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Sample records for hematopoietic cell engraftment

  1. Rapid Mobilization Reveals a Highly Engraftable Hematopoietic Stem Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Singh, Pratibha; Tate, Tiffany A; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Datari, Shruti R; Fukuda, Seiji; Liu, Liqiong; Kharchenko, Peter V; Schajnovitz, Amir; Baryawno, Ninib; Mercier, Francois E; Boyer, Joseph; Gardner, Jason; Morrow, Dwight M; Scadden, David T; Pelus, Louis M

    2018-01-11

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potential curative therapy for malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Improving the efficiency of stem cell collection and the quality of the cells acquired can broaden the donor pool and improve patient outcomes. We developed a rapid stem cell mobilization regimen utilizing a unique CXCR2 agonist, GROβ, and the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. A single injection of both agents resulted in stem cell mobilization peaking within 15 min that was equivalent in magnitude to a standard multi-day regimen of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Mechanistic studies determined that rapid mobilization results from synergistic signaling on neutrophils, resulting in enhanced MMP-9 release, and unexpectedly revealed genetic polymorphisms in MMP-9 that alter activity. This mobilization regimen results in preferential trafficking of stem cells that demonstrate a higher engraftment efficiency than those mobilized by G-CSF. Our studies suggest a potential new strategy for the rapid collection of an improved hematopoietic graft. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. In utero depletion of fetal hematopoietic stem cells improves engraftment after neonatal transplantation in mice.

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    Derderian, S Christopher; Togarrati, P Priya; King, Charmin; Moradi, Patriss W; Reynaud, Damien; Czechowicz, Agnieszka; Weissman, Irving L; MacKenzie, Tippi C

    2014-08-07

    Although in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation is a promising strategy to treat congenital hematopoietic disorders, levels of engraftment have not been therapeutic for diseases in which donor cells have no survival advantage. We used an antibody against the murine c-Kit receptor (ACK2) to deplete fetal host hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and increase space within the hematopoietic niche for donor cell engraftment. Fetal mice were injected with ACK2 on embryonic days 13.5 to 14.5 and surviving pups were transplanted with congenic hematopoietic cells on day of life 1. Low-dose ACK2 treatment effectively depleted HSCs within the bone marrow with minimal toxicity and the antibody was cleared from the serum before the neonatal transplantation. Chimerism levels were significantly higher in treated pups than in controls; both myeloid and lymphoid cell chimerism increased because of higher engraftment of HSCs in the bone marrow. To test the strategy of repeated HSC depletion and transplantation, some mice were treated with ACK2 postnatally, but the increase in engraftment was lower than that seen with prenatal treatment. We demonstrate a successful fetal conditioning strategy associated with minimal toxicity. Such strategies could be used to achieve clinically relevant levels of engraftment to treat congenital stem cell disorders. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Maternal T cells limit engraftment after in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijagal, Amar; Wegorzewska, Marta; Jarvis, Erin; Le, Tom; Tang, Qizhi; MacKenzie, Tippi C

    2011-02-01

    Transplantation of allogeneic stem cells into the early gestational fetus, a treatment termed in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx), could potentially overcome the limitations of bone marrow transplants, including graft rejection and the chronic immunosuppression required to prevent rejection. However, clinical use of IUHCTx has been hampered by poor engraftment, possibly due to a host immune response against the graft. Since the fetal immune system is relatively immature, we hypothesized that maternal cells trafficking into the fetus may pose the true barrier to effective IUHCTx. Here, we have demonstrated that there is macrochimerism of maternal leukocytes in the blood of unmanipulated mouse fetuses, with substantial increases in T cell trafficking after IUHCTx. To determine the contribution of these maternal lymphocytes to rejection after IUHCTx, we bred T and/or B cell-deficient mothers to wild-type fathers and performed allogeneic IUHCTx into the immunocompetent fetuses. There was a marked improvement in engraftment if the mother lacked T cells but not B cells, indicating that maternal T cells are the main barrier to engraftment. Furthermore, when the graft was matched to the mother, there was no difference in engraftment between syngeneic and allogeneic fetal recipients. Our study suggests that the clinical success of IUHCTx may be improved by transplanting cells matched to the mother.

  4. Identification of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment Genes in Gene Therapy Studies.

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    Powers, John M; Trobridge, Grant D

    2013-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapy using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors is a promising approach to provide life-long correction for genetic defects. HSC gene therapy clinical studies have resulted in functional cures for several diseases, but in some studies clonal expansion or leukemia has occurred. This is due to the dyregulation of endogenous host gene expression from vector provirus insertional mutagenesis. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replicating retroviruses have been used extensively to identify genes that influence oncogenesis. However, retroviral mutagenesis screens can also be used to determine the role of genes in biological processes such as stem cell engraftment. The aim of this review is to describe the potential for vector insertion site data from gene therapy studies to provide novel insights into mechanisms of HSC engraftment. In HSC gene therapy studies dysregulation of host genes by replication-incompetent vector proviruses may lead to enrichment of repopulating clones with vector integrants near genes that influence engraftment. Thus, data from HSC gene therapy studies can be used to identify novel candidate engraftment genes. As HSC gene therapy use continues to expand, the vector insertion site data collected will be of great interest to help identify novel engraftment genes and may ultimately lead to new therapies to improve engraftment.

  5. Effect of radiation dose-rate on hematopoietic cell engraftment in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Glass

    Full Text Available Although exceptionally high radiation dose-rates are currently attaining clinical feasibility, there have been relatively few studies reporting the biological consequences of these dose-rates in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT. In zebrafish models of HCT, preconditioning before transplant is typically achieved through radiation alone. We report the comparison of outcomes in adult zebrafish irradiated with 20 Gy at either 25 or 800 cGy/min in the context of experimental HCT. In non-transplanted irradiated fish we observed no substantial differences between dose-rate groups as assessed by fish mortality, cell death in the kidney, endogenous hematopoietic reconstitution, or gene expression levels of p53 and ddb2 (damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 in the kidney. However, following HCT, recipients conditioned with the higher dose rate showed significantly improved donor-derived engraftment at 9 days post transplant (p ≤ 0.0001, and improved engraftment persisted at 31 days post transplant. Analysis for sdf-1a expression, as well as transplant of hematopoietic cells from cxcr4b -/- zebrafish, (odysseus, cumulatively suggest that the sdf-1a/cxcr4b axis is not required of donor-derived cells for the observed dose-rate effect on engraftment. Overall, the adult zebrafish model of HCT indicates that exceptionally high radiation dose-rates can impact HCT outcome, and offers a new system for radiobiological and mechanistic interrogation of this phenomenon. Key words: Radiation dose rate, Total Marrow Irradiation (TMI, Total body irradiation (TBI, SDF-1, Zebrafish, hematopoietic cell transplant.

  6. Sheep CD34+ amniotic fluid cells have hematopoietic potential and engraft after autologous in utero transplantation.

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    Shaw, S W Steven; Blundell, Michael P; Pipino, Caterina; Shangaris, Panicos; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Ramachandra, Durrgah L; Georgiades, Fanos; Boyd, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian J; Porada, Christopher D; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Cheng, Po-Jen; David, Anna L; de Coppi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Unmatched allogeneic in utero stem cell transplantation (IUSCT) produces poor engraftment unless the fetus has congenital immunodeficiency, probably because of maternal and fetal immune responses to injected cells. We studied the functional hematopoietic potential of transduced green fluorescent protein (GFP+) sheep amniotic fluid (AF) stem cells, before and after autologous IUSCT. CD34+ cells were selected from first trimester sheep AF, transduced overnight, and injected intravenously into NOD-SCID-gamma (NSG) mice. At 3 months, primary recipient bone marrow (BM) was injected into secondary NSG recipients. GFP+ cells were detected in the hematopoietic organs and peripheral blood of primary and secondary recipients at 3 months. Autologous IUSCT (transduced GFP+CD34+AF) was performed in fetal sheep. Six months postnatally, lamb BM was injected into secondary NSG recipients. GFP+ cells were detected in the peripheral blood of primary and secondary recipients. This confirms the hematopoietic potential of AF stem cells supporting the concept of autologous IUSCT to treat congenital hematopoietic disease. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Fluorophore-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticle labeling and analysis of engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxwell, Dustin J; Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A

    2008-01-01

    The use of nanometer-sized iron oxide particles combined with molecular imaging techniques enables dynamic studies of homing and trafficking of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Identifying clinically applicable strategies for loading nanoparticles into primitive HSC requires strictly defined...... culture conditions to maintain viability without inducing terminal differentiation. In the current study, fluorescent molecules were covalently linked to dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (Feridex) to characterize human HSC labeling to monitor the engraftment process. Conjugating fluorophores...... or in vivo. Transplantation of purified primary human cord blood lineage-depleted and CD34(+) cells into immunodeficient mice allowed detection of labeled human HSC in the recipient bones. Flow cytometry was used to precisely quantitate the cell populations that had sequestered the nanoparticles...

  8. The Involvment of Hematopoietic-Specific PLC -β2 in Homing and Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

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    Adamiak, Mateusz; Suszynska, Malwina; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-12-01

    Migration and bone marrow (BM) homing of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) is regulated by several signaling pathways, and here we provide evidence for the involvement in this process of hematopoietic-specific phospholipase C-β2 (PLC-β2). This enzyme is involved in release of intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Recently we reported that PLC-β2 promotes mobilization of HSPCs from BM into peripheral blood (PB), and this effect is mediated by the involvement of PLC-β2 in the release of proteolytic enzymes from granulocytes and its role in disintegration of membrane lipid rafts. Here we report that, besides the role of PLC-β2 in the release of HSPCs from BM niches, PLC-β2 regulates the migration of HSPCs in response to chemotactic gradients of BM homing factors, including SDF-1, S1P, C1P, and ATP. Specifically, HSPCs from PLC-β2-KO mice show impaired homing and engraftment in vivo after transplantation into lethally irradiated mice. This decrease in migration of HSPCs can be explained by impaired calcium release in PLC-β2-KO mice and a high baseline level of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), an enzyme that negatively regulates cell migration.

  9. Avoidance of stimulation improves engraftment of cultured and retrovirally transduced hematopoietic cells in primates

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    Takatoku, Masaaki; Sellers, Stephanie; Agricola, Brian A.; Metzger, Mark E.; Kato, Ikunoshin; Donahue, Robert E.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2001-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that cells in active cell cycle have an engraftment defect compared with quiescent cells. We used nonhuman primates to investigate this finding, which has direct implications for clinical transplantation and gene therapy applications. Transfer of rhesus CD34+ cells to culture in stem cell factor (SCF) on the CH-296 fibronectin fragment (FN) after 4 days of culture in stimulatory cytokines maintained cell viability but decreased cycling. Using retroviral marking with two different gene transfer vectors, we compared the engraftment potential of cytokine-stimulated cells versus those transferred to nonstimulatory conditions (SCF on FN alone) before reinfusion. In vivo competitive repopulation studies showed that the level of marking originating from the cells continued in culture for 2 days with SCF on FN following a 4-day stimulatory transduction was significantly higher than the level of marking coming from cells transduced for 4 days and reinfused without the 2-day culture under nonstimulatory conditions. We observed stable in vivo overall gene marking levels of up to 29%. This approach may allow more efficient engraftment of transduced or ex vivo expanded cells by avoiding active cell cycling at the time of reinfusion. PMID:11489938

  10. Maternal alloantibodies induce a postnatal immune response that limits engraftment following in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation in mice

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    Merianos, Demetri J.; Tiblad, Eleonor; Santore, Matthew T.; Todorow, Carlyn A.; Laje, Pablo; Endo, Masayuki; Zoltick, Philip W.; Flake, Alan W.

    2009-01-01

    The lack of fetal immune responses to foreign antigens, i.e., fetal immunologic tolerance, is the most compelling rationale for prenatal stem cell and gene therapy. However, the frequency of engraftment following in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) in the murine model is reduced in allogeneic, compared with congenic, recipients. This observation supports the existence of an immune barrier to fetal transplantation and challenges the classic assumptions of fetal tolerance. Here, we present evidence that supports the presence of an adaptive immune response in murine recipients of IUHCT that failed to maintain engraftment. However, when IUHCT recipients were fostered by surrogate mothers, they all maintained long-term chimerism. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the cells responsible for rejection of the graft were recipient in origin. Our observations suggest a mechanism by which IUHCT-dependent sensitization of the maternal immune system and the subsequent transmission of maternal alloantibodies to pups through breast milk induces a postnatal adaptive immune response in the recipient, which, in turn, results in the ablation of engraftment after IUHCT. Finally, we showed that non-fostered pups that maintained their chimerism had higher levels of Tregs as well as a more suppressive Treg phenotype than their non-chimeric, non-fostered siblings. This study resolves the apparent contradiction of induction of an adaptive immune response in the pre-immune fetus and confirms the potential of actively acquired tolerance to facilitate prenatal therapeutic applications. PMID:19652363

  11. Mice engrafted with human fetal thymic tissue and hematopoietic stem cells develop pathology resembling chronic graft-versus-host disease.

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    Lockridge, Jennifer L; Zhou, Ying; Becker, Yusof A; Ma, Shidong; Kenney, Shannon C; Hematti, Peiman; Capitini, Christian M; Burlingham, William J; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Gumperz, Jenny E

    2013-09-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a significant roadblock to long-term hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation success. Effective treatments for cGVHD have been difficult to develop, in part because of a paucity of animal models that recapitulate the multiorgan pathologies observed in clinical cGVHD. Here we present an analysis of the pathology that occurs in immunodeficient mice engrafted with human fetal HSCs and implanted with fragments of human fetal thymus and liver. Starting at time points generally later than 100 days post-transplantation, the mice developed signs of illness, including multiorgan cellular infiltrates containing human T cells, B cells, and macrophages; fibrosis in sites such as lungs and liver; and thickened skin with alopecia. Experimental manipulations that delayed or reduced the efficiency of the HSC engraftment did not affect the timing or progression of disease manifestations, suggesting that pathology in this model is driven more by factors associated with the engrafted human thymic organoid. Disease progression was typically accompanied by extensive fibrosis and degradation of the thymic organoid, and there was an inverse correlation of disease severity with the frequency of FoxP3(+) thymocytes. Hence, the human thymic tissue may contribute T cells with pathogenic potential, but the generation of regulatory T cells in the thymic organoid may help to control these cells before pathology resembling cGVHD eventually develops. This model thus provides a new system to investigate disease pathophysiology relating to human thymic events and to evaluate treatment strategies to combat multiorgan fibrotic pathology produced by human immune cells. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. TRANSIENT AND PERMANENT ENGRAFTMENT POTENTIAL OF MURINE HEMATOPOIETIC STEM-CELL SUBSETS - DIFFERENTIAL-EFFECTS OF HOST CONDITIONING WITH GAMMA-RADIATION AND CYTOTOXIC DRUGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOWN, JD; PLOEMACHER, RE

    Transplant of sorted donor (BG-Gpi-1(a)) hematopoietic stem cell subsets and host (BG-Gpi-1(b)) treatment with total body irradiation (TBI) or cytotoxic drugs were compared for induction of short- and long-term engraftment in a murine chimera model of congenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT).

  13. Evaluation of engraftment and immunological tolerance after reduced intensity conditioning in a rhesus hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy model.

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    Uchida, N; Weitzel, R P; Evans, M E; Green, R; Bonifacino, A C; Krouse, A E; Metzger, M E; Hsieh, M M; Donahue, R E; Tisdale, J F

    2014-02-01

    Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) is desirable for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) targeted gene therapy; however, RIC may be insufficient for efficient engraftment and inducing immunological tolerance to transgenes. We previously established long-term gene marking in our rhesus macaque autologous HSC transplantation model following 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). In this study, we evaluated RIC transplantation with 4 Gy TBI in two rhesus macaques that received equal parts of CD34(+) cells transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing lentiviral vector and empty vector not expressing transgenes. In both animals, equivalently low gene marking between GFP and empty vectors was observed 6 months post-transplantation, even with efficient transduction of CD34(+) cells in vitro. Autologous lymphocyte infusion with GFP marking resulted in an increase of gene marking in lymphocytes in a control animal with GFP tolerance, but not in the two RIC-transplanted animals. In vitro assays revealed strong cellular and humoral immune responses to GFP protein in the two RIC-transplanted animals, but this was not observed in controls. In summary, 4 Gy TBI is insufficient to permit engraftment of genetically modified HSCs and induce immunological tolerance to transgenes. Our findings should help in the design of conditioning regimens in gene therapy trials.

  14. Influence of a dual-injection regimen, plerixafor, and CXCR4 on in-utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and engraftment using the sheep model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, A. Daisy; Varain, Nicole M.; Jeanblanc, Christine M.; Colon, Donna M.; Kim, Jaehyup; Zanjani, Esmail D.; Hematti, Peiman

    2014-01-01

    Background Inadequate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) following in-utero HSC transplantation (IUHSCT) remains a major obstacle for the prenatal correction of numerous hereditary disorders. HSCs express CXCR4 receptors that allow homing and engraftment in response to SDF1 ligand present in the bone marrow (BM) stromal niche. Plerixafor, a mobilization drug, works through the interruption of the CXCR4-SDF1 axis. Methods We used the fetal sheep large animal model to test our hypotheses that: a) by administering plerixafor in-utero before performing IUHSCT to release fetal HSCs and thus vacating recipient HSC niches, b) by using human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) to immunomodulate and humanize the fetal BM niches, and c) by increasing the CXCR4+ fraction of CD34+ HSCs, we could improve engraftment. Human cord blood-derived CD34+ cells and human bone marrow-derived MSCs were used for these studies. Results When MSCs were transplanted one week prior to CD34+ cells with plerixafor treatment, we observed 2.80% donor hematopoietic engraftment. Combination of this regimen with additional CD34+ cells at the time of MSC infusion increased engraftment levels to 8.77%. Next, increasing the fraction of CXCR4+ cells in the CD34+ population albeit transplanting at a late gestation age was not beneficial. Our results show engraftment of both lymphoid and myeloid lineages. Discussion Prior MSC and HSC cotransplantation followed by manipulation of the CXCR4-SDF1 axis in IUHSCT provides an innovative conceptual approach for conferring competitive advantage to donor HSCs. Our novel approach could provide a clinically relevant approach for enhancing engraftment early in the fetus. PMID:25108653

  15. Influence of a dual-injection regimen, plerixafor and CXCR4 on in utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and engraftment with use of the sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, A Daisy; Varain, Nicole M; Jeanblanc, Christine M; Colon, Donna M; Kim, Jaehyup; Zanjani, Esmail D; Hematti, Peiman

    2014-09-01

    Inadequate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) after in utero HSC transplantation (IUHSCT) remains a major obstacle for the prenatal correction of numerous hereditary disorders. HSCs express CXCR4 receptors that allow homing and engraftment in response to stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) ligand present in the bone marrow stromal niche. Plerixafor, a mobilization drug, works through the interruption of the CXCR4-SDF-1 axis. We used the fetal sheep large-animal model to test our hypotheses that (i) by administering plerixafor in utero before performing IUHSCT to release fetal HSCs and thus vacating recipient HSC niches, (ii) by using human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) to immunomodulate and humanize the fetal BM niches and (iii) by increasing the CXCR4(+) fraction of CD34(+) HSCs, we could improve engraftment. Human cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells and human bone marrow-derived MSCs were used for these studies. When MSCs were transplanted 1 week before CD34(+) cells with plerixafor treatment, we observed 2.80% donor hematopoietic engraftment. Combination of this regimen with additional CD34(+) cells at the time of MSC infusion increased engraftment levels to 8.77%. Next, increasing the fraction of CXCR4(+) cells in the CD34(+) population albeit transplanting at a late gestation age was not beneficial. Our results show engraftment of both lymphoid and myeloid lineages. Prior MSC and HSC cotransplantation followed by manipulation of the CXCR4-SDF-1 axis in IUHSCT provides an innovative conceptual approach for conferring competitive advantage to donor HSCs. Our novel approach could provide a clinically relevant approach for enhancing engraftment early in the fetus. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cord Blood-Derived Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells: Current Challenges in Engraftment, Infection, and Ex Vivo Expansion

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    Katsuhiro Kita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood has served as an alternative to bone marrow for hematopoietic transplantation since the late 1980s. Numerous clinical studies have proven the efficacy of umbilical cord blood. Moreover, the possible immaturity of cells in umbilical cord blood gives more options to recipients with HLA mismatch and allows for the use of umbilical cord blood from unrelated donors. However, morbidity and mortality rates associated with hematopoietic malignancies still remain relatively high, even after cord blood transplantation. Infections and relapse are the major causes of death after cord blood transplantation in patients with hematopoietic diseases. Recently, new strategies have been introduced to improve these major problems. Establishing better protocols for simple isolation of primitive cells and ex vivo expansion will also be very important. In this short review, we discuss several recent promising findings related to the technical improvement of cord blood transplantation.

  17. Human CD34+ CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells cultured with growth factors including Angptl5 efficiently engraft adult NOD-SCID Il2rγ-/- (NSG mice.

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    Adam C Drake

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in clinical and research applications necessitates expansion of HSCs in vitro. Before these cells can be used they must be carefully evaluated to assess their stem cell activity. Here, we expanded cord blood CD34(+ CD133(+ cells in a defined medium containing angiopoietin like 5 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 and evaluated the cells for stem cell activity in NOD-SCID Il2rg(-/- (NSG mice by multi-lineage engraftment, long term reconstitution, limiting dilution and serial reconstitution. The phenotype of expanded cells was characterized by flow cytometry during the course of expansion and following engraftment in mice. We show that the SCID repopulating activity resides in the CD34(+ CD133(+ fraction of expanded cells and that CD34(+ CD133(+ cell number correlates with SCID repopulating activity before and after culture. The expanded cells mediate long-term hematopoiesis and serial reconstitution in NSG mice. Furthermore, they efficiently reconstitute not only neonate but also adult NSG recipients, generating human blood cell populations similar to those reported in mice reconstituted with uncultured human HSCs. These findings suggest an expansion of long term HSCs in our culture and show that expression of CD34 and CD133 serves as a marker for HSC activity in human cord blood cell cultures. The ability to expand human HSCs in vitro should facilitate clinical use of HSCs and large-scale construction of humanized mice from the same donor for research applications.

  18. Incidence, risk factors and outcome of pre engraftment Gram-negative bacteremia after allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an Italian prospective multicenter survey.

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    Girmenia, Corrado; Bertaina, Alice; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Carotti, Alessandra; Algarotti, Alessandra; Busca, Alessandro; Cattaneo, Chiara; Raiola, Anna Maria; Guidi, Stefano; Iori, Anna Paola; Candoni, Anna; Irrera, Giuseppe; Milone, Giuseppe; Marcacci, Giampaolo; Scimè, Rosanna; Musso, Maurizio; Cudillo, Laura; Sica, Simona; Castagna, Luca; Corradini, Paolo; Marchesi, Francesco; Pastore, Domenico; Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Annaloro, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Santarone, Stella; Nassi, Luca; Farina, Claudio; Viscoli, Claudio; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bonifazi, Francesca; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Italiano, Gruppo

    2017-08-03

    Gram-negative bacteremia (GNB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) and updated epidemiological investigation is advisable. We prospectively evaluated the epidemiology of pre-engraftment GNB in 1,118 allogeneic HSCT (allo-HSCT) and 1,625 autologous HSCT (auto-HSCT) among 54 transplant centers during 2014 (SIGNB-GITMO-AMCLI study). Using logistic regression methods we identified risk factors for GNB and evaluated the impact of GNB on the 4-month overall-survival after transplant. SIGNB-GITMO-AMCLI is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02088840. The cumulative incidence of pre-engraftment GNB was 17.3% in allo-HSCT and 9% in auto-HSCT. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common isolates. By multivariate analysis variables associated with GNB were a diagnosis of acute leukemia, a transplant from HLA-mismatched donor and from cord-blood, older age and duration of severe neutropenia in allo-HSCT, and a diagnosis of lymphoma, older age and no antibacterial prophylaxis in auto-HSCT. A pre-transplant infection by a resistant pathogen was significantly associated with an increased risk of post-transplant infection by the same microorganism in allo-HSCT. Colonization by resistant Gram-negative bacteria was significantly associated with an increased rate of infection by the same pathogen in both transplant procedures. GNB was independently associated with increased mortality at 4-months both in allo-HSCT (HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.45-3.13;p=.0001) and auto-HSCT (HR 2.43, 95% CI 1.22-4.84;p=.012). Pre-engraftment GNB is an independent factor associated with increased mortality at four months from auto-HSCT and allo-HSCT. Previous infectious history and colonization monitoring represent major indicators of GNB.

  19. Host T cells affect donor T cell engraftment and graft-versus-host disease after reduced-intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Nancy M; Hakim, Frances; Steinberg, Seth M; Krumlauf, Michael; Cvitkovic, Romana; Babb, Rebecca; Odom, Jeanne; Fowler, Daniel H; Gress, Ronald E; Bishop, Michael R

    2007-09-01

    Mixed chimerism in the T cell compartment (MCT) after reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) may influence immune repopulation with alloreactive donor T cells. We examined effects of host T cell numbers on donor T cell engraftment and recovery and on acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) in a relatively homogeneous patient population with respect to residual host T cells through quantified immune depletion prior to RIST and to donor T cells by setting the allograft T cell dose of 1x10(5) CD3+ cells/kg. In this setting, 2 patterns of early donor T cell engraftment could be distinguished by day +42: (1) early and complete donor chimerism in the T cell compartment (FDCT) and (2) persistent MCT. FDCT was associated with lower residual host CD8+ T cell counts prior to transplant and aGVHD. With persistent MCT, subsequent development of aGVHD could be predicted by the direction of change in T cell donor chimerism after donor lymphocyte infusion, and no aGVHD occurred until FDCT was established. MCT did not affect recovery of donor T cell counts. These observations suggest that the relative number and alloreactivity of donor and host T cells are more important than the absolute allograft T cell dose in determining donor engraftment and aGVHD after RIST.

  20. Latexin Inactivation Enhances Survival and Long-Term Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Expands the Entire Hematopoietic System in Mice

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    Yi Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural genetic diversity offers an important yet largely untapped resource to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. Latexin (Lxn is a negative stem cell regulatory gene identified on the basis of genetic diversity. By using an Lxn knockout mouse model, we found that Lxn inactivation in vivo led to the physiological expansion of the entire hematopoietic hierarchy. Loss of Lxn enhanced the competitive repopulation capacity and survival of HSCs in a cell-intrinsic manner. Gene profiling of Lxn-null HSCs showed altered expression of genes enriched in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1 was a potential downstream target with a dramatic downregulation in Lxn-null HSCs. Enforced expression of Thbs1 restored the Lxn inactivation-mediated HSC phenotypes. This study reveals that Lxn plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostatic hematopoiesis, and it may lead to development of safe and effective approaches to manipulate HSCs for clinical benefit.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells versus mesenchymal stem cells combined with cord blood for engraftment failure after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a pilot prospective, open-label, randomized trial.

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    Xiong, Yi-Ying; Fan, Qian; Huang, Fen; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xiao-Yong; Fan, Zhi-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Xiao, Yang; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Dai, Min; Xu, Na; Sun, Jing; Xiang, Peng; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Qi-Fa

    2014-02-01

    Engraftment failure (EF) after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a serious complication. We prospectively evaluated the effects and safeties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) alone and MSCs combined with cord blood (CB) for EF. Twenty-two patients were randomized to receive MSCs (MSC group; n = 11) or MSCs plus CB (CB group; n = 11). Patients with no response (NR) to MSCs received the therapeutic schedule in the CB group, and those patients with partial response (PR) in the MSC group and patients without complete remission (CR) in the CB group received another cycle of MSC treatment. Patients who did not achieve CR after 2 cycles of treatments received other treatments, including allogeneic HSCT. After the first treatment cycle, response was seen in 7 of 11 patients in the MSC group and in 9 of 11 in the CB group (P = .635), with a significant difference in neutrophil reconstruction between the 2 groups (P = .030). After 2 treatment cycles, 16 patients achieved CR, 3 achieved PR, and 3 had NR. No patient experienced graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). With a median follow-up of 345 d (range, 129 to 784 d) post-transplantation, 18 patients remained alive and 4 had died (3 from primary disease relapse and 1 from cytomegalovirus pneumonia). The 2-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and cumulative incidence of tumor relapse post-transplantation were 75.2% ± 12.0%, 79.5% ± 9.4%, and 20.5% ± 9.4%, respectively. Our data indicate that the 2 strategies are effective for EF and do not result in GVHD or increase the risk of tumor relapse, but the MSC plus CB regimen has a superior effect on neutrophil reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacologic increase in HIF1α enhances hematopoietic stem and progenitor homing and engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Jennifer M; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Singh, Pratibha; Pelus, Louis M

    2014-01-09

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for a number of immunologic disorders. For effective transplant, HSCs must traffic from the peripheral blood to supportive bone marrow niches. We previously showed that HSC trafficking can be enhanced by ex vivo treatment of hematopoietic grafts with 16-16 dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2). While exploring regulatory molecules involved in dmPGE2 enhancement, we found that transiently increasing the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1α) is required for dmPGE2-enhanced CXCR4 upregulation and enhanced migration and homing of stem and progenitor cells and that pharmacologic manipulation of HIF1α is also capable of enhancing homing and engraftment. We also now identify the specific hypoxia response element required for CXCR4 upregulation. These data define a precise mechanism through which ex vivo pulse treatment with dmPGE2 enhances the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells; these data also define a role for hypoxia and HIF1α in enhancement of hematopoietic transplantation.

  3. Etiology, clinical features and outcomes of pre-engraftment and post-engraftment bloodstream infection in hematopoietic SCT recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, C; Garcia-Vidal, C; Arnan, M; Sánchez-Ortega, I; Patiño, B; Duarte, R; Carratalà, J

    2014-06-01

    We conducted an observational study to assess the etiology, clinical features and outcomes of bloodstream infection (BSI) in 172 hematopoietic SCT (HCST) recipients. One hundred episodes of BSI in the pre-engraftment period (early onset) were compared with 89 episodes in the post-engraftment phase (late onset). More patients with late-onset BSI received an allogeneic HSCT, had GVHD and had received corticosteroids, whereas patients with early-onset BSI were more likely to have neutropenia, severe mucositis and a central venous catheter (CVC) in place. CVC was the most frequent site of infection, followed by an endogenous source. Pneumonia and gastrointestinal infection were particularly frequent in late-onset BSI, whereas mucositis was more frequent in the early-onset group. Gram-positive organisms predominated over Gram negatives. Streptococcus pneumoniae was more frequent in patients with late-onset BSI. Patients with late-onset BSI presented worse outcomes regarding septic shock, intensive care unit admission and early and overall case-fatality rates. Early-onset BSI was mainly related to the presence of neutropenia, mucositis and CVC, whereas late-onset BSI mainly affected severely immunosuppressed allogeneic HSCT recipients with GVHD and corticosteroids. Late-onset BSI caused high case-fatality rates. BSI due to S. pneumoniae was especially frequent late after transplantation. The development of better vaccination strategies is needed.

  4. Engraftment potential of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells after in utero transplantation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chie-Pein; Liu, Shu-Hsiang; Huang, Jian-Pei; Aplin, John D; Wu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Chun; Hu, Cing-Siang; Ko, Chun-Chuan; Lee, Ming-Yi; Chen, Chia-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Human placental mesenchymal stem cells (hPMCs) are thought to be multipotent, but their fate after in utero transplantation is not known. hPMCs isolated from term placenta were assessed for their phenotype markers, mutilineage capacity, and immunomodulatory properties. Their engraftment potential was analyzed in a pregnant rat model after in utero transplantation at embryonic day 17. Immunohistochemistry, tracing of labeled cells, fluorescence in situ hybridization and real-time PCR were used to assess post-transplant chimerism. In vitro, lineage-negative, CD34-negative hPMCs differentiated into osteocytes, adipocytes, hepatocytes and endothelial cells with tube formation, and actively suppressed the rat lymphocyte proliferative response to allogeneic lymphocyte stimulation (P transplantation into pregnant rats, a low level of engraftment was achieved in various fetal tissues. Engraftment occurred in more than 60% of the fetal rats. Cells persisted for at least 12 weeks after delivery and evidence was obtained to suggest differentiation into specific lineages, including hepatocytes and hematopoietic cells. However, a greater number of hPMCs migrated to the placenta than to the fetus, thus limiting the degree of cell engraftment in fetal organs. We conclude that hPMCs are mutipotent cells that can be engrafted long-term in immunocompetent rats after in utero transplantation.

  5. Engraftment and in vivo proliferation advantage of gene-corrected mobilized CD34+cells from Fanconi anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río, Paula; Navarro, Susana; Guenechea, Guillermo; Sánchez-Domínguez, Rebeca; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Yañez, Rosa; Casado, Jose A; Mehta, Parinda A; Pujol, Maria Roser; Surrallés, Jordi; Charrier, Sabine; Galy, Anne; Segovia, José C; Díaz de Heredia, Cristina; Sevilla, Julián; Bueren, Juan A

    2017-09-28

    Previous Fanconi anemia (FA) gene therapy studies have failed to demonstrate engraftment of gene-corrected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from FA patients, either after autologous transplantation or infusion into immunodeficient mice. In this study, we demonstrate that a validated short transduction protocol of G-CSF plus plerixafor-mobilized CD34 + cells from FA-A patients with a therapeutic FANCA- lentiviral vector corrects the phenotype of in vitro cultured hematopoietic progenitor cells. Transplantation of transduced FA CD34 + cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in reproducible engraftment of myeloid, lymphoid, and CD34 + cells. Importantly, a marked increase in the proportion of phenotypically corrected, patient-derived hematopoietic cells was observed after transplantation with respect to the infused CD34 + graft, indicating the proliferative advantage of corrected FA-A hematopoietic repopulating cells. Our data demonstrate for the first time that optimized protocols of hematopoietic stem cell collection from FA patients, followed by the short and clinically validated transduction of these cells with a therapeutic lentiviral vector, results in the generation of phenotypically corrected HSPCs capable of repopulating and developing proliferation advantage in immunodeficient mice. Our results suggest that clinical approaches for FA gene therapy similar to those used in this study will facilitate hematopoietic repopulation in FA patients with gene corrected HSPCs, opening new prospects for gene therapy of FA patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivu-Economescu, Mihaela; Rubach, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are recognized as a new way to treat various diseases and injuries, with a wide range of health benefits. The goal is to heal or replace diseased or destroyed organs or body parts with healthy new cells provided by stem cell transplantation. The current practical form of stem cell therapy is the hematopoietic stem cells transplant applied for the treatment of hematological disorders. There are over 2100 clinical studies in progress concerning hematopoietic stem cell therapies. All of them are using hematopoietic stem cells to treat various diseases like: cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, cardiac failure, neural disorders, auto-immune diseases, immunodeficiency, metabolic or genetic disorders. Several challenges are to be addressed prior to developing and applying large scale cell therapies: 1) to explain and control the mechanisms of differentiation and development toward a specific cell type needed to treat the disease, 2) to obtain a sufficient number of desired cell type for transplantation, 3) to overcome the immune rejection and 4) to show that transplanted cells fulfill their normal functions in vivo after transplants. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Major complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afessa, Bekele; Peters, Steve G

    2006-06-01

    Tens of thousands of patients undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually, 15 to 40% of whom are admitted to the intensive care unit. Pulmonary complications are the most life threatening conditions that develop in HSCT recipients. Both infectious and noninfectious complications occur more frequently in allogeneic HSCT. The management of HSCT recipients requires knowledge of their immune status, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, and early treatment. During the pre-engraftment phase (0 to 30 days after transplant), the most prevalent pathogens causing infection are bacteria and Candida species and, if the neutropenia persists, Aspergillus species. The early post-engraftment phase (30 to 100 days) is characterized by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Pneumocystis jiroveci, and Aspergillus infections. During the late posttransplant phase (> 100 days), allogeneic HSCT recipients are at risk for CMV, community-acquired respiratory virus, and encapsulated bacterial infections. Antigen and polymerase chain reaction assays are important for the diagnosis of CMV and Aspergillus infections. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and peri-engraftment respiratory distress syndrome occur in both allogeneic and autologous HSCT recipients, usually during the first 30 days. Bronchiolitis obliterans occurs exclusively in allogeneic HSCT recipients with graft versus host disease. Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome occurs at any time following transplant. Bronchoscopy is usually helpful for the diagnosis of the infectious pulmonary complications and DAH.

  8. Valproic acid affects the engraftment of TPO-expanded cord blood cells in NOD/SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano, Francesca; Milazzo, Luisa; Ciccarelli, Carmela; Barca, Alessandra; Agostini, Francesca; Altieri, Ilaria; Macioce, Giampiero; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Screnci, Maria; De Felice, Lidia; Giampaolo, Adele; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2012-02-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) can improve the long-term outcome of transplanted individuals and reduce the relapse rate. Valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, when combined with different cytokine cocktails, induces the expansion of CD34+ cell populations derived from cord blood (CB) and other sources. We evaluated the effect of VPA, in combination with thrombopoietin (TPO), on the viability and expansion of CB-HSPCs and on short- and long-term engraftability in the NOD/SCID mouse model. In vitro, VPA+TPO inhibited HSPC differentiation and preserved the CD34+ cell fraction; the self-renewal of the CD34+ TPO+VPA-treated cells was suggested by the increased replating efficiency. In vivo, short- and long-term engraftment was determined after 6 and 20 weeks. After 6 weeks, the median chimerism percentage was 13.0% in mice transplanted with TPO-treated cells and only 1.4% in those transplanted with TPO+VPA-treated cells. By contrast, after 20 weeks, the engraftment induced by the TPO+VPA-treated cells was three times more effective than that induced by TPO alone, and over ten times more effective compared to the short-term engraftment induced by the TPO+VPA-treated cells. The in vivo results are consistent with the higher secondary plating efficiency of the TPO+VPA-treated cells in vitro. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Isoform-specific potentiation of stem and progenitor cell engraftment by AML1/RUNX1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu Tsuzuki

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available AML1/RUNX1 is the most frequently mutated gene in leukaemia and is central to the normal biology of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the role of different AML1 isoforms within these primitive compartments is unclear. Here we investigate whether altering relative expression of AML1 isoforms impacts the balance between cell self-renewal and differentiation in vitro and in vivo.The human AML1a isoform encodes a truncated molecule with DNA-binding but no transactivation capacity. We used a retrovirus-based approach to transduce AML1a into primitive haematopoietic cells isolated from the mouse. We observed that enforced AML1a expression increased the competitive engraftment potential of murine long-term reconstituting stem cells with the proportion of AML1a-expressing cells increasing over time in both primary and secondary recipients. Furthermore, AML1a expression dramatically increased primitive and committed progenitor activity in engrafted animals as assessed by long-term culture, cobblestone formation, and colony assays. In contrast, expression of the full-length isoform AML1b abrogated engraftment potential. In vitro, AML1b promoted differentiation while AML1a promoted proliferation of progenitors capable of short-term lymphomyeloid engraftment. Consistent with these findings, the relative abundance of AML1a was highest in the primitive stem/progenitor compartment of human cord blood, and forced expression of AML1a in these cells enhanced maintenance of primitive potential both in vitro and in vivo.These data demonstrate that the "a" isoform of AML1 has the capacity to potentiate stem and progenitor cell engraftment, both of which are required for successful clinical transplantation. This activity is consistent with its expression pattern in both normal and leukaemic cells. Manipulating the balance of AML1 isoform expression may offer novel therapeutic strategies, exploitable in the contexts of leukaemia and also in cord blood

  10. The Genetic Landscape of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Frequency in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior efforts to identify regulators of hematopoietic stem cell physiology have relied mainly on candidate gene approaches with genetically modified mice. Here we used a genome-wide association study (GWAS strategy with the hybrid mouse diversity panel to identify the genetic determinants of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC frequency. Among 108 strains, we observed ∼120- to 300-fold variation in three HSPC populations. A GWAS analysis identified several loci that were significantly associated with HSPC frequency, including a locus on chromosome 5 harboring the homeodomain-only protein gene (Hopx. Hopx previously had been implicated in cardiac development but was not known to influence HSPC biology. Analysis of the HSPC pool in Hopx−/− mice demonstrated significantly reduced cell frequencies and impaired engraftment in competitive repopulation assays, thus providing functional validation of this positional candidate gene. These results demonstrate the power of GWAS in mice to identify genetic determinants of the hematopoietic system.

  11. Advances in unrelated and alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for nonmalignant disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shenoy, Shalini; Boelens, Jaap J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/189880783

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The role of hematopoietic cell transplantation in non-malignant disorders has increased exponentially with the recognition that multiple diseases can be controlled or cured if engrafted with donor-derived cells. This review provides an overview of advances made in alternative

  12. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaf, Carolyn A; Metcalf, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO s...

  13. Different strategies to improve the use of the umbilical cord and cord blood for hematopoietic and other regenerative cell therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garde, Mark Paul van der

    2016-01-01

    The umbilical cord and cord blood contain stem cells that can be used for regenerative cell therapies such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the application of cord blood is hindered by the slow engraftment of the cells and delayed immune reconstitution compared to stem cells of

  14. Effects of Mobilization Regimens in Donors on Outcomes of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Miniature Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Abraham J; Crepeau, Rebecca L; Pathiraja, Vimukthi; Robson, Simon; Fishman, Jay A; Spitzer, Thomas R; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Duran-Struuck, Raimon

    2012-01-01

    Toxicities and complications associated with hematopoietic cell transplantation currently limit this potentially curative therapy for malignant and nonmalignant blood disorders. Miniature swine provide a clinically relevant model for studies to improve posttransplantation outcomes. Miniature swine recipients of high-dose haploidentical hepatopoietic cell transplantation after reduced-intensity conditioning consisting of low-dose (100 cGy) total-body irradiation, partial T-cell depletion by using a CD3 immunotoxin, and a 45-d course of cyclosporine A typically successfully engraft without graft-versus-host disease. We recently observed broad variability in engraftment outcomes that correlates with the occurrence of adverse reactions in donors after cytokine treatment to mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood for collection. Haploidentical recipients (n = 16) of cells from donors remaining healthy during cytokine treatment engrafted with multilineage chimerism, did not develop graft-versus-host disease, and did not require any blood products. In comparison, identically conditioned recipients of cells from donors that had severe reactions during cytokine treatment had adverse outcomes, including the development of clinically significant thrombocytopenia requiring blood product support in 8 of 11 swine. Furthermore, all 11 recipients lost peripheral blood myeloid chimerism (indicating lack of engraftment of donor stem cells). These data suggest that posttransplantation complications in swine are influenced by the health status of the donor before and during the collection of hematopoietic cells by leukapheresis. PMID:23561882

  15. FIFTY YEARS OF MELPHALAN USE IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Ulas D.; Bashir, Qaiser; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2015-01-01

    Melphalan remains the most widely used agent in preparative regimens for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. From its initial discovery more than 50 years ago, it has been gradually incorporated in the conditioning regimens for both autologous and allogeneic transplantation due to its myeloablative properties and broad antitumor effects as a DNA alkylating agent. Melphalan remains the mainstay conditioning for multiple myeloma and lymphomas; and has been used successfully in preparative regimens of a variety of other hematological and non-hematological malignancies. The addition of newer agents to conditioning like bortezomib or lenalidomide for myeloma, or clofarabine for myeloid malignancies, may improve antitumor effects for transplantation, while in combination with alemtuzumab may represent a backbone for future cellular therapy due to reliable engraftment and low toxicity profile. This review summarizes the development and the current use of this remarkable drug in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. PMID:22922522

  16. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  17. Tissue distribution and engraftment of human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, J F; Stenderup, K; Hansen, F D

    2005-01-01

    Engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in peripheral tissues for replenishing of local stem cell function has been proposed as a therapeutic approach to degenerative diseases. We have previously reported the development of an immortalized human telomerase reverse transcriptase transduced MSC...... line (hMSC-TERT). In the present study, we co-transduced hMSC-TERT with enhanced green fluorescent protein gene, and studied tissue distribution, engraftment, and cell survival after intracardiac and intravenous injections in immunodeficient mice. The pattern of organ distribution suggested...... that infused cells were efficiently arrested in microvasculature during first-pass, but only for a fraction of the infused cells was arrest followed by vascular emigration and tissue engraftment. Few engrafted cells in lungs, heart, and kidney glomeruli remained after 4 weeks. These observations are consistent...

  18. Human liver endothelial cells, but not macrovascular or microvascular endothelial cells, engraft in the mouse liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filali, Ebtisam El; Hiralall, Johan K.; van Veen, Henk A.; Stolz, Donna B.; Seppen, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation has had limited clinical success so far, partly due to poor engraftment of hepatocytes. Instead of hepatocytes. other cell types, such as endothelial cells, could be used in ex vivo liver gene therapy. The goal of the present study was to compare the grafting and

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies: Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Juliana Folloni; Kerbauy, Fabio Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Andreza Alice Feitosa; Kutner, Jose Mauro; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Stape, Adalberto; Troster, Eduardo Juan; Zamperlini-Netto, Gabriele; Azambuja, Alessandra Milani Prandini de; Carvalho, Bruna; Dorna, Mayra de Barros; Vilela, Marluce Dos Santos; Jacob, Cristina Miuki Abe; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Cunha, Jose Marcos; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda Maria; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2011-06-01

    To report the experience of a tertiary care hospital with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with primary immunodeficiencies. Seven pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiencies (severe combined immunodeficiency: n = 2; combined immunodeficiency: n = 1; chronic granulomatous disease: n = 1; hyper-IgM syndrome: n = 2; and IPEX syndrome: n = 1) who underwent eight hematopoietic stem cell transplants in a single center, from 2007 to 2010, were studied. Two patients received transplants from HLA-identical siblings; the other six transplants were done with unrelated donors (bone marrow: n = 1; cord blood: n = 5). All patients had pre-existing infections before hematopoietic stem cell transplants. One patient received only anti-thymocyte globulin prior to transplant, three transplants were done with reduced intensity conditioning regimens and four transplants were done after myeloablative therapy. Two patients were not evaluated for engraftment due to early death. Three patients engrafted, two had primary graft failure and one received a second transplant with posterior engraftment. Two patients died of regimen related toxicity (hepatic sinusoidal obstruction syndrome); one patient died of progressive respiratory failure due to Parainfluenza infection present prior to transplant. Four patients are alive and well from 60 days to 14 months after transplant. Patients' status prior to transplant is the most important risk factor on the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplants in the treatment of these diseases. Early diagnosis and the possibility of a faster referral of these patients for treatment in reference centers may substantially improve their survival and quality of life.

  20. Mesenchymal stromal cells and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Fibbe, Willem E

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of multipotent cells that can be isolated from various human tissues and culture-expanded ex vivo for clinical use. Due to their immunoregulatory properties and their ability to secrete growth factors, MSCs play a key role in the regulation of hematopoiesis and in the modulation of immune responses against allo- and autoantigens. In light of these properties, MSCs have been employed in clinical trials in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to facilitate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and to prevent graft failure, as well as to treat steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The available clinical evidence derived from these studies indicates that MSC administration is safe. Moreover, promising preliminary results in terms of efficacy have been reported in some clinical trials, especially in the treatment of acute GvHD. In this review we critically discuss recent advances in MSC therapy by reporting on the most relevant studies in the field of HSCT. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of Multipotent Progenitors that Emerge Prior to Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Inlay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis in the embryo proceeds in a series of waves, with primitive erythroid-biased waves succeeded by definitive waves, within which the properties of hematopoietic stem cells (multilineage potential, self-renewal, and engraftability gradually arise. Whereas self-renewal and engraftability have previously been examined in the embryo, multipotency has not been thoroughly addressed, especially at the single-cell level or within well-defined populations. To identify when and where clonal multilineage potential arises during embryogenesis, we developed a single-cell multipotency assay. We find that, during the initiation of definitive hematopoiesis in the embryo, a defined population of multipotent, engraftable progenitors emerges that is much more abundant within the yolk sac (YS than the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM or fetal liver. These experiments indicate that multipotent cells appear in concert within both the YS and AGM and strongly implicate YS-derived progenitors as contributors to definitive hematopoiesis.

  2. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Carolyn A

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO signaling associated with bone marrow failure and thrombocytopenia. Recent studies have shown that constitutive activation mutations in Mpl contribute to myeloproliferative disease. In this review, we will discuss TPO signaling pathways, regulation of TPO levels and the role of TPO in normal hematopoiesis and during myeloproliferative disease. PMID:21478671

  3. Umbilical cord bloods hematopoietic stem cells ex vivo expansion (the literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Shamanskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord blood (CB is now an attractive source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs for transplantation in pediatric and adult patients with various malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, its clinical application is limited by low cells numbers in graft, which correlates with delayed engraftment, an extension of time to platelets and neutrophils recovery and increasing risk of infectious complications. Several strategies have been suggested to overcome this limitation, one of which is obtaining a sufficient number of hematopoietic progenitor cells by ex vivo expansion. Literature review about CB HSCs expansion in given article is presented.

  4. Cytokines regulating hematopoietic stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng C; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-07-01

    Regulation of the multiple fates of hematopoietic stem cells - including quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, and mobilization from the niche - requires the cooperative actions of several cytokines and other hormones that bind to receptors on these cells. In this review we discuss recent advances in the identification of novel hematopoietic stem cell supportive cytokines and the mechanisms by which they control hematopoietic stem cell fate decisions. Several extrinsic factors that stimulate ex-vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells were recently identified by a number of experimental approaches, including forward genetic screening and transcriptional profiling of supportive stromal cells. Recent experiments in which multiple cytokine signaling pathways are activated or suppressed in hematopoietic stem cells reveal the complexity of signal transduction and cell-fate choice in hematopoietic stem cells in vivo and in vitro. The study of genetically modified mice and improvements in the in-vitro hematopoietic stem cell culture system will be powerful tools to elucidate the functions of cytokines that regulate hematopoietic stem cell function. These will further reveal the complex nature of the mechanisms by which extrinsic factors regulate signal transduction and cell-fate decisions of hematopoietic stem cells.

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation monitoring in childhood. Hematological diseases in Serbia: STR-PCR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Aleksandra D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a very successful method of treatment for children with different aquired or inborn diseases. The main goal of post-transplantation chimerism monitoring in HSCT is to predict negative events (such as disease relapse and graft rejection, in order to intervene with appropriate therapy and improve the probability of long-term DFS (disease free survival. In this context, by quantifying the relative amounts of donor and recipient cells present in the peripheral blood sample, it can be determined if engraftment has taken place at all, or if full or mixed chimerism exists. In a group of patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the Mother and Child Health Care Institute, we decided to use standard human identfication tests based on multiplex PCR analyses of short tandem repeats (STRs, as they are highly informative, sensitive, and fast and therefore represent an optimal methodological approach to engraftment analysis.

  6. THE EFFECT OF DONOR LYMPHOCYTES-T AND TOTAL-BODY IRRADIATION ON HEMATOPOIETIC ENGRAFTMENT AND PULMONARY TOXICITY FOLLOWING EXPERIMENTAL ALLOGENEIC BONE-MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOWN, JD; MAUCH, P; WARHOL, M; NEBEN, S; FERRARA, JLM

    1992-01-01

    To study the effects of donor T lymphocytes on engraftment and graft-versus-host disease in relation to recipient total-body irradiation, we have returned small numbers of T cells to T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplanted across a minor histocompatibility barrier in mice (B10.BR --> CBA).

  7. OP9-Lhx2 stromal cells facilitate derivation of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating engraftable hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is an ideal approach for obtaining induced HSCs for cell therapy. However, the path from PSCs to robustly induced HSCs (iHSCs in vitro remains elusive. We hypothesize that the modification of hematopoietic niche cells by transcription factors facilitates the derivation of induced HSCs from PSCs. The Lhx2 transcription factor is expressed in fetal liver stromal cells but not in fetal blood cells. Knocking out Lhx2 leads to a fetal hematopoietic defect in a cell non-autonomous role. In this study, we demonstrate that the ectopic expression of Lhx2 in OP9 cells (OP9-Lhx2 accelerates the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. OP9-Lhx2 significantly increased the yields of hematopoietic progenitor cells via co-culture with PSCs in vitro. Interestingly, the co-injection of OP9-Lhx2 and PSCs into immune deficient mice also increased the proportion of hematopoietic progenitors via the formation of teratomas. The transplantation of phenotypic HSCs from OP9-Lhx2 teratomas but not from the OP9 control supported a transient repopulating capability. The upregulation of Apln gene by Lhx2 is correlated to the hematopoietic commitment property of OP9-Lhx2. Furthermore, the enforced expression of Apln in OP9 cells significantly increased the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. These results indicate that OP9-Lhx2 is a good cell line for regeneration of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Féraud

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process.

  9. Osteopontin attenuates aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Novella; Sacma, Mehmet; Ständker, Ludger; Soller, Karin; Marka, Gina; Eiwen, Karina; Weiss, Johannes M; Kirchhoff, Frank; Weil, Tanja; Cancelas, Jose A; Florian, Maria Carolina; Geiger, Hartmut

    2017-04-03

    Upon aging, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo changes in function and structure, including skewing to myeloid lineages, lower reconstitution potential and loss of protein polarity. While stem cell intrinsic mechanisms are known to contribute to HSC aging, little is known on whether age-related changes in the bone marrow niche regulate HSC aging. Upon aging, the expression of osteopontin (OPN) in the murine bone marrow stroma is reduced. Exposure of young HSCs to an OPN knockout niche results in a decrease in engraftment, an increase in long-term HSC frequency and loss of stem cell polarity. Exposure of aged HSCs to thrombin-cleaved OPN attenuates aging of old HSCs, resulting in increased engraftment, decreased HSC frequency, increased stem cell polarity and a restored balance of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood. Thus, our data suggest a critical role for reduced stroma-derived OPN for HSC aging and identify thrombin-cleaved OPN as a novel niche informed therapeutic approach for ameliorating HSC phenotypes associated with aging. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  10. Mobilization and engraftment of peripheral blood stem cells in healthy related donors >55 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlló, Cristina; Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Grífols, Joan-Ramon; Juncà, Jordi; Morgades, Mireia; Ester, Anna; Rodríguez, Inés; Vives, Susana; Batlle, Montserrat; Guardia, Ramon; Ferrà, Christelle; Gallardo, David; Millá, Fuensanta; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2014-03-01

    The increasing scarcity of young related donors has led to the use of older donors for related allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). This study analyzed the influence of age on the results of mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) in healthy donors as well as on the engraftment and outcome of HSCT. A retrospective analysis from a single center was performed comparing the results of PBSC mobilization from related healthy donors according to their age. The study included 133 consecutive related donors. The median age was 50 years (range, 4-77 years); 70 (53%) donors were males, and 44 (33%) were >55 years old. All donors were mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for 5 days. The peak CD34(+) cell count in peripheral blood was higher in younger than in older donors (median, 90.5 CD34(+) cells/μL [range, 18-240 CD34(+) cells/μL] versus 72 CD34(+) cells/μL [range, 20-172.5 CD34(+) cells/μL], P = 0.008). The volume processed was lower in younger than in older donors (16,131 mL [range, 4424-36,906 mL] versus 18,653 mL [range, 10,003-26,261 mL], P = 0.002) with similar CD34(+) cells collected (579.3 × 10(6) cells [range, 135.14 × 10(6)-1557.24 × 10(6) cells] versus 513.69 × 10(6) cells [range, 149.81 × 10(6)-1290 × 10(6) cells], P = 0.844). There were no differences in time to recovery of neutrophils and platelets or in the incidences of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, overall survival, non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence. Donors >55 years old mobilized fewer CD34(+) cells and required a greater volume to collect a similar number of CD34(+) cells. The outcome of HSCT was not influenced by donor age. Donor age should not be a limitation for related allogeneic HSCT. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Co-transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Cxcr4 Gene-Transduced Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Miao; Su, Guizhen; Zang, Yu; Yan, Zhiling; Cheng, Hai; Pan, Bin; Cao, Jiang; Wu, Qingyun; Zhao, Kai; Zhu, Feng; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Xu, Kailin

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising candidate for cellular therapies. Co-transplantation of MSCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) promotes successful engraftment and improves hematopoietic recovery. In this study, the effects of co-transplantation of HSCs and mouse bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs overexpressing CXCR4 (CXCR4-MSC) on CXCR4-MSC homing capacity and the reconstitution potential in lethally irradiated mice were evaluated. Recovery of donor-derived peripheral blood leukocytes and platelets was accelerated when CXCR4-MSCs were co-transplanted with BM cells. The frequency of c-kit(+)Sca(+)Lin(-) HSCs was higher in recipient BM following co-transplantation of CXCR4-MSCs compared with the EGFP-MSC control and the BMT only groups. Surprisingly, the rate of early engraftment of donor-derived BM cells in recipients co-transplanted with CXCR4-MSCs was slightly lower than in the absence of MSCs on day 7. Moreover, co-transplantation of CXCR4-MSCs regulated the balance of T helper cells subsets. Hematopoietic tissue reconstitution was evaluated by histopathological analysis of BM and spleen. Co-transplantation of CXCR4-MSCs was shown to promote the recovery of hematopoietic organs. These findings indicate that co-transplantation of CXCR4-MSCs promotes the early phase of hematopoietic recovery and sustained hematopoiesis.

  12. Monitoring the source of mesenchymal stem cells in patients after transplantation of mismatched-sex hematopoietic stem cells plus third-party cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Dai-Hong; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Lai, Yue-Yun; Hou, Rui-Qin; Qin, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Kai-Yan

    2013-11-01

    In bone marrow transplant patients, the microenvironment in bone marrow is damaged after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Subsequent to allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with clinically successful engraftments, the source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) remains controversial. To further verify the stimulatory effect of the simultaneous transplantation of cells from second donors on engraftment success for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in support of donor MSCs engraftments, the aim of this study is to monitor the dynamics of the engraftment of bone marrow-derived MSCs in patients after transplantation with mismatched-sex hematopoietic stem and third-party cells. In this study, the hematopoietic stem cells from 32 clinical donors of different sexes that resulted in successful engraftments were selected for transplantation and were classified into three groups for research purposes: group A consisted of 14 cases of transplantation with bone marrow and recruited peripheral hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, group B contained 8 cases of simultaneous re-transfusion of MSCs from the second donor, and group C contained 10 cases of simultaneous re-transfusion of umbilical blood from the second donor. The bone marrow from 32 patients with successful engraftments of hematopoietic transplantation were selected and sub-cultured with MSCs. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to measure the expression of surface antigens on MSCs. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) in combination with polymerase chain reaction amplification of short tandem repeats (STRPCR) was used to measure the engraftment status of fifth-generation MSCs in patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed the sex origin of the fifth-generation MSCs in 32 patients. Dynamic examinations were performed on patients receiving donor transplantations. The progenies of fifth-generation MSCs were successfully cultured in 32 cases. The results of FCM

  13. In vitro megakaryocyte expansion in patients with delayed platelet engraftment after autologous stem cell transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drayer, AL; Sibinga, CTS; Esselink, MT; de Wolf, JTM; Vellenga, E

    Increasing the number of megakaryocytic cells in stem cell transplants by ex vivo expansion culture may provide an approach to accelerate platelet engraftment after high-dose chemotherapy. However, it is unknown if a relationship exists between the expansion potential of progenitor cells and the

  14. Gata2 in Hematopoietic Cell Generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.-L. Kauts (Mari-Liis)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe mammalian hematopoietic system is maintained by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Whereas in the adult, they reside in the bone marrow, the first HSCs are generated in the main vasculature of the midgestation embryo as a result of tightly regulated extrinsic and intrinsic molecular

  15. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  16. No Synergistic Effect of Cotransplantation of MSC and Ex Vivo TPO-Expanded CD34(+) Cord Blood Cells on Platelet Recovery and Bone Marrow Engraftment in NOD SCID Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Garde, Mark; Brand, Anneke; Slot, Manon C; de Graaf-Dijkstra, Alice; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; van Hensbergen, Yvette

    2015-06-15

    After cord blood (CB) transplantation, early platelet recovery in immune-deficient mice is obtained by expansion of CB CD34(+) cells with thrombopoietin (TPO) as single growth factor. Moreover, improvement of hematopoietic engraftment has been shown by cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We investigated whether a combination of both approaches would further enhance the outcome of CB transplantation in NOD SCID mice. NOD SCID mice were transplanted with either CB CD34(+) cells, CD34(+) cells with MSC, TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells or TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells with MSC. We analyzed human platelet recovery in the peripheral blood (PB) from day 4 after transplantation onward and human bone marrow (BM) engraftment at week 6. The different transplants were assessed in vitro for their migration capacity and expression of CXCR4. TPO expansion improved the early platelet recovery in the PB of the mice. Cotransplantation of MSC with CD34(+) cells improved BM engraftment and platelet levels in the PB 6 weeks after transplantation. Combining TPO expansion and MSC cotransplantation, however, neither resulted in a more efficient early platelet recovery, nor in a better BM engraftment, nor even very low or absent BM engraftment occurred. In vitro, MSC boosted the migration of CD34(+) cells, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increase in engraftment. Our results show that cotransplantation of MSC with TPO-expanded CD34(+) cells at most combines, but does not increase the separate advantages of these different strategies. A combination of both strategies even adds a risk of non engraftment.

  17. No Synergistic Effect of Cotransplantation of MSC and Ex Vivo TPO-Expanded CD34+ Cord Blood Cells on Platelet Recovery and Bone Marrow Engraftment in NOD SCID Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Garde, Mark; Brand, Anneke; Slot, Manon C.; de Graaf-Dijkstra, Alice; van Hensbergen, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    After cord blood (CB) transplantation, early platelet recovery in immune-deficient mice is obtained by expansion of CB CD34+ cells with thrombopoietin (TPO) as single growth factor. Moreover, improvement of hematopoietic engraftment has been shown by cotransplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We investigated whether a combination of both approaches would further enhance the outcome of CB transplantation in NOD SCID mice. NOD SCID mice were transplanted with either CB CD34+ cells, CD34+ cells with MSC, TPO-expanded CD34+ cells or TPO-expanded CD34+ cells with MSC. We analyzed human platelet recovery in the peripheral blood (PB) from day 4 after transplantation onward and human bone marrow (BM) engraftment at week 6. The different transplants were assessed in vitro for their migration capacity and expression of CXCR4. TPO expansion improved the early platelet recovery in the PB of the mice. Cotransplantation of MSC with CD34+ cells improved BM engraftment and platelet levels in the PB 6 weeks after transplantation. Combining TPO expansion and MSC cotransplantation, however, neither resulted in a more efficient early platelet recovery, nor in a better BM engraftment, nor even very low or absent BM engraftment occurred. In vitro, MSC boosted the migration of CD34+ cells, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increase in engraftment. Our results show that cotransplantation of MSC with TPO-expanded CD34+ cells at most combines, but does not increase the separate advantages of these different strategies. A combination of both strategies even adds a risk of non engraftment. PMID:25668618

  18. The role of the donor in the repair of the marrow vascular niche following hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, William B; Li, Xiao-Miao; Butler, Jason; Guthrie, Steven M; Jorgensen, Marda L; Wingard, John R; Scott, Edward W

    2007-11-01

    Bone marrow sinusoids maintain homeostasis between developing hematopoietic cells and the circulation, and they provide niches for hematopoietic progenitors. Sinusoids are damaged by chemotherapy and radiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been shown to produce endothelial progenitor cells that contribute to the repair of damaged blood vessels. Because HSCs home to the marrow during bone marrow transplant, these cells may play a role in repair of marrow sinusoids. Here, we explore the role of donor HSCs in the repair of damaged sinusoids following hematopoietic stem cell transplant. We used three methods to test this role: (a) expression of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule to identify endothelial progenitors and the presence of the Y chromosome to identify male donor cells in female recipients; (b) presence of the Y chromosome to identify male donor cells in female recipients, and expression of the panendothelial marker mouse endothelial cell antigen-32 to identify sinusoidal endothelium; and (c) use of Tie-2/green fluorescent protein mice as donors or recipients and presence of Dil-Ac-LDL to identify sinusoids. We found that sinusoids were predominantly host-derived posttransplant. Donor cells spread along the marrow vasculature early post-transplant in a pattern that matched stromal-derived factor-1 expression. Furthermore, these engrafting progenitors were positioned to provide physical support, as well as growth and survival signals in the form of vascular-endothelial growth factor-A. Occasionally, donor cells provide cellular "patches" in the damaged sinusoids, although this occurred at a low level compared with hematopoietic engraftment. Donor support for the repair of the marrow vascular niche may be a critical first step of hematopoietic engraftment.

  19. Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Dickinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT lies with the ability of the engrafting immune system to remove residual leukemia cells via a graft-versus-leukemia effect (GvL, caused either spontaneously post-HSCT or via donor lymphocyte infusion. GvL effects can also be initiated by allogenic mismatched natural killer cells, antigen-specific T cells, and activated dendritic cells of leukemic origin. The history and further application of this GvL effect and the main mechanisms will be discussed and reviewed in this chapter.

  20. Thrombopoietin expands hematopoietic stem cells after transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Norma; Priestley, Greg; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that thrombopoietin (TPO) contributes to the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), supporting their survival and proliferation in vitro. To determine whether TPO supports the impressive expansion of HSC observed following transplantation, we transplanted normal marrow cells into lethally irradiated Tpo–/– and Tpo+/+ mice and quantified HSC self-renewal and expansion and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing. Although essentially identical numbers of...

  1. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transient activation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells by IFNγ during acute bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNamara, Katherine C; Jones, Maura; Martin, Olga; Winslow, Gary M

    2011-01-01

    How hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) respond to inflammatory signals during infections is not well understood. Our studies have used a murine model of ehrlichiosis, an emerging tick-born disease, to address how infection impacts hematopoietic function. Infection of C57BL/6 mice with the intracellular bacterium, Ehrlichia muris, results in anemia and thrombocytopenia, similar to what is observed in human ehrlichiosis patients. In the mouse, infection promotes myelopoiesis, a process that is critically dependent on interferon gamma (IFNγ) signaling. In the present study, we demonstrate that E. muris infection also drives the transient proliferation and expansion of bone marrow Lin-negative Sca-1(+) cKit(+) (LSK) cells, a population of progenitor cells that contains HSCs. Expansion of the LSK population in the bone marrow was associated with a loss of dormant, long-term repopulating HSCs, reduced engraftment, and a bias towards myeloid lineage differentiation within that population. The reduced engraftment and myeloid bias of the infection-induced LSK cells was transient, and was most pronounced on day 8 post-infection. The infection-induced changes were accompanied by an expansion of more differentiated multipotent progenitor cells, and required IFNγ signaling. Thus, in response to inflammatory signals elicited during acute infection, HSCs can undergo a rapid, IFNγ-dependent, transient shift from dormancy to activity, ostensibly, to provide the host with additional or better-armed innate cells for host defense. Similar changes in hematopoietic function likely underlie many different infections of public health importance.

  3. Transient activation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells by IFNγ during acute bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C MacNamara

    Full Text Available How hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs respond to inflammatory signals during infections is not well understood. Our studies have used a murine model of ehrlichiosis, an emerging tick-born disease, to address how infection impacts hematopoietic function. Infection of C57BL/6 mice with the intracellular bacterium, Ehrlichia muris, results in anemia and thrombocytopenia, similar to what is observed in human ehrlichiosis patients. In the mouse, infection promotes myelopoiesis, a process that is critically dependent on interferon gamma (IFNγ signaling. In the present study, we demonstrate that E. muris infection also drives the transient proliferation and expansion of bone marrow Lin-negative Sca-1(+ cKit(+ (LSK cells, a population of progenitor cells that contains HSCs. Expansion of the LSK population in the bone marrow was associated with a loss of dormant, long-term repopulating HSCs, reduced engraftment, and a bias towards myeloid lineage differentiation within that population. The reduced engraftment and myeloid bias of the infection-induced LSK cells was transient, and was most pronounced on day 8 post-infection. The infection-induced changes were accompanied by an expansion of more differentiated multipotent progenitor cells, and required IFNγ signaling. Thus, in response to inflammatory signals elicited during acute infection, HSCs can undergo a rapid, IFNγ-dependent, transient shift from dormancy to activity, ostensibly, to provide the host with additional or better-armed innate cells for host defense. Similar changes in hematopoietic function likely underlie many different infections of public health importance.

  4. Hematopoietic stem cells from NOD mice exhibit autonomous behavior and a competitive advantage in allogeneic recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Paula M; Rezzoug, Francine; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Fugier-Vivier, Isabelle; Ratajczak, Janina; Kucia, Magda; Huang, Yiming; Tanner, Michael K; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2005-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a systemic autoimmune disease that can be cured by transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from disease-resistant donors. Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice have a number of features that distinguish them as bone marrow transplant recipients that must be understood prior to the clinical application of chimerism to induce tolerance. In the present studies, we characterized NOD HSCs, comparing their engraftment characteristics to HSCs from disease-resistant strains. Strikingly, NOD HSCs are significantly enhanced in engraftment potential compared with HSCs from disease-resistant donors. Unlike HSCs from disease-resistant strains, they do not require graft-facilitating cells to engraft in allogeneic recipients. Additionally, they exhibit a competitive advantage when coadministered with increasing numbers of syngeneic HSCs, produce significantly more spleen colony-forming units (CFU-Ss) in vivo in allogeneic recipients, and more granulocyte macrophage-colony-forming units (CFU-GMs) in vitro compared with HSCs from disease-resistant controls. NOD HSCs also exhibit significantly enhanced chemotaxis to a stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) gradient and adhere significantly better on primary stroma. This enhanced engraftment potential maps to the insulin-dependent diabetes locus 9 (Idd9) locus, and as such the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family as well as ski/sno genes may be involved in the mechanism underlying the autonomy of NOD HSCs. These findings may have important implications to understand the evolution of autoimmune disease and impact on potential strategies for cure.

  5. Imaging spectrum of central nervous system complications of hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Server, Andres [Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Bargallo, Nuria [Universitat de Barcelona, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBARS), Resonance Magnetic Image Core Facility, Barcelona (Spain); Floeisand, Yngvar [Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Department of Hematology, Oslo (Norway); Sponheim, Jon [Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Section of Gastroenterology, Department of Transplantation Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Graus, Francesc [Universitat de Barcelona, Department of Neurology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBARS), Neuroimmunology Program, Barcelona (Spain); Hald, John K. [Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Section of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway)

    2017-02-15

    Neurologic complications are common after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and solid organ transplantation (SOT) and affect 30-60% of transplant recipients. The aim of this article is to provide a practical imaging approach based on the timeline and etiology of CNS abnormalities, and neurologic complications related to transplantation of specific organs. The lesions will be classified based upon the interval from HSCT procedure: pre-engraftment period <30 days, early post-engraftment period 30-100 days, late post-engraftment period >100 days, and the interval from SOT procedure: postoperative phase 1-4 weeks, early posttransplant syndromes 1-6 months, late posttransplant syndromes >6 months. Further differentiation will be based on etiology: infections, drug toxicity, metabolic derangements, cerebrovascular complications, and posttransplantation malignancies. In addition, differentiation will be based on complications specific to the type of transplantation: allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), heart, lung, kidney, pancreas, and liver. Thus, in this article we emphasize the strategic role of neuroradiology in the diagnosis and response to treatment by utilizing a methodical approach in the work up of patients with neurologic complications after transplantation. (orig.)

  6. Optical imaging of subacute airway remodeling and adipose stem cell engraftment after airway injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Kim, Sung Won; Hwang, Sang Seok; Chae, Yu-Gyeong; Lee, Andrew Sungwan; Jung, Maan Hong; Chun, Bong Kwon; Lee, Sang Joon; Park, Eun-Kee; Oak, Chulho

    2013-12-20

    Acquired airway injury is frequently caused by endotracheal intubations, long-term tracheostomies, trauma, airway burns, and some systemic diseases. An effective and less invasive technique for both the early assessment and the early interventional treatment of acquired airway stenosis is therefore needed. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proposed to have unique potential for early monitoring from the proliferative epithelium to the cartilage in acute airway injury. Additionally, stem cell therapy using adipose stem cells is being investigated as an option for early interventional treatment in airway and lung injury. Over the past decade, it has become possible to monitor the level of injury using OCT and to track the engraftment of stem cells using stem cell imaging in regenerative tissue. The purpose of this study was to assess the engraftment of exogenous adipose stem cells in injured tracheal epithelium with fluorescent microscopy and to detect and monitor the degree of airway injury in the same tracheal epithelium with OCT. OCT detected thickening of both the epithelium and basement membrane after tracheal scraping. The engraftment of adipose stem cells was successfully detected by fluorescent staining in the regenerative epithelium of injured tracheas. OCT has the potential to be a high-resolution imaging modality capable of detecting airway injury in combination with stem cell imaging in the same tracheal mucosa.

  7. Autonomous behavior of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Akkerman, [No Value; Weersing, E; Ausema, A; Dontje, B; Van Zant, G; de Haan, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Mechanisms that affect the function of primitive hematopoietic stem cells with long-term proliferative potential remain largely unknown. Here we assessed whether properties of stem cells are cell-extrinsically or cell-autonomously regulated. Materials and Methods. We developed a model in

  8. Hyaluronic Acid-Serum Hydrogels Rapidly Restore Metabolism of Encapsulated Stem Cells and Promote Engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Angel T.; Karakas, Mehmet F.; Vakrou, Styliani; Afzal, Junaid; Rittenbach, Andrew; Lin, Xiaoping; Wahl, Richard L.; Pomper, Martin G.; Steenbergen, Charles J.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell death due to anoikis, necrosis and cell egress from transplantation sites limits functional benefits of cellular cardiomyoplasty. Cell dissociation and suspension, which are a pre-requisite for most cell transplantation studies, lead to depression of cellular metabolism and anoikis, which contribute to low engraftment. Objective We tissue engineered scaffolds with the goal of rapidly restoring metabolism, promoting viability, proliferation and engraftment of encapsulated stem cells. Methods The carboxyl groups of HA were functionalized with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) to yield HA succinimidyl succinate (HA-NHS) groups that react with free amine groups to form amide bonds. HA-NHS was cross-linked by serum to generate HA:Serum (HA:Ser) hydrogels. Physical properties of HA:Ser hydrogels were measured. Effect of encapsulating cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) in HA:Ser hydrogels on viability, proliferation, glucose uptake and metabolism was assessed in vitro. In vivo acute intra-myocardial cell retention of 18FDG-labeled CDCs encapsulated in HA:Ser hydrogels was quantified. Effect of CDC encapsulation in HA:Ser hydrogels on in vivo metabolism and engraftment at 7 days was assessed by serial, dual isotope SPECT-CT and bioluminescence imaging of CDCs expressing the Na-iodide symporter and firefly luciferase genes respectively. Effect of HA:Ser hydrogels +/− CDCs on cardiac function was assessed at 7 days & 28 days post-infarct. Results HA:Ser hydrogels are highly bio-adhesive, biodegradable, promote rapid cell adhesion, glucose uptake and restore bioenergetics of encapsulated cells within 1 h of encapsulation, both in vitro and in vivo. These metabolic scaffolds can be applied epicardially as a patch to beating hearts or injected intramyocardially. HA:Ser hydrogels markedly increase acute intramyocardial retention (~6 fold), promote in vivo viability, proliferation, engraftment of encapsulated stem cells and angiogenesis. Conclusion HA:Ser hydrogels

  9. Ebola Virus Replication and Disease Without Immunopathology in Mice Expressing Transgenes to Support Human Myeloid and Lymphoid Cell Engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Jessica R; Lavender, Kerry J; Martellaro, Cynthia; Carmody, Aaron; Kurth, Andreas; Keck, James G; Saturday, Greg; Scott, Dana P; Nichol, Stuart T; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2016-10-15

    The study of Ebola virus (EBOV) pathogenesis in vivo has been limited to nonhuman primate models or use of an adapted virus to cause disease in rodent models. Herein we describe wild-type EBOV (Makona variant) infection of mice engrafted with human hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells (Hu-NSG™-SGM3 mice; hereafter referred to as SGM3 HuMice). SGM3 HuMice support increased development of myeloid immune cells, which are primary EBOV targets. In SGM3 HuMice, EBOV replicated to high levels, and disease was observed following either intraperitoneal or intramuscular inoculation. Despite the high levels of viral antigen and inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver, the characteristic histopathology of Ebola virus disease was not observed, and this absence of severe immunopathology may have contributed to the recovery and survival of some of the animals. Future investigations into the underlying mechanisms of the atypical disease presentation in SGM3 HuMice will provide additional insights into the immunopathogenesis of severe EBOV disease. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Direct evaluation of myocardial viability and stem cell engraftment demonstrates salvage of the injured myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul J; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Ge, Xiaohu; Matsuura, Yuka; Toma, Ildiko; Metzler, Scott; Kooreman, Nigel G; Ramunas, John; Holbrook, Colin; McConnell, Michael V; Blau, Helen; Harnish, Phillip; Rulifson, Eric; Yang, Phillip C

    2015-03-27

    The mechanism of functional restoration by stem cell therapy remains poorly understood. Novel manganese-enhanced MRI and bioluminescence reporter gene imaging were applied to follow myocardial viability and cell engraftment, respectively. Human-placenta-derived amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (AMCs) demonstrate unique immunoregulatory and precardiac properties. In this study, the restorative effects of 3 AMC-derived subpopulations were examined in a murine myocardial injury model: (1) unselected AMCs, (2) ckit(+)AMCs, and (3) AMC-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (MiPSCs). To determine the differential restorative effects of the AMC-derived subpopulations in the murine myocardial injury model using multimodality imaging. SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice underwent left anterior descending artery ligation and were divided into 4 treatment arms: (1) normal saline control (n=14), (2) unselected AMCs (n=10), (3) ckit(+)AMCs (n=13), and (4) MiPSCs (n=11). Cardiac MRI assessed myocardial viability and left ventricular function, whereas bioluminescence imaging assessed stem cell engraftment during a 4-week period. Immunohistological labeling and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of the explanted myocardium were performed. The unselected AMC and ckit(+)AMC-treated mice demonstrated transient left ventricular functional improvement. However, the MiPSCs exhibited a significantly greater increase in left ventricular function compared with all the other groups during the entire 4-week period. Left ventricular functional improvement correlated with increased myocardial viability and sustained stem cell engraftment. The MiPSC-treated animals lacked any evidence of de novo cardiac differentiation. The functional restoration seen in MiPSCs was characterized by increased myocardial viability and sustained engraftment without de novo cardiac differentiation, indicating salvage of the injured myocardium. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Single-cell imaging of normal and malignant cell engraftment into optically clear prkdc-null SCID zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John C; Tang, Qin; Yordán, Nora Torres; Moore, Finola E; Garcia, Elaine G; Lobbardi, Riadh; Ramakrishnan, Ashwin; Marvin, Dieuwke L; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Langenau, David M

    2016-11-14

    Cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice has revolutionized our understanding of regeneration, stem cell self-renewal, and cancer; yet models for direct imaging of engrafted cells has been limited. Here, we characterize zebrafish with mutations in recombination activating gene 2 (rag2), DNA-dependent protein kinase (prkdc), and janus kinase 3 (jak3). Histology, RNA sequencing, and single-cell transcriptional profiling of blood showed that rag2 hypomorphic mutant zebrafish lack T cells, whereas prkdc deficiency results in loss of mature T and B cells and jak3 in T and putative Natural Killer cells. Although all mutant lines engraft fluorescently labeled normal and malignant cells, only the prkdc mutant fish reproduced as homozygotes and also survived injury after cell transplantation. Engraftment into optically clear casper, prkdc-mutant zebrafish facilitated dynamic live cell imaging of muscle regeneration, repopulation of muscle stem cells within their endogenous niche, and muscle fiber fusion at single-cell resolution. Serial imaging approaches also uncovered stochasticity in fluorescently labeled leukemia regrowth after competitive cell transplantation into prkdc mutant fish, providing refined models to assess clonal dominance and progression in the zebrafish. Our experiments provide an optimized and facile transplantation model, the casper, prkdc mutant zebrafish, for efficient engraftment and direct visualization of fluorescently labeled normal and malignant cells at single-cell resolution. © 2016 Moore et al.

  12. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... made recently in the field of stem cell biology, researchers now have improved tools to define novel populations of stem cells, examine them ex vivo using conditions that promote self-renewal, track them into recipients, and determine whether they can contribute to the repair of damaged tissues...

  13. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  14. Ex vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Farahbakhshian (Elnaz)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a complex cellular differentiation process resulting in the formation of all blood cell types. In this process, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside at the top of the hematopoiesis hierarchy and have the capacity to differentiate into all blood cell lineages

  15. Injury to the Spinal Cord Niche Alters the Engraftment Dynamics of Human Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Sontag

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment is a critical mediator of stem cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The majority of preclinical studies involving transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs into the CNS have focused on injured or degenerating microenvironments, leaving a dearth of information as to how NSCs differentially respond to intact versus damaged CNS. Furthermore, single, terminal histological endpoints predominate, providing limited insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of NSC engraftment and migration. We investigated the early and long-term engraftment dynamics of human CNS stem cells propagated as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns following transplantation into uninjured versus subacutely injured spinal cords of immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. We stereologically quantified engraftment, survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation at 1, 7, 14, 28, and 98 days posttransplantation, and identified injury-dependent alterations. Notably, the injured microenvironment decreased hCNS-SCns survival, delayed and altered the location of proliferation, influenced both total and fate-specific migration, and promoted oligodendrocyte maturation.

  16. Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is recruited to CD22 following B cell antigen receptor ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; van Schijndel, G. M.; van Lier, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages. Motheaten mice, which are devoid of (functional) hematopoietic cell phosphatase, have severe disturbances in the regulation of B cell activation and

  17. Amniotic fluid as a source of engraftable stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar V Borlongan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of stem cells to differentiate into various lineages has made them powerful tools of regenerative medicine and applicable to multiple human diseases. Of particular interest, amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSC have been characterized to express both adult and embryonic cell markers, indicating them as cells within an intermediate stage between embryonic and adult phenotype. AFSC can differentiate into cells of all three germ layers, including hepatic, myogenic, osteogenic, and neurogenic cell types. Furthermore, AFSC have minimal replicative senescence, retaining the ability to divide effectively for over 250 doublings. These facts indicate that amniotic fluid may exist as a promising donor source of stem cells for the treatment of multiple clinically relevant conditions. Of particular interest is the convenience of harvesting stem cells from the amniotic fluid stem for the treatment of newborns, as well as for banking or cryopreserving purposes to be used at a later date. Importantly, the promise of amniotic fluid as a source of stem cells merits ongoing research into their potential therapeutic applications. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the references section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  18. In Utero Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies

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    Tippi C. Mackenzie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application.

  19. Autologous peripheral blood hematopoietic cell transplantation in dogs with B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, J L; Pruitt, A; Suter, S E

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral blood CD34+ hematopoietic cell transplantation (PBHCT) is commonly used to treat human patients with relapsed non-Hodgkin diffuse, large B-cell lymphoma with cure rates approaching 50%. To determine the safety and feasibility of performing PBHCT to treat canine B-cell lymphoma (LSA) patients in a clinical academic setting. Twenty-four client-owned dogs diagnosed with B-cell LSA. After high-dose cyclophosphamide and rhG-colony-stimulating factor treatment, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected using cell separator machines. The harvested cells then were infused after a 10 Gy dose of total body irradiation (TBI). Post-irradiation adverse effects were managed symptomatically and dogs were discharged upon evidence of engraftment. More than 2 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg were harvested in 23/24 dogs. Preapheresis peripheral blood monocyte count was correlated with the number of CD34+ cells/kg harvested. Twenty-one of 24 (87.5%) dogs engrafted appropriately, whereas 2 dogs (8.3%) died in the hospital. One (5%) dog exhibited delayed engraftment and died 45 days after PBHCT. One dog developed presumed TBI-induced pulmonary fibrosis approximately 8 months after PBHCT. The median disease-free interval and overall survival (OS) of all dogs from the time of PBHCT was 271 and 463 days, respectively. Five of 15 (33%) dogs transplanted before they relapsed remain in clinical remission for their disease at a median OS of 524 days (range, 361-665 days). In most cases, PBHCT led to complete hematologic reconstitution. Therefore, PBHCT may be considered as a treatment option for dogs with B-cell lymphoma. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  1. RESULTS OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousavi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is an accepted treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML in first remission, the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and high risk groups of ALL who relapse with conventional chemotherapy. We assessed results of HCT for pediatric leukemia in our center. A total of 92 children, 63 with diagnose of AML, 23 with ALL and 6 with CML received allogeneic transplantation from HLA full matched siblings (57.6% and autologous transplantation (42.4%. Source of hematopoietic cells were peripheral blood 83.7%, bone marrow 15.2% and cord blood 1.6%. The median transplanted nucleated cells were 6.4 ± 4.7 ×108 /Kg (body weight of patients and mononuclear cells were 5.5 ± 2.9×108/Kg. The most common conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide + busulfan. Prophylaxis regimen for GVHD was cyclosporin ± methotrexate. GVHD occurred in 50 (54.3% patients. Eighty five of children had engraftment, 26 (28.6% relapsed and 57 (62% are alive. The most common cause of death was relapse (68.6%. Five years overall survival of patients with AML and ALL were 49% and 44% respectively and disease free survival of them were 52% and 49%. One year overall survival and disease free survival of CML was 57%. Overall survival increased with increasing age of patients at transplantation time (P = 0.06. Longer survival significantly related to earlier WBC and platelet recovery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.006 respectively. Considering acceptable overall and disease free survival of patients after HCT, we concluded that is a good modality in treatment of leukemia of children.

  2. Spheroid Coculture of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells and Monolayer Expanded Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Polydimethylsiloxane Microwells Modestly Improves In Vitro Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrega, Kathryn; Atkinson, Kerry; Lott, William B; Doran, Michael R

    2017-04-01

    While two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to enhance hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) expansion in vitro, expanded cells do not engraft long term in human recipients. This outcome is attributed to the failure of 2D culture to recapitulate the bone marrow (BM) niche signal milieu. Herein, we evaluated the capacity of a novel three-dimensional (3D) coculture system to support HSPC expansion in vitro. A high-throughput polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microwell platform was used to manufacture thousands of uniform 3D multicellular coculture spheroids. Relative gene expression in 3D spheroid versus 2D adherent BM-derived MSC cultures was characterized and compared with literature reports. We evaluated coculture spheroids, each containing 25-400 MSCs and 10 umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived CD34+ progenitor cells. At low exogenous cytokine concentrations, 2D and 3D MSC coculture modestly improved overall hematopoietic cell and CD34+ cell expansion outcomes. By contrast, a substantial increase in CD34+CD38- cell yield was observed in PDMS microwell cultures, regardless of the presence or absence of MSCs. This outcome indicated that CD34+CD38- cell culture yield could be increased using the microwell platform alone, even without MSC coculture support. We found that the increase in CD34+CD38- cell yield observed in PDMS microwell cultures did not translate to enhanced engraftment in NOD/SCID gamma (NSG) mice or a modification in the relative human hematopoietic lineages established in engrafted mice. In summary, there was no statistical difference in CD34+ cell yield from 2D or 3D cocultures, and MSC coculture support provided only modest benefit in either geometry. While the high-throughput 3D microwell platform may provide a useful model system for studying cells in coculture, further optimization will be required to generate HSPC yields suitable for use in clinical applications.

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development and Transcriptional Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gekas, Christos

    2008-01-01

    The continuous production of blood cells, a process termed hematopoiesis, is sustained throughout the lifetime of an individual by a relatively small population of cells known as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are unique cells characterized by their ability to self-renew and give rise to all types of mature blood cells. Given their high proliferative potential, HSCs need to be tightly regulated on the cellular and molecular levels or could otherwise turn malignant. On the other hand, t...

  4. Clonal dominance and transplantation dynamics in hematopoietic stem cell compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ashcroft

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells in mammals are known to reside mostly in the bone marrow, but also transitively passage in small numbers in the blood. Experimental findings have suggested that they exist in a dynamic equilibrium, continuously migrating between these two compartments. Here we construct an individual-based mathematical model of this process, which is parametrised using existing empirical findings from mice. This approach allows us to quantify the amount of migration between the bone marrow niches and the peripheral blood. We use this model to investigate clonal hematopoiesis, which is a significant risk factor for hematologic cancers. We also analyse the engraftment of donor stem cells into non-conditioned and conditioned hosts, quantifying the impact of different treatment scenarios. The simplicity of the model permits a thorough mathematical analysis, providing deeper insights into the dynamics of both the model and of the real-world system. We predict the time taken for mutant clones to expand within a host, as well as chimerism levels that can be expected following transplantation therapy, and the probability that a preconditioned host is reconstituted by donor cells.

  5. Expansion of cord blood CD34 cells in presence of zVADfmk and zLLYfmk improved their in vitro functionality and in vivo engraftment in NOD/SCID mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha V M

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cord blood (CB is a promising source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. The limitation of cell dose associated with this source has prompted the ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs. However, the expansion procedure is known to exhaust the stem cell pool causing cellular defects that promote apoptosis and disrupt homing to the bone marrow. The role of apoptotic machinery in the regulation of stem cell compartment has been speculated in mouse hematopoietic and embryonic systems. We have consistently observed an increase in apoptosis in the cord blood derived CD34(+ cells cultured with cytokines compared to their freshly isolated counterpart. The present study was undertaken to assess whether pharmacological inhibition of apoptosis could improve the outcome of expansion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CB CD34(+ cells were expanded with cytokines in the presence or absence of cell permeable inhibitors of caspases and calpains; zVADfmk and zLLYfmk respectively. A novel role of apoptotic protease inhibitors was observed in increasing the CD34(+ cell content of the graft during ex vivo expansion. This was further reflected in improved in vitro functional aspects of the HSPCs; a higher clonogenicity and long term culture initiating potential. These cells sustained superior long term engraftment and an efficient regeneration of major lympho-myeloid lineages in the bone marrow of NOD/SCID mouse compared to the cells expanded with growth factors alone. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that, use of either zVADfmk or zLLYfmk in the culture medium improves expansion of CD34(+ cells. The strategy protects stem cell pool and committed progenitors, and improves their in vitro functionality and in vivo engraftment. This observation may complement the existing protocols used in the manipulation of hematopoietic cells for therapeutic purposes. These findings may have an impact in the CB transplant

  6. Engraftment of neural stem cells in the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M. Mortazavi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is one of the main causes of disability in the young population. Based on the underlying pathological changes, many modalities of treatments have been trialed. However, the most promising so far, has been the replacement of lost cellular elements, using stem cells and non-stem cells transplantation. The route of cellular administration and engraftment into the site of injury is an important determining factor for functional outcome, and should be chosen to be safe and efficacious in human patients. Herein, we will review the underlying changes following spinal cord injury, and the possible routes of cellular transplantation.

  7. Cellular memory and, hematopoietic stem cell aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Leonie M.; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) balance self-renewal and differentiation in order to sustain lifelong blood production and simultaneously maintain the HSC pool. However, there is clear evidence that HSCs are subject to quantitative and qualitative exhaustion. In this review, we briefly discuss

  8. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Piltti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell (hNSC engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury.

  9. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, Katja M; Avakian, Sabrina N; Funes, Gabriella M; Hu, Antoinette; Uchida, Nobuko; Anderson, Aileen J; Cummings, Brian J

    2015-09-01

    The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell (hNSC) engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns) transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT) and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Transient apoptosis inhibition in donor stem cells improves hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollek, Matthias; Voigt, Gesina; Molnar, Christian; Murad, Fabronia; Bertele, Daniela; Krombholz, Christopher Felix; Bohler, Sheila; Labi, Verena; Schiller, Stefan; Kunze, Mirjam; Geley, Stephan; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Garcia-Saez, Ana; Erlacher, Miriam

    2017-10-02

    During hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, a substantial number of donor cells are lost because of apoptotic cell death. Transplantation-associated apoptosis is mediated mainly by the proapoptotic BCL-2 family proteins BIM and BMF, and their proapoptotic function is conserved between mouse and human stem and progenitor cells. Permanent inhibition of apoptosis in donor cells caused by the loss of these BH3-only proteins improves transplantation outcome, but recipients might be exposed to increased risk of lymphomagenesis or autoimmunity. Here, we address whether transient inhibition of apoptosis can serve as a safe but efficient alternative to improve the outcome of stem cell transplantation. We show that transient apoptosis inhibition by short-term overexpression of prosurvival BCL-XL, known to block BIM and BMF, is not only sufficient to increase the viability of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during engraftment but also improves transplantation outcome without signs of adverse pathologies. Hence, this strategy represents a promising and novel therapeutic approach, particularly under conditions of limited donor stem cell availability. © 2017 Kollek et al.

  11. Gene Profiling of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Astrocyte Progenitors Following Spinal Cord Engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidet-Phillips, Amanda M.; Roybon, Laurent; Gross, Sarah K.; Tuteja, Alisha; Donnelly, Christopher J.; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Ko, Myungsung; Sherman, Alex; Eggan, Kevin; Henderson, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represents an exciting advancement with promise for stem cell transplantation therapies as well as for neurological disease modeling. Based on the emerging roles for astrocytes in neurological disorders, we investigated whether hiPSC-derived astrocyte progenitors could be engrafted to the rodent spinal cord and how the characteristics of these cells changed between in vitro culture and after transplantation to the in vivo spinal cord environment. Our results show that human embryonic stem cell- and hiPSC-derived astrocyte progenitors survive long-term after spinal cord engraftment and differentiate to astrocytes in vivo with few cells from other lineages present. Gene profiling of the transplanted cells demonstrates the astrocyte progenitors continue to mature in vivo and upregulate a variety of astrocyte-specific genes. Given this mature astrocyte gene profile, this work highlights hiPSCs as a tool to investigate disease-related astrocyte biology using in vivo disease modeling with significant implications for human neurological diseases currently lacking animal models. PMID:24604284

  12. Ibrutinib enhances chimeric antigen receptor T-cell engraftment and efficacy in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraietta, Joseph A; Beckwith, Kyle A; Patel, Prachi R; Ruella, Marco; Zheng, Zhaohui; Barrett, David M; Lacey, Simon F; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; McGettigan, Shannon E; Cook, Danielle R; Zhang, Changfeng; Xu, Jun; Do, Priscilla; Hulitt, Jessica; Kudchodkar, Sagar B; Cogdill, Alexandria P; Gill, Saar; Porter, David L; Woyach, Jennifer A; Long, Meixiao; Johnson, Amy J; Maddocks, Kami; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Byrd, John C; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-03-03

    Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is highly promising but requires robust T-cell expansion and engraftment. A T-cell defect in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) due to disease and/or therapy impairs ex vivo expansion and response to CAR T cells. To evaluate the effect of ibrutinib treatment on the T-cell compartment in CLL as it relates to CAR T-cell generation, we examined the phenotype and function of T cells in a cohort of CLL patients during their course of treatment with ibrutinib. We found that ≥5 cycles of ibrutinib therapy improved the expansion of CD19-directed CAR T cells (CTL019), in association with decreased expression of the immunosuppressive molecule programmed cell death 1 on T cells and of CD200 on B-CLL cells. In support of these findings, we observed that 3 CLL patients who had been treated with ibrutinib for ≥1 year at the time of T-cell collection had improved ex vivo and in vivo CTL019 expansion, which correlated positively together and with clinical response. Lastly, we show that ibrutinib exposure does not impair CAR T-cell function in vitro but does improve CAR T-cell engraftment, tumor clearance, and survival in human xenograft models of resistant acute lymphocytic leukemia and CLL when administered concurrently. Our collective findings indicate that ibrutinib enhances CAR T-cell function and suggest that clinical trials with combination therapy are warranted. Our studies demonstrate that improved T-cell function may also contribute to the efficacy of ibrutinib in CLL. These trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01747486, #NCT01105247, and #NCT01217749. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem...... evaluation, 893 proteins were found differentially expressed between multipotent and myeloid committed cells. The differential protein content in these cell populations points to a distinct structural organization of the cytoskeleton including remodeling activity. In addition, we found a marked difference...

  14. Repeated Gene Transfection Impairs the Engraftment of Transplanted Porcine Neonatal Pancreatic Cells

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    Min Koo Seo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPreviously, we reported that neonatal porcine pancreatic cells transfected with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF gene in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-based plasmid (pEBVHGF showed improved proliferation and differentiation compared to those of the control. In this study, we examined if pancreatic cells transfected repeatedly with pEBVHGF can be successfully grafted to control blood glucose in a diabetes mouse model.MethodsNeonatal porcine pancreatic cells were cultured as a monolayer and were transfected with pEBVHGF every other day for a total of three transfections. The transfected pancreatic cells were re-aggregated and transplanted into kidney capsules of diabetic nude mice or normal nude mice. Blood glucose level and body weight were measured every other day after transplantation. The engraftment of the transplanted cells and differentiation into beta cells were assessed using immunohistochemistry.ResultsRe-aggregation of the pancreatic cells before transplantation improved engraftment of the cells and facilitated neovascularization of the graft. Right before transplantation, pancreatic cells that were transfected with pEBVHGF and then re-aggregated showed ductal cell marker expression. However, ductal cells disappeared and the cells underwent fibrosis in a diabetes mouse model two to five weeks after transplantation; these mice also did not show controlled blood glucose levels. Furthermore, pancreatic cells transplanted into nude mice with normal blood glucose showed poor graft survival regardless of the type of transfected plasmid (pCEP4, pHGF, or pEBVHGF.ConclusionFor clinical application of transfected neonatal porcine pancreatic cells, further studies are required to develop methods of overcoming the damage for the cells caused by repeated transfection and to re-aggregate them into islet-like structures.

  15. Fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells require beta1 integrin function for colonizing fetal liver, spleen, and bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potocnik, A J; Brakebusch, C; Fässler, R

    2000-01-01

    Homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) into hematopoietic organs is a prerequisite for the establishment of hematopoiesis during embryogenesis and after bone marrow transplantation. We show that beta1 integrin-deficient HSCs from the para-aortic splanchnopleura and the fetal blood had...... hematolymphoid differentiation potential in vitro and in fetal organ cultures but were unable to seed fetal and adult hematopoietic tissues. Adult beta1 integrin null HSCs isolated from mice carrying loxP-tagged beta1 integrin alleles and ablated for beta1 integrin expression by retroviral cre transduction...... failed to engraft irradiated recipient mice. Moreover, absence of beta1 integrin resulted in sequestration of HSCs in the circulation and their reduced adhesion to endothelioma cells. These findings define beta1 integrin as an essential adhesion receptor for the homing of HSCs....

  16. Letermovir for cytomegalovirus prophylaxis in hematopoietic-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemaly, Roy F; Ullmann, Andrew J; Stoelben, Susanne; Richard, Marie Paule; Bornhäuser, Martin; Groth, Christoph; Einsele, Hermann; Silverman, Margarida; Mullane, Kathleen M; Brown, Janice; Nowak, Horst; Kölling, Katrin; Stobernack, Hans P; Lischka, Peter; Zimmermann, Holger; Rübsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Champlin, Richard E; Ehninger, Gerhard

    2014-05-08

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of illness and death in patients who have undergone allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation. Available treatments are restricted by clinically significant toxic effects and drug resistance. In this phase 2 study, we evaluated the effect of letermovir (also known as AIC246), a new anti-CMV drug with a novel mechanism of action, on the incidence and time to onset of prophylaxis failure in CMV-seropositive recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplants from matched related or unrelated donors. From March 2010 through October 2011, we randomly assigned 131 transplant recipients in a 3:1 ratio to three sequential study cohorts according to a double-blind design. Patients received oral letermovir (at a dose of 60, 120, or 240 mg per day, or matching placebo) for 12 weeks after engraftment. The primary end point was all-cause prophylaxis failure, defined as discontinuation of the study drug because of CMV antigen or DNA detection, end-organ disease, or any other cause. Patients underwent weekly surveillance for CMV infection. The reduction in the incidence of all-cause prophylaxis failure was dose-dependent. The incidence of prophylaxis failure with letermovir, as compared with placebo, was 48% versus 64% at a daily letermovir dose of 60 mg (P=0.32), 32% at a dose of 120 mg (P=0.01), and 29% at a dose of 240 mg (P=0.007). Kaplan-Meier time-to-onset profiles for prophylaxis failure showed a significant difference in the comparison of letermovir at a dose of 240 mg per day with placebo (P=0.002). The safety profile of letermovir was similar to placebo, with no indication of hematologic toxicity or nephrotoxicity. Letermovir, as compared with placebo, was effective in reducing the incidence of CMV infection in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplants. The highest dose (240 mg per day) had the greatest anti-CMV activity, with an acceptable safety profile. (Funded by AiCuris; Clinical

  17. Human placenta is a potent hematopoietic niche containing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells throughout development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Catherine; Bollerot, Karine; Mendes, Sandra; Haak, Esther; Crisan, Mihaela; Cerisoli, Francesco; Lauw, Ivoune; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Jorna, Ruud; Vermeulen, Mark; Kayser, Manfred; van der Linden, Reinier; Imanirad, Parisa; Verstegen, Monique; Nawaz-Yousaf, Humaira; Papazian, Natalie; Steegers, Eric; Cupedo, Tom; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this emergence, HSCs are found in other anatomical sites of the mouse conceptus. While the mouse placenta contains abundant HSCs at midgestation, little is known concerning whether HSCs or hematopoietic progenitors are present and supported in the human placenta during development. In this study we show, over a range of developmental times including term, that the human placenta contains hematopoietic progenitors and HSCs. Moreover, stromal cell lines generated from human placenta at several developmental time points are pericyte-like cells and support human hematopoiesis. Immunostaining of placenta sections during development localizes hematopoietic cells in close contact with pericytes/perivascular cells. Thus, the human placenta is a potent hematopoietic niche throughout development. PMID:19796619

  18. Melatonin enhances neural stem cell differentiation and engraftment by increasing mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Fernandez-Gil, Beatriz I; Florido, Javier; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Tejada, Miguel A; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Rusanova, Iryna; Garcia-Verdugo, José M; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; López, Luis Carlos; Velez-Pardo, Carlos; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Ferrer, José M; Escames, Germaine

    2017-09-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are regarded as a promising therapeutic approach to protecting and restoring damaged neurons in neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (PD and AD, respectively). However, new research suggests that NSC differentiation is required to make this strategy effective. Several studies have demonstrated that melatonin increases mature neuronal markers, which reflects NSC differentiation into neurons. Nevertheless, the possible involvement of mitochondria in the effects of melatonin during NSC differentiation has not yet been fully established. We therefore tested the impact of melatonin on NSC proliferation and differentiation in an attempt to determine whether these actions depend on modulating mitochondrial activity. We measured proliferation and differentiation markers, mitochondrial structural and functional parameters as well as oxidative stress indicators and also evaluated cell transplant engraftment. This enabled us to show that melatonin (25 μM) induces NSC differentiation into oligodendrocytes and neurons. These effects depend on increased mitochondrial mass/DNA/complexes, mitochondrial respiration, and membrane potential as well as ATP synthesis in NSCs. It is also interesting to note that melatonin prevented oxidative stress caused by high levels of mitochondrial activity. Finally, we found that melatonin enriches NSC engraftment in the ND mouse model following transplantation. We concluded that a combined therapy involving transplantation of NSCs pretreated with pharmacological doses of melatonin could efficiently restore neuronal cell populations in PD and AD mouse models depending on mitochondrial activity promotion. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Engraftment of syngeneic bone marrow is not more efficient after intrafemoral transplantation than after traditional intravenous administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, Ronald; Ausema, Albertina; Dontje, Bert; van Riezen, Manon; van Dam, Gooitzen; de Haan, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Objective Hematopoietic stem cells are key elements for life long production of mature blood cells The success of clinical stem cell transplantation may be Improved when the number of stem cells that engraft after transplantation can be increased Here, we investigated in a syngeneic mouse model

  20. Identification of the homing molecules that escort pluripotent stem cells-derived hematopoietic stem cells to their niches and human activated T-cells to inflammatory sites.

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Amal

    2017-12-01

    Hematopoietic cells exploit the multistep paradigm of cell migration to ultimately enable them to perform their function. This process is dictated by the ability of adhesion molecules on the circulating hematopoietic cells to find their counter-receptors on endothelial cells. Of those molecules, the selectin family and their respective ligands induce the initial transient interactions between circulating cells and the opposing endothelium. In this thesis, I focused on studying E-selectin mediated cellular migration in two hematopoietic cell types, namely human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and human T-lymphocytes. HSPCs derived from pluripotent sources theoretically offers a novel, unlimited source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy. In vitro pluripotent stem cell derived- hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (ES/iPS-HSPCs) behave much like somatic HSPCs in that they exhibit clonal expansion and multilineage hematopoietic capacity. However, unlike somatic sources, ES/iPS-HSPCs do not give rise to effective hematopoietic repopulation, which may be due to insufficient HSPCs homing to the bone marrow. HSPCs exploit E- and P-selectin to home and engraft into bone marrow niches. Thus, one of my objectives in this thesis was to study the expression of E-selectin ligands associated with ES/iPS-HSPCs. I showed that ES/iPS-HSPCs lack functional E-selectin ligand(s). In an effort to enhance the interaction between Eselectin and ES/iPS-HSPCs, we decorated the cell surface with sialyl-Lewis x (sLex) using the ex-vivo glycan engineering technology. However, this decoration did not improve the engraftment capacity of ES/iPS-HSPCs, in vivo. Induction of E-selectin expression during inflammation is key to recruitment of immune cells and therefore I also focused on analyzing the expression of E-selectin ligands on activated human T-cells. I identified several novel glycoproteins that may function as E-selectin ligands. Specifically, I compared the

  1. Unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the pediatric population: single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hespanha Marinho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been successfully used to treat the pediatric population with malignant and non-malignant hematological diseases. This paper reports the results up to 180 days after the procedure of all unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in pediatric patients that were performed in one institution.METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of all under 18-year-old patients who received unrelated transplantations between 1995 and 2009. Data were analyzed using the log-rank test, Cox stepwise model, Kaplan-Meier method, Fine and Gray model and Fisher's exact test.RESULTS: This study included 118 patients (46.8% who received bone marrow and 134 (53.2% who received umbilical cord blood transplants. Engraftment occurred in 89.47% of the patients that received bone marrow and 65.83% of those that received umbilical cord blood (p-value < 0.001. Both neutrophil and platelet engraftments were faster in the bone marrow group. Acute graft-versus-host disease occurred in 48.6% of the patients without statistically significant differences between the two groups (p-value = 0.653. Chronic graft-versus-host disease occurred in 9.2% of the patients with a higher incidence in the bone marrow group (p-value = 0.007. Relapse occurred in 24% of the 96 patients with malignant disease with 2-year cumulative incidences of 45% in the bone marrow group and 25% in the umbilical cord blood group (p-value = 0.117. Five-year overall survival was 47%, with an average survival time of 1207 days, and no significant differences between the groups (p-value = 0.4666.CONCLUSION: Despite delayed engraftment in the umbilical cord blood group, graft-versus-host disease, relapse and survival were similar in both groups.

  2. Synergistic actions of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells in vascularizing bioengineered tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo K Moioli

    Full Text Available Poor angiogenesis is a major road block for tissue repair. The regeneration of virtually all tissues is limited by angiogenesis, given the diffusion of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products is limited to a few hundred micrometers. We postulated that co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells improves angiogenesis of tissue repair and hence the outcome of regeneration. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by using bone as a model whose regeneration is impaired unless it is vascularized. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs were isolated from each of three healthy human bone marrow samples and reconstituted in a porous scaffold. MSCs were seeded in micropores of 3D calcium phosphate (CP scaffolds, followed by infusion of gel-suspended CD34(+ hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of CD34(+ HSCs and CD34(- MSCs in microporous CP scaffolds subcutaneously in the dorsum of immunocompromised mice yielded vascularized tissue. The average vascular number of co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSC scaffolds was substantially greater than MSC transplantation alone. Human osteocalcin was expressed in the micropores of CP scaffolds and was significantly increased upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Human nuclear staining revealed the engraftment of transplanted human cells in vascular endothelium upon co-transplantation of MSCs and CD34(+ cells. Based on additional in vitro results of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, we adsorbed VEGF with co-transplanted CD34(+ and MSCs in the microporous CP scaffolds in vivo, and discovered that vascular number and diameter further increased, likely owing to the promotion of endothelial differentiation of CD34(+ cells by VEGF. Together, co-transplantation of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells may improve the regeneration of vascular dependent tissues such as bone

  3. Involvement of urokinase receptor in the cross-talk between human hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selleri, Carmine; Montuori, Nunzia; Salvati, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) and can be induced to mobilize into the circulation for transplantation. Homing and lodgement into BM of transplanted HSCs are the first critical steps in their engraftment and involve multiple interactions between HSCs and the BM...... microenvironment.uPAR is a three domain receptor (DIDIIDIII) which binds urokinase, vitronectin, integrins. uPAR can be cleaved and shed from the cell surface generating full-length and cleaved soluble forms (suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR). DIIDIII-suPAR can bind fMLF receptors through the SRSRY sequence (residues 88......-92).We previously reported the involvement of soluble uPAR in HSC mobilization. We now investigate its possible role in HSC homing and engraftment.We show similar levels of circulating full-length suPAR in healthy donors and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients before and after the pre...

  4. Engraftment Potential of Spheroid-Forming Hepatic Endoderm Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Eun; An, Su Yeon; Woo, Dong-Hun; Han, Jiyou; Kim, Jong Hyun; Jang, Yu Jin; Son, Jeong Sang; Yang, Hyunwon; Cheon, Yong Pil

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation and drug discovery programs for liver diseases are hampered by the shortage of donor tissue. While recent studies have shown that hepatic cells can be derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), few cases have shown selective enrichment of hESC-derived hepatocytes and their integration into host liver tissues. Here we demonstrate that the dissociation and reaggregation procedure after an endodermal differentiation of hESC produces spheroids mainly consisted of cells showing hepatic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. A combined treatment with Wnt3a and bone morphogenic protein 4 efficiently differentiated hESCs into definitive endoderm in an adherent culture. Dissociation followed by reaggregation of these cells in a nonadherent condition lead to the isolation of spheroid-forming cells that preferentially expressed early hepatic markers from the adherent cell population. Further differentiation of these spheroid cells in the presence of the hepatocyte growth factor, oncostatin M, and dexamethasone produced a highly enriched population of cells exhibiting characteristics of early hepatocytes, including glycogen storage, indocyanine green uptake, and synthesis of urea and albumin. Furthermore, we show that grafted spheroid cells express hepatic features and attenuate the serum aspartate aminotransferase level in a model of acute liver injury. These data suggest that hepatic progenitor cells can be enriched by the spheroid formation of differentiating hESCs and that these cells have engraftment potential to replace damaged liver tissues. PMID:23373441

  5. Cigarette Smoke Alters the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Siggins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of tobacco smoke on hematologic derangements have received little attention. This study employed a mouse model of cigarette smoke exposure to explore the effects on bone marrow niche function. While lung cancer is the most widely studied consequence of tobacco smoke exposure, other malignancies, including leukemia, are associated with tobacco smoke exposure. Animals received cigarette smoke exposure for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 9 months. Results reveal that the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC pool size is reduced by cigarette smoke exposure. We next examined the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on one supporting cell type of the niche, the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Smoke exposure decreased the number of MSCs. Transplantation of naïve HSPCs into irradiated mice with cigarette smoke exposure yielded fewer numbers of engrafted HSPCs. This result suggests that smoke-exposed mice possess dysfunctional niches, resulting in abnormal hematopoiesis. Co-culture experiments using MSCs isolated from control or cigarette smoke-exposed mice with naïve HSPCs in vitro showed that MSCs from cigarette smoke-exposed mice generated marked expansion of naïve HSPCs. These data show that cigarette smoke exposure decreases in vivo MSC and HSC number and also increases pro-proliferative gene expression by cigarette smoke-exposed MSCs, which may stimulate HSPC expansion. These results of this investigation are clinically relevant to both bone marrow donors with a history of smoking and bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients with a history of smoking.

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization: updated conceptual renditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonig, H; Papayannopoulou, T

    2013-01-01

    Despite its specific clinical relevance, the field of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization has received broad attention, owing mainly to the belief that pharmacologic stem cell mobilization might provide clues as to how stem cells are retained in their natural environment, the bone marrow ‘niche’. Inherent to this knowledge is also the desire to optimally engineer stem cells to interact with their target niche (such as after transplantation), or to lure malignant stem cells out of their protective niches (in order to kill them), and in general to decipher the niche’s structural components and its organization. Whereas, with the exception of the recent addition of CXCR4 antagonists to the armamentarium for mobilization of patients refractory to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone, clinical stem cell mobilization has not changed significantly over the last decade or so, much effort has been made trying to explain the complex mechanism(s) by which hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells leave the marrow. This brief review will report some of the more recent advances about mobilization, with an attempt to reconcile some of the seemingly inconsistent data in mobilization and to interject some commonalities among different mobilization regimes. PMID:22951944

  7. Engrafted Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Promote Functional Recovery through Synapse Reorganization with Spared Host Neurons after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Yokota

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury (SCI. However, the efficacy of NSPC transplantation on severe SCI is poorly understood. We herein show that NSPC transplantation promotes functional recovery after mild and moderate SCI, but not after severe SCI. In severe SCI mice, there were few remaining host neurons within the range of NSPC engraftment; thus, we examined whether the co-distribution of transplant and host is a contributory factor for functional improvement. A cellular selective analysis using laser microdissection revealed that drug-induced host neuronal ablation considerably decreased the synaptogenic potential of the engrafted NSPCs. Furthermore, following host neuronal ablation, neuronal retrograde tracing showed less propriospinal relay connections bridging the lesion after NSPC transplantation. Our findings suggest that the interactive synaptic reorganization between engrafted NSPCs and spared host neurons is crucial for functional recovery, providing significant insight for establishing therapeutic strategies for severe SCI.

  8. T-cell suicide gene therapy prompts thymic renewal in adults after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Luca; Oliveira, Giacomo; Bondanza, Attilio; Noviello, Maddalena; Soldati, Corrado; Ghio, Domenico; Brigida, Immacolata; Greco, Raffaella; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Peccatori, Jacopo; Fracchia, Sergio; Del Fiacco, Matteo; Traversari, Catia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2012-08-30

    The genetic modification of T cells with a suicide gene grants a mechanism of control of adverse reactions, allowing safe infusion after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the TK007 clinical trial, 22 adults with hematologic malignancies experienced a rapid and sustained immune recovery after T cell-depleted HSCT and serial infusions of purified donor T cells expressing the HSV thymidine kinase suicide gene (TK+ cells). After a first wave of circulating TK+ cells, the majority of T cells supporting long-term immune reconstitution did not carry the suicide gene and displayed high numbers of naive lymphocytes, suggesting the thymus-dependent development of T cells, occurring only upon TK+ -cell engraftment. Accordingly, after the infusions, we documented an increase in circulating TCR excision circles and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants and a substantial expansion of the active thymic tissue as shown by chest tomography scans. Interestingly, a peak in the serum level of IL-7 was observed after each infusion of TK+ cells, anticipating the appearance of newly generated T cells. The results of the present study show that the infusion of genetically modified donor T cells after HSCT can drive the recovery of thymic activity in adults, leading to immune reconstitution.

  9. Exogenous endothelial cells as accelerators of hematopoietic reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizer J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the successes of recombinant hematopoietic-stimulatory factors at accelerating bone marrow reconstitution and shortening the neutropenic period post-transplantation, significant challenges remain such as cost, inability to reconstitute thrombocytic lineages, and lack of efficacy in conditions such as aplastic anemia. A possible means of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution would be administration of cells capable of secreting hematopoietic growth factors. Advantages of this approach would include: a ability to regulate secretion of cytokines based on biological need; b long term, localized production of growth factors, alleviating need for systemic administration of factors that possess unintended adverse effects; and c potential to actively repair the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Here we overview the field of hematopoietic growth factors, discuss previous experiences with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in accelerating hematopoiesis, and conclude by putting forth the rationale of utilizing exogenous endothelial cells as a novel cellular therapy for acceleration of hematopoietic recovery.

  10. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Donor Satellite Cell Engraftment is Significantly Augmented When the Host Niche is Preserved and Endogenous Satellite Cells are Incapacitated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Luisa; Neal, Alice; Zammit, Peter S; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is already in clinical practice for certain genetic diseases and is a promising therapy for dystrophic muscle. We used the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy to investigate the effect of the host satellite cell niche on the contribution of donor muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to muscle regeneration. We found that incapacitation of the host satellite cells and preservation of the muscle niche promote donor satellite cell contribution to muscle regeneration and functional reconstitution of the satellite cell compartment. But, if the host niche is not promptly refilled, or is filled by competent host satellite cells, it becomes nonfunctional and donor engraftment is negligible. Application of this regimen to aged host muscles also promotes efficient regeneration from aged donor satellite cells. In contrast, if the niche is destroyed, yet host satellite cells remain proliferation-competent, donor-derived engraftment is trivial. Thus preservation of the satellite cell niche, concomitant with functional impairment of the majority of satellite cells within dystrophic human muscles, may improve the efficiency of stem cell therapy. Stem Cells2012;30:1971–1984 PMID:22730231

  15. Tympanic membrane organ culture using cell culture well inserts engrafted with tympanic membrane tissue explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Lawrence J; Day, Richard M; Dilley, Rodney J

    2017-03-01

    Tissue engineering approaches using growth factors and various materials for repairing chronic perforations of the tympanic membrane are being developed, but there are surprisingly few relevant tissue culture models available to test new treatments. Here, we present a simple three-dimensional model system based on micro-dissecting the rat tympanic membrane umbo and grafting it into the membrane of a cell culture well insert. Cell outgrowth from the graft produced sufficient cells to populate a membrane of similar surface area to the human tympanic membrane within 2 weeks. Tissue grafts from the annulus region also showed cell outgrowth but were not as productive. The umbo organoid supported substantial cell proliferation and migration under the influence of keratinocyte growth medium. Cells from umbo grafts were enzymatically harvested from the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membrane for expansion in routine culture and cells could be harvested consecutively from the same graft over multiple cycles. We used harvested cells to test cell migration properties and to engraft a porous silk scaffold material as proof-of-principle for tissue engineering applications. This model is simple enough to be widely adopted for tympanic membrane regeneration studies and has promise as a tissue-equivalent model alternative to animal testing.

  16. Perforin gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells improves immune dysregulation in murine models of perforin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Marlene; Risma, Kimberly A; Arumugam, Paritha; Tiwari, Swati; Hontz, Adrianne E; Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Malik, Punam; Thrasher, Adrian J; Jordan, Michael B; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2015-04-01

    Defects in perforin lead to the failure of T and NK cell cytotoxicity, hypercytokinemia, and the immune dysregulatory condition known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL). The only curative treatment is allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which carries substantial risks. We used lentiviral vectors (LV) expressing the human perforin gene, under the transcriptional control of the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase promoter or a lineage-specific perforin promoter, to correct the defect in different murine models. Following LV-mediated gene transfer into progenitor cells from perforin-deficient mice, we observed perforin expression in mature T and NK cells, and there was no evidence of progenitor cell toxicity when transplanted into irradiated recipients. The resulting perforin-reconstituted NK cells showed partial recovery of cytotoxicity, and we observed full recovery of cytotoxicity in polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, reconstituted T cells with defined antigen specificity displayed normal cytotoxic function against peptide-loaded targets. Reconstituted CD8(+) lymphoblasts had reduced interferon-γ secretion following stimulation in vitro, suggesting restoration of normal immune regulation. Finally, upon viral challenge, mice with >30% engraftment of gene-modified cells exhibited reduction of cytokine hypersecretion and cytopenias. This study demonstrates the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy as a curative treatment for perforin-deficient FHL.

  17. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  18. Routine filtration of hematopoietic stem cell products: the time has arrived.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Kristjan; Gilpin, Scott G; Shpiruk, Tanner A; Anjos, Karla; Tulloch, Marie; Giftakis, Angleine; Blankstein, Anna R; Szwajcer, David; Wall, Donna A

    2015-08-01

    Most blood products are infused at the time of transfusion through a standard blood filter, designed to capture macroaggregates and cellular debris that might be harmful to the patient if infused. Hematopoietic stem cell products are not universally filtered, likely due to concern about loss of viable stem cells in the filtration process. We conducted a two-phase study to better understand the safety of routine filtration. First, surplus cryopreserved stem cell products were thawed and filtered, with markers of viability and potency measured. Second, routine filtration was implemented as part of routine practice at our center, and date of neutrophil and platelet (PLT) recovery was compared to historical controls. In the first phase, there was no difference seen in any markers of viability or potency for products after routine filtration. Based on those results, routine filtration was implemented. There was no difference in neutrophil or PLT engraftment. Thus, in this study, routine filtration did not impact the number of viable stem cells and did not delay engraftment. Given the very real harm posed by infusion of macroaggregates and cellular debris, and no clear disadvantage to filtration, routine filtration of stem cell products should be considered the standard of care. © 2015 AABB.

  19. Tracking the engraftment and regenerative capabilities of transplanted lung stem cells using fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsai-Jung; Tzeng, Yan-Kai; Chang, Wei-Wei; Cheng, Chi-An; Kuo, Yung; Chien, Chin-Hsiang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Yu, John

    2013-09-01

    Lung stem/progenitor cells are potentially useful for regenerative therapy, for example in repairing damaged or lost lung tissue in patients. Several optical imaging methods and probes have been used to track how stem cells incorporate and regenerate themselves in vivo over time. However, these approaches are limited by photobleaching, toxicity and interference from background tissue autofluorescence. Here we show that fluorescent nanodiamonds, in combination with fluorescence-activated cell sorting, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and immunostaining, can identify transplanted CD45-CD54+CD157+ lung stem/progenitor cells in vivo, and track their engraftment and regenerative capabilities with single-cell resolution. Fluorescent nanodiamond labelling did not eliminate the cells' properties of self-renewal and differentiation into type I and type II pneumocytes. Time-gated fluorescence imaging of tissue sections of naphthalene-injured mice indicates that the fluorescent nanodiamond-labelled lung stem/progenitor cells preferentially reside at terminal bronchioles of the lungs for 7 days after intravenous transplantation.

  20. Fibrocartilage Stem Cells Engraft and Self-Organize into Vascularized Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, J; Ruscitto, A; Pylawka, S; Sohraby, A; Shawber, C J; Embree, M C

    2017-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex, multicellular process that is critical for bone development and generation. Endochondral ossification depends on an avascular cartilage template that completely remodels into vascularized bone and involves a dynamic interplay among chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and endothelial cells. We have discovered fibrocartilage stem cells (FCSCs) derived from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mandibular condyle that generates cartilage anlagen, which is subsequently remodeled into vascularized bone using an ectopic transplantation model. Here we explore FCSC and endothelial cell interactions during vascularized bone formation. We found that a single FCSC colony formed transient cartilage and host endothelial cells may participate in bone angiogenesis upon subcutaneous transplantation in a nude mouse. FCSCs produced an abundance of the proangiogenic growth factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and promoted the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Using a fibrinogen gel bead angiogenesis assay experiment, FCSC cell feeder layer induced HUVECs to form significantly shorter and less sprouts than D551 fibroblast controls, suggesting that FCSCs may initially inhibit angiogenesis to allow for avascular cartilage formation. Conversely, direct FCSC-HUVEC contact significantly enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of FCSCs. To corroborate this idea, upon transplantation of FCSCs into a bone defect microenvironment, FCSCs engrafted and regenerated intramembranous bone. Taken together, we demonstrate that the interactions between FCSCs and endothelial cells are essential for FCSC-derived vascularized bone formation. A comprehensive understanding of the environmental cues that regulate FCSC fate decisions may contribute to deciphering the mechanisms underlying the role of FCSCs in regulating bone formation.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.beerman@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States); Rossi, Derrick J. [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...... in restoration of self-tolerance. Relatively young patients with active inflammatory lesions of relatively short duration and rapidly progressive disease, but still low disability scores, unresponsive to conventional therapy seem the best candidates for transplantation. Transplant-related mortality was 6...

  3. Identification of embryonic stem cell-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons for engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganat, Yosif M; Calder, Elizabeth L; Kriks, Sonja; Nelander, Jenny; Tu, Edmund Y; Jia, Fan; Battista, Daniela; Harrison, Neil; Parmar, Malin; Tomishima, Mark J; Rutishauser, Urs; Studer, Lorenz

    2012-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent a promising source of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons for applications in Parkinson disease. However, ESC-based transplantation paradigms carry a risk of introducing inappropriate or tumorigenic cells. Cell purification before transplantation may alleviate these concerns and enable identification of the specific DA neuron stage most suitable for cell therapy. Here, we used 3 transgenic mouse ESC reporter lines to mark DA neurons at 3 stages of differentiation (early, middle, and late) following induction of differentiation using Hes5::GFP, Nurr1::GFP, and Pitx3::YFP transgenes, respectively. Transplantation of FACS-purified cells from each line resulted in DA neuron engraftment, with the mid-stage and late-stage neuron grafts being composed almost exclusively of midbrain DA neurons. Mid-stage neuron cell grafts had the greatest amount of DA neuron survival and robustly induced recovery of motor deficits in hemiparkinsonian mice. Our data suggest that the Nurr1+ stage (middle stage) of neuronal differentiation is particularly suitable for grafting ESC-derived DA neurons. Moreover, global transcriptome analysis of progeny from each of the ESC reporter lines revealed expression of known midbrain DA neuron genes and also uncovered previously uncharacterized midbrain genes. These data demonstrate remarkable fate specificity of ESC-derived DA neurons and outline a sequential stage-specific ESC reporter line paradigm for in vivo gene discovery.

  4. Therapeutic limitations in tumor-specific CD8+ memory T cell engraftment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Thomas R

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adoptive immunotherapy with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL represents an alternative approach to treating solid tumors. Ideally, this would confer long-term protection against tumor. We previously demonstrated that in vitro-generated tumor-specific CTL from the ovalbumin (OVA-specific OT-I T cell receptor transgenic mouse persisted long after adoptive transfer as memory T cells. When recipient mice were challenged with the OVA-expressing E.G7 thymoma, tumor growth was delayed and sometimes prevented. The reasons for therapeutic failures were not clear. Methods OT-I CTL were adoptively transferred to C57BL/6 mice 21 – 28 days prior to tumor challenge. At this time, the donor cells had the phenotypical and functional characteristics of memory CD8+ T cells. Recipients which developed tumor despite adoptive immunotherapy were analyzed to evaluate the reason(s for therapeutic failure. Results Dose-response studies demonstrated that the degree of tumor protection was directly proportional to the number of OT-I CTL adoptively transferred. At a low dose of OT-I CTL, therapeutic failure was attributed to insufficient numbers of OT-I T cells that persisted in vivo, rather than mechanisms that actively suppressed or anergized the OT-I T cells. In recipients of high numbers of OT-I CTL, the E.G7 tumor that developed was shown to be resistant to fresh OT-I CTL when examined ex vivo. Furthermore, these same tumor cells no longer secreted a detectable level of OVA. In this case, resistance to immunotherapy was secondary to selection of clones of E.G7 that expressed a lower level of tumor antigen. Conclusions Memory engraftment with tumor-specific CTL provides long-term protection against tumor. However, there are several limitations to this immunotherapeutic strategy, especially when targeting a single antigen. This study illustrates the importance of administering large numbers of effectors to engraft sufficiently efficacious immunologic

  5. Macrophages improve survival, proliferation and migration of engrafted myogenic precursor cells into MDX skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-François Lesault

    Full Text Available Transplantation of muscle precursor cells is of therapeutic interest for focal skeletal muscular diseases. However, major limitations of cell transplantation are the poor survival, expansion and migration of the injected cells. The massive and early death of transplanted myoblasts is not fully understood although several mechanisms have been suggested. Various attempts have been made to improve their survival or migration. Taking into account that muscle regeneration is associated with the presence of macrophages, which are helpful in repairing the muscle by both cleansing the debris and deliver trophic cues to myoblasts in a sequential way, we attempted in the present work to improve myoblast transplantation by coinjecting macrophages. The present data showed that in the 5 days following the transplantation, macrophages efficiently improved: i myoblast survival by limiting their massive death, ii myoblast expansion within the tissue and iii myoblast migration in the dystrophic muscle. This was confirmed by in vitro analyses showing that macrophages stimulated myoblast adhesion and migration. As a result, myoblast contribution to regenerating host myofibres was increased by macrophages one month after transplantation. Altogether, these data demonstrate that macrophages are beneficial during the early steps of myoblast transplantation into skeletal muscle, showing that coinjecting these stromal cells may be used as a helper to improve the efficiency of parenchymal cell engraftment.

  6. Latexin is a newly discovered regulator of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Gerald

    Deeply hidden in the bone marrow are rare hematopoietic stem cells that produce all types of blood cells in the circulatory system. A new study shows that the latexin gene affects the size of this population of cells.

  7. Hematopoietic stem cells: concepts, definitions, and the new reality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eaves, Connie J

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) research took hold in the 1950s with the demonstration that intravenously injected bone marrow cells can rescue irradiated mice from lethality by reestablishing blood cell production...

  8. Infrared fluorescent protein 1.4 genetic labeling tracks engrafted cardiac progenitor cells in mouse ischemic hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lijuan; Phillips, M Ian; Miao, Hui-Lai; Zeng, Rong; Qin, Gangjian; Kim, Il-man; Weintraub, Neal L; Tang, Yaoliang

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has a potential for regenerating damaged myocardium. However, a key obstacle to cell therapy's success is the loss of engrafted cells due to apoptosis or necrosis in the ischemic myocardium. While many strategies have been developed to improve engrafted cell survival, tools to evaluate cell efficacy within the body are limited. Traditional genetic labeling tools, such as GFP-like fluorescent proteins (eGFP, DsRed, mCherry), have limited penetration depths in vivo due to tissue scattering and absorption. To circumvent these limitations, a near-infrared fluorescent mutant of the DrBphP bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans, IFP1.4, was developed for in vivo imaging, but it has yet to be used for in vivo stem/progenitor cell tracking. In this study, we incorporated IFP1.4 into mouse cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) by a lentiviral vector. Live IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were imaged by their near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) using an Odyssey scanner following overnight incubation with biliverdin. A significant linear correlation was observed between the amount of cells and NIRF signal intensity in in vitro studies. Lentiviral mediated IFP1.4 gene labeling is stable, and does not impact the apoptosis and cardiac differentiation of CPC. To assess efficacy of our model for engrafted cells in vivo, IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were intramyocardially injected into infarcted hearts. NIRF signals were collected at 1-day, 7-days, and 14-days post-injection using the Kodak in vivo multispectral imaging system. Strong NIRF signals from engrafted cells were imaged 1 day after injection. At 1 week after injection, 70% of the NIRF signal was lost when compared to the intensity of the day 1 signal. The data collected 2 weeks following transplantation showed an 88% decrease when compared to day 1. Our studies have shown that IFP1.4 gene labeling can be used to track the viability of transplanted cells in vivo.

  9. Enhanced Survival and Engraftment of Transplanted Stem Cells using Growth Factor Sequestering Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Amit K.; Tharp, Kevin M.; Ye, Jianqin; Santiago-Ortiz, Jorge L.; Jackson, Wesley M.; Stahl, Andreas; Schaffer, David V.; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    We have generated a bioinspired tunable system of hyaluronic acid (HyA)-based hydrogels for Matrix-Assisted Cell Transplantation (MACT). With this material, we have independently evaluated matrix parameters such as adhesion peptide density, mechanical properties, and growth factor sequestering capacity, to engineer an environment that imbues donor cells with a milieu that promotes survival and engraftment with host tissues after transplantation. Using a versatile population of Sca-1+/CD45− cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), we demonstrated that the addition of heparin in the HyA hydrogels was necessary to coordinate the presentation of TGFβ1 and to support the trophic functions of the CPCs via endothelial cell differentiation and vascular like tubular network formation. Presentation of exogenous TGFβ1 by binding with heparin improved differentiated CPC function by sequestering additional endogenously-produced angiogenic factors. Finally, we demonstrated that TGFβ1 and heparin-containing HyA hydrogels can promote CPC survival when implanted subcutaneously into murine hind-limbs and encouraged their participation in the ensuing neovascular response, including blood vessels that had anastomosed with the host’s blood vessels. PMID:25682155

  10. Neural progenitor cell engraftment corrects lysosomal storage throughout the MPS VII mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, E Y; Taylor, R M; Wolfe, J H

    1995-03-23

    Many metabolic diseases affecting the central nervous system are refractory to treatment because the blood-brain barrier restricts entry of therapeutic molecules. It may be possible to deliver therapeutic gene products directly to the brain by transplantation of neural progenitor cells, which can integrate into the murine central nervous system in a cytoarchitecturally appropriate manner. We tested this approach in mucopolysaccharidosis VII (Sly disease), a lysosomal storage disorder of humans, dogs and mice caused by an inherited deficiency of beta-glucuronidase. Lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans occurs in the brain and other tissues, causing a fatal progressive degenerative disorder, including mental retardation. Treatments are designed to provide a source of normal enzyme for uptake by diseased cells. We report here that by transplanting beta-glucuronidase-expressing neural progenitors into the cerebral ventricles of newborn mice, donor cells engrafted throughout the neuraxis. At maturity, donor-derived cells were present as normal constituents of diverse brain regions. beta-Glucuronidase activity was expressed along the entire neuraxis, resulting in widespread correction of lysosomal storage in neurons and glia in affected mice.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients: factors determining progression to lower respiratory tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yae-Jean; Guthrie, Katherine A; Waghmare, Alpana; Walsh, Edward E; Falsey, Ann R; Kuypers, Jane; Cent, Anne; Englund, Janet A; Boeckh, Michael

    2014-04-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRD) is a life-threatening complication in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Lymphopenia has been associated with an increased risk of progression from upper respiratory tract infection (URI) to LRD. This study retrospectively analyzed the significance of lymphocyte engraftment dynamics, lung function, smoking history, corticosteroids, antiviral treatment, viral subtypes, and RSV-specific neutralizing antibodies for the progression to LRD in 181 HCT recipients with RSV URI. In multivariable models, smoking history, conditioning with high-dose total body irradiation, and an absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) ≤100/mm(3) at the time of URI onset were significantly associated with disease progression. No progression occurred in patients with ALCs of >1000/mm(3) at URI onset. Lymphocyte engraftment dynamics were similar in progressors and nonprogressors. Pre- and posttransplant donor and posttransplant recipient RSV subtype-specific neutralizing antibody levels, RSV viral subtypes, and corticosteroids also were not significantly associated with LRD progression. Host and transplant related factors appear to determine the risk of progression to LRD more than viral factors. Dysfunctional cell-mediated immunity appears to be important in the pathogenesis of progressive RSV disease after HCT. A characterization of RSV-specific T-cell immunity is warranted.

  12. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiece, I; Briddell, R

    2001-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells have the potential for providing benefit in a variety of clinical settings. These include cells for support of patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy, as a target for replacement gene therapy, and as a source of cells for immunotherapy. The limitation to many of these applications has been the total absolute number of defined target cells. Therefore many investigators have explored methods to culture hematopoietic cells in vitro to increase the numbers of these cells. Studies attempting to expand hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells, and mature cells in vitro have become possible over the past decade due to the availability of recombinant growth factors and cell selection technologies. To date, no studies have demonstrated convincing data on the expansion of true stem cells, and so the focus of this review is the expansion of committed progenitor cells and mature cells. A number of clinical studies have been preformed using a variety of culture conditions, and several studies are currently in progress that explore the use of ex vivo expanded cells. These studies will be discussed in this review. There are evolving data that suggest that there are real clinical benefits associated with the use of the expanded cells; however, we are still at the early stages of understanding how to optimally culture different cell populations. The next decade should determine what culture conditions and what cell populations are needed for a range of clinical applications.

  13. Eradication of HIV by Transplantation of CCR5-Deficient Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gero Hütter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, 30 years after the onset of the HIV pandemic, although treatment strategies have considerably improved, there is still no cure for the disease. Recently, we described a successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in an HIV-1–infected patient, transferring donor-derived cells with a natural resistance against HIV infection. These hematopoietic stem cells engrafted, proliferated, and differentiated into mature myeloid and lymphoid cells. To date, the patient has not required any antiretroviral treatment, more than 4 years after allogeneic transplantation. In the analysis of peripheral blood cells and different tissue samples, including gut, liver, and brain, no viral load or proviral DNA could be detected. Our report raises the hope for further targeted treatment strategies against HIV and represents a successful personalized treatment with allogeneic stem cells carrying a beneficial gene. However, this case has ignited a controversy regarding the question of whether this patient has achieved complete eradication of HIV or not. Here we give an update on open questions, unsolved aspects, and clinical consequences concerning this unique case.

  14. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA. Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals.

  15. Total lymphoid irradiation based conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in severe aplastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Hee; Kim, Ji Yoon; Choi, Byung Ock; Ryu, Mi Ryeong; Chung, Su Mi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) based conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) patients who experienced an engraftment failure from prior HSCT or were heavily transfused. Between 1995 and 2006, 20 SAA patients received TLI for conditioning of HSCT. All patients were multi-transfused or had long duration of disease. Fifteen (75%) patients had graft failure from prior HSCT. In 18 (90%) patients, the donors were human leukocyte antigen identical siblings. The stem cell source was the peripheral blood stem cell in 15 (75%) patients. The conditioning regimen was composed of antithymocyte globulin plus TLI with a median dose of 750 cGy in 1 fraction. The graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis used cyclosporine with methotrexate. With a median follow-up of 10.8 years, graft failures developed in 6 patients. Among them, 3 patients received their third HSCT to be engrafted finally. The Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate was 85.0% and 83.1% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The incidence of acute and chronic GVHD was 20% and 20%, respectively. None of the patients have developed a malignancy after HSCT. In our study, TLI based conditioning in allogeneic HSCT was feasible with acceptable rates of GVHD in SAA patients who experienced graft failure from prior HSCT or was at a high risk of graft rejection. We achieved relatively better results of engraftment and survival with a long term follow-up.

  16. Expansion and homing of umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Sudipto; Seah, Kevin Kwee Hong; Poon, Zhiyong; Cheung, Alice Man Sze; Fan, Xiubo; Ong, Shin-Yeu; Li, Shang; Koh, Liang Piu; Hwang, William Ying Khee

    2015-06-01

    The successful expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from umbilical cord blood (UCB) for transplantation could revolutionize clinical practice by improving transplantation-related outcomes and making available UCB units that have suboptimal cell doses for transplantation. New cytokine combinations appear able to promote HSPC growth with minimal differentiation into mature precursors and new agents, such as insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2, are being used in clinical trials. Molecules that simulate the HSPC niche, such as Notch ligand, have also shown promise. Further improvements have been made with the use of mesenchymal stromal cells, which have made possible UCB expansion without a potentially deleterious prior CD34/CD133 cell selection step. Chemical molecules, such as copper chelators, nicotinamide, and aryl hydrocarbon antagonists, have shown excellent outcomes in clinical studies. The use of bioreactors could further add to HSPC studies in future. Drugs that could improve HSPC homing also appear to have potential in improving engraftment times in UCB transplantation. Technologies to expand HSPC from UCB and to enhance the homing of these cells appear to have attained the goal of accelerating hematopoietic recovery. Further discoveries and clinical studies are likely to make the goal of true HSPC expansion a reality for many applications in future. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, Simon N; van Os, Ronald P; Bunting, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Animal models have added significantly to our understanding of the mechanism(s) of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization. Such models suggest that changes in the interaction between the HSPC and the hematopoietic microenvironmental 'niche' (cellular and extracellular components)

  18. Childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy more than 5 years after hematopoietic cell transplantation: the first case from Serbia and southeastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potic, Ana; Rovelli, Attilio M; Uziel, Graziella; Kozic, Dusko; Mladenovic, Jelena; Milic-Rasic, Vedrana

    2010-12-01

    We report the clinical course, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings in a boy with childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy whose neurological disease keeps progressing more than 5 years after conventional hematopoietic cell transplantation with full donor-derived engraftment accomplishment. The described clinical and radiological findings follow all phases of this childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: from the clinically asymptomatic pretransplant stage to the present day. This is the first patient not only from Serbia but from the entire area of Southeastern Europe who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation for childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. The presented disease course and the posttransplant outcome in the only case of transplanted adrenoleukodystrophy from Serbia enhances the overwhelming appeal for better X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy screening, earlier disease detection, and contributes to the well-known anticipation of the refined hematopoietic cell transplantation eligibility criteria in future adrenoleukodystrophy treatment.

  19. Interleukin-7 and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: beyond the thymus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Broers (Anna Elisabeth Clasine)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAllogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has been established as important treatment modality for patients with hematological malignancies, aplastic anemia, and inborn errors of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Nevertheless, major lethal and non-lethal complications

  20. Enhanced in utero allogeneic engraftment in mice after mobilizing fetal HSCs by α4β1/7 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aimee G; Vrecenak, Jesse D; Boelig, Matthew M; Eissenberg, Linda; Rettig, Michael P; Riley, John S; Holt, Matthew S; Conner, Michael A; Loukogeorgakis, Stavros P; Li, Haiying; DiPersio, John F; Flake, Alan W; Peranteau, William H

    2016-11-17

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) is a novel nonmyeloablative approach that results in donor-specific tolerance and mixed allogeneic chimerism. Clinical application is limited by low levels of donor cell engraftment. Competition from endogenous hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for limited "space" in fetal hematopoietic organs remains a significant barrier to successful IUHCT. AMD3100, a CXCR4 inhibitor, and firategrast, an α4β1 and α4β7 integrin inhibitor (α4β1/7), have been shown to disrupt HSC retention in the postnatal hematopoietic niche. We hypothesized that maternal administration of AMD3100 and/or firategrast prior to IUHCT would mobilize endogenous HSCs from the fetal liver (FL) and result in preferential FL homing of donor HSCs and enhanced long-term engraftment following IUHCT in an allogeneic mouse model. We demonstrate that (1) both agents cross the placenta with rapidly detectable fetal serum concentrations following maternal administration; (2) firategrast treatment alone or with AMD3100 mobilizes endogenous HSCs from the FL and results in increased FL homing of donor HSCs following IUHCT; and (3) enhanced donor HSC homing following firategrast treatment translates into increased long-term multilineage donor cell engraftment. This approach highlights the potential of mobilization strategies to overcome barriers to successful engraftment and increase the clinical promise of IUHCT. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Gene Therapy for Cerebral Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Florian; Duncan, Christine; Musolino, Patricia L; Orchard, Paul J; De Oliveira, Satiro; Thrasher, Adrian J; Armant, Myriam; Dansereau, Colleen; Lund, Troy C; Miller, Weston P; Raymond, Gerald V; Sankar, Raman; Shah, Ami J; Sevin, Caroline; Gaspar, H Bobby; Gissen, Paul; Amartino, Hernan; Bratkovic, Drago; Smith, Nicholas J C; Paker, Asif M; Shamir, Esther; O'Meara, Tara; Davidson, David; Aubourg, Patrick; Williams, David A

    2017-10-26

    In X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, mutations in ABCD1 lead to loss of function of the ALD protein. Cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy is characterized by demyelination and neurodegeneration. Disease progression, which leads to loss of neurologic function and death, can be halted only with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. We enrolled boys with cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy in a single-group, open-label, phase 2-3 safety and efficacy study. Patients were required to have early-stage disease and gadolinium enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at screening. The investigational therapy involved infusion of autologous CD34+ cells transduced with the elivaldogene tavalentivec (Lenti-D) lentiviral vector. In this interim analysis, patients were assessed for the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, death, and major functional disabilities, as well as changes in neurologic function and in the extent of lesions on MRI. The primary end point was being alive and having no major functional disability at 24 months after infusion. A total of 17 boys received Lenti-D gene therapy. At the time of the interim analysis, the median follow-up was 29.4 months (range, 21.6 to 42.0). All the patients had gene-marked cells after engraftment, with no evidence of preferential integration near known oncogenes or clonal outgrowth. Measurable ALD protein was observed in all the patients. No treatment-related death or graft-versus-host disease had been reported; 15 of the 17 patients (88%) were alive and free of major functional disability, with minimal clinical symptoms. One patient, who had had rapid neurologic deterioration, had died from disease progression. Another patient, who had had evidence of disease progression on MRI, had withdrawn from the study to undergo allogeneic stem-cell transplantation and later died from transplantation-related complications. Early results of this study suggest that Lenti-D gene therapy may be a safe and effective alternative to

  2. Fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stromal cells augment engraftment of transplanted hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Meghnad; B Patil, Pradeep; He, Zhong; Holgersson, Jan; Olausson, Michael; Sumitran-Holgersson, Suchitra

    2012-07-01

    One important problem commonly encountered after hepatocyte transplantation is the low numbers of transplanted cells found in the graft. If hepatocyte transplantation is to be a viable therapeutic approach, significant liver parenchyma repopulation is required. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) produce high levels of various growth factors, cytokines and metalloproteinases, and have immunomodulatory effects. We therefore hypothesized that co-transplantation of MSC with human fetal hepatocytes (hFH) could augment in vivo expansion after transplantation. We investigated the ability of human fetal liver MSC (hFLMSC) to augment expansion of phenotypically and functionally well-characterized hFH. Two million hFH (passage 6) were either transplanted alone or together (1:1 ratio) with green fluorescence protein-expressing hFLMSC into the spleen of C57BL/6 nude mice with retrorsine-induced liver injury. After 4 weeks, engraftment of cells was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization using a human-specific DNA probe. Significantly higher numbers of cells expressing human cytokeratin (CK)8, CK18, CK19, Cysteine-rich MNNG HOS Transforming gene (c-Met), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), human nuclear antigen, mitochondrial antigen, hepatocyte-specific antigen and albumin (ALB) were present in the livers of recipient animals co-transplanted with hFLMSC compared with those without. Furthermore, expression of human hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-4α and HNF-1β, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A7 mRNA was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in these animals. In addition, significantly increased amounts of human ALB were detected. Importantly, hFLMSC did not transdifferentiate into hepatocytes. Our study reports the use of a novel strategy for enhanced liver repopulation and thereby advances this experimental procedure closer to clinical liver cell therapy.

  3. [Hematopoietic reconstitution and prognosis of different types of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wu, Depei; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Song; Wang, Xiuli; Miao, Miao; Chen, Jia; Han, Yue; Tang, Xiaowen; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Jin, Zhengming; Fu, Chengcheng; Ma, Xiao; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    To compare the differences between hematopoietic reconstitution and longterm prognosis of patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) after HLA- matched sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(MSD-HSCT), Haploidentical HSCT(Haplo-HSCT), unrelated donor allogeneic HSCT(UD-HSCT)and umbilical cord blood HSCT(UCB-HSCT). In this retrospective study, 63 patients with SAA who received HSCT in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University between May 2008 and December 2013 were enrolled. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the transplantation types. The hematopoietic reconstitution, the incidence of acute graft-versushost disease(aGVHD)and 5- year survival rate after transplantation were compared. All 53 subjects who received MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. Of them, the recovery of neutrophil and platelet were not significantly different(P0.05). MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT had no statistically significance in terms of hematopoietic reconstitution or prognosis. Although hematopoietic reconstitution of UCB-HSCT was lower than other transplantation types, but no significant difference in overall prognosis. So if HLA-matched sibling donor is not available, SAA patients can choose Haplo- HSCT, UD - HSCT or UCB- HSCT with comparable efficacy to MSD- HSCT, as an alternative therapy.

  4. Effects of anti-NKG2A antibody administration on leukemia and normal hematopoietic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Loredana; Urbani, Elena; André, Pascale; Mancusi, Antonella; Tosti, Antonella; Topini, Fabiana; Bléry, Mathieu; Animobono, Lucia; Romagné, François; Wagtmann, Nicolai; Velardi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are key cells of the innate immune system. Natural killer cell receptor repertoires are diversified by a stochastic expression of killer-cell-immunoglobulin-like receptors and lectin-like receptors such as NKG2 receptors. All individuals harbor a subset of natural killer cells expressing NKG2A, the inhibitory checkpoint receptor for HLA-E. Most neoplastic and normal hematopoietic cells express HLA-E, the inhibitory ligand of NKG2A. A novel anti-human NKG2A antibody induced tumor cell death, suggesting that the antibody could be useful in the treatment of cancers expressing HLA-E. We found that immunodeficient mice, co-infused with human primary leukemia or Epstein-Barr virus cell lines and NKG2A+ natural killer cells, pre-treated with anti-human NKG2A, were rescued from disease progression. Human NKG2A+ natural killer cells reconstituted in immunodeficient mice after transplantation of human CD34+ cells. These natural killer cells are able to kill engrafted human primary leukemia or Epstein-Barr virus cell lines by lysis after intraperitoneal administration of anti-human NKG2A. Thus, this anti-NKG2A may exploit the anti-leukemic action of the wave of NKG2A+ natural killer cells recovering after hematopoietic stem cell transplants or adoptive therapy with natural killer cell infusions from matched or mismatched family donors after chemotherapy for acute leukemia, without the need to search for a natural killer cell alloreactive donor. PMID:26721894

  5. Fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cell engraftment after allogeneic in utero transplantation into rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Rafael; Martínez-González, Itziar; Rosal, Marta; Nadal, Marga; Petriz, Jordi; Gratacós, Eduard; Aran, Josep M

    2012-01-20

    Prenatal transplantation of genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) might benefit prevention or treatment of early-onset genetic disorders due to the cells' intrinsic regenerative potential plus the acquired advantage from therapeutic transgene expression. However, a thorough assessment of the safety, accessibility, and behavior of these MSCs in the fetal environment using appropriate animal models is required before we can advance toward a clinical application. We have recently shown that fetal rabbit liver MSCs (fl-MSCs) have superior growth rate, clonogenic capability, and in vitro adherence and differentiation abilities compared with adult rabbit bone marrow MSCs. In this follow-up study, we report safe and widespread distribution of recombinant pSF-EGFP retrovirus-transduced fl-MSCs (EGFP(+)-fl-MSCs) in neonatal rabbit tissues at 10 days after fetal allogeneic transplantation through both intrahepatic and intra-amniotic administration. Conversely, a more restricted biodistribution pattern according to the route of administration was apparent in the young rabbits intervened at 16 weeks after fetal EGFP(+)-fl-MSC transplantation. Furthermore, the presence of these cells in the recipients' tissues, tracked with the reporter provirus, was inversely related to the developmental stage of the fetuses at the time of intervention. Long-term engraftment was confirmed both by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on touch tissue imprints using a chromosome Y-specific BAC probe, and by immunohistochemical localization of EGFP expression. Finally, there was no evidence of immune responses against the transplanted EGFP(+)-fl-MSCs or the EGFP transgenic product in the treated young rabbits. Thus, cell transplantation approaches using genetically engineered fetal MSCs may prove particularly valuable to frontier medical treatments for congenital birth defects in perinatology.

  6. Steady state peripheral blood provides cells with functional and metabolic characteristics of real hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, Antonin; Avalon, Maryse; Lapostolle, Véronique; Ismail, Sadek; Mombled, Margaux; Debeissat, Christelle; Guérinet, Marianne; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski-Lafarge, Marija; Villacreces, Arnaud; Praloran, Vincent; Ivanovic, Zoran; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are located in the bone marrow, also circulate in cord and peripheral blood. Despite high availability, HSCs from steady state peripheral blood (SSPB) are little known and not used for research or cell therapy. We thus aimed to characterize and select HSCs from SSPB by a direct approach with a view to delineating their main functional and metabolic properties and the mechanisms responsible for their maintenance. We chose to work on Side Population (SP) cells which are highly enriched in HSCs in mouse, human bone marrow, and cord blood. However, no SP cells from SSBP have as yet been characterized. Here we showed that SP cells from SSPB exhibited a higher proliferative capacity and generated more clonogenic progenitors than non-SP cells in vitro. Furthermore, xenotransplantation studies on immunodeficient mice demonstrated that SP cells are up to 45 times more enriched in cells with engraftment capacity than non-SP cells. From a cell regulation point of view, we showed that SP activity depended on O2 concentrations close to those found in HSC niches, an effect which is dependent on both hypoxia-induced factors HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Moreover SP cells displayed a reduced mitochondrial mass and, in particular, a lower mitochondrial activity compared to non-SP cells, while they exhibited a similar level of glucose incorporation. These results provided evidence that SP cells from SSPB displayed properties of very primitive cells and HSC, thus rendering them an interesting model for research and cell therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Catalase inhibits ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xia; Luo, Hongmei; Vanek, Kenneth N; LaRue, Amanda C; Schulte, Bradley A; Wang, Gavin Y

    2015-06-01

    Hematologic toxicity is a major cause of mortality in radiation emergency scenarios and a primary side effect concern in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Therefore, there is a critical need for the development of novel and more effective approaches to manage this side effect. Catalase is a potent antioxidant enzyme that coverts hydrogen peroxide into hydrogen and water. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of catalase as a protectant against ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results revealed that catalase treatment markedly inhibits IR-induced apoptosis in murine hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Subsequent colony-forming cell and cobble-stone area-forming cell assays showed that catalase-treated HSPCs can not only survive irradiation-induced apoptosis but also have higher clonogenic capacity, compared with vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, transplantation of catalase-treated irradiated HSPCs results in high levels of multi-lineage and long-term engraftments, whereas vehicle-treated irradiated HSPCs exhibit very limited hematopoiesis reconstituting capacity. Mechanistically, catalase treatment attenuates IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and inhibits reactive oxygen species. Unexpectedly, we found that the radioprotective effect of catalase is associated with activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 abolishes the protective activity of catalase, suggesting that catalase may protect HSPCs against IR-induced toxicity via promoting STAT3 activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which catalase inhibits IR-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in HSPCs.

  8. Oral or parenteral administration of curcumin does not prevent the growth of high-risk t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells engrafted into a NOD/SCID mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of orally and parenterally administered curcumin was evaluated in NOD.CB17-Prkdcscid/J mice engrafted with the human t(4;11) acute lymphoblastic leukemia line SEM. SEM cells were injected into the tail vein and engraftment was monitored by flow cytometry. Once engraftment was observed...

  9. Implantation of healthy matrix-embedded endothelial cells rescues dysfunctional endothelium and ischaemic tissue in liver engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Balcells, Mercedes; Edelman, Elazer R

    2017-07-01

    Liver transplantation is limited by ischaemic injury which promotes endothelial cell and hepatocyte dysfunction and eventually organ failure. We sought to understand how endothelial state determines liver recovery after hepatectomy and engraftment. Matrix-embedded endothelial cells (MEECs) with retained healthy phenotype or control acellular matrices were implanted in direct contact with the remaining median lobe of donor mice undergoing partial hepatectomy (70%), or in the interface between the remaining median lobe and an autograft or isograft from the left lobe in hepatectomised recipient mice. Hepatic vascular architecture, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in the median lobe and grafts, serum markers of liver damage and phenotype of macrophage and lymphocyte subsets in the liver after engraftment were analysed 7 days post-op. Healthy MEECs create a functional vascular splice in donor and recipient liver after 70% hepatectomy in mouse protecting these livers from ischaemic injury, hepatic congestion and inflammation. Macrophages recruited adjacent to the vascular nodes into the implants switched to an anti-inflammatory and regenerative profile M2. MEECs improved liver function and the rate of liver regeneration and prevented apoptosis in donor liver lobes, autologous grafts and syngeneic engraftment. Implants with healthy endothelial cells rescue liver donor and recipient endothelium and parenchyma from ischaemic injury after major hepatectomy and engraftment. This study highlights endothelial-hepatocyte crosstalk in hepatic repair and provides a promising new approach to improve regenerative medicine outcomes and liver transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Human Placenta Is a Potent Hematopoietic Niche Containing Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells throughout Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Robin (Catherine); K. Bollerot (Karine); S.C. Mendes (Sandra); E. Haak (Esther); M. Crisan (Mihaela); F. Cerisoli (Francesco); I. Lauw (Ivoune); P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); M. Vermeulen (Mark); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); R. van der Linden (Reinier); P. Imanirad (Parisa); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); H. Nawaz-Yousaf (Humaira); N. Papazian (Natalie); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); T. Cupedo (Tom); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this

  11. Gab2 promotes hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and self-renewal synergistically with STAT5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geqiang Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Grb2-associated binding (Gab adapter proteins play major roles in coordinating signaling downstream of hematopoietic cytokine receptors. In hematopoietic cells, Gab2 can modulate phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and mitogen associated protein kinase activities and regulate the long-term multilineage competitive repopulating activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Gab2 may also act in a linear pathway upstream or downstream of signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT5, a major positive regulator of HSC function. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Gab2 and STAT5 function in hematopoiesis in a redundant or non-redundant manner.To do this we generated Gab2 mutant mice with heterozygous and homozygous deletions of STAT5. In heterozygous STAT5 mutant mice, deficiencies in HSC/multipotent progenitors were reflected by decreased long-term repopulating activity. This reduction in repopulation function was mirrored in the reduced growth response to early-acting cytokines from sorted double mutant c-Kit(+Lin(-Sca-1(+ (KLS cells. Importantly, in non-ablated newborn mice, the host steady-state engraftment ability was impaired by loss of Gab2 in heterozygous STAT5 mutant background. Fetal liver cells isolated from homozygous STAT5 mutant mice lacking Gab2 showed significant reduction in HSC number (KLS CD150(+CD48(-, reduced HSC survival, and dramatic loss of self-renewal potential as measured by serial transplantation.These data demonstrate new functions for Gab2 in hematopoiesis in a manner that is non-redundant with STAT5. Furthermore, important synergy between STAT5 and Gab2 was observed in HSC self-renewal, which might be exploited to optimize stem cell-based therapeutics.

  12. Regulated apoptosis of genetically modified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells via an inducible caspase-9 suicide gene in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barese, Cecilia N; Felizardo, Tania C; Sellers, Stephanie E; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Di Stasi, Antonio; Metzger, Mark E; Krouse, Allen E; Donahue, Robert E; Spencer, David M; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2015-01-01

    The high risk of insertional oncogenesis reported in clinical trials using integrating retroviral vectors to genetically modify hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) requires the development of safety strategies to minimize risks associated with novel cell and gene therapies. The ability to ablate genetically modified cells in vivo is desirable, should an abnormal clone emerge. Inclusion of "suicide genes" in vectors to facilitate targeted ablation of vector-containing abnormal clones in vivo is one potential safety approach. We tested whether the inclusion of the "inducible Caspase-9" (iCasp9) suicide gene in a gamma-retroviral vector facilitated efficient elimination of vector-containing HSPCs and their hematopoietic progeny in vivo long-term, in an autologous non-human primate transplantation model. Following stable engraftment of iCasp9 expressing hematopoietic cells in rhesus macaques, administration of AP1903, a chemical inducer of dimerization able to activate iCasp9, specifically eliminated vector-containing cells in all hematopoietic lineages long-term, suggesting activity at the HSPC level. Between 75% and 94% of vector-containing cells were eliminated by well-tolerated AP1903 dosing, but lack of complete ablation was linked to lower iCasp9 expression in residual cells. Further investigation of resistance mechanisms demonstrated upregulation of Bcl-2 in hematopoietic cell lines transduced with the vector and resistant to AP1903 ablation. These results demonstrate both the potential and the limitations of safety approaches using iCasp9 to HSPC-targeted gene therapy settings, in a model with great relevance to clinical development. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  14. Increasing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Yield to Develop Mice with Human Immune Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos Biancotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are unique in their capacity to give rise to all mature cells of the immune system. For years, HSC transplantation has been used for treatment of genetic and neoplastic diseases of the hematopoietic and immune systems. The sourcing of HSCs from human umbilical cord blood has salient advantages over isolation from mobilized peripheral blood. However, poor sample yield has prompted development of methodologies to expand HSCs ex vivo. Cytokines, trophic factors, and small molecules have been variously used to promote survival and proliferation of HSCs in culture, whilst strategies to lower the concentration of inhibitors in the culture media have recently been applied to promote HSC expansion. In this paper, we outline strategies to expand HSCs in vitro, and to improve engraftment and reconstitution of human immune systems in immunocompromised mice. To the extent that these “humanized” mice are representative of the endogenous human immune system, they will be invaluable tools for both basic science and translational medicine.

  15. Human peripheral blood leukocyte engraftment into SCID mice: critical role of CD4(+) T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchosal, M. A.; Mauray, S.; Rüegg, M.; Trouillet, P.; Vallet, V.; Aarden, L.; Tissot, J. D.; Schapira, M.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the influence of donor T lymphocytes on human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) engraftment into severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. Mice were injected with unfractionated or subset-depleted human PBL, and treated at various times with OKT3, a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody

  16. CCR1 plays a critical role in modulating pain through hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuruddeen D Lewis

    Full Text Available Inflammation is associated with immune cells infiltrating into the inflammatory site and pain. CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1 mediates trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. However, the contribution of CCR1 to pain is incompletely understood. Here we report an unexpected discovery that CCR1-mediated trafficking of neutrophils and CCR1 activity on non-hematopoietic cells both modulate pain. Using a genetic approach (CCR1-/- animals and pharmacological inhibition of CCR1 with selective inhibitors, we show significant reductions in pain responses using the acetic acid-induced writhing and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced mechanical hyperalgesia models. Reductions in writhing correlated with reduced trafficking of myeloid cells into the peritoneal cavity. We show that CCR1 is highly expressed on circulating neutrophils and their depletion decreases acetic acid-induced writhing. However, administration of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity did not enhance acetic acid-induced writhing in wild-type (WT or CCR1-/- mice. Additionally, selective knockout of CCR1 in either the hematopoietic or non-hematopoietic compartments also reduced writhing. Together these data suggest that CCR1 functions to significantly modulate pain by controlling neutrophil trafficking to the inflammatory site and having an unexpected role on non-hematopoietic cells. As inflammatory diseases are often accompanied with infiltrating immune cells at the inflammatory site and pain, CCR1 antagonism may provide a dual benefit by restricting leukocyte trafficking and reducing pain.

  17. Infrared fluorescent protein 1.4 genetic labeling tracks engrafted cardiac progenitor cells in mouse ischemic hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Chen

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has a potential for regenerating damaged myocardium. However, a key obstacle to cell therapy's success is the loss of engrafted cells due to apoptosis or necrosis in the ischemic myocardium. While many strategies have been developed to improve engrafted cell survival, tools to evaluate cell efficacy within the body are limited. Traditional genetic labeling tools, such as GFP-like fluorescent proteins (eGFP, DsRed, mCherry, have limited penetration depths in vivo due to tissue scattering and absorption. To circumvent these limitations, a near-infrared fluorescent mutant of the DrBphP bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans, IFP1.4, was developed for in vivo imaging, but it has yet to be used for in vivo stem/progenitor cell tracking. In this study, we incorporated IFP1.4 into mouse cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs by a lentiviral vector. Live IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were imaged by their near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF using an Odyssey scanner following overnight incubation with biliverdin. A significant linear correlation was observed between the amount of cells and NIRF signal intensity in in vitro studies. Lentiviral mediated IFP1.4 gene labeling is stable, and does not impact the apoptosis and cardiac differentiation of CPC. To assess efficacy of our model for engrafted cells in vivo, IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were intramyocardially injected into infarcted hearts. NIRF signals were collected at 1-day, 7-days, and 14-days post-injection using the Kodak in vivo multispectral imaging system. Strong NIRF signals from engrafted cells were imaged 1 day after injection. At 1 week after injection, 70% of the NIRF signal was lost when compared to the intensity of the day 1 signal. The data collected 2 weeks following transplantation showed an 88% decrease when compared to day 1. Our studies have shown that IFP1.4 gene labeling can be used to track the viability of transplanted cells in vivo.

  18. Multiple myeloma–related deregulation of bone marrow–derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadeddu, Ron-Patrick; Brueckmann, Ines; Fröbel, Julia; Geyh, Stefanie; Büst, Sebastian; Fischer, Johannes C.; Roels, Frederik; Wilk, Christian Matthias; Schildberg, Frank A.; Hünerlitürkoglu, Ali-Nuri; Zilkens, Christoph; Jäger, Marcus; Steidl, Ulrich; Zohren, Fabian; Fenk, Roland; Kobbe, Guido; Brors, Benedict; Czibere, Akos; Schroeder, Thomas; Trumpp, Andreas; Haas, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal plasma cell disorder frequently accompanied by hematopoietic impairment. We show that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), in particular megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors, are diminished in the BM of MM patients. Genomic profiling of HSPC subsets revealed deregulations of signaling cascades, most notably TGFβ signaling, and pathways involved in cytoskeletal organization, migration, adhesion, and cell-cycle regulation in the patients. Functionally, proliferation, colony formation, and long-term self-renewal were impaired as a consequence of activated TGFβ signaling. In accordance, TGFβ levels in the BM extracellular fluid were elevated and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) had a reduced capacity to support long-term hematopoiesis of HSPCs that completely recovered on blockade of TGFβ signaling. Furthermore, we found defective actin assembly and down-regulation of the adhesion receptor CD44 in MM HSPCs functionally reflected by impaired migration and adhesion. Still, transplantation into myeloma-free NOG mice revealed even enhanced engraftment and normal differentiation capacities of MM HSPCs, which underlines that functional impairment of HSPCs depends on MM-related microenvironmental cues and is reversible. Taken together, these data implicate that hematopoietic suppression in MM emerges from the HSPCs as a result of MM-related microenvironmental alterations. PMID:22517906

  19. Multiple myeloma-related deregulation of bone marrow-derived CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Ingmar; Cadeddu, Ron-Patrick; Brueckmann, Ines; Fröbel, Julia; Geyh, Stefanie; Büst, Sebastian; Fischer, Johannes C; Roels, Frederik; Wilk, Christian Matthias; Schildberg, Frank A; Hünerlitürkoglu, Ali-Nuri; Zilkens, Christoph; Jäger, Marcus; Steidl, Ulrich; Zohren, Fabian; Fenk, Roland; Kobbe, Guido; Brors, Benedict; Czibere, Akos; Schroeder, Thomas; Trumpp, Andreas; Haas, Rainer

    2012-09-27

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal plasma cell disorder frequently accompanied by hematopoietic impairment. We show that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), in particular megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors, are diminished in the BM of MM patients. Genomic profiling of HSPC subsets revealed deregulations of signaling cascades, most notably TGFβ signaling, and pathways involved in cytoskeletal organization, migration, adhesion, and cell-cycle regulation in the patients. Functionally, proliferation, colony formation, and long-term self-renewal were impaired as a consequence of activated TGFβ signaling. In accordance, TGFβ levels in the BM extracellular fluid were elevated and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) had a reduced capacity to support long-term hematopoiesis of HSPCs that completely recovered on blockade of TGFβ signaling. Furthermore, we found defective actin assembly and down-regulation of the adhesion receptor CD44 in MM HSPCs functionally reflected by impaired migration and adhesion. Still, transplantation into myeloma-free NOG mice revealed even enhanced engraftment and normal differentiation capacities of MM HSPCs, which underlines that functional impairment of HSPCs depends on MM-related microenvironmental cues and is reversible. Taken together, these data implicate that hematopoietic suppression in MM emerges from the HSPCs as a result of MM-related microenvironmental alterations.

  20. CD56 expression in normal immature granulocytes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Kazuo; Fujiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Tatara, Raine; Sugimoto, Miyuki; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Uehara, Eisuke; Meguro, Akiko; Hatano, Kaoru; Okazuka, Kiyoshi; Oh, Iekuni; Ohmine, Ken; Suzuki, Takahiro; Mori, Masaki; Nagai, Tadashi; Ozawa, Keiya

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells from 93 patients with hematological malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) were analyzed using flow cytometry (FCM). The disease was acute myeloblastic leukemia (50 patients), acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and others. Conditioning was myeloablative (80 patients) or reduced intensity. The stem cell source was bone marrow (75 patients), peripheral blood stem cells, or cord blood. After AHSCT, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was given to all patients. All patients showed engraftment of the donor cells. FCM was conducted on a median of 22 days after AHSCT. The gate was set around a granulocytic region consisting of immature granulocytes. The positivity rates of CD13, CD14, CD15, CD33, CD34, CD56, and HLA-DR in the cells were 59.9 ± 27.4%, 5.8 ± 8.8%, 98.3 ± 1.9%, 92.3 ± 12.4%, 2.6 ± 5.8%, 24.3 ± 16.7%, and 9.1 ± 6.6%, respectively. The greatest value of CD56 positivity was 73.1%. On the basis of CD56 expression, cases of more than 24% CD56 positivity were assigned to the CD56-high group (39 patients), while the rest were assigned to the CD56-low/negative group. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of disease status, sex, donor, hematopoietic stem cells, days of FCM analysis, or peripheral blood cell counts around the days of performing FCM. These results indicate that CD56 can be expressed in normal immature granulocytes at a variety of expression levels in regenerative bone marrow. Attention should be paid when evaluating aberrant antigen expression of CD56 in granulocytes.

  1. Melanoma Stem Cells and Metastasis: Mimicking Hematopoietic Cell Trafficking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nayoung; Barthel, Steven R.; Schatton, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a highly metastatic cancer that bears responsibility for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Amidst the research efforts to better understand melanoma progression, there has been increasing evidence that hints at a role for a subpopulation of virulent cancer cells, termed malignant melanoma stem or initiating cells (MMICs), in metastasis formation. MMICs are characterized by their preferential ability to initiate and propagate tumor growth and their selective capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into less tumorigenic melanoma cells. The frequency of MMICs has been shown to correlate with poor clinical prognosis in melanoma. Additionally, MMICs are enriched among circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, suggesting that MMICs may be a critical player in the metastatic cascade. Although these links exist between MMICs and metastatic disease, the mechanisms by which MMICs may advance metastatic progression are only beginning to be elucidated. Recent studies have shown that MMICs express molecules critical for hematopoietic cell maintenance and trafficking, providing a possible explanation for how circulating MMICs could drive melanoma dissemination. We therefore propose that MMICs might fuel melanoma metastasis by exploiting homing mechanisms commonly utilized by hematopoietic cells. Here we review the biological properties of MMICs and the existing literature on their metastatic potential. We will discuss possible mechanisms by which MMICs might initiate metastases in the context of established knowledge of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in other cancers and of hematopoietic homing molecules, with a particular focus on selectins, integrins, chemokines, and chemokine receptors known to be expressed by melanoma cells. Biological understanding of how these molecules might be utilized by MMICs to propel the metastatic cascade could critically impact the development of more effective therapies for advanced

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekadja, Mohamed Amine; Brahimi, Mohamed; Osmani, Soufi; Yafour, Nabil; Krim, Amina; Serradj, Faiza; Talhi, Souad; Amani, Kamila; Bouhass, Rachid Amar

    2017-07-11

    Algeria is a country of 40.4 million inhabitants and half of which is under 30years. In Algeria, Health-care insurance covered, 90% of the population. Health care is free and it is supported by the Ministry of Health. 16 university hospitals exist in Algeria and only two (Algiers and Oran) practicing bone marrow transplant. Adult hematologic malignancies account for 10% (about 4000 new cases/year) of the malignancy affecting in most cases young patients under 65years of age. In 2016, 270 transplants were performed in total (Algiers+Oran), including 149 allografts (related donor transplants: 99%) and 121 autografts. 98% of transplants are done in adults and only 2% in children with cord blood transplants. In summary for the two transplant centers, the predominant types of transplantation performed are allogeneic transplant in 55% and autologous transplant in 45%. The particularity of EHU1st November in Oran, is the use of non-cryopreserved stem cells. Stem cell was mobilized using G-CSF alone and the grafts were kept in a conventional blood bank refrigerator at +4°C until reinfusion on day 0. The outcome with non-cryopreserved stem cells are the same as those with cryopreserved stem cells and we conclude that autologous transplant with non cryopreserved hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is a simple, effective and safe method and the cryopreservation is not necessary in our work conditions in developing countries. The projects are achieving the autograft in all University Hospitals with non cryopreserved HSC, achieving a center allograft in the east of the country and the development of bone marrow transplantation in children. Currently in Algeria, the number of transplantation is insufficient and the development of new transplant centers is essential. In the future, we hope to implement the National Society of Bone Marrow transplant and also the National recipient registry and Donor registry in Algeria. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research

  3. JAK2V617F expression in mice amplifies early hematopoietic cells and gives them a competitive advantage that is hampered by IFNα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Salma; Lacout, Catherine; Marty, Caroline; Cuingnet, Marie; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Villeval, Jean-Luc

    2013-08-22

    The acquired gain-of-function V617F mutation in the Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2(V617F)) is the main mutation involved in BCR/ABL-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), but its effect on hematopoietic stem cells as a driver of disease emergence has been questioned. Therefore, we reinvestigated the role of endogenous expression of JAK2(V617F) on early steps of hematopoiesis as well as the effect of interferon-α (IFNα), which may target the JAK2(V617F) clone in humans by using knock-in mice with conditional expression of JAK2(V617F) in hematopoietic cells. These mice develop a MPN mimicking polycythemia vera with large amplification of myeloid mature and precursor cells, displaying erythroid endogenous growth and progressing to myelofibrosis. Interestingly, early hematopoietic compartments [Lin-, LSK, and SLAM (LSK/CD48-/CD150+)] increased with the age. Competitive repopulation assays demonstrated disease appearance and progressive overgrowth of myeloid, Lin-, LSK, and SLAM cells, but not lymphocytes, from a low number of engrafted JAK2(V617F) SLAM cells. Finally, IFNα treatment prevented disease development by specifically inhibiting JAK2(V617F) cells at an early stage of differentiation and eradicating disease-initiating cells. This study shows that JAK2(V617F) in mice amplifies not only late but also early hematopoietic cells, giving them a proliferative advantage through high cell cycling and low apoptosis that may sustain MPN emergence but is lost upon IFNα treatment.

  4. Strength Training Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Larson, Janet; Kujath, Amber; Peace, David; Rondelli, Damiano; Gaston, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Interventions/Methods Nineteen subjects were randomized to the exercise or control group. Moderate intensity strength training began following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Results Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, the trends suggest that the exercise group may be more physically active following the intervention compared to the usual activity group. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential positive effects of strength training on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life in people receiving high-dose chemotherapy and HSCT. Implications for Practice Preliminary evidence is provided for using strength training to enhance early recovery following HSCT. Elastic resistance bands are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. PMID:21116175

  5. Retinoic acid regulates hematopoietic development from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönn, Roger E; Guibentif, Carolina; Moraghebi, Roksana; Chaves, Patricia; Saxena, Shobhit; Garcia, Bradley; Woods, Niels-Bjarne

    2015-02-10

    The functions of retinoic acid (RA), a potent morphogen with crucial roles in embryogenesis including developmental hematopoiesis, have not been thoroughly investigated in the human setting. Using an in vitro model of human hematopoietic development, we evaluated the effects of RA signaling on the development of blood and on generated hematopoietic progenitors. Decreased RA signaling increases the generation of cells with a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like phenotype, capable of differentiation into myeloid and lymphoid lineages, through two separate mechanisms: by increasing the commitment of pluripotent stem cells toward the hematopoietic lineage during the developmental process and by decreasing the differentiation of generated blood progenitors. Our results demonstrate that controlled low-level RA signaling is a requirement in human blood development, and we propose a new interpretation of RA as a regulatory factor, where appropriate control of RA signaling enables increased generation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from pluripotent stem cells in vitro. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Karin [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden); Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Grawé, Jan [Department of Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 75185 (Sweden); McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L. [Department of Hematology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105 (United States); Daley, George Q. [HHMI, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Welsh, Michael, E-mail: michael.welsh@mcb.uu.se [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala 751 23 (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via

  7. Characterization, isolation, and differentiation of murine skin cells expressing hematopoietic stem cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Simone; Schmidt, Uwe; Vaculik, Christine; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2006-10-01

    As the phenotype of adult dermal stem cells is still elusive, and the hematopoietic stem cell is one of the best-characterized stem cells in the body, we tested dermal cell suspensions, sections, and wholemounts in newborn and adult mice for hematopoietic stem cell marker expression. Phenotypic analysis revealed that a small population of CD45(+) cells and a large population of CD45(-) cells expressed CD34, CD117, and stem cell antigen-1 molecules. When cultivated in selected media supplemented with hematopoietic cytokines, total dermal cells, lineage(-), and/or highly enriched phenotypically defined cell subsets produced hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic colonies. When injected into lethally irradiated recipient mice, a small percentage of newborn dermal cells was able to migrate into hematopoietic tissues and the skin and survived through the 11-month monitoring period. Our ability to isolate a candidate autologous stem cell pool will make these cells ideal vehicles for genetic manipulation and gene therapy.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem cell transplantation and lentiviral vector-based gene therapy for Krabbe's disease: Present convictions and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Scesa, Giuseppe; Bi, Yanmin; Pan, Dao; Moore, Dominic; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Sands, Mark S; Miller, Ryan; Kafri, Tal

    2016-11-01

    Currently, presymtomatic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation (HSPCT) is the only therapeutic modality that alleviates Krabbe's disease (KD)-induced central nervous system damage. However, all HSPCT-treated patients exhibit severe deterioration in peripheral nervous system function characterized by major motor and expressive language pathologies. We hypothesize that a combination of several mechanisms contribute to this phenomenon, including 1) nonoptimal conditioning protocols with consequent inefficient engraftment and biodistribution of donor-derived cells and 2) insufficient uptake of donor cell-secreted galactocerebrosidease (GALC) secondary to a naturally low expression level of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate-receptor (CI-MPR). We have characterized the effects of a busulfan (Bu) based conditioning regimen on the efficacy of HSPCT in prolonging twi mouse average life span. There was no correlation between the efficiency of bone marrow engraftment of donor cells and twi mouse average life span. HSPCT prolonged the average life span of twi mice, which directly correlated with the aggressiveness of the Bu-mediated conditioning protocols. HSPC transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying the GALC cDNA under control of cell-specific promoters were efficiently engrafted in twi mouse bone marrow. To facilitate HSPCT-mediated correction of GALC deficiency in target cells expressing low levels of CI-MPR, a novel GALC fusion protein including the ApoE1 receptor was developed. Efficient cellular uptake of the novel fusion protein was mediated by a mannose-6-phosphate-independent mechanism. The novel findings described here elucidate some of the cellular mechanisms that impede the cure of KD patients by HSPCT and concomitantly open new directions to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of HSPCT protocols for KD. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroscience

  9. Amniotic mesenchymal stem cells enhance wound healing in diabetic NOD/SCID mice through high angiogenic and engraftment capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Whan; Zhang, Hong-Zhe; Guo, Longzhe; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Moo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Although human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (AMMs) have been recognised as a promising stem cell resource, their therapeutic potential for wound healing has not been widely investigated. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of AMMs using a diabetic mouse wound model. Quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA results revealed that the angiogenic factors, IGF-1, EGF and IL-8 were markedly upregulated in AMMs when compared with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMs) and dermal fibroblasts. In vitro scratch wound assays also showed that AMM-derived conditioned media (CM) significantly accelerated wound closure. Diabetic mice were generated using streptozotocin and wounds were created by skin excision, followed by AMM transplantation. AMM transplantation significantly promoted wound healing and increased re-epithelialization and cellularity. Notably, transplanted AMMs exhibited high engraftment rates and expressed keratinocyte-specific proteins and cytokeratin in the wound area, indicating a direct contribution to cutaneous closure. Taken together, these data suggest that AMMs possess considerable therapeutic potential for chronic wounds through the secretion of angiogenic factors and enhanced engraftment/differentiation capabilities.

  10. Phenotypic and Functional Changes Induced in Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells After Gamma-Ray Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonnet, A.J.; Nehme, J.; Leboulch, Ph.; Tronik-Le Roux, D. [Institute of Emerging Diseases and Innovative Therapies, Functional Bioengineering Laboratory, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Evry (France); Simonnet, A.J.; Nehme, J.; Leboulch, Ph.; Tronik-Le Roux, D. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) U733 (Unite Mixte de Recherche) - UMR INSERM CEA Paris XI (France); Vaigot, P. [Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Genetic Instability, Recombination and Repair, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Vaigot, P. [UMR 217, UMR-CEA-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (France); Barroca, V. [Laboratory of Gametogenesis, Apoptosis, Genotoxicity, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Biology, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Barroca, V. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale U566 - UMR INSERM-CEA-PARIS VII (France); Leboulch, Ph. [Genetics Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (US)

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure causes rapid and acute bone marrow (BM) suppression that is reversible for nonlethal doses. Evidence is accumulating that IR can also provoke long-lasting residual hematopoietic injury. To better understand these effects, we analyzed phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartment of irradiated mice over a 10-week period. We found that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) identified by their repopulating ability continued to segregate within the Hoechst dye excluding 'side population (SP)' early after IR exposure. However, transient phenotypic changes were observed within this cell population: Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels were increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SPSK cells positive for established indicators of the presence of HSCs: CD150 and CD105. Ten weeks after IR exposure, expression of Sca-1 and c-Kit at the SP cell surface returned to control levels, and BM cellularity of irradiated mice was restored. However, the c-Kit{sup +}Sca-1{sup +}Lin{sup -/low} (KSL) stem/progenitor compartment displayed major phenotypic modifications, including an increase and a severe decrease in the frequencies of CD150{sup +}Flk2{sup -} and CD150{sup -}Flk2{sup +} cells, respectively. CD150{sup +} KSL cells also showed impaired reconstituting ability, an increased tendency to apoptosis, and accrued DNA damage. Finally, 15 weeks after exposure, irradiated mice, but not age matched controls, allowed engraftment and significant hematopoietic contribution from transplanted con-genic HSCs without additional host conditioning. These results provide novel insight in our understanding of immediate and delayed IR-induced hematopoietic injury and highlight similarities between HSCs of young irradiated and old mice. (authors)

  11. Comprehensive Screening of Cell Surface Markers Expressed by Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells Harvested at Passage 5: Potential Implications for Engraftment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Edouard Dollet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are known to have potential therapeutic benefits for a number of diseases. However, many studies report low engraftment levels, regardless of the target organ. One possible explanation could be that MSCs do not express the necessary receptors for engraftment. Indeed, MSCs appear to use a similar mechanism to leukocytes to engraft into injured organs, relying on various receptors for rolling, firm adhesion, and transmigration. In this study, we conducted an extensive surface molecule screening of adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSC in an attempt to shed some light on this subject. We observed that ADHLSCs lack expression of most of the costimulatory molecules tested. Furthermore, study of the adhesion molecule profile of ADHLSCs revealed that they do not express selectin ligands or LFA-1 which are, respectively, involved in the rolling process and the firm adhesion. In addition, ADHLSCs slightly express VLA-4 and lose expression of CXCR4 altogether on their surface during culture expansion. However, ADHLSCs express all the integrin couples and matrix metalloproteinases needed to bind and integrate the extracellular matrix once the endothelial barrier is crossed. Collectively, these results suggest that binding to the endothelium may be the critical weak point in the engraftment process.

  12. Immunophenotype of hematopoietic stem cells from placental/umbilical cord blood after culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pranke

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification and enumeration of human hematopoietic stem cells remain problematic, since in vitro and in vivo stem cell assays have different outcomes. We determined if the altered expression of adhesion molecules during stem cell expansion could be a reason for the discrepancy. CD34+CD38- and CD34+CD38+ cells from umbilical cord blood were analyzed before and after culture with thrombopoietin (TPO, FLT-3 ligand (FL and kit ligand (KL; or stem cell factor in different combinations: TPO + FL + KL, TPO + FL and TPO, at concentrations of 50 ng/mL each. Cells were immunophenotyped by four-color fluorescence using antibodies against CD11c, CD31, CD49e, CD61, CD62L, CD117, and HLA-DR. Low-density cord blood contained 1.4 ± 0.9% CD34+ cells, 2.6 ± 2.1% of which were CD38-negative. CD34+ cells were isolated using immuno-magnetic beads and cultured for up to 7 days. The TPO + FL + KL combination presented the best condition for maintenance of stem cells. The total cell number increased 4.3 ± 1.8-fold, but the number of viable CD34+ cells decreased by 46 ± 25%. On the other hand, the fraction of CD34+CD38- cells became 52.0 ± 29% of all CD34+ cells. The absolute number of CD34+CD38- cells was expanded on average 15 ± 12-fold when CD34+ cells were cultured with TPO + FL + KL for 7 days. The expression of CD62L, HLA-DR and CD117 was modulated after culture, particularly with TPO + FL + KL, explaining differences between the adhesion and engraftment of primary and cultured candidate stem cells. We conclude that culture of CD34+ cells with TPO + FL + KL results in a significant increase in the number of candidate stem cells with the CD34+CD38- phenotype.

  13. Prospective, comprehensive, and effective viral monitoring in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberger, S; Meisel, R; Adams, O; Pufal, Y; Laws, H J; Enczmann, J; Dilloo, D

    2010-10-01

    Major advances in the monitoring and treatment of viral infections after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have been achieved over the last decade. The appropriate extent of viral monitoring and antiviral therapy remains controversial, and reports in pediatric patients receiving allogeneic unmanipulated hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are sparse. A total of 40 pediatric patients who underwent HSCT with either peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs, n = 30) or bone marrow (BM; n = 10) were prospectively monitored every week for viral DNAemia (VDNA) by simultaneous detection of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6 (HHV6), human adenovirus (ADV), and polyoma BK virus (BKV) using real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All patients received prophylactic acyclovir and preemptive ganciclovir (GCV) when 500 copies/microg DNA (EBV/HHV6) or >1 copy/microg DNA (CMV) were detected on 2 consecutive measurements. VDNA occurred in 25 of 40 recipients (CMV, 11/40 patients [28%]; EBV, 19/40 [48%]; HHV6, 2/40 [5%]; ADV/BKV, 1/40) and was found exclusively after neutrophil engraftment and in most cases up to day +100. Recurrent VDNA (P = .028) and (readily treatable) viral disease (P = .003) were observed predominantly in patients suffering from nonmalignant diseases, a cohort characterized by delayed lymphocyte engraftment. VDNA occurred more frequently in HLA-mismatched HSCT and in the 24 of 40 patients receiving antithymocyte globulin (ATG). The incidence of EBV, but not that of CMV, was increased in the ATG group. Yet, in these patients, viral loads of both EBV and CMV were higher, but with prompt initiation of preemptive GCV, no posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder or other life-threatening morbidities occurred. HHV6 was typically detected at low viral loads (stem cell source, but not severe acute graft-versus-host disease were identified as independent risk factors for VDNA. This comprehensive viral monitoring

  14. Engraftment potential of adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells after transplantation in the fetal rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Moreno, Rafael; Petriz, Jordi; Gratacós, Eduard; Aran, Josep M

    2012-12-10

    Due to their favorable intrinsic features, including engraftment, differentiation, and immunomodulatory potential, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed for therapeutic in utero intervention. Further improvement of such attributes for particular diseases might merely be achieved by ex vivo MSC genetic engineering previous to transplantation. Here, we evaluated for the first time the feasibility, biodistribution, long-term engraftment, and transgenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression of genetically engineered human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (EGFP(+)-ASCs) after intra-amniotic xenotransplantation at E17 of gestation into our validated pregnant rabbit model. Overall, the procedure was safe (86.4% survival rate; absence of anatomical defects). Stable, low-level engraftment of EGFP(+)-ASCs was confirmed by assessing the presence of the pWT-EGFP lentiviral provirus in the young transplanted rabbit tissues. Accordingly, similar frequencies of provirus-positive animals were found at both 8 weeks (60%) and 16 weeks (66.7%) after in utero intervention. The presence of EGFP(+)-ASCs was more frequent in respiratory epithelia (lung and trachea), according to the route of administration. However, we were unable to detect EGFP expression, neither by real-time polymerase chain reaction nor by immunohistochemistry, in the provirus-positive tissues, suggesting EGFP transgene silencing mediated by epigenetic events. Moreover, we noticed lack of both host cellular immune responses against xenogeneic ASCs and humoral immune responses against transgenic EGFP. Therefore, the fetal microchimerism achieved by the EGFP(+)-ASCs in the young rabbit hosts indicates induction of donor-specific tolerance after fetal rabbit xenotransplantation, which should boost postnatal transplantation for the early treatment/prevention of many devastating congenital disorders.

  15. Colony forming cell (CFC) assay for human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Nayan J; Takeda, Akiko; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-12-18

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells are usually obtained from bone marrow, cord blood, or peripheral blood and are used to study hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis. They have the capacity to differentiate into lymphoid and myeloid lineages. The colony forming cell (CFC) assay is used to study the proliferation and differentiation pattern of hematopoietic progenitors by their ability to form colonies in a semisolid medium. The number and the morphology of the colonies formed by a fixed number of input cells provide preliminary information about the ability of progenitors to differentiate and proliferate. Cells can be harvested from individual colonies or from the whole plate to further assess their numbers and differentiation states using flow cytometry and morphologic evaluation of Giemsa-stained slides. This assay is useful for assessing myeloid but not lymphoid differentiation. The term myeloid in this context is used in its wider sense to encompass granulocytic, monocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocytic lineages. We have used this assay to assess the effects of oncogenes on the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells derived from peripheral blood. For this purpose cells are transduced with either control retroviral construct or a construct expressing the oncogene of interest, in this case NUP98-HOXA9. We employ a commonly used retroviral vector, MSCV-IRES-GFP, that expresses a bicistronic mRNA that produces the gene of interest and a GFP marker. Cells are pre-activated by growing in the presence of cytokines for two days prior to retroviral transduction. After another two days, GFP+ cells are isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and mixed with a methylcellulose-containing semisolid medium supplemented with cytokines and incubated till colonies appear on the surface, typically 14 days. The number and morphology of the colonies are documented. Cells are then removed from the plates, washed, counted, and subjected to flow cytometry and

  16. Tumor stroma engraftment of gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells as anti-tumor therapy against ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Jennifer L; Wilson, Shanna M; Spaeth, Erika L; Studeny, Matus; Zompetta, Claudia; Samudio, Ismael; Roby, Katherine; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank C

    2013-01-01

    Many ovarian cancers originate from ovarian surface epithelium, where they develop from cysts intermixed with stroma. The stromal layer is critical to the progression and survival of the neoplasm and consequently is recruited into the tumor microenvironment. Using both syngeneic mouse tumors (ID8-R) and human xenograft (OVCAR3, SKOV3) tumor models, we first confirmed that intraperitoneally injected circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could target, preferentially engraft and differentiate into α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts, suggesting their role as "reactive stroma" in ovarian carcinoma development and confirming their potential as a targeted delivery vehicle for the intratumoral production of interferon-β (IFN-β). Mice with ovarian carcinomas then received weekly intraperitoneal injections of IFN-β expressing MSCs. Intraperitoneal injections of IFN-β expressing MSCs resulted in complete eradication of tumors in 70% of treated OVCAR3 mice (P = 0.004) and an increased survival of treated SKOV3 mice compared with controls (P = 0.01). Similar tumor growth control was observed using murine IFN-β delivered by murine MSCs in ID8-R ovarian carcinoma. As a potential mechanism of tumor killing, MSCs produced IFN-β-induced caspase-dependent tumor cell apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that ovarian carcinoma engrafts MSCs to participate in myofibrovascular networks and that IFN-β produced by MSCs intratumorally modulates tumor kinetics, resulting in prolonged survival. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozkan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the only curative therapy for primary immunodeficiency diseases. Early diagnosis, including prenatally, and early transplantation improve HSCT outcomes. Survival rates improve with advances in the methods of preparing hosts and donor cells, and in supportive and conditioning regimes.

  18. [Endothelial origin for hematopoietic stem cells: a visual proof].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisset, Jean-Charles; Robin, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are the source of all blood cell types produced during the entire life of an organism. They appear during embryonic development, where they will transit through different successive hematopoietic organs, before to finally colonize the bone marrow. Nowadays, the precise origin of HSC remains a matter of controversy. Different HSC precursor candidates, located in different anatomical sites, have been proposed. Here, we summarize and discuss the different theories in light of the recent articles, especially those using in vivo confocal microscopy technology. © 2011 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  19. Injectable shear-thinning hydrogels to deliver endothelial progenitor cells, enhance cell engraftment, and improve ischemic myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffey, Ann C.; Chen, Minna H.; Venkataraman, Chantel M.; Trubelja, Alen; Rodell, Christopher B.; Dinh, Patrick V.; Hung, George; MacArthur, John W.; Soopan, Renganaden V.; Burdick, Jason A.; Atluri, Pavan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The clinical translation of cell based therapies for ischemic heart disease has been limited due to low cell retention (myocardial borderzone enables direct cell delivery to address adverse remodeling after myocardial infarction. We hypothesize that this system will enhance vasculogenesis to improve myocardial stabilization in the context of a clinically translatable therapy. METHODS EPCs (DiLDL+ VEGFR2+ CD34+) were harvested from adult male Wistar Rats, cultured, and then suspended in the STG. In vitro viability was quantified using a live-dead stain of EPCs. STG-EPC constructs were injected at the borderzone of ischemic rat myocardium after acute myocardial infarction (left anterior descending coronary artery ligation). The migration of the eGFP+ EPCs from the construct to ischemic myocardium was analyzed using fluorescent microscopy. Vasculogenesis, myocardial remodeling, and hemodynamic function were analyzed in 4 groups: control (PBS injection), intramyocardial injection of EPCs alone (EPC), injection of the STG alone (STG), and treatment with the gel-EPC construct (STG-EPC). Hemodynamics and ventricular geometry were quantified using echocardiography and Doppler flow analysis. RESULTS EPCs demonstrated viability within the STG. A marked increase in EPC engraftment was observed one-week post-injection within the treated myocardium with gel delivery when compared to EPC injection alone (17.2 ± 0.8 cells/HPF vs. 3.5 cells ± 1.3 cells/HPF, p = 0.0002). A statistically significant increase in vasculogenesis was noted with the STG-EPC construct (15.3 ± 5.8 vessels/HPF) when compared to control (p treatment compared to the control. CONCLUSIONS A novel injectable shear-thinning hyaluronic acid hydrogel seeded with EPCs enhanced cell retention and vasculogenesis after delivery to ischemic myocardium. This therapy limited adverse myocardial remodeling while preserving contractility. PMID:26293548

  20. Hematopoietic (stem) cell development — how divergent are the roads taken?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.-L. Kauts (Mari-Liis); C.S. Vink (Chris); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe development of the hematopoietic system during early embryonic stages occurs in spatially and temporally distinct waves. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the most potent and self-renewing cells of this system, are produced in the final ‘definitive’ wave of hematopoietic cell

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  1. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

  2. In Vivo Transplantation of Enteric Neural Crest Cells into Mouse Gut; Engraftment, Functional Integration and Long-Term Safety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Cooper

    Full Text Available Enteric neuropathies are severe gastrointestinal disorders with unsatisfactory outcomes. We aimed to investigate the potential of enteric neural stem cell therapy approaches for such disorders by transplanting mouse enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs into ganglionic and aganglionic mouse gut in vivo and analysing functional integration and long-term safety.Neurospheres generated from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP expressing ENCCs selected from postnatal Wnt1-cre;R26R-YFP/YFP murine gut were transplanted into ganglionic hindgut of wild-type littermates or aganglionic hindgut of Ednrbtm1Ywa mice (lacking functional endothelin receptor type-B. Intestines were then assessed for ENCC integration and differentiation using immunohistochemistry, cell function using calcium imaging, and long-term safety using PCR to detect off-target YFP expression.YFP+ ENCCs engrafted, proliferated and differentiated into enteric neurons and glia within recipient ganglionic gut. Transplanted cells and their projections spread along the endogenous myenteric plexus to form branching networks. Electrical point stimulation of endogenous nerve fibres resulted in calcium transients (F/F0 = 1.16 ± 0.01;43 cells, n = 6 in YFP+ transplanted ENCCs (abolished with TTX. Long-term follow-up (24 months showed transplanted ENCCs did not give rise to tumours or spread to other organs (PCR negative in extraintestinal sites. In aganglionic gut ENCCs similarly spread and differentiated to form neuronal and glial networks with projections closely associated with endogenous neural networks of the transition zone.Transplanted ENCCs successfully engrafted into recipient ganglionic and aganglionic gut showing appropriate spread, localisation and, importantly, functional integration without any long-term safety issues. This study provides key support for the development and use of enteric neural stem cell therapies.

  3. Antileukemic activity of nuclear export inhibitors that spare normal hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchin, J; Sun, Q; Kentsis, A; Farmer, A; Zhang, Z C; Sanda, T; Mansour, M R; Barcelo, C; McCauley, D; Kauffman, M; Shacham, S; Christie, A L; Kung, A L; Rodig, S J; Chook, Y M; Look, A T

    2013-01-01

    Drugs that target the chief mediator of nuclear export, chromosome region maintenance 1 protein (CRM1) have potential as therapeutics for leukemia, but existing CRM1 inhibitors show variable potencies and a broad range of cytotoxic effects. Here, we report the structural analysis and antileukemic activity of a new generation of small-molecule inhibitors of CRM1. Designated selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE), these compounds were developed using molecular modeling to screen a small virtual library of compounds against the nuclear export signal (NES) groove of CRM1. The 2.2-Å crystal structure of the CRM1-Ran-RanBP1 complex bound to KPT-251, a representative molecule of this class of inhibitors, shows that the drug occupies part of the groove in CRM1 that is usually occupied by the NES, but penetrates much deeper into the groove and blocks CRM1-directed protein export. SINE inhibitors exhibit potent antileukemic activity, inducing apoptosis at nanomolar concentrations in a panel of 14 human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines representing different molecular subtypes of the disease. When administered orally to immunodeficient mice engrafted with human AML cells, KPT-251 had potent antileukemic activity with negligible toxicity to normal hematopoietic cells. Thus, KPT-SINE CRM1 antagonists represent a novel class of drugs that warrant further testing in AML patients.

  4. Persistence of donor-derived protein in host myeloid cells after induced rejection of engrafted allogeneic bone marrow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toshiki I.; Fujisaki, Joji; Carlson, Alicia L.; Lin, Charles P.; Sykes, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Objective In recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to treat hematologic malignancies, we have unexpectedly observed anti-tumor effects in association with donor cell rejection in both mice and humans. Host-type CD8 T cells were shown to be required for these anti-tumor effects in the murine model. Since sustained host CD8 T cell activation was observed in the murine bone marrow following the disappearance of donor chimerism in the peripheral blood, we hypothesized that donor antigen presentation in the bone marrow might be prolonged. Materials and Methods To assess this hypothesis, we established mixed chimerism with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive allogeneic bone marrow cells, induced rejection of the donor cells by giving recipient leukocyte infusions (RLI), and utilized in vivo microscopy to follow GFP-positive cells. Results After peripheral donor leukocytes disappeared, GFP persisted within host myeloid cells surrounding the blood vessels in the bone marrow, suggesting that the host myeloid cells captured donor-derived GFP protein. Conclusions Since the host-versus-graft reaction promotes the induction of anti-tumor responses in this model, this retention of donor-derived protein may play a role in the efficacy of RLI as an anti-tumor therapy. PMID:20167247

  5. Human hematopoietic stem cell adherence to cytokines and matrix molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Long, M. W.; Briddell, R.; Walter, A W; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R.

    1992-01-01

    The hematopoietic microenvironment is a complex structure in which stem cells, progenitor cells, stromal cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules each interact to direct the coordinate regulation of blood cell development. While much is known concerning the individual components of this microenvironment, little is understood of the interactions among these various components or, in particular, the nature of those interactions responsible for the regional localization of...

  6. CCND1-CDK4-mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico; Waskow, Claudia

    2015-07-27

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1-CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1-CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1-CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. © 2015 Mende et al.

  7. On signaling pathways: hematopoietic stem cell specification from hemogenic endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yan; Huang, He

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are specified and generated during the embryonic development and have remarkable potential to replenish the full set of blood cell lineages. Researchers have long been interested in clarifying the molecular events involved in HSC specification. Many studies have reported the development of methods for generating functional hematopoietic cells from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs-embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)) for decades. However, the generation of HSCs with robust long-term repopulation potential remains a swingeing challenge, of which a major factor contributing to this failure is the difficulty to define the intraembryonic signals related to the specification of HSCs. Since HSCs directly derive from hemogenic endothelium, in this review, we summarize both in vivo and in vitro studies on conserved signaling pathways that control the specification of HSCs from hemogenic endothelial cells.

  8. Limited transplantation of antigen-expressing hematopoietic stem cells induces long-lasting cytotoxic T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren L Denning

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the ability of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs to recognize and eradicate tumor or pathogen-infected cells is a critical goal of modern immune-based therapies. Although multiple immunization strategies efficiently induce high levels of antigen-specific CTLs, the initial increase is typically followed by a rapid contraction phase resulting in a sharp decline in the frequency of functional CTLs. We describe a novel approach to immunotherapy based on a transplantation of low numbers of antigen-expressing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs following nonmyeloablative or partially myeloablative conditioning. Continuous antigen presentation by a limited number of differentiated transgenic hematopoietic cells results in an induction and prolonged maintenance of fully functional effector T cell responses in a mouse model. Recipient animals display high levels of antigen-specific CTLs four months following transplantation in contrast to dendritic cell-immunized animals in which the response typically declines at 4-6 weeks post-immunization. Majority of HSC-induced antigen-specific CD8+ T cells display central memory phenotype, efficiently kill target cells in vivo, and protect recipients against tumor growth in a preventive setting. Furthermore, we confirm previously published observation that high level engraftment of antigen-expressing HSCs following myeloablative conditioning results in tolerance and an absence of specific cytotoxic activity in vivo. In conclusion, the data presented here supports potential application of immunization by limited transplantation of antigen-expressing HSCs for the prevention and treatment of cancer and therapeutic immunization of chronic infectious diseases such as HIV-1/AIDS.

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class–based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22553502

  10. Pharmacokinetics of mycophenolate mofetil in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hest, Reinier M.; Doorduijn, Jeanette K.; de Winter, Brenda C. M.; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Vulto, Arnold G.; Oellerich, Michael; Löwenberg, Bob; Mathot, Ron A. A.; Armstrong, Victor William; van Gelder, Teun

    2007-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA), is increasingly used in the prophylaxis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). Few pharmacokinetic data are available about the use of MMF for this indication. This case series aimed

  11. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-08

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Longitudinal assessment of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and hyposalivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laaksonen, M.; Ramseier, A. M.; Rovó, A.; Jensen, S. B.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Zitzmann, N. U.; Waltimo, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hyposalivation is a common adverse effect of anti-neoplastic therapy of head and neck cancer, causing impaired quality of life and predisposition to oral infections. However, data on the effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on salivary secretion are scarce. The present study

  13. Lifelong dietary intervention does not affect hematopoietic stem cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazare, Seka; Ausema, Albertina; Reijne, Aaffien C; van Dijk, Gertjan; van Os, Ronald; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo a profound functional decline during normal aging. Because caloric or dietary restriction has been shown to delay multiple aspects of the aging process in many species, we explored the consequences of lifelong caloric restriction, or conversely, lifelong

  14. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, Coco; Plantinga, Maud; Besseling, Paul; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has evolved into a potent curative treatment option for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The occurrence of complications and mortality after allo-HCT is, however, still high and is strongly associated with immune

  15. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs...

  16. Lung function after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Larsen Bang, Cæcilie; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    Reduction in pulmonary function (PF) has been reported in up to 85% of pediatric patients during the first year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our understanding of the etiology for this decrease in lung function is, however, sparse. The aim of this study was to describe PF...

  17. Sexual function 1-year after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noerskov, K. H.; Schjødt, I.; Syrjala, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with short and long-term toxicities that can result in alterations in sexual functioning. The aims of this prospective evaluation were to determine: (1) associations between HSCT and increased sexual dysfunction...

  18. Depression and anxiety following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuba, K; Esser, P; Mehnert, A

    2017-01-01

    In this prospective multicenter study, we investigated the course of depression and anxiety during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) until 5 years after transplantation adjusting for medical information. Patients were consulted before HSCT (n=239), at 3 months (n=150), 12 months (n=102...

  19. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell aging and self-renewal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dykstra, Brad; de Haan, Gerald

    A functional decline of the immune system occurs during organismal aging that is attributable, in large part, to changes in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. In the mouse, several hallmark age-dependent changes in the HSC compartment have been identified, including an increase in HSC

  1. Interleukin-1 regulates Hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia); M. Peeters (Marian); E. Haak (Esther); K. van der Horn (Karin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are

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  1. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. Divisional History and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function during Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajing Qiu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the homeostatic behavior of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs temporally defined according to their divisional histories using an HSPC-specific GFP label-retaining system. We show that homeostatic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs lose repopulating potential after limited cell divisions. Once HSCs exit dormancy and accrue divisions, they also progressively lose the ability to return to G0 and functional activities associated with quiescent HSCs. In addition, dormant HSPCs phenotypically defined as multipotent progenitor cells display robust stem cell activity upon transplantation, suggesting that temporal quiescence is a greater indicator of function than cell-surface phenotype. Our studies suggest that once homeostatic HSCs leave dormancy, they are slated for extinction. They self-renew phenotypically, but they lose self-renewal activity. As such, they question self-renewal as a characteristic of homeostatic, nonperturbed HSCs in contrast to self-renewal demonstrated under stress conditions.

  3. Transplantation Dose Alters the Differentiation Program of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Casey; Chu, Elizabeth; Chin, Mike; Lu, Rong

    2016-05-24

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the most prevalent stem cell therapy, but it remains a risky procedure. To improve this treatment, it is important to understand how transplanted stem cells rebuild the blood and immune systems and how this process is impacted by transplantation variables such as the HSC dose. Here, we find that, in the long term following transplantation, 70%-80% of donor-HSC-derived clones do not produce all measured blood cell types. High HSC doses lead to more clones that exhibit balanced lymphocyte production, whereas low doses produce more T-cell-specialized clones. High HSC doses also produce significantly higher proportions of early-differentiating clones compared to low doses. These complex differentiation behaviors uncover the clonal-level regeneration dynamics of hematopoietic regeneration and suggest that transplantation dose can be exploited to improve stem cell therapy. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Endogenous formalde- hyde is a hematopoietic stem cell genotoxin and metabolic carcinogen. Molecular Cell 60(1):177-88. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel...interested in our newly generated data on the role of aldehydes, especially endogenous aldehydes generated as part of normal cellular metabolism , as an...pancytopenia in multiple lineages, including lower platelet counts, lower white and red blood cell counts, and lower hemoglobin levels than their wild-type

  5. Mom Knows Best: Imprinted Control of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Lopez, Juana; Cancelas, Jose A

    2016-02-04

    The mechanisms by which imprinted loci control activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are not known. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Qian et al. (2016) demonstrate that non-coding RNAs expressed by the maternal-imprinted locus Dlk1-Gtl2 maintain HSC self-renewal through the inhibition of PI3K-mTOR signaling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and metabolic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Symptoms after hospital discharge following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Oguz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purposes of this study were to assess the symptoms of hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients after hospital discharge, and to determine the needs of transplant patients for symptom management. Materials and Methods: The study adopted a descriptive design. The study sample comprised of 66 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. The study was conducted in Istanbul. Data were collected using Patient Information Form and Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS. Results: The frequency of psychological symptoms in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients after discharge period (PSYCH subscale score 2.11 (standard deviation (SD = 0.69, range: 0.93-3.80 was higher in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients than frequency of physical symptoms (PHYS subscale score: 1.59 (SD = 0.49, range: 1.00-3.38. Symptom distress caused by psychological and physical symptoms were at moderate level (Mean = 1.91, SD = 0.60, range: 0.95-3.63 and most distressing symptoms were problems with sexual interest or activity, difficulty sleeping, and diarrhea. Patients who did not have an additional chronic disease obtained higher MSAS scores. University graduates obtained higher Global Distress Index (GDI subscale and total MSAS scores with comparison to primary school graduates. Total MSAS, MSAS-PHYS subscale, and MSAS-PSYCH subscale scores were higher in patients with low level of income (P < 0.05. The patients (98.5% reported to receive education about symptom management after hospital discharge. Conclusions: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients continue to experience many distressing physical or psychological symptoms after discharge and need to be supported and educated for the symptom management.

  7. Increased mitochondrial apoptotic priming of human regulatory T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kazuyuki; Kim, Haesook T; Bascug, O R Gregory; Kawano, Yutaka; Ryan, Jeremy; Matsuoka, Ken-ichi; Davids, Matthew S; Koreth, John; Ho, Vincent T; Cutler, Corey; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P; Blazar, Bruce R; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Letai, Anthony; Ritz, Jerome

    2014-09-01

    CD4 regulatory T cells play a critical role in establishment of immune tolerance and prevention of graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The recovery and maintenance of regulatory T cells is dependent on homeostatic factors including the generation of naïve regulatory T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells, the proliferation and expansion of mature regulatory T cells, and the survival of regulatory T cells in vivo. In this study, quantitation of mitochondrial apoptotic priming was used to compare susceptibility of regulatory T cells, conventional CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells to intrinsic pathway apoptosis in 57 patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and 25 healthy donors. In healthy donors, regulatory T cells are more susceptible to mitochondrial priming than conventional T cells. Mitochondrial priming is increased after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in all T-cell subsets and particularly in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease. Regulatory T cells express high levels of CD95 and are also more susceptible than conventional T cells to apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway. However, CD95 expression and extrinsic pathway apoptosis is not increased after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Decreased expression of BCL2 and increased expression of BIM, a mitochondrial cell death activator protein, in regulatory T cells contributes to increased mitochondrial priming in this T-cell subset but additional factors likely contribute to increased mitochondrial priming following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Injectable shear-thinning hydrogels used to deliver endothelial progenitor cells, enhance cell engraftment, and improve ischemic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffey, Ann C; Chen, Minna H; Venkataraman, Chantel M; Trubelja, Alen; Rodell, Christopher B; Dinh, Patrick V; Hung, George; MacArthur, John W; Soopan, Renganaden V; Burdick, Jason A; Atluri, Pavan

    2015-11-01

    The clinical translation of cell-based therapies for ischemic heart disease has been limited because of low cell retention (myocardium. To address these issues, we developed an injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) shear-thinning hydrogel (STG) and endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) construct (STG-EPC). The STG assembles as a result of interactions of adamantine- and β-cyclodextrin-modified HA. It is shear-thinning to permit delivery via a syringe, and self-heals upon injection within the ischemic myocardium. This directed therapy to the ischemic myocardial border zone enables direct cell delivery to address adverse remodeling after myocardial infarction. We hypothesize that this system will enhance vasculogenesis to improve myocardial stabilization in the context of a clinically translatable therapy. Endothelial progenitor cells (DiLDL(+) VEGFR2(+) CD34(+)) were harvested from adult male rats, cultured, and suspended in the STG. In vitro viability was quantified using a live-dead stain of EPCs. The STG-EPC constructs were injected at the border zone of ischemic rat myocardium after acute myocardial infarction (left anterior descending coronary artery ligation). The migration of the enhanced green fluorescent proteins from the construct to ischemic myocardium was analyzed using fluorescent microscopy. Vasculogenesis, myocardial remodeling, and hemodynamic function were analyzed in 4 groups: control (phosphate buffered saline injection); intramyocardial injection of EPCs alone; injection of the STG alone; and treatment with the STG-EPC construct. Hemodynamics and ventricular geometry were quantified using echocardiography and Doppler flow analysis. Endothelial progenitor cells demonstrated viability within the STG. A marked increase in EPC engraftment was observed 1-week postinjection within the treated myocardium with gel delivery, compared with EPC injection alone (17.2 ± 0.8 cells per high power field (HPF) vs 3.5 cells ± 1.3 cells per HPF, P = .0002). A

  9. Human hematopoietic stem cell adherence to cytokines and matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M W; Briddell, R; Walter, A W; Bruno, E; Hoffman, R

    1992-07-01

    The hematopoietic microenvironment is a complex structure in which stem cells, progenitor cells, stromal cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules each interact to direct the coordinate regulation of blood cell development. While much is known concerning the individual components of this microenvironment, little is understood of the interactions among these various components or, in particular, the nature of those interactions responsible for the regional localization of specific developmental signals. We hypothesized that cytokines act together with ECM molecules to anchor stem cells within the microenvironment, thus modulating their function. In order to analyze matrix-cytokine-stem cell interactions, we developed an ECM model system in which purified stem cell populations and plastic-immobilized individual proteins are used to assess the role of various matrix molecules and/or cytokines in human hematopoietic cell development. Analysis of these interactions revealed that a single ECM protein, thrombospondin, in conjunction with a single cytokine (e.g., c-kit ligand), constitutes a developmental signal that synergistically modulates hematopoietic stem cell function.

  10. Development of human B cells and antibodies following human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Anne; Hallam, Steven J; Nielsen, Stanton J; Cuadra, German I; Berges, Bradford K

    2015-06-01

    Humanized mice represent a valuable model system to study the development and functionality of the human immune system. In the RAG-hu mouse model highly immunodeficient Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice are transplanted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, resulting in human hematopoiesis and a predominant production of B and T lymphocytes. Human adaptive immune responses have been detected towards a variety of antigens in humanized mice but both cellular and humoral immune responses tend to be weak and sporadically detected. The underlying mechanisms for inconsistent responses are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of human B cell development and antibody production in RAG-hu mice to better understand the lack of effective antibody responses. We found that T cell levels in blood did not significantly change from 8 to 28 weeks post-engraftment, while B cells reached a peak at 14 weeks. Concentrations of 3 antibody classes (IgM, IgG, IgA) were found to be at levels about 0.1% or less of normal human levels, but human antibodies were still detected up to 32 weeks after engraftment. Human IgM was detected in 92.5% of animals while IgG and IgA were detected in about half of animals. We performed flow cytometric analysis of human B cells in bone marrow, spleen, and blood to examine the presence of precursor B cells, immature B cells, naïve B cells, and plasma B cells. We detected high levels of surface IgM(+) B cells (immature and naïve B cells) and low levels of plasma B cells in these organs, suggesting that B cells do not mature properly in this model. Low levels of human T cells in the spleen were observed, and we suggest that the lack of T cell help may explain poor B cell development and antibody responses. We conclude that human B cells that develop in humanized mice do not receive the signals necessary to undergo class-switching or to secrete antibody effectively, and we discuss strategies to potentially overcome these barriers. Copyright © 2015

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition improves proliferation and engraftment of myogenic cells in dystrophic muscle of mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajedah M Hindi

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD caused by loss of cytoskeletal protein dystrophin is a devastating disorder of skeletal muscle. Primary deficiency of dystrophin leads to several secondary pathological changes including fiber degeneration and regeneration, extracellular matrix breakdown, inflammation, and fibrosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a group of extracellular proteases that are involved in tissue remodeling, inflammation, and development of interstitial fibrosis in many disease states. We have recently reported that the inhibition of MMP-9 improves myopathy and augments myofiber regeneration in mdx mice (a mouse model of DMD. However, the mechanisms by which MMP-9 regulates disease progression in mdx mice remain less understood. In this report, we demonstrate that the inhibition of MMP-9 augments the proliferation of satellite cells in dystrophic muscle. MMP-9 inhibition also causes significant reduction in percentage of M1 macrophages with concomitant increase in the proportion of promyogenic M2 macrophages in mdx mice. Moreover, inhibition of MMP-9 increases the expression of Notch ligands and receptors, and Notch target genes in skeletal muscle of mdx mice. Furthermore, our results show that while MMP-9 inhibition augments the expression of components of canonical Wnt signaling, it reduces the expression of genes whose products are involved in activation of non-canonical Wnt signaling in mdx mice. Finally, the inhibition of MMP-9 was found to dramatically improve the engraftment of transplanted myoblasts in skeletal muscle of mdx mice. Collectively, our study suggests that the inhibition of MMP-9 is a promising approach to stimulate myofiber regeneration and improving engraftment of muscle progenitor cells in dystrophic muscle.

  12. Priming of endothelial colony-forming cells in a mesenchymal niche improves engraftment and vasculogenic potential by initiating mesenchymal transition orchestrated by NOTCH signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Abbas; Patel, Jatin; Wong, Ho Yi; Donovan, Prudence; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2017-02-01

    The prospect of using endothelial progenitors is currently hampered by their low engraftment upon transplantation. We report that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), independent of source and age, improve the engraftment of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs). MSC coculture altered ECFC appearance to an elongated mesenchymal morphology with reduced proliferation. ECFC primed via MSC contact had reduced self-renewal potential, but improved capacity to form tube structures in vitro and engraftment in vivo Primed ECFCs displayed major differences in transcriptome compared to ECFCs never exposed to MSCs, affecting genes involved in the cell cycle, up-regulating of genes influencing mesenchymal transition, adhesion, extracellular matrix. Inhibition of NOTCH signaling, a potential upstream regulator of mesenchymal transition, in large part modulated this gene expression pattern and functionally reversed the mesenchymal morphology of ECFCs. The collective results showed that primed ECFCs survive better and undergo a mesenchymal transition that is dependent on NOTCH signaling, resulting in significantly increased vasculogenic potential.-Shafiee, A., Patel, J., Wong, H. Y., Donovan, P., Hutmacher, D. W., Fisk, N. M., Khosrotehrani, K. Priming of endothelial colony-forming cells in a mesenchymal niche improves engraftment and vasculogenic potential by initiating mesenchymal transition orchestrated by NOTCH signaling. © FASEB.

  13. The many faces of hematopoietic stem cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Mihaela; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-12-15

    Not all hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are alike. They differ in their physical characteristics such as cell cycle status and cell surface marker phenotype, they respond to different extrinsic signals, and they have different lineage outputs following transplantation. The growing body of evidence that supports heterogeneity within HSCs, which constitute the most robust cell fraction at the foundation of the adult hematopoietic system, is currently of great interest and raises questions as to why HSC subtypes exist, how they are generated and whether HSC heterogeneity affects leukemogenesis or treatment options. This Review provides a developmental overview of HSC subtypes during embryonic, fetal and adult stages of hematopoiesis and discusses the possible origins and consequences of HSC heterogeneity. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Prevention of Graft Rejection by Donor Type II CD8+ T Cells (Tc2 Cells) Is Not Sufficient to Improve Engraftment in Fetal Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeng-Chang; Chang, Ming-Ling; Lee, Hanmin; Muench, Marcus O.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Tc2 cells, a subset of CD8+ T cells, are able to facilitate engraftment in a murine model of postnatal allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether Tc2 cells could improve engraftment in fetal transplantation. Methods: Gestational day 13 C57BL/6 (H-2b) fetal mice were used as recipients, adult B6D2F1 mice (C57BL/6 × DBA/2,H-2b/d) as donors, and splenocytes from B6C3F1 (C57BL/6 × C3H/He, H-2b/k) mice were used as stimulators in cultures used to generate the Tc2 cells from B6D2F1 mice Peripheral blood chimerism was examined monthly for 3 months. Thereafter, recipients were sacrificed to evaluate the levels of peritoneal, splenic and bone marrow chimerism. The T-cell responses of recipient splenocytes to cells of host origin were measured as a proliferative response in mixed lymphocyte cultures. Results: Low levels of peripheral blood cell chimerism (cells in the spleen, bone marrow and peritoneal cavity were usually not more than 0.05%. The peritoneal cavity tended to have higher levels of donor cells with 1 recipient sustaining as high as 25.03% at the age of 3 months. Higher peritoneal chimerism correlated with a lower donor-specific T-cell response. Conclusions: Transplantation of Tc2 cells was insufficient to improve bone marrow engraftment in utero, suggesting that graft rejection is not the major barrier to successful in utero transplantation. Donor cells can persist in the peritoneal cavity and might play an important role in inducing immune tolerance in fetuses. PMID:15608458

  15. Prevention of graft rejection by donor type II CD8(+) T cells (Tc2 cells) is not sufficient to improve engraftment in fetal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeng-Chang; Chang, Ming-Ling; Lee, Hanmin; Muench, Marcus O

    2005-01-01

    Tc2 cells, a subset of CD8(+) T cells, are able to facilitate engraftment in a murine model of postnatal allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether Tc2 cells could improve engraftment in fetal transplantation. Gestational day 13 C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) fetal mice were used as recipients, adult B6D2F(1) mice (C57BL/6 x DBA/2, H-2(b/d)) as donors, and splenocytes from B6C3F(1) (C57BL/6 x C3H/He, H-2(b/k)) mice were used as stimulators in cultures used to generate the Tc2 cells from B6D2F(1) mice. Peripheral blood chimerism was examined monthly for 3 months. Thereafter, recipients were sacrificed to evaluate the levels of peritoneal, splenic and bone marrow chimerism. The T-cell responses of recipient splenocytes to cells of host origin were measured as a proliferative response in mixed lymphocyte cultures. Low levels of peripheral blood cell chimerism (cells in the spleen, bone marrow and peritoneal cavity were usually not more than 0.05%. The peritoneal cavity tended to have higher levels of donor cells with 1 recipient sustaining as high as 25.03% at the age of 3 months. Higher peritoneal chimerism correlated with a lower donor-specific T-cell response. Transplantation of Tc2 cells was insufficient to improve bone marrow engraftment in utero, suggesting that graft rejection is not the major barrier to successful in utero transplantation. Donor cells can persist in the peritoneal cavity and might play an important role in inducing immune tolerance in fetuses.

  16. DNA Methylation Dynamics of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlik, Matthias; Halbritter, Florian; Müller, Fabian; Choudry, Fizzah A; Ebert, Peter; Klughammer, Johanna; Farrow, Samantha; Santoro, Antonella; Ciaurro, Valerio; Mathur, Anthony; Uppal, Rakesh; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Ouwehand, Willem H; Laurenti, Elisa; Lengauer, Thomas; Frontini, Mattia; Bock, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to all blood cells in a differentiation process that involves widespread epigenome remodeling. Here we present genome-wide reference maps of the associated DNA methylation dynamics. We used a meta-epigenomic approach that combines DNA methylation profiles across many small pools of cells and performed single-cell methylome sequencing to assess cell-to-cell heterogeneity. The resulting dataset identified characteristic differences between HSCs derived from fetal liver, cord blood, bone marrow, and peripheral blood. We also observed lineage-specific DNA methylation between myeloid and lymphoid progenitors, characterized immature multi-lymphoid progenitors, and detected progressive DNA methylation differences in maturing megakaryocytes. We linked these patterns to gene expression, histone modifications, and chromatin accessibility, and we used machine learning to derive a model of human hematopoietic differentiation directly from DNA methylation data. Our results contribute to a better understanding of human hematopoietic stem cell differentiation and provide a framework for studying blood-linked diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving Outcome of Aplastic Anaemia with HLA-Matched Sibling Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: An Experience of Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute (GCRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Shreeniwas S; Shah, Sandip A; Patel, Kinnari A; Shah, Kamlesh M; Anand, Asha S; Talati, Shailesh S; Panchal, Harsha P; Patel, Apurva A; Parikh, Sonia K; Parekh, Bhavesh B; Shukla, Shilin N

    2015-03-01

    Fifteen patients, with a median age of 19 years having severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) underwent human leucocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using conditioning regimens containing cyclophosphamide with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) or a combination of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide with or without ATG during December 2007 to May 2013. Cyclosporine and mini methotrexate were used as graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Graft source included peripheral blood stem cells in 11, bone marrow in 3 and both in 1. One patient had primary graft failure while 14 patients were engrafted with a median neutrophil and platelet engraftment time of 13.5 days. One patient had secondary graft rejection. Acute GVHD occurred in 3 patients and chronic GVHD in 4. One year death rate in engrafted patients was 14.28 %. At a mean follow-up of 21.2 months, 12 (80 %) are alive and well. One of the donors was a patient of haemophilia but the disease did not occur in the recipient. The graft was successful and the recipient is alive till date.

  18. Aging, Clonality and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and increased production of reactive oxygen species have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts such as global ...

  19. BK viremia precedes hemorrhagic cystitis in children undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Benjamin L; Denburg, Michelle; Furth, Susan; Diorio, Donna; Goebel, Jens; Davies, Stella M; Jodele, Sonata

    2013-08-01

    BK virus is associated with hemorrhagic cystitis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), although evidence supporting a causal relationship remains limited. Although BK viruria is common after HSCT, BK viremia may better predict clinically significant cystitis, similar to its predictive value for nephropathy after kidney transplantation. We hypothesized that BK viremia would precede hemorrhagic cystitis in a cohort of 88 consecutive children prospectively enrolled to originally study thrombotic microangiopathy in the first 100 days after allogeneic HSCT. Cox regression models with time-varying covariates assessed the association between different BK viremia cutoffs and the development of hemorrhagic cystitis, defined as at least macroscopic hematuria. Subjects with a peak plasma BK viral load 1 to 9999 copies/mL had an adjusted hazard ratio of 4.2 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3 to 13.7) for the development of hemorrhagic cystitis. Those with peak BK viremia >100,000 copies/mL had an adjusted hazard ratio of 116.8 (95% CI, 12 to 1136) for cystitis. Other independent risk factors for hemorrhagic cystitis included age >7 years and HHV-6 viremia. Neither graft-versus-host disease nor achieving engraftment increased the risk for cystitis. If therapeutic strategies are found to be effective, these observations may support screening for BK viremia after HSCT, as currently recommended for other DNA viruses. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro and in vivo assessment of direct effects of simulated solar and galactic cosmic radiation on human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, C; Almeida-Porada, G; George, S K; Moon, J; Soker, S; Pardee, T; Beaty, M; Guida, P; Sajuthi, S P; Langefeld, C D; Walker, S J; Wilson, P F; Porada, C D

    2017-06-01

    Future deep space missions to Mars and near-Earth asteroids will expose astronauts to chronic solar energetic particles (SEP) and galactic cosmic ray (GCR) radiation, and likely one or more solar particle events (SPEs). Given the inherent radiosensitivity of hematopoietic cells and short latency period of leukemias, space radiation-induced hematopoietic damage poses a particular threat to astronauts on extended missions. We show that exposing human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC) to extended mission-relevant doses of accelerated high-energy protons and iron ions leads to the following: (1) introduces mutations that are frequently located within genes involved in hematopoiesis and are distinct from those induced by γ-radiation; (2) markedly reduces in vitro colony formation; (3) markedly alters engraftment and lineage commitment in vivo; and (4) leads to the development, in vivo, of what appears to be T-ALL. Sequential exposure to protons and iron ions (as typically occurs in deep space) proved far more deleterious to HSC genome integrity and function than either particle species alone. Our results represent a critical step for more accurately estimating risks to the human hematopoietic system from space radiation, identifying and better defining molecular mechanisms by which space radiation impairs hematopoiesis and induces leukemogenesis, as well as for developing appropriately targeted countermeasures.

  1. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A; Hardison, Ross C; Bodine, David M

    2016-01-04

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Aging, Clonality, and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts, such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as the clonal selection of HSCs upon aging, provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and, potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E Graham

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Leukocyte adhesion deficiency is a rare primary immune disorder caused by defects of the CD18 beta-integrin molecule on immune cells. The condition usually presents in early infancy and is characterized by deep tissue infections, leukocytosis with impaired formation of pus, and delayed...... wound healing. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation offers the possibility of curative therapy, and with patient numbers at any individual center being limited, we surveyed the transplant experience at 14 centers worldwide. METHODS: The course of 36 children with a confirmed diagnosis...... of leukocyte adhesion deficiency who underwent hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the Center for International...

  4. Prostaglandin E2 increases hematopoietic stem cell survival and accelerates hematopoietic recovery after radiation injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Rebecca L.; Georger, Mary; Bromberg, Olga; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Frisch, Benjamin J.; Becker, Michael W.; Calvi, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), which continuously maintain all mature blood cells, are regulated within the marrow microenvironment. We previously reported that pharmacologic treatment of naïve mice with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expands HSPCs. However, the cellular mechanisms mediating this expansion remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that PGE2 treatment in naïve mice inhibits apoptosis of HSPCs without changing their proliferation rate. In a murine model of sub-lethal total body irradiation (TBI), in which HSPCs are rapidly lost, treatment with a long-acting PGE2 analogue (dmPGE2) reversed the apoptotic program initiated by TBI. dmPGE2 treatment in vivo decreased the loss of functional HSPCs following radiation injury, as demonstrated both phenotypically and by their increased reconstitution capacity. The antiapoptotic effect of dmPGE2 on HSPCs did not impair their ability to differentiate in vivo, resulting instead in improved hematopoietic recovery after TBI. dmPGE2 also increased microenvironmental cyclooxygenase-2 expression and expanded the α-SMA+ subset of marrow macrophages, thus enhancing the bone marrow microenvironmental response to TBI. Therefore, in vivo treatment with PGE2 analogues may be particularly beneficial to HSPCs in the setting of injury by targeting them both directly and also through their niche. The current data provide rationale for in vivo manipulation of the HSPC pool as a strategy to improve recovery after myelosuppression. PMID:23169593

  5. Engraftment and morphological development of vascularized human iPS cell-derived 3D-cardiomyocyte tissue after xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Hirokazu; Shima, Fumiaki; Yokoyama, Junya; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Tsukamoto, Yoshinari; Takamura, Yasushi; Hiura, Ayami; Fukumoto, Ken; Chiba, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Seiji; Sawa, Yoshiki; Akashi, Mitsuru; Shimoda, Hiroshi

    2017-10-20

    One of the major challenges in cell-based cardiac regenerative medicine is the in vitro construction of three-dimensional (3D) tissues consisting of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (iPSC-CM) and a blood vascular network supplying nutrients and oxygen throughout the tissue after implantation. We have successfully built a vascularized iPSC-CM 3D-tissue using our validated cell manipulation technique. In order to evaluate an availability of the 3D-tissue as a biomaterial, functional morphology of the tissues was examined by light and transmission electron microscopy through their implantation into the rat infarcted heart. Before implantation, the tissues showed distinctive myofibrils within iPSC-CMs and capillary-like endothelial tubes, but their profiles were still like immature. In contrast, engraftment of the tissues to the rat heart led the iPSC-CMs and endothelial tubes into organization of cell organelles and junctional apparatuses and prompt development of capillary network harboring host blood supply, respectively. A number of capillaries in the implanted tissues were derived from host vascular bed, whereas the others were likely to be composed by fusion of host and implanted endothelial cells. Thus, our vascularized iPSC-CM 3D-tissues may be a useful regenerative paradigm which will require additional expanded and long-term studies.

  6. Cross talk with hematopoietic cells regulates the endothelial progenitor cell differentiation of CD34 positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sang-Mo; Lee, Jun-Hee; Lee, Sang-Hun; Jung, Seok-Yun; Kim, Da-Yeon; Kang, Song-Hwa; Yoo, So-Young; Hong, Jong-Kyu; Park, Ji-Hye; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Sun-Jin; Kim, Hwi-Gon; Asahara, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vascular regeneration, the specific interactions between EPCs and hematopoietic cells remain unclear. In EPC colony forming assays, we first demonstrated that the formation of EPC colonies was drastically increased in the coculture of CD34+ and CD34- cells, and determined the optimal concentrations of CD34+ cells and CD34- cells for spindle-shaped EPC differentiation. Functionally, the coculture of CD34+ and CD34- cells resulted in a significant enhancement of adhesion, tube formation, and migration capacity compared with culture of CD34+ cells alone. Furthermore, blood flow recovery and capillary formation were remarkably increased by the coculture of CD34+ and CD34- cells in a murine hind-limb ischemia model. To elucidate further the role of hematopoietic cells in EPC differentiation, we isolated different populations of hematopoietic cells. T lymphocytes (CD3+) markedly accelerated the early EPC status of CD34+ cells, while macrophages (CD11b+) or megakaryocytes (CD41+) specifically promoted large EPC colonies. Our results suggest that specific populations of hematopoietic cells play a role in the EPC differentiation of CD34+ cells, a finding that may aid in the development of a novel cell therapy strategy to overcome the quantitative and qualitative limitations of EPC therapy.

  7. Clostridium difficile infection in Chilean patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Javier Pilcante

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection and multiple risk factors have been identi- fied. Published reports have indicated an incidence from 9% to 30% of transplant patients however to date there is no information about infection in these patients in Chile. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who developed C. difficile infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantations from 2000 to 2013. Statistical analysis used the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results: Two hundred and fifty patients were studied (mean age: 39 years; range: 17-69, with 147 (59% receiving allogeneic transplants and 103 (41% receiving autologous trans- plants. One hundred and ninety-two (77% patients had diarrhea, with 25 (10% cases of C. difficile infection being confirmed. Twenty infected patients had undergone allogeneic trans- plants, of which ten had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, three had acute myeloid leukemia and seven had other diseases (myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, severe aplastic anemia. In the autologous transplant group, five patients had C. difficile infection; two had multiple myeloma, one had amyloidosis, one had acute myeloid leukemia and one had germinal carcinoma. The overall incidence of C. difficile infection was 4% within the first week, 6.4% in the first month and 10% in one year, with no difference in overall survival between infected and non-infected groups (72.0% vs. 67.6%, respectively; p-value = 0.56. Patients infected after allogeneic transplants had a slower time to neutrophil engraftment compared to non-infected patients (17.5 vs. 14.9 days, respectively; p-value = 0.008. In the autologous transplant group there was no significant difference in the neutrophil engraftment time between infected and non-infected patients (12.5 days vs. 11.8 days, respectively; p

  8. Analysis of the feasibility of early hospital discharge after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the implications to nursing care

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    Alessandra Barban

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a conduct used to treat some hematologic diseases and to consolidate the treatment of others. In the field of nursing, the few published scientific studies on nursing care and early hospital discharge of transplant patients are deficient. Knowledge about the diseases treated using hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, providing guidance to patients and caregivers and patient monitoring are important nursing activities in this process. Guidance may contribute to long-term goals through patients' short-term needs. AIM: To analyze the results of early hospital discharge on the treatment of patients submitted to autologous transplantation and the influence of nursing care on this conduct. METHODS: A retrospective, quantitative, descriptive and transversal study was conducted. The hospital records of 112 consecutive patients submitted to autologous transplantation in the period from January to December 2009 were revisited. Of these, 12 patients, who remained in hospital for more than ten days after transplantation, were excluded from the study. RESULTS: The medical records of 100 patients with a median age of 48.5 years (19-69 years were analyzed. All patients were mobilized and hematopoietic stem cells were collected by leukapheresis. The most common conditioning regimes were BU12Mel100 and BEAM 400. Toxicity during conditioning was easily managed in the outpatient clinic. Gastrointestinal toxicity, mostly Grades I and II, was seen in 69% of the patients, 62% of patients had diarrhea, 61% of the patients had nausea and vomiting and 58% had Grade I and II mucositis. Ten patients required hospitalization due to the conditioning regimen. Febrile neutropenia was seen in 58% of patients. Two patients died before Day +60 due to infections, one with aplasia. The median times to granulocyte and platelet engraftment were 12 days and 15 days, respectively, with median red blood cell and

  9. The relationship between circulating natural killer cells after reduced intensity conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and relapse-free survival and graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Erin M; Buzzeo, Mathew P; Levine, Jeff B; Schold, Jesse D; Meier-Kriesche, Herwig-Ulf; Reddy, Vijay

    2008-12-01

    Natural killer cells are known to have anti-tumor activity in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that reconstituted circulating natural killer cells may be associated with improved relapse-free survival after HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Serial peripheral blood absolute natural killer cell counts were prospectively measured by flow cytometry of lymphocytes expressing CD56 and CD16 in 167 patients. Cluster analysis was used at engraftment and 60 days post-transplant to distinguish patients with high and low absolute natural killer cell counts. At engraftment 80 patients had high counts (> 22.2/mm3) and 43 had low counts. At 60 days post-transplant 84 patients had high counts (> 18.2/mm3) and 38 had low counts. The primary study end-points were death, relapse and acute graft-versus-host disease. The median follow-up was 373 days (range, 67-1767). Among patients given reduced intensity conditioning, a low absolute natural killer cell count at 60 days post-transplant was independently associated with relapse [adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) = 28.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.3-186.4] and death (AHR = 17.5, 95% CI 4.3-71.3). Furthermore, patients given reduced intensity conditioning who had a high absolute natural killer cell count at 60 days had a significantly better 1-year survival than those with a low count by Kaplan-Meier analysis (83% vs. 11%, pkiller count in patients given reduced intensity conditioning was independently associated with an increase in relapse or death (AHR = 20.22, 95% CI 4.76-85.40). In contrast, there was no significant association between 60-day absolute natural killer cell counts and clinical outcomes in patients receiving myeloablative conditioning. There was no significant association between absolute natural killer cell count and graft-versus-host disease. High natural killer cell reconstitution is associated with reduced relapse and death without an increased incidence of

  10. Bone marrow cells in murine colitis: multi-signal analysis confirms pericryptal myofibroblast engraftment without epithelial involvement.

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    Chung-Yin Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to epithelial tissues in the inflamed gut remains controversial. Recent reports have suggested that cell fusion between bone marrow-derived cells and the intestinal epithelium takes place in inflammatory conditions. METHODS: In attempts to confirm this, we have undertaken gender mis-matched bone marrow (BM transplants from male Swiss Webster (SWR mice to B and T cell-deficient female Rag2 KO mice which, 4 weeks later, were given 5% dextran sodium sulphate in drinking water to induce acute colitis. A further BM-treated group of animals with a graft versus host-like condition was also studied. We developed a new method to combine up to three brightfield or fluorescent lectin- or immuno-histochemical signals with fluorescent in situ hybridisation for the Y and X chromosomes to enable us unequivocally to identify BM-derived male cells which presented as different cell types in the gastrointestinal tract. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In rolled preparations of whole intestines we scanned around 1.5 million crypts at many tissue levels. In no instance did we see a Y chromosome-positive cell in the epithelial compartment, which was not also CD45-positive. We saw no evidence of cell fusion, based on combined X and Y chromosome analysis. Levels of CD45-positive stromal and lymphoid cells and pericryptal myfibroblasts (positive for α-smooth muscle actin increased with time up to a plateau, which resembled the level seen in untreated control grafted animals. We saw very few Y chromosome-positive endothelial cells in intestinal stromal vessels. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that whole BM transplantation does not result in intestinal epithelial engraftment in this model. Our new methods can usefully assist in multi-signal analyses of cell phenotypes following BM transplant and in models of chimaerism and regenerative medicine.

  11. Longitudinal Assessment of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Hyposalivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laaksonen, Matti; Ramseier, Adrian; Rovó, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Hyposalivation is a common adverse effect of anti-neoplastic therapy of head and neck cancer, causing impaired quality of life and predisposition to oral infections. However, data on the effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on salivary secretion are scarce. The present study ......-HSCT, respectively. Additionally, conditioning regimen and sex had an impact on saliva flow. In conclusion, hyposalivation was observed to be a common but generally reversible complication among HSCT recipients.......Hyposalivation is a common adverse effect of anti-neoplastic therapy of head and neck cancer, causing impaired quality of life and predisposition to oral infections. However, data on the effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on salivary secretion are scarce. The present study...

  12. Highly purified CD34+ cells isolated using magnetically activated cell selection provide rapid engraftment following high-dose chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richel, D J; Johnsen, H E; Canon, J; Guillaume, T; Schaafsma, M R; Schenkeveld, C; Hansen, S W; McNiece, I; Gringeri, A J; Briddell, R; Ewen, C; Davies, R; Freeman, J; Miltenyi, S; Symann, M

    2000-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of infusion of CD34+ cells, selected using a clinical scale magnetically activated cell sorting device, assessed by time to hematological engraftment and incidence of adverse events. Secondary objectives included evaluation of device performance in terms of purity and recovery of the CD34+ cell product. Breast cancer patients suitable for transplantation received cyclophosphamide and filgrastim for mobilisation, followed by three leukaphereses. The products of the first two leukaphereses underwent CD34+ cell selection. The product of the third leukapheresis was cryopreserved unmanipulated. Following high-dose cyclophosphamide, thiotepa and carboplatin, selected CD34+ cells were infused. In 54 patients who received selected cells only, the median time to platelet recovery and neutrophil recovery was 11 days (range 5-51) and 9 days (range 5-51), respectively. There were no adverse events associated with infusion of selected cells. A total of 126 leukapheresis samples was available before and after selection for central CD34+ analysis. The median purity was 96.1% (27.4-99.4) and the median recovery was 52. 3% (15.2-146.3). These data show that cells selected using magnetically activated cell selection provide safe and rapid engraftment after high-dose therapy. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 243-249.

  13. Ion Channels in Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Serena Pillozzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs reside in bone marrow niches and give rise to hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs. These have more restricted lineage potential and eventually differentiate into specific blood cell types. Bone marrow also contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, which present multilineage differentiation potential toward mesodermal cell types. In bone marrow niches, stem cell interaction with the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrin receptors. Ion channels regulate cell proliferation and differentiation by controlling intracellular Ca2+, cell volume, release of growth factors, and so forth. Although little evidence is available about the ion channel roles in true HSCs, increasing information is available about HPCs and MSCs, which present a complex pattern of K+ channel expression. K+ channels cooperate with Ca2+ and Cl− channels in regulating calcium entry and cell volume during mitosis. Other K+ channels modulate the integrin-dependent interaction between leukemic progenitor cells and the niche stroma. These channels can also regulate leukemia cell interaction with MSCs, which also involves integrin receptors and affects the MSC-mediated protection from chemotherapy. Ligand-gated channels are also implicated in these processes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors regulate cell proliferation and migration in HSCs and MSCs and may be implicated in the harmful effects of smoking.

  14. Functional assays for hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, John M; Li, Linheng

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells are defined by the ability to self-renew. Specific functional assays have been developed for the rigorous identification and quantification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), making these cells the benchmark in studies of self-renewal. Here, we review the theory behind these functional stem cell tests and discuss important considerations in choosing and designing these assays. Finally, we provide a basic protocol for the serial-dilution assay, a quantitative assay for HSCs, from which individual researchers can construct their own customized protocols utilizing the guidelines discussed.

  15. Sexuality and Quality of Life after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hong Ghi; Park, Eun Young; Kim, Hyun Mee; Kim, Kihyun; Kim, Won Seog; Yoon, Sung Soo; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Keun Chil; Park, Chan Hyung

    2002-01-01

    Background The quality of sexuality is significantly affected by physical changes following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the dissatisfied and/or dysfunctional sexuality may cause deterioration in the quality of life (QOL). Methods With two models of questionnaires, we interviewed thirty-eight patients who remained in the disease-free status after HSCT and had sex partners, to assess: 1) the changes in sexuality, 2) QOL in physical, psychological, social and spiritual dom...

  16. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  17. Co-infusion of haplo-identical CD19-chimeric antigen receptor T cells and stem cells achieved full donor engraftment in refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Bo Cai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elderly patients with relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL have poor prognosis. Autologous CD19 chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T cells have potentials to cure patients with B cell ALL; however, safety and efficacy of allogeneic CD19 CAR-T cells are still undetermined. Case presentation We treated a 71-year-old female with relapsed and refractory ALL who received co-infusion of haplo-identical donor-derived CD19-directed CAR-T cells and mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC following induction chemotherapy. Undetectable minimal residual disease by flow cytometry was achieved, and full donor cell engraftment was established. The transient release of cytokines and mild fever were detected. Significantly elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase, alanine transaminase, bilirubin and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase were observed from days 14 to 18, all of which were reversible after immunosuppressive therapy. Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest that co-infusion of haplo-identical donor-derived CAR-T cells and mobilized PBSCs may induce full donor engraftment in relapsed and refractory ALL including elderly patients, but complications related to donor cell infusions should still be cautioned. Trial registration Allogeneic CART-19 for Elderly Relapsed/Refractory CD19+ ALL. NCT02799550

  18. Long-Term Quantitative Biodistribution and Side Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs Engraftment in NOD/SCID Mice following Irradiation

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    Sabine François

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little information on the fate of infused mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and long-term side effects after irradiation exposure. We addressed these questions using human MSCs (hMSCs intravenously infused to nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mice submitted to total body irradiation (TBI or local irradiation (abdominal or leg irradiation. The animals were sacrificed 3 to 120 days after irradiation and the quantitative and spatial distribution of hMSCs were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Following their infusion into nonirradiated animals, hMSCs homed to various tissues. Engraftment depended on the dose of irradiation and the area exposed. Total body irradiation induced an increased hMSC engraftment level compared to nonirradiated mice, while local irradiations increased hMSC engraftment locally in the area of irradiation. Long-term engraftment of systemically administered hMSCs in NOD/SCID mice increased significantly in response to tissue injuries produced by local or total body irradiation until 2 weeks then slowly decreased depending on organs and the configuration of irradiation. In all cases, no tissue abnormality or abnormal hMSCs proliferation was observed at 120 days after irradiation. This work supports the safe and efficient use of MSCs by injection as an alternative approach in the short- and long-term treatment of severe complications after radiotherapy for patients refractory to conventional treatments.

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplantation Can Normalize Thyroid Function in a Cystinosis Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaide Chevronnay, H P; Janssens, V; Van Der Smissen, P; Rocca, C J; Liao, X H; Refetoff, S; Pierreux, C E; Cherqui, S; Courtoy, P J

    2016-04-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most frequent and earliest endocrine complication in cystinosis, a multisystemic lysosomal storage disease caused by defective transmembrane cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS gene). We recently demonstrated in Ctns(-/-) mice that altered thyroglobulin biosynthesis associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, combined with defective lysosomal processing, caused hypothyroidism. In Ctns(-/-) kidney, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation provides long-term functional and structural protection. Tissue repair involves transfer of cystinosin-bearing lysosomes from HSCs differentiated as F4/80 macrophages into deficient kidney tubular cells, via tunneling nanotubes that cross basement laminae. Here we evaluated the benefit of HSC transplantation for cystinotic thyroid and investigated the underlying mechanisms. HSC engraftment in Ctns(-/-) thyroid drastically decreased cystine accumulation, normalized the TSH level, and corrected the structure of a large fraction of thyrocytes. In the thyroid microenvironment, HSCs differentiated into a distinct, mixed macrophage/dendritic cell lineage expressing CD45 and major histocompatibility complex II but low CD11b and F4/80. Grafted HSCs closely apposed to follicles and produced tunneling nanotube-like extensions that crossed follicular basement laminae. HSCs themselves further squeezed into follicles, allowing extensive contact with thyrocytes, but did not transdifferentiate into Nkx2.1-expressing cells. Our observations revealed significant differences of basement lamina porosity between the thyroid and kidney and/or intrinsic macrophage invasive properties once in the thyroid microenvironment. The contrast between extensive thyrocyte protection and low HSC abundance at steady state suggests multiple sequential encounters and/or remanent impact. This is the first report demonstrating the potential of HSC transplantation to correct thyroid disease and supports a major multisystemic benefit of stem

  20. Disease-specific hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Luo, Changying; Luo, Chengjuan; Wang, Jianmin; Li, Benshang; Ding, Lixia; Chen, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using an optimized conditioning regimen is essential for the long-term survival of patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS). We report HSCT in 24 children with Fanconi anemia (FA, n = 12), Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, n = 7), and dyskeratosis congenita (DC, n = 5) from a single HSCT center. The graft source was peripheral blood stem cells (n = 19) or cord blood stem cells (n = 5). FA and DC patients received reduced-intensity conditioning, while DBA patients had myeloablative conditioning. The median numbers of infused mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells were 14.20 × 108/kg and 4.3 × 106/kg, respectively. The median time for neutrophil and platelet recovery was 12 and 18 days, respectively. Complete donor engraftment was achieved in 23 of 24 patients. There was one primary graft failure. During a median follow-up of 27.5 months (range, 2-130 months), the overall survival in all patients was 95.8%. The incidence of grade II-III acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD was 29.2% and 16.7%, respectively. We conclude that HSCT can be a curative option for patients with IBMFS. Modification of the conditioning regimen based on the type of disease may lead to encouraging long-term outcomes.

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant-related airflow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Arkadiusz Z; Mahaseth, Hemchandra

    2006-03-01

    Airflow obstruction is a rare but fatal complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is noninfectious, relatively late, and primarily affects small airways, ultimately leading to their obliteration. If airflow obstruction is consistent with obliteration histologically, the condition is often called bronchiolitis obliterans. This review of literature published recently evaluates progress made in this field. Changes reported in analysis of pulmonary function test results and their follow-up might be helpful to better manage bronchiolitis obliterans and to detect and treat it earlier. Graft-versus-host reaction possibly underlies the development of this fatal disease. Findings from high-resolution computed tomography might aid in the diagnostic process. Anti-inflammatory therapy, azithromycin and lung transplant might be an option to treat bronchiolitis obliterans. The pathomechanism of bronchiolitis obliterans remains unclear and it remains a fatal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. An appropriate model to study hematopoietic stem cell transplantation-related airflow obstruction, consensus diagnostic criteria, and prospective trials for treatment are necessary to overcome the challenge presented by bronchiolitis obliterans.

  2. Isolation and characterization of hematopoietic stem cells in teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Isao; Katakura, Fumihiko; Moritomo, Tadaaki

    2016-05-01

    Despite 400 million years of evolutionary divergence, hematopoiesis is highly conserved between mammals and teleost fish. All types of mature blood cells including the erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages show a high degree of similarity to their mammalian counterparts at the morphological and molecular level. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are cells that are capable of self-renewal and differentiating into all hematopoietic lineages over the lifetime of an organism. The study of HSCs has been facilitated through bone marrow transplantation experiments developed in the mouse model. In the last decade, the zebrafish and clonal ginbuna carp (Carassius auratus langsdorfii) have emerged as new models for the study of HSCs. This review highlights the recent progress and future prospects of studying HSCs in teleost fish. Transplantation assays using these teleost models have demonstrated the presence of HSCs in the kidney, which is the major hematopoietic organ in teleost fish. Moreover, it is possible to purify HSCs from the kidney utilizing fluorescent dyes or transgenic animals. These teleost models will provide novel insights into the universal mechanisms of HSC maintenance, homeostasis, and differentiation among vertebrates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are characterized by their ability to self-renew and differentiate into all blood lineage cells. The fate decisions of HSCs (self-renewal versus differentiation) are made through the process of cell division and are often compared to "birth" and "death". Stem cells give rise to undifferentiated stem cells (birth) or differentiate into progenitor cells (death). This process is regulated by asymmetric/symmetric divisions of HSCs. It has been proposed that fate determination occurs as a stochastic process and that individual stem cell dynamics are randomly regulated. The behavior of HSCs is known to be regulated by the cell intrinsic factor and extrinsic (microenvironmental) stimuli. Therefore, it is possible that the signals from a specific microenvironment (niche) have the potential to control or modulate stem cell dynamics. This review focuses on the functions of the HSC niche and the application of single cell analysis for understanding the mechanisms underlying the HSC decision-making process.

  4. Generation of an HIV-1-resistant immune system with CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a triple-combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jon E; Chen, Rachel X; McGee, Jeannine; Nacey, Catherine; Pollard, Richard B; Abedi, Mehrdad; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A; Anderson, Joseph S

    2012-05-01

    HIV gene therapy has the potential to offer an alternative to the use of current small-molecule antiretroviral drugs as a treatment strategy for HIV-infected individuals. Therapies designed to administer HIV-resistant stem cells to an infected patient may also provide a functional cure, as observed in a bone marrow transplant performed with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) homozygous for the CCR5-Δ32-bp allele. In our current studies, preclinical evaluation of a combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector was performed, in vivo, in humanized NOD-RAG1(-/-) IL2rγ(-/-) knockout mice. This combination vector, which displays strong preintegration inhibition of HIV-1 infection in vitro, contains a human/rhesus macaque TRIM5α isoform, a CCR5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a TAR decoy. Multilineage hematopoiesis from anti-HIV lentiviral vector-transduced human CD34(+) HSCs was observed in the peripheral blood and in various lymphoid organs, including the thymus, spleen, and bone marrow, of engrafted mice. Anti-HIV vector-transduced CD34(+) cells displayed normal development of immune cells, including T cells, B cells, and macrophages. The anti-HIV vector-transduced cells also displayed knockdown of cell surface CCR5 due to the expression of the CCR5 shRNA. After in vivo challenge with either an R5-tropic BaL-1 or X4-tropic NL4-3 strain of HIV-1, maintenance of human CD4(+) cell levels and a selective survival advantage of anti-HIV gene-modified cells were observed in engrafted mice. The data provided from our study confirm the safety and efficacy of this combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector in a hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy setting for HIV and validates its potential application in future clinical trials.

  5. Generation of an HIV-1-Resistant Immune System with CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transduced with a Triple-Combination Anti-HIV Lentiviral Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jon E.; Chen, Rachel X.; McGee, Jeannine; Nacey, Catherine; Pollard, Richard B.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A.

    2012-01-01

    HIV gene therapy has the potential to offer an alternative to the use of current small-molecule antiretroviral drugs as a treatment strategy for HIV-infected individuals. Therapies designed to administer HIV-resistant stem cells to an infected patient may also provide a functional cure, as observed in a bone marrow transplant performed with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) homozygous for the CCR5-Δ32-bp allele. In our current studies, preclinical evaluation of a combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector was performed, in vivo, in humanized NOD-RAG1−/− IL2rγ−/− knockout mice. This combination vector, which displays strong preintegration inhibition of HIV-1 infection in vitro, contains a human/rhesus macaque TRIM5α isoform, a CCR5 short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a TAR decoy. Multilineage hematopoiesis from anti-HIV lentiviral vector-transduced human CD34+ HSCs was observed in the peripheral blood and in various lymphoid organs, including the thymus, spleen, and bone marrow, of engrafted mice. Anti-HIV vector-transduced CD34+ cells displayed normal development of immune cells, including T cells, B cells, and macrophages. The anti-HIV vector-transduced cells also displayed knockdown of cell surface CCR5 due to the expression of the CCR5 shRNA. After in vivo challenge with either an R5-tropic BaL-1 or X4-tropic NL4-3 strain of HIV-1, maintenance of human CD4+ cell levels and a selective survival advantage of anti-HIV gene-modified cells were observed in engrafted mice. The data provided from our study confirm the safety and efficacy of this combination anti-HIV lentiviral vector in a hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy setting for HIV and validates its potential application in future clinical trials. PMID:22398281

  6. Fucose-deficient hematopoietic stem cells have decreased self-renewal and aberrant marrow niche occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jay; Huang, Yuanshuai; Wei, Lebing; Yan, Quanjian; Huang, Alex; Zhou, Lan

    2010-12-01

    Modification of Notch receptors by O-linked fucose and its further elongation by the Fringe family of glycosyltransferase has been shown to be important for Notch signaling activation. Our recent studies disclose a myeloproliferative phenotype, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) dysfunction, and abnormal Notch signaling in mice deficient in FX, which is required for fucosylation of a number of proteins including Notch. The purpose of this study was to assess the self-renewal and stem cell niche features of fucose-deficient HSCs. Homeostasis and maintenance of HSCs derived from FX(-/-) mice were studied by serial bone marrow transplantation, homing assay, and cell cycle analysis. Two-photon intravital microscopy was performed to visualize and compare the in vivo marrow niche occupancy by fucose-deficient and wild-type (WT) HSCs. Marrow progenitors from FX(-/-) mice had mild homing defects that could be partially prevented by exogenous fucose supplementation. Fucose-deficient HSCs from FX(-/-) mice displayed decreased self-renewal capability compared with the WT controls. This is accompanied with their increased cell cycling activity and suppressed Notch ligand binding. When tracked in vivo by two-photon intravital imaging, the fucose-deficient HSCs were found localized farther from the endosteum of the calvarium marrow than the WT HSCs. The current reported aberrant niche occupancy by HSCs from FX(-/-) mice, in the context of a faulty blood lineage homeostasis and HSC dysfunction in mice expressing Notch receptors deficient in O-fucosylation, suggests that fucosylation-modified Notch receptor may represent a novel extrinsic regulator for HSC engraftment and HSC niche maintenance. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. Co-transplantation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallekleiv, Merete; Larun, Lillebeth; Bruserud, Øystein; Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative treatment option for patients with hematological malignancies. Co-transplantation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) during allogeneic HSCT has been explored to enhance engraftment and decrease the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We aimed to identify, evaluate and summarize the findings of all relevant controlled clinical studies to determine the potential benefits of MSC infusion during allogeneic HSCT, with regard to the outcomes engraftment, GVHD, post-transplant relapse and survival. We conducted a systematic search of electronic databases for relevant controlled clinical studies. Studies included patients of all ages with hematological malignancies receiving allogeneic HSCT with or without infusion of MSCs within a 24-h time frame of transplantation. Nine studies met our inclusion criteria, including three randomized, one non-randomized and five historically controlled trials, representing a total of 309 patients. Our meta-analyses did not reveal any statistically significant differences in donor engraftment or GVHD. A review of data regarding relapse and overall survival may result in a positive attitude toward intervention with MSCs, but due to heterogeneous reporting, it is difficult to draw any strict conclusions. None of the studies had overall serious risks of bias, but the quality of the evidence is low. Meta-analysis did not reveal any statistically significant effects of MSC co-transplantation, but the results must be interpreted with caution because of the weak study design and small study populations. We discuss further needs to explore the potential effects of MSCs in a HSCT setting. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Tanaka

    Full Text Available In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+ cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+ c-Kit(+ hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+ c-Kit(+ cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  9. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuka; Inoue-Yokoo, Tomoko; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+) cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+) c-Kit(+) hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+) c-Kit(+) cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  10. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) marks hematopoietic stem cells in human embryonic, fetal, and adult hematopoietic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokubaitis, Vanta J.; Sinka, Lidia; Driessen, Rebecca; Whitty, Genevieve; Haylock, David N.; Bertoncello, Ivan; Smith, Ian; Peault, Bruno; Tavian, Manuela; Simmons, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that mAb BB9 reacts with a subset of CD34(+) human BM cells with hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) characteristics. Here we map B89 expression throughout hernatopoietic development and show that the earliest definitive HSCs that arise at the ventral wall of the aorta and

  11. TET2 deficiency inhibits mesoderm and hematopoietic differentiation in human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langlois, Thierry; da Costa Reis Monte Mor, Barbara; Lenglet, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    . Here, we show that TET2 expression is low in human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines and increases during hematopoietic differentiation. ShRNA-mediated TET2 knockdown had no effect on the pluripotency of various ES cells. However, it skewed their differentiation into neuroectoderm at the expense...... profile, including abnormal expression of neuronal genes. Intriguingly, when TET2 was knockdown in hematopoietic cells, it increased hematopoietic development. In conclusion, our work suggests that TET2 is involved in different stages of human embryonic development, including induction of the mesoderm...... and hematopoietic differentiation. Stem Cells 2014....

  12. Allo-reactivity of mesenchymal stem cells in rhesus macaques is dose and haplotype dependent and limits durable cell engraftment in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna A Isakova

    Full Text Available The emerging paradigm that MSCs are immune privileged has fostered the use of "off-the-shelf" allogeneic MSC-based therapies in human clinical trials. However, this approach ignores studies in experimental animals wherein transplantation of MSCs across MHC boundaries elicits measurable allo-immune responses. To determine if MSCs are hypo-immunogeneic, we characterized the immune response in rhesus macaques following intracranial administration of allogeneic vs. autologous MSCs. This analysis revealed unambiguous evidence of productive allo-recognition based on expansion of NK, B and T cell subsets in peripheral blood and detection of allo-specific antibodies in animals administered allogeneic but not autologous MSCs. Moreover, the degree of MHC class I and II mismatch between the MSC donor and recipient significantly influenced the magnitude and nature of the allo-immune response. Consistent with these findings, real-time PCR analysis of brain tissue from female recipients administered varying doses of male, allogeneic MSCs revealed a significant inverse correlation between MSC engraftment levels and cell dose. Changes in post-transplant neutrophil and lymphocyte counts also correlated with dose and were predictive of overall MSC engraftment levels. However, secondary antigen challenge failed to elicit a measurable immune response in allogeneic recipients. Finally, extensive behavior testing of animals revealed no main effect of cell dose on motor skills, social development, or temperament. Collectively, these data indicate that allogeneic MSCs are weakly immunogenic when transplanted across MHC boundaries in rhesus macaques and this negatively impacts durable engraftment levels. Therefore the use of unrelated donor MSCs should be carefully evaluated in human patients.

  13. Transplantation of artificial human lymphatic vascular tissues fabricated using a cell-accumulation technique and their engraftment in mouse tissue with vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Yoshiya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-09-06

    Transplantation of engineered tissues with microvascular structure is advancing towards therapeutic application to improve the flow of blood and/or lymphatic fluids. In lymphatic disorders, transplantation of tissue-engineered lymphatic grafts can be an ideal treatment for draining excessive lymphatic fluid. In this study, we examined the transplantation of three-dimensional artificial human lymphatic network tissue (AHLT) fabricated by the cell accumulation technique into the subcutaneous tissue and fascia of mice. At 2 weeks after transplantation, the AHLT showed engraftment of artificial lymphatic vessels immunopositive for human CD31 and human podoplanin. Notably, we also observed the generation of blood vessel-like structure comprising endothelial cells immunopositive for human CD34 and mural-like cells immunopositive for human CD90 and αSMA, which were considered as myofibroblasts. In the fabrication of AHLT in vitro, the sporadic emergence of human CD34-positive / Prox-1-negative sites was observed, followed by the formation of blood vessel-like structure in the graft within 7 days after transplantation. The fine structure of engrafted AHLT observed by transmission electron microscopy showed that the engrafted artificial lymphatic vessels possess the specific structures of native lymphatic capillaries such as loose inter-endothelial connections and anchoring filaments. In contrast, blood vessel-like structure showed tight inter-endothelial connections, thick basement membranes, and layers of mural-like cells, which resemble small blood vessels. These results suggested the remodeling of artificial lymphatic network to form blood vessel-like structure associated with mural-like cells along with AHLT fabrication and engraftment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term engraftment stability of peripheral blood stem cells cryopreserved using the dump-freezing method in a -80 degrees C mechanical freezer with 10% dimethyl sulfoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, C W; Kim, B S; Seo, J H; Shin, S W; Kim, Y H; Kim, J S

    2001-02-01

    In this study, we summarize our long-term follow-up data of 24 patients who underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) using the dump-freezing method in a -80 degrees C freezer. Collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells were mixed with a cryoprotectant solution consisting of autologous plasma and 20% dimethyl sulfoxide, then placed in a -80 degrees C freezer. The recovery rate of mononuclear cells (MNCs), colony-forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) colonies, and CD34+ cells were calculated. Engraftment time (with neutrophil count > 0.5 x 10(9)/L, platelet count > 50 x 10(9)/L) and normal hemopoiesis (neutrophil count > 2 x 10(9)/L, platelet count > 100 x 10(9)/L) were evaluated. Median duration of cryopreservation was 76 days. The mean recovery rates of MNCs, CFU-GM colonies, and CD34+ cells were 93.4%, 78.4%, and 95.3%, respectively. The median engraftment times of neutrophils and platelets were 8 and 27 days, respectively. The median normal hemopoiesis times of neutrophil and platelet were 31 and 45 days, respectively. Nine patients are alive and in complete remission (CR). Seven patients in first CR sustained normal hemopoiesis with a median duration of 35 months. Two patients, who achieved second CR after salvage chemotherapy due to a leukemia relapse after PBSCT, maintained engraftment status for 24 and 28 months, and 1 reached normal hemopoiesis. These results demonstrate that PBSCT using the dump-freezing method in a -80 degrees C freezer leads to acceptable long-term engraftment stability.

  15. Improving stem cell engraftment to enhance functional efficacy in cardiovascular disease: where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Thi-Van Bui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is a promising therapy for repairing damaged tissue. A growing body of research shows that stem cells work effectively in several diseases such as cardiovascular disease, hepatic disease, and diabetes. It has been shown that stem cells not only differentiate into functional cells and replace dead cells, but also release growth factors and cytokines which can recruit autologous cells. The most significant barrier to achieve clinical relevance of this treatment mode is the poor survival rate of injected cells. To improve transplantation and enhance functional outcome, investigations of gene transfection (overexpression of anti-apoptotic and antioxidant proteins, growth factor supplementation, and scaffolding matrices are being conducted. In this review, we will focus on methods to increase cell survival in stem cell transplantation as a novel treatment for cardiovascular disease.

  16. Sympathetic Innervation Induced in Engrafted Engineered Cardiomyocyte Sheets by Glial Cell Line Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-ming Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of myocardial tissue engineering is to repair or regenerate damaged myocardium with engineered cardiac tissue. However, this strategy has been hampered by lack of functional integration of grafts with native myocardium. Autonomic innervation may be crucial for grafts to function properly with host myocardium. In this study, we explored the feasibility of in vivo induction of autonomic innervation to engineered myocardial tissue using genetic modulation by adenovirus encoding glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. GFP-transgene (control group or GDNF overexpressing (GDNF group engineered cardiomyocyte sheets were transplanted on cryoinjured hearts in rats. Nerve fibers in the grafts were examined by immunohistochemistry at 1, 2, and 4 weeks postoperatively. Growth associated protein-43 positive growing nerves and tyrosine hydroxylase positive sympathetic nerves were first detected in the grafts at 2 weeks postoperatively in control group and 1 week in GDNF group. The densities of growing nerve and sympathetic nerve in grafts were significantly increased in GDNF group. No choline acetyltransferase immunopositive parasympathetic nerves were observed in grafts. In conclusion, sympathetic innervation could be effectively induced into engrafted engineered cardiomyocyte sheets using GDNF.

  17. Rapid engraftment without significant graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic transplantation of CD34+ selected cells from peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano-Ispizua, A; Rozman, C; Martínez, C; Marín, P; Briones, J; Rovira, M; Féliz, P; Viguria, M C; Merino, A; Sierra, J; Mazzara, R; Carreras, E; Montserrat, E

    1997-06-01

    We have prospectively evaluated the feasibility and results of the biotin-avidin immunoadsorption method (Ceprate SC system) for a phase I/II study of T-cell depletion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) for allogeneic transplantation. Twenty consecutive patients, median age, 40 years (21 to 54) and diagnoses of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (n = 5), acute myeloblastic leukemia (n = 7), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 2), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 1), refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (n = 3), histiocytosis X (n = 1), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 1), were conditioned with cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and total body irradiation (13 Gy; 4 fractions). HLA identical sibling donors received G-CSF at 10 microg/kg/d subcutaneously (SC); on days 5 and 6 (19 cases) and days 5 to 8 (1 case) donors underwent 10 L leukapheresis. PBPC were purified by positive selection of CD34+ cells using immunoadsorption biotin-avidin method (Ceprate SC) and were infused in the patients as the sole source of progenitor cells. No growth factors were administered posttransplant. The median recovery of CD34+ cells after the procedure was of 65%. The median number of CD34+ cells infused in the patients was 2.9 (range, 1.5 to 8.6) x 10(6)/kg. The median number of CD3+ cells administered was 0.42 x 10(6)/kg (range, 0.1 to 2). All patients engrafted. Neutrophil counts >500 and >1,000/microL were achieved at a median of 14 days (range, 10 to 18) and 15 days (range, 11 to 27), respectively. Likewise, platelet counts >20,000 and >50,000/microL were observed at a median of 10 days (range, 6 to 23) and 17 days (range, 12 to 130), respectively. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine plus methylprednisolone. No patient developed either grade II to IV acute or extensive chronic GVHD. After a median follow-up of 7.5 months (range, 2 to 22) three patients

  18. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cells: concepts, definitions, and the new reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Connie J

    2015-04-23

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) research took hold in the 1950s with the demonstration that intravenously injected bone marrow cells can rescue irradiated mice from lethality by reestablishing blood cell production. Attempts to quantify the cells responsible led to the discovery of serially transplantable, donor-derived, macroscopic, multilineage colonies detectable on the spleen surface 1 to 2 weeks posttransplant. The concept of self-renewing multipotent HSCs was born, but accompanied by perplexing evidence of great variability in the outcomes of HSC self-renewal divisions. The next 60 years saw an explosion in the development and use of more refined tools for assessing the behavior of prospectively purified subsets of hematopoietic cells with blood cell-producing capacity. These developments have led to the formulation of increasingly complex hierarchical models of hematopoiesis and a growing list of intrinsic and extrinsic elements that regulate HSC cycling status, viability, self-renewal, and lineage outputs. More recent examination of these properties in individual, highly purified HSCs and analyses of their perpetuation in clonally generated progeny HSCs have now provided definitive evidence of linearly transmitted heterogeneity in HSC states. These results anticipate the need and use of emerging new technologies to establish models that will accommodate such pluralistic features of HSCs and their control mechanisms. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Bioluminescence Imaging of Olig2-Neural Stem Cells Reveals Improved Engraftment in a Demyelination Mouse Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; van Dam, Go; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2009-01-01

    A major issue in the potential application of neural stem cell (NSC)-based cell replacement therapy for demyelinating diseases is the question of the survival, functional behavior, and stability of implanted NSC-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) over an extended period. To address this

  1. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Tanyeli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Attemps to employ marrow stem cell for therapeutic purpose began in 1940’s. Marrow transplantation might be of use not only in irradiation protection, but also with therapeutic aim to marrow aplasia, leukemia and other diseases. The use and defining tissue antigens in humans were crucial to the improving of transplantation. The administration of methotrexate for GVHD improved the long term survival. Conditioning regimens for myeloablation designed according to diseases. Cord blood and peripheral blood stem cells were used for transplantion after 1980’s. Cord blood and bone marrow stem cell banks established to find HLA matched donor.

  2. Maintenance of human embryonic stem cells in mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media augments hematopoietic specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Fernández, Agustín F; Ayllón, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Bueno, Clara; Anderson, Per; Martín, Francisco; Fraga, Mario F; Menendez, Pablo

    2012-06-10

    The realization of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) as a model for human developmental hematopoiesis and in potential cell replacement strategies relies on an improved understanding of the extrinsic and intrinsic factors regulating hematopoietic-specific hESC differentiation. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells of mesodermal origin that form a part of hematopoietic stem cell niches and have an important role in the regulation of hematopoiesis through production of secreted factors and/or cell-to-cell interactions. We have previously shown that hESCs may be successfully maintained feeder free using hMSC-conditioned media (MSC-CM). Here, we hypothesized that hESCs maintained in MSC-CM may be more prone to differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage than hESCs grown in standard human foreskin fibroblast-conditioned media. We report that specification into hemogenic progenitors and subsequent hematopoietic differentiation and clonogenic progenitor capacity is robustly enhanced in hESC lines maintained in MSC-CM. Interestingly, co-culture of hESCs on hMSCs fully abrogates hematopoietic specification of hESCs, thus suggesting that the improved hematopoietic differentiation is mediated by MSC-secreted factors rather than by MSC-hESC physical interactions. To investigate the molecular mechanism involved in this process, we analyzed global (LINE-1) methylation and genome-wide promoter DNA methylation. hESCs grown in MSC-CM showed a decrease of 17% in global DNA methylation and a promoter DNA methylation signature consisting of 45 genes commonly hypomethylated and 102 genes frequently hypermethylated. Our data indicate that maintenance of hESCs in MSC-CM robustly augments hematopoietic specification and that the process seems mediated by MSC-secreted factors conferring a DNA methylation signature to undifferentiated hESCs which may influence further predisposition toward hematopoietic specification.

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and History

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atila Tanyeli; Gulcan Aykut; Ahmet Onur Demirel; Tugba Akcaoglu

    2014-01-01

    Attemps to employ marrow stem cell for therapeutic purpose began in 1940's. Marrow transplantation might be of use not only in irradiation protection, but also with therapeutic aim to marrow aplasia, leukemia and other diseases...

  4. Early hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a patient with severe mucopolysaccharidosis II: A 7 years follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneliese L. Barth

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II - Hunter syndrome is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency in the enzyme iduronate-2 sulfatase (I2S, leading to the accumulation of the glycosaminoglycans, affecting multiple organs and systems. Enzyme replacement therapy does not cross the blood brain barrier, limiting results in neurological forms of the disease. Another option of treatment for severe MPS, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT has become the treatment of choice for the severe form of MPS type I, since it can preserve neurocognition when performed early in the course of the disease. To date, only few studies have examined the long-term outcomes of HSCT in patients with MPS II. We describe the seven-year follow-up of a prenatally diagnosed MPS II boy with positive family history of severe MPS form, submitted to HSCT with umbilical cord blood cells at 70 days of age. Engraftment after 30 days revealed mixed chimerism with 79% donor cells; after 7 years engraftment remains at 80%. I2S activity 30 days post-transplant was low in plasma and normal in leukocytes and the same pattern is observed to date. At age 7 years growth charts are normal and he is very healthy, although mild signs of dysostosis multiplex are present, as well as hearing loss. The neuropsychological evaluation (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Fourth Edition - WISC-IV, disclosed an IQ of 47. Despite this low measured IQ, the patient continues to show improvements in cognitive, language and motor skills, being quite functional. We believe that HSCT is a therapeutic option for MPS II patients with the severe phenotype, as it could preserve neurocognition or even halt neurodegeneration, provided strict selection criteria are followed.

  5. Promotion of Survival and Engraftment of Transplanted Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal and Vascular Cells by Overexpression of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Baldari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Short-term persistence of transplanted cells during early post-implant period limits clinical efficacy of cell therapy. Poor cell survival is mainly due to the harsh hypoxic microenvironment transplanted cells face at the site of implantation and to anoikis, driven by cell adhesion loss. We evaluated the hypothesis that viral-mediated expression of a gene conferring hypoxia resistance to cells before transplant could enhance survival of grafted cells in early stages after implant. We used adipose tissue as cell source because it consistently provides high yields of adipose-tissue-derived stromal and vascular cells (ASCs, suitable for regenerative purposes. Luciferase positive cells were transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing either green fluorescent protein as control or human manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2. Cells were then exposed in vitro to hypoxic conditions, mimicking cell transplantation into an ischemic site. Cells overexpressing SOD2 displayed survival rates significantly greater compared to mock transduced cells. Similar results were also obtained in vivo after implantation into syngeneic mice and assessment of cell engraftment by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Taken together, these findings suggest that ex vivo gene transfer of SOD2 into ASCs before implantation confers a cytoprotective effect leading to improved survival and engraftment rates, therefore enhancing cell therapy regenerative potential.

  6. Imaging of complications from hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell transplant has been the focus of clinical research for a long time given its potential to treat several incurable diseases like hematological malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and neuro-degenerative disorders like Parkinson disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the oldest and most widely used technique of stem cell transplant. HSCT has not only been used to treat hematological disorders including hematological malignancies, but has also been found useful in treamtent of genetic, immunological, and solid tumors like neuroblastoma, lymphoma, and germ cell tumors. In spite of the rapid advances in stem cell technology, success rate with this technique has not been universal and many complications have also been seen with this form of therapy. The key to a successful HSCT therapy lies in early diagnosis and effective management of complications associated with this treatment. Our article aims to review the role of imaging in diagnosis and management of stem cell transplant complications associated with HSCT.

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with conditioning regimens containing melphalan in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Takaharu; Kato, Koji [Nagoya First Red Cross Hospital (Japan). Children' s Medical Center; Hanada, Ryoji [Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Iwatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    A multicenter comparative study was carried out to investigate the efficacy and safety of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with conditioning regimens containing melphalan in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. One hundred twenty three patients at a variety of remission stages were eligible for study participation. Eighty-nine were transplanted with allogeneic grafts and 34 patients with autologous grafts (23 cases with bone marrow and 11 cases with peripheral blood stem cells). Conditioning regimens used were as follows: melphalan and busulfan for 40 patients, melphalan, busulfan and TBI for 44 patients, other regimens for 39 patients. To accelerate engraftment G-CSF (lenograstim) was administered as a 1-hour or 24-hour drip infusion daily at 5 {mu}g/kg from day 5 until hematological recovery. The five year disease free survival (DFS) was 63% for 42 patients at CR1, 41% for 41 patients at CR2 and 33% for 40 patients at other stages. There was no significant difference in the DFS between allogeneic-transplantation and autologous-transplantation in all disease stages. In patients at remission stage for CR1 and CR2, the 5-year DFS by conditioning regimen was 63% for regimen with melphalan and busulfan, 54% for regimen with melphalan, busulfan and TBI and 54% for regimens with melphalan and TBI. There was no significant difference in the DFS between the groups. Serious complications such as renal failure were observed in 11%, veno-occlusive disease in 9%, and interstitial pneumonia in 9%. The most dominating cause of death was relapse in the disease (48% of deaths) which was most commonly observed in autologous transplantation. Contrary to that, treatment related toxic death was the most frequent cause of deaths in allogeneic-transplantation. (author)

  8. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials. ©AlphaMed Press.

  9. Engraftment of enteric neural progenitor cells into the injured adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Hotta, Ryo; Whalen, Michael; Nayyar, Naema; Nagy, Nandor; Cheng, Lily; Zuckerman, Aaron; Goldstein, Allan M; Dietrich, Jorg

    2016-01-25

    A major area of unmet need is the development of strategies to restore neuronal network systems and to recover brain function in patients with neurological disease. The use of cell-based therapies remains an attractive approach, but its application has been challenging due to the lack of suitable cell sources, ethical concerns, and immune-mediated tissue rejection. We propose an innovative approach that utilizes gut-derived neural tissue for cell-based therapies following focal or diffuse central nervous system injury. Enteric neuronal stem and progenitor cells, able to differentiate into neuronal and glial lineages, were isolated from the postnatal enteric nervous system and propagated in vitro. Gut-derived neural progenitors, genetically engineered to express fluorescent proteins, were transplanted into the injured brain of adult mice. Using different models of brain injury in combination with either local or systemic cell delivery, we show that transplanted enteric neuronal progenitor cells survive, proliferate, and differentiate into neuronal and glial lineages in vivo. Moreover, transplanted cells migrate extensively along neuronal pathways and appear to modulate the local microenvironment to stimulate endogenous neurogenesis. Our findings suggest that enteric nervous system derived cells represent a potential source for tissue regeneration in the central nervous system. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to explore whether autologous gut-derived cell transplantation into the injured brain can result in functional neurologic recovery.

  10. Comparison of chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: Chemotherapy is frequently used as a conditioning regimen to destroy malignant marrow cells before transplantation. Xerostomia, dysphagia, altered taste perception, mucositis, soft‑tissue ulceration, and infection are common adverse oral effects of chemotherapy. The study was aimed to compare decayed, missing, ...

  11. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  12. Functional evaluation indicates physical losses after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Vasconcellos de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a function evaluation of patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: From November 2008 to November 2010, 29 female (58% and 21 male patients (42% with median age of 48 years (range: 24-67 were enrolled in this study. Data collection was performed before and after autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Evaluation instruments included the 2-minute walking test to evaluate gait performance with assessment of the oxygen saturation, heart rate and Borg Scale before and after the test; grip strength for strength evaluation, Schober Test for spine mobility testing and maximum and adapted activity scores of the Human Activity Profile questionnaire to test functionality in daily activities. RESULTS: Fifty patients were evaluated at baseline; six did not undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (three died, one refused and two were excluded. Thus 44/50 (88% - 21 allogeneic and 23 autologous transplantations were performed. Only 33 of the 44 patients (75% performed evaluations after transplantation (nine died and two were excluded. Of the patients who performed both evaluations, significantly lower values were found in the evaluation after transplantation for the 2-minute walking test (p-value = 0.004, grip strength of both right and left hands (p-value = 0.004 and p-value < 0.0001, respectively, the Schober Test, and maximum and adapted activity scores (p-value < 0.0001. The heart rate was higher (p-value = 0.01 before the 2-minute walking test and oxygen saturation was higher (p-value = 0.02 after. CONCLUSION: Statistical differences indicate functional impairment after transplantation showing physical losses in this population.

  13. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso José Pereira Cortez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. RESULTS: The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. CONCLUSION: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not

  14. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  15. Cardiac atrial appendage stem cells engraft and differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vivo: A new tool for cardiac repair after MI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton, Yanick; Robic, Boris; Rummens, Jean-Luc; Daniëls, Annick; Windmolders, Severina; Willems, Leen; Jamaer, Luc; Dubois, Jasperina; Bijnens, Eric; Heuts, Nic; Notelaers, Kristof; Paesen, Rik; Ameloot, Marcel; Mees, Urbain; Bito, Virginie; Declercq, Jeroen; Hensen, Karen; Koninckx, Remco; Hendrikx, Marc

    2015-12-15

    This study assessed whether autologous transplantation of cardiac atrial appendage stem cells (CASCs) preserves cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) in a minipig model. CASCs were isolated from right atrial appendages of Göttingen minipigs based on high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and expanded. MI was induced by a 2h snare ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Upon reperfusion, CASCs were intramyocardially injected under NOGA guidance (MI-CASC, n=10). Non-transplanted pigs (MI, n=8) received sham treatment. 3D electromechanical mapping (EMM) and cardiac MRI were performed to assess left ventricular (LV) function. MI pigs developed LV dilatation at 2 months (2M), while in the MI-CASC group volumes remained stable. Global LV ejection fraction decreased by 16 ± 8% in MI animals vs 3 ± 10% in MI-CASC animals and regional wall thickening in border areas was better preserved in the MI-CASC group. EMM showed decreased viability and wall motion in the LV for both groups POST-MI, whereas at 2M these parameters only improved in the MI-CASC. Substantial cell retention was accompanied by cardiomyogenic differentiation in 98±1% of the transplanted CASCs, which functionally integrated. Second harmonic generation microscopy confirmed the formation of mature sarcomeres in transplanted CASCs. Absence of cardiac arrhythmias indicated the safety of CASC transplantation. CASCs preserve cardiac function by extensive engraftment and cardiomyogenic differentiation. Our data indicate the enormous potential of CASCs in myocardial repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Engineering antigen-specific T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells in immunodeficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott G Kitchen

    Full Text Available There is a desperate need for effective therapies to fight chronic viral infections. The immune response is normally fastidious at controlling the majority of viral infections and a therapeutic strategy aimed at reestablishing immune control represents a potentially powerful approach towards treating persistent viral infections. We examined the potential of genetically programming human hematopoietic stem cells to generate mature CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes that express a molecularly cloned, "transgenic" human anti-HIV T cell receptor (TCR. Anti-HIV TCR transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells directed the maturation of a large population of polyfunctional, HIV-specific CD8+ cells capable of recognizing and killing viral antigen-presenting cells. Thus, through this proof-of-concept we propose that genetic engineering of human hematopoietic stem cells will allow the tailoring of effector T cell responses to fight HIV infection or other diseases that are characterized by the loss of immune control.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell-specific GFP-expressing transgenic mice generated by genetic excision of a pan-hematopoietic reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Boyer, Scott W; Landon, Mark; Forsberg, E Camilla

    2016-08-01

    Selective labeling of specific cell types by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) within the hematopoietic system would have great utility in identifying, localizing, and tracking different cell populations in flow cytometry, microscopy, lineage tracing, and transplantation assays. In this report, we describe the generation and characterization of a new transgenic mouse line with specific GFP labeling of all nucleated hematopoietic cells and platelets. This new "Vav-GFP" mouse line labels the vast majority of hematopoietic cells with GFP during both embryonic development and adulthood, with particularly high expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). With the exception of transient labeling of fetal endothelial cells, GFP expression is highly selective for hematopoietic cells and persists in donor-derived progeny after transplantation of HSPCs. Finally, we also demonstrate that the loxP-flanked reporter allows for specific GFP labeling of different hematopoietic cell subsets when crossed to various Cre reporter lines. By crossing Vav-GFP mice to Flk2-Cre mice, we obtained robust and highly selective GFP expression in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These data describe a new mouse model capable of directing GFP labeling exclusively of hematopoietic cells or exclusively of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral changes in individuals undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Haddad Barrach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receive high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which cause severe immunosuppression.OBJECTIVE: To report an oral disease management protocol before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.METHODS: A prospective study was carried out with 65 patients aged > 18 years, with hematological diseases, who were allocated into two groups: A (allogeneic transplant, 34 patients; B (autologous transplant, 31 patients. A total of three dental status assessments were performed: in the pre-transplantation period (moment 1, one week after stem cell infusion (moment 2, and 100 days after transplantation (moment 3. In each moment, oral changes were assigned scores and classified as mild, moderate, and severe risks.RESULTS: The most frequent pathological conditions were gingivitis, pericoronitis in the third molar region, and ulcers at the third moment assessments. However, at moments 2 and 3, the most common disease was mucositis associated with toxicity from the drugs used in the immunosuppression.CONCLUSION: Mucositis accounted for the increased score and potential risk of clinical complications. Gingivitis, ulcers, and pericoronitis were other changes identified as potential risk factors for clinical complications.

  19. Pulmonary function impairment in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesiak, Pawel; Gorczynska, Ewa; Brzecka, Anna; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Deterioration of pulmonary function can be the sole symptom of early stages of pulmonary complications following allogeneic hematopoietic cells transplantation (alloHCT). The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and types of pulmonary function abnormalities in allogenic cells recipients. Twenty three (5 children and 18 adults) allogeneic hematopoietic cells recipients who underwent pulmonary function assessment before and 6-12 months after alloHCT were included in the study. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC), and lung diffusion capacity for carbon dioxide (D(L)CO) were determined. Values function impairment before alloHCT: obstructive lung disease (4%), restrictive lung disease (13%), and decreased D(L)CO (17%). In 19 patients (83%) pulmonary function abnormalities were demonstrated after alloHCT. The most common disturbance was a D(L)CO decrease that occurred in 16 patients (70%). In conclusion, frequency of pulmonary function abnormalities in patients after alloHCT is high. A diffusion capacity decrease and restrictive pattern of ventilation insufficiency develop in the majority of patients after alloHCT. It would be reasonable to include pulmonary function testing to standard periodic examination in patients qualified for, and after, alloHCT procedure.

  20. Oral changes in individuals undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrach, Regina Haddad; Souza, Mair Pedro de; Silva, Daniela Polo Camargo da; Lopez, Priscila Suman; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receive high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which cause severe immunosuppression. To report an oral disease management protocol before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A prospective study was carried out with 65 patients aged>18 years, with hematological diseases, who were allocated into two groups: A (allogeneic transplant, 34 patients); B (autologous transplant, 31 patients). A total of three dental status assessments were performed: in the pre-transplantation period (moment 1), one week after stem cell infusion (moment 2), and 100 days after transplantation (moment 3). In each moment, oral changes were assigned scores and classified as mild, moderate, and severe risks. The most frequent pathological conditions were gingivitis, pericoronitis in the third molar region, and ulcers at the third moment assessments. However, at moments 2 and 3, the most common disease was mucositis associated with toxicity from the drugs used in the immunosuppression. Mucositis accounted for the increased score and potential risk of clinical complications. Gingivitis, ulcers, and pericoronitis were other changes identified as potential risk factors for clinical complications. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacoeconomics of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization : An Overview of Current Evidence and Gaps in the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaughnessy, Paul; Chao, Nelson; Shapiro, Jamie; Walters, Kent; McCarty, John; Abhyankar, Sunil; Shayani, Sepideh; Helmons, Pieter; Leather, Helen; Pazzalia, Amy; Pickard, Simon

    Adequate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization and collection is required prior to proceeding with high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Cytokines such as G-CSF, GM-CSF, and peg-filgrastim, alone or in combination with plerixafor, and after chemotherapy have

  2. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, M; van Os, R; Velders, GA; Hagoort, H; Heegaard, PMH; Lindley, IJD; Willemze, R; Fibbe, WE

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory

  3. Effects of hematopoietic growth factors on purified bone marrow progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Bot (Freek)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractWe have used highly enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells and in-vitro culture to examine the following questions: 1. The effects of recombinant lL-3 and GM-CSF on proliferation and differentiation of enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells have not been clearly defined: - how do IL~3

  4. Vitamin D deficiency and outcomes in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Kristen; Magee, Kyrie; McNulty, Annmarie; Stahlecker, Jennifer; Salzberg, Dana; Miller, Holly; Mirea, Lucia; Adams, Roberta; Ngwube, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are frequently diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency, which may impact outcomes. To estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and examine its association with short-term survival in pediatric HSCT patients. Patients undergoing HSCT at Phoenix Children's Hospital were retrospectively identified. Routine serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D measurements were described prior to transplant and at 100 days and 1-year post-HSCT. Associations of pre-HSCT vitamin D groups (i.e., normal ≥30 ng/ml, insufficient 20-29 ng/ml, and deficient <30 ng/ml) with demographics, clinical factors, and outcomes were examined using nonparametric tests and Cox proportional hazards analyses. Among 72 study subjects, the median vitamin D pre-HSCT was 26 ng/ml (range: 19-34 ng/ml). Levels were insufficient and deficient in 25 (35%) and 20 (28%) patients, respectively, with only two (3%) patients on supplemental therapy pre-HSCT. Despite supplemental therapy provided to 46 (74%) subjects, insufficient/deficient rates did not significantly change between pre-HSCT and 100 days post-HSCT, but mean vitamin D levels significantly increased by 1-year post-HSCT (P = 0.01).Vitamin D pre-HSCT was not associated with the development of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or delayed engraftment. Overall 1-year survival was significantly lower for patients with deficient (65%) compared to normal (93%) pre-HSCT vitamin D (P = 0.001). Suboptimal vitamin D levels are common in pediatric patients scheduled to receive HSCT and are associated with lower overall 1-year survival. Further study is warranted to delineate the mechanisms underlying the role of vitamin D in successful HSCT. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somaraju, Usha R; Tadepalli, Krishna

    2017-10-18

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Current treatment of the disease involves a choice from enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy and hemotopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT is a high risk procedure with possible long-term benefits in the regression of skeletal and neurological changes in people with Gaucher disease. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To determine the role of HSCT in people with Gaucher disease in relation to: mortality risk associated with the procedure; efficacy in modifying the course of the disease; and arrest or regression of neurological manifestations in neuronopathic forms (types 2 and 3). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Inborn Errors of Metabolism Trials Register which comprises of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 19 January 2017.We also searched the websites: www.clinicaltrials.gov; WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform portal and www.genzymeclinicalresearch.com. Date of most recent search of these sites: 02 March 2017. All randomised, quasi-randomised and controlled clinical trials comparing stem cell transplantation with enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, symptomatic treatment or no treatment in people with Gaucher disease of all ages. We independently assessed trials for inclusion, however, no relevant trials were identified. Thirty two trials were identified by the searches; however, these were not suitable for inclusion in the review. HSCT is a form of treatment that offers the potential of permanent cure. However, there are no clinical trials that have assessed the safety and efficacy of this treatment in comparison to other

  6. Priming of mononuclear cells with a combination of growth factors enhances wound healing via high angiogenic and engraftment capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Enze; Kim, Jong-Min; Kim, Sung-Whan

    2013-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that a specific combination of growth factors enhances the survival, adhesion and angiogenic potential of mononuclear cells (MNCs). In this study, we sought to investigate the changes of the angiogenic potential of MNCs after short-time priming with a specific combination of growth factors. MNCs were isolated using density gradient centrifugation and incubated with a priming cocktail containing epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FMS-like tyrosine kinase (Flt)-3L , Angiopoietin (Ang)-1, granulocyte chemotactic protein (GCP)-2 and thrombopoietin (TPO) (all 400 ng/ml) for 15, 30 and 60 min. Wounds in nonobese diabetic-severe combined immune deficiency (NOD-SCID) mice were created by skin excision followed by cell transplantation. We performed a qRT-PCR analysis on the growth factor-primed cells. The angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, FGF-2, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and interleukin (IL)-8 and the anti-apoptotic factors IGF-1 and transforming growth factor-β1 were significantly elevated in the MNCs primed for 30 min. (T30) compared with the non-primed MNCs (T0). The scratch wound assay revealed that T30- conditioned media (CM) significantly increased the rate of fibroblast-mediated wound closure compared with the rates from T0-CM and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)-CM at 20 hrs. In vivo wound healing results revealed that the T30-treated wounds demonstrated accelerated wound healing at days 7 and 14 compared with those treated with T0. The histological analyses demonstrated that the number of engrafted cells and transdifferentiated keratinocytes in the wounds were significantly higher in the T30-transplanted group than in the T0-transplanted group. In conclusion, this study suggests that short-term priming of MNCs with growth factors might be alternative therapeutic option for cell

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  7. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  8. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers.

  9. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Emmons

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers.

  10. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  11. Is Cytomegalovirus Surveillance Necessary for Patients With Low Reactivation Risk in an Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, A H; Tekgunduz, E; Akpinar, S; Batgi, H; Bekdemir, F; Kayikci, O; Namdaroglu, S; Ulu, B U; Dal, M S; Cakar, M K; Korkmaz, S; Altuntas, F

    2017-10-01

    In an autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) setting, routine cytomegalovirus (CMV) surveillance is not indicated except in high-risk situations. On the other hand, some studies reported increased CMV reactivation in AHCT setting as a result of incorporation of novel agents into treatment algorithms, such as bortezomib and rituximab. We retrospectively analyzed CMV reactivation and infection rates in patients with no high-risk features, who were treated with AHCT. During January 2010 to November 2015, all consecutive, CMV-seropositive patients were included. The viral copy numbers were measured twice a week from the start of the conditioning regimen until engraftment, once a week for the remaining time period until day 30 after AHCT and once weekly only for patients who had been diagnosed with CMV reactivation before and who developed primary/secondary engraftment failure during 31 to 60 days after AHCT. One hundred one (61.6%) men and 63 (38.4%) women were included in the study. The median age of study cohort was 51 years (range, 16-71 years). The indications for AHCT were Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma in 44 (26.8%), 41 (25%), and 79 (48.2%) patients, respectively. CMV reactivation occurred in 60 (37%) patients, and 13 patients (8%) received pre-emptive ganciclovir treatment. On the basis of our results, it might be stated that CMV surveillance may be recommended during 40 days after AHCT in countries with a high CMV prevalence, even in patients without high-risk features regarding reactivation. Additionally, the risky conditions necessitating CMV screening after AHCT must be re-defined in the era of novel agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Use of Intravenous Antibiotics at the Onset of Neutropenia in Patients Receiving Outpatient-Based Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadah, Aziz; Schreiber, Yoko; Toye, Baldwin; McDiarmid, Sheryl; Huebsch, Lothar; Bredeson, Christopher; Tay, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Empirical antibiotics at the onset of febrile neutropenia are one of several strategies for management of bacterial infections in patients undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) (empiric strategy). Our HSCT program aims to perform HSCT in an outpatient setting, where an empiric antibiotic strategy was employed. HSCT recipients began receiving intravenous antibiotics at the onset of neutropenia in the absence of fever as part of our institutional policy from 01 Jan 2009; intravenous Prophylactic strategy. A prospective study was conducted to compare two consecutive cohorts [Year 2008 (Empiric strategy) vs. Year 2009 (Prophylactic strategy)] of patients receiving HSCT. There were 238 HSCTs performed between 01 Jan 2008 and 31 Dec 2009 with 127 and 111 in the earlier and later cohorts respectively. Infection-related mortality pre- engraftment was similar with a prophylactic compared to an empiric strategy (3.6% vs. 7.1%; p = 0.24), but reduced among recipients of autologous HSCT (0% vs. 6.8%; p = 0.03). Microbiologically documented, blood stream infections and clinically documented infections pre-engraftment were reduced in those receiving a prophylactic compared to an empiric strategy, (11.7% vs. 28.3%; p = 0.001), (9.9% vs. 24.4%; p = 0.003) and (18.2% vs. 33.9% p = 0.007) respectively. The prophylactic use of intravenous once-daily ceftriaxone in patients receiving outpatient based HSCT is safe and may be particularly effective in patients receiving autologous HSCT. Further studies are warranted to study the impact of this Prophylactic strategy in an outpatient based HSCT program. PMID:23029441

  13. No association between donor telomere length and outcomes after allogeneic unrelated hematopoietic cell transplant in patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Wang, Tao; Loftus, David; Friedman, Lyssa; Dagnall, Casey; Haagenson, Michael; Spellman, Stephen R; Buturovic, Ljubomir; Blauwkamp, Marsha; Shelton, Jason; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Hsu, Katharine C; Verneris, Michael R; Krstajic, Damjan; Hicks, Belynda; Jones, Kristine; Lee, Stephanie J; Savage, Sharon A

    2017-12-21

    Recent studies suggest improved survival in patients with severe aplastic anemia receiving hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) from unrelated donors with longer telomeres. Here, we tested whether this effect is generalizable to patients with acute leukemia. From the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR®) database, we identified 1097 patients who received 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated HCT for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) between 2004 and 2012 with myeloablative conditioning, and had pre-HCT blood sample from the donor in CIBMTR repository. The median age at HCT for recipients was 40 years (range ≤1-68), and 32 years for donors (range = 18-61). We used qPCR for relative telomere length (RTL) measurement, and Cox proportional hazard models for statistical analyses. In a discovery cohort of 300 patients, longer donor RTL (>25th percentile) was associated with reduced risks of relapse (HR = 0.62, p = 0.05) and acute graft-versus-host disease II-IV (HR = 0.68, p = 0.05), and possibly with a higher probability of neutrophil engraftment (HR = 1.3, p = 0.06). However, these results did not replicate in two validation cohorts of 297 and 488 recipients. There was one exception; a higher probability of neutrophil engraftment was observed in one validation cohort (HR = 1.24, p = 0.05). In a combined analysis of the three cohorts, no statistically significant associations (all p > 0.1) were found between donor RTL and any outcomes.

  14. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  15. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Deconstructing the Complexity of TGFβ Signaling in Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Quiescence and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinge, Ashwini; Filippi, Marie-Dominique

    2016-12-01

    The hematopoietic system is highly dynamic and must constantly produce new blood cells every day. Mature blood cells all derive from a pool of rare long-lived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are mostly quiescent but occasionally divide and self-renew in order to maintain the stem cell pool and continuous replenishment of mature blood cells throughout life. A tight control of HSC self-renewal, commitment to differentiation and maintenance of quiescence states is necessary for lifelong blood supply. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a critical regulator hematopoietic cell functions. It is a potent inhibitor of hematopoietic cell growth. However, TGFβ functions are more complex and largely context-dependent. Emerging evidence suggests a role in aging, cell identity and cell fate decisions. Here, we will review the role of TGF-β and downstream signaling in normal HSC functions, in HSC quiescence and beyond.

  17. Comparison of engraftment following different stem cell mobilization modalities in patients with multiple myeloma treated with a uniform induction regimen containing bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamini, Noam; Avivi, Irit; Dann, Eldad J; Zuckerman, Tsila; Lavi, Noa; Katz, Tami

    2017-03-01

    Bortezomib-based induction followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is a common treatment for multiple myeloma (MM). Stem cell (SC) mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone has become an alternative to G-CSF combined with chemotherapeutic agents. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of the two mobilization modalities following induction with a uniform regimen containing bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone (VCD). We retrospectively evaluated results of SC mobilization using either G-CSF alone or combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide (HD-CY) in MM patients after VCD induction. The primary endpoints of the study were engraftment and mobilization-associated toxicity. Parameters of stem cell collection, transplantation and engraftment were assessed. Data of 92 patients were analyzed [56 (61%) mobilized with HD-CY + G-CSF and 36 (39%) with G-CSF only]. HD-CY + G-CSF provided a higher number of CD34 + cells (15.9 vs 8.1 × 10 6 /kg, p = 0.001) with fewer apheresis sessions. However, while no adverse events were observed in patients receiving G-CSF alone, nine patients (16%) receiving HD-CY + G-CSF developed neutropenic fever requiring hospitalization. Although a greater number of cells was transplanted following mobilization with HD-CY + G-CSF, neutrophil and platelet engraftment and duration of transplant-related hospitalization were similar in both cohorts. G-CSF alone provided a sufficient SC amount, without exposing patients to additional toxicity. While HD-CY + G-CSF resulted in a superior SC yield in MM patients induced with VCD, this advantage should be balanced against adverse effects of this mobilization regimen.

  18. NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to test therapeutics targeting human signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadeh-Khorasani Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal models of human inflammatory diseases have limited predictive quality for human clinical trials for various reasons including species specific activation mechanisms and the immunological background of the animals which markedly differs from the genetically heterogeneous and often aged patient population. Objective Development of an animal model allowing for testing therapeutics targeting pathways involved in the development of Atopic Dermatitis (AD with better translatability to the patient. Methods NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC derived from patients suffering from AD and healthy volunteers were treated with IL-4 and the antagonistic IL-4 variant R121/Y124D (Pitrakinra. Levels of human (hIgE, amount of B-, T- and plasma- cells and ratio of CD4 : CD8 positive cells served as read out for induction and inhibition of cell proliferation and hIgE secretion. Results were compared to in vitro analysis. Results hIgE secretion was induced by IL-4 and inhibited by the IL-4 antagonist Pitrakinra in vivo when formulated with methylcellulose. B-cells proliferated in response to IL-4 in vivo; the effect was abrogated by Pitrakinra. IL-4 shifted CD4 : CD8 ratios in vitro and in vivo when hPBMC derived from healthy volunteers were used. Pitrakinra reversed the effect. Human PBMC derived from patients with AD remained inert and engrafted mice reflected the individual responses observed in vitro. Conclusion NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human PBMC reflect the immunological history of the donors and provide a complementary tool to in vitro studies. Thus, studies in this model might provide data with better translatability from bench to bedside.

  19. Rapid engraftment by peripheral blood progenitor cells mobilized by recombinant human stem cell factor and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R G; Briddell, R A; Knitter, G H; Rowley, S D; Appelbaum, F R; McNiece, I K

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that administration of low-dose recombinant human stem cell factor (rhSCF) plus recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) to baboons mobilizes greater numbers of progenitor cells in the blood than does administration of rhG-CSF alone. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether marrow repopulating cells are present in the blood of nonhuman primates administered low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF, and if present, whether these cells engraft lethally irradiated recipients as rapidly as blood cells mobilized by treatment with rhG-CSF alone. One group of baboons was administered low-dose rhSCF (25 micrograms/kg/d) plus rhG-CSF (100 micrograms/kg/d) while a second group received rhG-CSF alone (100 micrograms/kg/d). Each animal underwent a single 2-hour leukapheresis occurring the day when the number of progenitor cells per volume of blood was maximal. For baboons administered low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF, the leukapheresis products contained 1.8-fold more mononuclear cells and 14.0-fold more progenitor cells compared to the leukapheresis products from animals treated with rhG-CSF alone. All animals successfully engrafted after transplantation of cryopreserved autologous blood cells. In animals transplanted with low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells, we observed a time to a platelet count of > 20,000 was 8 days +/- 0, to a white blood cell count (WBC) of > 1,000 was 11 +/- 1 days, and to an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of > 500 was 12 +/- 1 days. These results compared with 42 +/- 12, 16 +/- 1, and 24 +/- 4 days to achieve platelets > 20,000, WBC > 1,000, and ANC > 500, respectively, for baboons transplanted with rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells. Animals transplanted with low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilized blood cells had blood counts equivalent to pretransplant values within 3 weeks after transplant. The results suggest that the combination of low-dose rhSCF plus rhG-CSF mobilizes greater numbers of

  20. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonek, Justyna; Kralj Juric, Mateja; Ghimire, Sakhila; Varanasi, Pavankumar Reddy; Holler, Ernst; Greinix, Hildegard; Weissinger, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The timely reconstitution and regain of function of a donor-derived immune system is of utmost importance for the recovery and long-term survival of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of note, new developments such as umbilical cord blood or haploidentical grafts were associated with prolonged immunodeficiency due to delayed immune reconstitution, raising the need for better understanding and enhancing the process of immune reconstitution and finding strategies to further optimize these transplant procedures. Immune reconstitution post-HSCT occurs in several phases, innate immunity being the first to regain function. The slow T cell reconstitution is regarded as primarily responsible for deleterious infections with latent viruses or fungi, occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, and relapse. Here we aim to summarize the major steps of the adaptive immune reconstitution and will discuss the importance of immune balance in patients after HSCT. PMID:27909435

  1. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  2. A novel complex, RUNX1-MYEF2, represses hematopoietic genes in erythroid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Riel (Boet); T. Pakozdi (Tibor); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); R. Monteiro (Rui); E. Tuladhar (Era); V. Franke (Vedran); J.C. Bryne; R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); E.J. Rijkers; W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); C. Andrieu-Soler (Charlotte); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); R. Patient (Roger); E. Soler (Eric); B. Lenhard (Boris); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractRUNX1 is known to be an essential transcription factor for generating hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), but much less is known about its role in the downstream process of hematopoietic differentiation. RUNX1 has been shown to be part of a large transcription factor complex, together with

  3. Hes repressors are essential regulators of hematopoietic stem cell development downstream of notch signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Guiu (Jordi); R. Shimizu (Ritsuko); C. D'Altri; S.T. Fraser (Stuart); S. Hatakeyama (Shingo); E.H. Bresnick (Emery); T. Kageyama (Tsutomu); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); M. Yamamoto (Masayuki); L. Espinosa (Lluis); A. Bigas (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies have identified Notch as a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, but the underlying downstream mechanisms remain unknown. The Notch target Hes1 is widely expressed in the aortic endothelium and hematopoietic clusters, though Hes1-deficient mice show

  4. Improved function and proliferation of adult human beta cells engrafted in diabetic immunodeficient NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice treated with alogliptin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurczyk A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Agata Jurczyk,1 Philip diIorio,1 Dean Brostowin,1 Linda Leehy,1 Chaoxing Yang,1 Fumihiko Urano,2 David M Harlan,3 Leonard D Shultz,4 Dale L Greiner,1 Rita Bortell1 1Program in Molecular Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 2Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, 3Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, 4The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA Purpose: Dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors are known to increase insulin secretion and beta cell proliferation in rodents. To investigate the effects on human beta cells in vivo, we utilize immunodeficient mice transplanted with human islets. The study goal was to determine the efficacy of alogliptin, a DPP-4 inhibitor, to enhance human beta cell function and proliferation in an in vivo context using diabetic immunodeficient mice engrafted with human pancreatic islets. Methods: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic NOD-scid IL2rγnull (NSG mice were transplanted with adult human islets in three separate trials. Transplanted mice were treated daily by gavage with alogliptin (30 mg/kg/day or vehicle control. Islet graft function was compared using glucose tolerance tests and non-fasting plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide; beta cell proliferation was determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation. Results: Glucose tolerance tests were significantly improved by alogliptin treatment for mice transplanted with islets from two of the three human islet donors. Islet-engrafted mice treated with alogliptin also had significantly higher plasma levels of human insulin and C-peptide compared to vehicle controls. The percentage of insulin+BrdU+ cells in human islet grafts from alogliptin-treated mice was approximately 10-fold more than from vehicle control mice, consistent with a significant increase in human beta cell proliferation. Conclusion: Human islet-engrafted immunodeficient mice

  5. The Total Body Irradiation Schedule Affects Acute Leukemia Relapse After Matched T Cell–Depleted Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristei, Cynthia, E-mail: cynthia.aristei@unipg.it [Radiation Oncology Section, Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, University of Perugia and Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Carotti, Alessandra [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Palazzari, Elisa [Radiation Oncology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Amico, Lucia; Ruggeri, Loredana [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Perrucci, Elisabetta; Falcinelli, Lorenzo [Radiation Oncology Division, Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Lancellotta, Valentina [Radiation Oncology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Palumbo, Isabella [Radiation Oncology Section, Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, University of Perugia and Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Falzetti, Franca [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Aversa, Franco [Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Parma General Hospital and University, Parma (Italy); Merluzzi, Mara; Velardi, Andrea; Martelli, Massimo Fabrizio [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to determine whether the total body irradiation (TBI) schedule affected outcome in patients with acute leukemia in complete remission who received T cell–depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from HLA identical siblings. Methods and Materials: The study recruited 55 patients (median age, 48 years; age range, 20-66 years; 30 men and 25 women; 34 with acute myeloid leukemia and 21 with acute lymphoid leukemia). Hyperfractionated TBI (HTBI) (1.2 Gy thrice daily for 4 days [for a total dose of 14.4 Gy] from day −12 to day −9) was administered to 29 patients. Single-dose TBI (STBI) (8 Gy, at a median dose rate of 10.7 cGy/min on day −9) was given to 26 patients. Results: All patients achieved primary, sustained engraftment with full donor-type chimerism. At 10 years, the overall cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality was 11% (SE, ±0.1%). It was 7% (SE, ±0.2%) after HTBI and 15% (SE, ±0.5%) after STBI (P=.3). The overall cumulative incidence of relapse was 33% (SE, ±0.5). It was 13% (SE, ±0.5%) after HTBI and 46% (SE, ±1%) after STBI (P=.02). The overall probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 59% (SE, ±7%). It was 67% (SE, ±0.84%) after HTBI and 37% (SE, ±1.4%) after STBI (P=.01). Multivariate analyses showed the TBI schedule was the only risk factor that significantly affected relapse and DFS (P=.01 and P=.03, respectively). Conclusions: In patients with acute leukemia, HTBI is more efficacious than STBI in eradicating minimal residual disease after HLA-matched T cell–depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, thus affecting DFS.

  6. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Ramsahai, Shweta; Kim, Bak C.; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2004-02-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological and cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, including muscle, bone, skin, liver, and neuronal cells, we advanced a hypothesis that some of the space-caused disorders might be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia (β-thalassemia) and spaceflight (hindlimb suspension unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, the β-thalassemic mice were successfully transplanted with isologous HSCs, resulting in chimerism of hemoglobin species and alleviation of the hemoglobinopathy. In the case of HSCT for muscle loss, β-galactosidase-marked HSCs, which were prepared from β-galactosidase-transgenic mice, were detected by the X-gal wholemount staining procedure in the hindlimbs of unloaded mice following transplantation. Histochemical and physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. To investigate HSCT for immunodeficiency, β-galactosidase-transformed Escherichia coli was used as the reporter bacteria, and infected to control and the hindlimb suspended mice. Results of the X-gal stained tissues indicated that the HSCT could help eliminate the E. coli infection. In an effort to facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs has been optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

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  1. File list: NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. Restricted intra-embryonic origin of bona fide hematopoietic stem cells in the chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yvernogeau, Laurent; Robin, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are responsible for blood cell production, are generated during embryonic development. Human and chicken embryos share features that position the chicken as a reliable and accessible alternative model to study developmental hematopoiesis. However, the existence

  4. CCND1–CDK4–mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E.; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1–CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1–CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1–CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. PMID:26150472

  5. Collection of peripheral hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dihenescikova, V Rimajova; Mistrik, M; Martinka, J; Zwiewka, M; Bizikova, I; Batorova, A

    2015-01-01

    Several variables possibly affecting collection of peripheral hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (PBSC) were evaluated: type of apheresis machine (Amicus version 2.5, Baxter vs Cobe Spectra version 7.0, Terumo BCT), venous access (peripheral vein vs central venous catheter, i.g. CVC), and apheresis regimen (standard vs large volume leukapheresis, i.g. SVL vs LVL) with the objective to increase collection efficacy at the site. Peripheral blood represents the currently preferred source of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) for transplantation. Data regarding 169 collection procedures performed in healthy donors and patients between January 2008 and December 2011 at the Clinics of Haematology and Transfusiology in St Cyril and Method Hospital in Bratislava (Slovakia) were analysed. With Cobe Spectra apheresis machine it was possible to process larger blood volumes per procedure with higher CD34+ cell collection efficiency (p = 0.0229) and lower RBC contamination of the harvest than with Amicus (p = 0.0116). On the other hand, Amicus helped to limit PLT contamination of the harvest (p < 0.0001), thus minimizing post-procedural decrease in patient´s PLT count. The highest detected advantage of CVC usage was higher flow rate of procedure, thus processing larger blood volumes per unit of time. Interesting finding was the tendency to lower harvest PLT contamination (p = 0.054). When LVL was performed, significantly higher HSCs yields were collected, even in "poor mobilizers" when the pre-run parameters were low. Management of PBSC collection requires a particular approach in each subject. Institutionally and individually optimized collection may help to improve the transplantation outcome and decrease the financial costs (Tab. 8, Ref. 15).

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Primary Immunodeficiency Patients in the Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldıran, Alişan; Çeliksoy, Mehmet Halil; Borte, Stephan; Güner, Şükrü Nail; Elli, Murat; Fışgın, Tunç; Özyürek, Emel; Sancak, Recep; Oğur, Gönül

    2017-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a promising curative therapy for many combined primary immunodeficiencies and phagocytic disorders. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric cases of patients diagnosed with primary immunodeficiencies and scheduled for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 22 patients (median age, 6 months; age range, 1 month to 10 years) with various diagnoses who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient diagnoses included severe combined immunodeficiency (n=11), Chediak-Higashi syndrome (n=2), leukocyte adhesion deficiency (n=2), MHC class 2 deficiency (n=2), chronic granulomatous syndrome (n=2), hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (n=1), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (n=1), and Omenn syndrome (n=1). Of the 22 patients, 7 received human leukocyte antigen-matched related hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, 12 received haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 2 received matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The results showed that 5 patients had graft failure. Fourteen patients survived, yielding an overall survival rate of 67%. Screening newborn infants for primary immunodeficiency diseases may result in timely administration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  7. Wnt3a protein reduces growth factor-driven expansion of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in serum-free cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia E Duinhouwer

    Full Text Available Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC is a promising approach to improve insufficient engraftment after umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation (UCB-SCT. Although culturing HSPC with hematopoietic cytokines results in robust proliferation, it is accompanied with extensive differentiation and loss of self-renewal capacity. Wnt signaling has been implicated in regulating HSPC fate decisions in vivo and in promoting HSPC self-renewal by inhibition of differentiation, but the effects of Wnt on the ex vivo expansion of HSPC are controversial. Here, we demonstrate that exogenous Wnt3a protein suppresses rather than promotes the expansion of UCB-derived CD34+ cells in serum free expansion cultures. The reduced expansion was also observed in cultures initiated with Lin-CD34+CD38lowCD45RA-CD90+ cells which are highly enriched in HSC and was also observed in response to activation of beta-catenin signaling by GSK3 inhibition. The presence of Wnt3a protein during the culture reduced the frequency of multilineage CFU-GEMM and the long-term repopulation ability of the expanded HSPC. These data suggest that Wnt signaling reduces expansion of human HSPC in growth factor-driven expansion cultures by promoting differentiation of HSPC.

  8. Higher infused CD34+ cell dose and overall survival in patients undergoing in vivo T-cell depleted, but not t-cell repleted, allogeneic peripheral blood hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanate, Abraham Sebastian; Craig, Michael; Cumpston, Aaron; Saad, Ayman; Hobbs, Gerry; Leadmon, Sonia; Bunner, Pamela; Watkins, Kathy; Bulian, Deirdre; Gibson, Laura; Abraham, Jame; Remick, Scott C; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the effect of cellular graft composition on allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) outcomes is an area of great interest. The objective of the study was to analyze the correlation between transplant-related outcomes and administered CD34+, CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cell doses in patients who had undergone peripheral blood, AHCT and received either in vivo T-cell depleted or T-cell replete allografts. Comparison of consecutive patients who underwent peripheral blood AHCT in our institution between January 2003 and December 2009. The cohort of 149 patients was divided into two groups; non T-cell depleted (NTCD) (n=54) and T-cell depleted (TCD) (n=95). Study endpoints were overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), engraftment kinetics (neutrophil and platelet recovery), incidence of acute graft versus host disease (acute GVHD), chronic GVHD, nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and disease relapse. Multivariate analysis showed that higher infused CD34+ cell dose improved OS (relative risk 0.58, 95% CI 0.34-0.98, P=.04), PFS (relative risk 0.59, 95% CI 0.35-1.00, P=.05) and NRM (relative risk 0.49, 95% CI 0.24-0.99, P=.048) in the TCD group. By multivariate analysis, there was no difference in engraftment, grades II-IV acute GVHD, extensive chronic GVHD and relapse in the two groups relative to the infused cell doses. There was a trend towards improved OS (relative risk 0.54, 95% CI 0.29-1.01, P=.05) with higher CD3+ cell dose in the TCD group. Our findings suggest that higher CD34+ cell dose imparts survival benefit only to in vivo TCD peripheral blood AHCT recipients.

  9. Interleukin-21 promotes thymopoiesis recovery following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Tormo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired T cell reconstitution remains a major deterrent in the field of bone marrow (BM transplantation (BMT due to pre-conditioning-induced damages inflicted to the thymi of recipient hosts. Given the previously reported thymo-stimulatory property of interleukin (IL-21, we reasoned that its use post-BMT could have a profound effect on de novo T cell development. Methods To evaluate the effect of IL-21 on de novo T cell development in vivo, BM derived from RAG2p-GFP mice was transplanted into LP/J mice. Lymphocyte reconstitution was first assessed using a hematological analyzer and a flow cytometer on collected blood samples. Detailed flow cytometry analysis was then performed on the BM, thymus, and spleen of transplanted animals. Finally, the effect of human IL-21 on thymopoiesis was validated in humanized mice. Results Using a major histocompatibility complex (MHC-matched allogeneic BMT model, we found that IL-21 administration improves immune reconstitution by triggering the proliferation of BM Lin−Sca1+c-kit+ (LSK subsets. The pharmacological effect of IL-21 also culminates in the recovery of both hematopoietic (thymocytes and non-hematopoietic (stromal cells within the thymi of IL-21-treated recipient animals. Although T cells derived from all transplanted groups proliferate, secrete various cytokines, and express granzyme B similarly in response to T cell receptor (TCR stimulation, full regeneration of peripheral naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and normal TCRvβ distribution could only be detected in IL-21-treated recipient mice. Astonishingly, none of the recipient mice who underwent IL-21 treatment developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in the MHC-matched allogeneic setting while the graft-versus-tumor (GVT effect was strongly retained. Inhibition of GVHD onset could also be attributed to the enhanced generation of regulatory B cells (B10 observed in the IL-21, but not PBS, recipient mice. We also tested the

  10. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an alternative stem cell source in Fanconi anemia patients: analysis of 47 patients from a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. de Medeiros

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We transplanted 47 patients with Fanconi anemia using an alternative source of hematopoietic cells. The patients were assigned to the following groups: group 1, unrelated bone marrow (N = 15; group 2, unrelated cord blood (N = 17, and group 3, related non-sibling bone marrow (N = 15. Twenty-four patients (51% had complete engraftment, which was not influenced by gender (P = 0.87, age (P = 0.45, dose of cyclophosphamide (P = 0.80, nucleated cell dose infused (P = 0.60, or use of anti-T serotherapy (P = 0.20. Favorable factors for superior engraftment were full HLA compatibility (independent of the source of cells; P = 0.007 and use of a fludarabine-based conditioning regimen (P = 0.046. Unfavorable factors were > or = 25 transfusions pre-transplant (P = 0.011 and degree of HLA disparity (P = 0.007. Intensity of mucositis (P = 0.50 and use of androgen prior to transplant had no influence on survival (P = 0.80. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD grade II-IV and chronic GVHD were diagnosed in 47 and 23% of available patients, respectively, and infections prevailed as the main cause of death, associated or not with GVHD. Eighteen patients are alive, the Kaplan-Meyer overall survival is 38% at ~8 years, and the best results were obtained with related non-sibling bone marrow patients. Three recommendations emerged from the present study: fludarabine as part of conditioning, transplant in patients with <25 transfusions and avoidance of HLA disparity. In addition, an extended family search (even when consanguinity is not present seeking for a related non-sibling donor is highly recommended.

  11. Iron Overload in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Pullarkat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT frequently have iron overload resulting from chronic transfusion therapy for anemia. In some cases, for example, in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and thalassemia, this can be further exacerbated by increased absorption of iron from the gut as a result of ineffective erythropoiesis. Accumulating evidence has established the negative impact of elevated pretransplantation serum ferritin, a surrogate marker of iron overload, on overall survival and nonrelapse mortality after HSCT. Complications of HSCT associated with iron overload include increased bacterial and fungal infections as well as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome and possibly other regimen-related toxicities. Based on current evidence, particular attention should be paid to prevention and management of iron overload in allogeneic HSCT candidates, especially in patients with thalassemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. The pathophysiology of iron overload in the HSCT patient and optimum strategies to deal with iron overload during and after HSCT require further study.

  12. Twitter Use in the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar S; Majhail, Navneet S

    2018-01-26

    Social media has revolutionized the access and exchange of information in healthcare. The microblogging platform Twitter has been used by blood and marrow transplant physicians over the last several years with increasing enthusiasm. We review the adoption of Twitter in the transplant community and its implications on clinical care, education, and research. Twitter allows instantaneous access to the latest research publications, developments at national and international meetings, networking with colleagues, participation in advocacy, and promoting available clinical trials. Additionally, Twitter serves as a gateway for resources dedicated to education and support for patients undergoing transplantation. We demonstrate the utilization and various applications in using Twitter among hematopoietic cell transplant healthcare professionals, patients, and other affiliated stakeholders. Professionalism concerns with clinician use of such social media platforms, however, also exist. Overall, Twitter has enhanced and increased the opportunities for engagement in the transplant community.

  13. Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masmas, T.N.; Petersen, S.L.; Madsen, H.O.

    2008-01-01

    Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with nonmyeloablative conditioning is a rare but serious clinical problem. Graft rejection and salvage therapy in eight patients in a retrospective analysis of 124 consecutive patients is reported. The patients were conditioned with low......-dose fludarabine and total body irradiation (TBI). The association of pretransplantation risk factors with rejection and the effect of chimerism and graft-versus-host disease on rejection were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without...... rejection. Retransplantation was performed with increased TBI conditioning for all patients, and with increased mycophenolate mofetil doses for recipients with HLA-identical sibling donors. No known pretransplantation risk factors were confirmed in this study. Rejection episodes were unevenly distributed...

  14. Genetic Engineering and Manufacturing of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyan Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The marketing approval of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs as the first-line therapy for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID is a tribute to the substantial progress that has been made regarding HSC engineering in the past decade. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade, genetically engineered HSCs is the foundation for broadening the application of this technology. Herein, the current state-of-the-art manufacturing platforms to genetically engineer HSCs as well as the challenges pertaining to production standardization and product characterization are addressed in the context of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs and other monogenic disorders.

  15. Bone Marrow Vascular Niche: Home for Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though discovered later than osteoblastic niche, vascular niche has been regarded as an alternative indispensable niche operating regulation on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. As significant progresses gained on this type niche, it is gradually clear that the main work of vascular niche is undertaking to support hematopoiesis. However, compared to what have been defined in the mechanisms through which the osteoblastic niche regulates hematopoiesis, we know less in vascular niche. In this review, based on research data hitherto we will focus on component foundation and various functions of vascular niche that guarantee the normal hematopoiesis process within bone marrow microenvironments. And the possible pathways raised by various research results through which this environment undergoes its function will be discussed as well.

  16. A synthetic three-dimensional niche system facilitates generation of functional hematopoietic cells from human-induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficient generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs holds great promise in personalized transplantation therapies. However, the derivation of functional and transplantable HSCs from iPSCs has had very limited success thus far. Methods We developed a synthetic 3D hematopoietic niche system comprising nanofibers seeded with bone marrow (BM-derived stromal cells and growth factors to induce functional hematopoietic cells from human iPSCs in vitro. Results Approximately 70 % of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells accompanied with CD43+ progenitor cells could be derived from this 3D induction system. Colony-forming-unit (CFU assay showed that iPSC-derived CD34+ cells formed all types of hematopoietic colonies including CFU-GEMM. TAL-1 and MIXL1, critical transcription factors associated with hematopoietic development, were expressed during the differentiation process. Furthermore, iPSC-derived hematopoietic cells gave rise to both lymphoid and myeloid lineages in the recipient NOD/SCID mice after transplantation. Conclusions Our study underscores the importance of a synthetic 3D niche system for the derivation of transplantable hematopoietic cells from human iPSCs in vitro thereby establishing a foundation towards utilization of human iPSC-derived HSCs for transplantation therapies in the clinic.

  17. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, EL Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression. PMID:26764384

  18. Differential bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells mobilization in hepatectomized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herencia, Carmen; Rodríguez-Ariza, Antonio; Canalejo, Antonio; Naranjo, Alvaro; Briceño, F Javier; López-Cillero, Pedro; De la Mata, Manuel; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R

    2011-08-01

    The involvement of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (BMHSC) mobilization during liver regeneration from hepatectomized patients is under debate. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of BMHSC mobilization after hepatic resection in 33 patients with liver disease. Mobilization of CD34(+) BMHSC after 72 h of surgery was found in peripheral blood of some, but not all, of the hepatectomized patients. These CD34(+) cells co-expressed other stem cells markers. The patients without BMHSC mobilization showed high levels of circulating and liver tissue BMHSC (CD34(+) cells) previous to surgery. Therefore, two types of patients: "mobilizers" and "non-mobilizers" were distinguished based on the values of CD34(+) cells before and after surgery. Changes in cytokines involved in the hepatic regeneration (HGF and TGF-β), and in BMHSC mobilization process (SCF, SDF-1, IL-12, or MMP-2), were detected in both groups. In addition, a higher activation previous to surgery of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in liver tissue was observed in non mobilizers patients compared to mobilizer patients. BMHSC mobilization seems to be associated with variations in the levels of cytokines and proteolytic enzymes involved in hepatic regeneration and bone marrow matrix degradation. Hepatectomy may be an insufficient stimulus for BMSHC mobilization. The pre-hepatectomy higher levels CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood and liver, associated to the activation of hepatic SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, suggest a BMHSC mobilization process previous to surgery in non mobilizer patients.

  19. Sirolimus and mirabegron interaction in a hematopoietic cell transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Jeff A; Fair, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Hematopoietic cell transplant patients are exposed to numerous classes of medications. Transplant practitioners must vigilantly monitor for drug interactions especially involving immunosuppressants. We report a hematopoietic cell transplant patient receiving sirolimus who developed supratherapeutic serum concentrations after initiating mirabegron. Summary A 31-year-old, 98 kg female received a second umbilical cord blood transplant four years after the first transplant for relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. Mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus were utilized for graft versus host disease prophylaxis. The patient was receiving sirolimus 2 mg daily and the serum concentration on day 26 post-transplant (day + 26) was within therapeutic range (6.7 μg/L, goal range 3-12 μg/L). Her post-transplant course was complicated by BK viruria-associated cystitis for which she was started on mirabegron. Six days after starting the new medication (day + 33), the sirolimus serum concentration increased to 19.2 μg/L. Thus mirabegron was discontinued and sirolimus was held. Sirolimus was restarted once the serum concentration was within goal and subsequently stabilized with a combination of 1 mg and 2 mg daily for a total weekly dose of 10 mg. The proposed mechanisms of interaction include: (1) sirolimus inhibition of organic anion transporting polypeptide leading to increased mirabegron in the intestinal lumen; (2) mirabegron inhibition of P-glycoprotein leading to increased absorption of sirolimus and; (3) increased sirolimus absorption leading to increased sirolimus serum concentrations. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a potential drug interaction between sirolimus and mirabegron. Transplant specialists should be aware of this potential interaction when considering the concurrent use of these medications.

  20. DNA damage: a sensible mediator of the differentiation decision in hematopoietic stem cells and in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Cary N; Ito, Keisuke

    2015-03-17

    In the adult, the source of functionally diverse, mature blood cells are hematopoietic stem cells, a rare population of quiescent cells that reside in the bone marrow niche. Like stem cells in other tissues, hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew, in order to maintain the stem cell population for the lifetime of the organism, and to differentiate, in order to give rise to the multiple lineages of the hematopoietic system. In recent years, increasing evidence has suggested a role for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in the decision for hematopoietic stem cells to exit quiescence and to differentiate. In this review, we will examine recent work supporting the idea that detection of cell stressors, such as oxidative and genetic damage, is an important mediator of cell fate decisions in hematopoietic stem cells. We will explore the benefits of such a system in avoiding the development and progression of malignancies, and in avoiding tissue exhaustion and failure. Additionally, we will discuss new work that examines the accumulation of DNA damage and replication stress in aging hematopoietic stem cells and causes us to rethink ideas of genoprotection in the bone marrow niche.

  1. DNA Damage: A Sensible Mediator of the Differentiation Decision in Hematopoietic Stem Cells and in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary N. Weiss

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the adult, the source of functionally diverse, mature blood cells are hematopoietic stem cells, a rare population of quiescent cells that reside in the bone marrow niche. Like stem cells in other tissues, hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew, in order to maintain the stem cell population for the lifetime of the organism, and to differentiate, in order to give rise to the multiple lineages of the hematopoietic system. In recent years, increasing evidence has suggested a role for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in the decision for hematopoietic stem cells to exit quiescence and to differentiate. In this review, we will examine recent work supporting the idea that detection of cell stressors, such as oxidative and genetic damage, is an important mediator of cell fate decisions in hematopoietic stem cells. We will explore the benefits of such a system in avoiding the development and progression of malignancies, and in avoiding tissue exhaustion and failure. Additionally, we will discuss new work that examines the accumulation of DNA damage and replication stress in aging hematopoietic stem cells and causes us to rethink ideas of genoprotection in the bone marrow niche.

  2. CD14+ cells from peripheral blood positively regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival resulting in increased erythroid yield

    OpenAIRE

    Heideveld, Esther; Masiello, Francesca; Marra, Manuela; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Yağcı, Nurcan; von Lindern, Marieke; Migliaccio, Anna Rita F.; van den Akker, Emile

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of erythroblasts from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells is 4- to 15-fold more efficient than that of CD34+ cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, purified CD34+ and CD34− populations from blood do not reconstitute this erythroid yield, suggesting a role for feeder cells present in blood mononuclear cells that increase hematopoietic output. Immunodepleting peripheral blood mononuclear cells for CD14+ cells reduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor...

  3. [Analysis and significance of hematopoietic progenitor B cells in patients with acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-Li; Wang, Shun-Qing; Mao, Ping; DU, Qing-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Normal hematopoietic B progenitor cells are similar with acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells in terms of morphology and immunophenotypes which easily result in misdiagnosis of diseases. This study was purposed to explore the importance of B progenitor cell (BPC) level in differential diagnosis of hematologic diseases. A total of 664 specimens including 87 specimens from patients with non-malignant hematologic diseases as control and 577 specimens from AL patients in different progressive stage were analyzed. Out of 577 specimens 26 were collected from ALL patients, 261 were collected from B-ALL, 290 were collected from AML. The relation of different clinical status (new diagnosis, remission, relapse), age and degree of leukemia cell involvement with hematopoietic BPC level were analyzed through identification of CD34/CD10/CD19/CD45 antibody combination and quantification of hematopoietic BPC. The results indicated that (1) CD45 distributed from positive to weak positive, and with very low side scatter. The early hematopoietic BPC expressed CD34⁺, along with increasing of cell maturation, the CD34 expression gradually disappeared, while CD19 and CD10 showed positive in whole stage of hemaropoietic BPC, and early CD10 highly was expressed. (2) the mean percentage of hematopoietic BPC was 1.36% in control group, 0.60% in T-ALL, 1.39% in B-ALL and 0.80% in AML; the detected rate of hematopoietic BPC in control, T-ALL, B-ALL and AML were 87.4%, 61.5%, 83.5%, 75.9%, respectively; the mean percentage of hematopoietic BPC was 0.37% at new diagnosis, 1.66% in remission and 0.55% in relapse. (3) along with increase of age, the hematopoietic BPC level generally disclined. (4) specimens >5% hematopoietic BPC were mainly found in remission stage of leukemia patients. It is concluded that the hematopoietic BPC are present in malignant and non-malignant hematologic diseases. The changes of hematopoietic BPC level correlate with disease state, age and leukemia cell

  4. Periodontal status and post-transplantation complications following intensive periodontal treatment in patients underwent allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation conditioned with myeloablative regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürgan, C A; Özcan, M; Karakuş, Ö; Zincircioğlu, G; Arat, M; Soydan, E; Topcuoglu, P; Gürman, G; Bostancı, H S

    2013-05-01

    Evaluation of the periodontal status is necessary prior to management with high-dose chemotherapy before hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT). During medical therapy, pre-existing periodontal conditions may exacerbate and cause local and systemic complications. When possible, maximal oral health should be achieved prior to engraftment. In this study, we aimed to determine the alterations occurred in the periodontal status of the patients after periodontal treatment and allogenic HSCT and evaluate the effect of intensive periodontal approach on the short-term complications of HSCT. The alterations occurred in the periodontal tissues 3-4 weeks after periodontal treatment and after HSCT periods of 3 months for 29 patients treated with full-mouth periodontal treatment completed in 24 h in addition to eradication of dental foci, and oral hygiene status were evaluated using pocket depth measurements, presence of bleeding on probing and plaque and gingival indices. The incidence and severity of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and oral mucositis (OM) were recorded. Duration of engraftment period and the episode of febrile neutropenia were also evaluated. There were significant improvements in periodontal status after periodontal treatment (Pmaintenance of the improvement in periodontal health, remarkable decrease in the incidence and severity of OM were observed. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Recombinant TAT-BMI-1 fusion protein induces ex vivo expansion of human umbilical cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codispoti, Bruna; Rinaldo, Nicola; Chiarella, Emanuela; Lupia, Michela; Spoleti, Cristina Barbara; Marafioti, Maria Grazia; Aloisio, Annamaria; Scicchitano, Stefania; Giordano, Marco; Nappo, Giovanna; Lucchino, Valeria; Moore, Malcolm A S; Zhou, Pengbo; Mesuraca, Maria; Bond, Heather Mandy; Morrone, Giovanni

    2017-07-04

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is a well-established therapeutic approach for numerous disorders. HSCs are typically derived from bone marrow or peripheral blood after cytokine-induced mobilization. Umbilical cord blood (CB) represents an appealing alternative HSC source, but the small amounts of the individual CB units have limited its applications. The availability of strategies for safe ex vivo expansion of CB-derived HSCs (CB-HSCs) may allow to extend the use of these cells in adult patients and to avoid the risk of insufficient engraftment or delayed hematopoietic recovery.Here we describe a system for the ex vivo expansion of CB-HSCs based on their transient exposure to a recombinant TAT-BMI-1 chimeric protein. BMI-1 belongs to the Polycomb family of epigenetic modifiers and is recognized as a central regulator of HSC self-renewal. Recombinant TAT-BMI-1 produced in bacteria was able to enter the target cells via the HIV TAT-derived protein transduction peptide covalently attached to BMI-1, and conserved its biological activity. Treatment of CB-CD34+ cells for 3 days with repeated addition of 10 nM purified TAT-BMI-1 significantly enhanced total cell expansion as well as that of primitive hematopoietic progenitors in culture. Importantly, TAT-BMI-1-treated CB-CD34+ cells displayed a consistently higher rate of multi-lineage long-term repopulating activity in primary and secondary xenotransplants in immunocompromised mice. Thus, recombinant TAT-BMI-1 may represent a novel, effective reagent for ex vivo expansion of CB-HSC for therapeutic purposes.

  6. Pilot experience with opebacan/rBPI21 in myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Guinan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection and inflammation contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. Endotoxin, a component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, is a potent inflammatory stimulus in humans. Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI, a constituent of human neutrophil granules, binds endotoxin thereby precluding endotoxin-induced inflammation and also has direct anti-infective properties against bacteria. As a consequence of myeloablative therapy used in preparation for hematopoietic cell infusion, patients experience gastrointestinal leak of bacteria and bacterial toxins into the systemic circulation and a period of inflammatory cytokine elevation associated with subsequent regimen-related toxicities.  Patients frequently become endotoxemic and febrile as well as BPI-deficient due to sustained neutropenia. To examine whether enhancing endotoxin-neutralizing and anti-infective activity by exogenous administration of a recombinant N-terminal fragment of BPI (rBPI21, generic name opebacan might ameliorate regimen-related toxicities including infection, we recruited patients scheduled to undergo myeloablative HCT to participate in a proof-of-concept prospective phase I/II trial. After the HCT preparative regimen was completed, opebacan was initiated 18-36 hours prior to administration of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (defined as Day 0 and continued for 72 hours. The trial was to have included escalation of rBPI21 dose and duration but was stopped prematurely due to lack of further drug availability.  Therefore, to better understand the clinical course of opebacan-treated patients (n=6, we compared their outcomes with a comparable cohort meeting the same eligibility criteria and enrolled in a non-interventional myeloablative HCT observational study (n = 35.  Opebacan-treated participants had earlier platelet engraftment (p=0.005, mirroring

  7. BK DNA viral load in plasma: evidence for an association with hemorrhagic cystitis in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erard, Veronique; Kim, Hyung Woo; Corey, Lawrence; Limaye, Ajit; Huang, Meei-Li; Myerson, David; Davis, Chris; Boeckh, Michael

    2005-01-01

    We performed a case-control study to determine the association of BK plasma viremia with hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Thirty cases of HC (14 of which occurred after platelet engraftment with documented BK viruria [BK-HC]) were compared with matched controls. Weekly plasma samples were tested for BK virus DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). BK viremia detected before or during the disease was independently associated with HC (adjusted odds ratio = 30, P < .001); BK viremia was even important before clinical symptoms of HC occurred (odds ratio = 11, P < .001). Cases of HC and BK-HC had a significantly higher peak of BK plasma viral load than controls. BK virus was detected by in situ hybridization in bladder biopsies of 2 cases with severe HC and long-lasting BK viremia. BK virus seems to play a role in the development of HC and quantitative detection of BK DNA in plasma appears to be a marker of BK virus disease in HCT recipients. PMID:15845896

  8. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Shinde, Shivani S; Damlaj, Moussab; Hefazi Rorghabeh, Mehrdad; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Litzow, Mark R; Hogan, William J; Gangat, Naseema; Elliott, Michelle A; Al-Kali, Aref; Tefferi, Ayalew; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2017-04-01

    MDS/MPN (myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm) overlap syndromes are myeloid malignancies for which allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) is potentially curative. We describe transplant outcomes of 43 patients - 35 with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, CMML (of which 17 had blast transformation, BT) and eight with MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN,U). At median follow-up of 21 months, overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 55%, 29%, and 25% respectively in CMML without BT and 47%, 40%, and 34% respectively in CMML with BT. Higher HSCT-comorbidity index (HSCT-CI >3 versus ≤3; p = 0.015) and splenomegaly (p = 0.006) predicted worse OS in CMML without BT. In CMML with BT, engraftment failure (p = 0.006) and higher HSCT-CI (p = 0.03) were associated with inferior OS, while HSCT within 1-year of diagnosis was associated with improved OS (p = 0.045). In MDS/MPN,U, at median follow-up of 15 months, OS, CIR, and NRM were 62%, 30%, and 14%, respectively.

  9. HSC-explorer: a curated database for hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Montrone

    Full Text Available HSC-Explorer (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/HSC/ is a publicly available, integrative database containing detailed information about the early steps of hematopoiesis. The resource aims at providing fast and easy access to relevant information, in particular to the complex network of interacting cell types and molecules, from the wealth of publications in the field through visualization interfaces. It provides structured information on more than 7000 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and environmental factors. Information is manually derived by critical reading of the scientific literature from expert annotators. Hematopoiesis-relevant interactions are accompanied with context information such as model organisms and experimental methods for enabling assessment of reliability and relevance of experimental results. Usage of established vocabularies facilitates downstream bioinformatics applications and to convert the results into complex networks. Several predefined datasets (Selected topics offer insights into stem cell behavior, the stem cell niche and signaling processes supporting hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. HSC-Explorer provides a versatile web-based resource for scientists entering the field of hematopoiesis enabling users to inspect the associated biological processes through interactive graphical presentation.

  10. Treatment of CMV infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffini, Enrico; Giaccone, Luisa; Festuccia, Moreno; Brunello, Lucia; Busca, Alessandro; Bruno, Benedetto

    2016-06-01

    Despite a remarkable reduction in the past decades, cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients remains a feared complication, still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Today, first line treatment of CMV infection/reactivation is still based on dated antiviral compounds Ganciclovir (GCV), Foscarnet (FOS) and Cidofovir (CDF) with their burdensome weight of side effects. Maribavir (MBV), Letermovir (LMV) and Brincidofovir (BDF) are three new promising anti-CMV drugs without myelosuppressive properties or renal toxic effects that are under investigation in randomized phase II and III trials. Adoptive T-cell therapy (ATCT) in CMV infection possesses a strong rationale, demonstrated by several proof of concept studies; its feasibility is currently under investigation by clinical trials. ATCT from third-party and naïve donors could meet the needs of HSCT recipients of seronegative donors and cord blood grafts. In selected patients such as recipients of T-cell depleted grafts, ATCT, based on CMV-specific host T-cells reconstitution kinetics, would be of value in the prophylactic and/or preemptive CMV treatment. Vaccine-immunotherapy has the difficult task to reduce the incidence of CMV reactivation/infection in highly immunocompromised HSCT patients. Newer notions on CMV biology may represent the base to flush out the Troll of transplantation.

  11. [Effects of Different Culture Systems on the Hematopoietic Differentiation Ability of iPS Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Di; He, Wen-Yin; Niu, Xiao-Hua; Ou, Zhan-Hui; Chen, Yu-Chang; Sun, Xiao-Fang

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the in vitro effects of different culture systems on hematopoietic differentiation ability of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Two culture systems including E8 and mTESR(freeder-free medium), and the classical ES culture medium were chosen for culture of iPS cells. The iPS cells maintaining in above mentioning culcure systems were co-cultured with OP9 cells(murine bone marrow stromal cells) in vitro to be induced to differentiate into hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Flow cytometry and real-time quantitative PCR were used to detect the expression of specific hematopoietic markers and the effects of different culture systems on the differentiation of iPS in vitro. iPS cultured in the 3 selected medium could be differentiated into hematopoietic stem cells. Efficiency of hematopoietic differentiation was up to 28.4% in classical ES culture system, which was significantly higher than that in E8 and mTESR system. Under the co-culture with OP9, iPS can differentiate into hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which shows higher efficiency when iPS maintained in the ES medium.

  12. Oral features and dental health in Hurler Syndrome following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, Eleanor

    2010-09-01

    Hurler Syndrome is associated with a deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in early infancy is undertaken to help prevent the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and improve organ function.

  13. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Christian R.; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Vellenga, Edo; Coffer, Paul J.; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and myelodysplastic

  14. Mammalian target of rapamycin activity is required for expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, C.R.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Vellenga, E.; Coffer, P.J.; Buitenhuis, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian target of rapamycin is a conserved protein kinase known to regulate protein synthesis, cell size and proliferation. Aberrant regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin activity has been observed in hematopoietic malignancies, including acute leukemias and

  15. Post-transplantation Cyclophosphamide and Sirolimus after Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Using a Treosulfan-based Myeloablative Conditioning and Peripheral Blood Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieri, Nicoletta; Greco, Raffaella; Crucitti, Lara; Morelli, Mara; Giglio, Fabio; Levati, Giorgia; Assanelli, Andrea; Carrabba, Matteo G; Bellio, Laura; Milani, Raffaella; Lorentino, Francesca; Stanghellini, Maria Teresa Lupo; De Freitas, Tiago; Marktel, Sarah; Bernardi, Massimo; Corti, Consuelo; Vago, Luca; Bonini, Chiara; Ciceri, Fabio; Peccatori, Jacopo

    2015-08-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) performed using bone marrow (BM) grafts and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) has gained much interest for the excellent toxicity profile after both reduced-intensity and myeloablative conditioning. We investigated, in a cohort of 40 high-risk hematological patients, the feasibility of peripheral blood stem cells grafts after a treosulfan-melphalan myeloablative conditioning, followed by a PTCy and sirolimus-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis (Sir-PTCy). Donor engraftment occurred in all patients, with full donor chimerism achieved by day 30. Post-HSCT recovery of lymphocyte subsets was broad and fast, with a median time to CD4 > 200/μL of 41 days. Cumulative incidences of grade II to IV and III-IV acute GVHD were 15% and 7.5%, respectively, and were associated with a significant early increase in circulating regulatory T cells at day 15 after HSCT, with values transplantation in complete remission (1-year DFS 71%) versus patients who underwent transplantation with active disease (DFS, 34%; P = .01). Overall, myeloablative haploidentical HSCT with peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and Sir-PTCy is a feasible treatment option: the low rates of GVHD and NRM as well as the favorable immune reconstitution profile pave the way for a prospective comparative trial comparing BM and PBSC in this specific transplantation setting. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Deregulated gene expression pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellagatti, A; Cazzola, M; Giagounidis, A; Perry, J; Malcovati, L; Della Porta, M G; Jädersten, M; Killick, S; Verma, A; Norbury, C J; Hellström-Lindberg, E; Wainscoat, J S; Boultwood, J

    2010-04-01

    To gain insight into the molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), we performed global gene expression profiling and pathway analysis on the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of 183 MDS patients as compared with the HSC of 17 healthy controls. The most significantly deregulated pathways in MDS include interferon signaling, thrombopoietin signaling and the Wnt pathways. Among the most significantly deregulated gene pathways in early MDS are immunodeficiency, apoptosis and chemokine signaling, whereas advanced MDS is characterized by deregulation of DNA damage response and checkpoint pathways. We have identified distinct gene expression profiles and deregulated gene pathways in patients with del(5q), trisomy 8 or -7/del(7q). Patients with trisomy 8 are characterized by deregulation of pathways involved in the immune response, patients with -7/del(7q) by pathways involved in cell survival, whereas patients with del(5q) show deregulation of integrin signaling and cell cycle regulation pathways. This is the first study to determine deregulated gene pathways and ontology groups in the HSC of a large group of MDS patients. The deregulated pathways identified are likely to be critical to the MDS HSC phenotype and give new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of this disorder, thereby providing new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Cytomegalovirus in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients - management of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Franco; Bertaina, Alice; Bertaina, Valentina; Merli, Pietro

    2016-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) still causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients given allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Despite effective pharmacotherapy, potentially life-threatening CMV disease occurs nowadays in up to 10% of HSCT recipients; moreover, routinely used anti-CMV agents have been shown to be associated with morbidity. Areas covered: This review examines different issues related to diagnosis and management of CMV infection in HSCT recipients, paying particular attention to the monitoring of CMV-specific immune recovery, approaches of adoptive cell therapy and new antiviral drugs. Expert commentary: Despite advances in diagnostic tests and treatment, there is still room for refining management of CMV in HSCT recipients. Immunological monitoring should be associated in the future to virological monitoring. The safety profile and efficacy of new anti-CMV agents should be compared with that of standard-of-care drugs. Donor-derived, pathogen-specific T cells adoptively transferred after transplantation could contribute to reduce the impact of CMV infection on patient's outcome.

  18. Characterization of Selectin Ligands on Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Hanan

    2013-05-18

    Successful bone marrow (BM) transplantation requires the homing of the transplanted hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow niche, where they undergo differentiation to form mature cells that are eventually released into the peripheral blood. However, the survival rate of patients receiving BM transplants is poor since many of the transplanted HSPCs do not make it to their BM niches in the recipient’s body. Since the availability of HSPCs from traditional sources is limited, transplanting more number of HSPCs is not a solution to this problem. This study aims to characterize the adhesion molecules mediating cell migration in order to better understand the adhesion mechanisms of HSCs with the bone marrow endothelium. This will aid in developing future tools to improve the clinical transplantation of HSPCs. This study also aims to understand the factors that influence HSPC proliferation in the bone marrow niche. E-selectin plays an important role in the process of homing; however, its ligands on HSPCs are not well characterized. We used western blotting and immunoprecipitation to show that endomucin is expressed on HSPCs and plays a role in the binding of HSPCs to E-selectin. We also studied the effect of recombinant E-selectin on the expression of a newly characterized E-selectin ligand in our lab, CD34, in HSPCs. This will provide us insight into novel roles for endomucin and E-selectin and help us to understand the factors influencing HSPC migration to BM endothelium.

  19. Efficient hematopoietic redifferentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from primitive murine bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Nils; Lachmann, Nico; Kohlscheen, Saskia; Sgodda, Malte; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Greber, Boris; Kues, Wilfried; Glage, Silke; Baum, Christopher; Niemann, Heiner; Schambach, Axel; Cantz, Tobias; Moritz, Thomas

    2012-03-20

    Heterogeneity among induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines with regard to their gene expression profile and differentiation potential has been described and at least partly linked to the tissue of origin. Here, we generated iPSCs from primitive [lineage negative (Lin(neg))] and nonadherent differentiated [lineage positive (Lin(pos))] bone marrow cells (BM-iPSC), and compared their differentiation potential to that of fibroblast-derived iPSCs (Fib-iPSC) and embryonic stem cells (ESC). In the undifferentiated state, individual iPSC clones but also ESCs proved remarkably similar when analyzed for alkaline phosphatase and SSEA-1 staining, endogenous expression of the pluripotency genes Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2, or global gene expression profiles. However, substantial differences between iPSC clones were observed after induction of differentiation, which became most obvious upon cytokine-mediated instruction toward the hematopoietic lineage. All 3 BM-iPSC lines derived from undifferentiated Lin(neg) cells yielded high proportions of cells expressing the hematopoietic differentiation marker CD41 and in 2 of these lines high proportions of CD41+/ CD45+ cells were detected. In contrast, little hematopoiesis-specific surface marker expression was detected in 4 Lin(pos) BM-iPSC and 3 Fib-iPSC lines. These results were corroborated by functional studies demonstrating robust colony outgrowth from hematopoietic progenitors in 2 of the Lin(neg) BM-iPSCs only. Thus, in conclusion, our data demonstrate efficient generation of iPSCs from primitive hematopoietic tissue as well as efficient hematopoietic redifferentiation for Lin(neg) BM-iPSC lines, thereby supporting the notion of an epigenetic memory in iPSCs.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell derived hematopoietic cells are permissive to HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, self-renewing cells known for their differentiation potential into cells of mesenchymal lineage. The ability of single cell clones isolated from adipose tissue resident MSCs (ASCs to differentiate into cells of hematopoietic lineage has been previously demonstrated. In the present study, we investigated if the hematopoietic differentiated (HD cells derived from ASCs could productively be infected with HIV-1. Results HD cells were generated by differentiating clonally expanded cultures of adherent subsets of ASCs (CD90+, CD105+, CD45-, and CD34-. Transcriptome analysis revealed that HD cells acquire a number of elements that increase their susceptibility for HIV-1 infection, including HIV-1 receptor/co-receptor and other key cellular cofactors. HIV-1 infected HD cells (HD-HIV showed elevated p24 protein and gag and tat gene expression, implying a high and productive infection. HD-HIV cells showed decreased CD4, but significant increase in the expression of CCR5, CXCR4, Nef-associated factor HCK, and Vpu-associated factor BTRC. HIV-1 restricting factors like APOBEC3F and TRIM5 also showed up regulation. HIV-1 infection increased apoptosis and cell cycle regulatory genes in HD cells. Although undifferentiated ASCs failed to show productive infection, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of several hematopoietic lineage associated genes such as c-Kit, MMD2, and IL-10. Conclusions Considering the presence of profuse amounts of ASCs in different tissues, these findings suggest the possible role that could be played by HD cells derived from ASCs in HIV-1 infection. The undifferentiated ASCs were non-permissive to HIV-1 infection; however, HIV-1 exposure increased the expression of some hematopoietic lineage related genes. The findings relate the importance of ASCs in HIV-1 research and facilitate the understanding of the disease process and management strategies.

  1. The histone demethylase Jarid1b is required for hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Morag H; Albert, Mareike; Sroczynska, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    Jarid1b/KDM5b is a histone demethylase that regulates self-renewal and differentiation in stem cells and cancer, however its function in hematopoiesis is unclear. Here, we find that Jarid1b is highly expressed in primitive hematopoietic compartments and is overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias...... compromises hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal capacity and suggest that Jarid1b is a positive regulator of HSC potential....

  2. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    OpenAIRE

    van Pel, Melissa; van Os, Ronald; Velders, Gerjo A.; Hagoort, Henny; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Lindley, Ivan J. D.; Willemze, Roel; Fibbe, Willem E.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory mediators in cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization, we considered a possible role for protease inhibitors in the induction of HSC/HPC mobilization. Bone marrow (BM) extracellular extracts that wer...

  3. Validation of a single-platform method for hematopoietic CD34+ stem cells enumeration according to accreditation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massin, Frédéric; Huili, Cai; Decot, Véronique; Stoltz, Jean-François; Bensoussan, Danièle; Latger-Cannard, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells for autologous and allogenic transplantation are obtained from several sources including bone marrow, peripheral blood or cord blood. Accurate enumeration of viable CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is routinely used in clinical settings, especially to monitor progenitor cell mobilization and apheresis. The number of viable CD34+ HSC has also been shown to be the most critical factor in haematopoietic engraftment. The International Society for Cellular Therapy actually recommends the use of single-platform flow cytometry system using 7-AAD as a viability dye. In a way to move routine analysis from a BD FACSCaliburTM instrument to a BD FACSCantoTM II, according to ISO 15189 standard guidelines, we define laboratory performance data of the BDTM Stem Cell Enumeration (SCE) kit on a CE-IVD system including a BD FACSCanto II flow cytometer and the BD FACSCantoTM Clinical Software. InterQCTM software, a real time internet laboratory QC management system developed by VitroTM and distributed by Becton DickinsonTM, was also tested to monitor daily QC data, to define the internal laboratory statistics and to compare them to external laboratories. Precision was evaluated with BDTM Stem Cell Control (high and low) results and the InterQC software, an internet laboratory QC management system by Vitro. This last one drew Levey-Jennings curves and generated numeral statistical parameters allowing detection of potential changes in the system performances as well as interlaboratory comparisons. Repeatability, linearity and lower limits of detection were obtained with routine samples from different origins. Agreement evaluation between BD FACSCanto II system versus BD FACSCalibur system was tested on fresh peripheral blood, freeze-thawed apheresis, fresh bone marrow and fresh cord blood samples. Instrument's measure and staining repeatability clearly evidenced acceptable variability on the different samples tested. Intra- and inter-laboratory CV in CD34+ cell absolute

  4. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eCoste

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  5. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells from allogeneic healthy donors using a new biosimilar G-CSF (Zarzio®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelo, María Luisa; Zabalza, Amaya; Sánchez Antón, María Piva; Zalba, Saioa; Aznar, Mariví; Mansilla, Cristina; Ramírez, Natalia; Olavarría, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) have become the major source of hematopoietic progenitor cells for allogeneic transplantation. In February 2008, Zarzio® was approved by the European Medicine Agency for PBPCs mobilization, but this authorization was not based in trials analyzing safety and efficacy for PBPCs mobilization. Since August 2011, Zarzio® has been used at our institution for PBPCs mobilization. In total 36 healthy family donors underwent PBPCs mobilization, 18 with Neupogen® and 18 with Zarzio®. Donor characteristics were equivalent between groups, and no severe adverse effects were registered in the Zarzio® group. The number of CD34 cells collected/Kg recipient body weight was 6.7 × 10(6) (3.8-11.1) in the Zarzio® group versus 8.4 × 10(6) (5.6-16.6) in the Neupogen® group (P = 0.04). We collected the minimal target cell dose (2 × 10(6) /kg) in all donors from each group and no significant differences were found in the collection of the optimal cell dose (5 × 10(6) /kg) between groups, although 3/18 (16.6%) donors that received Zarzio® failed to mobilize the optimal cell dose compared with 0% in the Neupogen® group. A total of 35 patients proceeded to transplantation (17 in the Zarzio® and 18 in the Neupogen® groups, respectively). Platelet and neutrophil median time to engraftment was comparable between the two groups. Our retrospective study supports the conclusion that Zarzio® mobilization of PBPCs in healthy donors is safe but perhaps not as effective as the reference Neupogen. However, more prospective trials are required to definitively asses the safety and efficacy of G-CSF biosimilars for PBPCs mobilization in healthy donors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Molecular signatures of proliferation and quiescence in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa A Venezia

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells resident in adult tissues are principally quiescent, yet harbor enormous capacity for proliferation to achieve self renewal and to replenish their tissue constituents. Although a single hematopoietic stem cell (HSC can generate sufficient primitive progeny to repopulate many recipients, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that maintain their potency or regulate their self renewal. Here we have examined the gene expression changes that occur over a time course when HSCs are induced to proliferate and return to quiescence in vivo. These data were compared to data representing differences between naturally proliferating fetal HSCs and their quiescent adult counterparts. Bioinformatic strategies were used to group time-ordered gene expression profiles generated from microarrays into signatures of quiescent and dividing stem cells. A novel method for calculating statistically significant enrichments in Gene Ontology groupings for our gene lists revealed elemental subgroups within the signatures that underlie HSC behavior, and allowed us to build a molecular model of the HSC activation cycle. Initially, quiescent HSCs evince a state of readiness. The proliferative signal induces a preparative state, which is followed by active proliferation divisible into early and late phases. Re-induction of quiescence involves changes in migratory molecule expression, prior to reestablishment of homeostasis. We also identified two genes that increase in both gene and protein expression during activation, and potentially represent new markers for proliferating stem cells. These data will be of use in attempts to recapitulate the HSC self renewal process for therapeutic expansion of stem cells, and our model may correlate with acquisition of self renewal characteristics by cancer stem cells.

  7. Alternative donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfraih, Feras; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Kassim, Adetola A

    2016-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a curative therapy for patients with hemoglobinopathies, mainly severe sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemia (TM). However, the applicability of HSCT has been limited mainly by donor availability, with a less than 25%-30% of eligible patients having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donors. Previous outcomes using alternate donor options have been markedly inferior due to increased regimen-related toxicity, transplant-related mortality, graft failure, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Advances in transplant technology, including high-resolution HLA typing, improved GVHD prophylactic approaches with tolerance induction, and better supportive care over the last decade, are addressing these historical challenges, resulting in increasing donor options. Herein, we review alternate donor HSCT approaches for severe SCD and TM using unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood units, or related haploidentical donors. Though this is an emerging field, early results are promising and in selected patients, this may be the preferred option to mitigate against the age-related morbidity and early mortality associated with these disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Replication stress in hematopoietic stem cells in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Johanna; Milyavsky, Michael

    2017-10-18

    Life-long blood regeneration relies on a rare population of self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These cells' nearly unlimited self-renewal potential and lifetime persistence in the body signifies the need for tight control of their genome integrity. Their quiescent state, tightly linked with low metabolic activity, is one of the main strategies employed by HSCs to preserve an intact genome. On the other hand, HSCs need to be able to quickly respond to increased blood demands and rapidly increase their cellular output in order to fight infection-associated inflammation or extensive blood loss. This increase in proliferation rate, however, comes at the price of exposing HSCs to DNA damage inevitably associated with the process of DNA replication. Any interference with normal replication fork progression leads to a specialized molecular response termed replication stress (RS). Importantly, increased levels of RS are a hallmark feature of aged HSCs, where an accumulating body of evidence points to causative relationships between RS and the aging-associated impairment of the blood system's functional capacity. In this review, we present an overview of RS in HSCs focusing on its causes and consequences for the blood system of mice and men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal stromal cell derived Osteoblasts Promote the Expansion of Hematopoietic Progenitors through Beta-Catenin and Notch Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalicka, Matthew; Boisjoli, Gavin; Jahan, Suria; Hovey, Owen; Doxtator, Emily; Abu-Khader, Ahmad; Pasha, Roya; Pineault, Nicolas

    2017-10-19

    Coculture of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) with primary stromal cells from HSC niches supports the maintenance and expansion of HSC and progenitors ex vivo. However, a major drawback is the availability of primary human samples for research and clinical applications. We investigated the use of in vitro derived osteoblasts as a new source of feeder cells and characterized the molecular pathways that mediate their growth promoting activities. First, we compared the growth and differentiation modulating activities of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC)-derived osteoblasts (M-OST) to that of their undifferentiated precursor on umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitors. Feeder-free cultures were also included as baseline control. Cell growth and expansion of hematopoietic progenitors were significantly enhanced by both feeder cell types. However, progenitor cell growth was considerably greater with M-OST. Coculture also promoted the maintenance of immature CD34+ progenitor subsets and modulated in a positive fashion the expression of several homing-related cell surface receptors, in a feeder-specific fashion. Serial transplantation experiments revealed that M-OST coculture supported the maintenance of long-term lympho-myeloid reconstituting HSC that provided engraftment levels generally superior to that from MSC cocultures. Mechanistically, we found that coculture with M-OST was associated with enhanced -catenin (-Cat) activity in UCB cells and that abrogation of -Cat/TCF activity blunted the growth promoting activity of the M-OST coculture. Conversely, Notch inhibition reduced UCB cell expansion but to a much lesser extent. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that M-OST are excellent feeder cells for HSC and progenitors, and identify key molecular pathways responsible for the growth enhancing activities of osteoblasts on UCB progenitors.

  10. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, P.; Carrillo, E.; Vélez, C.; Hita-Contreras, F.; Martínez-Amat, A.; Rodríguez-Serrano, F.; Boulaiz, H.; Ortiz, R.; Melguizo, C.; Prados, J.; Aránega, A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM) and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a) the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), among other ligands; (b) the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c) the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d) the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases. PMID:23844360

  11. Regulatory Systems in Bone Marrow for Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Mobilization and Homing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell release, migration, and homing from the bone marrow (BM and of the mobilization pathway involves a complex interaction among adhesion molecules, cytokines, proteolytic enzymes, stromal cells, and hematopoietic cells. The identification of new mechanisms that regulate the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs cells has important implications, not only for hematopoietic transplantation but also for cell therapies in regenerative medicine for patients with acute myocardial infarction, spinal cord injury, and stroke, among others. This paper reviews the regulation mechanisms underlying the homing and mobilization of BM hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, investigating the following issues: (a the role of different factors, such as stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, among other ligands; (b the stem cell count in peripheral blood and BM and influential factors; (c the therapeutic utilization of this phenomenon in lesions in different tissues, examining the agents involved in HSPCs mobilization, such as the different forms of G-CSF, plerixafor, and natalizumab; and (d the effects of this mobilization on BM-derived stem/progenitor cells in clinical trials of patients with different diseases.

  12. Evaluation of engraftment of superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled mesenchymal stem cells using three-dimensional reconstruction of magnetic resonance imaging in photo thrombotic cerebral infarction models of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Jae Hyun; Kwak, Byung Kook; Jung, Ji Sung; Park, Se Rah [Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate engraftment by visualizing the location of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) three-dimensionally in photothrombotic cerebral infarction (PTCI) models of rats. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an agarose block containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled hBM-MSCs was performed using a 3.0-T MRI, T2-(T2WI), T2{sup *}-(T2{sup *}WI), and susceptibility-weighted images (SWI). PTCI was induced in 6 rats, and 2.5 x 10(5) SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs were infused through the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA group) or tail vein (IV group). MRI was performed on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 after stem cell injection. Dark signal regions were confirmed using histology. Three-dimensional MRI reconstruction was performed using the clinical workflow solution to evaluate the engraftment of hBM-MSCs. Volumetric analysis of the engraftment was also performed. The volumes of SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs in the phantom MRI were 129.3, 68.4, and 25.9 microL using SWI, T2{sup *}WI, and T2WI, respectively. SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs appeared on day 1 after injection, encircling the cerebral infarction from the ventral side. Dark signal regions matched iron positive cells and human origin (positive) cells. The volume of the engraftment was larger in the ICA group on days 1, 3, and 7, after stem cell injection (p < 0.05 on SWI). SWI was the most sensitive MRI pulse sequence (p < 0.05). The volume of infarction decreased until day 14. The engraftment of SPIO-labeled hBM-MSCs can be visualized and evaluated three-dimensionally in PTCI models of rats. The engraftment volume was larger in the ICA group than IV group on early stage within one week.

  13. Exposure of a tendon extracellular matrix to synovial fluid triggers endogenous and engrafted cell death: A mechanism for failed healing of intrathecal tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvican, Elaine R; Salavati, Mazdak; Smith, Roger K W; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of normal synovial fluid (SF) on exposed endogenous tendon-derived cells (TDCs) and engrafted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) within the tendon extracellular matrix. Explants from equine superficial digital flexor (extra-synovial) and deep digital flexor tendons (DDFTs) from the compressed, intra-synovial and the tensile, extra-synovial regions were cultured in allogeneic or autologous SF-media. Human hamstring explants were cultured in allogeneic SF. Explant viability was assessed by staining. Proliferation of equine monolayer MSCs and TDCs in SF-media and co-culture with DDFT explants was determined by alamarblue®. Non-viable Native Tendon matrices (NNTs) were re-populated with MSCs or TDCs and cultured in SF-media. Immunohistochemical staining of tendon sections for the apoptotic proteins caspase-3, -8, and -9 was performed. Contact with autologous or allogeneic SF resulted in rapid death of resident tenocytes in equine and human tendon. SF did not affect the viability of equine epitenon cells, or of MSCs and TDCs in the monolayer or indirect explant co-culture. MSCs and TDCs, engrafted into NNTs, died when cultured in SF. Caspase-3, -8, and -9 expression was the greatest in SDFT explants exposed to allogeneic SF. The efficacy of cells administered intra-synovially for tendon lesion repair is likely to be limited, since once incorporated into the matrix, cells become vlnerable to the adverse effects of SF. These observations could account for the poor success rate of intra-synovial tendon healing following damage to the epitenon and contact with SF, common with most soft tissue intra-synovial pathologies.

  14. A novel serum-free monolayer culture for orderly hematopoietic differentiation of human pluripotent cells via mesodermal progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Niwa

    Full Text Available Elucidating the in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem (ES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells is important for understanding both normal and pathological hematopoietic development in vivo. For this purpose, a robust and simple hematopoietic differentiation system that can faithfully trace in vivo hematopoiesis is necessary. In this study, we established a novel serum-free monolayer culture that can trace the in vivo hematopoietic pathway from ES/iPS cells to functional definitive blood cells via mesodermal progenitors. Stepwise tuning of exogenous cytokine cocktails induced the hematopoietic mesodermal progenitors via primitive streak cells. These progenitors were then differentiated into various cell lineages depending on the hematopoietic cytokines present. Moreover, single cell deposition assay revealed that common bipotential hemoangiogenic progenitors were induced in our culture. Our system provides a new, robust, and simple method for investigating the mechanisms of mesodermal and hematopoietic differentiation.

  15. AF10 plays a key role in the survival of uncommitted hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Chamorro-Garcia

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a complex process regulated by both cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic factors. Alterations in the expression of critical genes during hematopoiesis can modify the balance between stem cell differentiation and proliferation, and may ultimately give rise to leukemia and other diseases. AF10 is a transcription factor that has been implicated in the development of leukemia following chromosomal rearrangements between the AF10 gene and one of at least two other genes, MLL and CALM. The link between AF10 and leukemia, together with the known interactions between AF10 and hematopoietic regulators, suggests that AF10 may be important in hematopoiesis and in leukemic transformation. Here we show that AF10 is important for proper hematopoietic differentiation. The induction of hematopoietic differentiation in both human hematopoietic cell lines and murine total bone marrow cells triggers a decrease of AF10 mRNA and protein levels, particularly in stem cells and multipotent progenitors. Gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrate that over- or under-expression of AF10 leads to apoptotic cell death in stem cells and multipotent progenitors. We conclude that AF10 plays a key role in the maintenance of multipotent hematopoietic cells.

  16. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Orio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo- and autologous- (auto- stem cell transplant (HSCT. This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma, gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT.

  17. Liver biopsy findings in patients with hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Farzan; Rowan, Daniel J; Hari, Parameswaran; Kapke, Jonathan; Schneidewend, Robert; E Hagen, Catherine; Oshima, Kiyoko

    2017-08-01

    Liver dysfunction is a frequent complication after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Liver biopsy has an important role for confirming the diagnosis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or other liver diseases. The histological features of GVHD are not specific, and GVHD and other coexisting diseases may be present in the same biopsy, which makes the histologic interpretation of the liver biopsy more complex and challenging. The aim of the study is to improve the present diagnostic criteria. Fifty-two liver biopsies were studied. Most biopsies (47, 92%) showed some features of GVHD. Five (9.6%) had no GVHD, 20 (38.5%) had possible GVHD, and 27 (51.9%) had likely GVHD. Histologic features were analyzed semi-quantitatively and scored. Bile duct damage and intraepithelial lymphocytes were significantly more frequent in likely GVHD groups. Bile duct injury score calculated as the sum of bile duct damage and intraepithelial lymphocytes score was 2.3 in no GVHD and possible GVHD groups, and 4.2 in likely GVHD group (Pliver injury (8, 16%) and sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (6, 12%) are particularly important causes of liver dysfunction. Moderate degree of bile duct injury and intraepithelial lymphocytes were the most helpful histologic findings to confirm the diagnosis of GVHD. In addition, it is important for the pathologist to be aware of the etiologies of liver dysfunction other than GVHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Massage for Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Qualitative Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Sara L.; Lown, E. Anne; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Dunn, Elizabeth A.; Abrams, Donald I.; Horn, Biljana N.; Degelman, Marcia; Cowan, Morton J.; Mehling, Wolf E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. No in-depth qualitative research exists about the effects of therapeutic massage with children hospitalized to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The objective of this study is to describe parent caregivers' experience of the effects of massage/acupressure for their children undergoing HCT. Methods. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended interviews with 15 parents of children in the intervention arm of a massage/acupressure trial. Children received both practitioner and parent-provided massage/acupressure. Results. Parents reported that their child experienced relief from pain and nausea, relaxation, and greater ease falling asleep. They also reported increased caregiver competence and closeness with their child as a result of learning and performing massage/acupressure. Parents supported a semistandardized massage protocol. Conclusion. Massage/acupressure may support symptom relief and promote relaxation and sleep among pediatric HCT patients if administered with attention to individual patients' needs and hospital routines and may relieve stress among parents, improve caregiver competence, and enhance the sense of connection between parent and child. PMID:22474526

  19. [Sirolimus associated pneumonitis in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Estefanía; Buenasmañanas, Diana; Martín, Carmen; Rojas, Rafael

    2015-07-06

    Sirolimus (SR) is a lipophilic macrocytic lactone with immunosuppressive properties (mTOR inhibitor) commonly used in solid organ transplantation and recently introduced in the prophylaxis and treatment of graft-versus-host disease. Its numerous side effects include: hyperlipidemia, arthralgias, noncardiac peripheral edema, thrombotic microangiopathy and interstitial pneumonitis. SR-associated pneumonitis is a rare but potentially serious complication due to its increasing utilization in transplant patients. We report the case of a patient undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with severe respiratory distress and SR therapy. Microbiological tests were all negative and other complications related to transplantation were discarded. The chest computed tomography of high-resolution showed pneumonitis. The SR therapy was interrupted and treatment was started with steroids with resolution of symptoms. SR associated pneumonitis is a potentially fatal side effect. In patients treated with SR and respiratory failure, we must suspect this complication because early recognition along with drug discontinuation and steroid treatment is essential to reverse this complication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Features of transfusion therapy in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kucher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to identify factors influencing the safety and efficacy of the transfusion therapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. From January 1 to December 31, 2015, 329 patients with hematologic diseases and malignancies who had undergone 367 HSCT were included into the study. Transfusion therapy was conducted in 345 HSCT – 94 % of cases. Totally, 9074 cases of transfusion of blood components were recorded: red blood cellcontaining – 2378 (26.2 %, plateletcontaining – 6255 (68.9 %, fresh frozen plasma – 441 (4.9 %. АВ0incompatibility between the donor and recipient was determined in 60.4 % of cases (n=154 in HSCT from allogeneic donor. Acute «graft versus host disease» was observed in 34.9 % of cases (n=89. Hemorrhagic complications were in 46 cases (12.5 %, mainly nasal, gastrointestinal bleeding and hemorrhagic cystitis. Pprevention and treatment of anemic and hemorrhagic complications in HSCT requires longterm and massive transfusion therapy with the availability of АВ0-incompatibility. The use of leukofiltrated, γ - or x-ray irradiated, individually and immunologically compatible blood components can reduce the risk of development of acute and delayed transfusion reactions in HSCT. 

  1. Growth and development after hematopoietic cell transplant in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J E

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following high-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for children with malignant or nonmalignant hematologic disorders has resulted in an increasing number of long-term disease-free survivors. The preparative regimens include high doses of alkylating agents, such as CY with or without BU, and may include TBI. These agents impact the neuroendocrine system in growing children and their subsequent growth and development. Children receiving high-dose CY or BUCY have normal thyroid function, but those who receive TBI-containing regimens may develop thyroid function abnormalities. Growth is not impacted by chemotherapy-only preparative regimens, but TBI is likely to result in growth hormone deficiency and decreased growth rates that need to be treated with synthetic growth hormone therapy. Children who receive high-dose CY-only have normal development through puberty, whereas those who receive BUCY have a high incidence of delayed pubertal development. Following fractionated TBI preparative regimens, approximately half of the patients have normal pubertal development. These data demonstrate that the growth and development problems after HCT are dependent upon the preparative regimen received. All children should be followed for years after HCT for detection of growth and development abnormalities that are treatable with appropriate hormone therapy.

  2. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A.; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Luger, Selina M.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Litzow, Mark R.; Marks, David I.; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F.; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A.; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S.; Uy, Geoffrey L.; Wood, William A.; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S.; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, N=240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MK+MDS, N=221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes compared to other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, N=3,360; MDS, N=1,373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1998 to 2011. MK+AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio [HR] 1.98, pabnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (HR 1.72, p<0.01) and MDS (HR1.79, p<0.01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. PMID:26327629

  3. Longitudinal assessment of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and hyposalivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, M; Ramseier, A M; Rovó, A; Jensen, S B; Raber-Durlacher, J E; Zitzmann, N U; Waltimo, T

    2011-10-01

    Hyposalivation is a common adverse effect of anti-neoplastic therapy of head and neck cancer, causing impaired quality of life and predisposition to oral infections. However, data on the effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on salivary secretion are scarce. The present study determined stimulated whole-saliva flow rates in HSCT recipients in comparison with a healthy control group. Stimulated whole-saliva flow rates of 228 allogeneic HSCT recipients (134 males, 94 females; mean age, 43 yrs) were examined pre-HSCT and 6, 12, and 24 months post-HSCT. Healthy individuals (n = 144; 69 males, 75 females; mean age, 46 yrs) served as the control group. Stimulated saliva flow rates (mL/min) were measured and analyzed statistically, stratifying for hematological diagnoses and conditioning therapy. Hyposalivation (≤ 0.7 mL/min) was found in 40% (p hyposalivation. Severe hyposalivation (≤ 0.3 mL/min) was found in 11%, 18%, 4%, and 4% of the recipients pre-HSCT, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-HSCT, respectively. Additionally, conditioning regimen and sex had an impact on saliva flow. In conclusion, hyposalivation was observed to be a common but generally reversible complication among HSCT recipients.

  4. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells regulates proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopp, Sabine; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ugarte, Fernando; Wobus, Manja; Kuhn, Matthias; Brenner, Sebastian; Thieme, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule defines mesenchymal stromal cells in the human bone marrow that regenerate bone and establish a hematopoietic microenvironment in vivo. The role of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in primary human mesenchymal stromal cells and the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during ex vivo culture has not yet been demonstrated. We applied RNA interference or ectopic overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells to evaluate the effect of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule on their proliferation and differentiation as well as its influence on co-cultivated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockdown and overexpression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule affected several characteristics of human mesenchymal stromal cells related to osteogenic differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Furthermore, knockdown of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells stimulated the proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and strongly reduced the formation of long-term culture-initiating cells. In contrast, melanoma cell adhesion molecule-overexpressing human mesenchymal stromal cells provided a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule increased the adhesion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells to human mesenchymal stromal cells and their migration beneath the monolayer of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Our results demonstrate that the expression of the melanoma cell adhesion molecule in human mesenchymal stromal cells determines their fate and regulates the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through direct cell-cell contact.

  5. Labeling of human mesenchymal stem cells with quantum dots allows tracking of transplanted cells engrafted in infarcted pig hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mara de Oliveira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this paper was to validate fluorescent quantum dots QD as a cell marker for tracking human mesenchymal stem cells in vivo, using a pre-clinical model of acute myocardium infarction. Methods: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were isolated and expanded in vitro. Mesenchymal stem cells were labeled with QD 655. Myocardium infarction induction in pigs was performed by occluding the left descending coronary artery for 60 minutes, with a balloon catheter. One day after the myocardium infarction, intracoronary injection of mesenchymal stem cells was performed. One week after cell transplantation, the animals were killed; their hearts were removed and underwent histological examination Rresults: All the mesenchymal stem cells were labeled with QD 655. The labeling process did not affect viability, proliferation, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of the cells. Labeled mesenchymal stem cells were easily tracked in the histological sections of the infarcted area. Cells were observed with a frequency of two per section, while no cells were observed in the remote myocardium. Cconclusion: These results indicate that QD 655 labeling is an efficient tool for tracking mesenchymal stem cells in vivo.

  6. Predicting clonal self-renewal and extinction of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sieburg, Hans B.; Rezner, Betsy D.; Muller-Sieburg, Christa E.

    2011-01-01

    A single hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) can generate a clone, consisting of daughter HSCs and differentiated progeny, which can sustain the hematopoietic system of multiple hosts for a long time. At the same time, this massive expansion potential must be restrained to prevent abnormal, leukemic proliferation. We used an interdisciplinary approach, combining transplantation assays with mathematical and computational methods, to systematically analyze the proliferative potential of individual HS...

  7. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Jiang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo.To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo.Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  8. Natural killer cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells: a comparative analysis of heparin- and stromal cell-supported methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dezell, S.A.; Ahn, Y.O.; Spanholtz, J.; Wang, H.; Weeres, M.; Jackson, S.; Cooley, S.; Dolstra, H.; Miller, J.S.; Verneris, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) may have significant clinical benefits over NK cells from adult donors, including the ability to choose alloreactive donors and potentially more robust in vivo expansion. Stromal-based methods have been used to study the

  9. Frozen cord blood hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into higher numbers of functional natural killer cells in vitro than mobilized hematopoietic stem cells or freshly isolated cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Luevano

    Full Text Available Adoptive natural killer (NK cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34(+ being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34(+ and frozen PBCD34(+ to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34(+ cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34(+ cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34(+ and PBCD34(+ expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34(+-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-γ and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34(+-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34(+ for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34(+, without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC.

  10. Early Clostridium difficile infection during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Kinnebrew

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI is frequently diagnosed in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. We characterized early-transplant CDI and its associations, and analyzed serially-collected feces to determine intestinal carriage of toxigenic C. difficile. Fecal specimens were collected longitudinally from 94 patients during allo-HSCT hospitalization, from the start of pre-transplant conditioning until up to 35 days after stem cell infusion. Presence of C. difficile 16S rRNA and tcdB genes was determined. Clinical variables and specimen data were analyzed for association with development of CDI. Historical data from an additional 1144 allo-HSCT patients was also used. Fecal specimens from 37 patients (39% were found to harbor C. difficile. Early-transplant CDI was diagnosed in 16 of 94 (17% patients undergoing allo-HSCT; cases were generally mild and resembled non-CDI diarrhea associated with transplant conditioning. CDI was associated with preceding colonization with tcdB-positive C. difficile and conditioning regimen intensity. We found no associations between early-transplant CDI and graft-versus-host disease or CDI later in transplant. CDI occurs with high frequency during the early phase of allo-HSCT, where recipients are pre-colonized with toxigenic C. difficile. During this time, CDI incidence peaks during pre-transplant conditioning, and is correlated to intensity of the treatment. In this unique setting, high rates of CDI may be explained by prior colonization and chemotherapy; however, cases were generally mild and resembled non-infectious diarrhea due to conditioning, raising concerns of misdiagnosis. Further study of this unique population with more discriminating CDI diagnostic tests are warranted.

  11. Evaluation of the ability of bone marrow derived cells to engraft the kidney and promote renal tubular regeneration in mice following exposure to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Aurélien; Galichon, Pierre; Wetzstein, Morgane; Legouis, David; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that bone marrow derived stem cells have the ability to engraft the kidney and improve the outcome of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) in mice exposed to high doses of cisplatin, providing hope for cancer patients in whom irreversible renal damage occasionally occurs following the use of this highly effective anti-tumor drug. We tested the therapeutic potential of bone marrow derived cells injected during the acute phase (day 3 after cisplatin administration) of experimentally-induced AKI in C57Bl6/J mice, characterized by massive tubular necrosis, apoptosis, and a low proliferation capacity. We failed to show any benefit of bone marrow derived cells versus a regular homogenate of intact renal cells, or normal saline. Using cell tracers and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that bone marrow derived cells did indeed home to the bone marrow of the recipients but failed to settle in the kidney. Conversely, renal cells homed to injured kidneys. However, neither cell therapy protected the animals against cisplatin-induced death. We therefore question the short-term efficacy of bone marrow derived cells used to repair established injuries of the tubular epithelium.

  12. Bone marrow transplantation in mice as a tool for studying the role of hematopoietic cells in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; de Haan, Gerald; Hofker, Marten H.

    2010-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells have been established as major players in cardiovascular disease, with an important role in the etiology of atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, hematopoietic cells, and in particular the cells of monocyte and macrophage lineages, have recently been unmasked as one of the main

  13. Constitutive Expression of Inducible Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Early Repressor (ICER) in Cycling Quiescent Hematopoietic Cells: Implications for Aging Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Steven J; Yehia, Ghassan; Potian, Julius A; Molina, Carlos A; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2017-02-01

    Despite extensive insights on the interaction between hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and the supporting bone marrow (BM) stroma in hematopoietic homeostasis there remains unanswered questions on HSC regulation. We report on the mechanism by which HSCs attain cycling quiescence by addressing a role for inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER). ICER negatively transcriptional regulators of cAMP activators such as CREM and CREB. These activators can be induced by hematopoietic stimulators such as cytokines. We isolated subsets of hematopoietic cells from ten healthy donors: CD34(+)CD38(-)/c-kit (+) (primitive progenitor), CD34(+)CD38(+)/c-kit(low) (mature progenitor) and CD34(-)CD38(+/-)/c-kit(low/-) (differentiated lineage-). The relative maturity of the progenitors were verified in long-term culture initiating assay. Immunoprecipitation indicated the highest level of ICER in the nuclear extracts of CD34(+)/CD38(-) cells. Phospho (p)-CREM was also present suggesting a balance between ICER and p-CREM in HSC. ICER seems to be responsible for decrease in G1 transition, based on reduced Cdk4 protein, decreased proliferation and functional studies with propidium iodide. There were no marked changes in the cycling inhibitors, p15 and p-Rb, suggesting that ICER may act independently of other cycling inhibitors. The major effects of ICER were validated with BM mononuclear cells (BMNCs) in which ICER was ectopically expressed, and with BMNCs resistant to 5-fluorouracil- or cyclophosphamide. In total, this study ascribes a novel role for ICER in G1 checkpoint regulation in HSCs. These findings are relevant to gene therapy that require engineering of HSCs, age-related disorders that are associated with hematopoietic dysfunction and other hematological disorders.

  14. CD133-targeted Gene Transfer Into Long-term Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brendel, Christian; Goebel, Benjamin; Daniela, Abriss; Brugman, Martijn; Kneissl, Sabrina; Schwaeble, Joachim; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Mueller-Kuller, Uta; Kunkel, Hana; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Abel, Tobias; Serve, Hubert; Bystrykh, Leonid; Buchholz, Christian J.; Grez, Manuel

    Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem

  15. The combination of valproic acid and lithium delays hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, Marta A.; Bystrykh, Leonid; van den Boom, Vincent; Olthof, Sandra; Ausema, Albertina; Ritsema, Martha; Huls, Gerwin; de Haan, Gerald; van Os, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge on the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) self-renewal and differentiation, in vitro control of stem cell fate decisions has been difficult. The ability to inhibit HSPC commitment in culture may be of benefit to cell therapy protocols. Small

  16. The combination of valproic acid and lithium delays hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell differentiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, M.A.; Bystrykh, L.; Boom, V. van den; Olthof, S.; Ausema, A.; Ritsema, M.; Huls, G.A.; Haan, G. de; Os, R. van

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge on the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) self-renewal and differentiation, in vitro control of stem cell fate decisions has been difficult. The ability to inhibit HSPC commitment in culture may be of benefit to cell therapy protocols. Small

  17. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

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    Elisa Balletto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are major complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT. They consist mainly of bloodstream infections (BSI, followed by pneumonia and gastrointestinal infections, including typhlitis and Clostridium difficile infection. Microbiological data come mostly from BSI. Coagulase negative staphylococci and Enterobacteriaceae are the most frequent pathogens causing approximately 25% of BSI each, followed by enterococci, P. aeruginosa and viridans streptococci. Bacterial pneumonia is frequent after HSCT, and Gram-negatives are predominant. Clostridium difficile infection affects approximately 15% of HSCT recipients, being more frequent in case of allogeneic than autologous HSCT. The epidemiology and the prevalence of resistant strains vary significantly between transplant centres. In some regions, multi-drug resistant Gram-negative rods are increasingly frequent. In others, vancomycin-resistant enterococci are predominant. In the era of an increasing resistance to antibiotics, the efficacy of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and standard treatment of febrile neutropenia have been questioned. Therefore, thorough evaluation of local epidemiology is mandatory in order to decide the need for prophylaxis and the choice of the best regimen for empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia. For the latter, individualised approach has been proposed, consisting of either escalation or de-escalation strategy. De-escalation strategy is recommended is resistant bacteria should be covered upfront, mainly in patients with severe clinical presentation and previous infection or colonisation with a resistant pathogens. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as screening for resistant bacteria, applying isolation and contact precautions should be put in place in order to limit the spread of MDR bacteria. Antimicrobial stewardship program should be implemented in transplant centres.

  19. Bacterial Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balletto, Elisa; Mikulska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are major complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT). They consist mainly of bloodstream infections (BSI), followed by pneumonia and gastrointestinal infections, including typhlitis and Clostridium difficile infection. Microbiological data come mostly from BSI. Coagulase negative staphylococci and Enterobacteriaceae are the most frequent pathogens causing approximately 25% of BSI each, followed by enterococci, P. aeruginosa and viridans streptococci. Bacterial pneumonia is frequent after HSCT, and Gram-negatives are predominant. Clostridium difficile infection affects approximately 15% of HSCT recipients, being more frequent in case of allogeneic than autologous HSCT. The epidemiology and the prevalence of resistant strains vary significantly between transplant centres. In some regions, multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative rods are increasingly frequent. In others, vancomycin-resistant enterococci are predominant. In the era of increasing resistance to antibiotics, the efficacy of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and standard treatment of febrile neutropenia have been questioned. Therefore, a thorough evaluation of local epidemiology is mandatory to decide the need for prophylaxis and the choice of the best regimen for empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia. For the latter, individualised approach has been proposed, consisting of either escalation or de-escalation strategy. De-escalation strategy is recommended since resistant bacteria should be covered upfront, mainly in patients with severe clinical presentation and previous infection or colonisation with a resistant pathogen. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as screening for resistant bacteria, applying isolation and contact precautions should be put in place to limit the spread of MDR bacteria. Antimicrobial stewardship program should be implemented in transplant centres. PMID:26185610

  20. Hematopoietic Support Capacity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Orduña, Guadalupe R; Mayani, Héctor; Montesinos, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in the physiology and homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. Because MSCs generate most of the stromal cells present in the bone marrow (BM), form part of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche, and produce various molecules regulating hematopoiesis, their hematopoiesis-supporting capacity has been demonstrated. In the last decade, BM-MSCs have been proposed to be useful in some ex vivo protocols for HSC expansion, with the aim of expanding their numbers for transplant purposes (HSC transplant, HSCT). Furthermore, application of MSCs has been proposed as an adjuvant cellular therapy for promoting rapid hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients. Although the MSCs used in preliminary clinical trials have come from the BM, isolation of MSCs from far more accessible sources such as neonatal tissues has now been achieved, and these cells have been found to possess similar biological characteristics to those isolated from the BM. Therefore, such tissues are now considered as a potential alternative source of MSCs for clinical applications. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the biological characteristics of MSCs as related to their capacity to support the formation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We also describe MSC manipulation for ex vivo HSC expansion protocols used for transplants and their clinical relevance for hematopoietic recovery in HSCT patients. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NK Cells and Other Innate Lymphoid Cells in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, Paola; Montaldo, Elisa; Croxatto, Daniele; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Vitale, Chiara; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3) are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILCs provide host defenses against viruses, bacteria, and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodeling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defenses that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILCs may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodeling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILCs. Of note, CD34(+) cells isolated from different sources of HSC may differentiate in vitro toward various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g., IL-1β) may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT.

  2. Leukemic cells create bone marrow niches that disrupt the behavior of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmone, Angela; Amorim, Maria; Pontier, Andrea L; Wang, Sheng; Jablonski, Elizabeth; Sipkins, Dorothy A

    2008-12-19

    The host tissue microenvironment influences malignant cell proliferation and metastasis, but little is known about how tumor-induced changes in the microenvironment affect benign cellular ecosystems. Applying dynamic in vivo imaging to a mouse model, we show that leukemic cell growth disrupts normal hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) bone marrow niches and creates abnormal microenvironments that sequester transplanted human CD34+ (HPC-enriched) cells. CD34+ cells in leukemic mice declined in number over time and failed to mobilize into the peripheral circulation in response to cytokine stimulation. Neutralization of stem cell factor (SCF) secreted by leukemic cells inhibited CD34+ cell migration into malignant niches, normalized CD34+ cell numbers, and restored CD34+ cell mobilization in leukemic mice. These data suggest that the tumor microenvironment causes HPC dysfunction by usurping normal HPC niches and that therapeutic inhibition of HPC interaction with tumor niches may help maintain normal progenitor cell function in the setting of malignancy.

  3. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafdar, Anuradha; Dobbin, Edwina; Corrigan, Pamela; Freeburn, Robin; Wheadon, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP) formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  4. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes early hematopoietic progenitor formation and erythroid specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Tarafdar

    Full Text Available The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between β-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. β-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. β-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of β-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction.

  5. Sowing the Seeds of a Fruitful Harvest: Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Speth, Jennifer M.; Pelus, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only curative option for a number of malignant and non-malignant diseases. As the use of hematopoietic transplant has expanded, so too has the source of stem and progenitor cells. The predominate source of stem and progenitors today, particularly in settings of autologous transplantation, is mobilized peripheral blood. This review will highlight the historical advances which lead to the widespread use of peripheral blood stem cells for transplantation, with a look towards future enhancements to mobilization strategies. PMID:24123398

  6. Concise review: Sowing the seeds of a fruitful harvest: hematopoietic stem cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Speth, Jennifer M; Pelus, Louis M

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only curative option for a number of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. As the use of hematopoietic transplant has expanded, so too has the source of stem and progenitor cells. The predominate source of stem and progenitors today, particularly in settings of autologous transplantation, is mobilized peripheral blood. This review will highlight the historical advances which led to the widespread use of peripheral blood stem cells for transplantation, with a look toward future enhancements to mobilization strategies. © AlphaMed Press.

  7. PRDM11 is dispensable for the maintenance and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoren, Lina A; Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC)(1) supply organisms with life-long output of mature blood cells. To do so, the HSC pool size has to be maintained by HSC self-renewing divisions. PRDM3 and PRDM16 have been documented to regulate HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function. We found Prdm11 to have...... similar expression patterns in the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) compartments as Prdm3 and Prdm16. Therefore, we undertook experiments to test if PRDM11 regulates HSC self-renewal, maintenance and function by investigating the Prdm11(-/-) mice. Our data shows that phenotypic HSPCs...

  8. Placenta as a source of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); C. Robin (Catherine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe placenta is a large, highly vascularised hematopoietic tissue that functions during the embryonic and foetal development of eutherian mammals. Although recognised as the interface tissue important in the exchange of oxygen, nutrients and waste products between the foetus and mother,

  9. Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of adequacy of hematopoietic stem cell collection for autologous transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combariza, Juan F.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to carry out an autologous transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells should be mobilized to peripheral blood and later collected by apheresis. The CD34+ cell count is a tool to establish the optimal time to begin the apheresis procedure. Objective: To evaluate the association between peripheral blood CD34+ cell count and the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Materials and methods: A predictive test evaluation study was carried out to establish the usefulness of peripheral blood CD34+ cell count as a predictor of successful stem cell collection in patients that will receive an autologous transplantation. Results: 77 patients were included (median age: 49 years; range: 5-66. The predominant baseline diagnosis was lymphoma (53.2 %. The percentage of patients with successful harvest of hematopoietic stem cells was proportional to the number of CD34+cells in peripheral blood at the end of the mobilization procedure. We propose that more than 15 CD34+cells/μL must be present in order to achieve an adequate collection of hematopoietic stem cells. Conclusion: Peripheral blood CD34+ cell count is a useful tool to predict the successful collection of hematopoietic stem cells.

  10. Preliminary findings on the use of pulsatile machine reperfusion of a placenta to improve the cord blood collection yield including primitive hematopoietic stem cell fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Naoko; Gage, Fred; Cheng, Xiangfei; Lauw, Marietya I S

    2009-09-01

    Umbilical cord blood (CB) use is limited in most adults since the mean amount of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) collected is generally insufficient to engraft successfully. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of pulsatile machine placenta reperfusion (PMPR), which significantly improves CB collection quantity and quality compared to standard collection methods. PMPR was performed on eight delivered placentas up to 39 hours after venipuncture-based collection. PMPR was performed on average for 26 (20-30) minutes, 17 hours after delivery (6.25-39), using perfusate approved for donated organ reperfusion. Both PMPR and conventional collection-derived CB cells were analyzed using immunophenotyping and colony assays. The combination of PMPR and the conventional venipuncture method yielded a mean of 1.5-, 4.9-, 11-, 7.5-, 7.5-, and 7.7-fold increased number of total mononuclear, CD34+, CD34+/CD38-, CD133+, CD133+/CD34+, and CD133+/CD34- cells, respectively, compared to conventional venipuncture alone. CB cells obtained by PMPR alone generally demonstrated a significant increase in percentages of primitive HSC phenotype with equivalent cell viability between PMPR and venipuncture. This article demonstrates for the first time that CB can be collected up to 39 hours after delivery with PMPR while maximizing CB collection including HSCs with primitive phenotypes.

  11. Truth-telling and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Iranian nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Sayadi, Leila; Taleghani, Fariba; Howard, A Fuchsia; Jeddian, Alireza

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potential cure for a range of life-threatening diseases, but is also associated with a high mortality rate. Nurses encounter a variety of situations wherein they are faced with discussing bad news with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and strategies used by Iranian nurses related to truth-telling and communicating bad news to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. A qualitative approach using content analysis of interview data was conducted. A total of 18 nurses from the main hematopoietic stem cell transplantation center in Iran participated in semi-structured interviews. The Institutional Review Board of the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences and the Hematology-Oncology and Stem Cell Transplantation Research Center affiliated with the Tehran University of Medical Sciences approved the study. In the first main category, not talking about the disease and potential negative outcomes, the nurses described the strategies of not naming the disease, talking about the truth in indirect ways and telling gradually. In the second main category, not disclosing the sad truth, the nurses described the strategies of protecting patients from upsetting information, secrecy, denying the truth and minimizing the importance of the problem. The nurses used these strategies to minimize psychological harm, avoid patient demoralization, and improve the patient's likelihood of a fast and full recovery. The priority for Iranian hematopoietic stem cell transplantation nurses is to first do no harm and to help patients maintain hope. This reflects the Iranian healthcare environment wherein communicating the truth to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients is commonly considered inappropriate and avoided. Iranian nurses require education and support to engage in therapeutic, culturally appropriate communication that emphasizes effective techniques for

  12. A problem-solving education intervention in caregivers and patients during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Margaret; Wehrlen, Leslie; Castro, Kathleen; Prince, Patricia; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Soeken, Karen; Zabora, James; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in informal caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients. Patient/caregiver teams attended three 1-hour problem-solving education sessions to help cope with problems during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Primary measures included the Cancer Self-Efficacy Scale-transplant and Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Active caregivers reported improvements in self-efficacy (p education; caregiver responders also reported better health outcomes such as fatigue. The effect of problem-solving education on self-efficacy and distress in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation caregivers supports its inclusion in future interventions to meet the multifaceted needs of this population.

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26) inhibition does not improve engraftment of unfractionated syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow after nonmyeloablative conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Elisabeth; Klaus, Christoph; Matheeussen, Veerle; Baranyi, Ulrike; Pilat, Nina; Ramsey, Haley; Korom, Stephan; De Meester, Ingrid; Wekerle, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In order to develop minimally toxic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) protocols suitable for use in a wider range of indications, it is important to identify ways to enhance BM engraftment at a given level of recipient conditioning. CXCL12/stromal cell-derived factor-1α plays a crucial physiological role in homing of hematopoietic stem cells to BM. It is regulated by the ectopeptidase dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV; DPP4) known as CD26, which cleaves dipeptides from the N-terminus of polypeptide chains. Blocking DPPIV enzymatic activity had a beneficial effect on hematopoietic stem cell engraftment in various but very specific experimental settings. Here we investigated whether inhibition of DPPIV enzymatic activity through Diprotin A or sitagliptin (Januvia) improves BM engraftment in nonmyeloablative murine models of syngeneic (i.e., CD45-congenic) and allogeneic (i.e., Balb/c to B6) BMT (1 Gy total body irradiation, 10–15 × 106 unseparated BM cells/mouse). Neither Diprotin A administered in vivo at the time of BMT and/or used for in vitro pretreatment of BM nor sitagliptin administered in vivo had a detectable effect on the level of multilineage chimerism (follow-up >20 weeks). Similarly, sitagliptin did not enhance chimerism after allogeneic BMT, even though DPPIV enzymatic activity measured in serum was profoundly inhibited (>98% inhibition at peak exposure). Our results provide evidence that DPPIV inhibition via Diprotin A or sitagliptin does not improve engraftment of unseparated BM in a nonmyeloablative BMT setting. PMID:22085453

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  1. Long-term outcomes among older patients following nonmyeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for advanced hematologic malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E

    2011-01-01

    A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions.......A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions....

  2. Efficacy of Enteral Supplementation Enriched with Glutamine, Fiber, and Oligosaccharide on Mucosal Injury following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Iyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The combination of glutamine, fiber and oligosaccharides (GFO is thought to be beneficial for alleviating gastrointestinal mucosal damage caused by chemotherapy. A commercial enteral supplementation product (GFO enriched with these 3 components is available in Japan. We performed a retrospective study to test whether oral GFO decreased the severity of mucosal injury following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Of 44 HSCT patients, 22 received GFO and 22 did not. Severity of diarrhea/mucositis, overall survival, weight loss, febrile illness/documented infection, intravenous hyperalimentation days/hospital days, engraftment, acute and chronic GVHD, and cumulative incidence of relapse were studied. Sex, age, performance status, diagnosis, disease status, and treatment variables were similar in both groups. There were fewer days of diarrhea grade 3-4 in patients receiving GFO than in those who did not (0.86 vs. 3.27 days; the same was true for days of mucositis grade 3-4 (3.86 vs. 6.00 days. Survival at day 100 was 100% in the GFO group, but only 77.3% for the patients not receiving GFO (p = 0.0091, log-rank test. Weight loss and the number of days of intravenous hyperalimentation were better in the GFO group (p Enterococcus species developed in the GFO group (p = 0.0728 than in the non-GFO group. Other outcomes were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comparative clinical study of GFO supplementation to alleviate mucosal injury after allo-HSCT. We conclude that glutamine, fiber and oligosaccharide supplementation is an effective supportive therapy to decrease the severity of mucosal damage in HSCT.

  3. [Collection of hematopoietic progenitor cells from healthy donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Ines; Cepulić, Branka Golubić; Mazić, Sanja

    2009-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation is an established therapy for many hematologic disorders. HPCs may be collected from bone marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood. In order to minimize the risk for healthy HPC donors, thorough investigation is required before donation. The donor work-up should include medical history, physical examination, ECG, chest x-ray, blood count, coagulation screening, and testing for infectious disease markers. Donors should be fully informed on the donation procedure and sign an informed consent for donation. HPCs are traditionally collected from bone marrow with the donor in general anesthesia. The procedure includes multiple bone marrow aspirates from pelvic bones and at least overnight hospital stay. Although marrow donation is generally safe and well tolerated, minor complications like pain at the collection site, fatigue and pain on walking or sitting may occur in a relatively small proportion of donors (6%-20%). Major and life-threatening complications such as anesthesia-related events, mechanical injury to the bone, sacroiliac joint and sciatic nerve following marrow donation are relatively rare, being estimated to 0.1%-0.3% of cases. In the last decade, peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) have become an increasingly used altemative to bone marrow. PBPC transplantation offers faster hematopoietic recovery and lower early transplant-related morbidity and mortality. The incidence of acute graft vs. host disease (GvHD) is no greater than in bone marrow transplants. However, there is evidence for increased chronic GvHD, which is in part related to the higher number of T and NK cells that are collected with PBPC and re-infused to the patient. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used to mobilize PBPCs for collection by leukapheresis. Leukapheresis is usually perfomed after 4 to 5 days of G-CSF subcutaneous administration at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. Vascular access

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell development requires transient Wnt/β-catenin activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ruiz-Herguido (Cristina); J. Guiu (Jordi); C. D'Altri; J. Inglés-Esteve (Julia); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); L. Espinosa (Lluis); A. Bigas (Anna)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractUnderstanding how hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are generated and the signals that control this process is a crucial issue for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. HSCs emerge during embryonic life from an endothelial-like cell population that

  5. Differential role for very late antigen-5 in mobilization and homing of hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P. K.; Weersing, E.; Dontje, B.; de Haan, G.; van Os, R.

    2006-01-01

    The role of very late antigen-5 (VLA-5) in homing and mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells from normal bone marrow (NBM) and bone marrow (MBM) and peripheral blood (MPB) from mobilized mice was investigated. We found a decreased number of VLA-5-expressing cells in the lineage-negative fraction

  6. The polycomb group gene Ezh2 prevents hematopoietic stem cell exhaustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, LM; Bystrykh, LV; Boer, AC; Houwer, S; Douma, J; Weersing, E; Dontje, B; de Haan, G

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for a decline of stem cell functioning after replicative stress remains unknown. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to identify genes involved in the process of cellular aging. In proliferating and senescent MEFs one of

  7. Persistent seropositivity for yellow fever in a previously vaccinated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayoko Hayakawa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The duration of a protective level of yellow fever antibodies after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a previously vaccinated person is unclear. The case of a patient who had previously been vaccinated for yellow fever and who remained seropositive for 22 months after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma is described herein.

  8. A genetic and genomic analysis identifies a cluster of genes associated with hematopoietic cell turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G; Bystrykh, LV; Weersing, E; Dontje, B; Geiger, H; Ivanova, N; Lemischka, IR; Vellenga, E; Van Zant, G

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells from different strains of mice vary widely with respect to their cell cycle activity. In the present study we used complementary genetic and genomic approaches to identify molecular pathways affecting this complex trait. We identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL)

  9. Potential role of immunoablation and hematopoietic cell transplantation in the treatment of early diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarski, Emilian; Milczarczyk, Alicja; Franek, Edward; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw

    2010-01-01

    Immunoablation with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation has shown some effectiveness in the treatment of autoimmune diseases as diverse as aplastic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and Crohn's disease. It has been recently shown that this treatment might prevent or delay development of diabetes type 1. The majority of more than 30 patients with early diabetes type 1 who underwent immunoablation and hematopoietic cell transplantation in various centers in the world achieved durable remission of diabetes and independence of exogenous insulin. This review summarizes advantages and risks of this treatment of early diabetes type 1.

  10. An Analysis of MicroRNA Expression in the Myelodysplastic Syndromes Using Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    predisposition for the development of MDS. 15. SUBJECT TERMS MicroRNAs, the myelodysplastic syndromes, hematopoietic stem cells...hematopoietic  stem  cells  (HSCs),  demonstrating   the  presence  of  disease  associated  cytogenetic  and  molecular   genetic ...hematopoiesis   in   the   context   of   aging   and   its   likely   implication   in   the   age-­‐related   predisposition

  11. Circulating hematopoietic progenitors and CD34+ cells predicted successful hematopoietic stem cell harvest in myeloma and lymphoma patients: experiences from a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu JT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jui-Ting Yu,1,2,* Shao-Bin Cheng,3,* Youngsen Yang,1 Kuang-Hsi Chang,4 Wen-Li Hwang,1 Chieh-Lin Jerry Teng,1,5,6 1Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 2Division of Hematology/Medical Oncology, Tungs' Taichung MetroHarbor Hospital, 3Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, 4Department of Medical Research and Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 5Department of Life Science, Tunghai University, 6School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Previous studies have shown that the numbers of both circulating hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC and CD34+ cell are positively correlated with CD34+ cell harvest yield. However, the minimal numbers of both circulating HPCs and CD34+ cells required for performing an efficient hematopoietic stem cell (HSC harvest in lymphoma and myeloma patients have not been defined in our institution. Patients and methods: Medical records of 50 lymphoma and myeloma patients undergoing peripheral blood HSC harvest in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. The minimal and optimal HSC harvest yield required for the treatment was considered to be ≥2×106 CD34+ cells/kg and ≥5×106 CD34+ cells/kg, respectively. Results: The minimally required or optimal HSC yield obtained was not influenced by age (≥60 years, sex, underlying malignancies, disease status, multiple rounds of chemotherapy, or history of radiotherapy. The numbers of both circulating HPC and CD34+ cell were higher in patients with minimally required HSC yields (P=0.000 for HPC and P=0.000 for CD34+ cell and also in patients with optimal HSC yields (P=0.011 for HPC and P=0.006 for CD34+ cell. The cell count cutoff for obtaining minimally required HSC harvest was determined to be 20/mm3 for HPCs and 10/mm3 for CD34+ cells. Furthermore, the cell count cutoff for obtaining

  12. Hematopoietic defects in response to reduced Arhgap21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Xavier-Ferrucio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arhgap21 is a member of the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP family, which function as negative regulators of Rho GTPases. Arhgap21 has been implicated in adhesion and migration of cancer cells. However, the role of Arhgap21 has never been investigated in hematopoietic cells. Herein, we evaluated functional aspects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC using a haploinsufficient (Arhgap21+/− mouse. Our results show that Arhgap21+/− mice have an increased frequency of phenotypic HSC, impaired ability to form progenitor colonies in vitro and decreased hematopoietic engraftment in vivo, along with a decrease in LSK cell frequency during serial bone marrow transplantation. Arhgap21+/− hematopoietic progenitor cells have impaired adhesion and enhanced mobilization of immature LSK and myeloid progenitors. Arhgap21+/− mice also exhibit reduced erythroid commitment and differentiation, which was recapitulated in human primary cells, in which knockdown of ARHGAP21 in CMP and MEP resulted in decreased erythroid commitment. Finally, we observed enhanced RhoC activity in the bone marrow cells of Arhgap21+/− mice, indicating that Arhgap21 functions in hematopoiesis may be at least partially mediated by RhoC inactivation.

  13. Early severe impairment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from the bone marrow caused by CLP sepsis and endotoxemia in a humanized mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirecki, Tomasz; Kawiak, Jerzy; Machaj, Eugeniusz; Pojda, Zygmunt; Wasilewska, Danuta; Czubak, Jarosław; Hoser, Grażyna

    2015-08-14

    An effective immune response to severe bacterial infections requires a robust production of the innate immunity cells from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in a process called emergency myelopoiesis. In sepsis, an altered immune response that leads to a failure of bacterial clearance is often observed. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of sepsis on human HSPCs in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment of humanized mice subjected to acute endotoxemia and polymicrobial sepsis. Humanized mice (hu-NSG) were generated by transplanting NOD.Cg-Prkdc/scidIL2rγ (NSG) mice with the human cord blood CD34(+) cells. Eight weeks after the transplantation, hu-NSG mice were subjected to sepsis induced by endotoxemia-Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-or by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Twenty-four hours later, HSPCs from BM were analyzed by flow cytometry and colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. CLP after inhibition of Notch signaling was also performed. The effects of LPS on the in vitro proliferation of CD34(+) cells from human BM were tested by CellTrace Violet dye staining. The expression of Toll-like receptor 4 receptor was present among engrafted human HSPCs. Both CLP and endotoxemia decreased (by 43 % and 37 %) cellularity of the BM. In addition, in both models, accumulation of early CD34(+) CD38(-) HSCs was observed, but the number of CD34(+) CD38(+) progenitors decreased. After CLP, there was a 1.5-fold increase of proliferating CD34(+) CD38(-)Ki-67(+) cells. Moreover, CFU assay revealed a depressed (by 75 % after LPS and by 50 % after CLP) production of human hematopoietic colonies from the BM of septic mice. In contrast, in vitro LPS stimulated differentiation of CD34(+) CD38(-) HSCs but did not induce proliferation of these cells in contrast to the CD34(+) CD38(+) progenitors. CLP sepsis modulated the BM microenvironment by upregulation of Jagged-1 expression on non-hematopoietic cells, and the proliferation of HSCs was Notch

  14. Cryopreservation of adult unrelated donor products in hematopoietic cell transplantation: the OneMatch experience and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Joseph; Morris, Gail; Rizk, Mina; Shorr, Risa; Mercer, Dena; Young, Kimberly; Allan, David

    2017-11-01

    The frequency of cryopreserving blood stem or progenitor products from unrelated donors is not known and the underlying reasons are poorly documented. Greater insight is needed to develop policies on cryopreservation that balance donor safety with patient needs. Cryopreservation requests between January 1, 2014, and May 31, 2016, at the OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network at Canadian Blood Services were reviewed and a systematic review of the literature was performed. Thirty products of 719 (4.2%) unrelated donor collections facilitated by OneMatch were cryopreserved. Patient-related reasons were most common and included the need to delay transplant for continued antimicrobial treatment (six patients), patient too deconditioned to proceed with scheduled transplant (five patients), and/or need for more treatment for relapsed disease (three patients). Donor-related issues leading to cryopreservation requests were less common (five cases), mainly due to lack of donor availability after attempting to reschedule. Cryopreservation of a product that was never infused occurred infrequently (two cases, 7%). In our systematic review of the literature, 993 cases were identified in 32 published reports. Both patient-related and donor-related reasons were cited but not specifically reported, precluding quantitative insight regarding the relative frequency of causes. The impact of cryopreservation on hematopoietic engraftment appears negligible when compared to controls in a subset of studies; however, reporting of outcomes was inconsistent. Future studies with standard outcome measures are needed to clarify the impact of cryopreservation on engraftment and other transplant outcomes. International guidelines that consider the ethical framework surrounding requests for donor product cryopreservation are needed. © 2017 AABB.

  15. Clearance of senescent cells by ABT263 rejuvenates aged hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Yingying; Shao, Lijian; Laberge, Remi-Martin; Demaria, Marco; Campisi, Judith; Janakiraman, Krishnamurthy; Sharpless, Norman E; Ding, Sheng; Feng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xiaoyan; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Krager, Kimberly; Ponnappan, Usha; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Meng, Aimin; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cells (SCs) accumulate with age and after genotoxic stress, such as total-body irradiation (TBI). Clearance of SCs in a progeroid mouse model using a transgenic approach delays several age-associated disorders, suggesting that SCs play a causative role in certain age-related pathologies. Thus, a 'senolytic' pharmacological agent that can selectively kill SCs holds promise for rejuvenating tissue stem cells and extending health span. To test this idea, we screened a collection of compounds and identified ABT263 (a specific inhibitor of the anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and BCL-xL) as a potent senolytic drug. We show that ABT263 selectively kills SCs in culture in a cell type- and species-independent manner by inducing apoptosis. Oral administration of ABT263 to either sublethally irradiated or normally aged mice effectively depleted SCs, including senescent bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and senescent muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Notably, this depletion mitigated TBI-induced premature aging of the hematopoietic system and rejuvenated the aged HSCs and MuSCs in normally aged mice. Our results demonstrate that selective clearance of SCs by a pharmacological agent is beneficial in part through its rejuvenation of aged tissue stem cells. Thus, senolytic drugs may represent a new class of radiation mitigators and anti-aging agents.