqueous extract of Cordyceps sinensis appreciably attenuated hypoxia induced ROS generation, oxidation of lipids and proteins and maintained antioxidant status similar to that of controls via induction of antioxidant gene HO1 (heme oxygenase-1, MT (metallothionein and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2. In contrast, lower level of NFκB (nuclear factor kappaB and tumor necrosis factor-α observed which might be due to higher levels of HO1, MT and transforming growth factor-β. Further, increase in HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1 and its regulated genes; erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and glucose transporter-1 was observed. Interestingly, Cordyceps sinensis treatment under normoxia did not regulate the expression HIF1, NFκB and their regulated genes evidencing that Cordyceps sinensis per se did not have an effect on these transcription factors. Overall, Cordyceps sinensis treatment inhibited hypoxia induced oxidative stress by maintaining higher cellular Nrf2, HIF1 and lowering NFκB levels. These findings provide a basis for possible use of Cordyceps sinensis in tolerating hypoxia.

  20. Cordyceps sinensis Increases Hypoxia Tolerance by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1 and Metallothionein via Nrf2 Activation in Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Manimaran; Misra, Kshipra

    2013-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, an edible mushroom growing in Himalayan regions, is widely recognized in traditional system of medicine. In the present study, we report the efficacy of Cordyceps sinensis in facilitating tolerance to hypoxia using A549 cell line as a model system. Treatment with aqueous extract of Cordyceps sinensis appreciably attenuated hypoxia induced ROS generation, oxidation of lipids and proteins and maintained antioxidant status similar to that of controls via induction of antioxidant gene HO1 (heme oxygenase-1), MT (metallothionein) and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2). In contrast, lower level of NFκB (nuclear factor kappaB) and tumor necrosis factor-α observed which might be due to higher levels of HO1, MT and transforming growth factor-β. Further, increase in HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1) and its regulated genes; erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and glucose transporter-1 was observed. Interestingly, Cordyceps sinensis treatment under normoxia did not regulate the expression HIF1, NFκB and their regulated genes evidencing that Cordyceps sinensis per se did not have an effect on these transcription factors. Overall, Cordyceps sinensis treatment inhibited hypoxia induced oxidative stress by maintaining higher cellular Nrf2, HIF1 and lowering NFκB levels. These findings provide a basis for possible use of Cordyceps sinensis in tolerating hypoxia. PMID:24063008

  1. Global gene expression profiling of endothelium exposed to heme reveals an organ-specific induction of cytoprotective enzymes in sickle cell disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samit Ghosh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease (SCD is characterized by hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ischemia reperfusion injury. These events cause endothelial dysfunction and vasculopathies in multiple systems. However, the lack of atherosclerotic lesions has led to the idea that there are adaptive mechanisms that protect the endothelium from major vascular insults in SCD patients. The molecular bases for this phenomenon are poorly defined. This study was designed to identify the global profile of genes induced by heme in the endothelium, and assess expression of the heme-inducible cytoprotective enzymes in major organs impacted by SCD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Total RNA isolated from heme-treated endothelial monolayers was screened with the Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 chip, and the microarray data analyzed using multiple bioinformatics software. Hierarchical cluster analysis of significantly differentially expressed genes successfully segregated heme and vehicle-treated endothelium. Validation studies showed that the induction of cytoprotective enzymes by heme was influenced by the origin of endothelial cells, the duration of treatment, as well as the magnitude of induction of individual enzymes. In agreement with these heterogeneities, we found that induction of two major Nrf2-regulated cytoprotective enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase-1 is organ-specific in two transgenic mouse models of SCD. This data was confirmed in the endothelium of post-mortem lung tissues of SCD patients. CONCLUSIONS: Individual organ systems induce unique profiles of cytoprotective enzymes to neutralize heme in SCD. Understanding this heterogeneity may help to develop effective therapies to manage vasculopathies of individual systems.

  2. Small Molecule Antivirulents Targeting the Iron-Regulated Heme Oxygenase (HemO) of P. aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria require iron for survival and virulence and employ several mechanisms including utilization of the host heme containing proteins. The final step in releasing iron is the oxidative cleavage of heme by HemO. A recent computer aided drug design (CADD) study identified several inhibitors of the bacterial HemOs. Herein we report the near complete HN, N, CO Cα and Cβ chemical shift assignment of the P. aeruginosa HemO in the absence and presence of inhibitors (E)-3-(4-(Phenylamino)phenylca...

  3. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 gene modulated mesenchymal stem cells on vasculogenesis in ischemic swine hearts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yi-bo; ZHANG Xiao-li; TANG Yao-liang; MA Gen-shan; SHEN Cheng-xing; WEI Qin; ZHU Qi; YAO Yu-yu; LIU Nai-feng

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation may partially restore heart function in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to explore the beneficial effects of MSCs modified with heme xygenase-1 (HO-1) on post-infarct swine hearts to determine whether the induction of therapeutic angiogenesis is modified by the angiogenic cytokines released from the implanted cells.Methods In vitro, MSCs were divided into four groups: (1) non-transfected MSCs (MSCs group), (2) MSCs transfected with the pcDNA3.1-Lacz plasmid (Lacz-MSCs group), (3) MSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 (HO-1-MSCs group),and (4) MSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 and pretreatment with an HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP)(HO-1-MSCs+SnPP group). Cells were cultured in an airtight incubation bottle for 24 hours, in which the oxygen concentration was maintained at <1%, followed by 12 hours of reoxygenation. After hypoxia/reoxygen treatment, ELISA was used to measure transforming growth factor (TGF-β) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) in the supernatant. In vivo,28 Chinese mini-pigs were randomly allocated to the following treatment groups: (1) control group (saline), (2)Lacz-MSCs group, (3) HO-1-MSCs group, and (4) HO-1-MSCs + SnPP group. About 1×107 of autologous stem cells or an idertical volume of saline was injected intracoronary into porcine hearts 1 hour after MI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assay and postmortem analysis were assessed four weeks after stem cell transplantation.Results Post hypoxia/reoxygenation in vitro, TGF-β in the supernatant was significantly increased in the HO-1-MSCs ((874.88±68.23) pg/ml) compared with Lacz-MSCs ((687.81±57.64) pg/ml, P <0.001). FGF-2 was also significantly increased in the HO-1-MSCs ((1106.48±107.06) pg/ml) compared with the Lacz-MSCs ((853.85±74.44) pg/ml, P <0.001 ).In vivo, at four weeks after transplantation, HO-1 gene transfer increased the capillary density in the peri

  4. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 gene modulated mesenchymal stem cells on vasculogenesis in ischemic swine hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Tang, Yao-Liang; Ma, Gen-Shan; Shen, Cheng-Xing; Wei, Qin; Zhu, Qi; Yao, Yu-Yu; Liu, Nai-Feng

    2011-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation may partially restore heart function in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to explore the beneficial effects of MSCs modified with heme xygenase-1 (HO-1) on post-infarct swine hearts to determine whether the induction of therapeutic angiogenesis is modified by the angiogenic cytokines released from the implanted cells. In vitro, MSCs were divided into four groups: (1) non-transfected MSCs (MSCs group), (2) MSCs transfected with the pcDNA3.1-Lacz plasmid (Lacz-MSCs group), (3) MSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 (HO-1-MSCs group), and (4) MSCs transfected with pcDNA3.1-hHO-1 and pretreatment with an HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) (HO-1-MSCs + SnPP group). Cells were cultured in an airtight incubation bottle for 24 hours, in which the oxygen concentration was maintained at < 1%, followed by 12 hours of reoxygenation. After hypoxia/reoxygen treatment, ELISA was used to measure transforming growth factor (TGF-β) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) in the supernatant. In vivo, 28 Chinese mini-pigs were randomly allocated to the following treatment groups: (1) control group (saline), (2) Lacz-MSCs group, (3) HO-1-MSCs group, and (4) HO-1-MSCs + SnPP group. About 1 × 10(7) of autologous stem cells or an identical volume of saline was injected intracoronary into porcine hearts 1 hour after MI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assay and postmortem analysis were assessed four weeks after stem cell transplantation. Post hypoxia/reoxygenation in vitro, TGF-β in the supernatant was significantly increased in the HO-1-MSCs ((874.88 ± 68.23) pg/ml) compared with Lacz-MSCs ((687.81 ± 57.64) pg/ml, P < 0.001). FGF-2 was also significantly increased in the HO-1-MSCs ((1106.48 ± 107.06) pg/ml) compared with the Lacz-MSCs ((853.85 ± 74.44) pg/ml, P < 0.001). In vivo, at four weeks after transplantation, HO-1 gene transfer increased the capillary density in the peri-infarct area

  5. Induction of docosahexaenoic acid to expression of heme oxygenase-1 in retinal pigment epithelial cells%二十二碳六烯酸对人视网膜色素上皮细胞中血红素氧合酶-1表达的诱导作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘越峰; 罗卫民; 张勇; 钟晓东

    2016-01-01

    .08,P<0.05;F=16.42,P<0.05),其中30、50和100μmol/L DHA组细胞中ROS相对荧光强度、细胞核Nrf2阳性细胞比例均明显高于0μmol/L DHA组,差异均有统计学意义(均P<0.05).100 μ.mol/L DHA处理条件下,NAC预处理后细胞中HO-1蛋白的相对表达量和细胞核Nrf2阳性细胞比例均明显低于单纯100μmol/L DHA组,Nrf2 siRNA转染组细胞中HO-1的相对表达量和细胞核Nrf2阳性细胞比例均明显低于空白siRNA转染组,差异均有统计学意义(均P<0.05). 结论 低于100 μmol/L的DHA可能通过ROS/Nrf2途径诱导RPE细胞表达HO-1,从而发挥对细胞的保护作用.%Background Oxydative stress is an important pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.Resent evidences indicate that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) plays an important role during the development of retinal photoreceptor cells and protect the cells against oxydative stress by inducing the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1).However,whether DHA can induce the expression of HO-1 in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells is unelucidated.Objective This study was to investigate the effect of DHA on the expression of HO-1 in RPE cells and its molecular mechanism.Methods Human RPE cell line ARPE-19 was cultured in vitro and treated with 30,50,100 and 120 μmol/L DHA for 4 to 24 hours,respectively,and the cells were cultured without DHA as the control group.The cytotoxicity of DHA was detected by lactate dehydrogenase(LDH),and the expression of HO-1 mRNA and protein were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot assay,respectively.The enzymatic activity of HO-1 was detected by colorimetry.The reactive oxygen species (ROS) proportion in the cells was detected using fluorescence probe H2 DCFDA,and immunofluorescence technology was adopted to detect the nuclear translocation of nuclear facotor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2).The expression of Nrt2 protein in the cells was detected by Western blot after intervention of ROS inhibitor N

  6. Roles of reactive oxygen species and heme oxygenase-1 in modulation of alveolar macrophage-mediated pulmonary immune responses to Listeria monocytogenes by diesel exhaust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Antonini, James M; Castranova, Vincent; Ma, Joseph K H

    2004-11-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have been shown to suppress alveolar macrophage (AM)-mediated pulmonary immune responses to Listeria monocytogenes in vivo. In this study, effects of DEP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 on AM-mediated immune responses to L. monocytogenes were investigated. Brown Norway rats were intratracheally inoculated with 100,000 L. monocytogenes, and AM were isolated at 7 days post-infection. Exposure to DEP or their organic extract (eDEP), but not the washed DEP (wDEP) or carbon black, increased intracellular ROS and HO-1 expression in AM. Induction of ROS and HO-1 by eDEP was partially reversed by alpha-naphthoflavone, a cytochrome P450 1A1 inhibitor, and totally blocked by N-acetylcysteine. In addition, exposure to eDEP, but not wDEP, inhibited lipopolysacchride-stimulated secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), but augmented production of IL-10 by AM. Kinetic studies showed that modulation of cytokines by eDEP was preceded by ROS and HO-1 induction. Furthermore, pretreatment of AM with superoxide dismutase (SOD) or zinc protoporphrin IX (Znpp), which attenuated eDEP-induced HO-1 expression/activity, substantially inhibited eDEP effect on IL-10. Finally, direct stimulation with pyrogallol (PYR), a superoxide donor, upregulated HO-1 and IL-10 but decreased secretion of IL-12 in L. monocytogenes-infected AM. These results show that DEP, through eDEP-mediated ROS, induce HO-1 expression and IL-10 production and at the same time inhibit AM production of TNF-alpha and IL-12 to dampen the host immune responses. The results also suggest that HO-1 may play an important role in regulating production of IL-10 by DEP-exposed and L. monocytogenes-infected AM.

  7. Anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase-1 inducing activities of lanostane triterpenes isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum in RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Solip; Nguyen, Van Thu; Tae, Nara; Lee, Suhyun; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2014-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a popular medicinal mushroom used in traditional medicine for preventing or treating a variety of diseases. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inducing effects of 12 lanostane triterpenes from G. lucidum in RAW264.7 cells. Of these, seven triterpenes, butyl lucidenateE2, butyl lucidenateD2 (GT-2), butyl lucidenate P, butyl lucidenateQ, Ganoderiol F, methyl ganodenate J and butyl lucidenate N induced HO-1 expression and suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibiting HO-1 activity abrogated the inhibitory effects of these triterpenes on the production of NO in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, suggesting the involvement of HO-1 in the anti-inflammatory effects of these triterpenes. We further studied the anti-inflammatory and HO-1 inducing effects of GT-2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, did not suppress GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction; however, LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, blocked GT-2-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. GT-2 increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering RNA blocked GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction, suggesting that GT-2 induced HO-1 expression via the PI3K/AKT-Nrf2 pathway. Consistent with the notion that HO-1 has anti-inflammatory properties, GT-2 inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. These findings suggest that HO-1 inducing activities of these lanostane triterpenes may be important in the understanding of a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of G. lucidum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PPARδ binding to heme oxygenase 1 promoter prevents angiotensin II-induced adipocyte dysfunction in Goldblatt hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, K; Puri, N; Kim, D H; Hinds, T D; Stechschulte, L A; Favero, G; Rodella, L; Shapiro, J I; Jude, D; Abraham, N G

    2014-03-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) regulates adipogenic response with adipocyte hypertrophy by increasing oxidative stress. Recent studies have shown the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPARδ) agonist in attenuation of angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore a potential mechanistic link between PPARδ and the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and to elucidate the contribution of HO-1 to the adipocyte regulatory effects of PPARδ agonism in an animal model of enhanced RAS, the Goldblatt 2 kidney 1 clip (2K1C) model. We first established a direct stimulatory effect of the PPARδ agonist (GW 501516) on the HO-1 gene by demonstrating increased luciferase activity in COS-7 cells transfected with a luciferase-HO-1 promoter construct. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham-operated animals, 2K1C rats and 2K1C rats treated with GW 501516, in the absence or presence of the HO activity inhibitor, stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP). 2K1C animals had increased visceral adiposity, adipocyte hypertrophy, increased inflammatory cytokines, increased circulatory and adipose tisssue levels of renin and Ang II along with increased adipose tissue gp91 phox expression (Padipose tissue HO-1 and adiponectin levels (Padipocytes (Padipose tissue dysregulation, which is abated by PPARδ-mediated upregulation of the heme-HO system. These findings highlight the pivotal role and symbiotic relationship of HO-1, adiponectin and PPARδ in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis in adipose tissues.

  9. The Janus face of the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase system in Alzheimer disease: it's time for reconciliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Eugenio; Di Domenico, Fabio; Mancuso, Cesare; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognition. These clinical features are due in part to the increase of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that mediate neurotoxic effects. The up-regulation of the heme oxygenase-1/biliverdin reductase-A (HO-1/BVR-A) system is one of the earlier events in the adaptive response to stress. HO-1/BVR-A reduces the intracellular levels of pro-oxidant heme and generates equimolar amounts of the free radical scavengers biliverdin-IX alpha (BV)/bilirubin-IX alpha (BR) as well as the pleiotropic gaseous neuromodulator carbon monoxide (CO) and ferrous iron. Two main and opposite hypotheses for a role of the HO-1/BVR-A system in AD propose that this system mediates neurotoxic and neuroprotective effects, respectively. This apparent controversy was mainly due to the fact that for over about 20years HO-1 was the only player on which all the analyses were focused, excluding the other important and essential component of the entire system, BVR. Following studies from the Butterfield laboratory that reported alterations in BVR activity along with decreased phosphorylation and increased oxidative/nitrosative post-translational modifications in the brain of subjects with AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, a debate was opened on the real pathophysiological and clinical significance of BVR-A. In this paper we provide a review of the main discoveries about the HO/BVR system in AD and MCI, and propose a mechanism that reconciles these two hypotheses noted above of neurotoxic and the neuroprotective aspects of this important stress responsive system.

  10. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 contributes to the amelioration of aluminum-induced oxidative stress in Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiti; Zhang, Jing; Xuan, Wei; Xie, Yanjie

    2013-10-15

    In this report, pharmacological, histochemical and molecular approaches were used to investigate the effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) up-regulation on the alleviation of aluminum (Al)-induced oxidative stress in Medicago sativa. Exposure of alfalfa to AlCl3 (0-100 μM) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of root elongation as well as the enhancement of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content. 1 and 10 μM (in particular) Al(3+) increased alfalfa HO-1 transcript or its protein level, and HO activity in comparison with the decreased changes in 100 μM Al-treated samples. After recuperation, however, TBARS levels in 1 and 10 μM Al-treated alfalfa roots returned to control values, which were accompanied with the higher levels of HO activity. Subsequently, exogenous CO, a byproduct of HO-1, could substitute for the cytoprotective effects of the up-regulation of HO-1 in alfalfa plants upon Al stress, which was confirmed by the alleviation of TBARS and Al accumulation, as well as the histochemical analysis of lipid peroxidation and loss of plasma membrane integrity. Theses results indicated that endogenous CO generated via heme degradation by HO-1 could contribute in a critical manner to its protective effects. Additionally, the pretreatments of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and hemin, an inducer of HO-1, exhibited the similar cytoprotective roles in the alleviation of oxidative stress, both of which were impaired by the potent inhibitor of HO-1, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP). However, the Al-induced inhibition of root elongation was not influenced by CO, BHT and hemin, respectively. Together, the present results showed up-regulation of HO-1 expression could act as a mechanism of cell protection against oxidative stress induced by Al treatment.

  11. Haptoglobin attenuates hemoglobin-induced heme oxygenase-1 in renal proximal tubule cells and kidneys of a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Nguyen, Julia; Belcher, John D; Vercellotti, Gregory M; Alayash, Abdu I

    2015-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a hereditary hemolytic disorder is characterized by chronic hemolysis, oxidative stress, vaso-occlusion and end-organ damage. Hemolysis releases toxic cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) into circulation. Under physiologic conditions, plasma Hb binds to haptoglobin (Hp) and forms Hb-Hp dimers. The dimers bind to CD163 receptors on macrophages for further internalization and degradation. However, in SCD patients plasma Hp is depleted and free Hb is cleared primarily by proximal tubules of kidneys. Excess free Hb in plasma predisposes patients to renal damage. We hypothesized that administration of exogenous Hp reduces Hb-mediated renal damage. To test this hypothesis, human renal proximal tubular cells (HK-2) were exposed to HbA (50μM heme) for 24h. HbA increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an enzyme which degrades heme, reduces heme-mediated oxidative toxicity, and confers cytoprotection. Similarly, infusion of HbA (32μM heme/kg) induced HO-1 expression in kidneys of SCD mice. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the increased HO-1 expression in the proximal tubules of the kidney. Exogenous Hp attenuated the HbA-induced HO-1 expression in vitro and in SCD mice. Our results suggest that Hb-mediated oxidative toxicity may contribute to renal damage in SCD and that Hp treatment reduces heme/iron toxicity in the kidneys following hemolysis.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor 10 protects neuron against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury through inducing heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li-Ye; Chen, Wei; Li, Ying-Ke; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-02

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of structurally related heparin-binding proteins with diverse biological functions. FGFs participate in mitogenesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell migration. Here, we investigated the potential effect of FGF10, a member of FGFs, on neuron survival in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons upon OGD, FGF10 treatment (100 and 1000 ng/ml) attenuated the decrease of cell viability and rescued the LDH release. Tuj-1 immunocytochemistry assay showed that FGF10 promoted neuronal survival. Apoptosis assay with Annexin V+PI by flow cytometry demonstrated that FGF10 treatment reduced apoptotic cell proportion. Moreover, immunoblotting showed that FGF10 alleviated the cleaved caspase-3 upregulation caused by OGD. FGF10 treatment also depressed the OGD-induced increase of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities. At last, we found FGF10 triggered heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression rather than hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Knockdown of HO-1 by siRNA partly abolished the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. In summary, our observations provide the first evidence for the neuroprotective function of FGF10 against ischemic neuronal injury and suggest that FGF10 may be a promising agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  13. Effects of Silymarin on Hepatitis C Virus and Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Expression in Human Hepatoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Vania; Shan, Ying; Lambrecht, Richard W.; Donohue, Susan E.; Moschenross, Darcy; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a global medical problem. The current standard treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC), pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, is prolonged, expensive, has serious side effects and, at best, is only 50% effective. Silymarin is a natural antioxidant often used by patients with CHC, although its efficacy for decreasing HCV levels or ameliorating CHC remains uncertain. HCV infection is associated with increased hepatic oxidative stress, and one of the antioxidant enzymes which protect cells against this stress is heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Methods We investigated effects of silymarin on HCV and HO-1 gene expression in Huh-7 cells, CNS3, and 9-13 cells (the latter two stably expressing HCV-proteins). Results Silymarin significantly down-regulated HCV core mRNA (by 20% - 36%) and protein (by 30%-60%) in CNS3 cells. In contrast, silymarin did not decrease HCV NS5A mRNA or protein expression in 9-13 cells. HO-1 mRNA was up-regulated (60%-400%) by silymarin in Huh-7, CNS3 and 9-13 cells, whereas Bach1 and Nrf2 mRNA levels were not affected. The effect of silymarin to down-regulate HCV core was not related to changes in the Jak-Stat signaling pathway. Conclusions Silymarin may be of benefit in CHC, although prospective, randomized, controlled trials are needed to be certain. PMID:18694403

  14. Protective effect of hemoglobin- induced heme oxygenase- 1on injured lungs caused by limb ischemia-reperfusion inrats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周君琳; 朱晓光; 张桂生; 凌彤

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the role of hemoglobin(HB) -induced heme oxygenase- 1 ( HO- 1 ) in injured lungscaused by limb ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) in rats.Methods: A rat model of ischemia in the hind limbswas made by clamping the infrarenal aorta with amicrovascular clip, and lung injury occurred afterreperfusion. To induce the expression of HO-1 in the lungs,Hb was administrated intraperitoneally at 16 hours beforereperfusion. Northern blotting and Western blotting wereused to detect the expression of HO-1 in the lungs, and thecarboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level in arterial blood wasassayed. The effect of hemoglobin (Hb) on the injuredlungs after limb I/R was determined by measuring thechanges of lung histology, polymorphonuclear (PMN)count, malondialdehyde (MDA) content and wet-to-dryweight ratio (W/D). Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), aninhibitor of HO, was used to determine whether HO-1 wasinduced by Hb after lung injury.Results: Hb led to a significant increase in HO-1mRNA and protein expression in the lungs, accompanied bythe increase of COHb level in arterial blood. Comparedwith the sham controls, the lung PMN count, MDA contentand W/D significantly increased at 4 hours after limb I/R,which reversed by the pretreatment with Hb at 16 hoursbefore reperfusion. ZnPP blocked this protective role of Hbin the injured lungs.Conclusions: Hb can induce the lung HO-1expression, which plays an important role in the defenseagainst I/R-induced lung injury in rats.

  15. GT microsatellite repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm in Croatian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorek, Andrea Crkvenac; Gornik, Kristina Crkvenac; Polancec, Darija Stupin; Dabelic, Sanja

    2013-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex genetic disorder caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental risk factors. The number of (GT)(n) repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene promoter modulates transcription of this enzyme, which might have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and antiproliferative effect. The distribution of alleles and genotypes in Croatian individuals genotyped for the (GT)(n) HO-1 polymorphism was similar to that in other European populations. Frequency of the short (S) alleles (GT < 25) was higher in AAA patients (41.9%) than in non-AAA individuals (28.2%, p = 0.0026) because there were more SL heterozygotes among the AAA patients. The SL genotype appeared to increase the risk for AAA, but the increase was not statistically significant after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia (OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.90-3.09, p = 0.062). These findings contradict those of the only other study performed so far on the association of (GT)(n) HO-1 polymorphism and AAA.

  16. The Aminopyridinol Derivative BJ-1201 Protects Murine Hippocampal Cells against Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity via Heme Oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sung Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. It can cause neuronal cell damage in the context of oxidative stress. BJ-1201 is a derivative of the compound aminopyridinol, which is known for its antioxidant activity. In this study, we examined the effect of BJ-1201, a 6-(diphenylamino-2,4,5-trimethylpyridin-3-ol compound, on neuroprotection in HT22 cells. Our data showed that BJ-1201 can protect HT22 cells against glutamate-induced cell cytotoxicity. In addition, BJ-1201 upregulated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 to levels comparable to those of the CoPP-treated group. BJ-1201 treatment induced phosphorylation of JNK, but not p38-MAPK or ERK. It also increased the signal in the reporter assay based on β-galactosidase activity driven by the nuclear transcription factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 promoter harboring antioxidant response elements (AREs and induced the translocation of Nrf2. These results demonstrate that BJ-1201 may be a good therapeutic platform against neurodegenerative diseases induced by oxidative stress.

  17. Depression-like behaviors and heme oxygenase-1 are regulated by Lycopene in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Fu, Yanyan; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Pan, Wei; Shi, Yue; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Xunbao; Qi, Dashi; Li, Lei; Ma, Kai; Tang, Renxian; Zheng, Kuiyang; Song, Yuanjian

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lycopene possesses anti-inflammatory properties in the central nervous system. However, the potential role and the molecular mechanisms of lycopene in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenge inflammation and depression-like behaviors has not been clearly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the effects and the potential mechanisms of lycopene on LPS-induced depression-like behaviors. Lycopene was orally administered (60mg/kg) every day for seven days followed by intraperitoneal LPS injection (1mg/kg). The Forced swim test and tail suspension test were used to detect changes in the depression-like behaviors. ELISA was used to measure the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) in the plasma. Immunoblotting was performed to measure the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the hippocampus. The results showed that pretreatment with lycopene could ameliorate depression-like behaviors. Moreover, lycopene relieved neuronal cell injury in hippocampal CA1 regions. Furthermore, lycopene decreased LPS-induced expression of IL-1β and HO-1 in the hippocampus together with decreasing level of IL-6 and TNF-α in the plasma. Taken together, these results suggest that lycopene can attenuate LPS-induced inflammation and depression-like behaviors, which may be involved in regulating HO-1 in the hippocampus.

  18. Atorvastatin Attenuates TNF-alpha Production via Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao Qiao; LUO Nian Sang; CHEN Zhong Qing; LIN Yong Qing; GU Miao Ning; CHEN Yang Xin

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo assess the effect of atorvastatin on lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-inducedTNF-α production in RAW264.7 macrophages. MethodsRAW264.7 macrophageswere treated in different LPS concentrations oratdifferent time points with or without atorvastatin. TNF-α level in supernatant was measured. Expressions of TNF-αmRNA and protein and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were detected by ELISA, PCR, and Western blot, respectively. HOactivity was assayed. ResultsLPS significantly increased the TNF-α expression and secretion in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The HO-1activity and HO-1 expression level were significantly higher after atorvastatin treatment than before atorvastatin treatment and attenuated by SB203580 and PD98059 but not by SP600125, suggesting that the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways participate inregulating the above-mentioned effects of atorvastatin. Moreover, the HO-1 activity suppressed by SnPP or the HO-1 expression inhibited by siRNA significantly attenuated the effect of atorvastatin onTNF-α expression and production in LPS-stimulated macrophages. ConclusionAtorvastatin can attenuate LPS-induced TNF-α expression and production by activating HO-1 via the ERK and p38 MAPK pathways,suggesting that atorvastatin can be used in treatment of inflammatory diseases such as sepsis, especially in those with atherosclerotic diseases.

  19. Nucleotide sequencing, cloning, and expression of Capra hircus Heme Oxygenase-1 in caprine islets to promote insulin secretion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhshiteh, Faezeh; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Lila, Mohd Azmi B Mohd; Abbasiliasi, Sahar; Ajdari, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of islets of Langerhans that have been isolated from whole pancreas is an attractive alternative for the reversal of Type 1 diabetes. However, in vitro culture of isolated pancreatic islets has been reported to cause a decrease in glucose response over time. Hence, the improvement in islet culture conditions is an important goal in islet transplantation. Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress protein that has been described as an inducible protein with the capacity of preventing apoptosis and cytoprotection via radical scavenging. Therefore, this study was aimed to assess the influence of endogenous HO-1 gene transfer on insulin secretion of caprine islets. The full-length cDNA sequence of Capra hircus HO-1 was determined using specific designed primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends of pancreatic tissue. The HO-1 cDNA was then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vectors and transfected into caprine islets using lipid carriers. Efficiency of lipid carriers to transfect caprine islets was determined by flow cytometry. Insulin secretion assay was carried out by ovine insulin ELISA. The finding demonstrated that endogenous HO-1 gene transfer could improve caprine islet function in in vitro culture. Consequently, strategies using HO-1 gene transfer to islets might lead to better outcome in islet transplantation.

  20. An improved method for purification of recombinant truncated heme oxygenase-1 by expanded bed adsorption and gel filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong-Bo; Wang, Wei; Han, Ling; Zhou, Wen-Pu; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) expressed in Escherichia coli was efficiently separated and purified from feedstock by DEAE-ion exchange expanded bed adsorption. Protocol optimization of hHO-1 on DEAE adsorbent resulted in adsorption in 0 M NaCl and elution in 150 mM NaCl at a pH of 8.5. The active enzyme fractions separated from the expanded bed column were further purified by a Superdex 75 gel filtration step. The specific hHO-1 activity increased from 0.82 +/- 0.05 to 24.8 +/- 1.8 U/mg during the whole purification steps. The recovery and purification factor of truncated hHO-1 of the whole purification were 72.7 +/- 4.7 and 30.2 +/- 2.3%, respectively. This purification process can decrease the demand on the preparation of feedstock and simplify the purification process.

  1. Crucial role of heme oxygenase-1 in the sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cell line Kasumi-1 to ursolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Fang, Qin; Li, Yan; Wang, Jishi; Sun, Jia; Zhang, Yaming; Hu, Xiuying; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Shengshu

    2014-04-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), which has been used extensively as an antileukemic agent in traditional Chinese medicine, is safely edible if originating from food. We found that the apoptotic rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtype M2 (AML-M2) cell line Kasumi-1 treated by UA was higher than those of other leukemia cell lines, but was not as high as that treated by arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C), suggesting that UA is an important chemotherapeutic agent to treat AML-M2. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a key enzyme exerting potent cytoprotection, cell proliferation, and drug resistance. HO-1 in Kasumi-1 cells was upregulated by being treated with low-dose rather than high-dose UA. Inhibition of HO-1 by zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) IX sensitized Kasumi-1 cells to UA, and the apoptotic rate was close to that induced by Ara-C (PKasumi-1 cell line was the most sensitive to UA, but the apoptotic effect was inferior to that treated by Ara-C because of HO-1 upregulation. AML-M2 can feasibly be treated by target-inhibiting HO-1 that enhances the antileukemia effects of UA in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Human Pharmacokinetics of High Dose Oral Curcumin and Its Effect on Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Healthy Male Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uros Klickovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 has been proposed to exert pharmacological benefits by its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. HO-1 expression may be affected by the GT length polymorphism in the promoter region of the HO-1 gene. We investigated the inducibility of HO-1 by orally administered curcumin in healthy male subjects and its correlation with the GT length polymorphism. Methods. In an open label uncontrolled phase-1 pilot study, ten male subjects received 12 g of oral curcumin. To investigate the effects of the GT length polymorphism on the inducibility of HO-1, five subjects with homozygous short and five with homozygous long GT genotypes were studied. Plasma concentrations of curcumin, bilirubin, HO-1 mRNA, and protein expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were analyzed over 48 hours. Results. At a detection limit of 1 µg/mL curcumin could not be detected in plasma of any subject. Compared to baseline, HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were not induced in PBMCs at any time point up to 48 hours. There was no correlation between any of the parameters and GT length polymorphism. Conclusions. Oral curcumin administration has low bioavailability and does not induce HO-1 on mRNA or protein level in PBMCs.

  3. Differential effect of gamma-radiation-induced heme oxygenase-1 activity in female and male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngsoo; Platonov, Alexander; Akhalaia, Medea; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Song, Jie-Young

    2005-08-01

    Ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species, which exert diverse biological effects on cells and animals. We investigated alterations of heme oxygenase (HO) and non-protein thiols (NPSH), which are known as two major anti-oxidant enzymes, in female and male C57BL/6 mice in the lung, liver, and brain after whole-body gamma-irradiation with 10 Gy (1-7 days) as well as in the lung after whole-thorax gamma-irradiation (WTI) with 12.5 Gy (1-26 weeks). Most significant alteration of HO activity was observed in the liver, which elevated 250% in males. NPSH level in female liver was increased on the 5th-7th days but decreased in males on the 3rd day. In the lung, the elevation of HO activity in both sexes and the pattern of NPSH change were similar to that of the liver. On the other hand, the increase of HO activity on the 16th week and the decrease of NPSH level on the 2nd week were observed only in male lung after WTI. This study shows that the liver is the most sensitive tissue to gamma-irradiation-induced alterations of HO activity in both female and male mice. In addition, there exists significant differential effect of gamma-irradiation on anti-oxidant system in female and male mice.

  4. Cross-talk between heme oxygenase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the regulation of physiological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndisang, Joseph Fomusi

    2014-06-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptors (PPARs) are transcription factors belonging to the superfamily of nuclear receptors. The isoforms of PPAR include PPAR alpha, PPAR gamma and PPAR delta (also known as PPAR beta). Generally, PPARs potentiate insulin sensitivity, improve glucose/lipid metabolism, suppress inflammation/oxidative stress, attenuate excessive immune responses, regulate cell-growth and differentiation. Interestingly, agonists of PPAR gamma and PPAR alpha have been shown to upregulate the heme-oxygenase (HO)-system. Conversely, the HO-system also enhances PPAR alpha, and potentiates the expression and activity of PPAR gamma. Moreover, the HO-system and related products including bilirubin, biliverdin, carbon monoxide and ferritin have been shown to increase insulin sensitivity, improve glucose/lipid metabolism, suppress inflammation/oxidative stress, abate immune response, and modulate cell-growth/differentiation. Therefore, an intimate, reciprocal, stimulatory and synergistic relationship between PPAR-signaling and the HO-system can be envisaged in the regulation of physiological functions. Thus, both the HO-system and PPARs-signaling participate in fine-tuning similar physiological functions, so novel pharmacological agents capable of optimizing this interaction should be sought. The coordinated regulation of PPAR-signaling and the HO-system may constitute the basis for future drug design.

  5. Oxidative Stress and Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulated Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Vanella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effect of increased expression of HO-1 protein and increased levels of HO activity on differentiation of bone-marrow-derived human MSCs. MSCs are multipotent cells that proliferate and differentiate into many different cell types including adipocytes and osteoblasts. HO, the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, plays an important role during MSCs differentiation. HO catalyzes the stereospecific degradation of heme to biliverdin, with the concurrent release of iron and carbon monoxide. Upregulation of HO-1 expression and increased HO activity are essential for MSC growth and differentiation to the osteoblast lineage consistent with the role of HO-1 in hematopoietic stem cell differentiation. HO-1 participates in the MSC differentiation process shifting the balance of MSC differentiation in favor of the osteoblast lineage by decreasing PPARγ and increasing osteogenic markers such as alkaline phosphatase and BMP-2. In this paper, we define HO-1 as a target molecule in the modulation of adipogenesis and osteogenesis from MSCs and examine the role of the HO system in diabetes, inflammation, osteoporosis, hypertension, and other pathologies, a burgeoning area of research.

  6. Effect of zinc protoporphyrin on carbon monoxide/heme oxygenase-1 system in rats subjected to recurrent febrile convulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on febrile convulsion (FC)-caused brain injury are disputed in many aspects.How FC cause nervous system injury in the developmental period and what are the characteristics of these pathological injury are unknown. The current studies have demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-l) exerts effects on brain injury mainly by catalyzing hemoglobin to produce degradation products, and HO-1 not only has neuroprotective effects, but also has neurotoxic effects during the FC-caused brain injury. Study on the effect of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) on brain injury is still in the stage of animal experiment.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of ZnPP on carbon monoxide (CO)/HO-1 system of rats subjected to FC, and to analyze the action pathway of ZnPP in brain protective effect.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Pediatrics, First Hospital Affiliated to Jiamusi University.MATERIALS: Sixty-five Wistar rats, of either gender, were involved in this study. They were randomized into normal control group( n =14, 37 ℃ water bath) and febrile treatment group (n =51, 44.5 ℃ hot water bath). Febrile treatment group was sub-divided into febrile non-convulsion group (FNC group, n =16) and FC group (n =35). FC group was further sub-divided into simple convulsion group (n =20) and ZnPP treatment group (n =15). HO-1 mRNA in situ hybridization kit was provided by Boster Bioengineering Co.,Ltd. ZnPP(dark brown powder) was the product of Jingmei Bioengineering Company.METHODS: This study was carried out in the postgraduate laboratory of Jiamusi University between January 2004 and January 2007. Rats in the febrile treatment group were placed in the 44.5 ℃ hot water bath box. If rats did not convulse in the water within 5 minutes, they were taken out, namely FNC group (n =16), and those, which were convulsed within 5 minutes, were taken out immediately when they presented such a phenomenon, namely FC group (n =35). Convulsion induction was

  7. Taraxacum coreanum protects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through heme oxygenase-1 expression in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chi-Su; Ko, Wonmin; Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Dong-Cheol; Kim, Jongsu; Choi, Moonbum; Beom, Jin Seon; An, Ren-Bo; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2017-02-22

    Taraxacum coreanum Nakai is a dandelion that is native to Korea, and is widely used as an edible and medicinal herb. The present study revealed the neuroprotective effect of this plant against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells. Ethanolic extracts from the aerial (TCAE) and the root parts (TCRE) of T. coreanum were prepared. Both extracts were demonstrated, by high performance liquid chromatography, to contain caffeic acid and ferulic acid as representative constituents. TCAE and TCRE significantly increased cell viability against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that treatment of HT22 cells with the extracts induced increased expression of the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), compared with untreated cells, in a concentration-dependent manner. Increased HO-1 enzymatic activity, compared with untreated cells, was also demonstrated following treatment with TCAE and TCRE. In addition, western blot analysis of the nuclear fractions of both TCAE and TCRE-treated HT22 cells revealed increased levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2 like 2 (Nrf2) compared with untreated cells, and decreased Nrf2 levels in the cytoplasmic fraction compared with untreated cells. The present study suggested that the neuroprotective effect of T. coreanum is associated with induction of HO-1 expression and Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus. Therefore, T. coreanum exhibits a promising function in prevention of neurodegeneration. Further studies will be required for the isolation and the full characterization of its active substances.

  8. Endogenous Hydrogen Peroxide Plays a Positive Role in the Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase and Acclimation to Oxidative Stress in Wheat Seedling Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yue Chen; Wen-Biao Shen; Xiao Ding; Sheng Xu; Ren Wang; Wei Xuan; Ze-Yu Cao; Jian Chen; Hong-Hong Wu; Mao-Bing Ye

    2009-01-01

    Pretreatment of lower H_2O_2 doses (0.05, 0.5 and 5 mM) for 24 h was able to dose-dependently attenuate lipid peroxidation In wheat seedling leaves mediated by further oxidative damage elicited by higher dose of H_2O_2 (150 mM) for 6 h, with 0.5 mM H_2O_2 being the most effective concentrations. Further results lllustrated that 0.5 mM H_2O_2 pretreatment triggered the biphasic production of H_2O_2 during a 24 h period. We also noticed that only peak Ⅰ (0.25 h) rather than peak Ⅱ (4 h) was approxlmately consistent with the enhancement of heme oxygenase (HO) activity, HO-1 gene expression. Meanwhile, enhanced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, Mn-SOD and Cu, Zn-SOD transcripts might be a potential source of peak I of endogenous H_2O_2. Further results confirmed that 0.5 mM H_2O_2 treatment for 0.5 h was able to upregulate HO gene expression, which was detected by enzyme activity determination, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blottlng. Meanwhile, the application of N,N'-dimethylthiourea, a trap for endogenous H_2O_2, not only blocked the upregulation of HO, but also reversed the corresponding oxidation attenuation. Together, the above results suggest that endogenous H_2O_2 production (peak I) plays a positive role in the induction of HO by enhancing its mRNA level and protein expression, thus leading to the acclimation to oxidative stress.

  9. Adoptive transfer of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-modified macrophages rescues the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) antiinflammatory phenotype in liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Shen, Xiu-Da; Yue, Shi; Zhu, Jianjun; Gao, Feng; Zhai, Yuan; Busuttil, Ronald W; Ke, Bibo; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2014-10-14

    Macrophages are instrumental in the pathophysiology of liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Although Nrf2 regulates macrophage-specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) antioxidant defense, it remains unknown whether HO-1 induction might rescue macrophage Nrf2-dependent antiinflammatory functions. This study explores the mechanisms by which the Nrf2-HO-1 axis regulates sterile hepatic inflammation responses after adoptive transfer of ex vivo modified HO-1 overexpressing bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Livers in Nrf2-deficient mice preconditioned with Ad-HO-1 BMMs, but not Ad-β-Gal-BMMs, ameliorated liver IRI (at 6 h of reperfusion after 90 min of warm ischemia), evidenced by improved hepatocellular function (serum alanine aminotransferase [sALT] levels) and preserved hepatic architecture (Suzuki histological score). Treatment with Ad-HO-1 BMMs decreased neutrophil accumulation, proinflammatory mediators and hepatocellular necrosis/apoptosis in ischemic livers. Moreover, Ad-HO-1 transfection of Nrf2-deficient BMMs suppressed M1 (Nos2(+)) while promoting the M2 (Mrc-1/Arg-1(+)) phenotype. Unlike in controls, Ad-HO-1 BMMs increased the expression of Notch1, Hes1, phosphorylation of Stat3 and Akt in IR-stressed Nrf2-deficient livers as well as in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BMMs. Thus, adoptive transfer of ex vivo generated Ad-HO-1 BMMs rescued Nrf2-dependent antiinflammatory phenotype by promoting Notch1/Hes1/Stat3 signaling and reprogramming macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. These findings provide the rationale for a novel clinically attractive strategy to manage IR liver inflammation/damage.

  10. The orbital ground state of the azide-substrate complex of human heme oxygenase is an indicator of distal H-bonding: Implications for the enzyme mechanism‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P.; Peng, Dungeng; Satterlee, James D.; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz; Mar, Gerd N. La

    2009-01-01

    The active site electronic structure of the azide complex of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-1, (hHO) has been investigated by 1H NMR spectroscopy to shed light on the orbital/spin ground state as an indicator of the unique distal pocket environment of the enzyme. 2D 1H NMR assignments of the substrate and substrate-contact residue signals reveal a pattern of substrate methyl contact shifts, that places the lone iron π-spin in the dxz orbital, rather than the dyz orbital found in the cyanide complex. Comparison of iron spin relaxivity, magnetic anisotropy and magnetic susceptibilities argues for a low-spin, (dxy)2(dyz,dxz)3, ground state in both azide and cyanide complexes. The switch from singly-occupied dyz for the cyanide to dxz for the azide complex of hHO is shown to be consistent with the orbital hole determined by the azide π-plane in the latter complex, which is ∼90° in-plane rotated from that of the imidazole π-plane. The induction of the altered orbital ground state in the azide relative to the cyanide hHO complex, as well as the mean low-field bias of methyl hyperfine shifts and their paramagnetic relaxivity relative to those in globins, indicate that azide exerts a stronger ligand field in hHO than in the globins, or that the distal H-bonding to azide is weaker in hHO than in globins. The Asp140 → Ala hHO mutant that abolishes activity retains the unusual WT azide complex spin/orbital ground state. The relevance of our findings for other HO complexes and the HO mechanism is discussed. PMID:19243105

  11. Glomerular Epithelial Cells-Targeted Heme Oxygenase-1 Over Expression in the Rat: Attenuation of Proteinuria in Secondary But Not Primary Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsaves, Vassilios; Makri, Panagiota; Detsika, Maria G; Tsirogianni, Alexandra; Lianos, Elias A

    2016-01-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in glomerular epithelial cells (GEC) in response to injury is poor and this may be a disadvantage. We, therefore, explored whether HO-1 overexpression in GEC can reduce proteinuria induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) or in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody (Ab)-mediated glomerulonephritis (GN). HO-1 overexpression in GEC (GECHO-1) of Sprague-Dawley rats was achieved by targeting a FLAG-human (h) HO-1 using transposon-mediated transgenesis. Direct GEC injury was induced by a single injection of PAN. GN was induced by administration of an anti-rat GBM Ab and macrophage infiltration in glomeruli was assessed by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, which was also used to assess glomerular nephrin expression. In GECHO-1 rats, FLAG-hHO-1 transprotein was co-immunolocalized with nephrin. Baseline glomerular HO-1 protein levels were higher in GECHO-1 compared to wild type (WT) rats. Administration of either PAN or anti-GBM Ab to WT rats increased glomerular HO-1 levels. Nephrin expression markedly decreased in glomeruli of WT or GECHO-1 rats treated with PAN. In anti-GBM Ab-treated WT rats, nephrin expression also decreased. In contrast, it was preserved in anti-GBM Ab-treated GECHO-1 rats. In these, macrophage infiltration in glomeruli and the ratio of urine albumin to urine creatinine (Ualb/Ucreat) were markedly reduced. There was no difference in Ualb/Ucreat between WT and GECHO-1 rats treated with PAN. Depending on the type of injury, HO-1 overexpression in GEC may or may not reduce proteinuria. Reduced macrophage infiltration and preservation of nephrin expression are putative mechanisms underlying the protective effect of HO-1 overexpression following immune injury. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The orbital ground state of the azide-substrate complex of human heme oxygenase is an indicator of distal H-bonding: implications for the enzyme mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Hiroshi; Evans, John P; Peng, Dungeng; Satterlee, James D; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R; La Mar, Gerd N

    2009-04-14

    The active site electronic structure of the azide complex of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase 1 (hHO) has been investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy to shed light on the orbital/spin ground state as an indicator of the unique distal pocket environment of the enzyme. Two-dimensional (1)H NMR assignments of the substrate and substrate-contact residue signals reveal a pattern of substrate methyl contact shifts that places the lone iron pi-spin in the d(xz) orbital, rather than the d(yz) orbital found in the cyanide complex. Comparison of iron spin relaxivity, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic susceptibilities argues for a low-spin, (d(xy))(2)(d(yz),d(xz))(3), ground state in both azide and cyanide complexes. The switch from singly occupied d(yz) for the cyanide to d(xz) for the azide complex of hHO is shown to be consistent with the orbital hole determined by the azide pi-plane in the latter complex, which is approximately 90 degrees in-plane rotated from that of the imidazole pi-plane. The induction of the altered orbital ground state in the azide relative to the cyanide hHO complex, as well as the mean low-field bias of methyl hyperfine shifts and their paramagnetic relaxivity relative to those in globins, indicates that azide exerts a stronger ligand field in hHO than in the globins, or that the distal H-bonding to azide is weaker in hHO than in globins. The Asp140 --> Ala hHO mutant that abolishes activity retains the unusual WT azide complex spin/orbital ground state. The relevance of our findings for other HO complexes and the HO mechanism is discussed.

  13. 血红素氧合酶-1与中枢神经系统疾病%Heme oxygenase-1 and central nervous system diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹

    2012-01-01

    血红素氧合酶-1(heme oxygenase-1,HO-1)是血红素降解的起始酶和限速酶,可被氧化应激、化学物质和药物等诱导激活,通过抗氧化、抗炎和抗凋亡机制发挥细胞保护作用.多种中枢神经系统(central nervous system,CNS)疾病均可引起HO-1表达变化,该酶的异常涉及到多种CNS疾病.文中就HO-1的生物学特性和在不同神经系统疾病中的表达、作用作简要综述.%Heme oxygenase-1 ( HO-1 ), as a rate-limiting enzyme of heme, can be activated by oxidative stress, chemical materials and drugs, and protects cells by its anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation and anti-apoptosis roles. Its abnormal expression is always related to many central nervous system diseases. This article summarizes the biological specificities and its expressions and effects in different central nervous system diseases.

  14. Inflammatory response to coronary artery bypass surgery:Does the heme-oxygenase-1 gene microsatellite polymorphism play a role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping; Jules Sanders; Emma Hawe; David Brull; Hugh Montgomery; Steve Humphries

    2005-01-01

    Background Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to bilirubin, ferritin and carbon monoxide (CO) and may have significant anti-inflammatory function.The HO-1 gene promoter region shows microsatellite polymorphism with different (GT)n repeats, reported to differently induce gene expression, with the short allele associated with higher gene expression.We measured the acute inflammatory response using coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) as a well-characterized and uniform stimulus and examined the correlation between levels of IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen and their relationship to HO-1 genotype.Methods Two hundred and seventy-five consecutive patients undergoing CABG were genotyped for the HO-1 promoter polymorphism using PCR and automated DNA capillary sequencer.IL-6, CRP and fibrinogen were measured at baseline and 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours after CABG.Results Complete IL-6,CRP and fibrinogen measures were available in 220 patients.Before surgery IL-6 levels showed a strong correlation with CRP and fibrinogen (r=0.48, P37(GT)n as L (long); allele frequency 0.35, 0.58 and 0.07 respectively.Baseline CRP differed by genotype: those carrying at least one long allele having higher CRP than those with no long allele (3.76±0.79 vs.2.07±0.17, P=0.013).Conversely, those carrying at least one short allele had higher fibrinogen levels than those with no short allele (3.83±0.79 vs.3.51±0.88, P=0.006).Conclusions There is a strong correlation between the measured acute phase reactants both at baseline and after the inflammatory response to CABG in patients with coronary disease.There was an association between the HO-1 microsatellite polymorphism and CRP and fibrinogen levels at baseline but there was no similar association following CABG.This may indicate that HO-1 is associated with chronic atherosclerotic inflammatory processes rather than acute.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 in pregnancy and cancer: similarities in cellular invasion, cytoprotection, angiogenesis, and immunomodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eZhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy can be defined as a permissible process, where a semi-allogeneic fetus and placenta are allowed to grow and survive within the mother. Similarly, in tumor growth, antigen-specific malignant cells proliferate and evade into normal tissues of the host. The microenvironments of the placenta and tumors are amazingly comparable, sharing similar mechanisms exploited by fetal or cancer cells with regard to surviving in a hypoxic microenvironment, invading tissues via degradation and vasculogenesis, and escaping host attack through immune privilege. Heme oxygease-1 (HO-1 is a stress-response protein that has anti-oxidative, anti-apoptotic, pro-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Although a large volume of research has been published in recent years investigating the possible role(s of HO-1 in pregnancy and in cancer development, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these yin-yang processes have still not been fully elucidated. Here, we summarize and compare pregnancy and cancer development, focusing primarily on the function of HO-1 in cellular invasion, cytoprotection, angiogenesis, and immunomodulation. Due to the similarities of both processes, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms of each process may reveal and guide the development of new approaches to prevent not only pregnancy disorders; but also, to study cancer.

  16. Influence of heme oxygenase-1 gene transfer on the viability and function of rat islets in in vitro culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Bo Chen; Yong-Xiang Li; Yang Jiao; Wei-Ping Dong; Ge Li; Jing Chen; Jian-Ming Tan

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To ifivestigate the influence of heme oxygenase-1(HO-1)gene transfer on the viability and function of cultured rat islets in vitro.METHODS:Islets were isolated from the pancreata of Sprague-Dawley rats by intraductal collagenase digestion,and purified by discontinuous Ficoll density gradient centrifugation.Purified rat islets were transfected with adenoviral vectors containing human HO-1 gene(Ad-HO-1)or enhanced green fluorescent protein gene(Ad-EGFP),and then cultured for seven days.Transfection was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy and Western blot.Islet viability was evaluated by acridine orange/propidium iodide fluorescent staining.Glucose-stimulated insulin release was detected using insulin radioimmunoassay kits and was used to assess the function of islets.Stimulation index (SI)was calculated by dividing the insulin release upon high glucose stimulation by the insulin release upon low glucose stimulation.RESULTS:After seven days culture,the viability of cultured rat islets decreased significantly(92% ± 6% vs 52% ± 13%,P < 0.05),and glucose-stimulated insulin release also decreased significantly(6.47 ± 0.55 mIU/L/30IEQ vs 4.57 ± 0.40 mIU/L/30IEQ,14.93 ± 1.17mIU/L/30IEQ vs 9.63 ± 0.71 mIU/L/30IEQ,P < 0.05).Transfection of rat Islets with adenoviral vectors at an MOI of 20 was efficient,and did not impair islet function.At 7 d post-transfection,the viability of Ad-HO-1 transfected islets was higher than that of control islets (71% ± 15% vs 52% ± 13%,P < 0.05).There was no significant difference in insulin release upon low glucose stimulation(2.8 mmol/L)among Ad-HO-1 transfected group,Ad-EGFP transfected group,and control group(P > 0.05),while when stimulated by high glucose(16.7 mmol/L)solution,insulin release in Ad-HO-1 transfected group was significantly higher than that in Ad-EGFP transfected group and control group,respectively(12.50 ± 2.17 mIU/L/30IEQ vs 8.87 ± 0.65 mIU/L/30IEQ;12.50 ± 2.17 mIU/L/30IEQ vs 9.63 ± 0.71 mIU/L/30IEQ

  17. Fibroblast growth factor 10 protects neuron against oxygen–glucose deprivation injury through inducing heme oxygenase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li-Ye; Chen, Wei; Li, Ying-Ke, E-mail: liyingke6f@126.com; Yuan, Hong-Bin, E-mail: yuanhongbin6f@126.com

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FGF10 attenuates OGD induced injury in cortical neuron. • FGF10 reduces OGD triggered ROS level in cortical neuron. • FGF10 induces HO-1 expression upon OGD stimuli in cortical neuron. • Knockdown of HO-1 impairs the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. - Abstract: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of structurally related heparin-binding proteins with diverse biological functions. FGFs participate in mitogenesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell migration. Here, we investigated the potential effect of FGF10, a member of FGFs, on neuron survival in oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons upon OGD, FGF10 treatment (100 and 1000 ng/ml) attenuated the decrease of cell viability and rescued the LDH release. Tuj-1 immunocytochemistry assay showed that FGF10 promoted neuronal survival. Apoptosis assay with Annexin V + PI by flow cytometry demonstrated that FGF10 treatment reduced apoptotic cell proportion. Moreover, immunoblotting showed that FGF10 alleviated the cleaved caspase-3 upregulation caused by OGD. FGF10 treatment also depressed the OGD-induced increase of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities. At last, we found FGF10 triggered heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression rather than hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Knockdown of HO-1 by siRNA partly abolished the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. In summary, our observations provide the first evidence for the neuroprotective function of FGF10 against ischemic neuronal injury and suggest that FGF10 may be a promising agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  18. Microsatellite polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter and the risk of atrial fibrillation in Taiwanese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-An Hsu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF is associated with increased oxidative stress. Emerging evidence suggests that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a potent antioxidant system against various oxidative stress-related diseases. The human HO-1 promoter has a GT-repeat length polymorphism that can determine the level of gene transcription. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to assess the role of the GT-repeat polymorphism in the promoter region of the HO-1 gene in Chinese-Taiwanese patients with AF. METHODS AND RESULTS: This study enrolled 200 AF patients and 240 controls, comparable for age and gender. In each subject, the length of GT-repeat polymorphism in the HO-1 promoter region was examined by polymerase chain reactions. The frequencies of long GT-repeat alleles (≧32 were significantly higher in AF patients than in controls. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of long allele was significantly and independently associated with AF (odds ratio: 1.91, 95% CI 1.07-3.72; P = 0.028. Right atrial tissues from patients with chronic AF were investigated with immunoconfocal microscopy. Patients homozygous for shorter GT-repeat alleles exhibited greater HO-1 expression in their atria than those homozygous for longer alleles, which was reflected by less oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, and fibrosis in the atria of patients with shorter GT-repeat. In vitro, transient transfection assay in HL-1 atrial myocytes showed that the responsiveness of HO-1 transcriptional activity to tachypacing was inversely correlated with the length of the GT-repeats. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the HO-1 microsatellite polymorphism may contribute to the genetic background of AF in Chinese-Taiwanese patients.

  19. Maternal serum heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1 concentrations in early pregnancy and subsequent risk of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfang Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 concentrations have been recently reported to be elevated in impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, no study has examined the association between HO-1 concentrations and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. METHODS: In a case-control study, nested within a prospective cohort of pregnant women (186 GDM cases and 191 women who remained eu-glycemic through pregnancy, we assessed the association of maternal serum HO-1 concentrations, measured in samples collected at 16 weeks gestation, on average, with subsequent risk of GDM. Maternal serum HO-1 concentrations were determined using ELISA. We fitted multivariate logistic regression models to derive estimates of odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. RESULTS: Median serum HO-1 concentrations in early pregnancy were lower in women who subsequently developed GDM compared with those who did not (1.60 vs. 1.80 ng/mL, p-value=0.002. After adjusting for maternal age, race, family history of T2DM and pre-pregnancy body mass index, women with HO-1 ≥ 3.05 ng/mL (highest decile experienced a 74% reduction of GDM risk (95% CI; 0.09-0.77 compared with women whose concentrations were<1.23 ng/mL (lowest quartile. CONCLUSION: Serum HO-1 concentrations were inversely associated with subsequent GDM risk. These findings underscore the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of GDM. Additional studies are warranted to confirm the clinical utility of serum HO-1 in diagnosis of GDM, particularly in the early pregnancy.

  20. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases.

  1. Desoxyrhapontigenin up-regulates Nrf2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression in macrophages and inflammatory lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Joo Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is an important anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and cytoprotective enzyme that is regulated by the activation of the major transcription factor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2. In the present study, six stilbene derivatives isolated from Rheum undulatum L. were assessed for their antioxidative potential. In the tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP-induced RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line, desoxyrhapontigenin was the most potent component that reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and peroxynitrite. In response to desoxyrhapontigenin, the mRNA expression levels of antioxidant enzymes were up-regulated. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA confirmed that desoxyrhapontigenin promoted the DNA binding of Nrf2 and increased the expression of antioxidant proteins and enzymes regulated by Nrf2. Further investigation utilizing specific inhibitors of Akt, p38, JNK and ERK demonstrated that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway mediates HO-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in Nrf2 expression mediated by treatment with desoxyrhapontigenin was reversed by Nrf2 or Akt gene knock-down. In the LPS-induced in vivo lung inflammation model, pretreatment with desoxyrhapontigenin markedly ameliorated LPS-induced lung inflammation and histological changes. Immunohistochemical analysis of Nrf2, HO-1 and p65 was conducted and confirmed that treatment with desoxyrhapontigenin induced Nrf2 and HO-1 expression but reduced p65 expression. These findings suggest that desoxyrhapontigenin may be a potential therapeutic candidate as an antioxidant or an anti-inflammatory agent.

  2. Sesamin increases heme oxygenase-1 protein in RAW 264.7 macrophages through inhibiting its ubiquitination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Mizuki; Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Shiratsuchi, Ayano; Kawakami, Takuya; Takahashi, Madoka; Motomura, Misato; Egusa, Kyohei; Urasaki, Tomoka; Inoue, Atsuko

    2014-10-15

    Sesamin is a major component in lignans of sesame seed oil, known to possess potent anti-oxidative capacity. In this study, the variation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, a kind of anti-oxidative enzyme, by sesamin in murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10μg/ml) exposure tended to increase HO-1 protein expression. Co-treatment with 100μM sesamin for 12h up-regulated the HO-1 protein level increased by LPS; however, HO-1 mRNA was unaffected. Sesamin delayed the reversal, by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (1μM), of the LPS-induced increase of HO-1 protein level. Meanwhile, sesamin suppressed LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) protein and associated NO release. LPS-induced increase of iNOS protein expression was also reversed by cycloheximide, which was not affected by sesamin, unlike HO-1. To clarify the mechanisms that underlie the up-regulation of HO-1 protein level by sesamin, the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cell line transfected with Flag-tagged HO-1 was used. A proteasome inhibitor, MG-132 (10μM), stabilized HO-1 protein in HEK 293T cells. Co-treatment with sesamin decreased ubiquitinated HO-1 protein accumulation by MG-132. However, sesamin did not affect the proteasome activity. These findings suggest that sesamin disturbs the degradation of HO-1 protein through inhibiting its ubiquitination, resulting in HO-1 protein up-regulation.

  3. De-etiolation of wheat seedling leaves: cross talk between heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Liu

    Full Text Available Greening of etiolated plants is predominantly stimulated by light but the complete molecular mechanism is still unknown. Multiple studies currently focus on the important physiological effects of heme oxygenase (HO/carbon monoxide (CO in plants. In this report, firstly, the role of HO/CO in light-induced de-etiolation process was investigated. We discovered that light could significantly increase HO activities, HO-1 gene expression, CO release, and chlorophyll accumulation, all of which were sensitive to zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPPIX, the potent inhibitor of HO-1, respectively. Both HO-1 inducer hematin (H and CO aqueous solution were able to relieve etiolation in wheat seedling leaves under completely darkness by up-regulating endogenous HO/CO system, so as nitric oxide (NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP did. Similarly, endogenous NO production was also boost in response to light, SNP, hematin and CO aqueous solution in wheat seedling leaves. Additionally, the restoration of chlorophyll contents was blocked, when the inhibitor of mammalian nitric oxide synthase N(G-nitro-L-arginine methylester hydrochloride (L-NAME or the specific scavenger of NO 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO was added, respectively. Furthermore, the inducible effects of light were different from those of SNP, hematin, and CO on Pfr accumulation and PHYA transcripts. However, all of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, hematin, and CO could accelerate NO emission, which suggested that HO/CO in wheat seedlings de-etiolation under dark-light transition may have a cross talk with NO.

  4. Enhanced expression of heme oxygenase-1 in the locus coeruleus can be associated with anxiolytic-like effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazuza, Rafael Alves; Pol, Olga; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade

    2017-09-05

    Some researchers have shown that carbon monoxide (CO) plays a role in emotional behavior modulation through intracellular 3'-5'-guanosine monophosphate mechanisms in the locus coeruleus (LC). In fact, the LC region has a high expression of the heme-oxygenase (HO) enzymes, which are responsible for the production of CO. However, the physiological mechanism by which the HO-CO pathway participates in the modulation of emotional responses in the LC still needs clarification. This study evaluates whether a systemic intraperitoneal treatment is able to alter behavioral responses (in the elevated plus-maze and the light-dark box test) and the expression of the HO-1 and HO-2 enzymes in the LC. The tested treatments are acute (3h before) or chronic (twice daily for 10 days) and with a carbon monoxide releaser (tricarbonyldichlororuthenium [II] dimer, or CORM-2) or with a HO-1 inducer compound (cobalt protoporphyrin IX, CoPP). The results for the elevated plus-maze show that CO-for both acute or chronic administration of either drug-increased the number of entries into the open arms and the percentage of time spent in the open arms. Regarding the light-dark box test, chronic treatment with either drug increased the time spent in the light compartment. Additionally, treatment with CORM-2 or CoPP, either acutely or chronically, increased HO-1 enzyme expression in the LC cells. This study shows that systemic CO treatment can promote an anxiolytic-like effect and the expression of HO-1 enzymes in LC cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Erythropoietin attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension through interplay between endothelial progenitor cells and heme-oxygenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa L.E. Loon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a pulmonary vascular disease with a high mortality, characterized by typical angio-proliferative lesions. Erythropoietin (EPO attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. We postulated that EPO acts through mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and activation of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO1.MethodsRats with flow-associated PAH, resembling pediatric PAH, were treated with HO-1 inducer EPO in the presence or absence of the selective HO-activity-inhibitor tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP. HO-activity, circulating EPCs and pulmonary vascular lesions were assessed after 3 weeks.ResultsIn PAH-rats, circulating EPCs were decreased and HO-activity was increased compared to control. EPO-treatment restored circulating EPCs and improved pulmonary vascular remodeling, as shown by a reduced wall thickness and occlusion rate of the intra-acinar vessels. Inhibition of HO-activity with SnMP aggravated PAH. Moreover, SnMP treatment abrogated EPO-induced amelioration of pulmonary vascular remodeling, while surprisingly further increasing circulating EPCs as compared with EPO alone.ConclusionsIn experimental PAH, EPO treatment restored the number of circulating EPC’s to control level, improved pulmonary vascular remodeling, and showed important interplay with HO-activity. Inhibition of increased HO-activity in PAH-rats exacerbated progression of pulmonary vascular remodeling, despite the presence of restored numbers of circulating EPC’s. We suggest that both EPO-induced HO1 and EPCs are promising targets to ameliorate the pulmonary vasculature in PAH.

  6. Treatment of Chronic Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and Glatiramer Acetate Alters Expression of Heme-Oxygenase-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Janssen

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG synergizes with the immunomodulatory agent glatiramer acetate (GA in eliciting anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in the relapsing-remitting EAE model. Thus, we hypothesized that mice with chronic EAE may also benefit from this combination therapy. We first assessed how a treatment with a single dose of GA together with daily application of EGCG may modulate EAE. Although single therapies with a suboptimal dose of GA or EGCG led to disease amelioration and reduced CNS inflammation, the combination therapy had no effects. While EGCG appeared to preserve axons and myelin, the single GA dose did not improve axonal damage or demyelination. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of EGCG was abolished when GA was applied in combination. To elucidate how a single dose of GA may interfere with EGCG, we focused on the anti-inflammatory, iron chelating and anti-oxidant properties of EGCG. Surprisingly, we observed that while EGCG induced a downregulation of the gene expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 in affected CNS areas, the combined therapy of GA+EGCG seems to promote an increased HO-1 expression. These data suggest that upregulation of HO-1 may contribute to diminish the neuroprotective benefits of EGCG alone in this EAE model. Altogether, our data indicate that neuroprotection by EGCG in chronic EAE may involve regulation of oxidative processes, including downmodulation of HO-1. Further investigation of the re-dox balance in chronic neuroinflammation and in particular functional studies on HO-1 are warranted to understand its role in disease progression.

  7. Identification of Heme Oxygenase-1 as a Novel Predictor of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghao Lu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main aim of this study was to determine the correlation between clinical outcome and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in acute leukemia. Methods: HO-1 mRNA levels in 83 patients were measured using qRT-PCR. In a comparative analysis of HO-1 levels in relation to different post-transplant outcomes, the HO-1 threshold, determined via the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, was effectively used to predict clinical relapse and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD. The correlations among clinical relapse, aGVHD and HO-1 expression were analyzed based on this threshold. Results: Leukemia risk stratification and relative expression of HO-1 before pretreatment had significant effects on clinical relapse. Leukemia risk stratification, relative expression of HO-1 after HSCT and the interval from diagnosis to transplantation had a significant influence on aGVHD. Both relapse and aGVHD appeared to be associated with relative HO-1 expression. The relative expression rate of HO-1 was 1.131-1.186 before pretreatment, and strongly associated with post-transplantation relapse. The relative expression rate of HO-1 was 1.102-1.144 after transplantation, and closely related to aGVHD. ROC curve analysis revealed high specificity and sensitivity of HO-1 expression in predicting relapse and aGVHD after allo-HSCT. Conclusions: HO-1 expression can be effectively used as a predictor of relapse as well as a diagnostic factor of aGVHD after transplantation for allo-HSCT patients with acute leukemia.

  8. [Gene transfer-induced human heme oxygenase-1 over-expression protects kidney from ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jin-xing; Yan, Chun-yin; Pu, Jin-xian; Hou, Jian-quan; Yuan, He-xing; Ping, Ji-gen

    2010-12-14

    To study the protection of gene transfer-induced human heme oxygenase-1 over-expression against renal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The model of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury was established with Sprague-Dawley rats. In the therapy group (n=18), the left kidney was perfused and preserved with Ad-hHO-1 at 2.5×10(9) pfu/1.0 ml after flushed with 0-4°C HC-A organ storage solution via donor renal aorta. The rats in control groups were perfused with 0.9% saline solution (n=12) or the vector carrying no interest gene Ad-EGFP 2.5×10(9) pfu/1.0 ml (n=18) instead of Ad-hHO-1. BUN and Cr in serum were measured by slide chemical methods. The kidney samples of rats were harvested for assay of histology, immunohistochemistry and quantification of HO enzymatic activity. Apoptosis cells in the kidney were measured by TUNEL. Ad-hHO-1 via donor renal aorta could transfect renal cells of rats effectively, enzymatic activity of HO in treated group [(1.62±0.07) nmol×mg(-1)×min(-1)] is higher than in control groups treated with saline solution team [(1.27±0.07) nmol×mg(-1)×min(-1)] and vector EGFP team [(1.22±0.06) nmol×mg(-1)×min(-1)] (PhHO-1 expressed hHO-1 in kidneys at a high level. Corresponding to this, the level of BUN and Cr, as well as the number of apoptosis cells, were decreased, and the damage in histology by HE staining was ameliorated. Over-expression of human HO-1 can protect the kidney from ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

  9. Tacrolimus modulates liver and pancreas nitric oxide synthetase and heme-oxygenase isoforms and cytokine production after endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balibrea, José M; García-Martín, M Cruz; Cuesta-Sancho, Sara; Olmedilla, Yoko; Arias-Díaz, Javier; Fernández-Sevilla, Elena; Vara, Elena; Balibrea, José L

    2011-03-15

    Cytoprotective effects of tacrolimus are due to its unspecific anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. Neither the exact mechanisms nor if there is any organ-specificity or dose-dependent response have not been yet elucidated. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of tacrolimus on oxidative stress and mediator production in liver and pancreatic tissue secondary to endotoxemia. Wistar rats were pretreated with intraperitoneal injection of tacrolimus (0.07, 0.15, and 0.3mg/kg) 24h before Escherichia coli LPS was administrated. Animals were sacrificed 24h after LPS administration and iNOS, eNOS, and nNOS and type 1 and 2 heme-oxygenase (HO) expression were measured. TNF-α and IL-1 tissue expression and plasmatic NO, CO, TNF-α, and IL-1 were also determined. LPS exposure increased iNOS expression in both organs, eNOS did not show variations and liver nNOS expression was significantly lower. Tacrolimus diminished both pancreas and liver iNOS and nNOS expression. Both liver and pancreatic eNOS expression augmented when tacrolimus was administrated. High doses of tacrolimus were correlated with ameliorated liver HO-1 plus HO-2 and pancreas HO-1 expression after LPS stimulation. Tacrolimus treatment diminished TNF-α but not IL-1 expression increase after LPS challenge in hepatic tissue. Pancreatic TNF-α and IL-1 values diminished partially when high doses were employed. Plasmatic NO, CO, TNF-α, and IL-1 concentrations increase after LPS challenge was diminished when highest doses of tacrolimus were given. In conclusion, tacrolimus exerts a protective effect on commonly observed harmful phenomena after LPS stimulation by modulating liver and pancreas oxidative enzyme expression and cytokine production.

  10. Interleukin-10-mediated heme oxygenase 1-induced underlying mechanism in inflammatory down-regulation by norfloxacin in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Zapater, Pedro; Bellot, Pablo; Pascual, Sonia; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel; Such, José; Francés, Rubén

    2011-03-01

    Patients with cirrhosis receiving norfloxacin show a restored inflammatory balance that likely prevents clinical complications derived from an excessive proinflammatory response to bacterial product challenges. This study sought to investigate associated inflammatory control mechanisms established in patients with cirrhosis receiving norfloxacin. A total of 62 patients with cirrhosis and ascites in different clinical conditions were considered. Blood samples were collected and intracellular and serum norfloxacin were measured. Inflammatory mediators were evaluated at messenger RNA and protein levels. Neutrophils from all patients were cultured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and anti-interleukin-10 (anti-IL-10) monoclonal antibody in different conditions. IL-10 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were up-regulated in patients receiving norfloxacin and correlated with norfloxacin in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and nuclear factor-κB behaved inversely. Higher IL-10 levels correlated with lower white blood cell count and higher mean arterial pressure. No correlations were found between IL-10 and disease clinical scores or liver function markers in blood. Neutrophilic in vitro assays showed that the effect of LPS on proinflammatory mediator levels in the presence of norfloxacin was abrogated by significantly increasing IL-10 and HO-1 expression. After stimulation with LPS plus anti-IL-10, proinflammatory mediators were dramatically increased in patients receiving norfloxacin, and increasing intracellular norfloxacin concentrations did not decrease the expression levels of these proinflammatory molecules. Unblocking IL-10 restored proinflammatory mediator and HO-1 expression to previously observed levels in response to LPS stimulation. Although the described association does not necessarily mean causality, an IL-10-mediated HO-1-induced anti-inflammatory mechanism is present in patients with

  11. Targeting heme oxygenase-1 in early diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo El Gheit, R; Emam, M N

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most common microvascular diabetic complications. This study was designed to evaluate the possible protective effect and underlying mechanisms of HO-1 induction in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced early DN in rats. The diabetic rats were divided into three groups: STZ-diabetic, cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP)-treated diabetic, and zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP)-treated diabetic groups. Compared to the STZ-diabetic group, CoPP-induced HO-1 upregulation improved the diabetic state and renal functional parameters, suppressed the renal proinflammatory marker, NF-κB, abrogated the elevated renal hydroxyprolin, and decreased the enhanced renal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity with parallel reduction of urinary oxidative stress markers. On the contrary, treatment with ZnPP abrogated HO-1 levels, aggravated the diabetic condition with further increases in renal oxidative stress, fibrotic and inflammatory markers, and exacerbated renal dysfunction in diabetic animals. These findings suggest that the reduced diabetic renal injury upon HO-1 induction implicates the role of HO-1 induction as a potential treatment for DN.

  12. Structures of the substrate-free and product-bound forms of HmuO, a heme oxygenase from corynebacterium diphtheriae: x-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Masaki; Ardèvol, Albert; Rovira, Carme; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2013-11-29

    Heme oxygenase catalyzes the degradation of heme to biliverdin, iron, and carbon monoxide. Here, we present crystal structures of the substrate-free, Fe(3+)-biliverdin-bound, and biliverdin-bound forms of HmuO, a heme oxygenase from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, refined to 1.80, 1.90, and 1.85 Å resolution, respectively. In the substrate-free structure, the proximal and distal helices, which tightly bracket the substrate heme in the substrate-bound heme complex, move apart, and the proximal helix is partially unwound. These features are supported by the molecular dynamic simulations. The structure implies that the heme binding fixes the enzyme active site structure, including the water hydrogen bond network critical for heme degradation. The biliverdin groups assume the helical conformation and are located in the heme pocket in the crystal structures of the Fe(3+)-biliverdin-bound and the biliverdin-bound HmuO, prepared by in situ heme oxygenase reaction from the heme complex crystals. The proximal His serves as the Fe(3+)-biliverdin axial ligand in the former complex and forms a hydrogen bond through a bridging water molecule with the biliverdin pyrrole nitrogen atoms in the latter complex. In both structures, salt bridges between one of the biliverdin propionate groups and the Arg and Lys residues further stabilize biliverdin at the HmuO heme pocket. Additionally, the crystal structure of a mixture of two intermediates between the Fe(3+)-biliverdin and biliverdin complexes has been determined at 1.70 Å resolution, implying a possible route for iron exit.

  13. Potential crosstalk of Ca2+-ROS-dependent mechanism involved in apoptosis of Kasumi-1 cells mediated by heme oxygenase-1 small interfering RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sixi; Wang, Yating; Chai, Qixiang; Fang, Qin; Zhang, Yaming; Wang, Jishi

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requires new therapies on the molecular level. Downregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by gene silencing improves the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapy drugs and promotes apoptosis. For the first time, we verified that endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways were activated by small interfering RNA that targeted-silenced the expression of HO-1 in AML-M2 Kasumi-1 cells. Ca2+ was prone to accumulation and reactive oxygen species were easily generated, while mitochondrial transmembrane potential was reduced. Thus, cytochrome c was released from mitochondria to the cytoplasm and caspases were activated for the following cascade to facilitate apoptosis.

  14. 1H NMR detection of immobilized water molecules within a strong distal hydrogen-bonding network of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvitski, Ray T; Li, Yiming; Auclair, Karine; Ortiz De Montellano, Paul R; La Mar, Gerd N

    2002-12-04

    Solution 1H NMR is used to probe the environments of the donor protons of eight strong hydrogen bonds on the distal side of the heme substrate in the cyanide-inhibited, substrate-bound complex of human heme oxygenase, hHO. It is demonstrated that significant magnetization transfer from the bulk water signal to the eight labile protons does not result from chemical exchange, but from direct nuclear Overhauser effect due to the dipolar interaction of these labile protons with "ordered" water molecules. The enzyme labile proton to water proton distances are estimated at approximately 3 A. It is proposed that the role of the strong hydrogen-bonding network is to immobilize numerous water molecules which both stabilize the activated hydroperoxy species and funnel protons to the active site.

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 is involved in nitric oxide- and cGMP-induced α-Amy2/54 gene expression in GA-treated wheat aleurone layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingzhu; Wang, Fangquan; Zhang, Chen; Xie, Yanjie; Han, Bin; Huang, Jingjing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-01-01

    Here, α-Amy2/54 gene expression was used as a molecular probe to investigate the interrelationship among nitric oxide (NO), cyclic GMP (cGMP), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in GA-treated wheat aleurone layers. The inducible expressions of α-Amy2/54 and α-amylase activity were respectively amplified by two NO-releasing compounds, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and spermine NONOate, in a GA-dependent fashion. Similar responses were observed when an inducer of HO-1, hemin-or one of its catalytic products, carbon monoxide (CO) in aqueous solution-was respectively added. The SNP-induced responses, mimicked by 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), a cGMP derivative, were NO-dependent. This conclusion was supported by the fact that endogenous NO overproduction was rapidly induced by SNP, and thereafter induction of α-Amy2/54 gene expression and increased α-amylase activity were sensitive to the NO scavenger. We further observed that the above induction triggered by SNP and 8-Br-cGMP was partially prevented by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), an inhibitor of HO-1. These blocking effects were clearly reversed by CO, confirming that the above response was HO-1-specific. Further analyses showed that both SNP and 8-Br-cGMP rapidly up-regulated HO-1 gene expression and increased HO activity, and SNP responses were sensitive to cPTIO and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY83583). Molecular evidence confirmed that GA-induced GAMYB and ABA-triggered PKABA1 transcripts were up-regulated or down-regulated by SNP, 8-Br-cGMP or CO cotreated with GA. Contrasting changes were observed when cPTIO, LY83583, or ZnPPIX was added. Together, our results suggested that HO-1 is involved in NO- and cGMP-induced α-Amy2/54 gene expression in GA-treated aleurone layers.

  16. Association of Heme Oxygenase 1 with Lung Protection in Malaria-Associated ALI/ARDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marcelo L. M.; Ortolan, Luana S.; Sercundes, Michelle K.; Debone, Daniela; Murillo, Oscar; Lima, Flávia A.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a serious disease, caused by the parasite of the genus Plasmodium, which was responsible for 440,000 deaths in 2015. Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) is one of the main clinical complications in severe malaria. The murine model DBA/2 reproduces the clinical signs of ALI/ARDS in humans, when infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. High levels of HO-1 were reported in cases of severe malaria. Our data indicated that the HO-1 mRNA and protein expression are increased in mice that develop malaria-associated ALI/ARDS (MA-ALI/ARDS). Additionally, the hemin, a HO-1 inducing drug, prevented mice from developing MA-ALI/ARDS when administered prior to the development of MA-ALI/ARDS in this model. Also, hemin treatment showed an amelioration of respiratory parameters in mice, high VEGF levels in the sera, and a decrease in vascular permeability in the lung, which are signs of ALI/ARDS. Therefore, the induction of HO-1 before the development of MA-ALI/ARDS could be protective. However, the increased expression of HO-1 on the onset of MA-ALI/ARDS development may represent an effort to revert the phenotype of this syndrome by the host. We therefore confirm that HO-1 inducing drugs could be used for prevention of MA-ALI/ARDS in humans. PMID:27974865

  17. Solution 1H NMR characterization of substrate-free C. diphtheriae heme oxygenase: pertinence for determining magnetic axes in paramagnetic substrate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenming; Unno, Masaki; Matsui, Toshitaka; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; La Mar, Gerd N

    2010-10-01

    Proton 2D NMR was used to confirm in solution a highly conserved portion of the molecular structure upon substrate loss for the heme oxygenase from the pathogenic bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae, HmuO. The chemical shifts for the conserved portion of the structure are assessed as references for the dipolar shifts needed to determine the orientation of the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor, chi, in paramagnetic substrate complexes of HmuO. It is shown that the chemical shifts for the structurally conserved portion of substrate-free HmuO serve as excellent references for residues with only small to moderate sized dipolar shifts in the cyanide-inhibited substrate complex of HmuO, yielding an orientation of chi that is essentially the same as conventionally obtained from large dipolar shifts based on empirical estimates of the diamagnetic reference. The implications of these diamagnetic chemical shifts for characterizing the hydrogen bonding in the physiologically relevant, resting-state, high-spin aquo complex are discussed. The pattern of labile proton exchange in the distal H-bond network of substrate-free HmuO allowed comparison of changes in dynamic stability of tertiary contacts in the substrate-free and substrate-bound HmuO and with the same complexes of human heme oxygenase.

  18. Protective effect of hypercapnic acidosis in ischemia-reperfusion lung injury is attributable to upregulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Yu; Li, Min-Hui; Ko, Fu-Chang; Wu, Geng-Chin; Huang, Kun-Lun; Chu, Shi-Jye

    2013-01-01

    Hypercapnic acidosis (HCA) has protective effects in animal models of acute lung injury, but the mechanism underlying the effect of HCA is unclear. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an antioxidant enzyme that protects tissue from inflammation injury. We investigated whether HO-1 contributes to the protective effects of HCA in ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced lung injury. Typical acute lung injury in rats was successfully induced by 40 min of ischemia and 90 min of reperfusion in an isolated perfused lung model. The rat lungs were randomly assigned to the control group, IR group or IR + HCA group with or without zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an HO-1 activity inhibitor. At the end of the experiment, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were collected to evaluate the degree of lung injury. In in vitro experiments, HO-1 siRNA transfected A549 cells were exposed to a normoxic or hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) environment in the presence or absence of HCA. IR caused significant increases in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung weight to body weight and wet/dry ratios, lung weight gain, capillary filtration coefficient, lung injury scores, neutrophil infiltration, and concentrations of protein and TNF-α in the BALF. IR also induced degradation of inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB-α, increased IκB kinase (IKK)-β phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and up-regulated HO-1 expression and activity. Furthermore, IR decreased Bcl-2 protein expression and increased the number of active caspase-3 stained cells. HCA treatment enhanced HO-1 expression and activity, and accordingly reduced IKK-NF-κB signaling, inhibited apoptosis, and significantly attenuated IR-induced changes. Treatment with ZnPP partially blocked the protective effect of HCA. In addition, HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed HCA-mediated inhibition of NF-κB signaling in A549 cells subjected to H/R. In conclusion, the protective effect of HCA in IR lung injury in rats was mediated in

  19. Protective effect of hypercapnic acidosis in ischemia-reperfusion lung injury is attributable to upregulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Wu

    Full Text Available Hypercapnic acidosis (HCA has protective effects in animal models of acute lung injury, but the mechanism underlying the effect of HCA is unclear. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is an antioxidant enzyme that protects tissue from inflammation injury. We investigated whether HO-1 contributes to the protective effects of HCA in ischemia-reperfusion (IR-induced lung injury. Typical acute lung injury in rats was successfully induced by 40 min of ischemia and 90 min of reperfusion in an isolated perfused lung model. The rat lungs were randomly assigned to the control group, IR group or IR + HCA group with or without zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP, an HO-1 activity inhibitor. At the end of the experiment, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and lung tissues were collected to evaluate the degree of lung injury. In in vitro experiments, HO-1 siRNA transfected A549 cells were exposed to a normoxic or hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R environment in the presence or absence of HCA. IR caused significant increases in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung weight to body weight and wet/dry ratios, lung weight gain, capillary filtration coefficient, lung injury scores, neutrophil infiltration, and concentrations of protein and TNF-α in the BALF. IR also induced degradation of inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF-κB-α, increased IκB kinase (IKK-β phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and up-regulated HO-1 expression and activity. Furthermore, IR decreased Bcl-2 protein expression and increased the number of active caspase-3 stained cells. HCA treatment enhanced HO-1 expression and activity, and accordingly reduced IKK-NF-κB signaling, inhibited apoptosis, and significantly attenuated IR-induced changes. Treatment with ZnPP partially blocked the protective effect of HCA. In addition, HO-1 siRNA significantly reversed HCA-mediated inhibition of NF-κB signaling in A549 cells subjected to H/R. In conclusion, the protective effect of HCA in IR lung injury in rats was

  20. Heme Oxygenase-1 Protects Retinal Endothelial Cells against High Glucose- and Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress-Induced Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Áurea F.; Aveleira, Célia A.; Leal, Ermelindo C.; Simões, Núria F.; Fernandes, Carolina R.; Meirinhos, Rita I.; Baptista, Filipa I.; Ambrósio, António F.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of visual loss and blindness, characterized by microvascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia is considered the major pathogenic factor for the development of diabetic retinopathy and is associated with increased oxidative/nitrosative stress in the retina. Since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an enzyme with antioxidant and protective properties, we investigated the potential protective role of HO-1 in retinal endothelial cells exposed to high glucose and oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions. Retinal endothelial cells were exposed to elevated glucose, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by MTT assay, Hoechst staining, TUNEL assay and Annexin V labeling. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by the oxidation of 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. The content of HO-1 was assessed by immunobloting and immunofluorescence. HO activity was determined by bilirubin production. Long-term exposure (7 days) of retinal endothelial cells to elevated glucose decreased cell viability and had no effect on HO-1 content. However, a short-time exposure (24 h) to elevated glucose did not alter cell viability, but increased both the levels of intracellular ROS and HO-1 content. Moreover, the inhibition of HO with SnPPIX unmasked the toxic effect of high glucose and revealed the protection conferred by HO-1. Oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions increased cell death and HO-1 protein levels. These effects of elevated glucose and HO inhibition on cell death were confirmed in primary endothelial cells (HUVECs). When cells were exposed to oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions there was also an increase in retinal endothelial cell death and HO-1 content. The inhibition of HO enhanced ROS production and the toxic effect induced by exposure to H2O2 and NOC-18 (NO donor). Overexpression of HO-1 prevented the toxic effect induced by H2O2 and NOC-18. In conclusion, HO-1

  1. The heme oxygenase system rescues hepatic deterioration in the condition of obesity co-morbid with type-2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Ntube Salley

    Full Text Available The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease (NAFLD is increasing globally. NAFLD is a spectrum of related liver diseases that progressive from simple steatosis to serious complications like cirrhosis. The major pathophysiological driving of NAFLD includes elevated hepatic adiposity, increased hepatic triglycerides/cholesterol, excessive hepatic inflammation, and hepatocyte ballooning injury is a common histo-pathological denominator. Although heme-oxygenase (HO is cytoprotective, its effects on hepatocyte ballooning injury have not been reported. We investigated the effects of upregulating HO with hemin or inhibiting it with stannous-mesoporphyrin (SnMP on hepatocyte ballooning injury, hepatic adiposity and inflammation in Zucker-diabetic-fatty rats (ZDFs, an obese type-2-diabetic model. Hemin administration to ZDFs abated hepatic/plasma triglycerides and cholesterol, and suppressed several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines including, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, macrophage-inflammatory-protein-1α (MIP-1α and macrophage-chemoattractant-protein-1 (MCP-1, with corresponding reduction of the pro-inflammatory M1-phenotype marker, ED1 and hepatic macrophage infiltration. Correspondingly, hemin concomitantly potentiated the protein expression of several markers of the anti-inflammatory macrophage-M2-phenotype including ED2, IL-10 and CD-206, alongside components of the HO-system including HO-1, HO-activity and cGMP, whereas the HO-inhibitor, SnMP abolished the effects. Furthermore, hemin attenuated liver histo-pathological lesions like hepatocyte ballooning injury and fibrosis, and reduced extracellular-matrix/profibrotic proteins implicated in liver injury such as osteopontin, TGF-β1, fibronectin and collagen-IV. We conclude that hemin restore hepatic morphology by abating hepatic adiposity, suppressing macrophage infiltration, inflammation and fibrosis. The selective enhancement of anti-inflammatory macrophage-M2-phenotype with parallel

  2. The heme oxygenase system suppresses perirenal visceral adiposity, abates renal inflammation and ameliorates diabetic nephropathy in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Fomusi Ndisang

    Full Text Available The growing incidence of chronic kidney disease remains a global health problem. Obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes and renal impairment. Perirenal adiposity, by virtue of its anatomical proximity to the kidneys may cause kidney disease through paracrine mechanisms that include increased production of inflammatory cytokines. Although heme-oxygenase (HO is cytoprotective, its effects on perirenal adiposity and diabetic nephropathy in Zucker-diabetic fatty rats (ZDFs remains largely unclear. Upregulating the HO-system with hemin normalised glycemia, reduced perirenal adiposity and suppressed several pro-inflammatory/oxidative mediators in perirenal fat including macrophage-inflammatory-protein-1α (MIP-1α, endothelin (ET-1, 8-isoprostane, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Furthermore, hemin reduced ED1, a marker of pro-inflammatory macrophage-M1-phenotype, but interestingly, enhanced markers associated with anti-inflammatory M2-phenotype such as ED2, CD206 and IL-10, suggesting that hemin selectively modulates macrophage polarization towards the anti-inflammatory M2-phenotype. These effects were accompanied by increased adiponectin, HO-1, HO-activity, atrial-natriuretic peptide (ANP, and its surrogate marker, urinary-cGMP. Furthermore, hemin reduced renal histological lesions and abated pro-fibrotic/extracellular-matrix proteins like collagen and fibronectin that deplete nephrin, an important transmembrane protein which forms the scaffolding of the podocyte slit-diaphragm allowing ions to filter but not massive excretion of proteins, hence proteinuria. Correspondingly, hemin increased nephrin expression in ZDFs, reduced markers of renal damage including, albuminuria/proteinuria, but increased creatinine-clearance, suggesting improved renal function. Conversely, the HO-blocker, stannous-mesoporphyrin nullified the hemin effects, aggravating glucose metabolism, and exacerbating renal injury and function. The hemin effects were less

  3. Induced fit on heme binding to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytoplasmic protein (PhuS) drives interaction with heme oxygenase (HemO)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Iron, an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability, requires specialized cellular mechanisms for uptake. Although iron uptake into the cytoplasm in the form of heme has been well characterized in many bacteria, the subsequent trafficking is poorly understood. The cytoplasmic heme-binding proteins belong to a structurally related family thought to have evolved as “induced fit” ligand-binding macromolecules. One member, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytoplasmic protein (PhuS), has previously bee...

  4. Novel Three-Component Rieske Non-Heme Iron Oxygenase System Catalyzing the N-Dealkylation of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides in Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Wang, Cheng-Hong; Deng, Shi-Kai; Wu, Ya-Dong; Li, Yi; Yao, Li; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2014-01-01

    Sphingomonads DC-6 and DC-2 degrade the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor via N-dealkylation. In this study, we report a three-component Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase (RHO) system catalyzing the N-dealkylation of these herbicides. The oxygenase component gene cndA is located in a transposable element that is highly conserved in the two strains. CndA shares 24 to 42% amino acid sequence identities with the oxygenase components of some RHOs that catalyze N- or O-demethylation. Two putative [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin genes and one glutathione reductase (GR)-type reductase gene were retrieved from the genome of each strain. These genes were not located in the immediate vicinity of cndA. The four ferredoxins share 64 to 72% amino acid sequence identities to the ferredoxin component of dicamba O-demethylase (DMO), and the two reductases share 62 to 65% amino acid sequence identities to the reductase component of DMO. cndA, the four ferredoxin genes, and the two reductases genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified using Ni-affinity chromatography. The individual components or the components in pairs displayed no activity; the enzyme mixture showed N-dealkylase activities toward alachlor, acetochlor, and butachlor only when CndA-His6 was combined with one of the four ferredoxins and one of the two reductases, suggesting that the enzyme consists of three components, a homo-oligomer oxygenase, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin, and a GR-type reductase, and CndA has a low specificity for the electron transport component (ETC). The N-dealkylase utilizes NADH, but not NADPH, as the electron donor. PMID:24928877

  5. Over-expression of heme oxygenase-1 in peripheral blood predicts the progression and relapse risk of chronic myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Sixi; Wang Yating; Chai Qixiang; Fang Qin; Zhang Yaming; Lu Yinghao; Wang Jishi

    2014-01-01

    Background There are limited eligible clinical markers at present to monitor the progress of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1),as one of the most important oxidation-regulating enzymes in vivo,suggests the onset and progression of cancer when highly expressed.Furthermore,HO-1 level is related with the occurrence and development of hematological diseases.But the relationship between HO-1 expression and progression/relapse of CML has seldom been studied hitherto.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between them to find out a new molecular marker for prediction.Methods A total of 60 peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) samples from 25 CML patients in different phases were collected respectively to detect the expressions of HO-1 and bcr/abl using real-time PCR.Routine blood test was performed to detect the changes of leukocyte and platelet counts.The proportion of primitive cells in BM was detected by flow cytometry.The relationship between high HO-1 expression and CML progression and relapse was explored by the analysis of variance by Wilcoxon test and linear regression analysis.The diagnostic accuracy and cutoff values were determined by receiver operating characteristic curve.Results Relative expression of HO-1 mRNA in CML patients peripheral blood was significantly higher than that of donors (P <0.0001),which were 0.57±3.78 and (1.417±1.125)×10-6,respectively.HO-1 expression level in CML patients was 0.061 5±0.062 4,which decreased to 0.009 4±0.006 7 upon CMoR,and remained remarkably higher 0.016 3±0.017 5 than that of normal donors (1.417±1.125)× 10-6,P <0.001.When relapse occurred,HO-1 expression significantly increased from 0.020 6±0.021 0 to 3.852±10.285 in CMoR stage and undergoing relapse.According to progression of CML,HO-1 expression level in CML patients increased from CP (0.009 5±0.017 6) to AP (0.028 0±0.055 7) and then to BP (0.276 7± 0.447 0).And there was a linear correlation between HO-1 expression

  6. Upregulated heme oxygenase-1 expression of mouse mesenchymal stem cells resists to chemotherapy-induced bone marrow suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shuya; Wang Jishi; Fang Qin; Gao Rui; Shi Qianying; Zhang Hui; Zhao Jiangyuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone marrow hematopoietic function suppression is one of the most common side effects of chemotherapy.After chemotherapy,the bone marrow structure gets destroyed and the cells died,which might cause the hematopoietic function suppression.Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a key enzyme of antioxidative metabolism that associates with cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis.The aim of this study was to restore or resist the bone marrow from the damage of chemotherapy by the HO-1 expression of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) homing to the mice which had the chemotherapy-induced bone marrow suppression.Methods One hundred and sixty female Balb/c mice (6-8-weeks old) were randomly divided into four groups.Each group was performed in 40 mice.The control group was intraperitoneally injected for 5 days and tail intravenously injected on the 6th day with normal saline.The chemotherapy-induced bone marrow suppression was established by intraperitoneally injecting cyclophosphamide (CTX) into the mice which performed as the chemotherapy group.The mMSCs were tail intravenously injected into 40 chemotherapically damaged mice which served as the mMSCs group.The difference between the HO-1 group and the mMSCs group was the injected cells.The HO-1 group was tail intravenously injected into the mMSCs that highly expressed HO-1 which was stimulated by hemin.The expression of HO-1 was analyzed by Western blotting and RT-PCR.Cell proliferation was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay.Histopathologic examinations were performed 1 week after injection.Results Compared with the control group,the expression levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein were significantly higher in the HO-1 group (all P <0.05),even obviously than the mMSCs group.CTX treatment induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation.After injected,the white blood cell (WBC),red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) declined fast and down to the bottom at the 7th day

  7. Oxidative stress regulated heme-oxygenase-1 and glutathione S-transferase-m1 gene expression changes in cell lines exposed to melanins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Li; Peng Zhao; Junfeng Yang; Renyun Zhang; Shen Li; Dan Liu

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of oxidative stress on substantia nigra neuronal degeneration and death in patients with Parkinson's disease, we treated neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) and glioma cells with Fenton's reagent, iron chelating agent, neuromelanin and dopamine melanin. We investigated the changes in expression of nine oxidative stress-related genes and proteins. The levels of mRNAs for heme-oxygenase-1 and glutathione S-transferase-m1 were significantly reduced in SK-N-SH cells exposed to oxidative stress, and increased in glial cells treated with deferoxamine. These results revealed that SK-N-SH neurons react sensitively to oxidative stress, which implies different outcomes between these two types of cells in the substantia nigra. Moreover, the influences of neuromelanin and dopamine melanin on cell function are varied, and dopamine melanin is not a good model for neuromelanin.

  8. Heme oxygenase 2 of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is induced under a microaerobic atmosphere and is required for microaerobic growth at high light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mete; Kang, Ilgu; Beale, Samuel I

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, red algae, and cryptomonad algae utilize phycobilin chromophores that are attached to phycobiliproteins to harvest solar energy. Heme oxygenase (HO) in these organisms catalyzes the first step in phycobilin formation through the conversion of heme to biliverdin IXalpha, CO, and iron. The Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 genome contains two open reading frames, ho1 (sll1184) and ho2 (sll1875), whose products have in vitro HO activity. We report that HO2, the protein encoded by ho2, was induced in the cells growing under a microaerobic atmosphere [0.2% (v/v) O(2)], whereas HO1 was constitutively expressed under both aerobic and microaerobic atmospheres. Light intensity did not have an effect on the expression of both the HOs. Cells, in which ho2 was disrupted, were unable to grow microaerobically at a light intensity of 40 micromol m(-2) s(-1), but did grow microaerobically at 10 micromol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity. These cells grew normally aerobically at both light intensities. Comparative analysis of complete cyanobacterial genomes revealed that possession of two HOs is common in cyanobacteria. In phylogenetic analysis of their amino acid sequences, cyanobacterial HO1 and HO2 homologs formed distinct clades. HO sequences of cyanobacteria that have only one isoform were most similar to HO1 sequences. We propose that HO2 might be the more ancient HO homolog that functioned under low O(2) tension, whereas the derived HO1 can better accommodate increased O(2) tension in the environment.

  9. Nitric oxide and iron modulate heme oxygenase activity as a long distance signaling response to salt stress in sunflower seedling cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neha; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-02-29

    Nitric oxide is a significant component of iron signaling in plants. Heme is one of the iron sensors in plants. Free heme is highly toxic and can cause cell damage as it catalyzes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Its catabolism is carried out by heme oxygenase (HOs; EC 1.14.99.3) which uses heme both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Two significant events, which accompany adaptation to salt stress in sunflower seedlings, are accumulation of ROS and enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) in roots and cotyledons. Present investigations on the immunolocalization of heme oxygenase distribution in sunflower seedling cotyledons by confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging provide new information on the differential spatial distribution of the inducible form of HO (HO-1) as a long distance in response to NaCl stress. The enzyme is abundantly distributed in the specialized cells around the secretory canals (SCs) in seedling cotyledons. Abundance of tyrosine nitrated proteins has also been observed in the specialized cells around the secretory canals in cotyledons derived from salt stressed seedlings. The spatial distribution of tyrosine nitrated proteins and HO-1 expression further correlates with the abundance of mitochondria in these cells. Present findings, thus, highlight a link among distribution of HO-1 expression, abundance of tyrosine nitrated proteins and mitochondria in specialized cells around the secretory canal as a long distance mechanism of salt stress tolerance in sunflower seedlings. Enhanced spatial distribution of HO-1 in response to NaCl stress in seedling cotyledons is in congruence with the observed increase in specific activity of HO-1 in NaCl stressed conditions. The enzyme activity is further enhanced by hemin (HO-1 inducer) both in the absence or presence of NaCl stress and inhibited by zinc protoporphyrin. Western blot analysis of cotyledon homogenates using anti-HO-1 polyclonal antibody shows one major band (29

  10. Short (GT)n microsatellite repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter are associated with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status in Mexican pediatric patients with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Armenta, Gabriela; González-Leal, Natalia; J Vázquez-de la Torre, Mayra; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Ramos-Márquez, Martha E; Hernández-Cañaveral, Iván; Plascencia-Hernández, Arturo; Siller-López, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    An adequate immune and antioxidant response is a key to the resolution of sepsis. Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) is a stress protein with a polymorphic (GT)n repeat in its gene promoter that regulates its expression in response to oxidative injury, such as that present in sepsis. HMOX1 is the rate-limiting enzyme of heme degradation, and the heme breakdown products, CO, Fe, and bilirubin, are considered to be biologically active metabolites with direct or indirect antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the inflammatory and antioxidant response and the relationship with the HMOX1 levels and HMOX1 polymorphism in Mexican septic pediatric patients. In a case-control pilot study, we enrolled 64 septic patients and 72 hospitalized control patients without a diagnosis of sepsis. DNA extracted from buffy coat was genotyped for HMOX1 (GT)n polymorphism by PCR and markers of antioxidant and inflammatory status were quantified in plasma by analysis of the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), protein carbonyl (PC), interleukin (IL) 6, IL10, and HMOX1 levels. In septic children, oxidative and inflammatory markers were elevated, and HMOX1 levels were positively correlated with IL10 levels. Genotypic and allelic distribution of HMOX1 polymorphism showed no difference between groups. HMOX1 short-allele septic carriers (< 25 GT repeats) presented favorable ORAC, PC and IL10 levels. This study confirms that an active response against pediatric sepsis involves the expression of HMOX1 and IL10, suggesting that the high antioxidant status associated with HMOX1 short-allele septic carriers might provide a beneficial environment for sepsis resolution.

  11. Solution NMR study of environmental effects on substrate seating in human heme oxygenase: influence of polypeptide truncation, substrate modification and axial ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenfeng; Li, Yiming; Wang, Jinling; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R; La Mar, Gerd N

    2006-01-01

    Solution proton NMR has been used here to show that, as either the high-spin ferric, protohemin (PH) substrate complex at neutral pH, or the low-spin ferric, cyanide-inhibited PH substrate complex, the active site electronic and molecular structure of the 233- and 265-residue recombinant constructs of human heme oxygenase-1, hHO, are essentially indistinguishable. It is shown, moreover, that the equilibrium PH orientational isomerism about the alpha,gamma-meso axis is 1:1 in the water-ligated, resting-state complex, but changes to a 4:1 equilibrium ratio as the cyanide-inhibited complex, with the minor species in solution corresponding to the only one found in crystals. The introduction of significant PH orientational preference in the cyanide over the aquo complex is rationalized by the crystallographic observation for the same H2O and CN ligated complexes of rat heme oxygenase (rHO), where the steric tilt of the Fe-CN unit resulted in a approximately 1 A transition of PH into the hydrophobic interior, and stronger interaction of the vinyls with the HO matrix [M. Sugishima, H. Sakamoto, M. Noguchi, K. Fukugama, Biochemistry 42 (2003) 9898-9905]. 1H NMR spectra of the cyanide-inhibited PH complex are the most used, and most useful, for determining the distribution of orientational isomerism for PH in complexes of HO. Hence, it is imperative that the time-course of the spectra after sample preparation be considered in order to reach conclusions that relate isomeric seating of the heme with variable isomeric biliverdin products. The natural orientational isomerism of PH leads to spectral congestion that has prompted the use of a synthetic, twofold symmetric substrate, 2,4-dimethyldeuterohemin, DMDH. While the hyperfine shift pattern for non-ligated residues are very similar and are consistent with largely conserved molecular structure with the alternate substrates, the steric tilt of the Fe-CN vector towards the protein interior, as determined by the orientation of

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Therapy Provides Cardioprotection Via Control of Post-Ischemic Inflammation: An Experimental Study in a Pre-Clinical Pig Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, Rabea; Lange, Philipp; Petersen, Björn; Gottlieb, Elena; Ng, Judy King Man; Finger, Stefanie; Horstkotte, Jan; Lee, Seungmin; Thormann, Michael; Knorr, Maike; El-Aouni, Chiraz; Boekstegers, Peter; Reichart, Bruno; Wenzel, Philip; Niemann, Heiner; Kupatt, Christian

    2015-07-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress-responsive enzyme converting heme to bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and free iron, which exerts anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects. Although efficient cardioprotection after HO-1 overexpression has been reported in rodents, its role in attenuating post-ischemic inflammation is unclear. This study assessed the efficacy of recombinant adenoassociated virus (rAAV)-encoding human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) in attenuating post-ischemic inflammation in a murine and a porcine ischemia/reperfusion model. Murine ischemia was induced by 45 min of left anterior descending occlusion, followed by 24 h of reperfusion and functional as well as fluorescent-activated cell sorting analysis. Porcine hearts were subjected to 60 min of ischemia and 24h of reperfusion before hemodynamic and histologic analyses were performed. Human microvascular endothelial cells transfected with hHO-1 displayed an attenuated interleukin-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression, resulting in reduced monocytic THP-1 cell recruitment in vitro. In murine left anterior descending occlusion and reperfusion, the post-ischemic influx of CD45(+) leukocytes, Ly-6G(+) neutrophils, and Ly-6C(high) monocytes was further exacerbated in HO-1-deficient hearts and reversed by rAAV.hHO-1 treatment. Conversely, in our porcine model of ischemia, the post-ischemic influx of myeloperoxidase-positive neutrophils and CD14(+) monocytes was reduced by 49% and 87% after rAAV.hHO-1 transduction, similar to hHO-1 transgenic pigs. Functionally, rAAV.hHO-1 and hHO-1 transgenic left ventricles displayed a smaller loss of ejection fraction than control animals. Whereas HO-1 deficiency exacerbates post-ischemic cardiac inflammation in mice, hHO-1 gene therapy attenuates inflammation after ischemia and reperfusion in murine and porcine hearts. Regional hHO-1 gene therapy provides cardioprotection in a pre-clinical porcine ischemia/reperfusion model. Copyright © 2015 American

  13. Characterization of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in human cancer cells: the importance of enhanced BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Hannafon, Bethany N; Wolf, Roman F; Zhou, Jundong; Avery, Jori E; Wu, Jinchang; Lind, Stuart E; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2014-05-01

    The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cancer cells has never been characterized. This study examines DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human cancer cell model systems. DHA enhanced HO-1 gene expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with maximal induction at 21 h of treatment. This induction of HO-1 expression was confirmed in vivo using a xenograft nude mouse model fed a fish-oil-enriched diet. The increase in HO-1 gene transcription induced by DHA was significantly attenuated by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. This was supported by direct measurement of lipid peroxide levels after DHA treatment. Using a human HO-1 gene promoter reporter construct, we identified two antioxidant response elements (AREs) that mediate the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription. Knockdown of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression compromised the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription, indicating the importance of the Nrf2 pathway in this event. However, the nuclear protein levels of Nrf2 remained unchanged upon DHA treatment. Further studies demonstrated that DHA reduces nuclear Bach1 protein expression by promoting its degradation and attenuates Bach1 binding to the AREs in the HO-1 gene promoter. In contrast, DHA enhanced Nrf2 binding to the AREs without affecting nuclear Nrf2 expression levels, indicating a new cellular mechanism that mediates DHA's induction of HO-1 gene transcription. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human malignant cells.

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 induction in the brain during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    Shigeru Maeda1, Ichiro Nakatsuka1, Yukiko Hayashi1, Hitoshi Higuchi1, Masahiko Shimada2, Takuya Miyawaki11Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama, Japan; 2Orofacial Pain Management, Department of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Delirium occurs in 23% of sepsis patients, in which pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide are suggested to be involved. However, in animal experiments, even a subsepti...

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 delays gibberellin-induced programmed cell death of rice aleurone layers subjected to drought stress by interacting with nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huangming eWu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cereal aleurone layers undergo a gibberellin (GA-regulated process of programmed cell death (PCD following germination. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is known as a rate-liming enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin IXα (BV, carbon monoxide (CO, and free iron ions (Fe2+. It is a critical component in plant development and adaptation to environment stresses. Our previous studies confirmed that HO-1 inducer hematin (Ht promotes the germination of rice seeds in drought (20% polyethylene glycol-6000, PEG conditions, but the corresponding effects of HO-1 on the alleviation of germination-triggered PCD in GA-treated rice aleurone layers remain unknown. The present study has determined that GA co-treated with PEG results in lower HO-1 transcript levels and HO activity, which in turn results in the development of vacuoles in aleurone cells, followed by PCD. The pharmacology approach illustrated that up- or down-regulated HO-1 gene expression and HO activity delayed or accelerated GA-induced PCD. Furthermore, the application of the HO-1 inducer hematin and nitric oxide (NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP not only activated HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and endogenous NO content, but also blocked GA-induced rapid vacuolation and accelerated aleurone layers PCD under drought stress. However, both HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX and NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl0-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO reserved the effects of hematin and SNP on rice aleurone layer PCD under drought stress by down-regulating endogenous HO-1 and NO, respectively. The inducible effects of hematin and SNP on HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and NO content were blocked by cPTIO. Together, these results clearly suggest that HO-1 is involved in the alleviation of GA-induced PCD of drought-triggered rice aleurone layers by associating with NO.

  16. Signal peptide peptidase-mediated nuclear localization of heme oxygenase-1 promotes cancer cell proliferation and invasion independent of its enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, F-F; Yeh, C-T; Sun, Y-J; Chiang, M-T; Lan, W-M; Li, F-A; Lee, W-H; Chau, L-Y

    2015-04-30

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a heme-degrading enzyme anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum by a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane segment (TMS). HO-1 is highly expressed in various cancers and its nuclear localization is associated with the progression of some cancers. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying HO-1 nuclear translocation and its pathological significance remain elusive. Here we show that the signal peptide peptidase (SPP) catalyzes the intramembrane cleavage of HO-1. Coexpression of HO-1 with wild-type SPP, but not a dominant-negative SPP, promoted the nuclear localization of HO-1 in cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of cytosolic HO-1 isolated from HeLa cells overexpressing HO-1 and SPP revealed two adjacent intramembrane cleavage sites located after S275 and F276 within the TMS. Mutations of S275F276 to A275L276 significantly hindered SPP-mediated HO-1 cleavage and nuclear localization. Nuclear HO-1 was detected in A549 and DU145 cancer cell lines expressing high levels of endogenous HO-1 and SPP. SPP knockdown or inhibition significantly reduced nuclear HO-1 localization in A549 and DU145 cells. The positive nuclear HO-1 stain was also evident in lung cancer tissues expressing high levels of HO-1 and SPP. Overexpression of a truncated HO-1 (t-HO-1) lacking the TMS in HeLa and H1299 cells promoted cell proliferation and migration/invasion. The effect of t-HO-1 was not affected by a mutation in the catalytic site. However, blockade of t-HO-1 nuclear localization abolished t-HO-1-mediated effect. The tumorigenic effect of t-HO-1 was also demonstrated in the mouse model. These findings disclose that SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage of HO-1 promotes HO-1 nuclear localization and cancer progression independent of HO-1 enzymatic activity.

  17. Solution NMR characterization of magnetic/electronic properties of azide and cyanide-inhibited substrate complexes of human heme oxygenase: implications for steric ligand tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dungeng; Ogura, Hiroshi; Ma, Li-Hua; Evans, John P; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz; La Mar, Gerd N

    2013-04-01

    Solution 2D (1)H NMR was carried out on the azide-ligated substrate complex of human heme oxygenase, hHO, to provide information on the active site molecular structure, chromophore electronic/magnetic properties, and the distal H-bond network linked to the exogenous ligand by catalytically relevant oriented water molecules. While 2D NMR exhibited very similar patterns of two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy cross peaks of residues with substrate and among residues as the previously characterized cyanide complex, significant, broadly distributed chemical shift differences were observed for both labile and non-labile protons. The anisotropy and orientation of the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor, χ, were determined for both the azide and cyanide complexes. The most significant difference observed is the tilt of the major magnetic axes from the heme normal, which is only half as large for the azide than cyanide ligand, with each ligand tilted toward the catalytically cleaved α-meso position. The difference in chemical shifts is quantitatively correlated with differences in dipolar shifts in the respective complexes for all but the distal helix. The necessity of considering dipolar shifts, and hence determination of the orientation/anisotropy of χ, in comparing chemical shifts involving paramagnetic complexes, is emphasized. The analysis shows that the H-bond network cannot detect significant differences in H-bond acceptor properties of cyanide versus azide ligands. Lastly, significant retardation of distal helix labile proton exchange upon replacing cyanide with azide indicates that the dynamic stability of the distal helix is increased upon decreasing the steric interaction of the ligand with the distal helix. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1 Delays Gibberellin-Induced Programmed Cell Death of Rice Aleurone Layers Subjected to Drought Stress by Interacting with Nitric Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huangming; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Heting; Chen, Huiping

    2015-01-01

    Cereal aleurone layers undergo a gibberellin (GA)-regulated process of programmed cell death (PCD) following germination. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is known as a rate-liming enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin IXα, carbon monoxide (CO), and free iron ions (Fe(2+)). It is a critical component in plant development and adaptation to environment stresses. Our previous studies confirmed that HO-1 inducer hematin (Ht) promotes the germination of rice seeds in drought (20% polyethylene glycol-6000, PEG) conditions, but the corresponding effects of HO-1 on the alleviation of germination-triggered PCD in GA-treated rice aleurone layers remain unknown. The present study has determined that GA co-treated with PEG results in lower HO-1 transcript levels and HO activity, which in turn results in the development of vacuoles in aleurone cells, followed by PCD. The pharmacology approach illustrated that up- or down-regulated HO-1 gene expression and HO activity delayed or accelerated GA-induced PCD. Furthermore, the application of the HO-1 inducer Ht and nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) not only activated HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and endogenous NO content, but also blocked GA-induced rapid vacuolation and accelerated aleurone layers PCD under drought stress. However, both HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX) and NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl0-4, 4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO) reserved the effects of Ht and SNP on rice aleurone layer PCD under drought stress by down-regulating endogenous HO-1 and NO, respectively. The inducible effects of Ht and SNP on HO-1 gene expression, HO activity, and NO content were blocked by cPTIO. Together, these results clearly suggest that HO-1 is involved in the alleviation of GA-induced PCD of drought-triggered rice aleurone layers by associating with NO.

  19. Molecular cloning and expression of a cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) heme oxygenase-1 gene, CsHO1, which is involved in adventitious root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Yue; Cao, Ze-Yu; Shen, Wen-Biao; Cui, Jin

    2011-10-15

    Our previous work showed that in cucumber (Cucumis sativus), auxin rapidly induces heme oxygenase (HO) activity and the product of HO action, carbon monoxide (CO), then triggers the signal transduction events leading to adventitious root formation. In this study, the cucumber HO-1 gene (named as CsHO1) was isolated and sequenced. It contains four exons and three introns and encodes a polypeptide of 291 amino acids. Further results show that CsHO1 shares a high homology with plant HO-1 proteins and codes a 33.3 kDa protein with a 65-amino transit peptide, predicting a mature protein of 26.1 kDa. The mature CsHO1 was expressed in Escherichia coli to produce a fusion protein, which exhibits HO activity. The CsHO1:GFP fusion protein was localized in the chloroplast. Related biochemical analyses of mature CsHO1, including Vmax, Km, Topt and pHopt, were also investigated. CsHO1 mRNA was found in germinating seeds, roots, stem, and especially in leaf tissues. Several well-known adventitious root inducers, including auxin, ABA, hemin, nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), CaCl(2), and sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), differentially up-regulate CsHO1 transcripts and corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that CsHO1 may be involved in cucumber adventitious rooting.

  20. Crocin Suppresses LPS-Stimulated Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hee Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crocin is a water-soluble carotenoid pigment that is primarily used in various cuisines as a seasoning and coloring agent, as well as in traditional medicines for the treatment of edema, fever, and hepatic disorder. In this study, we demonstrated that crocin markedly induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 which leads to an anti-inflammatory response. Crocin inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression and nitric oxide production via downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These effects were abrogated by blocking of HO-1 expression or activity. Crocin also induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular pools and phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CAMK4. CAMK4 knockdown and kinase-dead mutant inhibited crocin-mediated HO-1 expression, Nrf2 activation, and phosphorylation of Akt, indicating that HO-1 expression is mediated by CAMK4 and that Akt is a downstream mediator of CAMK4 in crocin signaling. Moreover, crocin-mediated suppression of iNOS expression was blocked by CAMK4 inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that crocin suppresses LPS-stimulated expression of iNOS by inducing HO-1 expression via Ca2+/calmodulin-CAMK4-PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling cascades. Our findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for the inhibitory effects of crocin against endotoxin-mediated inflammation.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effects of mangiferin on sepsis-induced lung injury in mice via up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xia; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Rong; Ye, Mengliang; Yin, Xinru; Wan, Jingyuan

    2013-06-01

    Sepsis, a serious unbalanced hyperinflammatory condition, is a tremendous burden for healthcare systems, with a high mortality and limited treatment. Increasing evidences indicated that some active components derived from natural foods have potent anti-inflammatory properties. Here we show that mangiferin (MF), a natural glucosyl xanthone found in both mango and papaya, attenuates cecal ligation and puncture-induced mortality and acute lung injury (ALI), as indicated by reduced systemic and pulmonary inflammatory responses. Moreover, pretreatment with MF inhibits sepsis-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells signaling, resulting in inhibiting production of proinflammatory mediators. Notably, MF dose-dependently up-regulates the expression and activity of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the lung of septic mice. Further, these beneficial effects of MF on the septic lung injury were eliminated by ZnPP IX, a specific HO-1 inhibitor. Our results suggest that MF attenuates sepsis by up-regulation of HO-1 that protects against sepsis-induced ALI through inhibiting inflammatory signaling and proinflammatory mediators. Thereby, MF may be effective in treating sepsis with ALI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acetylshikonin, a Novel AChE Inhibitor, Inhibits Apoptosis via Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in SH-SY5Y Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are prominent alternative in current clinical treatment for AD patients. Therefore, there is a continued need to search for novel AChEIs with good clinical efficacy and less side effects. By using our in-house natural product database and AutoDock Vina as a tool in docking study, we have identified twelve phytochemicals (emodin, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol, and rhein in Rhei Radix Et Rhizoma; xanthotoxin, phellopterin, alloisoimperatorin, and imperatorin in Angelicae dahuricae Radix; shikonin, acetylshikonin, isovalerylshikonin, and β,β-dimethylacrylshikonin in Arnebiae Radix as candidates of AChEIs that were not previously reported in the literature. In addition to AChEI activity, a series of cell-based experiments were conducted for the investigation of their neuroprotective activities. We found that acetylshikonin and its derivatives prevented apoptotic cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide in human and rat neuronal SH-SY5Y and PC12 cells at 10 μM. We showed that acetylshikonin exhibited the most potent antiapoptosis activity through the inhibition of the generation of reactive oxygen species as well as protection of the loss of mitochondria membrane potential. Furthermore, we identified for the first time that the upregulation of heme oxygenase 1 by acetylshikonin is a key step mediating its antiapoptotic activity from oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells.

  3. Ethyl linoleate from garlic attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by inducing heme oxygenase-1 in RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Seetharaman, Rajasekar; Ko, Min Jung; Kim, Do Yeon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yoon, Moo Kyoung; Kwak, Jung Ho; Lee, Sang Joon; Bae, Yoe Sik; Choi, Young Whan

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, an essential fatty acid, ethyl linoleate (ELA), was isolated from the cloves of Allium sativum, and its structure was elucidated by NMR and GC-MS analyses. In vitro systems were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of ELA. Our results indicate that ELA down-regulates inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and thereby reduces nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescent microscopy and western blot analyses revealed that these effects were mediated by impaired translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and inhibition of phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinases. Furthermore, ELA exerted its anti-inflammatory activity by inducing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, as determined by HO-1 small interfering (Si) RNA system. Si RNA-mediated knock-down of HO-1 abrogated the inhibitory effects of ELA on the production of NO, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in LPS-induced macrophages. These findings indicate the potential therapeutic use of ELA as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  4. Taurine Chloramine Suppresses LPS-Induced Neuroinflammatory Responses through Nrf2-Mediated Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Mouse BV2 Microglial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Kwon, Ki Han; Cheong, Sun Hee

    2017-01-01

    The brain is sensitive to the inflammation and oxidative stress that can cause the aging or neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the anti-neuroinflammatory activities of taurine chloramine (TauCl) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mouse BV2 microglia mediated through heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression. TauCl inhibited the protein expressions of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, nitric oxide (NO), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in LPS-treated BV2 microglia. TauCl markedly inhibited interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) production. These effects were related to the suppression of the degradation and phosphorylation of inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B- (IB-), translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-B) as well as DNA binding activity. In addition, TauCl induced the HO-1 expression by increasing the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) translocation to the nucleus in mouse BV2 microglia. These findings suggest that TauCl has protective effects of neurodegenerative disorders caused by neuroinflammation.

  5. Antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects of asiaticoside in lipopolysaccharide-treated rat through up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, JingYuan; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Li

    2013-08-01

    Asiaticoside (AS), a triterpenoid isolated from Centella asiatica, has been found to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in several experimental animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we provide experimental evidences that AS dose-dependently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever and inflammatory response, including serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 production, liver myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, brain cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) production. Interestingly, AS increased serum IL-10 level, liver heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression and activity. Furthermore, we found that the suppressive effects of AS on LPS-induced fever and inflammation were reversed by pretreatment with ZnPPIX, a HO-1 activity inhibitor. In summary, our results suggest that AS has the antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-treated rat. These effects could be associated with the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators, including TNF-α and IL-6 levels, COX-2 expression and PGE2 production, as well as MPO activity, which might be mediated by the up-regulation of HO-1.

  6. Protective effects of protostemonine on LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure: Roles of increased hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Yue, Ling; Zhao, Wenhao; Yang, Xinzhou; Shu, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    Here, we explored protective effects of protostemonine (PSN), on mouse acute liver failure induced by lipopolysaccharide/d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN). PSN dose-dependently declined LPS/GalN-induced lethality of mice as well as increase of ALT/AST activities in their serum. Hepatoprotective effects of PSN were also supported by liver histopathological examinations. After LPS/GalN treatment, severe oxidative stresses in the liver could be detected by boosted MDA and ROS as well as decreased GSH. Moreover, hepatic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, were sharply elevated. These symptoms were dose-dependently ameliorated by PSN. Mechanistically, PSN promoted the transcription and translation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in hepatocytes and liver Kupffer cells. Nrf2 is a master transcription factor contributing to the expression of HO-1. PSN elevated Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and enhanced Nrf2/HO-1 promoter interaction. Suppressing enzyme activity of HO-1 by co-treating mice with HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP abolished protective effects of PSN. ZnPP also abrogated alleviative impacts of PSN on LPS/GalN-mediated hepatic oxidative stresses and inflammatory responses. Finally, we showed that PSN exhibited undetectable toxic effects on vital organs of mice. Our findings suggested that PSN is able to attenuate LPS/GalN-induced acute liver failure and upregulating HO-1 expression is implicated in its hepatoprotective activity.

  7. Sirtuin-activating compounds (STACs) alleviate D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatotoxicity in rats: involvement of sirtuin 1 and heme oxygenase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemelo, M K; Kutinová Canová, N; Horinek, A; Farghali, H

    2017-02-28

    Sirtuin activating compounds (STACs) attenuate various type of liver insults through mechanisms which are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the ameliorative potential of quercetin (natural polyphenol) and SRT1720 (synthetic SIRT1 activator) against D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatotoxicity (an experimental model of acute liver failure). Moreover, we compared and contrasted the roles of stress responsive enzymes, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in hepatoprotection/ hepatotoxicity. Liver injury was induced in male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of D-galactosamine (400 mg/kg) and lipopolysaccharide (10 microg/kg). Some animals were pretreated with quercetin (50 mg/kg i.p.) or SRT1720 (5 mg/kg i.p.). Twenty-four hours later, the effects of these treatments were evaluated by biochemical studies and Western blot. D-GalN/LPS treatment upregulated HO-1 expression, downregulated SIRT1 expression, decreased AST: ALT ratio and markedly increased bilirubin, catalase and conjugated diene levels. Pretreatment of D-GalN/LPS rats with either quercetin or SRT1720 returned SIRT1 expression, HO-1 expression and all the aforementioned markers towards normal. Collectively, these findings suggest that elevated HO-1 and low SIRT1 expressions are involved in the pathogenesis of D-GalN/LPS-induced hepatotoxicity. Drugs that downregulate HO-1 and/or upregulate SIRT1 seem to have antihepatotoxic effects and need further exploration.

  8. Umbelliferone and daphnetin ameliorate carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in rats via nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed R; Emam, Manal A; Hassan, Nahla S; Mogadem, Abeer I

    2014-09-01

    Among various phytochemicals, coumarins comprise a very large class of plant phenolic compounds that have good nutritive value, in addition to their antioxidant effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of two coumarin derivatives, umbelliferone and daphnetin, against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats and elucidate the underlying mechanism. Treatment of rats with either umbelliferone or daphnetin significantly improved the CCl4-induced biochemical alterations. In addition, both compounds alleviated the induced-lipid peroxidation and boosted the antioxidant defense system. Moreover, the investigated compounds attenuated CCl4-induced histopathological alterations of the liver. Finally, umbelliferone and daphnetin induced the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), thereby inducing the expression and activity of the cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). These results suggest that umbelliferone and daphnetin ameliorate oxidative stress-related hepatotoxicity via their ability to augment cellular antioxidant defenses by activating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression.

  9. Irisin improves perivascular adipose tissue dysfunction via regulation of the heme oxygenase-1/adiponectin axis in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ningning; Liu, Yihui; Han, Fang; Wang, Di; Hou, Xiaoshuang; Hou, Shuting; Sun, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether irisin could improve perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) dysfunction via regulation of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)/adiponectin axis in obesity. C57BL/6 mice were given chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) with or without treatment with irisin. The concentration-dependent responses of the thoracic aorta with or without PVAT (PVAT+ or PVAT-) to phenylephrine were studied in an organ bath. Protein levels of HO-1 and adiponectin were determined by western blot. UCP-1, Cidea, and TNF-α gene expression in PVAT were analyzed by real-time PCR. Treatment of obese mice with irisin improved glucose and lipid metabolism, reduced plasma levels of TNF-α and malondialdehyde, and increased plasma adiponectin levels (Padiponectin receptor blocking peptide in irisin-treated HFD mice abolished the beneficial effects of irisin on PVAT function. The same results were also observed in HFD mice treated with irisin ex vivo. Treatment of HFD mice with irisin significantly enhanced protein levels of HO-1 and adiponectin, and reduced superoxide production and TNF-α expression in PVAT. Irisin treatment enhanced brown adipocyte markers UCP-1 and Cidea expression in PVAT from HFD mice. Irisin improved the anti-contractile properties of PVAT from the thoracic aorta in diet-induced obese mice. The mechanism for protective effects of irisin appeared to be related to upregulation of the HO-1/adiponectin axis in PVAT and browning of PVAT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Micro-RNA-155-mediated control of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is required for restoring adaptively tolerant CD4+ T-cell function in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinyu; Vandevenne, Patricia; Hamdi, Haifa; Van Puyvelde, Merry; Zucchi, Alessandro; Bettonville, Marie; Weatherly, Kathleen; Braun, Michel Y

    2015-03-01

    T cells chronically stimulated by a persistent antigen often become dysfunctional and lose effector functions and proliferative capacity. To identify the importance of micro-RNA-155 (miR-155) in this phenomenon, we analyzed mouse miR-155-deficient CD4(+) T cells in a model where the chronic exposure to a systemic antigen led to T-cell functional unresponsiveness. We found that miR-155 was required for restoring function of T cells after programmed death receptor 1 blockade. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) was identified as a specific target of miR-155 and inhibition of HO-1 activity restored the expansion and tissue migration capacity of miR-155(-/-) CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, miR-155-mediated control of HO-1 expression in CD4(+) T cells was shown to sustain in vivo antigen-specific expansion and IL-2 production. Thus, our data identify HO-1 regulation as a mechanism by which miR-155 promotes T-cell-driven inflammation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Potassium 2-(l-hydroxypentyl-benzoate attenuates neuroinflammatory responses and upregulates heme oxygenase-1 in systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyang Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A neuroinflammatory response is commonly involved in the progression of many neurodegenerative diseases. Potassium 2-(1-hydroxypentyl-benzoate (PHPB, a novel neuroprotective compound, has shown promising effects in the treatment of ischemic stroke and Alzheimer׳s disease (AD. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of PHPB were investigated in the plasma and brain of C57BL/6 mice administered a single intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Levels of iNOS and the cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-10 were elevated in plasma, cerebral cortex and hippocampus after LPS injection and the number of microglia and astrocytes in cortex and hippocampus were increased. LPS also upregulated the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 in the cortex and hippocampus. PHPB reduced the levels of iNOS and cytokines in the plasma and brain, decreased the number of microglia and astrocytes and further enhanced the upregulation of HO-1. In addition, PHPB inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK, P38 and JNK. These results suggest that PHPB is a potential candidate in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases through inhibiting neuroinflammation.

  12. Accumulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells treated with sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride or proteasomal inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Ena; Khan, Saad; Khamis, Imran; Heikkila, John J

    2014-11-01

    The present study examined the effect of sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride, heat shock and the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, withaferin A and celastrol on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; also known as HSP32) accumulation in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. Immunoblot analysis revealed that HO-1 accumulation was not induced by heat shock but was enhanced by sodium arsenite and cadmium chloride in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Immunocytochemistry revealed that these metals induced HO-1 accumulation in a granular pattern primarily in the cytoplasm. Additionally, in 20% of the cells arsenite induced the formation of large HO-1-containing perinuclear structures. In cells recovering from sodium arsenite or cadmium chloride treatment, HO-1 accumulation initially increased to a maximum at 12h followed by a 50% reduction at 48 h. This initial increase in HO-1 levels was likely the result of new synthesis as it was inhibited by cycloheximide. Interestingly, treatment of cells with a mild heat shock enhanced HO-1 accumulation induced by low concentrations of sodium arsenite and cadmium chloride. Finally, we determined that HO-1 accumulation was induced in A6 cells by the proteasomal inhibitors, MG132, withaferin A and celastrol. An examination of heavy metal and proteasomal inhibitor-induced HO-1 accumulation in amphibians is of importance given the presence of toxic heavy metals in aquatic habitats.

  13. Eriodictyol Protects Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death through Modulating ERK/Nrf2/ARE-Dependent Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases is complex and may involve oxidative stress-related pathways. Eriodictyol is a flavonoid present in citrus fruits that demonstrates anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, neurotrophic, and antioxidant effects in a range of pathophysiological conditions including vascular diseases. Because oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the present study was designed to verify whether eriodictyol has therapeutic potential. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a phase II detoxifying enzyme, in endothelial cells is considered to be helpful in cardiovascular disease. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs treated with eriodictyol showed the upregulation of HO-1 through extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/antioxidant response element (ARE signaling pathways. Further, eriodictyol treatment provided protection against hydrogen peroxide-provoked cell death. This protective effect was eliminated by treatment with a specific inhibitor of HO-1 and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of HO-1 expression. These data demonstrate that eriodictyol induces ERK/Nrf2/ARE-mediated HO-1 upregulation in human endothelial cells, which is directly associated with its vascular protection against oxidative stress-related endothelial injury, and propose that targeting the upregulation of HO-1 is a promising approach for therapeutic intervention in cardiovascular disease.

  14. The in vitro protection of human decay accelerating factor and hDAF/heme oxygenase-1 transgenes in porcine aortic endothelial cells against sera of Formosan macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C-F; Tai, H-C; Wu, C-P; Ho, L-L; Lin, Y-J; Hwang, C-S; Yang, T-S; Lee, J-M; Tseng, Y-L; Huang, C-C; Weng, C-N; Lee, P-H

    2010-01-01

    To mitigate hyperacute rejection, pigs have been generated with alpha-Gal transferase gene knockout and transgenic expression of human decay accelerating factor (hDAF), MCP, and CD59. Additionally, heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been suggested to defend endothelial cells. Sera (MS) (0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, and 15%) from Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis, MC), an Old World monkey wildly populated in Taiwan, was used to test the protective in vitro, effects of hDAF or hDAF/hHO-1 on porcine aortic endothelial cells (pAEC) derived from hDAF(+), hDAF(+)/hHO-1(+), and hDAF(+)/hHO-1(-) and 1 nontransgenic pAEC. Ten percent human serum (HS) served as a positive control. When MS addition increased to 10% or 15%, all transgenic pAEC exhibited a greater survival than nontransgenic pAEC. Noticeably, 15% MS reduced survived to 40% in nontransgenic and transgenic pAEC, respectively. These results revealed that hDAF exerted protective effects against MC complement activation. However, comparing with 10% MS and HS in pAEC of nontransgenic pigs, the survivability was higher in HS, suggesting that complement activation by MS was more toxic than that by HS. Furthermore, hDAF(+)/hHO-1(+) showed no further protection against effects of MS on transgenic pAEC. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Postneonatal Mortality and Liver Changes in Cloned Pigs Associated with Human Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor I-Fc and Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geon A; Jin, Jun-Xue; Lee, Sanghoon; Taweechaipaisankul, Anukul; Oh, Hyun Ju; Hwang, Joing-Ik; Ahn, Curie; Saadeldin, Islam M; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2017-01-01

    Soluble human tumor necrosis factor (shTNFRI-Fc) and human heme oxygenase 1 (hHO-1) are key regulators for protection against oxidative and inflammatory injury for xenotransplantation. Somatic cells with more than 10 copy numbers of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 were employed in somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cloned pigs, thereby resulting in seven cloned piglets. However, produced piglets were all dead within 24 hours after birth. Obviously, postnatal death with liver apoptosis was reported in the higher copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets. In liver, the transcript levels of ferritin heavy chain, light chain, transferrin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were significantly highly expressed compared to those of lower copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets (P hHO-1 piglets (P hHO-1 overexpression may apparently induce free iron in the liver and exert oxidative stress by enhancing reactive oxygen species production and block normal postneonatal liver metabolism.

  16. Postneonatal Mortality and Liver Changes in Cloned Pigs Associated with Human Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor I-Fc and Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geon A. Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble human tumor necrosis factor (shTNFRI-Fc and human heme oxygenase 1 (hHO-1 are key regulators for protection against oxidative and inflammatory injury for xenotransplantation. Somatic cells with more than 10 copy numbers of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 were employed in somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cloned pigs, thereby resulting in seven cloned piglets. However, produced piglets were all dead within 24 hours after birth. Obviously, postnatal death with liver apoptosis was reported in the higher copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets. In liver, the transcript levels of ferritin heavy chain, light chain, transferrin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were significantly highly expressed compared to those of lower copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets (P<0.05. Also, H2O2 contents were increased, and superoxide dismutase was significantly lower in the higher copy number of shTNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 piglets (P<0.05. These results indicate that TNFRI-Fc and hHO-1 overexpression may apparently induce free iron in the liver and exert oxidative stress by enhancing reactive oxygen species production and block normal postneonatal liver metabolism.

  17. Association of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein, and Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Polymorphisms with Diabetes and Obesity in Mexican Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Osorio, Angélica Saraí; González-Reyes, Susana; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Rodríguez-Arellano, Martha Eunice; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Barquera, Rodrigo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear factor-erythroid 2- (NF-E2-) related factor 2 (Nrf2) is abated and its ability to reduce oxidative stress is impaired in type 2 diabetes and obesity. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore if polymorphisms in Nrf2 and target genes are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican mestizo subjects. The rs1800566 of quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene, rs7211 of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) gene, rs2071749 of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene, and the rs6721961 and the rs2364723 from Nrf2 gene were genotyped in 627 diabetic subjects and 1020 controls. The results showed that the rs7211 polymorphism is a protective factor against obesity in nondiabetic subjects (CC + CT versus TT, OR = 0.40, P = 0.005) and in women (CC versus CT + TT, OR = 0.7, P = 0.016). TT carriers had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and lower body mass index. The rs2071749 was positively associated with obesity (AA versus AG + GG, OR = 1.25, P = 0.026). Finally, the rs6721961 was negatively associated with diabetes in men (CC versus CA + AA, OR = 0.62, P = 0.003). AA carriers showed lower glucose concentrations. No association was found for rs1800566 and rs2364723 polymorphisms. In conclusion, the presence of Nrf2 and related genes polymorphisms are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican patients.

  18. Isorhamnetin-3-O-Glucuronide Suppresses JNK and p38 Activation and Increases Heme-Oxygenase-1 in Lipopolysaccharide-Challenged RAW264.7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Song-In; Lee, Hee Jae; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Chun, Wanjoo

    2016-05-01

    Preclinical Research Isorhanmetin (ISH) exhibits a wide range of biological properties including anticancer, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the pharmacological properties of isorhamnetin-3-O-glucuronide (IG), a glycoside derivative of ISH, have not been extensively examined. The objective of this study was to examine the anti-inflammatory properties of IG and its underlying mechanism in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged RAW264.7 macrophage cells in comparison with its aglycone, ISH. IG suppressed LPS-induced extracellular secretion of the proinflammatory mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2 , and proinflammatory protein expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2. IG also increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). IG attenuated LPS-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 in a concentration-dependent manner with negligible suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that IG exerts anti-inflammatory activity by increasing HO-1 expression and by suppressing JNK and p38 signaling pathways in LPS-challenged RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Drug Dev Res 77 : 143-151, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cobalt Alleviates GA-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Wheat Aleurone Layers via the Regulation of H2O2 Production and Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhu Wu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 are key signaling molecules that are produced in response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt is able to delay gibberellic acid (GA-induced programmed cell death (PCD in wheat aleurone layers. A similar response was observed when samples were pretreated with carbon monoxide (CO or bilirubin (BR, two end-products of HO catalysis. We further observed that increased HO-1 expression played a role in the cobalt-induced alleviation of PCD. The application of HO-1-specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX, substantially prevented the increases of HO-1 activity and the alleviation of PCD triggered by cobalt. The stimulation of HO-1 expression, and alleviation of PCD might be caused by the initial H2O2 production induced by cobalt. qRT-PCR and enzymatic assays revealed that cobalt-induced gene expression and the corresponding activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and ascorbate peroxidase (APX, three enzymes that metabolize reactive oxygen species, were consistent with the H2O2 accumulation during GA treatment. These cobalt responses were differentially blocked by co-treatment with ZnPPIX. We therefore suggest that HO-1 functions in the cobalt-triggered alleviation of PCD in wheat aleurone layers, which is also dependent on the enhancement of the activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  20. Cobalt alleviates GA-induced programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers via the regulation of H2O2 production and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingzhu; Li, Jiale; Wang, Fangquan; Li, Feng; Yang, Jun; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-11-14

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are key signaling molecules that are produced in response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt is able to delay gibberellic acid (GA)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers. A similar response was observed when samples were pretreated with carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two end-products of HO catalysis. We further observed that increased HO-1 expression played a role in the cobalt-induced alleviation of PCD. The application of HO-1-specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX), substantially prevented the increases of HO-1 activity and the alleviation of PCD triggered by cobalt. The stimulation of HO-1 expression, and alleviation of PCD might be caused by the initial H2O2 production induced by cobalt. qRT-PCR and enzymatic assays revealed that cobalt-induced gene expression and the corresponding activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), three enzymes that metabolize reactive oxygen species, were consistent with the H2O2 accumulation during GA treatment. These cobalt responses were differentially blocked by co-treatment with ZnPPIX. We therefore suggest that HO-1 functions in the cobalt-triggered alleviation of PCD in wheat aleurone layers, which is also dependent on the enhancement of the activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  1. Association of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein, and Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Polymorphisms with Diabetes and Obesity in Mexican Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Saraí Jiménez-Osorio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear factor-erythroid 2- (NF-E2- related factor 2 (Nrf2 is abated and its ability to reduce oxidative stress is impaired in type 2 diabetes and obesity. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore if polymorphisms in Nrf2 and target genes are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican mestizo subjects. The rs1800566 of NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 gene, rs7211 of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP gene, rs2071749 of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1 gene, and the rs6721961 and the rs2364723 from Nrf2 gene were genotyped in 627 diabetic subjects and 1020 controls. The results showed that the rs7211 polymorphism is a protective factor against obesity in nondiabetic subjects (CC + CT versus TT, OR = 0.40, P=0.005 and in women (CC versus CT + TT, OR = 0.7, P=0.016. TT carriers had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and lower body mass index. The rs2071749 was positively associated with obesity (AA versus AG + GG, OR = 1.25, P=0.026. Finally, the rs6721961 was negatively associated with diabetes in men (CC versus CA + AA, OR = 0.62, P=0.003. AA carriers showed lower glucose concentrations. No association was found for rs1800566 and rs2364723 polymorphisms. In conclusion, the presence of Nrf2 and related genes polymorphisms are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican patients.

  2. Silencing heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in retinal pigment epithelial cells inhibits proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenjie [Ophthalmology Hospital, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 23 Youzheng Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Xiaomei, E-mail: zhangxm667@163.com [Ophthalmology Hospital, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 23 Youzheng Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Lu, Hong [Ophthalmology Hospital, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 23 Youzheng Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Matsukura, Makoto [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sojo University, 4-22-1 Ikeda, Kumamoto 860-0082 (Japan); Zhao, Jien; Shinohara, Makoto [Ashikita Institution for Developmental Disabilities, 2813 Oaza Ashikita, Ashikita-machi, Ashikita, Kumamoto 869-5461 (Japan)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HO-1 is highly induced in RPE cells by hypoxia. •Inhibition of HO-1 activity and knockdown of HO-1 expression inhibit VEGF expression in RPE cells under hypoxia. •Knockdown of HO-1 in RPE cells inhibits angiogenesis of endothelial cells in vitro. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the vasculature and in the angiogenesis of tumors, wounds and other environments. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are the main cells involved in choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a process in which hypoxia plays an important role. Our aim was to evaluate the role of human RPE-cell HO-1 in the angiogenic activities of cocultured endothelial cells under hypoxia. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) for HO-1 was transfected into human RPE cell line ARPE-19, and zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was used to inhibit HO-1 activity. Knockdown of HO-1 expression and inhibition of HO-1 activity resulted in potent reduction of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) under hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of HO-1 suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of cocultured endothelial cells. These findings indicated that HO-1 might have an angiogenic effect in CNV through modulation of VEGF expression and might be a potential target for treating CNV.

  3. Cobalt Alleviates GA-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Wheat Aleurone Layers via the Regulation of H2O2 Production and Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingzhu; Li, Jiale; Wang, Fangquan; Li, Feng; Yang, Jun; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are key signaling molecules that are produced in response to various environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that cobalt is able to delay gibberellic acid (GA)-induced programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers. A similar response was observed when samples were pretreated with carbon monoxide (CO) or bilirubin (BR), two end-products of HO catalysis. We further observed that increased HO-1 expression played a role in the cobalt-induced alleviation of PCD. The application of HO-1-specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX), substantially prevented the increases of HO-1 activity and the alleviation of PCD triggered by cobalt. The stimulation of HO-1 expression, and alleviation of PCD might be caused by the initial H2O2 production induced by cobalt. qRT-PCR and enzymatic assays revealed that cobalt-induced gene expression and the corresponding activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), three enzymes that metabolize reactive oxygen species, were consistent with the H2O2 accumulation during GA treatment. These cobalt responses were differentially blocked by co-treatment with ZnPPIX. We therefore suggest that HO-1 functions in the cobalt-triggered alleviation of PCD in wheat aleurone layers, which is also dependent on the enhancement of the activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25405743

  4. Heme exporter FLVCR1a regulates heme synthesis and degradation and controls activity of cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinchi, Francesca; Ingoglia, Giada; Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    The liver has one of the highest rates of heme synthesis of any organ. More than 50% of the heme synthesized in the liver is used for synthesis of P450 enzymes, which metabolize exogenous and endogenous compounds that include natural products, hormones, drugs, and carcinogens. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1a (FLVCR1a) is plasma membrane heme exporter that is ubiquitously expressed and controls intracellular heme content in hematopoietic lineages. We investigated the role of Flvcr1a in liver function in mice. We created mice with conditional disruption of Mfsd7b, which encodes Flvcr1a, in hepatocytes (Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice). Mice were analyzed under basal conditions, after phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis, and after induction of cytochromes P450 synthesis. Livers were collected and analyzed by histologic, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot analyses. Hepatic P450 enzymatic activities were measured. Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice accumulated heme and iron in liver despite up-regulation of heme oxygenase 1, ferroportin, and ferritins. Hepatic heme export activity of Flvcr1a was closely associated with heme biosynthesis, which is required to sustain cytochrome induction. Upon cytochromes P450 stimulation, Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice had reduced cytochrome activity, associated with accumulation of heme in hepatocytes. The expansion of the cytosolic heme pool in these mice was likely responsible for the early inhibition of heme synthesis and increased degradation of heme, which reduced expression and activity of cytochromes P450. In livers of mice, Flvcr1a maintains a free heme pool that regulates heme synthesis and degradation as well as cytochromes P450 expression and activity. These findings have important implications for drug metabolism. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 植物血红素加氧酶生理功能研究进展(综述)%Research Advance of Heme Oxygenase Physiological Function in Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王光辉; 吴黄铭; 郑岩; 李成梁; 陈惠萍

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative degradation of heme to carbon monoxide (CO), free iron, and biliverdin (BV).This review focuses on the recent advances of HO research made in plant including HO playing the role in phytochrome synthesis,regulating the constitution in morphological architecture of root,raising the resistance of plant against stress,and promoting the germination of seeds and regulating the closure of stoma, etc. Forthmore,the direction of coming research is made a discussion.%血红素加氧酶(heme oxygenase, HO)是血红素分解代谢的关键酶类,在植物体内起着重要的作用。本文从HO在植物光敏色素合成中的作用、对植物根形态建成、提高植物抗胁迫反应能力、促进植物种子萌发和调节植物气孔关闭等方面,综述植物HO生理功能的最新研究进展,并对HO未来研究方向进行展望。

  6. The microsatellite polymorphism of heme oxygenase-1 is associated with baseline plasma IL-6 level but not with restenosis after coronary in-stenting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping; Mohamed A. Elrayess; Abuzeid H. Gomma; Jutta Palmen; Emma Hawe; Kim M. Fox; Steve E.Humphries

    2005-01-01

    Background Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) can express heme-oxygenase (HO), a rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to bilirubin, ferritin and carbon monoxide (CO). VSMC-derived CO can suppress VSMC proliferation and 05-serve as an antiproliferation factor. The promoter region of HO-1 shows a polymorphism with different (GT)n repeats that has been reported to differently induce gene expression. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of this variation on the occurrence of restenosis after in-stent treatment in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods Candidates who underwent coronary stent implantation were genotyped for the HO-1 promoter polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and automated DNA capillary sequencer. Serum levels of IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were obtained at baseline, 24 hours and 48 hours after stenting. The primary end point for the study was angiographic evidence of in-stent restenosis at 6 months. All parameters for evaluation of restenosis were analysed by quantitatve computer-assisted angiographic analysis (QCA). Results One hundred and eighty-seven patients who underwent coronary stent implantation were studied of whom 27.8% showed ≥50% restenosis after 6 months. The distribution of (GT)n repeats of all patients in the promoter region of HO-1 genotype ranged from 22 to 42, with (GT)25 and (GT)32 being the two most common alleles. The allelic repeats were divided into the short class (S) with 29 (GT)n, the middle class (M) with 30-37 (GT)n and the long class (L) with 38 (GT)n. There was no significant difference in the restenosis between the genotype groups or between post operation levels of inflammation markers, but carriers of the S allele (n=120) had 33.3% lower baseline IL-6 compared with non-S carriers (n=67, P=0.0008). Conclusions Although no association was observed between the HO-1 promoter polymorphism and coronary in-stent restenosis following the stent procedure, the

  7. Involvement of carbon monoxide produced by heme oxygenase in ABA-induced stomatal closure in Vicia faba and its proposed signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has recently proven to be an important bioactive or signaling molecule in mammalian cells. Its effects are mainly mediated by nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). In Vicia faba leaves, CO production and heme oxygenase (HO) activity, an important CO synthetic enzyme, are first reported to increase in response to ABA treatment, which could result in stomatal closure. Inter-estingly, ABA-induced stomatal closure in V. Faba guard cells is partially blocked when the synthetic CO inhibitor ZnPP, or the CO/NO scavenger Hb is added. Furthermore, we show that, exogenously applied CO donor, hematin, and CO aqueous solution not only result in the enhancement of CO release, but also time-dependently induce stomatal closure, and the latter is mimicked by the application of an NO donor SNP. The above-mentioned stomatal closure effects are differentially reversed by the addition of tungstate, a potent inhibitor of NO synthetic enzyme nitrate reductase (NR), the specific NO scavenger cPTIO, ZnPP, or Hb. During treatment for 4 h, SNP, 0.01% CO aqueous solution or hematin significantly triggers NO synthesis, whereas cPTIO, or tungstate approximately fully inhibits NO fluorescence. Additionally, application of the GC inhibitor ODQ blocks CO-induced stomatal closure. This inhibition could be reversed when 8-Br-cGMP is added. Thus, the above results suggest that CO produced by HO is involved in ABA-induced stomatal closure, and NO and cGMP may function as downstream intermediates in the CO signaling responsible for stomatal closure.

  8. Evidence for a functional link between the heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway and corticotropin-releasing hormone release from primary cultures of human trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarra, P; Miceli, F; Tringali, G; Minici, F; Pardo, M G; Lanzone, A; Mancuso, S; Apa, R

    2001-01-01

    The gene expression and synthesis of both constitutive and inducible heme oxygenase (HO) isoforms have been recently described in human placental cells, but the functional role(s) of this biochemical pathway in placental physiology and pathology is still unclear. In the present study, we have investigated whether HO activity is involved in the control of CRH secretion from trophoblast cells. Fluctuations in HO activity were induced in primary cultures of human trophoblast cells using well-known activators and inhibitors of HO, and the subsequent changes in CRH secretion were monitored measuring CRH immunoreactivity released into the incubation medium. It was found that the increase in HO activity induced by hemin or cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) was associated with parallel significant increases in CRH release. This effect was probably caused by the gaseous HO end-product, carbon monoxide (CO), because it was blocked by the HO inhibitor tin-mesoporphyrin-9, but it was not mimicked by stable HO end-products, biliverdin and bilirubin. We have also investigated whether stimulation of CRH release induced by HO was mediated by the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway. Indeed, hemin also caused significant increases in PGE2 release in this experimental paradigm. However, CoCl(2), which also enhances CRH release, had no stimulatory effect and actually inhibited PG secretion; moreover, a nonselective COX inhibitor, indomethacin, failed to counteract hemininduced CRH release. Taken collectively, these findings suggested that modulation of CRH secretion by the HO-CO system occurs through a mechanism independent of COX activity.

  9. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) heme oxygenase-1 gene, MsHO1, which is pro-oxidants-regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guang-Qing; Xu, Sheng; Xie, Yan-Jie; Han, Bin; Nie, Li; Shen, Wen-Biao; Wang, Ren

    2011-07-01

    It has been documented that plant heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; EC 1.14.99.3) is both development- and stress-regulated, thus it plays a vital role in light signalling and stress responses. In this study, an alfalfa (Medica sativa L.) HO-1 gene MsHO1 was isolated and sequenced. It contains four exons and three introns within genomic DNA sequence and encodes a polypeptide with 283 amino acids. MsHO1 had a conserved HO signature sequence and showed high similarity to other HOs in plants, especially HO-1 isoform. The MsHO1:GFP fusion protein was localized in the chloroplast. Further biochemical activity analysis of mature MsHO1, which was expressed in Escherichia coli, showed that the Vmax was 48.78 nmol biliverdin-IXα (BV) h⁻¹ nmol⁻¹ protein with an apparent Km value for hemin of 2.33 μM, and the optimum Tm and pH were 37 °C and 7.2, respectively. Results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot showed that the expressions of MsHO1 were higher in alfalfa stems and leaves than those in germinating seeds and roots. Importantly, MsHO1 gene expression and protein level were induced significantly by some pro-oxidant compounds, including hemin and nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). In conclusion, MsHO1 may play an important role in oxidative responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter and the risk of carotid atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meei-Maan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a strong stimulus of heme oxygenase (HO-1 expression in experimental studies in response to oxidative stress caused by a stimulus. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter was inversely correlated to the development of coronary artery disease in diabetics and development of restenosis following angioplasty in patients. The role of this potential vascular protective factor in carotid atherosclerosis remains unclear. We previously reported a graded association of arsenic exposure in drinking water with an increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HO-1 genetic polymorphism and the risk of atherosclerosis related to arsenic. Methods Three-hundred and sixty-seven participants with an indication of carotid atherosclerosis and an additional 420 participants without the indication, which served as the controls, from two arsenic exposure areas in Taiwan, a low arsenic-exposed Lanyang cohort and a high arsenic-exposed LMN cohort, were studied. Carotid atherosclerosis was evaluated using a duplex ultrasonographic assessment of the extracranial carotid arteries. Allelic variants of (GTn repeats in the 5'-flanking region of the HO-1 gene were identified and grouped into a short (S allele ( Results Analysis results showed that arsenic's effect on carotid atherosclerosis differed between carriers of the class S allele (OR 1.39; 95% CI 0.86-2.25; p = 0.181 and non-carriers (OR 2.65; 95% CI 1.03-6.82; p = 0.044 in the high-exposure LMN cohort. At arsenic exposure levels exceeding 750 μg/L, difference in OR estimates between class S allele carriers and non-carriers was borderline significant (p = 0.051. In contrast, no such results were found in the low-exposure Lanyang cohort. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that at a relatively high level of arsenic exposure, carriers of the short (GTn allele (

  11. Effect of hypertonic saline resuscitation on heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression and apoptosis of the intestinal mucosa in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yuan-qiang; GU Lin-hui; HUANG Wei-dong; MOU Han-zhou

    2010-01-01

    Background Massive blood loss due to trauma is the leading cause of death in trauma patients and military combatants. The fluid category of resuscitation for hypotensive trauma patients is open to debate. This study was conducted to investigate the early effects of hypertonic and isotonic saline solutions on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA expression and apoptosis in the intestinal mucosa of rats with hemorrhagic shock.Methods A model of severe hemorrhagic shock was established in 21 Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into sham, normal saline resuscitation (NS), and hypertonic saline resuscitation (HTS) groups, with 7 in each group. We assessed and compared the HO-1 mRNA expression and apoptosis in the small intestinal mucosa of rats after hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation using the SYBR Green I fluorescence quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescein-iso-thiocyanate-annexin V/propidium iodide double staining, and flow cytometry.Results In the early stage of hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation, marked apoptosis occurred in the small intestinal mucosa from both the NS and HTS groups. The apoptotic rate in the NS group was higher than that in the HTS group (P <0.01). Among the three groups, HO-1 mRNA mucosa from the HTS group had the highest level of expression; however, the differences were not significant. There was a significant negative correlation between HO-1 mRNA expression and apoptosis in the small in