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Sample records for hematoma complicating transjugular

  1. Prevention and treatment of complications after transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XUE Hui

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS in the treatment of cirrhotic portal hypertension has been widely accepted both at home and abroad. This article focuses on the fatal complications of TIPS (including intraperitoneal bleeding and acute pulmonary embolism, shunt failure, and recurrent portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy, and elaborates on the reasons for such conditions and related preventive measures, in order to improve the accuracy and safety of intraoperative puncture, reduce common complications such as shunt failure and hepatic encephalopathy, and improve the clinical effect of TIPS in the treatment of cirrhotic portal hypertension.

  2. Intracerebral hematoma complicating herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sainz, Aida; Escalza-Cortina, Inés; Guio-Carrión, Laura; Matute-Nieves, Alexandra; Gómez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carbayo-Lozano, Guillermo; Garcia-Monco, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    To describe two patients who developed an intracranial hematoma as a complication of temporal lobe encephalitis due to herpes simplex type 1 virus, and to review the literature. The first patient, a 45-year-old woman developed a brain hematoma in the location of the encephalitic lesion on day 9 after the onset of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) that required surgical evacuation. The second patient, a 53-year-old woman was being treated for HSE; on day 8 after admission a temporal lobe hematoma with midline shift was disclosed due to persistent headache. Both patients survived but were left with sequelae. We conducted a PubMed/MEDLINE search from 1986 to April 2013 on this topic. We have found 20 additional cases reported in the literature and review their characteristics. Hemorrhage was present on admission in 35% of pooled patients, and consistently involved the area of encephalitis. Clinical presentation of intracranial hemorrhage overlapped the encephalitic symptoms in two-thirds of the patients. Half of patients underwent surgery. Overall, mortality rate was low (5.2%), and half of patients fully recovered. Intracranial bleeding, although infrequent, can complicate the evolution of herpes simplex encephalitis and should be borne in mind since its presence may require neurosurgery. Although its presentation may overlap the encephalitic features, the lack of improvement or the worsening of initial symptoms, particularly during the second week of admission, should lead to this suspicion and to perform a neuroimaging study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictors of Recurrence and Complications After Chronic Subdural Hematoma Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Kristiansson, Helena

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of recurrence and moderate to severe complications after burr-hole surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian single-center population-based cohort of 759 adult patients with cSDH operated...... regression model. RESULTS: Recurrence was observed in 85 patients (11.2%), whereas moderate to severe complications were observed in 35 patients (4.6%). Bilateral hematoma (odds ratio [OR], 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-3.35; P hematoma diameter in millimeters (OR, 1.05; 95% CI...... to severe complications. CONCLUSIONS: Recurrence after cSDH surgery is more often encountered in patients with radiologically more extensive disease reflected by bilateral hematoma and large hematoma diameter. On the other hand, moderate to severe complications are more often seen in patients in a worse...

  4. A Rare Complication of Spinal Anesthesia: Subdural Hematoma

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    Fuldem Yıldırım Dönmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is postdural puncture headache. Any injury of the dura may cause headache. After the injury of the dura, CSF leakage may occur and due to the tension of the veins between the cortex and the dural sinuses, subdural hematoma may be seen. Herein, we present a patient with persistent headache after the spinal anesthesia given during delivery of her baby, and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma

  5. Transjugular liver core biopsy: indications, results, and complications; Transjugulaere Leberstanzbiopsie: Indikationen, Ergebnisse, Komplikationen

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    Dinkel, H.P.; Wittchen, K.; Hoppe, H.; Triller, J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Inselspital, Univ. Bern (Switzerland); Dufour, J.F. [Inst. fuer Klinische Pharmakologie, Inselspital, Univ. Bern (Switzerland); Zimmermann, A. [Inst. fuer Pathologie, Inselspital, Univ. Bern (Switzerland)

    2003-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate benefit, feasibility, and frequency of complications with transjugular liver biopsy using a semi-automatic Tru-cut system. Materials and Methods: Eighty-five consecutive patients (57 males, 28 females) with various liver disorders (cirrhosis [30], hepatitis [12], acute hepatopathy [34], orthotopic liver transplantation [8], hepatocellular carcinoma [1]), coagulopathies (n=71) and/or ascites (n = 46) were referred to our department for a transjugular liver biopsy. Mean age was 48 {+-} 16 years (range 17 to 75 years). Success and complications were retrospectively evaluated from the radiology reports, pathology reports, and patient files. Success was defined as procuring a tissue specimen that enabled a definite histological diagnosis. The complications included thrombosis at the puncture site, hematoma, cardiac arrhythmia, capsular perforation, hemorrhage, and cardiac damage. Mortality included all deaths within 30 days after the procedure. Procedure-related mortality included all deaths related to the procedure. Results: The procedure was technically successful in 80 patients (94%) and unsuccessful in 5 patients (6%) due to a failed hepatic vein cannulation (1 patient with Budd Chiari syndrome and total liver vein occlusion, 4 patients with unsuitable anatomy). One biopsy pass was made in 22 patients, and two passes were made in 45 and three or more passes in 14 patients, all in a single session. The sample quality was judged by the pathologist as good in 71 of 80 patients (89%) and poor in 8 patients (10%). A diagnosis was not possible in 1 patient. Eight procedure-related complications occurred, which were classified according to the criteria of the society of interventional radiology (SIR) as minor in 5 (3 type A, 2 type B) and major in 3 (1 pneumothorax, type C, 1 nonfatal bleeding, type D, and 1 fatal bleeding, type F). Procedure-related mortality was 1%, overall mortality 15% (mostly due to progressive liver failure). (orig.) [German

  6. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@126.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology (China)

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  7. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications

  8. A Lethal Complication of Endoscopic Therapy: Duodenal Intramural Hematoma

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    Turan Calhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal intramural hematoma (DIH usually occurs in childhood and young adults following blunt abdominal trauma. It may also develop in the presence of coagulation disorders and may rarely be an iatrogenic outcome of endoscopic procedures. Management of DIH is usually a conservative approach. A case of intramural duodenal hematoma that developed following endoscopic epinephrine sclerotherapy and/or argon plasma coagulation and that was nonresponsive to conservative therapy in a patient with chronic renal failure who died from sepsis is being discussed in this report. Clinicians should be aware of such possible complications after endoscopic hemostasis in patients with coagulation disorders.

  9. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

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    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Harrer, J. [Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Cesak, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Herman, A. [1. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  10. Extensive spinal epidural hematoma: a rare complication of aortic coarctation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zizka, J.; Elias, P.; Michl, A.; Harrer, J.; Cesak, T.; Herman, A.

    2001-01-01

    Development of collateral circulation belongs among the typical signs of aortic coarctation. Cerebral or spinal artery aneurysm formation with increased risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage represent the most common neurovascular complication of this disease. We report a case of a 20-year-old sportsman who developed acute non-traumatic paraplegia as a result of extensive spinal epidural hemorrhage from collateral vessels accompanying aortic coarctation which was unrecognized up to that time. To the best of our knowledge, acute spinal epidural hematoma as a complication of aortic coarctation has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  11. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vien, Christine; Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  12. Transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt in the elderly: Palliation for complications of portal hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Mubin I; Karsan, Hetal; Ferral, Hector; Shaikh, Azim; Waheed, Uzma; Akhter, Talal; Gabbard, Alan; Morar, Kamal; Tyrrell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To present a dedicated series of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunts (TIPS) in the elderly since data is sparse on this population group. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of patients at least 65 years of age who underwent TIPS at our institutions between 1997 and 2010. Twenty-five patients were referred for TIPS. We deemed that 2 patients were not considered appropriate candidates due to their markedly advanced liver disease. Of the 23 patients suitable for TIPS, the indications for TIPS placement was portal hypertension complicated by refractory ascites alone (n = 9), hepatic hydrothorax alone (n = 2), refractory ascites and hydrothorax (n = 1), gastrointestinal bleeding alone (n = 8), gastrointestinal bleeding and ascites (n = 3). RESULTS: Of these 23 attempted TIPS procedure patients, 21 patients had technically successful TIPS procedures. A total of 29 out of 32 TIPS procedures including revisions were successful in 21 patients with a mean age of 72.1 years (range 65-82 years). Three of the procedures were unsuccessful attempts at TIPS and 8 procedures were successful revisions of our existing TIPS. Sixteen of 21 patients who underwent successful TIPS (excluding 5 patients lost to follow-up) were followed for a mean of 14.7 mo. Ascites and/or hydrothorax was controlled following technically successful procedures in 12 of 13 patients. Bleeding was controlled following technically successful procedures in 10 out of 11 patients. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated that TIPS is an effective procedure to control refractory complications of portal hypertension in elderly patients. PMID:22400084

  13. Intramural Hematoma of the Esophagus Complicating Severe Preeclampsia

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    Simone Garzon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramural hematoma of the esophagus is a rare injury causing esophageal mucosal dissection. Forceful vomiting and coagulopathy are common underlying causes in the elderly population taking antiplatelets or anticoagulation agents. Acute retrosternal pain followed by hematemesis and dysphagia differentiates the hematoma from other cardiac or thoracic emergencies, including acute myocardial infarction or aortic dissection. Direct inspection by endoscopy is useful, but chest computed tomography best assesses the degree of obliteration of the lumen and excludes other differential diagnoses. Intramural hematoma of the esophagus is generally benign and most patients recover fully with conservative treatment. Bleeding can be managed medically unless in hemodynamically unstable patients, for whom surgical or angiographic treatment may be attempted; only rarely esophageal obstruction requires endoscopic decompression. We report an unusual case of esophageal hematoma, presenting in a young preeclamptic woman after surgical delivery of a preterm twin pregnancy, with a favorable outcome following medical management.

  14. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

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    Christine Vien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia.

  15. Interventricular Septal Hematoma and Coronary-Ventricular Fistula: A Complication of Retrograde Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention

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    Abdul-rahman R. Abdel-karim; Minh Vo; Michael L. Main; J. Aaron Grantham

    2016-01-01

    Interventricular septal hematoma is a rare complication of retrograde chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with a typically benign course. Here we report two cases of interventricular septal hematoma and coronary-cameral fistula development after right coronary artery (RCA) CTO-PCI using a retrograde approach. Both were complicated by development of ST-segment elevation and chest pain. One case was managed actively and the other conservatively, both with a f...

  16. Predictors of Recurrence and Complications After Chronic Subdural Hematoma Surgery: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Kristiansson, Helena; Ståhl, Fredrik; Fornebo, Ida; Förander, Petter; Jakola, Asgeir S

    2017-10-01

    To investigate predictors of recurrence and moderate to severe complications after burr-hole surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian single-center population-based cohort of 759 adult patients with cSDH operated with burr-hole surgery between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2010. Possible predictors of recurrence and complications, assessed using a standardized reporting system of adverse events, were identified and analyzed in univariable analyses. Variables with a P value hematoma (odds ratio [OR], 2.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25-3.35; P hematoma diameter in millimeters (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.09; P 1 (OR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.10-4.75; P = 0.03) were independent predictors of moderate to severe complications. Recurrence after cSDH surgery is more often encountered in patients with radiologically more extensive disease reflected by bilateral hematoma and large hematoma diameter. On the other hand, moderate to severe complications are more often seen in patients in a worse clinical condition, reflected by decreased level of consciousness and more comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsauo Jiaywei; Li Xiao; Li Hongcui; Wei Bo; Luo Xuefeng; Zhang Chunle; Tang Chengwei; Wang Weiping

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients’ medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 μmol/L (range 203.4–369.3) to 146.2 μmol/L (range 95.8–223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 μmol/L (range 29.5–240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9–5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  18. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

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    Tsauo Jiaywei, E-mail: 80732059@qq.com; Li Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@gmail.com; Li Hongcui, E-mail: lihongcui520@126.com; Wei Bo, E-mail: allyooking@tom.com; Luo Xuefeng, E-mail: luobo_913@126.com; Zhang Chunle, E-mail: sugar139000@163.com; Tang Chengwei, E-mail: 20378375@qq.com [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (China); Wang Weiping, E-mail: irjournalclub@gmail.com [Section of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute (United States)

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients' medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 {mu}mol/L (range 203.4-369.3) to 146.2 {mu}mol/L (range 95.8-223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 {mu}mol/L (range 29.5-240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9-5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  19. Diagnostic imaging of severe rectus sheath hematoma complicating anticoagulant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, A.; Bui, P.; Boccaccini, H.; Bresler, L.; Claudon, M.; Boissel, P.; Regent, D.

    1995-01-01

    CT were performed in thirteen patients (12 women, 1 man) aged from 53 to 90 (mean age, 74) with severe RSH. Five patients also underwent ultrasound examination and three MR examination. Nine patients (69%) were receiving subcutaneous injection of heparin, three (23%) oral anticoagulant therapy and one continuous IV infusion of heparin. Clinical diagnosis was reached in 6 cases. Excessive activity of anticoagulant therapy was noted in 4 cases. The location of the RSH, their densities and their signals were analysed. All the RSH were mostly developed in the lower third of the abdominal wall, had a large spreading into the Retzius space and compressed the bladder and/or the bowels. RSH were all hyperdense and in 8 cases (61%) a fluid-fluid level due to the hematocrit effect was noted. In one case, a retroperitoneal hematoma was discovered. The extension of the RSH was well delineated with MRI. The RSH showed itself with heterogeneous signal intensities with areas of high-signal-intensity on T1-weighted images. Fluid-fluid levels and a concentric ring sign were also noted. Older women with subcutaneous injection of heparin are especially prone to RSH even though there is no overall excessive activity of anticoagulant therapy. Clinical and biological diagnosis may be difficult. CT scan is the exam of choice to reach a precise and acute diagnosis of RSH. (authors). 34 refs., 8 figs

  20. Intrahemispheric subdural hematoma complicated with chronic neurologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakashita, Yasuo; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Fuse, Shigeru; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Toyokura, Yasuo

    1987-01-01

    Two patients had interhemispheric subdural hematoma (ISH) without clinical signs or symptoms characteristic of ISH. The first patient, a 74-year-old woman with 7 years' history of Parkinson's disease, complained of unresponsiveness and akinesia. The treatment for suspected worsening of the disease failed to improve her conditions. Computed tomography (CT) showed hyperdensity along the falx from the frontal falx over the tentorium. Subsequent CT on the 23rd hospital day showed disappearance of hyperdensity, confirming ISH. The second patient, a 76-year-old woman with multiple cerebral infarction, was referred for loss of consciousness and vomiting. Neurological examination failed to reveal additional or augmented neurological deficits. Computed tomography showed a right parasagittal thin crescent hyperdensity with a flat medial border and a convex lateral border, extending from the anterior falx to the mid-falx. The hyperdensity disappeared on the 47th hospital day. These findings suggest the usefulness of CT as the only procedure when ISH features are not seen. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Lateral abdominal wall hematoma as a rare complication after carotid artery stenting: a case report

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    Satomi Jyunichiro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Abdominal wall hematoma is a rare and life-threatening complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS, but it can occur when activated clotting time is prolonged. We report a right lateral abdominal wall hematoma caused by rupture of the superficial circumflex iliac artery after CAS in a 72-year-old man with severe stenosis of the origin of the right internal carotid artery. We performed CAS for the targeted lesion while activated clotting time exceeded 300 seconds. After 2 hours, he complained of right lateral abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an extensive hematoma in the right lateral abdominal wall. Activated clotting time was 180 seconds at this point. Seven hours later, he developed hypotension and hemoglobin level dropped to 11.3 g/dl. Subsequent computed tomography showed enlargement of the hematoma. Emergent selective angiography of the external iliac artery revealed active bleeding from the right superficial circumflex iliac artery. Transcatheter arterial embolization with Gelfoam and microcoils was performed successfully. With more CAS procedures being performed, it is important for endovascular surgeons and radiologists to consider the possibility of abdominal wall hematoma in this situation.

  2. Endovascular Management of Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy Complication of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Comprehensive Review and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Keith; Carrion, Andres F.; Salsamendi, Jason; Doshi, Mehul; Baker, Reginald; Kably, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has evolved as an effective intervention for treatment of complications of portal hypertension. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents have improved the patency of the shunts and diminished the incidence of TIPS dysfunction. However, TIPS-related refractory hepatic encephalopathy (rHE) poses a significant challenge. Approximately 3–7 % of patients with TIPS develop rHE. Refractory hepatic encephalopathy is defined as a recurrent or persistent encephalopathy despite appropriate medical treatment. Hepatic encephalopathy can be an extremely debilitating complication that profoundly affects quality of life. The approach to management of patients with rHE is complex and typically requires collaboration between different specialties. Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for rHE; however, the ongoing shortage of organ donation markedly limits this treatment option. Alternative therapies such as shunt occlusion or reduction can control symptoms and serve as a ‘bridge’ therapy to liver transplantation. Therefore, interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients by offering a variety of endovascular techniques. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of these endovascular techniques and to develop a therapeutic algorithm that can be applied in clinical practice for the management of rHE

  3. Endovascular Management of Refractory Hepatic Encephalopathy Complication of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Comprehensive Review and Clinical Practice Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Keith, E-mail: keithjppereira@gmail.com [Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Carrion, Andres F., E-mail: andres.carrionmonsa@jhsmiami.org [Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami Hospital, Department of Hepatology (United States); Salsamendi, Jason, E-mail: JSalsamendi@med.miami.edu; Doshi, Mehul, E-mail: MDoshi@med.miami.edu; Baker, Reginald, E-mail: RBaker@med.miami.edu; Kably, Issam, E-mail: ikably@med.miami.edu [Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has evolved as an effective intervention for treatment of complications of portal hypertension. The use of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stents have improved the patency of the shunts and diminished the incidence of TIPS dysfunction. However, TIPS-related refractory hepatic encephalopathy (rHE) poses a significant challenge. Approximately 3–7 % of patients with TIPS develop rHE. Refractory hepatic encephalopathy is defined as a recurrent or persistent encephalopathy despite appropriate medical treatment. Hepatic encephalopathy can be an extremely debilitating complication that profoundly affects quality of life. The approach to management of patients with rHE is complex and typically requires collaboration between different specialties. Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for rHE; however, the ongoing shortage of organ donation markedly limits this treatment option. Alternative therapies such as shunt occlusion or reduction can control symptoms and serve as a ‘bridge’ therapy to liver transplantation. Therefore, interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of these patients by offering a variety of endovascular techniques. The purpose of this review is to highlight some of these endovascular techniques and to develop a therapeutic algorithm that can be applied in clinical practice for the management of rHE.

  4. An unusual complication of combined gonioscopy-assisted transluminal trabeculotomy and phacoemulsification: vision loss due to intracapsular hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalinbas, Duygu; Aktas, Zeynep; Hepsen, İbrahim; Dilekmen, Nilay

    2017-09-23

    To report two cases with an acute vision loss due to intracapsular hemorrhage (hematoma) after an uncomplicated gonioscopy-assisted transluminal trabeculotomy (GATT) combined with phacoemulsification surgery. Case report. Seventy-six-year-old male and 75-year-old female patients with cataract and pseudoexfoliative glaucoma (XFG) uncontrolled with maximum medical therapy both underwent GATT combined with phacoemulsification. Shortly after the surgery, intracapsular hematoma behind the intraocular lens (IOL) were noted in both patients. Hematoma cleared in both of them via IOL extraction-anterior vitrectomy and YAG-laser capsulotomy, respectively. Hematoma cleared in both patients without any surgical complications. Vision loss due to unclearing intracapsular hematoma might be an early complication of combined GATT and phacoemulsification surgery.

  5. An unusual complication of invasive video-EEG monitoring: subelectrode hematoma without subdural component: case report.

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    Bozkurt, Gokhan; Ayhan, Selim; Dericioglu, Nese; Saygi, Serap; Akalan, Nejat

    2010-08-01

    The potential complications of the subdural electrode implantation providing identification of the seizure focus and direct stimulation of the cerebral cortex for defining the eloquent cortical areas are epidural and subdural hematoma, cortical contusions, infection, brain edema, raised intracranial pressure, CSF leakage, and venous infarction have been previously reported in the literature. To present the first case of subelectrode hematoma without subdural component that was detected during invasive EEG monitoring after subdural electrode implantation. A 19-year-old female with drug resistant seizures was decided to undergo invasive monitoring with subdural electrodes. While good quality recordings had been initially obtained from all electrodes placed on the right parietal convexity, no cerebral cortical activity could be obtained from one electrode 2 days after the first operation. Explorative surgery revealed a circumscribed subelectrode hematoma without a subdural component. Awareness of the potential complications of subdural electrode implantation and close follow-up of the clinical findings of the patient are of highest value for early detection and successful management.

  6. Chryseobacterium meningosepticum Sepsis Complicated with Retroperitoneal Hematoma and Pleural Effusion in a Diabetic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Wu Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Intra-abdominal infection due to Chryseobacterium meningosepticum is rare, and bacteremia complicated with pleural effusion and retroperitoneal hematoma caused by C. meningosepticum has not been reported previously. A 57-year-old diabetic man presented with bacteremia with retroperitoneal abscess and pleural effusion caused by C. meningosepticum on the 12th day of hospitalization. His clinical condition improved after antimicrobial therapy with levofloxacin and rifampin, debridement of the retroperitoneal hematoma and left-side chest tube insertion. Antibiotics were administered for 1 month, and he was later transferred to a local respiratory care ward under afebrile condition. C. meningosepticum should be included in the list of suspected nosocomial infections, especially in patients with immunocompromised status. Administration of appropriate antibiotics, such as quinolone, minocycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or rifampin, and treatment of local infection improve the clinical outcome of patients with C. meningosepticum infection.

  7. Cranial epidural hematomas: A case series and literature review of this rare complication associated with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jennifer; Rathore, Nisha; Lee, Pearlene; LeBlanc, Zachary; Lebensburger, Jeffrey; Meier, Emily Riehm; Kwiatkowski, Janet L

    2017-03-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) may experience many complications of the central nervous system (CNS) including stroke, silent cerebral infarcts, and neuropsychological deficits. Cranial epidural hematoma is a rare but potentially serious complication. Case series of cranial epidural hematomas in children with SCD from three different institutions is considered, along with a literature review of cranial epidural hematomas in this population. Seven children with SCD with cranial epidural hematomas were identified from three different institutions. All patients were male and the age at presentation ranged from 10 to 18 years. Two patients presented with headache (28.6%), while the rest had no neurologic symptoms at presentation. Four patients required urgent neurosurgical intervention (57.1%) and one patient died (14.3%). A literature review identified 18 additional cases of cranial epidural hematomas in children with SCD. Of these, treatment ranged from supportive care to neurosurgical intervention. Twelve patients completely recovered (66.7%), one patient had long-term cognitive impairment (5.6%), and four patients died (22.2%). Combined with our data, cranial epidural hematomas have a mortality rate of 20.0%. Although rare, cranial epidural hematoma can be fatal and should be considered in patients with acute neurological symptoms. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cernea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity.

  9. The transjugular portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) as an intervention in clinical complication of portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Schwarz, W.; Balzer, J.; Abolmaali, N.; Vogl, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    Most frequent complications in patients with liver cirrhosis are due to portal hypertension. Beside ascites circumvent vessles formate with vasodilatation. Due to counterregulation a secondary hyperaldosteronism develops with release of vasocontrictive agents. If conservative and endoscopic methods fail, indication for building a portosystemic shunt is given. The TIPSS procedure is less invasive than the surgical method of Warren-Shunt, so the radiological intervention has replaced surgery. Reducing the portal pressure by the shunt, the clinical complications change for the better. Still problems are defined as hepatic encephalopathy and right ventricular heart failure. Regular follow up investigations have to be performed to detect complications in the shunt. Using regular clinical and radiological check up TIPSS is of clinical benefit with good long term results. (orig.) [de

  10. Extension of a Coronary Intramural Hematoma as a Complication of Early Percutaneous Coronary Intervention after Thrombolytic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El-Mawardy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal treatment approach for coronary intramural hematomas has not been well defined, and discussion is limited to scarce data. In addition, the impact of prior thrombolytic therapy in the setting of coronary artery dissections with possible development and/or extension of an intramural hematoma is not well understood. We describe a case of iatrogenic periprocedural dissection of the left anterior descending artery (LAD with development of an intramural hematoma and the extension of this hematoma to the left main (LM and left circumflex (LCX arteries in a middle-aged female, where prior recent thrombolytic therapy may have played a role in its triggering or facilitation of its extension. This case highlights the importance of facilitation of bleeding complications by prior use of thrombolytic therapy not only peripherally but intracoronary too and the use of intravascular ultrasound for both diagnosis, followup, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI guidance.

  11. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage.

  12. Intracranial Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hematoma — subdural hematoma, epidural hematoma and intraparenchymal hematoma. Subdural hematoma This occurs when blood vessels — usually veins — rupture ... brain damage can be prevented. The risk of subdural hematoma increases as you age. The risk is also ...

  13. Role of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in the management of severe complications of portal hypertension in idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonnette, Julien; Garcia-Pagán, Juan Carlos; Albillos, Agustín; Turon, Fanny; Ferreira, Carlos; Tellez, Luis; Nault, Jean-Charles; Carbonell, Nicolas; Cervoni, Jean-Paul; Abdel Rehim, Mohamed; Sibert, Annie; Bouchard, Louis; Perreault, Pierre; Trebicka, Jonel; Trottier-Tellier, Félix; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Valla, Dominique-Charles; Plessier, Aurélie

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by portal hypertension in the absence of cirrhosis. The efficacy and safety of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in this population are unknown. The charts of patients with idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension undergoing TIPS in seven centers between 2000 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Forty-one patients were included. Indications for TIPS were recurrent variceal bleeding (n = 25) and refractory ascites (n = 16). Patients were categorized according to the presence (n = 27) or absence (n = 14) of significant extrahepatic comorbidities. Associated conditions were hematologic, prothrombotic, neoplastic, immune, and exposure to toxins. During follow-up (mean 27 ± 29 months), variceal rebleeding occurred in 7/25 (28%), including three with early thrombosis of the stent. Post-TIPS overt hepatic encephalopathy was present in 14 patients (34%). Eleven patients died, five due the liver disease or complications of the procedure and six because of the associated comorbidities. The procedure was complicated by hemoperitoneum in four patients (10%), which was fatal in one case. Serum creatinine (P = 0.005), ascites as indication for TIPS (P = 0.04), and the presence of significant comorbidities (P = 0.01) at the time of the procedure were associated with death. Mortality was higher in patients with significant comorbidities and creatinine ≥100 μmol/L (P portal hypertension who have normal kidney function or do not have severe extrahepatic conditions, TIPS is an excellent option to treat severe complications of portal hypertension. (Hepatology 2016;64:224-231). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Intramural duodenal hematoma as a complication of therapy with Warfarin: a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Juliano; Pessoa, Roberta; Hudson, Marcelo; Vitoi, Silvio; Villela, Ovidio; Torres, Jose; Paula, Mara Delgado; Bemvindo, Aloisio

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of a patient receiving chronic oral anticoagulant therapy with Warfarin who presented with acute intestinal obstruction. Computed tomography showed intramural duodenal hematoma. Treatment was conservative with correction of the coagulation parameters and observation. This case exemplifies the usefulness of conservative therapy and computed tomography in patients with acute small bowel obstruction receiving anticoagulant therapy. (author)

  15. Subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subdural hemorrhage; Traumatic brain injury - subdural hematoma; TBI - subdural hematoma; Head injury - subdural hematoma ... A subdural hematoma is most often the result of a severe head injury. This type of subdural hematoma is among ...

  16. Rivaroxaban-Induced Nontraumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Yet Life-Threatening Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Zaarour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the desire for safer oral anticoagulants (OACs led to the emergence of newer drugs. Available clinical trials demonstrated a lower risk of OACs-associated life-threatening bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, compared to warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal hematoma is an uncommon yet life-threatening neurosurgical emergency that can be associated with the use of these agents. Rivaroxaban, one of the newly approved OACs, is a direct factor Xa inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, to date, only two published cases report the incidence of rivaroxaban-induced nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH. Our case is the third one described and the first one to involve the cervicothoracic spine.

  17. Transjugular portal vein recanalization with creation of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (PVR-TIPS) in patients with chronic non-cirrhotic, non-malignant portal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Christoph; Riecken, Bettina; Schmidt, Arthur; De Gottardi, Andrea; Meier, Benjamin; Bosch, Jaime; Caca, Karel

    2018-03-01

    To determine safety and efficacy of transjugular portal vein recanalization with creation of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (PVR-TIPS) in patients with chronic non-cirrhotic, non-malignant portal vein thrombosis (PVT). This retrospective study includes 17 consecutive patients with chronic non-cirrhotic PVT (cavernous transformation n = 15). PVR-TIPS was indicated because of variceal bleeding (n = 13), refractory ascites (n = 2), portal biliopathy with recurrent cholangitis (n = 1), or abdominal pain (n = 1). Treatment consisted of a combination of transjugular balloon angioplasty, mechanical thrombectomy, and-depending on extent of residual thrombosis-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and additional stenting of the portal venous system. Recanalization was successful in 76.5 % of patients despite cavernous transformation in 88.2 %. Both 1- and 2-year secondary PV and TIPS patency rates were 69.5 %. Procedure-related bleeding complications occurred in 2 patients (intraperitoneal bleeding due to capsule perforation, n = 1; liver hematoma, n = 1) and resolved spontaneously. However, 1 patient died due to subsequent nosocomial pneumonia. During follow-up, 3 patients with TIPS occlusion and PVT recurrence experienced portal hypertensive complications. PVR-TIPS is safe and effective in selected patients with chronic non-cirrhotic PVT. Due to technical complexity and possible complications, it should be performed only in specialized centers with high experience in TIPS procedures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Symptoms of an Intrauterine Hematoma Associated with Pregnancy Complications: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Lan; Wei, Zhaolian; Cao, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the predictive value of the symptoms of an intrauterine hematoma (IUH) for adverse pregnancy outcomes. Methods A literature review was performed with the search terms, including intrauterine/subchorionic/retroplacental/subplacental hematoma/hemorrhage/bleeding/collection/fluid, covering the period from January, 1981 to January, 2014. We just focused on the pregnancy outcomes associated with different symptoms of an IUH. Results It is generally agreed that a retroplacental, posterior or subchorionic in the fundus of uterus, and/or persistent IUH is associated with adverse outcomes in the ongoing pregnancy. However, the prognosis value of both volume and gestational age at diagnosis of IUH still remains controversial. Some researchers argue that a large IUH is associated with an increased risk of adverse events during pregnancy while others refuted. It is believed by some that the earlier an IUH was detected, the higher the risk for adverse outcomes would be, while no or weak association were reported by other studies. The prognostic value of the simultaneous presence of vaginal bleeding on pregnancy outcome is also controversial. Conclusions Both the position relative to the placenta or uterus and duration of IUH have strong predictive value on the prognosis in the ongoing pregnancy. However, the prognostic values of the IUH volume, gestational age at diagnosis and the simultaneous presence of vaginal bleeding remain controversial up to now. Moreover, most of previous reports are small, uncontrolled studies with incomplete information. Prospective, large sample, cohorts studies which take all detailed symptoms of an IUH into consideration are needed when we evaluate its clinical significance in the prognosis of pregnancy. PMID:25369062

  19. [Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) complicated by bilateral occipital lobe infarction: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Kanae; Naraoka, Masato; Shimamura, Norihito; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) is a common disease that is treated with burr hole drainage by neurosurgeons. The outcome of CSH is mostly favorable. We treated 2 cases with bilateral occipital lobe infarction due to CSH. A 57-year-old woman was ambulatory when she visited a clinic for evaluation of headache. One hour after the CT was taken, she developed acute impairment of consciousness, so that she was referred to our hospital. The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with a history of depression who was involved in a traffic accident 5 weeks before admission to our hospital. She was at first admitted to a psychiatric hospital for evaluation of gait disturbance. Three weeks after she was admitted to the psychiatric hospital, she fell into a coma. She was referred to our hospital. Their brain CT on admission revealed compressed ambient and interpeduncular cistern and bilateral CSH. Although burr hole drainage surgery was performed, the 2 patients developed severe sequelae due to occipital lobe infarction caused by central transtentorial herniation.

  20. Intrahemispheric subdural hematoma complicated with chronic neurologic diseases. Report of two cases diagnosed by CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakashita, Yasuo; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Fuse, Shigeru; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Toyokura, Yasuo

    1987-01-01

    Two patients had interhemispheric subdural hematoma (ISH) without clinical signs or symptoms characteristic of ISH. The first patient, a 74-year-old woman with 7 years' history of Parkinson's disease, complained of unresponsiveness and akinesia. The treatment for suspected worsening of the disease failed to improve her conditions. Computed tomography (CT) showed hyperdensity along the falx from the frontal falx over the tentorium. Subsequent CT on the 23rd hospital day showed disappearance of hyperdensity, confirming ISH. The second patient, a 76-year-old woman with multiple cerebral infarction, was referred for loss of consciousness and vomiting. Neurological examination failed to reveal additional or augmented neurological deficits. Computed tomography showed a right parasagittal thin crescent hyperdensity with a flat medial border and a convex lateral border, extending from the anterior falx to the mid-falx. The hyperdensity disappeared on the 47th hospital day. These findings suggest the usefulness of CT as the only procedure when ISH features are not seen. (Namekawa, K.).

  1. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, A.R.; Stanley, A.J.; Vijayananthan, A.; Moss, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The creation of an intrahepatic portosystemic shunt via a transjugular approach (TIPS) is an interventional radiological procedure used to treat the complications of portal hypertension. TIPS insertion is principally indicated to prevent or arrest variceal bleeding when medical or endoscopic treatments fail, and in the management refractory ascites. This review discusses the development and execution of the technique, with focus on its clinical efficacy. Patient selection, imaging surveillance, revision techniques, and complications are also discussed.

  2. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, A.R. [Department of Radiology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Melbourne (Australia)], E-mail: andrewowen@doctors.org.uk; Stanley, A.J. [Department of Gastroenterology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Vijayananthan, A. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Moss, J.G. [Department of Radiology, Gartnavel General Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The creation of an intrahepatic portosystemic shunt via a transjugular approach (TIPS) is an interventional radiological procedure used to treat the complications of portal hypertension. TIPS insertion is principally indicated to prevent or arrest variceal bleeding when medical or endoscopic treatments fail, and in the management refractory ascites. This review discusses the development and execution of the technique, with focus on its clinical efficacy. Patient selection, imaging surveillance, revision techniques, and complications are also discussed.

  3. Subungual Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Subungual Hematoma Share | A subungual hematoma is a transient condition where blood and fluid ... bleeding underneath the nail. Regardless of treatment the hematoma will eventually be resorbed by the body and ...

  4. [Treatment of macular hematoma complicating AMD by vitrectomy, subretinal r-TPA injection, intravitreal injection of bevacizumab combined with gas tamponade: Report of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, M; Benzerroug, M; Milazzo, S

    2017-02-01

    The occurrence of a subretinal hematoma in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a serious complication that can impact the visual prognosis with a poor functional recovery. The management of this complication remains controversial. Several therapeutic methods have been described. We report the results of four patients treated with a protocol combining: vitrectomy, subretinal injection of r-TPA 0.025mg/0.3ml, intravitreal injection of 0.05ml of bevacizumab and retinal tamponade with 20% SF6 gas. Our series consists of four patients with a submacular hematoma complicating AMD, included in succession between October 2013 and October 2014 and treated with the same treatment protocol and by the same surgeon. All patients underwent surgery within eight days after the onset of the macular hematoma. Patients with a consultation period longer than eight days did not undergo this treatment. Face down postoperative positioning was then carried out for seven days by the patients. We observed a shift in the macular hematoma in the four patients, which allowed the identification of secondary neovascularization responsible for the bleeding. The visual acuity improved in three patients from hand motion (HM) preoperatively to 2/10 at one month postoperatively. One patient maintained visual acuity 1/20 during the entire follow-up despite almost complete resorption of the subretinal hematoma. These visual acuities were stable at 6 months postoperatively. Macular subretinal hematoma can cause severe visual loss by several mechanisms. The blood accumulates between the neurosensory retina and the retinal pigment epithelium, which causes a toxic effect on the surrounding tissues, thus resulting in a loss of photoreceptors and cellular destruction in the pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris, evolving into a fibroglial scar. The therapeutic evaluation of this protocol in our series of four patients gives a favorable result. We observed an improvement in visual acuity in 3/4 of

  5. Suprarrenal hematoma Hematoma suprarrenal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Guardo B.

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal asymptomatic suprarrenal hemorrhage is relatively frequent; sometimes it is detected only after resolution when a calcification is found; symptomatic forms are rare; most times hemorrhage and hematoma are due to an obstetric trauma and are related to macrosomia, breech presentation, maternal diabetes and neonatal hypoxia. Clinical picture is characterized by abdominal mass and anemia; diagnosis is confirmed by imagenology. Two patients with suprarrenal hematoma from the University Hospital at Cartagena, Colombia, are presented. Both were related with traumatic delivery and cephalohematoma; one of them had oral and gastric bleeding and the othersuffered hematoma infection; diagnosis was done with abdominal ecography and CAT. Both patients recovered with medical treatment. La hemorragia suprarrenal asintomática del neonato es relativamente frecuente y muchas veces se detecta como una calcificación local después de que se resuelve el hematoma. La forma sintomática es rara y, a menudo, se debe a un trauma obstétrico relacionado con la macrosomía fetal, la presentación podálica, la diabetes materna o la hipoxia perinatal. Las manifestaciones clínicas son, principalmente, una masa abdominal y anemia importante; el diagnóstico se confirma con la imaginología. Se presentan dos casos de hematoma suprarrenal derecho tratados en el Hospital Universitario de Cartagena, ambos relacionados con un parto traumático y acompañados de cefalohematomas; uno de ellos presentó sangrado gastrointestinal alto y el otro infección del hematoma suprarrenal. El diagnóstico se comprobó con la ecografía abdominal y se verificó con la tomografía. El tratamiento fue médico y no se requirió cirugía a pesar de la anemia severa que presentó uno de los pacientes.

  6. Emergent Median Sternotomy for Mediastinal Hematoma: A Rare Complication following Internal Jugular Vein Catheterization for Chemoport Insertion—A Case Report and Review of Relevant Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptarshi Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediastinal hematoma is a rare complication following insertion of a central venous catheter with only few cases reported in the English literature. We report a case of a 71-year-old female who was admitted for elective chemoport placement. USG guided right internal jugular access was attempted using the Seldinger technique. Resistance was met while threading the guidewire. USG showed a chronic clot burden in the RIJ. A microvascular access was established under fluoroscopic guidance. Rest of the procedure was completed without any further issues. Following extubation, the patient complained of right-sided chest pain radiating to the back. Chest X-ray revealed a contained white out in the right upper lung field. She became hemodynamically unstable. Repeated X-ray showed progression of the hematoma. Median Sternotomy showed posterior mediastinal hematoma tracking into right pleural cavity. Active bleeding from the puncture site at RIJ-SCL junction was repaired. Patient had an uneventful recovery. Injury to the central venous system is the result of either penetrating trauma or iatrogenic causes as in our case. A possible explanation of our complication may be attributed to the forced manipulation of the dilator or guidewire against resistance. Clavicle and sternum offer bony protection to the underlying vital venous structures and injuries often need sternotomy with or without neck extension. Division of the clavicle and disarticulation of the sternoclavicular joint may be required for optimum exposure. Meticulous surgical technique, knowledge of the possible complications, and close monitoring in the postprocedural period are of utmost importance. Chest X-ray showed to be routinely done to detect any complication early.

  7. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Joon Koo; Chung, Jin Wook; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicidne, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    As a new interventional procedure for the control of variceal bleeding, a portosystemic shunt can be established with the installment of metallic stent through the transjugular approach. In order to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the procedure, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedure were performed in 5 patients with variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis. The metallic stents were mainly a self expandable Wallstent (Schneider, Switzerland), An 8 to 10 mm shunt was formed by the insertion of the stent and balloon dilatation after puncture of the proximal portal vein from the right or middle hepatic vein. The patency of the shunt was proven by portography after the procedure. The portal pressure measured in 3 patients before and after the procedure improved with decrease from 31 mmHg to 25 mmHg. The procedure failed in 1 patient due to pre-existing portal vein thrombosis. During the follow-up period from 1 month to 4 months, shunts were patent in all 4 patients. However, hepatic encephalopathy occurred in one patient one week following the procedure. Though the follow-up period was not long enough for full evaluation, we found the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was a safe and effective procedure for the control of variceal bleeding by lowering the portal pressure. For the appropriate application for this procedure, the optimal size of the shunt and optical degree of the resultant decompression are yet to be determined in the future.

  8. Large coronary intramural hematomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Lisbeth; Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2015-01-01

    Isolated spontaneous coronary intramural hematoma is a unique subset of spontaneous coronary artery dissection that is characterized by a hemorrhage limited to the medial-adventitial layers, causing subsequent hematoma formation without visible intimal flaps. It is an infrequent and serious...... diagnostics and treatment strategy. Coronary intramural hematomas can also occur iatrogenically, as a complication to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Coronary angiography (CAG) has limited diagnostic value in the absence of intimal dissections, and lesions are often angiographically ambiguous....... Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is an important diagnostic tool in establishing the correct diagnosis, as it provides a complete vessel wall assessment, and enables morphometric information regarding the magnitude and severity of the underlying hematoma. Due to the rarity of this clinical scenario...

  9. Hematoma subdural de medula espinhal associada ao uso de anticoagulante oral Hematoma subdural de la médula espinal asociado al uso de anticoagulante oral Spine subdural hematoma: a rare complication associated with vitamin K antagonist (VKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uri Adrian Prync Flato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O hematoma subdural de medula espinhal (HSDME é uma complicação rara decorrente do uso de antagonistas de vitamina K (AVK e de diagnostico difícil. Este artigo apresenta um caso com complicação ameaçadora à vida: um paciente octogenário portador de fibrilação atrial de início recente em uso de AVK. A história e o exame físico inicialmente se apresentavam normais, associados com a elevação dos valores de coagulograma supraterapêuticos (INR > 10. Após 24 horas da admissão hospitalar, o paciente apresentou tetraparesia progressiva, evidenciando na ressonância nuclear magnética (RNM de medula espinhal um HSDME (Figura 1. Após reversão completa da hipocoagulação e intervenção neurocirúrgica o paciente obteve melhora do quadro neurológico.El hematoma subdural espinal (HSE es una complicación rara proveniente del uso de antagonistas de vitamina K (AVK y de diagnostico difícil. Este artículo presenta un caso con complicación amenazadora para la vida: un paciente octogenario portador de fibrilación auricular de inicio reciente, en uso de AVK. Inicialmente, la historia y el examen físico se presentaban normales, asociados a la elevación de los valores de coagulograma supra terapéuticos (INR > 10. Tras 24 horas del ingreso hospitalario, el paciente presentó tetraparesia progresiva. Al realizarse una resonancia nuclear magnética (RNM de médula espinal, se evidenció un HSE (Figura 1. Tras reversión completa de la hipocoagulación e intervención neuroquirúrgica el paciente obtuvo mejora del cuadro neurológico.Spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH is a rare condition, which is difficult to diagnose, related to Vitamin K Antagonist. This a case report of a life-threatening situation in a octogenarian patient with a history of recent atrial fibrillation that received K-Vitamin Antagonist (KVA therapy. The history and the clinical assessment were normal at the admission, associated with increase in the coagulation parameters

  10. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement in Patients with Cirrhosis and Concomitant Portal Vein Thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Thuong G. Van; Hodge, Justin; Funaki, Brian; Lorenz, Jonathan; Rosenblum, Jordan; Straus, Christopher; Leef, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in patients with liver cirrhosis complicated by thrombosed portal vein. Methods. This study reviewed 15 cases of TIPS creation in 15 cirrhotic patients with portal vein thrombosis at our institution over an 8-year period. There were 2 women and 13 men with a mean age of 53 years. Indications were refractory ascites, variceal hemorrhage, and refractory pleural effusion. Clinical follow-up was performed in all patients. Results. The technical success rate was 75% (3/4) in patients with chronic portal vein thrombosis associated with cavernomatous transformation and 91% (10/11) in patients with acute thrombosis or partial thrombosis, giving an overall success rate of 87%. Complications included postprocedural encephalopathy and localized hematoma at the access site. In patients with successful shunt placement, the total follow-up time was 223 months. The 30-day mortality rate was 13%. Two patients underwent liver transplantation at 35 days and 7 months, respectively, after TIPS insertion. One patient had an occluded shunt at 4 months with an unsuccessful revision. The remaining patients had functioning shunts at follow-up. Conclusion. TIPS creation in thrombosed portal vein is possible and might be a treatment option in certain patients

  11. Adopting wedge hepatic venography with CO2 during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Linpeng; Chen Songtao; Shi Xiulan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To renovate angiography in identifying portal vein anatomy during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedures, saving the time of TIPS procedures, decreasing the risk of the complications of the post-procedure. Methods: The difference between the Wedge hepatic venography with Carbon Dioxide in 6 cases and Inferior Mesenteric artery angiography in 7 cases during TIPS procedures were compared in the identification of portal vein anatomy. The quality of images, their effects on the procedures, the complications and the recovery post-procedure were evaluated. Results: Using CO 2 , the portal veins were opacified in all 6 cases. TIPS procedures succeeded in all cases except 1 case because of poor coagulation function. Using Inferior Mesenteric artery angiography, the portal veins were opacified in all 7 cases. TIPS procedure succeeded in all cases except 1 case because of chronic portal occlusion. Puncture-site hematoma occurred in 1 case after TIPS procedure. Conclusion: Wedge hepatic venography with Carbon Dioxide is superior, safer and more convenient than Inferior Mesenteric Artery angiography in identifying portal vein anatomy during TIPS. (authors)

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size ... X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Venography Images related to Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) Sponsored ...

  15. Hepatostomy for central hepatic hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gewertz, B.L.; Olsen, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    Two patients with central hepatic hematomas are presented. Hepatostomy tube drainage provided prompt healing of the cavities without complications. The technique is presented as a safe and effective alternative to hepatic resection without compromising the established principles of management

  16. Gigantic retroperitoneal hematoma as a complication of anticoagulation therapy with heparin in therapeutic doses: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daliakopoulos Stavros I

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a distinct clinical entity that can present as a rare life-threatening event characterized by sudden onset of bleeding into the retroperitoneal space, occurring in association with bleeding disorders, intratumoral bleeding, or ruptures of any retroperitoneal organ or aneurysm. The spontaneous form is the most infrequent retroperitoneal hemorrhage, causing significant morbidity and representing a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation We report the case of a patient with coronary artery disease who presented with transient ischemic attack, in whom anticoagulant therapy with heparin precipitated a massive spontaneous atraumatic retroperitoneal hemorrhage (with international normalized ratio 2.4, which was treated conservatively. Conclusion Delay in diagnosis is potentially fatal and high clinical suspicion remains crucial. Finally, it is a matter of controversy whether retroperitoneal hematomas should be surgically evacuated or conservatively treated and the final decision should be made after taking into consideration patient's general condition and the possibility of permanent femoral or sciatic neuropathy due to compression syndrome.

  17. 4 cases of iliopsoas hematoma associated with hemophilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Yukiyoshi; Iwata, Hisashi; Inoda, Kunio

    1984-01-01

    Four patients were diagnosed as having iliopsoas hematoma associated with hemophilia by CT scanning. The site and disappearance of hematoma were observed on CT. It was suggested that hematoma occurs inside the iliacus or posoas muscle in cases of iliopsoas hematoma complicated by hemophilia or coagulation and that it occurs in the pelvic wall of the iliacus muscle in cases of iliopsoas hematoma uncomplicated by coagulation abnormality. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. 4 cases of iliopsoas hematoma associated with hemophilia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Yukiyoshi; Iwata, Hisashi; Inoda, Kunio (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1984-03-01

    Four patients were diagnosed as having iliopsoas hematoma associated with hemophilia by CT scanning. The site and disappearance of hematoma were observed on CT. It was suggested that hematoma occurs inside the iliacus or posoas muscle in cases of iliopsoas hematoma complicated by hemophilia or coagulation and that it occurs in the pelvic wall of the iliacus muscle in cases of iliopsoas hematoma uncomplicated by coagulation abnormality.

  19. The transjugular portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) as an intervention in clinical complication of portal hypertension; Der transjugulaere portosystemische Stentshunt (TIPSS) als Intervention bei klinischen Komplikationen der portalen Hypertonie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Schwarz, W.; Balzer, J.; Abolmaali, N.; Vogl, T.J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Zentrum der Radiologie

    2001-10-01

    Most frequent complications in patients with liver cirrhosis are due to portal hypertension. Beside ascites circumvent vessles formate with vasodilatation. Due to counterregulation a secondary hyperaldosteronism develops with release of vasocontrictive agents. If conservative and endoscopic methods fail, indication for building a portosystemic shunt is given. The TIPSS procedure is less invasive than the surgical method of Warren-Shunt, so the radiological intervention has replaced surgery. Reducing the portal pressure by the shunt, the clinical complications change for the better. Still problems are defined as hepatic encephalopathy and right ventricular heart failure. Regular follow up investigations have to be performed to detect complications in the shunt. Using regular clinical and radiological check up TIPSS is of clinical benefit with good long term results. (orig.) [German] Die haeufigsten Komplikationen bei Patienten mit einer Leberzirrhose lassen sich auf das Vorliegen einer portalen Hypertension zurueckfuehren. Neben einer Aszitesbildung kommt es zur Vasodilatation mit Ausbildung portaler Umgehungskreislaeufe, gegenregulatorisch zu einem sekundaeren Hyperaldosteronismus und Ausschuettung vasokonstriktiver Substanzen. Sind mittels konservativer und endoskopischer Methoden die Komplikationen nicht mehr zu beherrschen, ist die Indikation zur Shuntanlage gegeben. Wegen der geringeren Invasivitaet einer TIPSS-Anlage gegenueber der operativen Methode eines Warren-Shunts hat sich die interventionell radiologische Methodik in den letzten Jahren immer mehr durchgesetzt. Durch den mittels Shuntanlage reduzierten Pfortaderdruck kommt es zu einer deutlichen klinischen Besserung der unterschiedlichen Komplikationen. Als klinisch problematische Symptome bei der Shuntanlage sind die hepatische Enzephalopathie und eine Zunahme der Rechtsherzbelastung zu werten. Um Komplikationen im Bereich des Shunts frueh zu erkennen, muss dieser engmaschig kontrolliert werden. Unter

  20. Minilaparotomy-Assisted Transmesenteric-Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: Comparison with Conventional Transjugular Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalaeian, Hamed, E-mail: hjalaeia@umn.edu; Talaie, Reza; D’Souza, Donna; Taleb, Shayandokht [University of Minnesota, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Noorbaloochi, Siamak [University of Minnesota, School of Medicine (United States); Flanagan, Siobhan; Hunter, David; Golzarian, Jafar [University of Minnesota, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeThis study was performed to compare the intrahepatic shunt function outcome and procedural complications of minilaparotomy-assisted transmesenteric (MAT)-transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement with the conventional transjugular method.MethodsThis is a retrospective review of all patients who had a MAT or conventional TIPS procedure over a 6-year period at our institute. The primary patency rate, fluoroscopy time, technical success, major procedure-related complications, and mortality data were compared between two treatment groups.ResultsWe included 49 patients with MAT-TIPS, and 63 with conventional TIPS, with an average follow-up of 21.43 months. The primary patency rates at 6 and 12 months were 82.9 and 66.7 % in the conventional TIPS group, and 81.0 and 76.5 % in the MAT-TIPS group (p = 1.000, and 0.529), respectively. There was no significant difference in technical success rate, post-procedure portosystemic pressure gradient, fluoroscopy time, and peri-procedural mortality rate between treatment groups. Major procedural-related complications were seen more frequently among MAT-TIPS patients (p = 0.012). In the MAT-TIPS group, 5 (10.2 %) patients developed post-procedure minilaparotomy, wound-related complications, and 5 (10.2 %) developed bacterial peritonitis; whereas, none of patients with conventional TIPS had either of these complications (p = 0.014).ConclusionWhile both MAT-TIPS and conventional TIPS had similar shunt primary patency rate and technical success rate, the MAT approach was associated with a significantly higher rate of minilaparotomy-related wound complications or infectious complications. These complications maybe prevented by a change in post-procedure monitoring and therapy.

  1. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in patients with active variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Woong; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Lee, Sang Kwon; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Young Sun; Suh, Kyung Jin; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Joo

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with active variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis and pre-existing portal vein thrombosis. Of a total of 123 patients who underwent TIPS, 14 patients with intractable variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension and portal vein thrombosis were included in this study. Noncavernomatous portal vein occlusion was seen in eight patients, and complete portal vein occlusion with cavernomatous trans-formation in six. For all patients, the methods used for TIPS placement were the same as those used in patients with patents portal veins. In seven of eight patients with noncavernomatous occlusion, right hepatic vein-right portal vein shunting was performed; in one with knoncavernomatous occlusion, a shunt was created between the right hepatic and left portal vein. In five of six patients with cavernomatous occlusion, the right hepatic and main portal vein were connected via a collateral vein. The procedures were technically successful in all except one patient. Immediate hemostatis was achieved after all technically successful procedures, and no significant complications were encountered. Minor complications were noted in six patients (three biliary tree punctures, one transperitoneal puncture, one splenic vein perforation, one hepatic subcapsular hematoma). TIPS is a technically feasible and hemodynamically effective procedure, even in patients with active variceal bleeding due to cirrhosis and complete portal vein occlusion

  2. HEMATOMA AURIKULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Indah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematoma aurikula merupakan sekuele yang terjadi akibat trauma langsung pada daun telingayang menyebabkan penimbunan darah dalam ruang antara perikondrium dan kartilago yang biasanyaditemukan pada pegulat atau petinju. Keterlambatan diagnosis serta penanganan dapat menimbulkankomplikasi dimana salah satunya adalah telinga kembang kol atau cauliflower ear. Penatalaksanaanhematoma aurikula cukup bervariasi, namun tujuan utama pengobatan tersebut adalah mengevakuasidarah subperikondrial, mencegah kekambuhan, dan mencegah terjadinya infeksi. Dilaporkan satukasus hematoma aurikula pada seorang laki-laki dewasa berusia 68 tahun di Rumah Sakit UmumPusat ( RSUP  Sanglah-Denpasar yang telah dilakukan penanganan aspirasi serta bebat tekanmenggunakan teknik bolster yang memberikan hasil yang baik.

  3. Intramural duodenal hematoma as a complication of therapy with Warfarin: a case report and literature review; Hematoma intramural duodenal como complicacao de terapia anticoagulante com Warfarin: relato de caso e revisao da literatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Juliano [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: drjuliano@uol.com.br; Pessoa, Roberta; Hudson, Marcelo; Vitoi, Silvio; Villela, Ovidio; Torres, Jose; Paula, Mara Delgado [Hospital Marcio Cunha, Ipatinga, MG (Brazil). Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem; Bemvindo, Aloisio [Hospital Marcio Cunha, Ipatinga, MG (Brazil). Servico de Terapia Intensiva

    2004-12-01

    We report a case of a patient receiving chronic oral anticoagulant therapy with Warfarin who presented with acute intestinal obstruction. Computed tomography showed intramural duodenal hematoma. Treatment was conservative with correction of the coagulation parameters and observation. This case exemplifies the usefulness of conservative therapy and computed tomography in patients with acute small bowel obstruction receiving anticoagulant therapy. (author)

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt ( ...

  5. Chronic subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... A subdural hematoma develops when bridging veins tear and leak blood. These are the tiny veins that run between the ...

  6. Contralateral acute subdural hematoma occurring after evacuation of subdural hematoma with coexistent contralateral subdural hygroma

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hsiao-Lun; Chang, Chih-Ju; Hsieh, Cheng-Ta

    2014-01-01

    Burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage is a safe and effective method for the management of chronic subdural hematoma. However, contralateral acute subdural hematoma has been reported to be a rare and devastating complication. Only 3 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we reported an 80-year-old male with chronic subdural hematoma and contralateral subdural hygroma. The burr-hole craniostomy with closed-system drainage was initially performed to treat the chronic s...

  7. Transjugular Core Liver Biopsy with a 19-Gauge Spring-Loaded Cutting Needle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choh, Jeffery; Dolmatch, Bart; Safadi, Rami; Long, Phil; Geisinger, Michael; Lammert, Gary; Dempsey, James

    1998-01-01

    One hundred and five sequential transjugular core liver biopsies (TJLBx) were performed in 101 patients with coagulopathy and/or ascites using the 19-gauge Quick-Core Biopsy (QCB) needle. Two-hundred and seventy-three cores were obtained in 295 passes (92.5%). One-hundred and two of the 105 procedures (97.1%) led to a histopathologic diagnosis. One of the three nondiagnostic biopsies was done because of severe autolysis of the liver. There was one subcapsular hematoma, one hepatic arteriovenous fistula, and one liver capsular puncture. Two minor neck hematomas occurred. One death was reported (unrelated to the procedure). QCB needle TJLBx is an effective and relatively safe way to obtain core liver samples

  8. Massive Preperitoneal Hematoma after a Subcutaneous Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Katagiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preperitoneal hematomas are rare and can develop after surgery or trauma. A 74-year-old woman, receiving systemic anticoagulation, developed a massive preperitoneal hematoma after a subcutaneous injection of teriparatide using a 32-gauge, 4 mm needle. In this patient, there were two factors, the subcutaneous injection of teriparatide and systemic anticoagulation, associated with development of the hematoma. These two factors are especially significant, because they are widely used clinically. Although extremely rare, physicians must consider this potentially life-threatening complication after subcutaneous injections, especially in patients receiving anticoagulation.

  9. Nasal septal hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001292.htm Nasal septal hematoma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A nasal septal hematoma is a collection of blood within the septum ...

  10. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  11. Spontaneous soft tissue hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohan, A; Darnige, L; Sapoval, M; Pellerin, O

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous muscle hematomas are a common and serious complication of anticoagulant treatment. The incidence of this event has increased along with the rise in the number of patients receiving anticoagulants. Radiological management is both diagnostic and interventional. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the main tool for the detection of hemorrhage to obtain a positive, topographic diagnosis and determine the severity. Detection of an active leak of contrast material during the arterial or venous phase is an indication for the use of arterial embolization. In addition, the interventional radiological procedure can be planned with CTA. Arterial embolization of the pedicles that are the source of the bleeding is an effective technique. The rate of technical and clinical success is 90% and 86%, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Besime Utku; Uygar Utku

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous chronic subdural hematoma associated with neoplasm is a rare disorder. A rare case of chronic subdural hematoma associated with acute biphenotypic leukemia presented here. A 78-year-old woman who diagnosed as acute biphenotypic leukemia by hematology was complicated with a large chronic subdural hematoma. She presented to our emergency medicine service of hospital with left-sided weakness. Her non-contrast brain computerized tomography scan showed a non-traumatic right-sided, larg...

  13. Epidural Hematoma Following Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Hilibrand, Alan S; Arnold, Paul M; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Gum, Jeffrey L; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Isaacs, Robert E; Kanter, Adam S; Mroz, Thomas E; Nassr, Ahmad; Sasso, Rick C; Fehlings, Michael G; Buser, Zorica; Bydon, Mohamad; Cha, Peter I; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Lord, Elizabeth L; Mayer, Erik N; McBride, Owen J; Nguyen, Emily C; Roe, Allison K; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Yanez, Marisa Y; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicentered retrospective case series. To determine the incidence and circumstances surrounding the development of a symptomatic postoperative epidural hematoma in the cervical spine. Patients who underwent cervical spine surgery between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, at 23 institutions were reviewed, and all patients who developed an epidural hematoma were identified. A total of 16 582 cervical spine surgeries were identified, and 15 patients developed a postoperative epidural hematoma, for a total incidence of 0.090%. Substantial variation between institutions was noted, with 11 sites reporting no epidural hematomas, and 1 site reporting an incidence of 0.76%. All patients initially presented with a neurologic deficit. Nine patients had complete resolution of the neurologic deficit after hematoma evacuation; however 2 of the 3 patients (66%) who had a delay in the diagnosis of the epidural hematoma had residual neurologic deficits compared to only 4 of the 12 patients (33%) who had no delay in the diagnosis or treatment ( P = .53). Additionally, the patients who experienced a postoperative epidural hematoma did not experience any significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life metrics as a result of the index procedure at final follow-up evaluation. This is the largest series to date to analyze the incidence of an epidural hematoma following cervical spine surgery, and this study suggest that an epidural hematoma occurs in approximately 1 out of 1000 cervical spine surgeries. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may improve the chance of making a complete neurologic recovery, but patients who develop this complication do not show improvements in the health-related quality-of-life measurements.

  14. Treatment of Portosystemic Shunt Myelopathy with a Stent Graft Deployed through a Transjugular Intrahepatic Route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Deepak; Arora, Ankur; Deka, Pranjal; Mukund, Amar; Bhatnagar, Shorav; Jindal, Deepti; Kumar, Niteen; Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2013-01-01

    A case of surgically created splenorenal shunt complicated with shunt myelopathy was successfully managed by placement of a stent graft within the splenic vein to close the portosystemic shunt and alleviate myelopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of shunt myelopathy in a patient with noncirrhotic portal fibrosis without cirrhosis treated by a novel technique wherein a transjugular intrahepatic route was adopted to deploy the stent graft

  15. Treatment of hematomas after anterior cervical spine surgery: A retrospective study of 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Weiliang; Ma, Xiaojun; Liang, Deyong; Sun, Yu

    2018-05-04

    Postoperative hematoma is a rare and dangerous complication of cervical spine surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and related factors of postoperative hematoma, and to report on 15 cases at our institution over a 6-year period. Fifteen cases of postoperative hematoma were retrospectively identified. We investigated their neurological outcomes, characteristics, and surgical data, and identified risk factors associated with postoperative (PO) hematoma. Patients with hematoma were compared to those with no hematoma, in order to identify risk factors. Retropharyngeal hematomas developed in seven cases and epidural hematomas in eight. The total incidence of postoperative hematoma was 1.2%: 0.5% retropharyngeal hematomas and 0.6% spinal epidural hematomas. At time of onset, the severity of paralysis was assessed as grade B in one case, grade C in six cases, and grade D in eight cases. Risk factors for PO hematoma were: (1) presence of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) (Phematoma group and non-hematoma group (P>0.05). Precise preoperative preparation and systematic evaluation are central to successful management of PO hematoma after anterior cervical surgery. Risk factors for PO hematoma include multilevel decompression, OPLL, higher BMI, and longer operation time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Intra- versus retroplacental hematomas: a retrospective case-control study on pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Johannes; Pecnik, Philipp; Promberger, Regina; Pils, Sophie; Binder, Julia; Chalubinski, Kinga M

    2017-10-26

    Intrauterine hematomas are a common pregnancy complication. The literature lacks studies about outcomes based on hematoma localization. Thus, we aimed to compare pregnancies complicated by an intraplacental hematoma to cases with a retroplacental hematoma and to a control group. In a retrospective case-control study, 32 women with an intraplacental hematoma, 199 women with a retroplacental hematoma, and a control group consisting of 113 age-matched women with no signs of placental abnormalities were included. Main outcome measures were pregnancy complications. Second-trimester miscarriage was most common in the intraplacental hematoma group (9.4%), followed by women with a retroplacental hematoma (4.2%), and controls (0%; p = 0.007). The intraplacental hematoma group revealed the highest rates for placental insufficiency, intrauterine growth retardation, premature preterm rupture of membranes, preterm labor, preterm delivery hematoma group. When tested in multivariate models, intraplacental hematomas were independent predictors for placental insufficiency (ß = 4.19, p hematoma (p = 0.042). Intra- and retroplacental hematomas have different risk profiles for the affected pregnancy and act as independent risk factors.

  17. Spontaneous muscle hematomas in a patient with Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jency Maria Koshy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and Dengue shock syndrome manifest in various forms, ranging from petechial skin hemorrhage to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary hemorrhages. However it is very rare to have muscle hematomas in DHF. We report a rare case of spontaneous Iliopsoas hematoma complicating Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  18. Intramural intestinal hematoma causing obstruction in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R; Carpenter, J

    1984-01-15

    Intramural hematoma of the intestine caused intestinal obstruction in three dogs. Two dogs were examined because of vomiting and anorexia of several weeks' duration. In one of these, an intramural hematoma of the duodenum was associated with chronic pancreatitis. A cause was not found in the second dog. The third dog, which had clinical and radiographic evidence of gastric dilatation, was found at surgery to have hemoperitoneum associated with a ruptured intramural intestinal hematoma. In 1 dog, the hematoma was evacuated through a serosal incision. In the other 2 dogs, the problem was resolved by resection of the involved segment of intestine, followed by anastomosis. All 3 dogs recovered without complications.

  19. Groin hematoma after electrophysiological procedures-incidence and predisposing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Anja Borgen; Jakobsen, Christina Spåbæk; Riahi, Sam; Hjortshøj, Søren

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the incidence and predisposing factors of groin hematomas after electrophysiological (EP) procedures. Prospective, observational study, enrolling consecutive patients after EP procedures (Atrial fibrillation: n = 151; Supraventricular tachycardia/Diagnostic EP: n = 82; Ventricular tachycardia: n = 18). Patients underwent manual compression for 10 min and 3 h post procedural bed rest. AF ablations were performed with INR 2-3, ACT > 300, and no protamine sulfate. Adhesive pressure dressings (APDs) were used if sheath size ≥ 10F; procedural time > 120 min; and BMI > 30. Patient-reported hematomas were recorded by a telephone follow-up after 2 weeks. Hematoma developed immediately in 26 patients (10%) and after 14 days significant hematoma was reported in 68 patients (27%). Regression analysis on sex, age, BMI 25, ACT 300, use of APD, sheath size and number, and complicated venous access was not associated with hematoma, either immediately after the procedure or after 14 days. Any hematoma presenting immediately after procedures was associated with patient-reported hematomas after 14 days, odds ratio 18.7 (CI 95%: 5.00-69.8; P hematoma immediately after EP procedures was the sole predictor of patient-reported hematoma after 2 weeks. Initiatives to prevent groin hematoma should focus on the procedure itself as well as post-procedural care.

  20. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T.

    2008-01-01

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [de

  1. Minimally Invasive Surgical Treatment of Acute Epidural Hematoma: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Although minimally invasive surgical treatment of acute epidural hematoma attracts increasing attention, no generalized indications for the surgery have been adopted. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of minimally invasive surgery in acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes. Methods. Minimally invasive puncture and aspiration surgery were performed in 59 cases of acute epidural hematoma with various hematoma volumes (13–145 mL; postoperative follow-up was 3 months. Clinical data, including surgical trauma, surgery time, complications, and outcome of hematoma drainage, recovery, and Barthel index scores, were assessed, as well as treatment outcome. Results. Surgical trauma was minimal and surgery time was short (10–20 minutes; no anesthesia accidents or surgical complications occurred. Two patients died. Drainage was completed within 7 days in the remaining 57 cases. Barthel index scores of ADL were ≤40 (n=1, 41–60 (n=1, and >60 (n=55; scores of 100 were obtained in 48 cases, with no dysfunctions. Conclusion. Satisfactory results can be achieved with minimally invasive surgery in treating acute epidural hematoma with hematoma volumes ranging from 13 to 145 mL. For patients with hematoma volume >50 mL and even cerebral herniation, flexible application of minimally invasive surgery would help improve treatment efficacy.

  2. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  3. Transjugular local thrombolysis with/without TIPS in patients with acute non-cirrhotic, non-malignant portal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Christoph; Riecken, Bettina; Schmidt, Arthur; De Gottardi, Andrea; Meier, Benjamin; Bosch, Jaime; Caca, Karel

    2017-12-01

    Therapeutic anticoagulation is the standard treatment in patients with acute non-cirrhotic portal vein thrombosis (PVT). In critically ill patients, anticoagulation only may not suffice to achive rapid and stable recanalization. This study evaluates efficacy and safety of transjugular interventional therapy in acute non-cirrhotic PVT. This retrospective study includes 17 consecutive patients with acute noncirrhotic, non-malignant PVT. Main indication for interventional therapy was imminent intestinal infarction (n=10). Treatment consisted of a combination of transjugular thrombectomy, local fibrinolysis and - depending on thrombus resolution - transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. Recanalization was successful in 94.1%. One- and two-year secondary PV patency rates were 88.2%. Major complications (n=3) resolved spontaneously in all but one patient (heparin induced thrombocytopenia type 2 with intestinal infarction). Symptoms improved in all patients. However, segmental bowel resection had to be performed in two (11.8%). During a median follow-up of 28.6 months, no patient experienced portal hypertensive complications. Presence of JAK2 V617F mutation predicted both short-term and long-term technical success. Transjugular recanalization is safe and effective in patients with acute non-cirrhotic, non-malignant PVT. It should be considered especially in patients with imminent bowel infarction and low likelihood of recanalization following therapeutic anticoagulation. Patients with JAK2 mutation ought to be followed meticulously. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transjugular liver biopsy : the efficacy of quick-core biopsy needle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Gyoo Sik; Ahn, Byung Kwon; Lee, Sang Ouk; Chang, Hee Kyong; Oh, Kyung Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin Medical College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the Quick-Core biopsy needle system in performing transjugular liver biopsy. Between December 1995 and June 1997, eight patients underwent transjugular liver biopsy involving use of the Quick-Core biopsy needle system; the conditions involved were coagulopathy (n=4), thrombocytopenia (n=3), and ascites (n=1). Via the right internal jugular vein, the right hepatic vein was selectively catheterized with a 7-F transjugular guiding catheter, and a14-guage stiffening cannula was then inserted through this catheter; to obtain core tissue, a Quick-Core needle was then advanced into the liver parenchyma through the catheter-cannula combination. Eighteen- and 19-guage needles were used in three and five patients, respectively; specimen size, adequacy of the biopsy specimen and histologic diagnosis were determined, and complications were recorded. Biopsy was successful in all patients. The mean length of the specimen was 1.4 cm (1.0 - 1.8 cm), and all were adequate for pathologic examinations ; specific diagnosis was determined in all patients. There were two malignant neoplasms, two cases of veno-occlusive disease, and one case each of cirrhosis, fulminant hepatitis, Banti syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. One patient complained of neck pain after the procedure, but no serious procedural complications were noted. Our preliminary study shows that the Quick-Core biopsy needle system is safe and provides adequate core tissues with high diagnostic yields. (author). 23 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  5. Transjugular liver biopsy : the efficacy of quick-core biopsy needle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gyoo Sik; Ahn, Byung Kwon; Lee, Sang Ouk; Chang, Hee Kyong; Oh, Kyung Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the Quick-Core biopsy needle system in performing transjugular liver biopsy. Between December 1995 and June 1997, eight patients underwent transjugular liver biopsy involving use of the Quick-Core biopsy needle system; the conditions involved were coagulopathy (n=4), thrombocytopenia (n=3), and ascites (n=1). Via the right internal jugular vein, the right hepatic vein was selectively catheterized with a 7-F transjugular guiding catheter, and a14-guage stiffening cannula was then inserted through this catheter; to obtain core tissue, a Quick-Core needle was then advanced into the liver parenchyma through the catheter-cannula combination. Eighteen- and 19-guage needles were used in three and five patients, respectively; specimen size, adequacy of the biopsy specimen and histologic diagnosis were determined, and complications were recorded. Biopsy was successful in all patients. The mean length of the specimen was 1.4 cm (1.0 - 1.8 cm), and all were adequate for pathologic examinations ; specific diagnosis was determined in all patients. There were two malignant neoplasms, two cases of veno-occlusive disease, and one case each of cirrhosis, fulminant hepatitis, Banti syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome. One patient complained of neck pain after the procedure, but no serious procedural complications were noted. Our preliminary study shows that the Quick-Core biopsy needle system is safe and provides adequate core tissues with high diagnostic yields. (author). 23 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  6. Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6. Stewart BT, McLaughlin SJ, Thompson GA. Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage:a general surgeon's perspective. Aust N. Z J Surg 1998;68:371-3. Monib, et al.: Idiopathic retroperitoneal hematoma. How to cite this article: Monib S, Ritchie A, Thabet E. Idiopathic retroperitoneal hematoma. J Surg Tech Case Report ...

  7. Posterior fossa epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushner, M.J.; Luken, M.G. III

    1983-01-01

    CT demonstrated posterior fossa epidural hematoma in three patients with head trauma in whom this diagnosis was not clinically apparent. No patient was in stupor or coma and no patient experienced a lucid interval. Only one patient had signs referable to the posterior fossa. Two patients had occipital skull fracture disclosed by plain radiographs. CT revealed a unilateral biconvex hematoma in two cases, and a bilateral hematoma with supratentorial extension in the third. All patients underwent suboccipital craniectomy and recovered. Therapeutic success in these cases was facilitated by early CT and the rapid disclosure of the unsuspected posterior fossa lesions. CT showing contiguous hematoma below and above the tentorium cerebelli after posterior head trauma is highly suggestive of epidural hematoma arising from the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  8. Hematoma epidural subagudo Subacute epidural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvei González Orlandi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente con hematoma epidural subagudo, temporoparietal derecho, secundario a una agresión física. En el cuadro clínico, a las 24 h, predominó la cefalea de intensidad moderada, con somnolencia y agitación psicomotora ligera. Las radiografías simples de cráneo no mostraron alteraciones. Los síntomas se mantuvieron a pesar del tratamiento médico, por lo que se realizó una tomografía axial simple de cráneo que mostró la presencia de un hematoma epidural subagudo temporoparietal derecho, con desplazamiento de estructuras de la línea media. Se realizó una craneotomía temporoparietal derecha para la evacuación del hematoma posterior. El paciente evolucionó satisfactoriamente y se recuperó por completo, tanto clínica como imaginológicamente.This is the case of a patient presenting with right temporoparietal subacute hematoma secondary to a physical act of aggression. In clinical picture at 24 hours there was predominance of headache of moderate intensity with drowsiness and slight psychomotor restlessness. The skull single radiographies didn't show alterations. Symptoms remained despite the medical treatment, thus a single skull axial tomography was carried out showing the presence of a right temporoparietal subacute epidural hematoma with displacement from the middle line structures. A right temporoparietal craniotomy was carried out to evacuation of the posterior hematoma. Patient evolved satisfactorily with a total recovery as much clinical as imaging.

  9. A case of subdural hematoma following lumbar puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramatharaknath Vemuri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar puncture (LP is a frequent procedure done for administration of spinal anesthesia or for obtaining cerebrospinal fluid for analysis. The common complications of LP are pain at the local site and headache. Fortunately, the serious complications such as infections of central nervous system, brain stem herniation, and subdural hematoma are rare. We present a rare case of subdural hematoma following a LP.

  10. Transjugular Renal Biopsy: Our Experience and Technical Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    See, Teik Choon; Thompson, Barbara C.; Howie, Alexander J.; Karamshi, M.; Papadopoulou, Anthie M.; Davies, Neil; Tibballs, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the indications for and technique of transjugular renal biopsy (TJRB) and evaluate the efficacy and complications of this method. We performed a retrospective review of 59 patients who underwent TJRB using the Quick-core needle biopsy system (Cook, Letchworth, UK) over a 4-year period. The indications for obtaining renal biopsy included acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, and proteinuria with or without other associated disease. Indications for the transjugular approach included coagulopathy, biopsy of a solitary kidney or essentially single functioning kidney, simultaneous renal and hepatic biopsy, morbid obesity, and failed percutaneous biopsy. All but four cases were performed via the right internal jugular vein. The right, left, or both renal veins were cannulated in 41, 14, and 4 cases, respectively. Combined liver and renal biopsies were obtained in seven cases. Diagnostic biopsy specimens were obtained in 56 of 59 patients (95%). The number and size of tissue cores ranged from 1 to 9 mm and from 1 to 20 mm, respectively. The mean numbers of glomeruli per procedure on light microscopy and electron microscopy were 10.3 and 2.6, respectively. Specimens for immunohistology were acquired in 49 cases, of which 40 were adequate. Of the 56 successful TJRB procedures, 34 (61%) were associated with isolated capsular perforation (19), contained subcapsular leak (10), isolated collecting system puncture (1), and concurrent collecting system and capsular perforation (4). There was a significant increase in capsular perforation with six or more needle passes, although no significant correlation was seen between number of needle passes and complication. Six patients had minor complications defined as hematuria or loin pain. Seven patients developed major complications, of whom five received blood transfusion alone. Two required intervention: in one an arteriocalyceal fistula was embolized and the patient

  11. Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Abe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe abdominal pain in a flank distribution. A large mass was palpable in the right upper quadrant on physical examination. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a well-defined, right-sided, retroperitoneal cystic lesion located between the abdominal aorta and the inferior vena cava (IVC. The tumor size was 55 × 58 mm, and it compressed the gallbladder and the duodenum. Upper gastrointestinal radiography revealed a stricture of the second portion of the duodenum by the tumor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed that the whole part was hyperintense with hypointense rims, but the inner was partially hypointense. Based on the radiological findings, the preoperative differential diagnosis included retroperitoneal teratoma, Schwannoma, abscess, and primary retroperitoneal tumor. On laparotomy, the tumor was located in the right retroperitoneal cavity. Kocher maneuver and medial visceral rotation, which consists of medial reflection of the upper part of right colon and duodenum by incising their lateral peritoneal attachments, were performed. Although a slight adhesion to the IVC was detected, the tumor was removed safely. Thin-section histopathology examination detected neither tumor tissues nor any tissues such as adrenal gland, ovarian tissue, or endometrial implants. The final pathological diagnosis was idiopathic retroperitoneal hematoma; the origin of the bleeding was unclear. The patient was discharged without any complication 5 days after the operation.

  12. Management of traumatic duodenal hematomas in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michelle L; Abbas, Paulette I; Fallon, Sara C; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi J; Rodriguez, Jose Ruben

    2015-11-01

    Duodenal hematomas from blunt abdominal trauma are uncommon in children and treatment strategies vary. We reviewed our experience with this injury at a large-volume children's hospital. A retrospective case series was assembled from January 2003-July 2014. Data collected included demographics, clinical and radiographic characteristics, and hospital course. Patients with grade I injuries based on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Duodenum Injury Scale were compared with those with grade II injuries. Nineteen patients met inclusion criteria at a median age of 8.91 y (range, 1.7-17.2 y). Mechanisms of injury included direct abdominal blow or handle bar injury (n = 9), nonaccidental trauma (n = 5), falls (n = 3), and motor vehicle accident (n = 2). Ten patients had grade I hematomas and nine had grade II. Hematomas were most frequently seen in the second portion of the duodenum (n = 9). Five patients underwent a laparotomy for concerns for hollow viscus injury. No patients required operative drainage of the hematoma; however, one patient underwent percutaneous drainage. Twelve patients received parenteral nutrition (PN) for a median duration of 9 d (range, 5-14 d). Median duration of PN for grade I was 6.5 d (range, 5-8 d) versus 12 d for grade II (range, 9-14 d; P = 0.016). Complications included one readmission for concern of bowel obstruction requiring bowel rest. This study suggests that duodenal hematomas can be successfully managed nonoperatively. Grade II hematomas are associated with longer duration of PN therapy and consequently longer hospital stays. These data can assist in care management planning and parental counseling for patients with traumatic duodenal hematomas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Subacute epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Orlandi, Ivey; Elizondo Barrier, Luis; Junco Martin, Reinel

    2011-01-01

    This is the case of a patient presenting with right temporoparietal subacute hematoma secondary to a physical act of aggression. In clinical picture at 24 hours there was predominance of headache of moderate intensity with drowsiness and slight psychomotor restlessness. The skull single radiographies didn't show alterations. Symptoms remained despite the medical treatment, thus a single skull axial tomography was carried out showing the presence of a right temporoparietal subacute epidural hematoma with displacement from the middle line structures. A right temporoparietal craniotomy was carried out to evacuation of the posterior hematoma. Patient evolved satisfactorily with a total recovery as much clinical as imaging. (author)

  14. Clinical profile of subdural hematomas: dangerousness of subdural subacute hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kpelao, E; Beketi, K A; Moumouni, A K; Doleagbenou, A; Ntimon, B; Egbohou, P; Mouzou, T; Tomta, K; Sama, D H; Abalo, A; Walla, A; Dossim, A

    2016-04-01

    Subacute subdural hematomas are a poorly individualized nosological entity, often equated clinically to chronic subdural hematomas. Yet, their neurological deterioration which is usually rapid seems to distinguish them from chronic subdural hematomas. We wanted to show this dangerousness by establishing the clinically evolving profile of the three types of subdural hematomas. This was a prospective and retrospective study of 63 subdural hematoma (18 acute, 13 subacute, and 32 chronic) patients admitted between 2012 and 2014 in the neurosurgery unit of Lomé University Hospital. Hematomas were classified according to the elapsed time after head injury and blood density on CT. The main parameter studied was the evolution of the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) in the 3 months following the trauma, enabling to establish an evolving profile of each type of hematoma. The average age of patients was 58.1 years for chronic subdural hematomas and 47.6 years for subacute subdural hematomas. Disease duration before admission was 13.1 days for chronic against 36.6 h for subacute hematoma. The clinical profile shows acute worsening within hours during the second week for patients with subacute hematoma, while it is progressive for patients with chronic hematoma. We noted two deaths, all victims of a subacute hematoma (one operated, one patient waiting for surgery). Iso-density hematoma on CT, especially in a young person, must be considered as a predictive factor of rapid neurological aggravation suggesting an urgent care or increased monitoring by paramedics.

  15. Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Samuel; Gonçalves, Ana Rita; Araújo Correia, Luís

    2016-08-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted to our clinic with sudden left quadrant abdominal pain and hematochezia. There was no history of trauma. He denied other symptoms or taking off-the-counter medication. His medical history was relevant for ischemic and aortic-mitral valve disease with prosthetic valves for which he was medicated with aspirin and warfarin. On physical examination the patient presented normal vital signs with tenderness on palpation of the left side of the abdomen. Laboratory tests revealed moderate anemia (10.8 g/dl) and thrombocytopenia (135.000x10^9 U/L) with therapeutic international normalized ratio (2.53). Colonoscopy revealed an extensive area of erythematous and bluish mucosa with an apparent torsion of the proximal descending colon around a volumous hematoma measuring 6.5x3 cm (Figure 1 A-C). Urgent abdominal CT confirmed the presence of a large intramural hematoma of the descending colon (Figure 2 A-B). A conservative approach was adopted with temporary suspension of anticoagulation. Given the high thrombotic risk, abdominal ultrasound was performed after 72 hours showing considerable reduction in the size of the hematoma. Anti-coagulation was then resumed without complications. One month later, colonoscopy was repeated showing complete healing of the mucosa. The increasing use of anti-aggregating and anti-coagulant therapy, especially in elderly patients, explains the increasing incidence of bleeding events seen in this population. However, gastrointestinal hematomas are estimated to occur in only 1 for every 250.000 anti-coagulated patients. Diagnosis is based on characteristic radiologic findings. While most parietal hematomas can be approached conservatively, surgery is indicated in the presence of complications or persistence of the hematoma.

  16. A Rare Case of Acute Abdomen: Perforation Secondary to Intramural Hematoma at Rectosigmoid Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Yagmurkaya

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Intramural hematoma is a clinical situation which is secondary to anticoagulant therapy. In this study, a chronic atrial fibrilation patient taking anticoagulant, had perforation at rectosigmoid region which was secondary to intramural hematoma, is presented. Our case was a eighty-three-year-old male presented with acute abdomen at emergency room. In computerized tomography, intraabdominal free air and hematoma at rectosigmoid region were seen. Due to these, the decision of immidiate exploration was made. This should be noted that intramural hematoma can emerge in patientd on anticoagulant theraphy without trauma. Additionally, it shold be considered that intramural hematoma can lead to lethal complication such as perforation.

  17. Reversal of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)-Induced Hepatic Encephalopathy Using a Strictured Self-Expanding Covered Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Mitchell W.; Soltes, George D.; Lin, Peter H.; Bush, Ruth L.; Lumsden, Alan B.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a known complication following percutaneous transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. We describe herein a simple and effective strategy of TIPS revision by creating an intraluminal stricture within a self-expanding covered stent, which is deployed in the portosystemic shunt to reduce the TIPS blood flow. This technique was successful in reversing a TIPS-induced hepatic encephalopathy in our patient

  18. Hematoma formation during breast core needle biopsy in women taking antithrombotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetlen, Alison L; Kasales, Claudia; Mack, Julie; Schetter, Susann; Zhu, Junjia

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hematoma formation after breast core needle biopsy performed on patients undergoing and those not undergoing concurrent antithrombotic therapy. A prospective assessment of core needle biopsies (stereotactic, ultrasound guided, or MRI guided) performed on patients enrolled between September 2011 and July 2012 formed the basis of this study. Postprocedure mediolateral and craniocaudal mammograms were evaluated for the presence and size of hematomas. Patients were clinically evaluated for complications 24-48 hours after the procedure through telephone call or face-to-face consultation. Needle size, type of biopsy, and presence of hematoma and documented complications were correlated with use of antithrombotic agents (including aspirin, warfarin, clopidogrel, and daily nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications). No clinically significant hematomas or bleeding complications were found. Eighty-nine of 617 (14.4%) non-clinically significant hematomas were detected on postprocedure mammograms. The probability of development of a non-clinically significant hematoma was 21.6% for patients taking antithrombotics and 13.0% for those not taking antithrombotics. Concurrent antithrombotic therapy and larger needle gauge were significant factors contributing to the probability of hematoma formation. The volume of the hematoma was not related to needle gauge or presence of antithrombotic therapy. No clinically significant hematomas were found. Because there are potential life-threatening risks to stopping antithrombotic therapy before breast biopsy, withholding antithrombotic therapy for core needle breast biopsy is not recommended because the incidence of non-clinically significant hematoma is low.

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... catheter inside a blood vessel carries certain risks. These risks include damage to the blood vessel, bruising ... and infection. However precaution is taken to mitigate these risks. Other possible complications of the procedure include: ...

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other possible complications of the procedure include: fever muscle stiffness in the neck bruising on the neck ... lining abdominal bleeding that might require a transfusion laceration of the hepatic artery, which may result in ...

  1. Cardiac and renal effects of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Troels M; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Refractory ascites and recurrent variceal bleeding are among the serious complications of portal hypertension and cirrhosis for which a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) can be used. Cirrhotic patients have varying degrees of haemodynamic derangement, mainly characterized...... to improve in patients with the hepatorenal syndrome. The clinical and haemodynamic effects of TIPS have been studied intensively and will be reviewed in the present paper. Considerable knowledge on the effects of TIPS on the pathophysiology of cirrhosis has been gained, but studies on the central...

  2. Ultrasonographic findings of intrahepatic hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jang Ho; Lim, Hyo Keum; Ham, Eun Jae; Choo, In Wook; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Jong Sup

    1989-01-01

    Sequential ultrasonography was performed in 22 cases of intrahepatic hematomas diagnosed by operation, laboratory data, and clinical manifestation. We analyzed the shape, location, size of hematoma, and change in size and echogenicity by age of hematoma. The results were as follows: 1. The most common shape of intrahepatic hematoma was round. 2. The most common site of intrahepatic hematoma was the posterior segment of the right lobe of the liver. 3. Size of hematoma was decreased from 3rd day, and most hematomas were nearly or completely absorbed from 2nd week to 4th week. 4. Echogenecities of intrahepatic hematoma in immediate ultrasonography after injury showed mainly echogenic or mixed form, and then the echogenecities were decreased and nearly or completely not seen from 2nd week to 4th week

  3. Periocular hematoma secondary to subperiosteal injury by a short needle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nauman Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding and intraorbital hematoma is one of the most common complications of needle block for ophthalmic local anesthesia. We describe an unusual presentation of hematoma that originated in the subperiosteal space and extended to the subconjunctival and periocular area after a peribulbar block for phacoemulsification in a 55-year-old lady. It required an urgent surgical evacuation in order to reduce the intraocular pressure and save the eye. Detailed management to improve the outcome is discussed.

  4. Subdural Hematoma in Grave’s Disease Induced Thrombocytopenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, S; Diwan, S; Chandek, S; Nitey, PO; Kakani, A

    2013-01-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) usually occurs secondary to trauma, in bleeding disorders it may occur spontaneously. It is a rare complication of immune thrombocytopenia. Here we report a case of 45 years female presenting with presenting with complaints of headache, palpitation and menorrhagia and later diagnosed to be a case of Grave's disease with thrombocytopenia with sub dural hematoma. No such case reports are available in literature.

  5. Subdural Hematoma in Grave’s Disease Induced Thrombocytopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH usually occurs secondary to trauma, in bleeding disorders it may occur spontaneously. It is a rare complication of immune thrombocytopenia. Here we report a case of 45 years female presenting with presenting with complaints of headache, palpitation and menorrhagia and later diagnosed to be a case of Grave's disease with thrombocytopenia with sub dural hematoma. No such case reports are available in literature.

  6. Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen-Ranberg, Nina Christine; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Bergholt, Bo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (bCSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition frequently associated with the need for retreatment. The reason for the high rate of retreatment has not been thoroughly investigated. Thus, the authors focused on determining which independent predictors...... are associated with the retreatment of bCSDH with a focus on surgical laterality. METHODS In a national database of CSDHs (Danish Chronic Subdural Hematoma Study) the authors retrospectively identified all bCSDHs treated in the 4 Danish neurosurgical departments over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2012...... that a separated hematoma density and the absence of postoperative drainage were independent predictors of retreatment. CONCLUSIONS In bCSDHs bilateral surgical intervention significantly lowers the risk of retreatment compared with unilateral intervention and should be considered when choosing a surgical...

  7. Black Hole Sign: Novel Imaging Marker That Predicts Hematoma Growth in Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Gang; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Xing-Chen; Yang, Wen-Song; Li, Ke-Wei; Wei, Xiao; Xie, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Early hematoma growth is a devastating neurological complication after intracerebral hemorrhage. We aim to report and evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) black hole sign in predicting hematoma growth in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were screened for the presence of CT black hole sign on admission head CT performed within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. The black hole sign was defined as hypoattenuatting area encapsulated within the hyperattenuating hematoma with a clearly defined border. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of CT black hole sign in predicting hematoma expansion were calculated. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the presence of the black hole sign and early hematoma growth. A total of 206 patients were enrolled. Black hole sign was found in 30 (14.6%) of 206 patients on the baseline CT scan. The black hole sign was more common in patients with hematoma growth (31.9%) than those without hematoma growth (5.8%; Phole sign in predicting early hematoma growth were 31.9%, 94.1%, 73.3%, and 73.2%, respectively. The time-to-admission CT scan, baseline hematoma volume, and the presence of black hole sign on admission CT independently predict hematoma growth in multivariate model. The CT black hole sign could be used as a simple and easy-to-use predictor for early hematoma growth in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... seen in adults, often as a result of chronic liver problems leading to cirrhosis (scarring of the ... or congestive heart failure radiation injury to the skin is a rare complication (it ... with more advanced liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure ...

  9. Hematomas na fossa craniana posterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário S. Cademartori

    1969-09-01

    Full Text Available São relatados 6 casos de hematomas sub-tentorias (um de hematoma subdural crônico, quatro de hematomas intra-cerebelares, um de hematoma extra-dural. Salientando a pequena freqüência dos hematomas da fossa craniana posterior, o autor mostra a necessidade de vários exames complementares para o diagnóstico exato, indispensável para a aplicação de terapêutica cirúrgica adequada.

  10. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions.

  11. Giant unusual shaped chronic subdural hematoma in a patient with untreated congenital hydrocephalus

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Arvind; Ojha, Bal. K.; Chandra, Anil; Srivastava, Chhitij; Singh, Sunil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Subdural hematoma is a well known complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion for hydrocephalus and usually spreads out over the cerebral convexity, and appears as a crescent shaped lesion on imaging. Chronic subdural hematoma in a case of untreated compensated congenital hydrocephalus has not been reported in English literature. We report the rare case of an adult with congenital hydrocephalus with a huge unusual shaped hemispheric subdural hematoma.

  12. Bifrontal acute subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryapratap Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though, acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is one of the most common emergencies in neurological surgery practice, bilateral bifrontal ASDH is uncommon and may constitute diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have important roles in the diagnosis of ASDH. We present a case of bifrontal ASDH that was successfully managed in our institution.

  13. A case report for fatal Churg-Strauss syndrome complications: first reported death due to rapid progression of prominently huge hepatic capsular hematoma and multi-system organ hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jiejing; Tong, Hongyan; Chen, Feifei; Mai, Wenyuan; Lou, Yinjun; Jin, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare disease that has an extremely low incidence rate. CSS prognosis is good, in general; and there are no reports of multiple-organ hemorrhage in CSS. We report a unique case of CSS, wherein, an elderly man experienced multiple organ hemorrhage -- a particularly huge hematoma under the capsule of the liver and poor prognosis. PMID:25419420

  14. Transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: preliminary clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Won, Jong Yoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Joon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To determine the feasibility of transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins. Transcaval TIPS, performed in six patients, was indicated by active variceal bleeding (n=2), recurrent variceal bleeding (n=2), intractable ascites (n=1), and as a bridge to liver transplantation (n=1). The main reasons for transcaval rather than classic TIPS were the presence of an unusually acute angle between the hepatic veins and the level of the portal bifurcation (n=3), hepatic venous occlusion (n=2), and inadequate small hepatic veins (n=1). Technical and functional success was achieved in all patients. The entry site into liver parenchyma from the inferior vena cava was within 2 cm of the atriocaval junction. Procedure-related complications included the death of one patient due to hemoperitoneum despite the absence of contrast media spillage at tractography, and another suffered reversible hepatic encephalopathy. In patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins, transcaval TIPS creation is feasible.

  15. Transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: preliminary clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Won, Jong Yoon; Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Jae Kyu; Yoon, Woong

    2003-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins. Transcaval TIPS, performed in six patients, was indicated by active variceal bleeding (n=2), recurrent variceal bleeding (n=2), intractable ascites (n=1), and as a bridge to liver transplantation (n=1). The main reasons for transcaval rather than classic TIPS were the presence of an unusually acute angle between the hepatic veins and the level of the portal bifurcation (n=3), hepatic venous occlusion (n=2), and inadequate small hepatic veins (n=1). Technical and functional success was achieved in all patients. The entry site into liver parenchyma from the inferior vena cava was within 2 cm of the atriocaval junction. Procedure-related complications included the death of one patient due to hemoperitoneum despite the absence of contrast media spillage at tractography, and another suffered reversible hepatic encephalopathy. In patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins, transcaval TIPS creation is feasible

  16. Acute epidural hematoma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunose, Mutsuo; Nishijima, Michiharu; Fukuda, Osamu; Saito, Tetsugen; Takaku, Akira; Horie, Yukio.

    1992-01-01

    The clinical features and sequential changes of CT findings in children with acute epidural hematoma were correlated with the patient's age. Of the 373 children admitted for head injury during the past 8 years, 61 had an acute traumatic intra-cranial hematoma, and 38 of these had acute epidural hematoma. None of the patients with acute epidural hematoma was under 2 years of age, 15 were 2-6 years old, and 23 were 7-15 years old. In the pre-school group, the numbers of boys and girls were approximately equal, but in the older group boys outnumbered girls. Epidural hematoma was most often parietal (12 patients). Nine patients had posterior fossa hematomas; 30 (78.9%) had skull fractures, and the incidence was not related to the patient's age. In 28 of the 38 patients, CT scans were examined repeatedly for 24 hours. In 15 of them (53.6%), the size of the hematoma increased. In school-aged children, the hematoma tended to be larger than in pre-school children. In four patients with pneumocephalus, the hematoma increased in size. Eleven of the 13, whose hematomas did not increase in size, had skull fractures. (author)

  17. Hypertensive thalamic hematoma treated by CT stereotactic evacuation (with two cases reports)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongsheng; Zhu Fengqing

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate new surgical method to treat hypertensive thalamic hematoma. Methods: Two medial-degree coma patients with hypertensive thalamic hematoma were treated by CT stereotactic evacuation. Results: One week after operation the two patients regained consciousness. The function of paraplegic appendage restored partly, and one patient could take care of himself. Conclusion: CT stereotactic evacuation to treat hypertensive thalamic hematoma has the advantages of small trauma, little complication and good clinical results. The authors suggest that it be selected firstly in treating hypertensive thalamic hematoma

  18. Delayed traumatic intracranial hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Hiroki

    1984-01-01

    CT was performed serially within 24 hours after head injury in 64 patients having Glasgow Coma Scale of 14 or less or cranial fracture shown on roentgenogram. Delayed traumatic extradural hematoma was observed within 7-12 hours after head injury in 6 cases (9.4%). This was prominent in the frontal and occipital regions (67%). Good recovery was seen in 83.3%. Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma was observed within 6-24 hours after head injury in 17 cases (26.6%). This higher incidence was related to contre coup injury. Conservative treatment was possible in 14 of the 17 patients (82.4%), showing good recovery in 70%. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Sickle cell disease with orbital infarction and epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naran, A.D.; Fontana, L.

    2001-01-01

    Although bone infarction is a common feature in sickle cell disease, the involvement of the orbit is an unusual complication. Intracranial bleeding is another uncommon and serious complication. Few cases of orbital infarction alone have been reported. We report imaging findings (CT, bone scan, MRI) in a 16-year-old boy with sickle cell disease with orbital infarction and epidural hematoma. The precise cause of epidural hematoma is not well known, but it is probably related to vaso-occlusive episodes and the tearing of small vessels. (orig.)

  20. Microwave hematoma detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  1. Retroperitoneal and rectus sheath hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasotakis, George

    2014-02-01

    The retroperitoneum is rich in vascular structures and can harbor large hematomas, traumatic or spontaneous. The management of retroperitoneal hematomas depends on the mechanism of injury and whether they are pulsatile/expanding. Rectus sheath hematomas are uncommon abdominal wall hematomas secondary to trauma to the epigastric arteries of the rectus muscle. The common risk factors include anticoagulation, strenuous exercise, coughing, coagulation disorders, and invasive procedures on/through the abdominal wall. The management is largely supportive, with the reversal of anticoagulation and transfusions; angioembolization may be necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Incidence and Risk Factors for Major Hematomas in Aesthetic Surgery: Analysis of 129,007 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaoutzanis, Christodoulos; Winocour, Julian; Gupta, Varun; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Sarosiek, Konrad; Wormer, Blair; Tokin, Christopher; Grotting, James C; Higdon, K Kye

    2017-10-16

    Postoperative hematomas are one of the most frequent complications following aesthetic surgery. Identifying risk factors for hematoma has been limited by underpowered studies from single institution experiences. To examine the incidence and identify independent risk factors for postoperative hematomas following cosmetic surgery utilizing a prospective, multicenter database. A prospectively enrolled cohort of patients who underwent aesthetic surgery between 2008 and 2013 was identified from the CosmetAssure database. Primary outcome was occurrence of major hematomas requiring emergency room visit, hospital admission, or reoperation within 30 days of the index operation. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to identify potential risk factors for hematomas including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking, diabetes, type of surgical facility, procedure by body region, and combined procedures. Of 129,007 patients, 1180 (0.91%) had a major hematoma. Mean age (42.0 ± 13.0 years vs 40.9 ± 13.9 years, P hematomas. Males suffered more hematomas than females (1.4% vs 0.9%, P Hematoma rates were higher in patients undergoing combined procedures compared to single procedures (1.1% vs 0.8%, P hematoma included age (Relative Risk [RR] 1.01), male gender (RR 1.98), the procedure being performed in a hospital setting rather than an office-based setting (RR 1.68), combined procedures (RR 1.35), and breast procedures rather than the body/extremity and face procedures (RR 1.81). Major hematoma is the most common complication following aesthetic surgery. Male patients and those undergoing breast or combined procedures have a significantly higher risk of developing hematomas. 2. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Supratentorial arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma: neuroradiologic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochi, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan); Morikawa, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)]|[Dept. of Radiology, National Nagasaki Chuo Hospital, Ohmura (Japan); Ogino, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan); Nagaoki, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Isahaya General Hospital (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    CT and MR images of 8 patients with supratentorial arachnoid cyst complicated by subdural hematoma were studied and compared with those of 8 patients who developed nontraumatic subdural hematoma without arachnoid cyst. Ot the 8 patients with supratentorial arachnoid cyst, CT and MR disclosed temporal bulging and/or thinning of the temporal squama in all 6 patients with middle fossa arachnoid cysts, and the thinning of the calvaria was evident in another patient with a convexity cyst. Calvarial thinning at the site corresponding to interhemispheric arachnoid cyst was clearly depicted on coronal MR images. In contrast, none of the 8 young patients with nontraumatic subdural hematoma without arachnoid cyst had abnormal calvaria. Temporal bulging and thinning of the overlying calvaria were identified as diagnostic CT and MR features of arachnoid cyst with complicating intracystic and subdural hermorrhage. Radiologists should be aware of this association and should evaluate the bony structure carefully. (orig.)

  4. Clinical appraisal of stereotactic hematoma aspiration surgery for hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage; With respect to volume of the hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Koji; Matsumoto, Keizo (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-06-01

    Three hundred and four patients with hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage were managed by medical treatment, ventricular drainage, or CT-controlled stereotactic aspiration surgery (AS). The therapeutic results of the 6-month outcome were analyzed and correlated with the volume of the hematoma. A hematoma volume of 20 ml was thought to be the critical size in determining whether the outcome would be favorable or unfavorable. Indications for AS are suggested as follows. In patients with a small-sized hematoma having a volume of less than 10 ml use of AS should be restricted to patients with severe paralysis or other neurological complications and the elderly (aged 70 years or older). For patients with a medium-sized hematoma having a volume between 10 ml and 20 ml, AS is indicated for patients having severe paralysis and disturbances of consciousness. For patients with a large-sized hematoma having a volume of 20 ml or more, AS increases not only the survival rate of patients but also reduces the number of bedridden patients. We conclude that AS opens up a new avenue of surgical treatment for hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage, which has been no indication for hematoma evacuation by conventional craniotomy. (author).

  5. Renal Artery Embolization of Perirenal Hematoma in Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Seok; Lee, Yong Seok; Lim, Ji Hyon; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yoon, Yup [Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Cheol [Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute viral disease characterized by fever, hemorrhage and renal failure. Among the various hemorrhagic complications of HFRS, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma are very rare findings. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute infectious disease caused by hantavirus. HFRS is clinically characterized by fever, renal failure and hemorrhage in organs such as lung, kidney, spleen and the pituitary gland. Renal medullary hemorrhage is a well-known complication in the kidney, but spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma in HFRS is rare, and patients showing continuous bleeding and massive perirenal hematoma have often been surgically treated. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and the patient was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. In summary, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma is a rare complication of HFRS. We report here on a case of HFRS that caused massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with superselective renal artery embolization.

  6. Renal Artery Embolization of Perirenal Hematoma in Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hee Seok; Lee, Yong Seok; Lim, Ji Hyon; Kim, Kyung Soo; Yoon, Yup; Hwang, Jae Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute viral disease characterized by fever, hemorrhage and renal failure. Among the various hemorrhagic complications of HFRS, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma are very rare findings. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is an acute infectious disease caused by hantavirus. HFRS is clinically characterized by fever, renal failure and hemorrhage in organs such as lung, kidney, spleen and the pituitary gland. Renal medullary hemorrhage is a well-known complication in the kidney, but spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma in HFRS is rare, and patients showing continuous bleeding and massive perirenal hematoma have often been surgically treated. We report here on a case of HFRS complicated by massive perirenal hematoma, and the patient was treated with transcatheter arterial embolization. In summary, spontaneous rupture of the kidney and perirenal hematoma is a rare complication of HFRS. We report here on a case of HFRS that caused massive perirenal hematoma, and this was treated with superselective renal artery embolization

  7. Effect of puncture through frontal lobe in the treatment of intracranial hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOU Bo-sheng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to discuss the effect of an easy puncture through frontal lobe in the treatment of deep brain hematoma. The lesions of 37 patients with basal ganglia hemorrhage were accurately positioned by CT scan. Drainage tube was placed in the center of hematoma through frontal lobe and blood was aspirated. Urokinase 30 × 103 U was injected in the hematoma postoperatively to promote the evacuation of hematoma. Postoperative CT scan showed more than 75% hematoma was cleared in all patients after 3-7 d. Two patients died of complications; 2 patients were severely disabled; 3 rebleeding happened. Almost 33 patients had a good recovery. Minimal invasion, convenient operation and exact location were the adventages of this puncture and it does not need complicated device.

  8. Management of Recurrent Subdural Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Virendra R; Scranton, Robert A; Britz, Gavin W

    2017-04-01

    Subdural hematomas commonly recur after surgical evacuation, at a rate of 2% to 37%. Risk factors for recurrence can be patient related, radiologic, or surgical. Patient-related risk factors include alcoholism, seizure disorders, coagulopathy, and history of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Radiologic factors include poor brain reexpansion postoperatively, significant subdural air, greater midline shift, heterogeneous hematomas (layered or multi-loculated), and higher-density hematomas. Surgical factors include lack of or poor postoperative drainage. Most recurrent hematomas are managed successfully with burr hole craniostomies with postoperative closed-system drainage. Refractory hematomas may be managed with a variety of techniques, including craniotomy or subdural-peritoneal shunt placement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical results of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Auh Whan; Sim, Jae In; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Kim, Yong Joo [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate the clinical results of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt(TIPS) for the control of variceal bleeding. TIPS creation was attempted in 23 patients with endoscopically confirmed variceal bleeding. Most patients had multiple episodes of bleeding in the past and have been treated with multiple endoscopic sclerotherapies. Pre-and post-procedural hepatic and portal vein pressures were measured. After creation of TIPS patients were followed up at regular intervals. TIPS has been successfully accomplished in 22 of 23 patients using Wallstent(n = 21) and Strecker stent(n = 1). Immediate bleeding control was achieved in all patients with shunt creation. No procedure-related complication was noted. Portal vein pressure was reduced from 30.7 {+-} 5.8 mmHg to 20.8 {+-} 4.7 mmHg. The mean pressure gradient of portosystemic shunt dropped from 22.8 {+-} 6.0 prior to TIPS to 12.2 {+-} 4.1 immediately after. During the follow-up period (6-556 days, mean; 10 months), seven patients died; progressive hepatic failure (n 4), variceal rebleeding (n = 2), and respiratory failure(n = 1). Hepatic encephalopathy after TIPS was noted in 7 patients(31.8%). Variceal rebleeding occurred in 3 patients(13.6%). The remaining 15 patients have survived an average of 11 months. This results suggest that TIPS is a safe and effective method for lowering portal pressure and controlling variceal bleeding. Furthermore if these initial results are encouraged by further long-term observation, TIPS could replace endoscopic and risky surgical intervention.

  10. Imaging of postpartum complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooholamini, S.A.; Au, A.H.; Hansen, G.C.; Kioumehr, F.; Yaghmai, I.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficacy of various imaging modalities in the detection of postpartum complications. Nineteen cases of postpartum complications, studied radiologically, form the basis of this exhibit. Plain abdominal radiography, US, CT, and MR imaging were performed alone or in combination. The abnormalities detected included uterine rupture, intramural uterine hematoma, hematomas of the broad ligaments and the abdominal rectus muscles, ovarian vein thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, pyometrium, retained placenta and blood clots, periappendiceal abscess, superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, and cerebral edema. Representative cases will be illustrated; and the effective value of each technique will be stressed

  11. [Retrospective statistical analysis of clinical factors of recurrence in chronic subdural hematoma: correlation between univariate and multivariate analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Motoharu; Terui, Keita; Oiwa, Yoshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is common in elderly individuals and surgical procedures are simple. The recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma, however, varies from 9.2 to 26.5% after surgery. The authors studied factors of the recurrence using univariate and multivariate analyses in patients with chronic subdural hematoma We retrospectively reviewed 239 consecutive cases of chronic subdural hematoma who received burr-hole surgery with irrigation and closed-system drainage. We analyzed the relationships between recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma and factors such as sex, age, laterality, bleeding tendency, other complicated diseases, density on CT, volume of the hematoma, residual air in the hematoma cavity, use of artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Twenty-one patients (8.8%) experienced a recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. Multiple logistic regression found that the recurrence rate was higher in patients with a large volume of the residual air, and was lower in patients using artificial cerebrospinal fluid. No statistical differences were found in bleeding tendency. Techniques to reduce the air in the hematoma cavity are important for good outcome in surgery of chronic subdural hematoma. Also, the use of artificial cerebrospinal fluid reduces recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. The surgical procedures can be the same for patients with bleeding tendencies.

  12. Perirenal hematomas induced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Therapeutic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labanaris, Apostolos P; Kühn, Reinhard; Schott, Günter E; Zugor, Vahudin

    2007-09-17

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is nowadays accepted as the treatment of choice for the majority of patients with renal or proximal ureteral calculi. Although, a relatively noninvasive modality with low morbidity, minor or major complications can be noted. A relative severe complication for the patient and confusing for the treating physician is the perirenal hematoma. With review the literature and an example of perirenal hematoma induced by ESWL in a patient treated in our department, we describe its therapeutic management.

  13. MRI findings and hematoma contents of chronic subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyaki, Atsushi; Makita, Yasumasa; Nabeshima, Sachio; Tei, Taikyoku; Lee, Young-Eun; Higashi, Toshio; Matsubayashi, Keiko; Miki, Yukio; Matsuo, Michimasa (Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan))

    1991-02-01

    Twenty-six cases of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs) were studied with reference to magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and the biochemical analysis of the hematoma contents. There were 5 cases of bilateral CSDH. An apparent history of head trauma was obtained in 13 cases. All cases were evaluated preoperatively with both computed tomography (CT) and MRI. MRI was studied with both T{sub 1}-weighted (spin echo, TR/TE 600/15) imaging (T{sub 1}WI) and T{sub 2}-weighted (spin echo, TR/TE 3,000/90) imaging (T{sub 2}WI). A biochemical analysis of the hematoma contents was assayed with regard to hematocrit (HT), the total protein (TP), methemoglobin (Met-Hb), the total cholesterol (Tchol), triglyceride (TG), fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products (FDP), Fe, and osmolarity (Osm). The CT findings were divided into four groups: 5 cases of low-density, 7 cases of isodensity, 13 cases of high-density, and 5 cases of mixed-density hematomas. The MRI findings were also divided as 18 cases of high-, 4 cases of iso-, and 2 cases of low-signal-intensity hematomas on T{sub 1}WI. On T{sub 2}WI, 18 cases were high-, 4 cases were iso-, and 2 cases were low-signal-intensity hematomas. Twelve cases were high-signal-intensity hematomas on both T{sub 1}WI and T{sub 2}WI. In comparison with the CT and MRI findings, hematomas of low and isodensity on CT showed high signal intensities on T{sub 1}WI except in one case. The high-density hematomas on CT showed a variable signal intensity on MRI. The Ht value showed no apparent correlation with the MRI findings; however, increased values of TP in hematomas tended to show higher signal intensities on T{sub 1}WI. The most apparent correlation was seen between the Met-Hb ratio and T{sub 1}WI MRI. All hematomas containing >10% Met-Hb showed high signal intensities on T{sub 1}WI. The CT, the MRI, and the results of the biochemic analysis of hematoma contents were presented in 3 cases. (J.P.N.).

  14. Two occurrences of delayed epidural hematoma in different areas following decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma in a single patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruhong; Shi, Jia; Cao, Jiachao; Mao, Yumin; Dong, Bo

    2017-12-04

    Delayed epidural hematoma (DEH) following evacuation of traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) or acute epidural hematoma (EDH) is a rare but devastating complication, especially when it occurs sequentially in a single patient. A 19-year-old man who developed contralateral DEH following craniotomy for evacuation of a traumatic right-side ASDH and then developed a left-side DEH of the posterior cranial fossa after craniotomy for evacuation of the contralateral DEH. He was immediately returned to the operating room for additional surgeries and his neurological outcome was satisfactory. Although DEH occurring after evacuation of ASDH or acute EDH is a rare event, timely recognition is critical to prognosis.

  15. Contralateral delayed epidural hematoma following intracerebral hematoma surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomiichuk, Volodymyr O.; Drizhdov, Konstantin I.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Delayed epidural hematoma (EDH) is an uncommon finding in patients after intracranial hematomas evacuation. It occurs in 6.7-7.4% of cases. A total of 29 reports were found in literature. Between them were no cases of delayed contralateral EDH after intracerebral hematoma evacuation. Case Description: This paper represents a clinical case of a 28-year-old male patient with opened penetrating head injury, who underwent left frontal lobe intracerebral hematoma evacuation and one day later a contralateral EDH was found and successfully surgically treated. Conclusion: Contralateral EDH is a life-threatening neurosurgical emergency case, which can occur during first 24 hours after decompressive craniectomy. Control CT scans must be performed next day after the operation to verify and treat contralateral EDH timely. PMID:24233058

  16. Embolization of nonvariceal portosystemic collaterals in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, Jose Ignacio; Arias, Mercedes; Longo, Jesus Maria; Alejandre, Pedro Luis; Betes, Maria Teresa; Elizalde, Arlette Maria

    1997-01-01

    Percutaneous embolization of large portosystemic collaterals was performed in three patients following placement of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in order to improve hepatopetal portal flow. Improved hepatic portal perfusion was achieved in these cases, thereby theoretically reducing the risk of chronic hepatic encephalopathy

  17. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt by direct transcaval approach: indications and anatomic foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Jianguo; Sun Xiaoli; Huang He; Xu Xiaoming; Pu Longsong; Lv Chunyan; Sun Peng; Yang Shuhui; Liu Shuying

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate into the indications and related anatomic foundation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation by direct transcaval approach in patients with portal hypertension cirrhosis suffering unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation; and to evaluate the security, feasibility and clinical significance. Methods: Direct transcaval approach TIPS were performed in 65 patients including active variceal bleeding (n=52), intractable ascites (n=12), and as a bridge to liver transplantation (n=1). Results: Technical and functional success were achieved in all patients. The success rate was 100% without related complications including the technique and primary patency rate is obvious higher than classical TIPS. Conclusion: In patients with unusual anatomy between the hepatic veins and portal bifurcation, and inaccessible or inadequate hepatic veins, transcaval TIPS creation is secure and feasible. The results suggest that the direct transcaval approach offering favorable primary patency because the shunt has a straight line in construction

  18. Large Intraluminal Ileal Hematoma Presenting as Small Bowel Obstruction in a Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun Jung; Nam, So Hyun; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future

  19. Sharp tooth induced sublingual hematoma in a patient with elevated international normalized ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Baliah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublingual hematoma secondary to anticoagulation is a rare fatal condition. Hemorrhagic complications of warfarin are well-known. This particular case is unique because the patient was on warfarin for the past 2 years but did not develop the sublingual hematoma. However, a trauma by an attrited sharp cusp triggered the episode of the sublingual hematoma in this patient. Being a medical emergency, patient was promptly hospitalized in cardiac care unit and managed by medical team. The patient was transfused with 2 units of fresh frozen plasma and warfarin was temporarily stopped for 4 days. Alternate day regimen of warfarin was started after 4 days, and international normalized ratio dropped to 3. In dental management, enameloplasty of the mandibular first molar tooth was done to prevent trauma and ulcer development in the floor of the mouth. The hematoma resolved, and no new hematoma formation was observed for a period of 6 months.

  20. Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodan Paramanathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vinodan Paramanathan, Ardalan ZolnourianQueen's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire DE13 0RB, UKAbstract: Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma is an uncommon clinical entity seen in ophthalmology practice. It is poorly represented in the literature. Current evidence attributes it to orbital trauma, neoplasm, vascular malformations, acute sinusitis, and systemic abnormalities. A 65-year-old female presented with spontaneous intraorbital hematoma manifesting as severe ocular pains, eyelid edema, proptosis, and diplopia, without a history of trauma. Computer tomography demonstrated a fairly well defined extraconal lesion with opacification of the paranasal sinuses. The principal differential based on all findings was that of a spreading sinus infection and an extraconal tumor. An unprecedented finding of a spontaneous orbital hematoma was discovered when the patient was taken to theater. We discuss the rarity of this condition and its management.Keywords: hemorrhage, ophthalmology, spontaneous, intra-orbital, hematoma

  1. Amorous squeezing of the augmented breast may result in late capsular hematoma formation - A report of two cases (and a review of English-language literature on late hematoma formation in the augmented breast)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssen, A. L.; Wilmink, Han; van Wingerden, Jan J.; van der Lei, Berend

    Late hematoma formation is a rare complication of augmentation mammaplasty. Late hematoma formation related to excessive or vigorous squeezing of the breast during sexual activity has not been described. We present 2 such cases and review the English-language literature on all causes of late

  2. Amorous squeezing of the augmented breast may result in late capsular hematoma formation: A report of two cases (and a review of English-language literature on late hematoma formation in the augmented breast)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssen, A. L.; Wilmink, Han; van Wingerden, Jan J.; van der Lei, Berend

    2008-01-01

    Late hematoma formation is a rare complication of augmentation mammaplasty. Late hematoma formation related to excessive or vigorous squeezing of the breast during sexual activity has not been described. We present 2 such cases and review the English-language literature on all causes of late

  3. Surgical management of intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsementzis, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional and recent developments in the management of spontaneous intracranial hematomas are reviewed. A comprehensive account of the epidemiological characteristics worldwide with an etiological analysis including prevention and prophylaxis introduce the size and clinical significance of this neurological problem. The usefulness and limitations of the available diagnostic methods are described. Most of the emphasis, however, is placed on the management and medicosurgical treatment of intracranial hematomas in correlation with their clinical presentation and localization. 80 references

  4. Traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yamakawa, Kazuomi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Tsuji, Yukihide

    1981-01-01

    In this paper three acute cases and two subacute cases are reported. CT findings in acute cases show two different types. ''Type I'' shows crescent or lenticular high density area which is not enhanced after contrast infusion. ''Type II'' shows lenticular low density area with membranous high density region in its medial side after contrast infusion. In subacute cases plain CT scan shows lenticular iso or low density area with membranous high density region in its medial side. Forty five cases of posterior fossa epidural hematoma in the review of literature of this country are discussed. Disturbances of the consciousness are the most predominant symptoms in acute cases, while in subacute cases cerebellar signs, vomiting, headache and choked disc are noted. Angiographical examinations may not always be valuable in collecting the direct information of the existence of the epidural hematoma. Liquor cavity in the posterior fossa which is thought to serve as a buffer action of hematoma is about 20 ml, so we discuss about the volume of hematoma, especially of 20 ml, associated with clinical course and prognosis. Volume of epidural hematoma is one of the most important factors affecting clinical course and prognosis. In summary of these our experiences, we again emphasize the value of CT scan as the rapid, noninvasive, accurate radiological examination in the diagnosis of traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematoma. (author)

  5. Significant Risk Factors for Postoperative Enlargement of Basal Ganglia Hematoma after Frameless Stereotactic Aspiration: Antiplatelet Medication and Concomitant IVH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Wonsoo; Park, Jaechan

    2017-09-01

    Frameless stereotactic aspiration of a hematoma can be the one of the treatment options for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in the basal ganglia. Postoperative hematoma enlargement, however, can be a serious complication of intracranial surgery that frequently results in severe neurological deficit and even death. Therefore, it is important to identify the risk factors of postoperative hematoma growth. During a 13-year period, 101 patients underwent minimally invasive frameless stereotactic aspiration for basal ganglia hematoma. Patients were classified into two groups according to whether or not they had postoperative hematoma enlargement in a computed tomography scan. Baseline demographic data and several risk factors, such as hypertension, preoperative hematoma growth, antiplatelet medication, presence of concomitant intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), were analysed via a univariate statistical study. Nine of 101 patients (8.9%) showed hematoma enlargement after frameless stereotactic aspiration. Among the various risk factors, concomitant IVH and antiplatelet medication were found to be significantly associated with postoperative enlargement of hematomas. In conclusion, our study revealed that aspirin use and concomitant IVH are factors associated with hematoma enlargement subsequent to frameless stereotactic aspiration for basal ganglia hematoma.

  6. Outcome in Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Subdural vs. Subgaleal Drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishfaq, Asim

    2017-07-01

    To compare the outcome after surgery for chronic subdural hematoma when the drain is placed in subdural space or subgaleal space. Quasi experimental study. Combined Military Hospital, Lahore, from July 2015 to June 2016. Patients with chronic subdural hematoma of both genders and age, ranging between 55 to 85 years, were included. Patients on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy and acute on chronic subdural hematoma were excluded. Patients were divided in two equal groups each depending on whether drain was placed in subgaleal space (Group 1), and subdual space (Group 2), (n=31 patients each). Patients were positioned flat in bed after surgery. Clinical and radiological parameters and clinical outcome were compared between the two groups. Statistical test with significance of p hematoma was 15 ±6.5 mm. Patients with subdural drain placement had more complications such as pneumocephalus 11 (35.4%) vs. 6 (19.3%), and intracerebral hemorrhage 4 (12.9%) vs. 2 (6.4%). Clinical outcome was good in both groups 27 (87%) in Group 1 and 28 (90%) in Group 2. Patients of both groups had good outcome after surgery. Complications like pneumocephalus and intracerebral hemorrhage were more common in subdural location of drain, though not reaching statistically significance level to favor one technique over another.

  7. Pathogenesis of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Nakamura, Norio; Sato, Jun; Hasegawa, Yoshio.

    1982-01-01

    Ten cases of chronic subdural hematoma that were followed by a sequential study with CT from an early posttraumatic period to evolution of chronic subdural hematoma were reported. In four of these 10 cases, the initial CT showed thin subdural collections of high density suggesting acute subdural hematoma. Two weeks later, the density of subdural collections reduced, but their volumes increased. Clinical symptoms such as headache and disorientation occurred three or four weeks later. Preoperative CT showed similar huge subdural collections of low density and marked mass effect. These cases underwent surgery from 24 to 44 days after injury, and development of neomenbranes was confirmed. In the remaining six cases, the initial CT showed thin subdural collections of low density suggesting subdural hygroma. In five of the six cases, the density of the subdural collections was slightly higher than that of cerebrospinal fluid, and in one case, an area of spotted high density was shown. It was suggested that these were mixtures with blood. Follow-up CT scans revealed that the subdural collections increased in size but remained at a uniformly low density for the first month after the head injury, and then the increase in density occurred. Operations were performed 55 to 76 days after injury, and operative findings were not different from those of common chronic subdural hematoma. From these investigations, it was suggested that there were two types of evolution of chronic subdural hematoma. One is the development from acute subdural hematomas, and the other from subdural hygromas. It is supposed that blood and cerebrospinal fluid are very important factors in the evolution of subdural collections into chronic subdural hematomas. (J.P.N.)

  8. Computed tomography of traumatic extradural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukamachi, Akira; Wakao, Tetsuo; Kaneko, Masami; Kunimine, Hideo; Wada, Hirochiyo

    1981-01-01

    Since the introduction of CT in February, 1977, 64 cases with 67 traumatic extradural hematomas were experienced. These cases were analysed, especially with regard to CT findings of the hematomas, small extradural hematomas, and combined intracerebral hematomas, and the correlation between CT gradings and clinical outcomes. From these analyses, the following results were obtained. In 64 out of 66 hematomas, except for a case of sagittal sinus hematoma, shapes were biconvex on CT scans. The other two were planconvex and crescent. One sagittal sinus hematoma could not be diagnosed by CT alone because the highest parietal slice was not taken. In 60 acute hematomas, densities of 59 were high. The other one was hypo- or iso-dense. In six subacute hematomas, two were hypo- and iso-dense respectively. These two cases showed a marked dural enhancement for contrast material. Initial admission CT scans disclosed 35 large hematomas (> 20 mm in thickness) and 29 small ones (<= 20 mm). The other three were not clear in the initial CT scans. Among 12 small hematomas for which initial CT scans were performed within 6 hours after injury and sequential CT scans were carried out, six were shown to become larger. Three of these were operated on thereafter. Eleven cases with small hematomas on the initial CT scans were operated on. Their bleeding sources were the middle meningeal arteries in three cases, dural vein in one, fracture sites in four, and unclear in three. In 16 combined intradural lesions, ten were traumatic intracerebral hematomas. Four of these intracerebral hematomas were found simultaneously with extradural ones in CT scans. Six were obviously found later than the latter. Two cases with multiple extradural hematomas were reported. After evacuation of one extradural hematoma, additional extradural and intracerebral hematomas developed at other sites in these cases. (author)

  9. Neonatal adrenal hematoma with urinary tract infection: Risk factor or a chance association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhadi M Habeb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal adrenal hematoma is a rare finding that can be discovered incidentally or presents with various symptoms. However, urinary tract infection (UTI has not been reported in association with this condition. We report on a 4-week old child with massive unilateral adrenal hematoma discovered incidentally during a routine abdominal ultrasound scan for UTI. The mass resolved spontaneously after several months with no complications. The diagnosis and ma-nagement of infantile suprarenal mass and the possible link between this child′s UTI and the adrenal hematoma are discussed.

  10. Tracheal Compression Caused by a Mediastinal Hematoma After Interrupted Aortic Arch Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qingwang; Lin, Zhiyong; Hu, Xingti; Zhao, Qifeng

    2017-08-03

    Congenital abnormalities of the aortic arch include interrupted aortic arch (IAA), coarctation of the aorta (CoA), and double aortic arch (DAA). Aortic arch repair is difficult and postoperative complications are common. However, postoperative tracheobronchial stenosis with respiratory insufficiency is an uncommon complication and is usually caused by increased aortic anastomotic tension. We report here a case of tracheal compression by a mediastinal hematoma following IAA surgery. The patient underwent a repeat operation to remove the hematoma and was successfully weaned off the ventilator.In cases of tracheobronchial stenosis after aortic arch surgery, airway compression by increased aortic anastomotic tension is usually the first diagnosis considered by clinicians. Other causes, such as mediastinal hematomas, are often ignored. However, the severity of symptoms with mediastinal hematomas makes this an important entity.

  11. Transjugular embolization of the internal spermatic vein for the treatment of varicocele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Man Soo; Kwak, Byung Guk; Shim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Sae Chul; Kim, Kun Sang [College of Medicine, Chungang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    A transjugular approach for testicular venography and embolization of the internal spermatic vein was performed in 7 patients (6 left and 1 bilateral). Embolization were satisfactory in 6 of 7 patients. This transjugular technique fascilates subselective catheterization of the internal spermatic vein and its collaterals and enables coils to be placed deeply within these vessels.

  12. Iatrogenic Spinal Subdural Hematoma due to Apixaban: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Colell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, the clinical relevance for developing safer oral anticoagulants prompted the development of new classes of drugs that have shown a lower risk of life-threatening bleeding events as compared to standard warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma is an uncommon urgent complication that can be associated with the use of these agents. An unusual case of spinal subdural hematoma related to apixaban treatment for nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation is reported here.

  13. Longterm surgery of posttraumatic intracranial hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babochkin D.S.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Research objective — studying of consequences of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas in the remote period. Material. The nearest and remote results of the operated traumatic intracranial hematomas at 105 patients in terms from 6 months till 3 years are analyzed. During research the anamnesis was studied, neurologic investigation, and also research cognitive functions by means of scale MMSE, the test of drawing of hours, a scale of studying of alarm/depression HADS, learning of 5 words, scale quality of life SF-36. Results. It is established, that in the remote period the condition of the majority of patients gradually improves, at the same time, frequent enough and expressed consequences which are necessary for analyzing with the purpose of optimization of outcomes and the forecast at the given disease are observed. The special attention should be given again developing complications to which it is possible to carry epileptic seizures and behavioral-memorable infringements. Conclusion. Studying of the remote consequences of this heavy kind of craniocereberal trauma allows to optimize results of treatment and to provide complex medical, labor, social and family adaptation

  14. Chronic subdural hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  15. Ultrasound diagnosis of rectus sheath hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M. S.; Chang, J. C.; Rhee, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    6 cases of rectus sheath hematoma were correctly diagnosed by ultrasound. 2 cases had bilateral rectus sheath hematoma and 4 cases were unilateral. On ultrasound finding, relatively well defined oval or spindle like cystic mass situated in the area of rectus muscle on all cases. Ultrasound examination may give more definite diagnosis and extension rectus sheath hematoma and also helpful to follow up study of hematoma

  16. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Turner, Ryan C.; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  17. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  18. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma.

  19. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma. (orig.)

  20. Epidural hematomas of posterior fossa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Danilo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posterior fossa epidural hematomas represent 7-14% of all traumatic intracranial epidural hematomas. They are most frequently encountered posttraumatic mass lesions in the posterior fossa. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features that could lead to the early diagnosis of posterior fossa epidural hematoma. Methods. Between 1980 and 2002, 28 patients with epidural hematoma of the posterior fossa were operated on at the Institute for Neurosurgery, Belgrade. Clinical course neuroradiological investigations, and the results of surgical treatment of the patients with posterior fossa epidural hematomas were analyzed retrospectively. Results. Almost two thirds of patients were younger than 16 years of age. In 20 cases injury was caused by a fall, in 6 cases by a traffic accident, and in 2 by the assault. Clinical course was subacute or chronic in two thirds of the patients. On the admission Glasgow Coma Scale was 7 or less in 9 injured, 8-14 in 14 injured, and 15 in 5 injured patients. Linear fracture of the occipital bone was radiographically evident in 19 patients, but was intraoperatively encountered in all the patients except for a 4-year old child. In 25 patients the diagnosis was established by computer assisted tomography (CAT and in 3 by vertebral angiography. All the patients were operated on via suboccipital craniotomy. Four injured patients who were preoperatively comatose were with lethal outcome. Postoperatively, 24 patients were with sufficient neurologic recovery. Conclusion. Posterior fossa epidural hematoma should be suspected in cases of occipital injury, consciousness disturbances, and occipital bone fracture. In such cases urgent CAT-scan is recommended. Early recognition early diagnosis, and prompt treatment are crucial for good neurological recovery after surgery.

  1. MRI of subacute intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Hideo

    1990-01-01

    Subacute hematomas consisting of intracellular methemoglobin (MetHb) become hypointense on T 2 weighted spin-echo (SE) images using high-field magnetic resonance. This effect results from diffusion of proton through local field gradients created by MetHb and is called preferential T 2 proton relaxation enhancement (PT2PRE). Gradient-echo acquisition (GEA) can depict hematomas to be more hypointense, because the acquisition is sensitive to field inhomogeneity. In this paper, the difference between SE and GEA images of subacute hematomas was studied experimentally using intracellular MetHb suspension. Although T 2 * decay curves were expected to decline faster than T 2 decay curves, no significant differences were observed between them. This result suggests that PT2PRE cannot be increased significantly by GEA. T 2 obtained with multiple-echo technique is generally inaccurate and smaller than T 2 obtained with single-echo techqnie, but the results showed in a case of intracellular MetHb they were almost similar. This is because mutiple 180deg pulses partly correct the dephasing of proton resulting from its diffusion. As contrast of hematomas is dependent on differences of signal intensities between hematomas and surrounding tissues, it means that multiple-echo technique depicts the lesion less conspicuously than single-echo technique and GEA. GEA images (TR=200 msec/TE=15 msec) showed hypointense rim (boundary effect) at the margin of intracellular MetHb suspension with a hematocrit of larger than 30%, and with TE of 40 msec boundary effect could be seen even at a hematocrit of 15%. On the contrary, SE images (TR=2500 msec/TE=80 msec) hardly showed boundary effect. In conclusion, GEA can depict subacute hematomas to be more hypointense than SE using multiple-echo, because multiple 180deg pulses are not used and boundary effect is present. (author)

  2. Computerized tomographic evaluation of aortic prosthetic graft complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, D.; Kalmar, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Computerized tomography has been found to be an accurate and sensitive method of diagnosing complications of synthetic aortic grafts. Complications in this series of four cases included aortoesophageal fistula, aortoduodenal fistula, pseudoaneurysm, and retroperitoneal hematoma. 6 references, 5 figures

  3. Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Lester

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 21-year-old female with no past medical history presented to the ED after multiple tonic-clonic seizures over the previous 12 hours, the longest lasting 20 seconds. She returned to baseline after each seizure, had no obvious signs of trauma, and did not exhibit any focal neurologic deficits. She denied illicit drugs or new medications. A family member noted that she had fallen from her bed (approximately 3 feet high 2 days ago. Significant findings: Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT of the Head showed a dense extra-axial collection along the left frontal and parietal regions, extending superior to the vertex with mild mass effect, but no midline shift. Discussion: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is a term to describe any abnormal bleeding within the bony confines of the skull. Most commonly, subdural hemorrhages (SDH result from injury to the bridging veins that lead to bleeding between the dura and arachnoid maters. However, in 20%-30% of cases an arterial source of bleeding can be found.1 For adults, motor vehicle collisions and other unintentional head trauma are typically the provoking factors in developing SDH. Falls in the elderly are a common cause of SDH since diffuse cerebral atrophy leads to increased shear forces upon vasculature structures during the fall. The risk of SDH increases with the use of anti-thrombotic agents.2 Clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic to coma (in 50 percent of acute SDH. Chronic SDH may present with headaches, light-headedness, cognitive impairment, and seizures.1 The risk of posttraumatic epileptic seizures (PTS is higher in acute SDH. Risk factors for acute SDH PTS include low Glasgow Coma Score and craniotomy, whereas risk factors for PTS in chronic SDH include alcohol abuse, change in mental status, previous stroke, and hematoma density on CT.3 CT is the most widely used imaging modality for identifying ICH. Acute SDH (within 1-2 days are visualized as hyperdense

  4. Risk factors for reoperation after initial burr hole trephination in chronic subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Falko; Loos, Franz; Dünisch, Pedro; Sakr, Yasser; Safatli, Diaa Al; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The optimal management of chronic subdural hematomas remains a challenge. Twist drill craniotomy or burr hole trephination are considered optimal initial treatments, but the reoperation rate for hematoma recurrence and other complications is still high. Therefore, evaluation of possible risk factors for initial treatment failure is crucial. In this context, we performed a study to define a possible subpopulation that may benefit from a more invasive initial treatment regime. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 193 patients with 250 chronic subdural hematomas who had undergone burr hole trephination as first-line therapy in our institution between January 2005 and October 2012. To identify risk factors for reoperation, a multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed with reoperation as the dependent variable. Surgical complications, including acute rebleeding, infection and chronic hematoma recurrence, were analyzed separately using a logistic regression model. The mean age of the cohort was 71.4 years. The male/female ratio was 137:56. Reoperation was necessary in 56 cases (29%) for recurrent hematomas and surgical complications. Predictors for reoperation for surgical complications were midline shift (odds ratio [OR] (per mm) 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.29, p=0.006), arterial hypertension (OR 5.44, 95% CI: 1.45-20.41, p=0.012) and bilateral hematomas (OR 4.22, 95% CI: 1.22-14.58, p=0.023). There was a trend toward a higher risk of surgically-relevant hematoma recurrence in patients with prior treatment with vitamin K antagonists (OR 1.76, 95% CI: 0.75-4.13, p=0.191). Burr hole trephination is the therapy of choice in most chronic subdural hematomas, but the rate of recurrent hematomas is high. Every hematoma should be treated individually especially in relation to midline-shift and pre-existing conditions. Further prospective studies evaluating types of treatment and hematoma density are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement During Pregnancy: A Case Series of Five Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingraham, Christopher R.; Padia, Siddharth A.; Johnson, Guy E.; Easterling, Thomas R.; Liou, Iris W.; Kanal, Kalpana M.; Valji, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Background and AimsComplications of portal hypertension, such as variceal hemorrhage and ascites, are associated with significant increases in both mortality and complications during pregnancy. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a well-established procedure for treating portal hypertension, but the safety of TIPS during pregnancy is largely unknown. In this series, we review five patients who underwent TIPS placement while pregnant and describe their clinical outcomes.MethodsFive pregnant patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension underwent elective TIPS for complications of portal hypertension (four for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding and one for refractory ascites). Outcomes measured were recurrent bleeding episodes or need for further paracenteses during pregnancy, estimated radiation dose to the fetus and gestational age at delivery. All patients were followed after delivery to evaluate technical and clinical success of the procedure.ResultsAll five patients survived pregnancy and went on to deliver successfully. When TIPS was performed for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding (n = 4), no patients demonstrated variceal bleeding after TIPS placement. When TIPS was performed for refractory ascites (n = 1), no further paracenteses were required. All patients delivered successfully, albeit prematurely. Average radiation dose estimated to the fetus was 16.3 mGy.ConclusionsThis series suggests that TIPS can be performed in selective pregnant patients with portal hypertension, with little added risk to the mother or fetus

  6. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement During Pregnancy: A Case Series of Five Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingraham, Christopher R., E-mail: cringra@uw.edu; Padia, Siddharth A., E-mail: spadia@uw.edu; Johnson, Guy E., E-mail: gej@uw.edu [University of Washington, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States); Easterling, Thomas R., E-mail: easter@uw.edu [University of Washington, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (United States); Liou, Iris W., E-mail: irisl@medicine.washington.edu [University of Washington, Department of Medicine (United States); Kanal, Kalpana M., E-mail: kkanal@uw.edu [University of Washington, Physics Section, Department of Radiology (United States); Valji, Karim, E-mail: kvalji@uw.edu [University of Washington, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Background and AimsComplications of portal hypertension, such as variceal hemorrhage and ascites, are associated with significant increases in both mortality and complications during pregnancy. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a well-established procedure for treating portal hypertension, but the safety of TIPS during pregnancy is largely unknown. In this series, we review five patients who underwent TIPS placement while pregnant and describe their clinical outcomes.MethodsFive pregnant patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension underwent elective TIPS for complications of portal hypertension (four for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding and one for refractory ascites). Outcomes measured were recurrent bleeding episodes or need for further paracenteses during pregnancy, estimated radiation dose to the fetus and gestational age at delivery. All patients were followed after delivery to evaluate technical and clinical success of the procedure.ResultsAll five patients survived pregnancy and went on to deliver successfully. When TIPS was performed for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding (n = 4), no patients demonstrated variceal bleeding after TIPS placement. When TIPS was performed for refractory ascites (n = 1), no further paracenteses were required. All patients delivered successfully, albeit prematurely. Average radiation dose estimated to the fetus was 16.3 mGy.ConclusionsThis series suggests that TIPS can be performed in selective pregnant patients with portal hypertension, with little added risk to the mother or fetus.

  7. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt for Treatment of Cirrhosis-related Chylothorax and Chylous Ascites: Single-institution Retrospective Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikolski, Steven G., E-mail: skikolski@ucsd.edu; Aryafar, Hamed, E-mail: haryafar@ucsd.edu; Rose, Steven C., E-mail: scrose@ucsd.edu [University of California San Diego Health Sciences, Department of Radiology (United States); Roberts, Anne C., E-mail: acroberts@ucsd.edu [University of California San Diego Health Sciences, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Kinney, Thomas B., E-mail: tbkinney@ucsd.edu [University of California San Diego Health Sciences, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the efficacy and safety of the use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation to treat cirrhosis-related chylous collections (chylothorax and chylous ascites).MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed data from four patients treated for refractory cirrhosis-related chylous collections with TIPS at our institution over an 8 year period.ResultsOne patient had chylothorax, and three patients had concomitant chylothorax and chylous ascites. There were no major complications, and the only procedure-related complications occurred in two patients who had mild, treatable hepatic encephalopathy. All patients had improvement as defined by decreased need for thoracentesis or paracentesis, with postprocedure follow-up ranging from 19 to 491 days.ConclusionTIPS is a safe procedure that is effective in the treatment of cirrhosis-related chylous collections.

  8. Auricular hematoma cases caused by mobile phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil E. Özel, MD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report auricular hematoma cases caused by mobile phones. A 32-year-old male and a 23-year-old female presented with auricular hematoma, having no significant histories of trauma. The patients underwent simple hematoma aspiration. Hematoma re-accumulated in the first case. Incision and drainage were performed, and then auricular skin was stabilized by suturing a gauze pad over the area. Both patients recovered without sequelae after treatment. Judging from these cases, we want to postulate that prolonged mobile phone use may cause auricular hematoma.

  9. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stentshunt (TIPSS): A new nonoperative, transjugular percutaneous procedure. [Radiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, G M; Noeldge, G; Siegerstetter, V; Franke, M; Wenz, W; Palmaz, J C; Roessle, M

    1989-08-01

    In a 49-year-old male patient suffering from severe symptoms of end-stage portal hypertension and Child's stage C metabolic status, an intrahepatic stent-assisted portosystemic shunt was established for the first time exclusively by means of interventional radiology. Via transjugular access, a modified Brockenbrough needle was used to puncture the right branch of the portal vein via the right liver vein. As a target, a Dormia-basket was used that had previously been exposed in the right main portal branch. After successful puncture and balloon dilation of the artificial tract, two Palmaz stents were implanted to keep the tract permanently open. The portosystemic pressure gradient dropped from 38 to 18 mm Hg. The clinical status of the patient improved substantially during the following days. However, the patient died on day 11 after the procedure because of sudden onset of acute respiratory distress arising from acute nosocomial fungus and cytomegalovirus infection worsened by his primary immunoincompetence. Autopsy demonstrated a totally patent shunt without superficial thrombus. Microscopically, a thin endothelial layer on the inner shunt surface was found to be present. (orig.).

  10. [Renal hematomas after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor Navarro, Héctor; Carrión López, Pedro; Martínez Ruiz, Jesús; Pastor Guzmán, José Ma; Martínez Martín, Mariano; Virseda Rodríguez, Julio A

    2009-03-01

    The use of fragmentation due to shock- waves as a treatment of urinary stone was one of the most important therapeutics findings in the history of urology. It's the first election treatment for most of the calculus at renal and urethral location due to the fact that it is a low invasive treatment and it has a few number of complications, but this method also has a few negative side effects, it can caused a more or less important traumatic lesion at the organs which crosses the shock-waves, including the kidney where it can caused a small contusion or renal hematoma with different resolution and treatment. We reviewed 4815 extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy that we performed in our department in which we found six cases with subcapsular and perirenal hematoma which we followed up and treated. After the urological complications (pain, obstruction and infection) the renal and perirenal hematic collections are the most frequent adverse effects of shock-waves used in lithotripsy, these are related to the power of energy used and patient age. Between the years 1992-2007 we performed 4.815 extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy finding seven cases of severe hematoma, less then 1%. Treatment of these complications is usually not aggressive though sometimes it is necessary to perform surgical drainage and even nephrectomy.

  11. Postoperative course of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tsubone, Kyoji; Kyuma, Yoshikazu; Kuwabara, Takeo

    1983-01-01

    1) Fourty cases of chronic subdural hematoma were operated on by trephination, irrigation and external drainage. Postoperative neurological recovery and decrease of hematoma cavity on CT scan were followed. 2) Operation were effective for recovery of neurological grade in 28 cases, moderately effective in 7 cases and not effective in 5 cases. 3) Withinthe tenth postoperative day, more than half residual hematoma cavity existed in 53% of examined cases. After that, more than half residual cavity existed in only 17%. 4) Preoperative feature of neurologically unimproved cases were no definite history of head trauma and water like low density of hematoma cavity. Postoperative feature was persistence of more than three fourth of residual hematoma cavity on CT scan. 5) A group of unimproved cases described above are thought to have a feature of subdural hygroma rather than subdural hematoma. When possibility of subdural hygroma is high in preoperative differential diagnosis, indication of operation should be different from chronic subdural hematoma. (author)

  12. Risk factors for postoperative retropharyngeal hematoma after anterior cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kevin R; Neuman, Brian; Peters, Colleen; Riew, K Daniel

    2014-02-15

    Retrospective review of prospective database. To investigate risk factors involved in the development of anterior cervical hematomas and determine any impact on patient outcomes. Postoperative (PO) hematomas after anterior cervical spine surgery require urgent recognition and treatment to avoid catastrophic patient morbidity or death. Current studies of PO hematomas are limited. Cervical spine surgical procedures performed on adults by the senior author at a single academic institution from 1995 to 2012 were evaluated. Demographic data, surgical history, operative data, complications, and neck disability index (NDI) scores were recorded prospectively. Cases complicated by PO hematoma were reviewed, and time until hematoma development and surgical evacuation were determined. Patients who developed a hematoma (HT group) were compared with those that did not (no-HT group) to identify risk factors. NDI outcomes were compared at early (11 mo) time points. There were 2375 anterior cervical spine surgical procedures performed with 17 occurrences (0.7%) of PO hematoma. In 11 patients (65%) the hematoma occurred within 24 hours PO, whereas 6 patients (35%) presented at an average of 6 days postoperatively. All underwent hematoma evacuation, with 2 patients (12%) requiring emergent cricothyroidotomy. Risk factors for hematoma were found to be (1) the presence of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (relative risk = 13.2, 95% confidence interval = 3.2-54.4), (2) presence of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (relative risk = 6.8, 95% confidence interval = 2.3-20.6), (3) therapeutic heparin use (relative risk 148.8, 95% confidence interval = 91.3-242.5), (4) longer operative time, and (5) greater number of surgical levels. The occurrence of a PO hematoma was not found to have a significant impact on either early (HT: 30, no-HT: 28; P = 0.86) or late average NDI scores (HT: 28, no-HT 31; P = 0.76). With fast recognition and treatment, no long-term detriment

  13. Use of a pocket compression device for the prevention and treatment of pocket hematoma after pacemaker and defibrillator implantation (STOP-HEMATOMA-I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turagam, Mohit K; Nagarajan, Darbhamulla V; Bartus, Krzysztof; Makkar, Akash; Swarup, Vijay

    2017-08-01

    Pocket hematoma is a recognized complication after placement of cardiac implantable electronic devices and is associated with increased device infection, length of hospitalization, and morbidity especially with uninterrupted antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. We assessed the use of a post-surgical vest to decrease the incidence of pocket hematoma in patients undergoing device implantation with uninterrupted antiplatelet and anticoagulants. In this observational study, a vest was used by 20 consecutive patients who were compared to 20 age-, gender-, procedure-matched patients who received standard care. All patients were continued on antiplatelet and anticoagulants in the perioperative period. The pocket was assessed at post procedure day 0, 2, and 7, respectively. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics between both groups. Baseline mean international normalized ratio (INR) was significantly higher in the vest group when compared with the control group (2.7 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 0.3 = hematoma was significantly lower in the vest group than the control group (0 vs 30%, p = 0.02) at the end of 7 days. Control group had a total of six hematomas with one patient requiring evacuation and blood transfusion. The vest group had three hematomas on day 2 that resolved by day 7. The risk of moderate or large pocket hematoma is significantly reduced with the use of this vest in high-risk patients undergoing implantable devices on uninterrupted antiplatelet and anticoagulants.

  14. Application of electronic endoscopy and CT-guided stereotactic aspiration to intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusaka, Masahiko

    1991-01-01

    According to the development of computer technology and operative instruments, stereotactic neurosurgery became more precise, and extended as its indication. CT-guided stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma is superior operative procedure with rare complications. Using Stereotactic Aqua-Stream and Aspirator at the same time, hematoma was removed sufficiently. However, stereotactic neurosurgery had a major weak points, it was a blind operation. An endoscope (FVS-1000, M and M Co.) and SASA (Marui Medical Co.) were applied in 5 cases of intracerebral hematoma. In physiological saline, the endoscope had 32.9 deg angle of visual field, 1 mm - 25 mm depth of vision, and 16 pair/mm resolution. It was excellent ability for neurosurgery. Using for clinical cases, the bloody fluid in the hematoma cavity disturbed visibility. It was a difficult problem. Influence of bloody fluid concentration to depth of vision and resolution was investigated, and method of making clear visibility was described. (author)

  15. Complications with Outpatient Angiography and Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Noel; Chi, Ka-Kit; Ajaka, Joe; McKay, Lesa; O'Neill, Diane; Wong, Kai Ping

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively identify the complications, and rates of complication, in outpatient angiography and interventional procedures. Methods: There were 1050 consecutive patients, 646 men and 404 women, aged 17-89 years, with a total of 1239 procedures studied in a 2-year period, 1997 to 1999. Results: There were 560 cases of aorto-femoral angiography,resulting in 124 complications (22%), with pain or hematoma in 110.There were 206 cases of neck and cerebral angiography, resulting in 51 complications (25%), with pain and hematoma in 34, transient ischemic attack in 2 and cerebrovascular accident in 1. There were 197 interfentional procedures, with 177 being balloon dilatations, resulting in 68 complications (35%), with 2 having hematomas and 1 having hematoma/abscess requiring active treatment. There were 276 cases having various 'other' procedures (e.g., renal angiography),resulting in 65 complications (24%), with pain and hematoma in 61. No procedure-related death occurred. Eighteen cases (1.5%) had significant complications, with contrast allergy in eight. Conclusion: Outpatient angiography and intervention are relatively safe, with low significant complication rates

  16. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature.

  17. Delayed chest wall hematoma caused by progressive displacement of rib fractures after blunt trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rib fracture is a common injury resulting from blunt thoracic trauma. Although hemothorax and pneumothorax are known delayed complications of rib fracture, delayed chest wall hematoma has rarely been reported. We discuss the case of an 81-year-old woman who was not undergoing antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy who presented to our emergency department after a traffic injury. This patient had a nondisplaced rib fracture that went undetected on the initial computed tomography scan; the development of progressive displacement led to hemorrhagic shock due to delayed chest wall hematoma. The chest wall hematoma was effectively diagnosed and treated via contrast-enhanced computed tomography and angiographic embolization. This case highlights the possibility of this potential delayed complication from a common injury such as a rib fracture. Keywords: Angiography, Chest wall, Delayed complication, Rib fracture, Thoracic injury

  18. Is human fracture hematoma inherently angiogenic?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Street, J

    2012-02-03

    This study attempts to explain the cellular events characterizing the changes seen in the medullary callus adjacent to the interfragmentary hematoma during the early stages of fracture healing. It also shows that human fracture hematoma contains the angiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor and has the inherent capability to induce angiogenesis and thus promote revascularization during bone repair. Patients undergoing emergency surgery for isolated bony injury were studied. Raised circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor were seen in all injured patients, whereas the fracture hematoma contained significantly higher levels of vascular endothelial growth factor than did plasma from these injured patients. However, incubation of endothelial cells in fracture hematoma supernatant significantly inhibited the in vitro angiogenic parameters of endothelial cell proliferation and microtubule formation. These phenomena are dependent on a local biochemical milieu that does not support cytokinesis. The hematoma potassium concentration is cytotoxic to endothelial cells and osteoblasts. Subcutaneous transplantation of the fracture hematoma into a murine wound model resulted in new blood vessel formation after hematoma resorption. This angiogenic effect is mediated by the significant concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor found in the hematoma. This study identifies an angiogenic cytokine involved in human fracture healing and shows that fracture hematoma is inherently angiogenic. The differences between the in vitro and in vivo findings may explain the phenomenon of interfragmentary hematoma organization and resorption that precedes fracture revascularization.

  19. The Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Treatment of Portal Hypertension: Current Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Pomier-Layrargues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS represents a major advance in the treatment of complications of portal hypertension. Technical improvements and increased experience over the past 24 years led to improved clinical results and a better definition of the indications for TIPS. Randomized clinical trials indicate that the TIPS procedure is not a first-line therapy for variceal bleeding, but can be used when medical treatment fails, both in the acute situation or to prevent variceal rebleeding. The role of TIPS to treat refractory ascites is probably more justified to improve the quality of life rather than to improve survival, except for patients with preserved liver function. It can be helpful for hepatic hydrothorax and can reverse hepatorenal syndrome in selected cases. It is a good treatment for Budd Chiari syndrome uncontrollable by medical treatment. Careful selection of patients is mandatory before TIPS, and clinical followup is essential to detect and treat complications that may result from TIPS stenosis (which can be prevented by using covered stents and chronic encephalopathy (which may in severe cases justify reduction or occlusion of the shunt. A multidisciplinary approach, including the resources for liver transplantation, is always required to treat these patients.

  20. Dengue fever with rectus sheath hematoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  1. Acute intracranial hematoma formation following excision of a cervical subdural tumor: a report of two cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuexiao; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ting; Li, Guizhi; Zhang, Guoqing; Khan, Hassan; Xiang, Hongfei; Chen, Bohua

    2014-01-01

    An intracranial hematoma is a rare, yet significant, complication following spinal surgery. The authors describe two cases with acute intracranial hematoma formation after excision of a cervical subdural schwannoma. One was a 14-year-old girl who developed bilateral intracranial extradural hematomas immediately following excision of the C4 subdural schwannoma. The other was a 59-year-old woman who had an acute cerebellar hematoma after removal of the C2-C5 subdural schwannoma. During the surgeries of both cases, spinal dura was partially removed together with the tumor and the dural sac could not be repaired, resulting in large amounts of intraoperative CSF loss and persistent postoperative CSF leakage. Both patients failed to regain consciousness from anesthesia after surgery, and a cranial CT scan identified large intracranial hematomas. Urgent hematoma evacuation was ultimately performed to save the patients. Based on the authors' experience and literature review, a conclusion was drawn that considerable CSF leakage and a sharp decrease of CSF pressure are common features during the excision of a spinal subdural tumor, which may lead to acute intracranial hematomas. Continual postoperative monitoring in patients with this condition should be of a very high priority. A CT or MRI should be immediately investigated to exclude intracranial hematomas for any patient with delayed emergence from anesthesia following spinal surgery. Hematoma evacuation is indispensable once an intracranial hematoma is identified in the patient who fails to regain consciousness from anesthesia post surgery. Furthermore, the possible pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the formation of an intracranial hematoma after spinal procedures, particularly after manipulations of a cervical subdural tumor, are discussed.

  2. Effect of addition of clopidogrel to aspirin on subdural hematoma: meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheet, Majid F; Pearce, Lesly A; Hart, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Clopidogrel combined with aspirin is routinely prescribed after coronary artery stenting, in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and recently to prevent stroke in patients with acute minor ischemic stroke and TIA. Subdural hematomas are an important complication of antithrombotic treatment, but the risk associated with clopidogrel plus aspirin has not been previously defined. To quantify the risk of subdural hematoma associated with dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin. Randomized clinical trials comparing clopidogrel plus aspirin with aspirin alone were identified by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1990 to 2014, and restricted to those with more than 7 days of treatment. Two reviewers independently extracted data about subdural hematomas. Of 24 randomized trials testing clopidogrel added to aspirin, results for subdural hematoma were available for 11 trials, of which eight did not identify any subdural hematomas. The three trials reporting subdural hematomas were double-blind and included patients with recent lacunar stroke, acute coronary syndromes or atrial fibrillation with a total of 23,136 patients (mean age 66 years) and reported 39 subdural hematomas during a mean follow-up 2.1 years per patient. Clopidogrel plus aspirin was associated with a significantly increased risk of subdural hematoma compared with aspirin alone (risk ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.0, 3.8; P = 0.04; fixed effects model; I2 for heterogeneity of 0%, P = 0.51). The average absolute incidence of subdural hematoma averaged 1.1 (95% CI 0.7,1.6) per 1000 patient - years among those assigned clopidogrel plus aspirin in 11 randomized trials. The absolute rate of subdural hematoma during dual antiplatelet therapy is low, averaging 1.1 per 1000 patient-years. Chronic treatment with clopidogrel plus aspirin significantly increases the risk of subdural hematoma compared with aspirin alone. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  3. Postpartum Spontaneous Subcapsular Hepatic Hematoma Related to Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Anyfantakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcapsular hematoma of the liver represents an unusual clinical phenomenon in the pregnancy and postpartum period with serious complications in terms of fetal and maternal mortality. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old primiparous female at 36 weeks of gestation, admitted to a maternity ward of a private clinic for preeclampsia. The woman underwent an emergency caesarean section with the extraction of an alive foetus. A few hours after delivery, she was transferred to the emergency department of our institution complaining of severe epigastric pain. Diagnostic work-up was suggestive of a subcapsular right lob hepatic hematoma which was successfully managed conservatively. Timely diagnosis is necessary for the prevention of life-threatening events in mother and fetus. For this reason acute care physicians have to be vigilant of the condition and consider this in the differential diagnosis of epigastric pain during pregnancy and postpartum.

  4. Outcome in Chronic Subdural Hematoma After Subdural vs. Subgaleal Drain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishfaq, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcome after surgery for chronic subdural hematoma when the drain is placed in subdural space or subgaleal space. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Lahore, from July 2015 to June 2016. Methodology: Patients with chronic subdural hematoma of both genders and age, ranging between 55 to 85 years, were included. Patients on antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy and acute on chronic subdural hematoma were excluded. Patients were divided in two equal groups each depending on whether drain was placed in subgaleal space (Group 1), and subdual space (Group 2), (n=31 patients each). Patients were positioned flat in bed after surgery. Clinical and radiological parameters and clinical outcome were compared between the two groups. Statistical test with significance of p <0.05 was utilized using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS version 17). Results: Median age of the 62 patients was 72 +-12.5 years. Headache was the most common symptom reported in both groups, (n=47,75.8%) patients. Median thickness of hematoma was 15 +-6.5 mm. Patients with subdural drain placement had more complications such as pneumocephalus 11 (35.4%) vs. 6 (19.3%), and intracerebral hemorrhage 4 (12.9%) vs. 2 (6.4%). Clinical outcome was good in both groups 27 (87%) in Group 1 and 28 (90%) in Group 2. Conclusion: Patients of both groups had good outcome after surgery. Complications like pneumocephalus and intracerebral hemorrhage were more common in subdural location of drain, though not reaching statistically significance level to favor one technique over another. (author)

  5. Parkinsonsim due to a Chronic Subdural Hematoma

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    Bosuk Park

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of parkinsonism. We present the case of a 78-year-old man with right-side dominant parkinsonism about 3 months after a minor head injury. MRI reveals a chronic subdural hematoma on the left side with mildly displaced midline structures. The parkinsonian features were almost completely disappeared after neurosurgical evacuation of the hematoma without any anti-parkinson drug.

  6. Parkinsonsim due to a Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bosuk; Song, Sook Keun; Hong, Jin Yong; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2009-01-01

    Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of parkinsonism. We present the case of a 78-year-old man with right-side dominant parkinsonism about 3 months after a minor head injury. MRI reveals a chronic subdural hematoma on the left side with mildly displaced midline structures. The parkinsonian features were almost completely disappeared after neurosurgical evacuation of the hematoma without any anti-parkinson drug. PMID:24868353

  7. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimal management of hemophilic arthropathy and hematomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobet S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sébastien Lobet,1,2 Cedric Hermans,1 Catherine Lambert1 1Hemostasis-Thrombosis Unit, Division of Hematology, 2Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium Abstract: Hemophilia is a hematological disorder characterized by a partial or complete deficiency of clotting factor VIII or IX. Its bleeding complications primarily affect the musculoskeletal system. Hemarthrosis is a major hemophilia-related complication, responsible for a particularly debilitating chronic arthropathy, in the long term. In addition to clotting factor concentrates, usually prescribed by the hematologist, managing acute hemarthrosis and chronic arthropathy requires a close collaboration between the orthopedic surgeon and physiotherapist. This collaboration, comprising a coagulation and musculoskeletal specialist, is key to effectively preventing hemarthrosis, managing acute joint bleeding episodes, assessing joint function, and actively treating chronic arthropathy. This paper reviews, from a practical point of view, the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilia-induced arthropathy for hematologists, orthopedic surgeons, and physiotherapists. Keywords: hemophilia, arthropathy, hemarthrosis, hematoma, physiotherapy, target joint

  9. Diffusion-weighted MRI in the diagnosis of intracranial hematomas

    OpenAIRE

    Şanlı, Davut; Ünal, Özkan; Bora, Aydın; Beyazal, Mehmet; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Avcu, Serhat

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. To determinate the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in intracerebral hematomas, epidural hematomas, subdural hematomas, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, and to assess the contribution of diffusion signal characteristics in the differentiation of hematoma stages. In this prospective study, consecutive 67 patients (range: 3-89 years), 35 (18 men 17 women) with intracerebral hematoma, 18 (10 men 8 women) with subdural hematoma, 2 (1 man 1 woman) with epidural hematom...

  10. Clinical appraisal of stereotactic hematoma aspiration surgery for hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Koji; Matsumoto, Keizo

    1992-01-01

    Three hundred and four patients with hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage were managed by medical treatment, ventricular drainage, or CT-controlled stereotactic aspiration surgery (AS). The therapeutic results of the 6-month outcome were analyzed and correlated with the volume of the hematoma. A hematoma volume of 20 ml was thought to be the critical size in determining whether the outcome would be favorable or unfavorable. Indications for AS are suggested as follows. In patients with a small-sized hematoma having a volume of less than 10 ml use of AS should be restricted to patients with severe paralysis or other neurological complications and the elderly (aged 70 years or older). For patients with a medium-sized hematoma having a volume between 10 ml and 20 ml, AS is indicated for patients having severe paralysis and disturbances of consciousness. For patients with a large-sized hematoma having a volume of 20 ml or more, AS increases not only the survival rate of patients but also reduces the number of bedridden patients. We conclude that AS opens up a new avenue of surgical treatment for hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage, which has been no indication for hematoma evacuation by conventional craniotomy. (author)

  11. Angiosarcoma Arising in Chronic Expanding Hematoma: Five Cases of an Underrecognized Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgert-Lon, Christine E; Riddle, Nicole D; Lackman, Richard D; Evenski, Andrea J; Brooks, John S J

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the etiology or pathogenesis of angiosarcoma (AS). We describe a series of 5 cases of AS arising in chronic expanding hematomas. Inclusion criteria were the presence of a hematoma of at least 1-year duration and a thick fibrous wall surrounding the hematoma. Patients were 4 men and 1 woman; ages ranged from 43 to 71 years. Locations were the thigh (3), chest wall (1), and pelvic soft tissue involving the ischial bone (1). Hematoma duration ranged from 2 to 25 years. All cases had large cystic hematomas >10 cm; 2 had prior radiation. Thick fibrous walls surrounded the hematomas, with foci of hemosiderin and foamy histiocytes. Wall thickness ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 cm and varied within lesions. All AS were epithelioid, and in 3 cases the tumor invaded through the cyst wall. Immunoreactive nuclear c-myc was noted in 3/3 cases available for testing. Follow-up disclosed 4 patients developed metastatic disease, 3 of whom died of disease, 4, 8, and 15 months after diagnosis; the fourth patient is alive without disease after chemotherapy at 59 months. One patient without metastases is alive without disease 18 months after diagnosis; this tumor was confined to the cyst without penetration through the wall. We identified 4 similar cases in the literature, 3 as individual case reports (all epithelioid AS), and 1 as part of a series of AS. To our knowledge, this is the first series of AS arising in chronic expanding hematomas. Recognition of this unusual complication should alert clinicians to provide periodic clinical follow-up to these patients and to biopsy any case with sudden or uncontrolled enlargement. We recommend that excised chronic hematomas be well sampled histologically to search for AS and, if identified, to determine its extent and invasiveness.

  12. Evaluation of Oral Anticoagulant-Associated Intracranial Parenchymal Hematomas Using CT Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, E; Beyhan, M; Acu, B

    2015-06-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most serious and lethal complications of anticoagulants with a reported incidence of 5-18.5 %. Computed tomographic (CT) findings, should be carefully studied because early diagnosis and treatment of oral anticoagulant use-associated hematomas are vitally important. In the present study, CT findings of intraparenchymal hematomas associated with anticoagulant and antihypertensive use are presented. This study included 45 patients (25 men, 20 women) under anticoagulant (21 patients) or antihypertensive (24 patients) treatment who had brain CT examinations due to complaints and findings suggesting cerebrovascular disease during July 2010-October 2013 period. CT examinations were performed to determine hematoma volumes and presence of swirl sign, hematocrit effect, mid-line shift effect, and intraventricular extension. The patients were 40-89 years of age. In four cases, a total of 51 intraparenchymal hematomas (42 cerebral, 7 cerebellar and 2 brain stem) were detected in multiple foci. Hematoma volumes varied from 0.09 to 284.00 ml. Swirl sign was observed in 87.5 and 63.0 % of OAC-associated ICHs and non-OAC-associated ICHs, respectively. In addition, hematocrit effect was observed in 41.6 % of OAC-associated and in 3.7 % of non-OAC-associated ICHs. Volume increases were observed in all 19 hematomas where swirl sign was detected, and follow-up CT scanning was conducted. Mortality of OAC-associated ICHs was correlated with initial volumes of hematoma, mid-line shift amount, and intraventricular extension. Detection of hematocrit effect by CT scanning of intracranial hematomas should be cautionary in oral anticoagulant use, while detection of swirl sign should be suggestive of active hemorrhage.

  13. Computed tomography of isodense subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jae Won; Kim, Ock Dong; Woo, Won Hyung

    1983-01-01

    Most subdural hematomas with significant differed attenuation from that of adjacent brain tissue can be accurately diagnosed by CT. Difficulty arises when the hematoma is isodense that is exhibited similar attenuation to that of brain. Unilateral isodense subdural hematoma can be identified by indirect sign such as mass effect. Occasionally, the use of intravenous contrast material to aid in identifying isodense subdural hematomas has met with variable success. Moreover, bilateral isodense subdural hematoma may be more difficult. We therefore considered it of interest to evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of CT in isodense subdural hematomas. We have analysed 13 cases surgically provened cases of isodense subdural hematoma examined at Korea General Hospital from October 1981 to April 1982. The results were as follows: 1. One hundred twenty seven cases of subdural hematomas were studied by CT, 13 cases (10.2%) of which were isodense. 2. The age distribution was from 29 years to 69 years and mean age was 52 years. The sex ratio was 11 male to 2 female. 3. Seven (53.8%) of 13 cases has a history of head trauma. 4. The time interval which subdural hematoma became isodense was from 1 week to 4 months and peak time interval was from 1 week to 3 weeks. 5. The precontrast CT scan of isodense subdural hematoma appeared shifting of midline structure, compression and deformity of the ventricles in all 13 cases, effacement of cerebral sulci in 10 cases (76.9%) and dilatation of contralateral ventricles in 4 cases (30.8%). 6. The postcontrast CT scan demonstrated enhancement of the medial margin of the lession in 4 (30.8%) of 13 cases and displacement of cortical vein away from the inner table of the skull in 3 (23.1%) of 13 cases. 7. Bilateral isodense subdural hematomas were 2 (15.4%) of 13 cases

  14. The initial experience of transjugular retrieval of Geunther Tulip inferior vena cava filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Liang; Shen Jing; Tong Jiajie; Li Haiwei; Xu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the indications and technical procedures of transjugular retrieval of Geunther Tulip inferior vena cava filters. Methods: Seventy-four patients (40 males and 34 females with a mean age of 45.8 years) with acute lower extremity deep venous thrombosis encountered in our hospital from September 2007 to Mar 2009 were involved in this study. The onset of the disease was from one day to 14 days. Clinical symptoms included swelling, pain, cyanosis or pallescence of the affected limb with higher or normal skin temperature. Thirty-one patients who complicated with pulmonary embolism suffered from dyspnoea, chest pain, hemoptysis, etc. Implantation of Geunther Tulip retrievable inferior vena cava filters through femoral or right internal jugular vein was carried out, which was followed by intravenous transcatheter thrombolysis. Vascular ultrasound and angiography showed no fresh or free thrombus in 12-80 days after initial treatment, then the Geunther Tulip filter was taken out from right internal jugular vein, and inferior vena cavography was performed again. All patients accepted anticoagulation and antibiotic treatment for 3-5 days after operation. A follow-up lasting for 4-12 months was made. Results: Successful implantation of Geunther Tulip retrievable inferior vena cava filter with only one session was obtained in all 74 patients. During implantation procedure one filter became tilted 25 degrees. Successful removal of Geunther Tulip retrievable inferior vena cava filter was achieved in 40 patients in 41.3 days (12-80 days) after the filter was delivered, and the procedure cost only 5.8 minutes (1-115 minutes) with a successful rate of 97.6% (40/41). Failure of retrieval of IVC filter due to compact adhesion of the filter to IVC wall happened in one patient. Inferior vena cavography again confirmed that there was no any sign of vascular perforation or rupture. Retrieval of IVC filter was not performed in other 33 patients and no clinical

  15. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for severe jaundice in patients with acute Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fu-Liang; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Fan, Zhen-Hua; Zhao, Meng-Fei; Dai, Shan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Liu, Fu-Quan

    2015-02-28

    To evaluate the feasibility of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for severe jaundice secondary to acute Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). From February 2009 to March 2013, 37 patients with severe jaundice secondary to acute BCS were treated. Sixteen patients without hepatic venule, hepatic veins (HV) obstruction underwent percutaneous angioplasty of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and/or HVs. Twenty-one patients with HV occlusion underwent TIPS. Serum bilirubin, liver function, demographic data and operative data of the two groups of patients were analyzed. Twenty-one patients underwent TIPS and the technical success rate was 100%, with no technical complications. Sixteen patients underwent recanalization of the IVC and/or HVs and the technical success rate was 100%. The mean procedure time for TIPS was 84.0±12.11 min and angioplasty was 44.11±5.12 min (Pjaundice in either group. Severe jaundice is not a contraindication for TIPS in patients with acute BCS and TIPS is appropriate for severe jaundice due to BCS.

  16. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for the treatment of Budd-Chiari syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Guohong; He Chuangye; Yin Zhanxin; Meng Xiangjie; Wang Jianhong; Zhang Hongbo; Zhou Xinming; Wu Kaichun; Ding Jie; Fan Daiming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: 14 patients with clinical findings of progressive liver function abnormality and severe complication of portal hypertension (upper gastrointestinal bleeding and refractory ascites)were diagnosed as BCS. Based on imaging manifestations, these patients were classified as follows: obstruction of inferior vena cava (1 case); obstruction of hepatic veins (5 cases); combined obstruction (obstruction of hepatic veins and inferior vena cava)(8 cases). During the procedure, different puncture points were selected for fulfilling the real condition; including 7 cases from hepatic vein to portal vein; 4 cases from inferior vena cava to hepatic vein, 4 cases from the right hepatic vein to portal vein. After the operation, the follow-up evaluation of blood flow in the shunt was performed. Results: All of these patients were successfully performed with TIPS, with average pressure of portal vein decreasing from (4.9 ± 1.4) KPa to(3.2 ± 1.5) KPa. After 5 to 64 mouths follow-up, the recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in two patients due to stent stenosis and were well controlled through balloon angioplasty. Conclusions: TIPS is an effective treatment for BCS with progressive liver dysfunction or severe portal hypertension with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and refractory ascites. In addition, it also contributes to the treatment of the recurrent or severe portal hypertension after the inferior vena cava or hepatic vein angioplasty. (authors)

  17. Radiologic follow-up of the transjugular intrahepatic stent-shunt (TIPSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Noeldge, G.; Leutloff, U.; Radeleff, B.; Richter, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic stent-shunt (TIPSS) is a well accepted minimal invasive therapy for complications of portal hypertension: recurrent variceal bleeding, refractory ascites and liver failure due to the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The high frequency of shunt stenoses and occlusions makes regular follow up examinations essential. Despite modern non invasive imaging methods direct portography still is the gold standard for shunt surveillance in TIPSS. Ultrasound is helpful to detect shunt dysfunction, but nevertheless its failure rate is considerable despite the use of contrast enhancers such as Levovist because of anatomic and physical limitations, particularly when TIPSS-tracts deep in the liver are present. Reintervention rates approach 90-100% after 24 months, with 100% in child's A patients with comparatively good liver function. However, a strict shunt surveillance program with early portography and reintervention when necessary guarantees high clinical success rates associated with very low rebleeding rates below 10%. Overall the secondary success rate is 80%. Secondary failures are mainly caused by lack of patient compliance during follow-up. In a subgroup of patients no shunt maturation is observed, requiring multiple shunt revisions. In cases of recurrent shunt occlusions an association with bile leaks is presumed. In selected cases patients with chronically recurrent shunt stenosis or occlusions may benefit from placement of TIPSS stent grafts. (orig.) [de

  18. Subdural drainage versus subperiosteal drainage in burr-hole trepanation for symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellut, David; Woernle, Christoph Michael; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kockro, Ralf Alfons; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Krayenbühl, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (scSDH) is one of the most frequent diseases in neurosurgical practice, and its incidence is increasing. However, treatment modalities are still controversial. The aim of this retrospective single-center study is to compare for the first time two surgical methods in the treatment of subdural hematoma that have been proven to be efficient in previous studies in a direct comparison. We analyzed the data of 143 scSDHs in 113 patients undergoing surgery for subdural hematoma with placement of subperiosteal or subdural drainage after double burr-hole trepanation for hematoma evacuation. Overall, there were no statistically significant differences regarding general patient characteristics, preoperative and postoperative symptoms, postoperative hematoma remnant, rates of recurrences, mortality, complications, and outcome at discharge and at 3-month follow up between the groups. There was a close to significant tendency of lower mortality after placement of subperiosteal drainage system and a tendency towards lower rate of recurrent hematoma after placement of subdural drainage system. Our study shows for the first time a direct comparison of two mainly used surgical techniques in the treatment of scSDH. Both methods proved to be highly effective, and general patient data, complications, outcome and mortality of both groups are equal or superior compared with previously published series. Because there is a clear tendency to less mortality and fewer serious complications, treatment with double burr-hole trepanation, irrigation, and placement of subperiosteal drainage is our treatment of choice in patients with predictable high risk of complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MRI findings of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyeon Jo; Baek, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yun Suk; Jeong, Sun Ok; Park, Hyun Joo; Jo, Jin Man [Dae rim St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae [Inha General Hospital, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    To describe the MR imaging findings of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of six patients, with symptoms of acute spinal cord or cauda equena compression after trauma, together with spinal subdural hematoma. We analyzed the extent, location, configuration and signal intensity of the lesions. In five of sex cases, hematomas were distributed extensively throughout the thoracolumbosacral or lumbosacral spinal levels. In five cases they were located in the dorsal portion of the thecal sac, and in one case, in the ventral portion. On axial images, hematomas showed a concave or convex contour, depending on the amount of loculated hematoma. A lobulated appearance was due to limitation of free extension of the hematoma within the subdural space at the lateral sites (nerve root exist zone) at whole spine levels, and at the posteromedian site under lumbar 4-5 levels. In cases of spinal subdural hematoma, the lobulated appearance of hematoma loculation in the subdural space that bounds the lateral sites at al spinal levels and at the posteromedian site under L4-5 levels is a characteristic finding. (author)

  20. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, John C.; Jones, Blaise V.; Crone, Kerry R.

    2008-01-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma. (orig.)

  1. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neely, John C. [Marshall University School of Medicine, Huntington, WV (United States); Jones, Blaise V. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Crone, Kerry R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma. (orig.)

  2. Intra-uterine hematoma in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, K; Nøhr, S; Nielsen, P H

    1991-01-01

    In 60 patients with a live fetus and an intra-uterine hematoma (IUH) proven by ultrasonic scanning the outcome of pregnancy was spontaneous abortion in 12% and premature delivery in 10%. No correlation between the outcome of the pregnancy and the maximum size of the hematoma or the week...

  3. Parâmetros dopplervelocimétricos na avaliação da perviedade da anastomose portossistêmica intra-hepática transjugular (TIPS Dopplerflowmetric patterns for evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt patency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sergio Zafred Marcelino

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A anastomose portossistêmica intra-hepática transjugular (TIPS é um procedimento intervencionista minimamente invasivo realizado pela introdução de prótese metálica auto-expansível no parênquima hepático, via transjugular. Tem por objetivo tratar as complicações da hipertensão portal, principalmente a hemorragia digestiva alta e a ascite refratária. A estenose é complicação freqüente, embora o procedimento seja eficaz e com baixo índice de insucesso. O diagnóstico precoce da estenose é de fundamental importância, pois interfere no tipo de tratamento a ser realizado e o reaparecimento dos sintomas pode ser grave. O ultra-som Doppler é então utilizado para o seguimento dos pacientes portadores do TIPS, e vários parâmetros são descritos na literatura para o diagnóstico de estenose, como: as velocidades mínima e máxima no interior da prótese, a velocidade na veia porta, o gradiente de velocidade entre dois pontos da prótese, e outros. Infelizmente não há consenso sobre qual parâmetro ou conjunto de parâmetros é mais eficaz no diagnóstico, porque os protocolos de avaliação variam de instituição para instituição. Os autores realizaram uma revisão dos parâmetros de estenose descritos na literatura e de outros aspectos de fundamental importância na compreensão do procedimento, como as indicações, as contra-indicações e a fisiopatologia da estenose.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS is a minimally invasive interventional procedure that consists of placement of an auto expandable metallic stent in the hepatic parenchyma via transjugular. It is used to treat the complications of portal hypertension, particularly digestive bleeding of gullet varices and refractory ascites. Although TIPS is an efficient procedure with low rate of failure some complications such as stenosis are frequent. Early diagnosis of stenosis is mandatory since it interferes with the type of treatment and the

  4. Traumatic subdural hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jenn-Yeu; Chen, Yu-Hao; Hung, Kuang-Chen; Chang, Ti-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is rare and its mechanism remains unclear. This intervention describes a patient with mental retardation who was suffering from back pain and progressive weakness of the lower limbs following a traffic accident. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a lumbar subdural lesion. Hematoma was identified in the spinal subdural space during an operation. The muscle power of both lower limbs recovered to normal after surgery. The isolated traumatic spinal subdural hematoma was not associated with intracranial subdural hemorrhage. A spinal subdural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression, especially for patients who have sustained spinal trauma. Emergency surgical decompression is usually the optimal treatment for a spinal subdural hematoma with acute deterioration and severe neurological deficits. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) with use of Roesch-Uchida transjugular liver access set; Evaluation by CT and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Motoichiro; Okawada, Taketoshi; Kato, Ryoichi; Mochizuki, Takao; Ohkawa, Yoshihisa; Kaneko, Masao [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Ke, Xu; Hanguo, Zhang; Fangxian, He

    1992-12-01

    Appropriateness of the Roesch-Uchida transjugular liver access set designed for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPSS) procedure was confirmed, especially about the catheter angle and effective length of the 20 G puncture needle, by CT analysis on three dimensional vascular anatomy of the liver. Clinically, TIPSS using the set was successfully made for two patients, connecting superior right hepatic vein with right portal vein in one patient and middle hepatic vein with left portal vein in another patient with hypoplastic right portal vein. Prior to TIPSS procedure, verification of vascular anatomy on CT images is the key to success of TIPSS in safe. (author).

  6. Spontaneous sublingual and intramural small-bowel hematoma in a patient on oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Moftah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous sublingual hematoma and intramural small bowel hematoma are rare and serious complications of anticoagulant therapy. Though previously reported individually, there has been no previous report of the same two complications occurring in a single patient. A 71-year-old Caucasian man, who was on warfarin for atrial fibrillation, presented with difficulty in swallowing due to a sublingual hematoma. He was observed in our intensive care unit, his warfarin was held and he recovered with conservative management. He represented two months later with a two day history of abdominal pain and distension. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT scan now showed small bowel obstruction due to intramural small bowel hematoma and haemorrhagic ascites. Again, this was treated expectantly with a good outcome. In conclusion, life threatening haemorrhagic complications of oral anticoagulant therapy can recur. Conservative treatment is successful in most cases, but an accurate diagnosis is mandatory to avoid unnecessary surgery. CT scan is the investigation of choice for the diagnosis of suspected haemorrhagic complications of over coagulation.

  7. TIPS - anastomose portossistêmica intra-hepática transjugular. Revisão TIPS - transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson CARREIRO

    2001-01-01

    -expansiva.At the present time several therapeutic options are used for the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices in patients with portal hypertension. We will review the main medical publications on transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS, a procedure seldom used among us. TIPS works as a portocaval side-to-side shunt and decreases the risk of esophageal bleeding through lowering of the portal system pressure and a decrease of the portal hepatic pressure gradient. TIPS consists in the percutaneous insertion, through the internal jugular vein, of a metallic stent under fluoroscopic control in the hepatic parenchyma creating a true porta caval communication. There are several studies demonstrating the efficacy of TIPS, although only a few of them are randomized and control-matched to allow us to conclude that this procedure is safe, efficient and with a good cost benefit ratio. In this review, we search for the analysis of the TIPS utilization, its techniques, its major indications and complications. TIPS has been used in cases of gastroesophageal bleeding that has failed with pharmacologic or endoscopic treatment in patients Child-Pugh B and C. It can be used also as a bridge for liver transplantation. Others indications for TIPS are uncontrolled ascites, hepatic renal syndrome, and hepatic hydrotorax. The main early complications of TIPS using are related to the insertion site and hepatic encephalopathy and the stent occlusion is the chief late complication.

  8. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazuko; Sorimachi, Takatoshi; Honda, Yumie; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2017-09-01

    Sex differences in various diseases recently have been recognized as an important factor in the approach to more efficient preventive and therapeutic medicine. We clarified sex differences in the clinical characteristics of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) by comparing men and women with CSDH, as there is a well-known male predominance in the prevalence of CSDH. Clinical factors and computed tomography findings were investigated retrospectively in 490 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital between 2006 and 2015 who were diagnosed with CSDH. On univariate analysis, women were significantly older than men (P hematoma, and death as outcomes at discharge were significantly more frequent than in men (P < 0.05). In contrast, women had less frequent instances of good recovery and less alcohol intake (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated female sex as an independent predictor of consciousness disturbance at admission. Female sex also was identified as a predictor of death at discharge. We demonstrated sex differences in the clinical characteristics of CSDH. In the future, management of patients with CSDH with regard to sex differences in disease characteristics could be expected to improve the outcomes of women, which have been worse than in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hematoma epidural lombar pós-cirurgico em paciente com leucemia: relato de caso Hematoma epidural lumbar posquirúrgico en paciente con leucemia: relato de caso Postoperative lumbar epidural hematoma in a patient with leukemia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Pasqualini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A ocorrência de hematoma epidural como complicação pós-cirúrgica é relativamente baixa. O reconhecimento dessa patologia no diagnóstico diferencial nas paraplegias pós-cirúrgicas imediatas e o tratamento precoce por meio de intervenção cirúrgica com a descompressão do canal são fatores que estão diretamente relacionados à melhora do quadro neurológico. Este relato de caso é de um hematoma epidural no pós-operatório imediato de descompressão por estenose do canal vertebral lombar em paciente com leucemia.La ocurrencia de hematoma epidural, como complicación posquirúrgica, es relativamente baja. El reconocimiento de esa patología, en el diagnóstico diferencial en las paraplejías posquirúrgicas inmediatas y el tratamiento precoz por medio de intervención quirúrgica con la descompresión del canal, son factores que se relacionan directamente con la mejoría del cuadro neurológico. Este relato de caso es de un hematoma epidural en el posoperatorio inmediato, después de descompresión, por estenosis, del canal vertebral lumbar en paciente con leucemia.The occurrence of epidural hematoma as a postoperative complication is relatively low. The recognition of this condition in the differential diagnosis in the immediate postoperative paraplegia and the early surgical decompression are directly related with neurological improvement. We report a case of epidural hematoma in the early postoperative period of surgical decompression of the lumbar spinal canal, in a patient with leukemia.

  10. Supratentorial hematoma during infratentorial surgery: A short series of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Mohindra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant site hematoma formation may complicate an otherwise uneventful surgery. The authors describe three cases of such unexpected complications, while operating upon infratentorial lesions in prone position. Pathophysiology behind such complications and changes in intraoperative monitoring is discussed, along with all the previously reported cases. Of the three cases, there was one death, while rest of the two cases made eventless recovery. Meticulous hemostasis, isolation of operative site, avoidance of cerebrospinal fluid over-drainage during surgery may prevent such a complication. Careful interpretation of vital-monitoring may indicate the occurrence of such a complication.

  11. Adrenal hemorrhage presenting as a scrotal hematoma in the newborn: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarci, Erbu; Arayici, Sema; Sari, Fatma Nur; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Uras, Nurdan; Dilmen, Ugur

    2015-06-01

    Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage is uncommon. It is present in 0,2% of newborns. Ten percent of the cases occur bilaterally. It can be associated with birth trauma, large birth weight, or neonatal course complicated by hypoxia and asphyxia, hypotension, or coagulopathy. Scrotal hematoma is an extremely rare manifestation of NAH. Most patients present scrotal swelling with bluish discolouration. Scrotal swelling with/without bluish discoloration in newborns may result from different causes. We report an unusual case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage secondary to perinatal asphyxia, associated with SH. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage and scrotal hematoma were diagnosed by ultrasonography and treated by conservative treatment, avoiding unnecessary surgical exploration.

  12. Cortical enhancement in chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Sato, Jun; Makita, Tadatoshi; Hayashi, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Norio.

    1981-01-01

    In the CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma, brain enhancement adjacent to a subdural hematoma was seen occasionally after the injection of a contrast material. The authors called this finding ''cortical enhancement'', and 35 cases of chronic subdural hematoma were studied concerning cortical enhancement in relation to age, clinical signs and symptoms, hematoma density, and volume of the hematoma. Eight cases out of the 35 were subjected to measurements of the regional cerebral blood flow preoperatively by the method of the carotid injection of Xe-133. Cortical enhancement was apt to be seen in the cases which revealed intracranial hypertension or disturbance of consciousness, in isodensity or mixed-density hematomas, and in huge subdural hematomas. There was no specific correlation with age distribution. The pathogenesis of cortical enhancement seemed to be the result of cerebral compression with an increase in the contrast material per unit of volume and a prolonged venous outflow from the hemisphere, but no characteristic feature was detected in the average regional cerebral blood flow in our cases. (author)

  13. Hematoma Expansion Following Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H. Bart; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage, the most devastating form of stroke, has no specific therapy proven to improve outcome by randomized controlled trial. Location and baseline hematoma volume are strong predictors of mortality, but are non-modifiable by the time of diagnosis. Expansion of the initial hematoma is a further marker of poor prognosis that may be at least partly preventable. Several risk factors for hematoma expansion have been identified, including baseline ICH volume, early presentation after symptom onset, anticoagulation, and the CT angiography spot sign. Although the biological mechanisms of hematoma expansion remain unclear, accumulating evidence supports a model of ongoing secondary bleeding from ruptured adjacent vessels surrounding the initial bleeding site. Several large clinical trials testing therapies aimed at preventing hematoma expansion are in progress, including aggressive blood pressure reduction, treatment with recombinant factor VIIa guided by CT angiography findings, and surgical intervention for superficial hematomas without intraventricular extension. Hematoma expansion is so far the only marker of outcome that is amenable to treatment and thus a potentially important therapeutic target. PMID:23466430

  14. Transjugular balloon mitral valvotomy in a patient with severe kyphoscoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV performed by the conventional transfemoral approach can be difficult or even impossible in the presence of structural impediments such as severe kyphoscoliosis, gross cardiac anatomic distortion and inferior vena caval anomalies. A 25-year-old woman with severe thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis due to poliomyelitis presented with symptomatic rheumatic mitral valve stenosis. After the failure of transfemoral BMV, the procedure was attempted from the right jugular access, using a modified septal puncture technique. The left atrium was entered from the jugular access and the mitral valve was crossed and dilated successfully using over the wire balloon technique. Transjugular BMV is an effective alternative in patients with kyphoscoliotic spine that preclude transfemoral approach. The detailed technique used for the procedure, its advantages as well as the other percutaneous treatment options are also discussed.

  15. Age determination of soft tissue hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumayer, Bernhard; Hassler, Eva; Petrovic, Andreas; Widek, Thomas; Ogris, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2014-11-01

    In clinical forensic medicine, the estimation of the age of injuries such as externally visible subcutaneous hematomas is important for the reconstruction of violent events, particularly to include or exclude potential suspects. Since the estimation of the time of origin based on external inspection is unreliable, the aim of this study was to use contrast in MRI to develop an easy-to-use model for hematoma age estimation. In a longitudinal study, artificially created subcutaneous hematomas were repetitively imaged using MRI over a period of two weeks. The hemorrhages were created by injecting autologous blood into the subcutaneous tissue of the thigh in 20 healthy volunteers. For MRI, standard commercially available sequences, namely proton-density-weighted, T2 -weighted and inversion recovery sequences, were used. The hematomas' MRI data were analyzed regarding their contrast behavior using the most suitable sequences to derive a model allowing an objective estimation of the age of soft tissue hematomas. The Michelson contrast between hematoma and muscle in the proton-density-weighted sequence showed an exponentially decreasing behavior with a dynamic range of 0.6 and a maximum standard deviation of 0.1. The contrast of the inversion recovery sequences showed increasing characteristics and was hypointense for TI = 200ms and hyperintense for TI =1000ms. These sequences were used to create a contrast model. The cross-validation of the model finally yielded limits of agreement for hematoma age determination (corresponding to ±1.96 SD) of ±38.7h during the first three days and ±54 h for the entire investigation period. The developed model provides lookup tables which allow for the estimation of a hematoma's age given a single contrast measurement applicable by a radiologist or a forensic physician. This is a first step towards an accurate and objective dating method for subcutaneous hematomas, which will be particularly useful in child abuse. Copyright © 2014 John

  16. Ultraearly hematoma growth in active intracerebral hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscojuela, Pilar; Rubiera, Marta; Hill, Michael D.; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Aviv, Richard I.; Silva, Yolanda; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Lum, Cheemun; Czlonkowska, Anna; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Kase, Carlos S.; Gubitz, Gord; Bhatia, Rohit; Padma, Vasantha; Roy, Jayanta; Tomasello, Alejandro; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Molina, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of ultraearly hematoma growth (uHG) with the CT angiography (CTA) spot sign, hematoma expansion, and clinical outcomes in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: We analyzed data from 231 patients enrolled in the multicenter Predicting Haematoma Growth and Outcome in Intracerebral Haemorrhage Using Contrast Bolus CT study. uHG was defined as baseline ICH volume/onset-to-CT time (mL/h). The spot sign was used as marker of active hemorrhage. Outcome parameters included significant hematoma expansion (>33% or >6 mL, primary outcome), rate of hematoma expansion, early neurologic deterioration, 90-day mortality, and poor outcome. Results: uHG was higher in spot sign patients (p 4.7 mL/h (p = 0.002) and the CTA spot sign (p = 0.030) showed effects on rate of hematoma expansion but not its interaction (2-way analysis of variance, p = 0.477). uHG >4.7 mL/h improved the sensitivity of the spot sign in the prediction of significant hematoma expansion (73.9% vs 46.4%), early neurologic deterioration (67.6% vs 35.3%), 90-day mortality (81.6% vs 44.9%), and poor outcome (72.8% vs 29.8%), respectively. uHG was independently related to significant hematoma expansion (odds ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval 1.03–1.10) and clinical outcomes. Conclusions: uHG is a useful predictor of hematoma expansion and poor clinical outcomes in patients with acute ICH. The combination of high uHG and the spot sign is associated with a higher rate of hematoma expansion, highlighting the need for very fast treatment in ICH patients. PMID:27343067

  17. Combined transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and other interventions for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin; Zhao, Meng-Fei; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Wang, Lei; Fan, Zhen-Hua; He, Fu-Liang; Dai, Shan; Yao, Jian-Nan; Liu, Fu-Quan

    2015-11-21

    To evaluate combination transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) and other interventions for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and portal hypertension. Two hundred and sixty-one patients with HCC and portal hypertension underwent TIPS combined with other interventional treatments (transarterial chemoembolization/transarterial embolization, radiofrequency ablation, hepatic arterio-portal fistulas embolization, and splenic artery embolization) from January 1997 to January 2010 at Beijing Shijitan Hospital. Two hundred and nine patients (121 male and 88 female, aged 25-69 years, mean 48.3 ± 12.5 years) with complete clinical data were recruited. We evaluated the safety of the procedure (procedure-related death and serious complications), change of portal vein pressure before and after TIPS, symptom relief [e.g., ascites, hydrothorax, esophageal gastric-fundus variceal bleeding (EGVB)], cumulative rates of survival, and distributary channel restenosis. The characteristics of the patients surviving ≥ 5 and portal hypertension symptoms were ameliorated. During the 5 year follow-up, the total recurrence rate of resistant ascites or hydrothorax was 7.2% (15/209); 36.8% (77/209) for EGVB; and 39.2% (82/209) for hepatic encephalopathy. The cumulative rates of distributary channel restenosis at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years were 17.2% (36/209), 29.7% (62/209), 36.8% (77/209), 45.5% (95/209) and 58.4% (122/209), respectively. No procedure-related deaths and serious complications (e.g., abdominal bleeding, hepatic failure, and distant metastasis) occurred. Moreover, Child-Pugh score, portal vein tumor thrombosis, lesion diameter, hepatic arterio-portal fistulas, HCC diagnosed before or after TIPS, stent type, hepatic encephalopathy, and type of other interventional treatments were related to 5 year survival after comparing patient characteristics. TIPS combined with other interventional treatments seems to be safe and efficacious in patients with HCC and portal

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jonathan K.; Al-Tariq, Quazi Z.; Zaw, Taryar M.; Raman, Steven S.; Lu, David S.K.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeTo assess radiofrequency (RF) ablation efficacy, as well as the patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPSs), in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsRetrospective database review of patients with pre-existing TIPS undergoing RF ablation of HCC was conducted over a 159-month period ending in November 2013. TIPS patency pre- and post-RF ablation was assessed by ultrasound, angiography, and/or contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. Patient demographics and immediate post-RF ablation outcomes and complications were also reviewed.Results19 patients with 21 lesions undergoing 25 RF ablation sessions were included. Child-Pugh class A, B, and C scores were seen in 1, 13, and 5 patients, respectively. Eleven patients (58 %) ultimately underwent liver transplantation. Immediate technical success was seen in all ablation sessions without residual tumor enhancement (100 %). No patients (0 %) suffered liver failure within 1 month of ablation. Pre-ablation TIPS patency was demonstrated in 22/25 sessions (88 %). Of 22 cases with patent TIPS prior to ablation, post-ablation patency was demonstrated in 22/22 (100 %) at immediate post-ablation imaging and in 21/22 (95 %) at last follow-up (1 patient was incidentally noted to have occlusion 31 months later). No immediate complications were observed.ConclusionAblation efficacy was similar to the cited literature values for patients without TIPS. Furthermore, TIPS patency was preserved in the majority of cases. Patients with both portal hypertension and HCC are not uncommonly encountered, and a pre-existing TIPS does not appear to be a definite contraindication for RF ablation

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jonathan K., E-mail: jonathan.park09@gmail.com [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology (United States); Al-Tariq, Quazi Z., E-mail: qat200@gmail.com [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States); Zaw, Taryar M., E-mail: taryar.zaw@gmail.com; Raman, Steven S., E-mail: sraman@mednet.ucla.edu; Lu, David S.K., E-mail: dlu@mednet.ucla.edu [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo assess radiofrequency (RF) ablation efficacy, as well as the patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPSs), in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Materials and MethodsRetrospective database review of patients with pre-existing TIPS undergoing RF ablation of HCC was conducted over a 159-month period ending in November 2013. TIPS patency pre- and post-RF ablation was assessed by ultrasound, angiography, and/or contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. Patient demographics and immediate post-RF ablation outcomes and complications were also reviewed.Results19 patients with 21 lesions undergoing 25 RF ablation sessions were included. Child-Pugh class A, B, and C scores were seen in 1, 13, and 5 patients, respectively. Eleven patients (58 %) ultimately underwent liver transplantation. Immediate technical success was seen in all ablation sessions without residual tumor enhancement (100 %). No patients (0 %) suffered liver failure within 1 month of ablation. Pre-ablation TIPS patency was demonstrated in 22/25 sessions (88 %). Of 22 cases with patent TIPS prior to ablation, post-ablation patency was demonstrated in 22/22 (100 %) at immediate post-ablation imaging and in 21/22 (95 %) at last follow-up (1 patient was incidentally noted to have occlusion 31 months later). No immediate complications were observed.ConclusionAblation efficacy was similar to the cited literature values for patients without TIPS. Furthermore, TIPS patency was preserved in the majority of cases. Patients with both portal hypertension and HCC are not uncommonly encountered, and a pre-existing TIPS does not appear to be a definite contraindication for RF ablation.

  20. Spinal epidural hematomas examined on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejnowski, G.; Poniatowska, R.; Kozlowski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematomas are rare pathology, caused by trauma or spontaneous. In clinical examination acute spinal cord compression is observed. MRI designations appear entirely particular. In sagittal projection, biconvex mass in the dorsal, or sometimes ventral part of the spinal canal is clearly visible. This is well delineated by the thecal sac from the cord and cauda equina. MRI investigations in 3 patients revealed corresponding with spinal bone injuries and cord edema epidural hematomas. Differential diagnosis must contain subdural hematoma and epidural neoplasms or abscess. (author)

  1. Current Treatment Options for Auricular Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Ear disease, such as otitis externa, resulting in aggressive head shaking or ear scratching, is the most common cause of the development of aural hematomas in dogs and cats. An underlying immunologic cause has also been proposed to explain cartilage and blood vessel fragility. Numerous options exist for management of aural hematomas, from medical management alone with corticosteroids, to simple hematoma centesis, to surgical intervention. Because this condition is usually secondary to another disease process, regardless of mode of treatment, likelihood of recurrence is low if the underlying condition is managed properly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Duodenal Hematoma after upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Marta Reis; Vieira, Ana Catarina; Rio, Gisela; Moreira, Angela; Noruegas, Maria José; Sanches, Conceição

    2018-01-01

    Duodenal hematoma is a rare complication of endoscopic duodenal biopsy, with just a few cases reported in children in the literature available.The authors present a case of a 13 year-old girl, with a history of Noonan Syndrome and neurofibromatosis type 1, who presented abdominal pain and vomiting after an endoscopic duodenal biopsy.In this article, we describe the clinical case, imaging findings, evolution and therapeutic approach.We briefly discuss the hematologic complications in patients ...

  3. Spinal subdural hematoma following cranial subdural hematoma : a case report with a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Daeyeong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2013-12-01

    Coexistence of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas after previous head trauma. As the pathogenesis of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma yet remains unclear, we developed an alternative theory to those proposed in the literature for their coexistence, the migration of blood through the subdural space.

  4. Measurement of inflammatory cytokines and thrombomodulin in chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazono, Masatoshi; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Hidetaka; Onda, Hidetaka; Matsumoto, Gaku; Fuse, Akira; Teramoto, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and the coagulation system may influence the genesis of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). The appearance of CSDH on computed tomography (CT) varies with the stage of the hematoma. This study investigated the pathogenesis and the recurrence of CSDH by comparing cytokine levels with the CT features of CSDH in 26 patients with 34 CSDHs who underwent single burr-hole surgery at our hospital between October 2004 and November 2006. The hematoma components removed during the procedure were examined, and the hematoma serum levels of cytokines measured such as thrombomodulin (TM), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Using CT, mixed density hematomas were distinguished from other homogeneous hematomas, and found that the TM level was significantly higher in mixed density hematomas than in homogeneous hematomas (p = 0.043). Mixed density hematomas were classified into three subtypes (laminar, separated, and trabecular hematomas). The TM level was significantly higher in laminar and separated hematomas than in other hematomas (p = 0.01). The levels of IL-6, TNFα, and IL-10 were extremely high, but showed no significant differences in relation to the CT features. Mixed density hematomas had high recurrence rate, as reported previously, and TM level was high in mixed density hematomas such as laminar and separated mixed density hematomas. The present findings suggest that the types of CSDH associated with high TM levels tend to have higher recurrence rate.

  5. ‘Subarachnoid cyst’ after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Low Y. Y.; Wai Hoe, NG

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a ‘subarachnoid cyst’ after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the ‘cyst’ is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this ‘cyst’ develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a ‘subarachnoid cyst’ post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature. PMID:27366276

  6. A case of acoustic neurinoma associated with chronic subdural hematoma after gamma knife radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sho, Atsuko; Asaeda, Masahiro; Ohtake, Minoru [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). Inst. of Neurological Sciences] [and others

    2002-09-01

    A 72-year-old female presented with a unique case of acoustic neurinoma with a cystic component followed by the chronic subdural hematoma manifesting as trigeminal neuralgia, facial palsy and trunchal ataxia 7 months after gamma knife radiosurgery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a loss of central contrast enhancement at the postoperative residual tumor mass and a large cyst associated with a hematoma in the subdural space. A right suboccipital craniectomy was performed. A biopsy of the mass and the membrane was performed following aspiration of the brown-reddish fluid collection. The histological diagnosis was acoustic neurinoma with a hemorrhagic necrosis. The membranous tissue mimicked an outer membrane obtained from chronic subdural hematoma. The postoperative course was satisfactory and preoperative symptom have been alleviated. In this case, the chronic subdural hematoma occurred at posterior fossa during the development of cysts caused by the radiosurgery, because the subdural space had been connected with the subarachnoid space after the first operation. The development of cysts or hematoma should be taken into consideration as possible complications following treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas. (author)

  7. A case of acoustic neurinoma associated with chronic subdural hematoma after gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sho, Atsuko; Asaeda, Masahiro; Ohtake, Minoru

    2002-01-01

    A 72-year-old female presented with a unique case of acoustic neurinoma with a cystic component followed by the chronic subdural hematoma manifesting as trigeminal neuralgia, facial palsy and trunchal ataxia 7 months after gamma knife radiosurgery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a loss of central contrast enhancement at the postoperative residual tumor mass and a large cyst associated with a hematoma in the subdural space. A right suboccipital craniectomy was performed. A biopsy of the mass and the membrane was performed following aspiration of the brown-reddish fluid collection. The histological diagnosis was acoustic neurinoma with a hemorrhagic necrosis. The membranous tissue mimicked an outer membrane obtained from chronic subdural hematoma. The postoperative course was satisfactory and preoperative symptom have been alleviated. In this case, the chronic subdural hematoma occurred at posterior fossa during the development of cysts caused by the radiosurgery, because the subdural space had been connected with the subarachnoid space after the first operation. The development of cysts or hematoma should be taken into consideration as possible complications following treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery for acoustic neurinomas. (author)

  8. Delayed spinal extradural hematoma following thoracic spine surgery and resulting in paraplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban Chandra JKB

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Postoperative spinal extradural hematomas are rare. Most of the cases that have been reported occured within 3 days of surgery. Their occurrence in a delayed form, that is, more than 72 hours after surgery, is very rare. This case is being reported to enhance awareness of delayed postoperative spinal extradural hematomas. Case presentation We report a case of acute onset dorsal spinal extradural hematoma from a paraspinal muscular arterial bleed, producing paraplegia 72 hours following surgery for excision of a spinal cord tumor at T8 level. The triggering mechanism was an episode of violent twisting movement by the patient. Fresh blood in the postoperative drain tube provided suspicion of this complication. Emergency evacuation of the clot helped in regaining normal motor and sensory function. The need to avoid straining of the paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period is emphasized. Conclusion Most cases of postoperative spinal extradural hematomas occur as a result of venous bleeding. However, an arterial source of bleeding from paraspinal muscular branches causing extradural hematoma and subsequent neurological deficit is underreported. Undue straining of paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period after major spinal surgery should be avoided for at least a few days.

  9. Leptomeningeal metastasis mimicking Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Saurabh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of Leptomeningeal Metastasis varies widely. It can also present a condition very similar to Chronic Subdural Hematoma. One should have a low threshold for suspicion while diagnosing such conditions to avoid catastrophic events.

  10. Radiologic findings of acute spontaneous subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Bae, Won Kyong; Gyu, Cha Jang; Kim, Gun Woo; Cho, Won Su; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Kyung Suk [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of). Chonan Hospital

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the characteristic CT and cerebral angiographic findings in patients with acute spontaneous subdural hematomas and correlate these imaging findings with causes of bleeding and clinical outcome. Twenty-one patients with nontraumatic acute spontaneous subdural hematoma presenting during the last five years underwent CT scanning and cerebral angiography was performed in twelve. To determine the cause of bleedings, CT and angiographic findings were retrospectively analysed. Clinical history, laboratory and operative findings, and final clinical outcome were reviewed. Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma is a rare condition, and the mortality rate is high. In patients with acute spontaneous subdural hematoma, as seen on CT, associated subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage is strongly indicative of intracerebral vascular abnormalities such as aneurysm and arteriovenous malformation, and cerebral angiography is necessary. To ensure proper treatment and thus markedly reduce mortality, the causes of bleedings should be prompty determined by means of cerebral angiography. (author). 20 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  11. Leptomeningeal metastasis mimicking Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    The presentation of Leptomeningeal Metastasis varies widely. It can also present a condition very similar to Chronic Subdural Hematoma. One should have a low threshold for suspicion while diagnosing such conditions to avoid catastrophic events.

  12. Cutaneous manifestation of renal hematoma after ESWL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde-Benito, Francisco-Xavier; Elizalde-Benito, Ángel-Gabriel; Urra-Palos, María; Elizalde-Amatria, Angel-Gabriel

    2013-12-01

    A 73 year-old patient with history of arterial hypertension and regular treatment with antiplatelet agents who presented with an hypotensive episode after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was diagnosed of right renal hematoma.

  13. Remote Hemorrhage after Burr Hole Drainage of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Hyeun; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2017-10-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and symptomatic subdural hygroma are common diseases that require neurosurgical management. Burr hole trephination is the most popular surgical treatment for CSDH and subdural hygroma because of a low recurrence rate and low morbidity compared with craniotomy with membranectomy, and twist-drill craniotomy. Many reports suggest that placing a catheter in the subdural space for drainage can further reduce the rate of recurrence; however, complications associated with this type of drainage include acute subdural hematoma, cortical injury, and infection. Remote hemorrhage due to overdrainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is another possible complication of burr hole trephination with catheter drainage that has rarely been reported. Here, we present 2 cases of remote hemorrhages following burr hole trephination with catheter drainage for the treatment of CSDH and symptomatic subdural hygroma. One patient developed intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the contralateral hemisphere, while another patient developed remote hemorrhage 3 days after the procedure due to the sudden drainage of a large amount of subdural fluid over a 24-hour period. These findings suggest that catheter drainage should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage of CSF after burr hole trephination.

  14. Surgery for chronic subdural hematoma in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, J; Sjåvik, K; Ståhl, F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is a prevalent condition often seen in the elderly, with surgery being the treatment of choice when symptomatic. So far, few have explored the surgical outcomes in patients 90 years or older. The aim of this study was to investigate outcome after c...... neurosurgical centers. In a comparative analysis, the primary end-point was difference in hematoma recurrence rates between the ≥90 y/o and

  15. Rapid Spontaneously Resolving Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Zhao, Hexiang; Zhang, Hanmei; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study reports a rare patient of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma. In addition, an analysis of potential clues for the phenomenon is presented with a review of the literature. Patient Presentation: A 1-year-and-2-month-old boy fell from a height of approximately 2 m. The patient was in a superficial coma with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 when he was transferred to the authors’ hospital. Computed tomography revealed the presence of an acute subdural hematoma with a midline shift beyond 1 cm. His guardians refused invasive interventions and chose conservative treatment. Repeat imaging after 15 hours showed the evident resolution of the hematoma and midline reversion. Progressive magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the complete resolution of the hematoma, without redistribution to a remote site. Conclusions: Even though this phenomenon has a low incidence, the probability of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma should be considered when patients present with the following characteristics: children or elderly individuals suffering from mild to moderate head trauma; stable or rapidly recovered consciousness; and simple acute subdural hematoma with a moderate thickness and a particularly low-density band in computed tomography scans. PMID:28468224

  16. [Spontaneous hepatic hematoma in twin pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Carlos; Weber, Alejandro; Mendoza, Dalila; Garteiz, Denzil

    2012-02-01

    The hepatic hematoma or rupture appear in 1 of every 100,000 pregnancies. The most common causes of hepatic hematoma in pregnancy are severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome; some predisposing factors are seizures, vomiting, labor, preexistent hepatic disease and trauma. A 33 year old primigravid with a normal 33 week twin pregnancy presented abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock due to spontaneous subcapsular hepatic hematoma; laparoscopy was performed to evaluate the possibility of rupture, which was not found, later emergency cesarean section was carried out followed by hepatic hematoma drainage and abdominal packaging by laparoscopy. After surgery the flow through drainage was too high additionally hemodynamic instability and consumption coagulopathy. Abdominal panangiography was performed without identifying bleeding areas. Intesive care was given to the patient evolving satisfactorily, was discharged 19 days after the event. Seven months later she had laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to acute litiasic colecistitis. We found 5 cases in literatura about hepatic hematoma during pregnancy no related to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; these were related to hepatoma, amebian hepatic abscess, falciform cell anemia, cocaine consumption and molar pregnancy. Hepatics hematomas have high morbidity and mortality so is significant early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach.

  17. Usefulness of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, V.; Joly, L.; Perreault, P.; Bouchard, L.; Lafortune, M.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in the control of bleeding from ectopic varices. Methods. From 1995 to 2004, 24 cirrhotic patients, bleeding from ectopic varices, mean age 54.5 years (range 15-76 years), were treated by TIPS. The etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholic in 13 patients and nonalcoholic in 11 patients. The location of the varices was duodenal (n = 5), stomal (n = 8), ileocolic (n = 6), anorectal (n = 3), umbilical (n = 1), and peritoneal (n 1). Results. TIPS controlled the bleeding in all patients and induced a decrease in the portacaval gradient from 19.7 ± 5.4 to 6.4 ± 3.1 mmHg. Postoperative complications included self-limited intra-abdominal bleeding (n = 2), self-limited hemobilia (n = 1), acute thrombosis of the shunt (n = 1), and bile leak treated by a covered stent (n = 1). Median follow-up was 592 days (range 28-2482 days). Rebleeding occurred in 6 patients. In 2 cases rebleeding was observed despite a post-TIPS portacaval gradient lower than 12 mmHg and was controlled by variceal embolization; 1 patient underwent surgical portacaval shunt and never rebled; in 3 patients rebleeding was related to TIPS stenosis and treated with shunt dilatation with addition of a new stent. The cumulative rate of rebleeding was 23% and 31% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 80% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion. The present series demonstrates that bleeding from ectopic varices, a challenging clinical problem, can be managed safely by TIPS placement with low rebleeding and good survival rates

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Insertion for the Management of Portal Hypertension in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Lauren; McKiernan, Patrick; Sharif, Khalid; McGuirk, Simon

    2018-04-17

    To describe our 20-year experience with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS) procedures for children with resistant portal hypertension (PHTN). Retrospective review of all children that had a TIPSS performed at Birmingham Children's Hospital from 1 January 1995 - 1 January 2015. 40 children underwent 42 attempted TIPSS for resistant PHTN with recurrent variceal bleeding (n = 35), refractory ascites (n = 4), and hypersplenism (n = 1). Median age at operation was 12 years (range, 7 months - 17 years). Thirty-four procedures were elective and 8 were emergency cases.TIPSS was established in 33 cases (79%). Median portal venous pressure reduction was 10mmHg. Variceal bleeding ceased in 27 (96%) and ascites improved in all. Clinical improvement following TIPSS enabled 7 children to be bridged to transplantation and 7 others to become suitable for transplantation. The 1-year and 5-year survival with TIPSS was 57% and 35%, respectively. Child-Pugh score C was an independent risk factor for adverse outcome (LR = 8.0; 95% CI 2.7 - 23.5; P = 0.001).There were 6 major complications: hepatic artery thrombosis and infarction (n = 1), hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 1), bile leak (n = 1), and hepatic encephalopathy (n = 3). Encephalopathy was resistant to medical treatment in 2 cases, necessitating staged closure in one.Ten patients (30%) required intervention to maintain TIPSS patency. The 1-year and 5-year freedom from reintervention was 71% and 55%, respectively. A TIPSS is highly successful in controlling symptoms in children with resistant PHTN and facilitating liver transplantation. However, it is technically demanding and not without risk. Patients must be appropriately selected and counselled.

  19. Sarcopenia Is Risk Factor for Development of Hepatic Encephalopathy After Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardelli, Silvia; Lattanzi, Barbara; Torrisi, Sabrina; Greco, Francesca; Farcomeni, Alessio; Gioia, Stefania; Merli, Manuela; Riggio, Oliviero

    2017-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important complication in patients with cirrhosis who received transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS). We investigated whether a decrease in muscle mass was associated independently with the occurrence of HE after TIPS. We performed a prospective study of 46 consecutive patients with cirrhosis (mean age, 58.6 ± 9.1 y; mean model for end-stage liver disease score, 11.3 ± 3.3; mean Child-Pugh score, 7.6 ± 1.5) who received TIPS from January 2013 through December 2014 at a tertiary center in Rome, Italy. All patients underwent computed tomography analysis at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae to determine the skeletal muscle index; sarcopenia was defined by sex-specific cut-off values. We estimated the incidence of the first episode of HE after TIPS, taking into account the competing risk nature of the data (death or liver transplantation). Twenty-six patients (57%) were found to have sarcopenia. Twenty-one patients (46%) developed overt HE in the 7 ± 9 months after TIPS placement; all of these patients were sarcopenic, according to the skeletal muscle index. Of the 25 patients without HE after TIPS, only 5 had sarcopenia. In multivariate analysis, model for end-stage liver disease score (subdistribution hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.34; P = .043) and sarcopenia (subdistribution hazard ratio, 31.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.5-218.07; P Sarcopenia should be considered in selecting patients for TIPS therapy. Nutritional status should be evaluated in patients with sarcopenia before TIPS placement, which might reduce the incidence of HE. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-dimensional Image Fusion Guidance for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacher, Vania; Petit, Arthur; Derbel, Haytham; Novelli, Luigi; Vitellius, Manuel; Ridouani, Fourat; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Duvoux, Christophe; Salloum, Chady; Chiaradia, Mélanie; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2017-11-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of image fusion guidance with pre-procedural portal phase computed tomography with intraprocedural fluoroscopy for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. All consecutive cirrhotic patients presenting at our interventional unit for TIPS creation from January 2015 to January 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Procedures were performed under general anesthesia in an interventional suite equipped with flat panel detector, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and image fusion technique. All TIPSs were placed under image fusion guidance. After hepatic vein catheterization, an unenhanced CBCT acquisition was performed and co-registered with the pre-procedural portal phase CT images. A virtual path between hepatic vein and portal branch was made using the virtual needle path trajectory software. Subsequently, the 3D virtual path was overlaid on 2D fluoroscopy for guidance during portal branch cannulation. Safety, feasibility, effectiveness and per-procedural data were evaluated. Sixteen patients (12 males; median age 56 years) were included. Procedures were technically feasible in 15 of the 16 patients (94%). One procedure was aborted due to hepatic vein catheterization failure related to severe liver distortion. No periprocedural complications occurred within 48 h of the procedure. The median dose-area product was 91 Gy cm 2 , fluoroscopy time 15 min, procedure time 40 min and contrast media consumption 65 mL. Clinical benefit of the TIPS placement was observed in nine patients (56%). This study suggests that 3D image fusion guidance for TIPS is feasible, safe and effective. By identifying virtual needle path, CBCT enables real-time multiplanar guidance and may facilitate TIPS placement.

  1. [Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting with covered stents in children: a preliminary study of safety and patency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurera, L J; Espejo, J J; Canis, M; Bueno, A; Vicente, J; Gilbert, J J

    2014-01-01

    To retrospectively analyze the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS) using covered stents in children. We present 6 children (mean age, 10.6 years; mean weight, 33.5kg) who underwent TIPS with 8mm diameter Viatorr(®) covered stents for acute (n=4) or recurrent (n=2) upper digestive bleeding that could not be controlled by endoscopic measures. Five of the children had cirrhosis and the other had portal vein thrombosis with cavernous transformation. We analyzed the relapse of upper digestive bleeding, the complications that appeared, and the patency of the TIPS shunt on sequential Doppler ultrasonography or until transplantation. A single stent was implanted in a single session in each child; none of the children died. The mean transhepatic gradient decreased from 16mmHg (range: 12-21mmHg) before the procedure to 9mmHg (range: 1-15mmHg) after TIPS. One patient developed mild encephalopathy, and the girl who had portal vein thrombosis with cavernous transformation developed an acute occlusion of the TIPS that resolved after the implantation of a coaxial stent. Three children received transplants (7, 9, and 10 months after the procedure, respectively), and the patency of the TIPS was confirmed at transplantation. In the three remaining children, patency was confirmed with Doppler ultrasonography 1, 3, and 5 months after implantation. None of the children had new episodes of upper digestive bleeding during follow-up after implantation (mean: 8.1 months). Our results indicate that TIPS with 8mm diameter Viatorr(®) covered stents can be safe and efficacious for the treatment of upper digestive bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices in cirrhotic children; our findings need to be corroborated in larger series. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Percutaneous Transjugular Direct Porto-caval Shunt in Patients with Budd-Chiari Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quateen, A.; Pech, M.; Berg, T.; Bergk, A.; Podrabsky, P.; Felix, R.; Ricke, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of direct porto-caval shunts in patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) in whom there is no access to the hepatic veins during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPSS). We included six consecutive patients with fulminant/acute Budd-Chiari syndrome (mean age: 35 years) in whom a conventional TIPSS was not possible due to inaccessible hepatic veins. We performed a direct porto-caval shunt via a transhepatic approach. Patients were followed up by means of clinical examination, laboratory investigations, and Doppler ultrasound. TIPSS implantation from the inferior vena cava (IVC) was successful in all six patients (100%). The median transhepatic shunt length was 9 cm (8-10 cm). No procedure-related complications were observed in our patients. Early shunt occlusion occurred in three out of six patients (50%). In all three of these patients, the stent used to stabilize the shunt ended 1-2 cm before reaching the IVC. All occlusions were successfully recanalized. One of these patients developed recurrent early shunt as well as mesenteric and splenic vein occlusions. She died 7 days after TIPSS placement due to an unmanageable coagulation disorder. The remaining five patients were followed up by planned clinical examination and laboratory investigations (mean follow-up time was 15 months; patient 1 was followed up for 13 months, patient 2 for 14 months, patient 3 for 15 months, and patients 4 and 5 for 16 months) and all displayed a complete and durable resolution of liver failure and ascites without reintervention. In patients with acute liver failure originating from BCS and inaccessible hepatic veins, a direct transhepatic porto-caval shunt can be performed safely and effectively under ultrasound guidance. Future studies in larger patient groups should investigate if the patency of transcaval TIPSS with long transhepatic shunt segments is similar compared to conventional TIPSS via

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt before Abdominal Surgery in Cirrhotic Patients: A Retrospective, Comparative Study

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    Evelyne Vinet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery in cirrhotic patients is associated with high morbidity and mortality related to portal hypertension and liver insufficiency. Therefore, preoperative portal decompression is a logical approach to facilitate abdominal surgery and hopefully to improve postoperative survival. The present study evaluated the clinical outcomes of 18 patients (mean age 58 years with cirrhosis (seven alcoholics and 11 nonalcoholics who underwent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS placement before antrectomy (n=5, colectomy (n=10, small-bowel resection (n=1, pancreatectomy (n=1 and nephrectomy (n=1. TIPS was performed a mean (± SD of 72±21 days before surgery and induced a marked mean decrease in portohepatic gradient from 21.4±3.9 mmHg to 8.4±3.4 mmHg. Cirrhotic patients (n=17 who underwent elective abdominal surgery without preoperative TIPS placement were used as the control group. Both groups were matched for age, etiology of cirrhosis, indications for surgery, type of surgery and coagulation parameters. The mean Pugh score was significantly higher in the TIPS group (7.7 versus 6.2. No significant differences were observed for operative blood loss, postoperative complications, duration of hospitalization and one-month (83% versus 88% or one-year (54% versus 63% cumulative survival rate. Analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model showed that neither TIPS placement nor preoperative Pugh score were independent predictors for survival. The present study suggests that preoperative TIPS placement does not improve postoperative evolution after abdominal surgery in cirrhotic patients with good or moderately impaired liver function.

  4. Three-Dimensional Path Planning Software-Assisted Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: A Technical Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsauo, Jiaywei, E-mail: 80732059@qq.com; Luo, Xuefeng, E-mail: luobo-913@126.com [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Institute of Interventional Radiology (China); Ye, Linchao, E-mail: linchao.ye@siemens.com [Siemens Ltd, Healthcare Sector (China); Li, Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@gmail.com [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Institute of Interventional Radiology (China)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to report our results with a modified technique of three-dimensional (3D) path planning software assisted transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS).Methods3D path planning software was recently developed to facilitate TIPS creation by using two carbon dioxide portograms acquired at least 20° apart to generate a 3D path for overlay needle guidance. However, one shortcoming is that puncturing along the overlay would be technically impossible if the angle of the liver access set and the angle of the 3D path are not the same. To solve this problem, a prototype 3D path planning software was fitted with a utility to calculate the angle of the 3D path. Using this, we modified the angle of the liver access set accordingly during the procedure in ten patients.ResultsFailure for technical reasons occurred in three patients (unsuccessful wedged hepatic venography in two cases, software technical failure in one case). The procedure was successful in the remaining seven patients, and only one needle pass was required to obtain portal vein access in each case. The course of puncture was comparable to the 3D path in all patients. No procedure-related complication occurred following the procedures.ConclusionsAdjusting the angle of the liver access set to match the angle of the 3D path determined by the software appears to be a favorable modification to the technique of 3D path planning software assisted TIPS.

  5. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  6. A case report and technical tip of chronic subdural hematoma treated by the placement of a subdural peritoneal shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres M. Alvarez-Pinzon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH tend to occur most commonly in the elderly population, usually resulting from minor or insignificant head trauma. The pathophysiology behind CSDH is often directly associated with cerebral atrophy, and other causes of cerebral atrophy such as alcoholism or dementia. Other predisposing factors include diabetes, coagulopathy, use of anticoagulants (including aspirin, seizure disorders, and CSF shunts. Considerable evidence supporting the use of external drainage after evacuation of primary CSDH is readily available in the literature. Case report: We report the case of a 72 year-old male with a history of recurrent left subdural hematoma presenting to the neurosurgical clinic with a two-day history of personality changes, difficulty speaking, urinary incontinence, and headaches. Burr hole evacuation was performed with the placement of a subdural peritoneal shunt. At the one-month follow-up appointment, the patient had complete resolution of symptoms and CT scan showed no new recurrence of the subdural hematoma. Conclusions: Although several treatment options are available for the management of CSDH, recurrence of hematoma is a major and very common complication that may result in re-injury due to mass effect caused by chronic hematoma. However, placement of subdural peritoneal shunt for the treatment of CSDH can reduce the recurrence rate of CSDH and therefore, reduce the risk of brain re-injury. Keywords: Chronic subdural hematoma, CSDH, Subdural peritoneal shunt, Head trauma

  7. Major femoral vascular access complications after coronary diagnostic and interventional procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Pedersen, Frants; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    surgery within 30 days were collected. Mortality data were collected for minimum 12 months. RESULTS: We identified 130 (0.54%) access complications requiring surgery; 65 pseudoaneurysms (0.28%), 46 arterial occlusions (0.19%), 15 hematomas (nine groin and six retroperitoneal hematomas) (0.06%), and 4...

  8. Subdural hematoma from a cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Anne J; Mitha, Alim P; Germain, Rasha; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    To present a case of a cavernous malformation presenting with a subdural hematoma. A 27-year-old woman was admitted with progressively worsening headache, vomiting, weakness, and word-finding difficulties 1 week after she was discharged from an outside hospital, where she was managed conservatively for a presumed traumatic subdural hematoma. Computed tomography revealed an enlarging subacute left hemispheric subdural hematoma for which she underwent drill craniostomy. Postprocedural magnetic resonance imaging showed a posterior left temporal lobe mass consistent with a cavernous malformation juxtaposed with the subdural hematoma. Craniotomy for resection of the lesion was performed. She had an uncomplicated postoperative course and experienced a good recovery. The signs and symptoms, diagnostic imaging, and intraoperative findings suggest that the subdural hematoma was caused by extralesional hemorrhage of the cavernous malformation, which is a rare finding associated with these malformations. The clinical course, radiologic, and intraoperative findings suggest that the subdural hemorrhage was caused by extralesional hemorrhage of the cavernous malformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nontraumatic spinal epidural hematomas. MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Baumgartner, R.W.; Zambaz, B.D.; Remonda, L.; Ozdoba, C.; Schroth, G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare clinical entity with a bleak outcome. The aim of our study was to establish the value of MR findings in the diagnosis of nontraumatic SEH. Material and Methods: Seven patients with nontraumatic SEH were examined by MR at 1.5 T. Two patients were under anticoagulation therapy with heparin, and 2 others were taking salicylic acid. One patient had lupus erythematodes with a marked thrombocytopenia. One patient had a spinal arteriovenous malformation. Results: MR imaging permitted the accurate localization of extradural intraspinal expansive lesions which exhibited the characteristic signal intensities of blood. Five patients underwent laminectomy and evacuation of the hematoma. In the acute phase, the hematomas appeared isointense when compared with the spinal cord on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Later the hematomas were hyperintense on T1-weighted images and showed signals identical to those of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on T2-weighted images. Conclusion: MR imaging established the exact diagnosis and localization of SEH in all cases. MR also can provide useful information about the age of the hematomas. (orig.)

  10. Pathology of ear hematomas in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Richard; Hélie, Pierre; D'Allaire, Sylvie

    2016-05-01

    The objectives of our study were to describe the pathology of ear hematomas in swine and to add to the comprehension of the pathogenesis of this condition. The pathogenesis of aural hematomas has been studied mainly in dogs; however, disagreements exist about the precise anatomic location of the hemorrhage. Sixteen pigs with ear hematoma at various stages of development were included in this study. The pigs were submitted for routine autopsy for various and unrelated reasons over a period of several years. Based on gross examination, the 16 cases of aural hematomas were subjectively classified as acute (n = 6), subacute (n = 3), and chronic (n = 7). The age of the animals at the time of autopsy ranged from 2 weeks to adulthood, with all acute cases being hematoma developed predominantly in a subperichondral location on both sides of the cartilaginous plate simultaneously. Within these same cases, there were also some areas in which blood-filled clefts had formed within the cartilage itself. Besides fibroplasia, neoformation of cartilage was found to represent a significant part of the repair process. All chronic cases were characterized on cross-section of the ear by the presence of at least 2 distinct, wavy, focally folded, and roughly parallel plates of cartilage separated from each other by fibrous tissue. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Hepatic Rupture Induced by Spontaneous Intrahepatic Hematoma

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    Jin-bao Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of hepatic rupture is usually secondary to trauma, and hepatic rupture induced by spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma is clinically rare. We describe here a 61-year-old female patient who was transferred to our hospital with hepatic rupture induced by spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma. The patient had no history of trauma and had a history of systemic lupus erythematosus for five years, taking a daily dose of 5 mg prednisone for treatment. The patients experienced durative blunt acute right upper abdominal pain one day after satiation, which aggravated in two hours, accompanied by dizziness and sweating. Preoperative diagnosis was rupture of the liver mass. Laparotomy revealed 2500 mL fluid consisting of a mixture of blood and clot in the peritoneal cavity. A 3.5 cm × 2.5 cm rupture was discovered on the hepatic caudate lobe near the vena cava with active arterial bleeding, and a 5  × 6 cm hematoma was reached on the right posterior lobe of the liver. Abdominal computed tomography (CT and laparotomy revealed spontaneous rupture of intrahepatic hematoma with hemorrhagic shock. The patient was successfully managed by suturing the rupture of the hepatic caudate lobe and clearing part of the hematoma. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after two weeks of hospitalization.

  12. Recurrent massive subperiosteal hematoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenbrugge, F.; Poffyn, B.; Uyttendaele, D.; Verdonk, R. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium); Verstraete, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (Belgium)

    2001-03-01

    The authors report the case of a 13-year-old neurofibromatosis (NF-I) patient who suffered a blunt trauma in 1993. The diagnosis of subperiosteal hematoma was made. The pathogenesis of subperiosteal hematoma is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Recurrent massive subperiosteal hematoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbrugge, F.; Poffyn, B.; Uyttendaele, D.; Verdonk, R.; Verstraete, K.

    2001-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 13-year-old neurofibromatosis (NF-I) patient who suffered a blunt trauma in 1993. The diagnosis of subperiosteal hematoma was made. The pathogenesis of subperiosteal hematoma is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Chronic subdural hematoma: epidemiological and prognostic analysis of 176 cases

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    JAMIL FARHAT NETO

    Full Text Available Objective : To characterize patients with chronic subdural hematoma undergoing surgery and to identify prognostic indicators. Methods : We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH undergoing surgical treatment. We analyzed: age, period from trauma to diagnostic imaging, pre and postoperative Glasgow coma scale, type of surgery, associated comorbidities, use of postoperative drainage and outpatient treatment. Results : The sample consisted of 176 patients, 126 male and 50 female patients (ratio 2.5 : 1, ages ranged from six months to 97 years, with an average of 59.3 years. CSDH was caused by trauma in 52% of patients, with the time from trauma to imaging averaging 25.05 days; 37.7% were hypertensive patients and 20% had a neurological disease. Eighty-five (48.3% patients were elderly and altered consciousness was present in 63% of cases. Of the 91 (51.7% non-elderly patients, 44% presented with headache, altered consciousness occurred in 40% and motor abnormalities in 27.5%. The CSDH was located on the right in 41%, left in 43% and bilaterally in 16% of patients. Conclusion : the change of consciousness was the most common clinical alteration in the elderly and headache in non-elderly. The most associated comorbidity was the arterial hypertension and the most frequent cause, head trauma. The trepanation with two oriffices associated with a closed drainage system was the most used operating, with high efficacy and low complication rate.

  15. Spontaneous pharyngo-laryngeal hematoma and anticoagulation. A case report

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    Marleny CASASOLA-GIRÓN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective: Spontaneous pharyngeal-laryngeal hematoma shows the importance of a complete ENT examination in the face of symptoms of banal appearance and a correct history that, in the case reported, unveiled the therapeutic use of anticoagulants. Case description: A 55 year old woman comes to emergency because of unexplained dysphagia. The inspection shows the presence of a hematoma in the pharyngeal-laryngeal region that, after the anticoagulant therapy was reversed, evolved favorably with conservative treatment. Discussion: In this case, apart from medical management performed by the hematology department, we focus our therapeutic approach in the protection of the airway and the prevention of a possible massive bleeding. Determining which patients require endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy and hemostatic surgery is the key to treatment. Conclusions: The anticoagulant therapy involves several complications that ENT specialists must consider in the face of clinical symptoms of dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea or signs of bleeding and they must know the possibilities of performance depending on the severity of each case.

  16. Computerized tomography findings of acute traumatic epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yajima, Kouzo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1984-01-01

    During four year period from April, 1977 to March, 1981, 53 cases with acute traumatic epidural hematoma had been encountered out of 430 acute head injured patients examined by computerized tomography (CT) within 24 hours after incurring the trauma. Besides the initial CT, the authors performed contrast enhanced CT (41 cases) and serial CT scanning (31 cases). There were 49 cases of epidural hematoma existing in the supratentorial region, Two cases infratentorial region and 2 cases in the both regions. Two cases of vertex epidural hematoma had been encountered, one of them required vertical scan technique. In 22 (41%) of the 53 patients, the initial CT showed evidence of other cerebral lesions. The most frequent lesion was pneumocephalus (11 cases), 3 cases of them existed in the epidural hematoma. There were also intracerebral hematoma (6 cases), subdural hematoma (4 cases), cerebral contusion (2 cases), intraventricular hemorrhage (2 cases) and 2 cases of them demonstrated ''diffuse traumatic cerebral injury''. During contrast enhanced CT, 11 cases out of 41 cases indicated several enhancement pattern. There were total enhancement of epidural hematoma (2 cases), partial enhancement of hematoma (2 cases) and enhancement of internal margin of hematoma (2 cases). Serial CT scans was performed in 36 out of the 53 patients. Common findings on the serial CT scans were decreased density collection in the subdural space such as subdural effusions or chronic subdural hematomas (8 cases) and enlargement of small epidural hematomas (3 cases). After evacuation of epidural hematoma, there were some cases showing the so-called ''delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma'' (4 cases), appearance of other epidural hematoma (1 case) and development of small cerebral infarction in the basal ganglia. There was one case indicating appearance of a new epidural hematoma contra lateral to the side of evacuation of subdural hematoma. (J.P.N.)

  17. CT-guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondo, Hideki

    1983-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) is now effective not only for definite diagnosis and location of intracerebral hematomas but also for coordination of the center of a hematoma. CT-guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma was performed in 51 cases: 34 of basal ganglionic hematoma with or without ventricular perforation, 11 of subcortical hematoma, 3 of thalamic hematoma and 3 of cerebellar hematoma. Three dimensional CT images or biplane CT images were taken to determine the coordinates of the target point, which was the center of the hematoma. Then, a silicon tube (O.D. 3.5 phi, I.D. 2.1 phi) was inserted into the center of the hematoma through a burr-hole under local anesthesia, and the liquid or solid hematoma was aspirated as completely as possible with a syringe. Urokinase (6,000 I.U./5 ml saline) was administered through this silicon tube every 6 or 12 hours for several days until the hematoma had drained out competely. The silicon tube was taken out when repeated CT scanning revealed no hematoma. The results of clinical follow-ups indicated that this procedure is as good as, or rather better than conventional microsurgery with evacuation of hematoma under direct vision. Moreover this CT-guided stereotactic approach for evacuation of the hematoma has the following advantages: 1) the procedure is simple and safe, 2) operation can be performed under local anesthesia, and 3) the hematoma is drained out completely with the aid of urokinase. This surgery seems indicated as an emergency treatment for high-age or high risk patients and also as a routine surgery for intracerebral hematomas in patients showing no herination signs. (author)

  18. TIPS Placement via Combined Transjugular and Transhepatic Approach for Cavernous Portal Vein Occlusion: Targeted Approach

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    Natanel Jourabchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We report a novel technique which aided recanalization of an occluded portal vein for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS creation in a patient with symptomatic portal vein thrombosis with cavernous transformation. Some have previously considered cavernous transformation a contraindication to TIPS. Case Presentation. 62-year-old man with chronic pancreatitis, portal vein thrombosis, portal hypertension and recurrent variceal bleeding presents with melena and hematemesis. The patient was severely anemic, hemodynamically unstable, and required emergent portal decompression. Attempts to recanalize the main portal vein using traditional transjugular access were unsuccessful. After percutaneous transhepatic right portal vein access and navigation of a wire through the occluded main portal vein, an angioplasty balloon was inflated at the desired site of shunt takeoff. The balloon was targeted and punctured from the transjugular approach, and a wire was passed into the portal system. TIPS placement then proceeded routinely. Conclusion. Although occlusion of the portal vein increases difficulty of performing TIPS, it should not be considered an absolute contraindication. We have described a method for recanalizing an occluded portal vein using a combined transhepatic and transjugular approach for TIPS. This approach may be useful to relieve portal hypertension in patients who fail endoscopic and/or surgical therapies.

  19. Delayed epidural hematoma after mild head injury

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    Radulović Danilo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Traumatic delayed epidural hematoma (DEH can be defined as insignificant or not seen on the initial CT scan performed after a trauma but seen on the subsequent CT scan as a “massive” epidural bleeding. Case report. We presented two cases of traumatic DEH after mild head injury. Both patients were conscious and without neurological deficit on the admission. Initial CT scan did not reveal intracranial hematoma. Repeated CT scan, that was performed after neurological deterioration, revealed epidural hematoma in both cases. The patients were operated with a favorable surgical outcome. Conclusion. Traumatic DEH could occur in the patients with head injuries who were conscious on the admission with a normal initial CT scan finding. Early detection of DEH and an urgent surgical evacuation were essential for a good outcome.

  20. Computer tomography of intracranial tumours and hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tans, J.T.J.

    1978-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of intracranial tumors and hematomas was investigated in a retrospective study comprising 220 patients. All C.T.scans are reviewed and described in detail. To assess the diagnostic accuracy, the original interpretation of the C.T.scans was compared with that of conventional neuroradiological and neurophysiological examinations. The aspect on C.T. of the various types of tumors and hematomas proved to vary widely and specific features were seldom seen. This holds particularly for the malignant tumors. Benign tumors such as meningeomas, adenomas and neurilemmomas showed a rather easily identifiable and almost identical picture of the C.T.scan, and diagnosis had to be based mainly on differences in localization. The hematomas, with the exception of the older intracerebral ones, showed the most characteristic C.T.abnormalities. (Auth.)

  1. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

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    Kapan Selin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management.

  2. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation.

  3. Transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent-shunt for therapy of bleeding esophageal varices due to extramedullary hematopoiesis in primary myelofibrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip, Veit; Berger, Hermann; Straub, Melanie; Saugel, Bernd; Treiber, Matthias; Einwächter, Henrik; Schmid, Roland M; Huber, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis belongs to the group of myeloproliferative syndromes. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in the liver can lead to portal hypertension. We report a case of a patient with life-threatening, endoscopically not treatable bleeding from esophageal varices due to extramedullary hematopoiesis of the liver that was successfully treated with placement of a transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent-shunt (TIPS). Therapy of variceal bleeding by TIPS insertion was successful. During a 29-month follow-up, no hepatic failure, hepatic encephalopathy, or further variceal bleeding episode occurred. TIPS placement is a well-established procedure for the treatment of complications due to portal hypertension mainly due to liver cirrhosis. This report illustrates that TIPS placement can also be a promising treatment option in patients with primary myelofibrosis and portal hypertension due to extramedullary hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  5. A case with Parkinsonism secondary to bilateral subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalet Arıkanoğlu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of secondary Parkinsonism. In this study, we presented a case of Parkinsonian syndrome caused by a bilateral subdural hematoma. The patient’s Parkinsonism completely healed following successful surgical removal of the hematomas without any anti-parkinson drug.

  6. Posttraumatic subperiosteal hematomas of the orbit in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Bülent; Gönen, Tansu

    2011-01-01

    To describe 5 pediatric patients with traumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma and review the relevant literature. Retrospective chart analysis of 5 children with posttraumatic subperiosteal hematoma and a systematic review of the English language literature. Five new pediatric cases of orbital subperiosteal hematoma are presented with varying clinical and radiologic manifestations and treatments. Literature review (including the current 5 cases) yielded 23 cases in total. Eighteen (78%) of the patients were boys, and 5 (22%) were girls. The children ranged in age from 5 to 17 years, with the mean and median ages being 12 years. The leading cause was blunt trauma related to falls or direct impact. Two patients (9%) had an inherited coagulopathy, predisposing them to orbital hemorrhage. The hematomas developed in the superior orbit in all cases except one. In 3 patients (13%), orbital hematomas were bilateral. In 9 patients (39%), the hematomas extended in subgaleal or frontal subdural spaces. In 7 patients (30%), subperiosteal hematoma was associated with compressive optic neuropathy. Four patients (17%) had a nondisplaced orbital roof fracture. Seventeen patients were treated with surgical evacuation of hematoma (52%) or with needle aspiration (22%), and 5 patients (22%) were observed for spontaneous resolution. Three patients (13%) experienced a recurrence of hemorrhage. In children, traumatic subperiosteal hematomas of the orbit typically occur after blunt trauma in the superior orbit. The risk of compressive optic neuropathy may be higher in patients with bilateral hematoma and massive subgaleal hematoma. Most patients are treated with evacuation of the hematoma.

  7. The repeat CT-findings of the contusional hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubokawa, Takashi; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Tomizawa, Noritami; Takeuchi, Totaro; Shinozaki, Hideo

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-seven cases of traumatic intracerebral hematoma were treated from 1977 to 1979. The intracerebral hematomas are classified into three groups: central type, hematoma within contusional area and contusional hematoma, according to the CT findings and the clinical course. Fourteen of these cases are diagnosed as contusional hematoma which show a normal CT scan, subarachnoidal hemorrhage, subdural hematoma and epidural hematoma without any kind of intracerebral high density in the initial CT scan performed within 6 hours after injury. Ten of the cases were found during conservative treatment; in 2 cases, hematomas were revealed within 24 hours; in 2 more cases within 48 hours, and in 6 cases, within 3 - 5 days following injury. In the other 4 cases, hematoma occurred 1 - 2 days following the emergency evacuation of a subdural hematoma and decompressive craniectomy. Based on the clinical experience outlined above, it is our current practice in diagnosing patients with contusional hematoma to perform repeat CT scanning within 5 - 6 days after injury whenever isodensity or subarachnoidal hemorrhage with a shift in the midline structure is observed in an initial CT scan within 6 hours or whenever an evacuation of the subdural hematoma with decompressive craniectomy is performed. (author)

  8. Progressive hematoma in anterior neck after endovascular treatment of middle cerebral artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysun Ankay Yilbas

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Cervical hematomas can lead to airway compromise, a life threatening condition, regardless of the cause. The following case is the first presentation of cervical hematoma as a complication of endovascular treatment of middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Case report: A 49 year-old woman was scheduled for stent placement under general anesthesia for middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Few days before intervention, acetyl salicylic acid and clopidogrel treatment was started. Following standard monitoring and anesthesia induction, the patient's trachea was intubated with a 7.5 mm endotracheal tube and the procedure was completed without any complications. Three hours later, dyspnea developed and physical examination revealed progressive swelling and stiffness in the neck. Endotracheal intubation was performed with a 6 mm diameter uncuffed tube with the aid of sedation. The vocal cords were completely closed due to compression. There was no leak around the endotracheal tube. The rapidly performed computerized tomography scans showed an enormous hematoma around the neck and extravasation of contrast medium through superior thyroid artery. After coil embolization of superior thyroid artery, she was taken to the intensive care unit as intubated and sedated. Surgical exploration of the hematoma was not recommended by the surgeons, because she was on clopidogrel. After two days, the patient's trachea was extubated safely ensuring that the swelling was sufficiently ceased and leak detected around the endotracheal tube. Conclusions: Securing the airway rapidly by endotracheal intubation is the most crucial point in the management of cervical hematomas. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures should be performed only afterwards.

  9. Sickle Cell Beta-Plus Thalassemia with Subcapsular Hematoma of the Spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash Dahal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While splenic complications like hypersplenism, sequestration crisis, and infarction are commonly reported in sickle cell variants like sickle cell beta-plus thalassemia, splenic rupture with hematoma is rare. We present a case of a 32-year-old young male who presented with dull left upper quadrant pain who was found to have multiple subcapsular splenic lacerations and hematoma on abdominal imaging. Hemoglobin electrophoresis confirmed sickle cell beta-plus thalassemia in the patient. There was no history of trauma, and rest of the workup for possible cause of spontaneous rupture of spleen was negative. With the patient refusing splenectomy, he was managed conservatively. Clinicians need to be aware of this rare complication of sickle cell variants.

  10. Evaluation of awake burr hole drainage for chronic subdural hematoma in geriatric patients: a retrospective analysis of 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdal Albayrak

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Surgical interventions under local anesthesia in geriatric patients with chronic subdural hematoma can provide short operation time, early mobilization, early oral intake, avoidance of possible general anesthesia complications. Herewith, this intervention decrease mortality and morbidity in this age group. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 69-73

  11. Laryngeal complications after type 1 thyroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, C S; Avidano, M A; Crary, M A; Cassisi, N J; Gorham, M M

    1995-12-01

    Type I thyroplasty has become a primary surgical choice for voice restoration in patients with glottal incompetence. This study examines factors associated with laryngeal complications after type I thyroplasty. Ten laryngoscopic variables were analyzed from preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative videolaryngoscopies of 51 patients undergoing 58 medialization procedures. Ten patient and operative variables were examined by medical record review. Major complications were defined as wound hemorrhage, airway obstruction, or prosthesis extrusion. Minor complications were defined as vocal fold hematoma without airway obstruction or prosthesis movement. The major complication rate was 8.6%, and the minor complication rate was 29%. No delayed hemorrhage or airway obstruction occurred. Prosthesis extrusion occurred in five (8.6%) patients 1 week to 5 months after surgery. Extrusion was associated with suboptimal prosthesis placement in 80% of cases. Two patients retained excellent glottal closure despite extrusion. Vocal fold hematoma was identified in 14 (24%) cases and resolved within 1 week. Prosthesis movement occurred in three (5%) patients 1 week to 6 months after surgery and resulted in poor glottal closure. All patients with prosthesis extrusion or movement were female. Type I thyroplasty remains a safe outpatient procedure with few major complications. Prosthesis extrusion was associated with suboptimal prosthesis placement and may or may not result in poor glottal closure. Minor vocal fold hematomas were relatively frequent, resolved rapidly, and were not associated with airway obstruction. Female patients may be more prone to complications because of their small laryngeal size.

  12. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Cui,1 Timur Kouliev2 1Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Emergency Department, Beijing United Family Hospital, Beijing, China Abstract: Acute subdural hematoma (SDH resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. Keywords: head injury, oculomotor, palsy, subdural hematoma, trauma, tentorium, cerebral herniation, intracranial hemorrhage

  13. Influence of Postoperative Hypertension on the Development of Spinal Epidural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2017-11-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare postoperative complication but can result in catastrophic neurological deficits requiring immediate surgical evacuation of the hematoma. Knowing the risk factors for postoperative SEH can help surgeons stratify patients. Therefore, to identify possible risk factors for postoperative SEH, we reviewed 6 clinical cases and examined the relation between postoperative hypertension and the risk of developing SEH. A retrospective review was conducted of 1282 consecutive patients who underwent spinal surgery at a single institution between 2010 and 2015. Of this cohort, 6 patients developed symptomatic SEH and underwent emergency hematoma evacuation. The 6 SEH patients were evaluated for previously described risk factors of postoperative hematoma formation. In particular, postoperative blood pressure measurements were reviewed. The incidence of postoperative symptomatic SEH was 0.468%. Two patients developed SEH secondary to a nonfunctional surgical drain in the early postoperative period (5 or 12 h post-surgery). Preoperative and postoperative hypertension was observed in 4 patients who developed SEH at greater than or equal to 48 h following surgery. Our findings suggest that rigorous postoperative blood pressure control may decrease the risk of SEH. © 2017 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. MRI (1,5 T) of traumatic extracerebral hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, D.; Grodd, W.; Voigt, K.

    1989-09-01

    The advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of subacute and chronic traumatic extracerebral hematomas are described. The characteristic changes in signal intensity for hematomas depend on the magnetic properties of hemoglobin and its derivatives, which shorten the relaxation times and decrease the homogeneity of the local magnetic field. MRI is superior in detecting and depicting the extent of small hematomas adjacent to the skull. Changes in signal intensity with time allow rough estimation of the age of a hematoma. Small hemorrhages were often found (missed by CT) that were contralateral to chronic subdural hematomas. (orig.).

  15. Preoperative MR angiography evaluation of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Li; Yang Dakuan; Yuan Shuguang; Yan Dong; Wang Jiaping; Li Yingchun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the application of MR angiography (MRA) in deciding the puncture points of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: Preoperative MRA was performed in 59 patients with portal hypertension (study group) in order to search for the causes of portal hypertension, to observe the patterns and route of the hepatic and portal veins and to measure the vascular diameter at the scheduled puncture site. MRA was also performed in 50 healthy subjects, which was served as the control group. The results were compared between two groups. Results: The diseases in the study group included simple cirrhosis (n=49), cirrhosis accompanied with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=4), pure portal vein thrombosis (n=3), splenic vein stenosis (n=1) and Budd-Chiari syndrome (n=2). In study group the type I, II and III of the hepatic vein classification were seen in 14, 39 and 12 cases respectively,while in control group in 12, 34 and 14 cases respectively. In study group, the right, middle and left hepatic vein which had the diameter larger enough for puncturing existed in 52, 40 and 28 cases respectively, while in control group in 46, 34 and 23 cases respectively. The safe point for puncture via the right and the left branch of the portal vein was located beyond the distance of (16.2 ± 3.1) mm and (14.2 ± 3.8) mm respectively. Conclusion: MRA is a valuable non-invasive examination, which is of great value in determining the causes of portal hypertension and in planning the puncturing sites before performing TIPS. (authors)

  16. Immunohistochemical analysis of restenotic tissue after transjugular portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qin; An Yanli; Deng Gang; Fang Wen; Zhu Guangyu; Li Guozhao; Wei Xiaoying; Liu Yuanyuan; Teng Gaojun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of several restenotic tissue elements after transjugular portosystemic shunt, and to provide more informations for the mechanism of TIPS restenosis. Methods: TIPS was performed in 6 swine to set up TIPS animal models. 14-21 days after operation, the models were sacrificed to obtain the TIPS tissues for pathological examinations, including electric microscope, HE staining, and immunohistochemical staining of anti-SMC-actin-α, PCNA, Vementin, myoglobulin, eNOS and iNOS. Then , the results were comparatively analyzed between TIPS obstructed shunt tissues and non-obstructed shunt tissues. Results: Restenosis was occurred with different degrees in 4 swine of the 6 TIPS models. Electric microscopic results showed that the restenosis tissues were composed of over proliferated collagen, SMCs and fibroblasts. Anti-SMC-actin-α and PCNA were strongly positive expression in restenotic tissues, and also positive in patent tissues. Vimentin expressed strongly in unstenotic tissues, on the contrary, it expressed obviously weaker in restenotic tissues. Myoglobulin expressed more strongly in restenotic tissues and weakened in unstenotic tissues. eNOS expressed positive in normal liver tissues, and expressed weaker near TIPS restenotic tissues. iNOS showed stronger expression in restenotic tissues and could hardly expressed in normal liver tissues. Conclusions: Restenotic rate may be 67% in TIPS swine models. Restenotic tissues may be mainly composed of proliferated SMCs positively expressed anti-SMC-actin-α with strong ability of movement. eNOS may be expressed in normal liver tissues and instead iNOS be expressed in strongly injured liver tissues. (authors)

  17. Endoscopic Surgery for Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is generally addressed by craniotomy under general anesthesia. We report a patient whose traumatic ASDH was treated under local anesthesia by one-burr-hole endoscopic surgery. This 87-year-old woman had undergone coil embolization for a ruptured right middle-cerebral artery aneurysm and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus 5 years earlier. Upon admission, she manifested consciousness disturbance after suffering head trauma and right hemiplegia. Her Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (E2V2M4. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a thick, left-frontotemporal ASDH. Due to her advanced age and poor condition, we performed endoscopic surgery rather than craniotomy to evacuate the ASDH. Under local anesthesia, we made a burr hole in her left forehead and increased its size to 15 mm in diameter. After introducing a transparent sheath into the hematoma cavity with a rigid endoscope, the clot was evacuated with a suction tube. The arterial bleeding point was electrically coagulated. A postoperative CT scan confirmed the reduction of the hematoma. There was neither brain compression nor brain swelling. Her consciousness disturbance and right hemiplegia improved immediately. Endoscopic surgery may represent a viable method to address traumatic intracranial hematomas in some patients.

  18. Subdural hematoma and oral anticoagulant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintzen, A. R.; Tijssen, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    In a retrospective study of the period 1959 to 1978, the role of anticoagulant therapy (ACT) in the development of subdural hematoma (SH) was investigated. Of 212 cases, 46 were receiving ACT, a proportion highly in excess of the frequency of ACT in the general population of the Leiden area. In this

  19. Treatment Outcomes of Auricular Hematoma Using Corrugated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It poses a challenge to the otolaryngologist in the developing world due to its high rate of recurrence, and lack of appropriate materials for use as stitch dressing. The diagnosis of auricular hematoma is generally straightforward. The collected blood or serum causes a loss of normal contour on the lateral surface of the auricle ...

  20. Computed tomographic findings of intramural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Hoon; Kim, Hong; Woo, Seong Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-10-15

    The CT findings of eleven patients with intramural hematoma of the gastrointestinal tract are presented. The most frequent site of intramural hematoma was duodenum(7/11). followed jejunum(2/11), ascending colon(2/11), stomach(1/11), and rectum(1/11). Blunt abdominal trauma was the prime etiologic factor(7/11). others included pancreatitis, iatrogenic and unknown. Intramural hematoma showed three patterns of CT characteristics: intramural mass(8/11), thickened bowel wall(1/11), and both(2/11). There were variable attenuation value of 10 cases of intramural mass; homogenous hyperdensity or hypodensity in each 3 cases, inhomogeneous or mixed density in 4 cases. Also there were peripheral lucent halo(1/10), pseudocapsule or dense rim(5/10), crescentic hyperdensity(2/10) and central hyperdense area(4/10). Associated CT features were hemoperitoneum(4), mesenteric infiltration, fatty liver, pancreatic confusion, and chronic pancreatitis. CT is the most accurate method in establishing the diagnosis or intramural hematoma, evaluating the extent of bleeding and its effect on adjacent organs, demonstrating regression after treatment, and detecting associating injury.

  1. Bilateral Biconvex Frontal Chronic Subdural Hematoma Mimicking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common clinical entities encountered in daily neurosurgical practice.[1] CSDH is an encapsulated collection of old blood, mostly or totally liquefied and located between the dura mater and arachnoid.[2] We discuss the clinical and radiological findings in a case of ...

  2. Traumatic Extradural Hematoma in Enugu, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute extradural (epidural) hematoma (EDH) is a neurosurgical emergency and timely surgical intervention for significant EDH is the accepted standard for treatment. Acute (EDH) occurs in approximately 1-3% of patients with head injuries and in 5 to. 15% of patients with severe head injuries.[1] It is rare before the age of 2 ...

  3. Computed tomographic findings of intramural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Hoon; Kim, Hong; Woo, Seong Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1990-01-01

    The CT findings of eleven patients with intramural hematoma of the gastrointestinal tract are presented. The most frequent site of intramural hematoma was duodenum(7/11). followed jejunum(2/11), ascending colon(2/11), stomach(1/11), and rectum(1/11). Blunt abdominal trauma was the prime etiologic factor(7/11). others included pancreatitis, iatrogenic and unknown. Intramural hematoma showed three patterns of CT characteristics: intramural mass(8/11), thickened bowel wall(1/11), and both(2/11). There were variable attenuation value of 10 cases of intramural mass; homogenous hyperdensity or hypodensity in each 3 cases, inhomogeneous or mixed density in 4 cases. Also there were peripheral lucent halo(1/10), pseudocapsule or dense rim(5/10), crescentic hyperdensity(2/10) and central hyperdense area(4/10). Associated CT features were hemoperitoneum(4), mesenteric infiltration, fatty liver, pancreatic confusion, and chronic pancreatitis. CT is the most accurate method in establishing the diagnosis or intramural hematoma, evaluating the extent of bleeding and its effect on adjacent organs, demonstrating regression after treatment, and detecting associating injury

  4. Serious clopidogrel associated renal hematoma in a type 2 diabetic patient with primary hyperparathyroidism after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahceci, Mithat; Tuzcu, Alpaslan; Agil, Cuneyt; Akay, Ferruh; Akay, Hatice

    2005-01-01

    Renal hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy SWL is a rare complication. We report a case of a large renal hematoma following SWL that resulted in nephrectomy in a type 2 diabetic patient with primary hyperparathyroidism using clopidogrel due to coronary heart disease CHD. Although it was claimed that preoperative use of clopidogrel was not associated with increased bleeding, all patients who are scheduled for SWL should be interrogated in terms of using of platelet aggregation inhibitors such as clopidogrel, and these drugs should be interrupted appropriately before undergoing SWL. (author)

  5. Acute spinal epidural hematoma: MR imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenjian; Xu Aide

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathogenesis of acute spinal epidural hematomas (ASEHs), MRI features, and its value on diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Methods: Fifteen patients with ASEHs (8 males, 7 females, mean age 37.8 years) were reviewed. Seven of the patients were secondary to spinal injuries (5 spinal trauma, 1 post-spinal operation, and 1 post-lumbar puncture) and 8 were spontaneous. Eleven patients were confirmed by operation. MRI was performed in all patients in sagittal SE T 1 WI and SE or FSE T 2 WI, 12 in axial FSE T 2 WI, 8 in axial SE T 1 WI, and 4 in contrast-enhanced SE T 1 WI. Results: Fifteen ASEHs involved 18 spinal segments, 6 of the segments (6/18) in cervical spine, 9 segments (9/18) in thoracic spine, and 3 segments (3/18) in lumbar spine. The hematomas located at pre-epidural space in 7 segments (7/18) and at posterolateral epidural space in 11 segments (11/18). The craniocaudal extent of the hematomas varied from 1 to 13 vertebral levels (average 4.87 vertebral level). There were low signal intensity lines between hematomas and spinal cord in all of the cases on T 1 WI. The low signal intensity line between hematoma and subarachnoid space was demonstrated in 8 cases (8/12) and 4 cases (4/15) on axial T 2 WI and sagittal T 2 WI, respectively. The figure of hematomas was biconvex on axial imaging in all of the cases, and long lentiform on sagittal imaging in 13 cases (13/15). The hematomas showed variable signal intensity. On T 1 WI, 5 showed isointensity to cord, 6 with hyperintensity, and 4 with inhomogeneous iso-hyperintensity. On T 2 WI, 5 showed hypointensity, 10 with inhomogeneous hypo-hyperintensity. There was no special MR manifestation after contrast administration. Conclusion: ASEHs is a rare disorder, and MRI features are characteristic for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis

  6. Experimental models of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abbondanza, Josephine A; Loch Macdonald, R

    2014-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical problem. Most studies of pathogenesis and treatment involve humans. Advances in understanding of human diseases may be made using animal models. We reviewed all animal models of CSDH and report here their results, conclusions and limitations in order to set a baseline upon which further advanced experimental work related to this disease can be made. PubMed, Medline, Embase and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched with no time limits using the keyword 'chronic subdural hematoma' and MeSH term 'hematoma, subdural, chronic'. The authors reviewed all papers written related to this disease and selected all publications involving animals. There were no other restrictions. The findings and conclusions of the papers are summarized here. No formal analysis was done because of the variation in species used, methods for induction of CSDH, times of assessment and reporting of results. Attempts to create CSDH have been made in mice, rats, cats, dogs and monkeys. Methods include injection or surgical implantation of clotted blood or various other blood products and mixtures into the potential subdural space or the subcutaneous space. No intracranial model produced a progressively expanding CSDH. Transient hematoma expansion with liquification could be produced by subcutaneous injections in some models. Spontaneous subdural blood collections were found after creation of hydrocephalus in mice by systemic injection of the neurotoxin, 6-aminonicotinamide. The histology of the hematoma membranes in several models resembles the appearance in humans. None of the models has been replicated since its first description. We did not find a report of a reproducible, well-described animal model of human CSDH.

  7. [Three cases of acute interhemispheric subdural hematoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, N; Kurihara, E; Matsuoka, H; Kose, S; Tamaki, N; Matsumoto, S

    1988-01-01

    Traumatic acute subdural hematomas over the convexity of the cerebral hemispheres are often encountered, but acute interhemispheric subdural hematomas are rare. Fourty-eight cases of acute subdural hematomas was admitted to our hospital between 1977 and 1986, and three cases of them (6%) were located in the interhemispheric subdural space. In this paper, these three cases are reported with 20 documented cases. Case 1: an 81-year-old female was admitted to our hospital because of headache, nausea and vomiting. She hit her occiput a week ago. CT scan demonstrated contusion in the right frontal lobe and a high density in the interhemispheric space of the right frontal region. Her complaints disappeared gradually by conservative therapy and she returned to her social life. Case 2: a 50-year-old male fell downstairs and hit his vertex. As he lost consciousness, he was admitted to our hospital. He was stuporous and had left-hemiparesis. Skull X-ray film showed fracture line extending from the right temporal bone to the left parietal bone across the midline. CT scan revealed intracerebral hematoma in both frontal lobe and right parietal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern and Sylvian fissure of the right side. And interhemispheric subdural hematoma in the right parietal region was visualized. Angiography demonstrated a lateral displacement of the right callosomarginal artery and an avascular area between the falx and the callosomarginal artery. After admission his consciousness recovered and convulsion was controlled by drug. Left-hemiparesis was improved by conservative therapy and he was discharged on foot.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. The Effectiveness of Subdural Drains Using Urokinase after Burr Hole Evacuation of Subacute Subdural Hematoma in Elderly Patients: A Prelimilary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Chang-Gi; Jeon, Woo-Yeol; Kim, Seong-Ho; Kim, Oh-Lyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective A subdural drain using urokinase after a burr hole hematoma evacuation was performed for subacute subdural hematoma (SASDH), and its effectiveness and safety in elderly patients were evaluated. Methods Between January 2013 and May 2015, subdural drains using urokinase after burr hole hematoma evacuation were performed in 19 elderly patients. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) a subdural hematoma occurring between 4 and 20 days after injury; 2) worsening neurological symptoms, from mild to moderate or severe, due to injury during the subacute stage; 3) a mix of solid clots (high-density lighter shadow) and fluid hematoma (low-density darker shadow) on the computed tomography (CT) scan; 4) a score of ≥9 on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) assessed immediately before surgery; and 5) an age of ≥65 years. When the majority of the hematoma was evacuated on the CT, we removed the catheter. Results Under local anesthesia, a catheter was inserted into the hematoma through a burr hole. The mean age of the patients was 73.7 years (range, 65-87 years). The mean preoperative GCS score was 11.2 (range, 10-13), and the mean Glasgow Outcome Scale score for all patients was 5 at discharge. No recurrences of hematomas or surgical complications were observed. Conclusion A subdural drain using urokinase after burr hole hematoma evacuation under local anesthesia is thought to be an effective and safe method of blood clot removal with low morbidity. This surgical method is less invasive for treating elderly patients with SASDH. PMID:27857916

  9. Epidural Hematoma and Abscess Related to Thoracic Epidural Analgesia: A Single-Center Study of 2,907 Patients Who Underwent Lung Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupersztych-Hagege, Elisa; Dubuisson, Etienne; Szekely, Barbara; Michel-Cherqui, Mireille; François Dreyfus, Jean; Fischler, Marc; Le Guen, Morgan

    2017-04-01

    To report the major complications (epidural hematoma and abscess) of postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia in patients who underwent lung surgery. Prospective, monocentric study. A university hospital. All lung surgical patients who received postoperative thoracic epidural analgesia between November 2007 and November 2015. Thoracic epidural analgesia for patients who underwent lung surgery. During the study period, data for 2,907 patients were recorded. The following 3 major complications were encountered: 1 case of epidural hematoma (0.34 case/1,000; 95% confidence interval 0.061-1.946), for which surgery was performed, and 2 cases of epidural abscesses (0.68 case/1,000; 95% confidence interval 0.189-2.505), which were treated medically. The risk range of serious complications was moderate; only the patient who experienced an epidural hematoma also experienced permanent sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CT guided stereotactic evacuation of hypertensive and traumatic intracerebral hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondo, Hideki; Matsumoto, Keizo

    1983-01-01

    Recent advancement of CT system provides not only definite diagnosis and location of intracerebral hematoma but also coordinates of the center of the hematoma. Trials of stereotactic evacuation of the hematoma have been reported by some authors in the cases of subacute or chronic stages of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. In this series, similar surgery has been performed in 33 cases of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma including 22 cases in acute stage, and 2 cases of traumatic hematoma. Clinical outcomes were investigated and the results were considered to be equivalent or rather better in the conventional microsurgery with evacuation of hematoma under direct vision. However, there still remained controversial problems in the cases of threatened herniation signs, because in these cases regular surgery with total evacuation of the hematoma at one time might have been preferable. The benefits of this CT guided stereotactic approach for the evacuation of the hematoma were thought to be as follow: 1) the procedure is simple and safe, 2) operation is readily performed under local anesthesia, and 3) the hematoma was drained out totally by means of urokinase activity. It is our impression that this surgery not only is indicated as emergency treatment for the patients of high-age or in high risk, but also can institute as a routine surgery for the intracerebral hematomas in patients showing no herniation sign. (J.P.N.)

  11. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, F A M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C B L M; van Rijn, R R

    2014-08-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as dating subdural hematomas can lead to identification of a suspect. The aim of our study is to describe the current practice among radiologists in the Netherlands regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas in children. This is a cross-sectional study, describing the results of an online questionnaire regarding dating subdural hematomas among pediatric and neuro-radiologists in the Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic questions, theoretical questions and eight pediatric cases in which the participants were asked to date subdural hematomas based on imaging findings. Fifty-one out of 172 radiologists (30 %) filled out the questionnaire. The percentage of participants that reported it was possible to date the subdural hematoma varied between 58 and 90 % for the eight different cases. In four of eight cases (50 %), the age of the subdural hematoma as known from clinical history fell within the range reported by the participants. None of the participants was "very certain" of their age determination. The results demonstrate that there is a considerable practice variation among Dutch radiologists regarding the age determination of subdural hematomas. This implicates that dating of subdural hematomas is not suitable to use in court, as no uniformity among experts exists.

  12. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  13. Radiation Exposure in Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, Roberto, E-mail: rmiraglia@ismett.edu; Maruzzelli, Luigi, E-mail: lmaruzzelli@ismett.edu; Cortis, Kelvin, E-mail: kelvincortis@ismett.edu [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Radiology Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services (Italy); D’Amico, Mario, E-mail: mdamico@ismett.edu [University of Palermo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Floridia, Gaetano, E-mail: gfloridia@ismett.edu; Gallo, Giuseppe, E-mail: ggallo@ismett.edu; Tafaro, Corrado, E-mail: ctafaro@ismett.edu; Luca, Angelo, E-mail: aluca@ismett.edu [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Radiology Service, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation is considered as being one of the most complex procedures in abdominal interventional radiology. Our aim was twofold: quantification of TIPS-related patient radiation exposure in our center and identification of factors leading to reduced radiation exposure.Materials and methodsThree hundred and forty seven consecutive patients underwent TIPS in our center between 2007 and 2014. Three main procedure categories were identified: Group I (n = 88)—fluoroscopic-guided portal vein targeting, procedure done in an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS); Group II (n = 48)—ultrasound-guided portal vein puncture, procedure done in an IIDS; and Group III (n = 211)—ultrasound-guided portal vein puncture, procedure done in a flat panel detector-based system (FPDS). Radiation exposure (dose-area product [DAP], in Gy cm{sup 2} and fluoroscopy time [FT] in minutes) was retrospectively analyzed.ResultsDAP was significantly higher in Group I (mean ± SD 360 ± 298; median 287; 75th percentile 389 Gy cm{sup 2}) as compared to Group II (217 ± 130; 178; 276 Gy cm{sup 2}; p = 0.002) and Group III (129 ± 117; 70; 150 Gy cm{sup 2}p < 0.001). The difference in DAP between Groups II and III was also significant (p < 0.001). Group I had significantly longer FT (25.78 ± 13.52 min) as compared to Group II (20.45 ± 10.87 min; p = 0.02) and Group III (19.76 ± 13.34; p < 0.001). FT was not significantly different between Groups II and III (p = 0.73).ConclusionsReal-time ultrasound-guided targeting of the portal venous system during TIPS creation results in a significantly lower radiation exposure and reduced FT. Further reduction in radiation exposure can be achieved through the use of modern angiographic units with FPDS.

  14. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk Factors for Chronic Subdural Hematoma Recurrence Identified Using Quantitative Computed Tomography Analysis of Hematoma Volume and Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrinou, Pantelis; Katsigiannis, Sotirios; Lee, Jong Hun; Hamisch, Christina; Krischek, Boris; Mpotsaris, Anastasios; Timmer, Marco; Goldbrunner, Roland

    2017-03-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), a common condition in elderly patients, presents a therapeutic challenge with recurrence rates of 33%. We aimed to identify specific prognostic factors for recurrence using quantitative analysis of hematoma volume and density. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic and clinical data of 227 CSDHs in 195 consecutive patients who underwent evacuation of the hematoma through a single burr hole, 2 burr holes, or a mini-craniotomy. To examine the relationship between hematoma recurrence and various clinical, radiologic, and surgical factors, we used quantitative image-based analysis to measure the hematoma and trapped air volumes and the hematoma densities. Recurrence of CSDH occurred in 35 patients (17.9%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the percentage of hematoma drained and postoperative CSDH density were independent risk factors for recurrence. All 3 evacuation methods were equally effective in draining the hematoma (71.7% vs. 73.7% vs. 71.9%) without observable differences in postoperative air volume captured in the subdural space. Quantitative image analysis provided evidence that percentage of hematoma drained and postoperative CSDH density are independent prognostic factors for subdural hematoma recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Initial hematoma pressure and clinical recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma in cases where percutaneous subdural tapping was performed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Akitake; Kawamoto, Yukihiko; Yoshioka, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Taro; Yonezawa, Koki

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous subdural tapping for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) can measure initial hematoma pressure, which cannot be measured using burr-hole craniotomy. Initial hematoma pressure has not been discussed as a risk factor for recurrence. We evaluated the clinical features for recurrence, which included initial hematoma pressure. The study involved 71 unilateral CSDH cases whose initial hematoma pressure was measured using percutaneous subdural tapping. Clinical recurrence was identified in 19 cases (23%). Age, sex, neurological grading, alcohol consumption, presence of head injury, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, antiplatelet, anticoagulant medication, hematoma volume on computed tomography (CT) images, and initial hematoma pressure were compared between non-recurrence and recurrence groups. The initial hematoma pressure was 12.6±4.5 cmH 2 O in the non-recurrence group, and 15.5±6.2 cmH 2 O in the recurrence group (p<0.05). The other factors did not differ significantly except hematoma volume on CT images (92±45 ml in the non-recurrence group and 123±43 ml in the recurrence group, p<0.05). Cases with high initial hematoma pressure should be closely observed. (author)

  17. Spontaneous subdural hematoma and antiplatelet therapy: Does efficacy of Ticagrelor come with added risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattanagere Manjunatha Suryanarayana Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet therapy has established clinical benefit on cardiovascular outcome and has reduced the rates of re-infarction/in stent thrombosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes. Major bleeding episodes can occur with antiplatelet therapy and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is one of the most feared complications resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Identification of high risk groups and judicious use of antiplatelet therapy reduces the bleeding risk. Ticagrelor is a newer P2Y12 receptor antagonist with established clinical benefit. However, risks of having an ICH with these newer molecules cannot be ignored. Here, we report a case of spontaneous acute subdural hematoma developing in a patient on antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor. Early recognition, discontinuation of the medication and appropriate management resulted in resolution of hematoma and good clinical outcome. Authors have reviewed the antithrombotic drugs and their tendencies in causing intracranial bleeds from a neurophysicians perspective.

  18. [Neonatal adrenal hematoma: various modes of presentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadil, F-Z; Lehlimi, M; Chemsi, M; Habzi, A; Benomar, S

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal adrenal hematoma is a rare condition, most frequently caused by trauma. We report three cases of adrenal hematoma admitted to the Neonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the A. Harouchi Children's Hospital, the Ibn Rushd University Hospital in Casablanca, Morocco, over a 2-year period from January 2011 to December 2012. The average age of these patients was 5 days. The clinical presentations were diverse; the most common manifestations were intense jaundice in one case, acute adrenal insufficiency in one case, and severe anemia in the other case. Abdominal ultrasonography was used to confirm the diagnosis and monitor adrenal hemorrhage in all the patients. Analysis of clinical, laboratory, and ultrasonography data showed a favorable prognosis in all the patients. Based on these observations, we discuss the risk factors, clinical presentations, progression and management of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. Ultrasonographic findings of psoas abscess and hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Yong Dae; Kim, Ho Kyun; Kim, Soon Yong

    1984-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic findings of 9 cases tuberculous abscess, 5 cases of pyogenic abscess and 2 cases of hematoma of psoas and adjacent muscles was made. Fluid collection with or without internal echoes was seen in 12 cases out of total 16 cases. Other findings were 2 cases of only muscle swelling, 1 cases of highly echogenic mass-like appearance and 1 case of fluid collection with septae. Ultrasonography is considered an accurate method in identifying early pathologic changes of the psoas muscle and determining its extent, and in differentiating tumor from fluid collection of the psoas muscle. Authors dare to say that ultrasound examination is a procedure of choice in the diagnosis of psoas abscess and hematoma

  20. Effects of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on blood volume distribution in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Troels M; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens H

    2017-01-01

    increased (+22%, prestores central hypovolaemia......BACKGROUND: Cirrhosis is accompanied by portal hypertension with splanchnic and systemic arterial vasodilation, and central hypovolaemia. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) alleviates portal hypertension, but also causes major haemodynamic changes. AIMS: To investigate effects...... catheterization. Central and arterial blood volume (CBV) and cardiac output (CO) were determined with indicator dilution technique. RESULTS: After TIPS, the thoracic blood volume increased (+10.4% of total blood volume (TBV), p

  1. Postoperative CT appearance in chronic subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Takaaki; Nishikawa, Michio; Handa, Hajime; Iwaki, Kazuo; Sawai, Teruaki; Munaka, Masahiro

    1988-05-01

    Postoperative CT appearances in 65 cases of chronic subdural hematomas were evaluated in terms of patient's age, preoperative neurological symptoms and CT findings, final outcomes, and so on. All of the cases were treated with trepanation and irrigation. CT appearances were divided into four different types as follows; Type Ia: No abnormal findings in the subdural sapce, Type Ib: The same as above except for a linear high density suggestive of thickened outer membrane, Type II: Persistence subdural fluid collection and widened cortical sulci which indicate underlining brain atrophy, Type III: Remaining hematoma and/or density changes during follow-up period. Although the mean age of the patients in type Ib was higher than those in type Ia and reexpansion of the brain appear to delay in type Ib and preoperative CT in type Ib tended to show mixed density, final outcome in both groups were excellent. Characteristics in type II were that most of cases were in the eighth decade, preceding head injury was unclear, preoperative psychiatric symptoms and disturbance of consciousness were common and postoperative improvement of the symptoms was not satisfactory compared to other types. Aged patients as in type Ib and type II and thick hematomas of over 2 cm depth with mixed or high density tended to show type III postoperatively. All of the nine patients who required reoperation were included in this type. The present study indicates that thick hematomas with sizable mass effect and mixed or high density in the aged must be carefully treated, such as with placement of the subdural drainage or keeping the patient in the Trendelenburg position, to facilitate postoperative reexpansion of the brain.

  2. A new treatment for hypertensive intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiwaku, Tetsushi; Tanikawa, Tatsuya; Amano, Keiichi

    1986-01-01

    Durining the last 2 years, 46 cases of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage in the basal ganglia were treated by CT guided stereotactic aspiration and their outcome was evaluated in terms of the rate of hematoma removal, the change of consciousness level and the recovery of motor and sensory functions. They are aged from 45 to 79 years old, the average 56, and aspirated 1 to 24 days after the onset, two third of them being within 1 week. The whole procedure was done in the CT room under direct CT guidance and by one trial. In putaminal type hemorrhage, the removed hematoma volumes ranged from 9 to 48 ml, average being 23.7 ml, in thalamic type from 5 to 29 ml, average being 15.5 ml. The average rate of removal was 81.1 % in 30 cases within 1 week. In most cases, preoperative consciousness was not severely disturbed, in putaminal type, 19 were alert or confused, 4 somnolent, 5 stuperous and in thalamic type, 6, 6, 3 respectively and 2 were semicomatous, one of them had herniation sign. In putaminal type all but 2 cases recovered to alert or confused state, the first one had postoperative bleeding and the other was already apallic preoperatively. In thalamic type, we lost 3 cases, 2 by gastrointestinal bleeding and 1 DIC, by rehemorrhage 2 months after the operation. All but one who was semicomatous preoperatively recovered to alertness. In motor function, some cases of the putaminal bleeding with intact internal capsule remained hemiplegic. On the other hand, most of the cases with partial destruction of the internal capsule on CT recovered well in both types of hematoma. Especially in thalamic type, only 2 had inability to walk durinig the follow-up period. In sensory function, two thirds of the cases recovered to almost normal level. CT guided stereotactic aspiration, therefore, can be evaluated as less invasive and more definitive treatment for intracerebral hematoma in the basal ganglia. (author)

  3. Subdural Hematoma Mimickers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Dragos; Koziarz, Alex; Cenic, Aleksa; Nath, Siddharth; Singh, Sheila; Almenawer, Saleh A; Kachur, Edward

    2016-09-01

    A variety of subdural pathologies that may mimic hematomas are reported in the literature. We aimed to identify the atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of subdural masses that may mimic subdural hematomas. A systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase was conducted independently by 2 reviewers to identify articles describing subdural hematoma mimickers. We also present a patient from our institution with a subdural pathology mimicking a subdural hematoma. We analyzed patient clinical presentations, underlying pathologies, radiologic findings, and clinical outcomes. We included 43 articles totaling 48 patients. The mean ± SD patient age was 55.7 ± 16.8 years. Of the 45 cases describing patient history, 13 patients (27%) had a history of trauma. The underlying pathologies of the 48 subdural collections were 10 metastasis (21%), 14 lymphoma (29%), 7 sarcoma (15%), 4 infectious (8%), 4 autoimmune (8%), and 9 miscellaneous (19%). Findings on computed tomography (CT) scan were 18 hyperdense (41%), 11 hypodense (25%), 9 isodense (20%), 3 isodense/hyperdense (7%), and 3 hypodense/isodense (7%). Thirty-four patients (71%) were treated surgically; among these patients, 65% had symptom resolution. Neither the pathology (P = 0.337) nor the management strategy (P = 0.671) was correlated with improved functional outcomes. Identification of atypical history and radiologic features should prompt further diagnostic tests, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to elucidate the proper diagnosis, given that certain pathologies may be managed nonsurgically. A subdural collection that is hyperdense on CT scan and hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI, along with a history of progressive headache with no trauma, may raise the suspicion of an atypical subdural pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Malignant Subdural Hematoma Associated with High-Grade Meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Shinichiro; Tsunoda, Akira; Kawamura, Kaito; Sugiyama, Natsuki; Saito, Rikizo; Maruki, Chikashi

    2018-01-01

    A 70-year-old man, who had previously undergone surgical resection of left parasagittal meningioma involving the middle third of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) two times, presented with recurrence of the tumor. We performed removal of the tumor combined with SSS resection as Simpson grade II. After tumor removal, since a left dominant bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) appeared, it was treated by burr hole surgery. However, because the CSDH rapidly and repeatedly recurred and eventually changed to acute subdural hematoma, elimination of the hematoma with craniotomy was accomplished. The patient unfortunately died of worsening of general condition despite aggressive treatment. Histopathology of brain autopsy showed invasion of anaplastic meningioma cells spreading to the whole outer membrane of the subdural hematoma. Subdural hematoma is less commonly associated with meningioma. Our case indicates the possibility that subdural hematoma associated with meningioma is formed by a different mechanism from those reported previously. PMID:29896565

  5. Delayed hydronephrosis due to retroperitoneal hematoma after a seatbelt injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yoshitaka; Kumon, Kento; Masaoka, Yoshihisa; Hiraki, Takao; Yamada, Taihei; Naito, Hiromichi; Nakao, Atsunori

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hydronephrosis caused by retroperitoneal hematoma after a seatbelt injury is a unique clinical entity. Patient concerns: A 21-year-old man, who had been wearing a seatbelt, was brought to our hospital after a motor vehicle collision, complaining of abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed retroperitoneal hematoma in the upper pelvic region. Since he was hemodynamically stable throughout admission, he was managed conservatively. Seventeen days after initial discharge, the patient revisited our emergency department due to right back pain. Diagnoses: CT scans indicated retroperitoneal hematoma growth resulting in hydronephrosis of the right kidney. Interventions: Laparoscopic drainage of the retroperitoneal hematoma was successfully performed. Outcomes: His symptoms resolved after the surgery. Follow-up CT scans three months later demonstrated complete resolution of the hydronephrosis and retroperitoneal hematoma. Lessons: Our case highlights a patient with delayed hydronephrosis because of retroperitoneal hematoma expansion after a seatbelt injury. PMID:29879068

  6. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma in a patient with multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ahad Wani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in a patient of multiple myeloma receiving chemotherapy is an unknown event, needing an urgent neurosurgical management. We report this patient who presented with progressive neurological deterioration and a low platelet count. She was successfully managed by craniotomy and evacuation of subdural hematoma with intraoperative transfusion of platelets. The acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in her was probably related to the bleeding diathesis due to thrombocytopenia associated with chemotherapy.

  7. CT findings in a case of neonatal acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshu, K.; Horie, Y.; Hirashima, Y.; Endo, S.; Takaku, A.

    1981-01-01

    The CT findings in a case of neonatal accute subdural hematoma are presented. CT demonstrated a crescentic high density area in the subdural space over the left cerebral hemisphere and an oval high density area in the left occipital region. The latter was suspected of being an intracerebral hematoma. Emergency craniotomy revealed that the high density area was due to a subdural hematoma between the occipital lobe and the tentorium cerebelli. (orig.)

  8. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis presenting with an intracranial epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.-W.; McLeary, M.S.; Zuppan, C.W.; Won, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy developed vomiting and severe headache following minor head trauma. A CT scan of the head demonstrated a lytic lesion of the skull and adjacent epidural hematoma. Surgical evacuation and removal of the skull lesion and hematoma were carried out, and pathologic evaluation resulted in a diagnosis of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH). Epidural involvement of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis is very rare, and we report the first case of LCH presenting as an intracranial epidural hematoma. (orig.)

  9. Hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale score and ICH score: which predicts the 30-day mortality better for intracerebral hematoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality.This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant.The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018, 0.715 (P = 0.0008 (by ABC/2 to 0.738 (P = 0.0002 (by CAVA, 0.877 (P<0.0001 (by ABC/2 to 0.882 (P<0.0001 (by CAVA, and 0.912 (P<0.0001, respectively.Our study shows that hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score.

  10. Prognostic Significance of Ultraearly Hematoma Growth in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients Receiving Hematoma Evacuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Jun; Guo, Rui; Ma, Lu; Li, Mou; Wang, Xiaoze; Lin, Sen; You, Chao; Li, Hao

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the association between ultraearly hematoma growth (uHG) and clinical outcome in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) receiving hematoma evacuation. Supratentorial sICH patients receiving hematoma evacuation within 24 hours after ictus were enrolled in this study. uHG was defined as baseline hematoma volume/onset-to-computed tomography (CT) time (mL/h). The outcome was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 3 months. Unfavorable outcome was defined as mRS >2. A total of 93 patients were enrolled in this study. The mean uHG was 10.3 ± 5.5 mL/h. In 69 (74.2%) of patients, the outcome was unfavorable at 3 months. The uHG in patients with unfavorable outcome were significantly higher than in those with favorable outcome (11.0 ± 6.1 mL/h vs. 8.3 ± 2.5 mL/h, P = 0.003). The optimal cutoff of uHG for predicting unfavorable outcome was 8.7 mL/h. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of uHG >8.7 mL/h for predicting unfavorable outcome were 56.5%, 75.0%, 86.7%, and 37.5%, respectively. uHG is a helpful predictor of unfavorable outcome in sICH patients treated with hematoma evacuation. The optimal cutoff of uHG to assist in predicting unfavorable outcome in sICH patients receiving hematoma evacuation is 8.7mL/h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Calcified subdural hematoma associated with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishige, Naoki; Sunami, Kenro; Sato, Akira; Watanabe, Osamu

    1984-01-01

    A case of calcified subdural hematoma associated with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is reported. A left frontal subdural hematoma with left putaminal hemorrhage was incidentally found when a CT scan was performed to evaluate right hemiparesis and aphasia in a 55-year-old man. The putaminal hemorrhage was not very extensive, but his clinical symptoms were rather serious. Not only the putaminal hemorrhage, but also the presence of the calcified subdural hematoma was considered to have caused his clinical deterioration. The subtotal removal of the calcified subdural hematoma brought about a good result. (author)

  12. PATOBIOLOGÍA DEL HEMATOMA SUBDURAL CRÓNICO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Sabogal Barrios

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of subdural cronic hematoma in all ages is a therapeutic challenge. Chronic subdural hematoma is a disease that can be fatal without surgical treatment. A variety of treatment options like subdural tapping, endoscopic washout, shunting and craniotomy have been discussed. In chronic subdural hematoma, spontaneous resolution with conservative treatment is not an common therapeutic method because it has causes high mortality, requires long periods of time, and finally, many patients need surgical treatment. The etiology, physiopathology and surgical alternatives in the treatment of subdural chronic hematoma is discussed.

  13. Rapid spontaneous resolution of an acute subdural hematoma: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won Kyong; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byoung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok; Bae, Hack Gun; Yun, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University, Chonan Hospital, Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-10-15

    We present a case of acute subdural hematoma which was rapidly resolved without surgical intervention. This 31 year old man had a hematoma of which thickness was 9 mm and was paraplegic due to fracture-dislocation of thoracic spine at the level of TII-12 Rapid recovery of consciousness despite of sizable hematoma made to take a serial CT scanning instead of immediate surgical interventions. The hematoma was resolved within 4 hours without surgery. Possible mechanism of this rapid spontaneous resolution is discussed with brief review of the related literature.

  14. Ruptured aneurysms of the middle cerebral artery with intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomori, Shigeo; Kim, Ilu; Ueda, Shinsuke; Pak, Shinsa

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm with intracerebral hematoma were studied. The age distribution ranged from 16 to 68, with an average of 48 years. Fifteen were female, 6 male. Computerized tomography (CT) scans were performed within 24 hours after the onset in 19. Diagnosis was established by angiography or surgery. Seventeen patients were operated on, whereas 4 were not because their condition was too poor. CT showed hematoma in the Sylvian fissure and the temporal lobe in a section 30 mm above the orbitomeatal line. Extension of the hematoma was to the frontal lobe anteriorly and/or the temporal lobe posterosuperiorly. The site of hematoma was related to the direction of the aneurysmal projection. Cases were divided into the following three groups: Group I; cases with the temporal lobe hematoma. Group II; cases with hematoma extending to both the frontal and temporal lobes. Group III; cases with hematoma in the frontal lobe. All of the 14 cases in Group I underwent operation. Mortality was 14%. Morbidity was correlated to the size of hematoma. The outcome was good in cases with hematoma less than 40 mm in diameter. Four out of 6 cases of Group II were not operated on and died within 3 days after onset. Uncal herniation was suspected early in their course. Of two operated cases, one died and the other was severely disabled. Outcome in one case of Group III was good. This study suggests that outcome can be anticipated from CT findings. (author)

  15. Sonographic diagnosis of intramural hematoma of gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Seong Ku; Cheon, S. K.; Seong, N. G.

    1989-01-01

    Sonographic findings of nine cases of intramural hematoma of the gastrointestinal tract are presented. The duodenum was the most common site, followed by the ascending colon and the stomach. Intramural hematomas present as centrally or eccentrically located bowel mass of variable echogenicity: heter-ogeneously echogenic in six cases; hypoechoic in two case; anechoic in one case. In five cases of duodenal hematoma, the stomach and/or duodenal bulb were distended and filled with fluid. It is concluded that ultrasonography is a simple and useful tool in the diagnosis of intramural hematoma of the intestine

  16. Subdural hematomas: an analysis of 1181 Kashmiri patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayil, Khursheed; Ramzan, Altaf; Sajad, Arif; Zahoor, Sheikh; Wani, Abrar; Nizami, Furqan; Laharwal, Masood; Kirmani, Altaf; Bhat, Rashid

    2012-01-01

    We endeavored to analyze patients of subacute and chronic subdural hematomas studied in a 4-year period at the Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Kashmir, India. The study was a retrospective analysis of 1181 patients of subdural hematomas. Demographic characteristics, clinico-radiologic features, operative modalities, and outcome were studied. Acute subdural hematomas were excluded from the study. The mean age was 60.4 ± 12.4 and males outnumbered females. Chronic subdural collections were more common than subacute subdural hematomas and left side predominated. Two burr holes with closed-system drainage was used in most patients. Incidence of postoperative seizures is very low. Overall recurrence rates were low; however, multilocular hematomas had the highest incidence of recurrence. Morbidity and mortality were 7.53% and 2.96%, respectively. Preoperative neurologic grade correlated with outcome. Subdural hematomas are common in elderly males. Preoperative neurologic grade dictates the outcome. Multilocular hematomas have a higher chance of recurrence. Craniotomy should be reserved for recurrent hematomas, and there may be a scope of craniotomy for multilocular chronic subdural hematomas at the outset. Antiepileptic prophylaxis is not routinely recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spontaneous Rapid Resolution of Acute Epidural Hematoma in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Gülşen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute epidural hematoma is a critical emergency all around the world, and its aggressive diagnosis and treatment are of vital importance. Emergent surgical evacuation of the hematoma is known as standard management; however, conservative procedures are also used for small ones. Spontaneous rapid resolution of these hematomas has also been reported in eight pediatric cases. Various theories have been proposed to explain the underlying pathophysiology of this resolution. Herein, we are reporting a new pediatric case with spontaneously resolving acute epidural hematoma 12 hours after admission to the emergency room.

  18. Optimal perioperative management of antithrombotic agents in patients with chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Toshiyuki; Takahara, Kenta; Maehara, Naoki; Shimogawa, Takafumi; Mukae, Nobutaka; Sayama, Tetsuro; Arihiro, Shoji; Arakawa, Shuji; Morioka, Takato; Haga, Sei

    2016-12-01

    The use of antithrombotic agents such as anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents is widespread, and the opportunities to treat patients with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) under antithrombotic therapy are growing. However, whether antithrombotic therapy contributes to postoperative complications and recurrences of CSDH and how these agents should be managed in the surgical treatment of CSDH remains unclear. We retrospectively analyzed 150 consecutive patients with CSDH who underwent neurosurgical interventions at Kyushu Rosai Hospital from 2011 to 2015 and followed them for more than 3 months. Of the 150 study patients, 44 received antithrombotic therapy. All anticoagulants and 76% of the antiplatelet agents were discontinued before surgical treatment of CSDH and resumed within 1 week except in 4 patients whose treatment was terminated and 7 patients who developed postoperative complications or underwent reoperations before resumption of these agents. Postoperative hemorrhagic complications associated with surgical treatment of CSDH occurred in 8 patients (5.3%), and there was no significant difference in the incidence of these complications between patients with and without antithrombotic therapy (6.8% vs. 4.7%, respectively; p=0.90). Postoperative thromboembolic complications occurred in 5 patients (5.4%), including 4 patients with antithrombotic therapy; these complications developed before resumption of antithrombotic agents in 2 patients. There was a significant difference in the incidence of postoperative thromboembolic complications between patients with and without antithrombotic therapy (9.1% vs. 0.9%, respectively; p=0.04). There were no significant differences in the incidence of radiographic deterioration or reoperation of ipsilateral or contralateral hematomas between patients with and without antithrombotic therapy after surgical treatment of unilateral CSDH. A history of antithrombotic therapy was significantly correlated with the incidence of

  19. Opening the Internal Hematoma Membrane Does Not Alter the Recurrence Rate of Chronic Subdural Hematomas: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterhofer, Claudia; Freyschlag, Christian F; Thomé, Claudius; Ortler, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Factors determining the recurrence of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs) are not clear. Whether opening the so-called internal hematoma membrane is useful has not been investigated. To investigate whether splitting the inner hematoma membrane influences the recurrence rate in patients undergoing burr-hole craniotomy for CSDH. Fifty-two awake patients undergoing surgery for 57 CSDHs were prospectively randomized to either partial opening of the inner hematoma membrane (group A) or not (group B) after enlarged burr-hole craniotomy and hematoma evacuation. Drainage was left in situ for several days postoperatively. Groups were comparable with regard to demographic, clinical, and imaging variables. Outcome was assessed after 3-6 weeks for the combined outcome variable of reoperation or residual hematoma of one third or more of the original hematoma thickness. Fourteen patients underwent reoperation for clinical deterioration or residual hematoma during follow-up (n = 6 in group A, 21%; n = 8 in group B, 28 %) (P = 0.537). Residual hematoma of ≥ one third not requiring surgery was present in 7 patients in group A (25%) and 10 patients in group B (36%) (P = 0.383). The overall cumulative failure rate (reoperation or hematoma thickness ≥ one third) was 13/28 (46%) in group A and 18/28 in group B (P = 0.178; relative risk, 0.722 [95% confidence interval, 0.445-1.172]; absolute risk reduction -16% [95% confidence interval, -38% to 8%]). Opening the internal hematoma membrane does not alter the rate of patients requiring revision surgery and the number of patients showing a marked residual hematoma 6 weeks after evacuation of a CSDH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Capsulotomy for treatment of compartment syndrome in patients with post extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy renal hematomas: safe and effective, but also advisable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghazal, Andreas; Schnoeller, Thomas J; Baechle, Christian; Steinestel, Julie; Jentzmik, Florian; Steffens, Sandra; Hirning, Christian; Schrader, Mark; Schrader, Andres J

    2014-07-08

    To examine whether surgical decompression of hematomas by capsulotomy can help to improve long-term renal function following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). This study retrospectively identified 7 patients who underwent capsulotomy for post SWL renal hematomas between 2008 and 2012. The control group comprised 8 conservatively treated patients. The median follow-up time was 22 months. The two groups were comparable in age, gender, body mass index, risk factors for developing hematomas (renal failure, urinary flow impairment, indwelling ureteral stent and diabetes mellitus) and the selected SWL modalities. Hematoma size was also similar. However, significantly more patients in the surgical group had purely intracapsular hematomas (85.7% vs. 37.5%) without a potentially pressure-relieving capsular rupture. There were no significant differences in the post-interventional drop in hemoglobin, rise in retention parameters or drop in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). No capsulotomy-related complications were observed, but surgery required a significantly longer hospital stay than conservative management (median, 9 days vs. 5 days). The two groups also showed comparable recovery of renal function at long-term follow-up (median change in GFR from baseline, 97.1% and 97.8%, respectively). Since renal function did not differ between the two treatment groups, the conservative management remains the standard treatment for post-SWL renal hematoma.

  1. Clinical implications of acute pelvicaliceal hematoma formation during percutaneous catheter nephrostomy insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jessica K; Smith, Tony P; Kim, Charles Y

    To determine the clinical implications of acute pelvicaliceal hematoma formation during percutaneous catheter nephrostomy (PCN) insertion. Collecting system hematoma burden was retrospectively assessed for 694 PCN insertions in 502 patients. Pelvicaliceal hematoma formation occurred in 146 kidneys (21%) in 136 patients. Clinically significant blood loss occurred in 3 patients with hematomas within one week compared to 4 patients without hematomas (p=0.39). Twenty-four patients with hematomas underwent catheter exchange within one week, compared to 55 patients without hematomas (p=0.49). Pelvicaliceal hematoma formation after PCN insertion is not uncommon and is associated with very rare clinical sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Independent predictors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is characterized by blood in the subdural space that evokes an inflammatory reaction. Numerous factors potentially associated with recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma have been reported, but these factors have not been sufficiently investigated. In this study, we evaluated the independent risk factors of recurrence. We analyzed data for 420 patients with chronic subdural hematoma treated by the standard surgical procedure for hematoma evacuation at our institution. Ninety-two (21.9 %) patients experienced at least one recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma during the study period. We did not identify any significant differences between chronic subdural hematoma recurrence and current antiplatelet therapy. The recurrence rate was 7 % for the homogeneous type, 21 % for the laminar type, 38 % for the separated type, and 0 % for the trabecular type. The rate of recurrence was significantly lower in the homogeneous and trabecular type than in the laminar and separated type. We performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis and found that postoperative midline shifting (OR, 3.6; 95 % CI, 1.618-7.885; p = 0.001), diabetes mellitus (OR, 2.2; 95 % CI, 1.196-3.856; p = 0.010), history of seizure (OR, 2.6; 95 % CI, 1.210-5.430; p = 0.014), width of hematoma (OR, 2.1; 95 % CI, 1.287-3.538; p = 0.003), and anticoagulant therapy (OR, 2.7; 95 % CI, 1.424-6.960; p = 0.005) were independent risk factors for the recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. We have shown that postoperative midline shifting (≥5 mm), diabetes mellitus, preoperative seizure, preoperative width of hematoma (≥20 mm), and anticoagulant therapy were independent predictors of the recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma. According to internal architecture of hematoma, the rate of recurrence was significantly lower in the homogeneous and the trabecular type than the laminar and separated type.

  3. Hematoma Shape, Hematoma Size, Glasgow Coma Scale Score and ICH Score: Which Predicts the 30-Day Mortality Better for Intracerebral Hematoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Yang, Fu-Chi; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Kao, Hung-Wen; Juan, Chun-Jung; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH) score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA) and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC) were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018), 0.715 (P = 0.0008) (by ABC/2) to 0.738 (P = 0.0002) (by CAVA), 0.877 (Phematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score. PMID:25029592

  4. Rapid reduction of acute subdural hematoma and redistribution of hematoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Arata; Omata, Tomohiro; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman presented with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) which showed rapid resolution on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. She was transferred to our hospital after falling out of bed. On admission, she was comatose with Japan Coma Scale score of 200 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E1V1M2. Brain CT showed a thick left frontotemporal ASDH. Conservative treatment consisted of 200 ml of glycerol administered intravenously twice a day, and maintenance in the approximately 20 degree head-up position to reduce intracranial pressure. Three days later, her consciousness recovered to Japan Coma Scale score of 30 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E2V4M5. CT showed obvious reduction of the hematoma without brain or scalp swelling. Spinal MR imaging detected no redistribution of hematoma to the spine. The present case illustrates that rapid spontaneous reduction of ASDH may occur by redistribution of hematoma, mainly to the supratentorial subdural space because of brain atrophy.

  5. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) in the Treatment of Venous Symptomatic Chronic Portal Thrombosis in Non-cirrhotic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, Jose I.; Elorz, Mariana; Vivas, Isabel; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Bastarrika, Gorka; Benito, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To present a series of cases of non-cirrhotic patients with symptomatic massive portal thrombosis treated by percutaneous techniques. All patients underwent a TIPS procedure in order to maintain the patency of the portal vein by facilitating the outflow. Methods: A total of six patients were treated for thrombosis of the main portal vein (6/6); the main right and left branches (3/6) and the splenic vein (5/6) and superior mesenteric vein (6/6). Two patients had a pancreatic malignancy; one patient with an orthotopic liver transplant had been surgically treated for a pancreatic carcinoma. Two patients had idiopathic thrombocytosis, and in the remaining patient no cause for the portal thrombosis was identified. During the initial procedure in each patient one or more approaches were tried: transhepatic (5/6), transileocolic (1/6), trans-splenic (1/6) or transjugular (1/6). In all cases the procedure was completed with a TIPS with either ultrasound guidance (3/6), 'gun-shot' technique (2/6) or fluoroscopic guidance (1/6).Results: No complications were observed during the procedures. One patient had a repeat episode of variceal bleeding at 30 months, one patient remained asymptomatic and was lost to follow-up at 24 months, two patients were successfully treated surgically (cephalic duodenopancreatectomy) and are alive at 4 and 36 months. One patient remains asymptomatic (without new episodes of abdominal pain) at 16 months of follow-up. One patient died because of tumor progression at 10 months. Conclusion: Percutaneous techniques for portal recanalization are an interesting alternative even in non-acute thrombosis. Once flow has been restored in the portal vein TIPS may be necessary to obtain an adequate outflow, hence facilitating and maintaining the portal flow

  6. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric variceal bleeding: its feasibility compared with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Yoon, Chang Jin; Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Kwon, Jong Won [Seoul Natioonal University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Guk Myung [Cheju National University College of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) in active gastric variceal bleeding, and to compare the findings with those of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Twenty-one patients with active gastric variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis were referred for radiological intervention. In 15 patients, contrast-enhanced CT scans demonstrated gastrorenal shunt, and the remaining six (Group 1) underwent TIPS. Seven of the 15 with gastrorenal shunt (Group 2) were also treated with TIPS, and the other eight (Group 3) underwent BRTO. All patients were followed up for 6 to 21 (mean, 14.4) months. For statistical inter-group comparison of immediate hemostasis, rebleeding and encephalopathy, Fisher's exact test was used. Changes in the Child-Pugh score before and after each procedure in each group were statistically analyzed by means of Wilcoxon's signed rank test. One patient in Group 1 died of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and persistent bleeding three days after TIPS, while the remaining 20 survived the procedure with immediate hemostasis. Hepatic encephalopathy developed in four patients (one in Group 1, three in Group 2, and none in Group 3); one, in Group 2, died while in an hepatic coma 19 months after TIPS. Rebleeding occurred in one patient, also in Group 2. Except for transient fever in two Group-3 patients, no procedure-related complication occurred. In terms of immediate hemostasis, rebleeding and encephalopathy, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). In Group 3, the Child-Pugh score showed a significant decrease after the procedure (p = 0.02). BRTO can effectively control active gastric variceal bleeding, and because of immediate hemostasis, the absence of rebleeding, and improved liver function, is a good alternative to TIPS in patients in whom such bleeding, accompanied by gastrorenal shunt, occurs.

  7. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric variceal bleeding: its feasibility compared with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Ho; Yoon, Chang Jin; Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Kwon, Jong Won; Choi, Guk Myung

    2003-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) in active gastric variceal bleeding, and to compare the findings with those of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Twenty-one patients with active gastric variceal bleeding due to liver cirrhosis were referred for radiological intervention. In 15 patients, contrast-enhanced CT scans demonstrated gastrorenal shunt, and the remaining six (Group 1) underwent TIPS. Seven of the 15 with gastrorenal shunt (Group 2) were also treated with TIPS, and the other eight (Group 3) underwent BRTO. All patients were followed up for 6 to 21 (mean, 14.4) months. For statistical inter-group comparison of immediate hemostasis, rebleeding and encephalopathy, Fisher's exact test was used. Changes in the Child-Pugh score before and after each procedure in each group were statistically analyzed by means of Wilcoxon's signed rank test. One patient in Group 1 died of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and persistent bleeding three days after TIPS, while the remaining 20 survived the procedure with immediate hemostasis. Hepatic encephalopathy developed in four patients (one in Group 1, three in Group 2, and none in Group 3); one, in Group 2, died while in an hepatic coma 19 months after TIPS. Rebleeding occurred in one patient, also in Group 2. Except for transient fever in two Group-3 patients, no procedure-related complication occurred. In terms of immediate hemostasis, rebleeding and encephalopathy, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). In Group 3, the Child-Pugh score showed a significant decrease after the procedure (p = 0.02). BRTO can effectively control active gastric variceal bleeding, and because of immediate hemostasis, the absence of rebleeding, and improved liver function, is a good alternative to TIPS in patients in whom such bleeding, accompanied by gastrorenal shunt, occurs

  8. Acute subdural hematoma because of boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushi, Hidehiko; Saito, Takeshi; Sakagami, Yuichiro; Ohtsuki, Jyoji; Tanjoh, Katsuhisa

    2009-02-01

    To identify factors determining the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) arising from boxing injuries by comparing with ASDH due to any nonboxing cause. Two groups were selected for this study: 10 patients with ASDH because of boxing injuries and 26 patients with nonboxer ASDH. All of the patients underwent neurologic examination by neurosurgeons. Primary resuscitation and stabilization as well as operative therapy were performed to all patients according to the European Brain Injury Consortium Guidelines. Two groups were compared in terms of age, the Glasgow Coma Scale at admission, neurologic findings, craniogram and brain computed tomography scan findings, operative findings, and prognosis. As potential prognostic indicators for boxers, the time interval until surgery, the Glasgow Outcome Scale, hematoma thickness, midline shift, and the site of bleeding were analyzed. The characteristics of patients because of boxing injuries are that patients were younger, had lucid interval, and had no cerebral contusion or contralateral brain injury. There was no significant difference in initial Glasgow Coma Scale, hematoma thickness, midline shift, and their prognosis. The most peculiar clinical presentation of boxers' ASDH was that all bleedings were limited from "bridging veins" or "cortical veins." The prognosis of boxers was most closely correlated with the site of bleeding (r2 = 0.81; p = 0.0001) and the midline shift (r2 = 0.67; p = 0.007). Our study shows that ASDH because of boxing is characterized by bleeding from bridging or cortical veins, and that the site of bleeding is a significant determinant of their prognosis.

  9. Age determination of subdural hematomas: survey among radiologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, F. A. M.; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; van Rijn, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Abusive head trauma is a severe form of child abuse. One important diagnostic finding is the presence of a subdural hematoma. Age determination of subdural hematomas is important to relate radiological findings to the clinical history presented by the caregivers. In court this topic is relevant as

  10. The risk factors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Yu; Nakagawa, Toru; Murakami, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease in the elderly, and the recurrence rate of CSDH is reported to range from 2.3 to 33%. We performed a retrospective review of a number of CSDH cases and the potential factors associated with CSDH recurrence. The patient population comprised 112 men and 65 women with a mean age of 74.7 years. We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, antiplatelet and anticoagulant use, hematoma laterality, hematoma thickness, degree of midline shift and internal architecture of the hematoma in the preoperative CT films, use of irrigation, direction of the drainage tube, width of the subdural space, and degree of midline shift and the presence of a massive subdural air collection in the postoperative CT films. Univariate analysis revealed that there was a trend for different rates of recurrence among the different types of hematomas. The presence of a postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with the recurrence of hematoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that separated hematomas were significantly associated with CSDH recurrence, whereas the presence of postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with hematoma recurrence. Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis could demonstrate an association between the direction of the drainage tube and the recurrence of CSDH.

  11. Prognostic factors in intraparenchymatous hematoma with ventricular hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscalleda, J; Peiro, A

    1986-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage following intraparenchymatous hematoma is thought to be a frequent and often fatal event. Computerized tomography has proved to be valuable for their diagnosis. Hospital records of seventy-eight patients with intraparenchymatous hematoma and intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosed by computerized tomography were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate initial clinical features and CT findings in order to assess potential prognostic factors. (orig.).

  12. Prognostic factors in intraparenchymatous hematoma with ventricular hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruscalleda, J.; Peiro, A.

    1986-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage following intraparenchymatous hematoma is thought to be a frequent and often fatal event. Computerized tomography has proved to be valuable for their diagnosis. Hospital records of seventy-eight patients with intraparenchymatous hematoma and intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosed by computerized tomography were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate initial clinical features and CT findings in order to assess potential prognostic factors. (orig.)

  13. Clinical and computerized tomographic studies of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Takahiro; Maegawa, Mototsugu; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Tanikake, Tatsuo

    1981-01-01

    The authors' experience is based on 84 patients with chronic subdural hematomas verified by surgery. Analysis of CT findings of the chronic subdural hematoma led to a classification of four different types: low, iso-, mixed and high density. The mixed density type was classified into two subdivisions: Type I characterized by the sharp border between two compartments and Type II characterized by high density around the hematoma capsule. There was tendency in the high density type group for the clinical course from onset to be the most rapid, the mass effect for the brain the strongest and the period from onset to surgical intervention the shortest. They were slower, weaker and longer in order of the mixed, iso- and low density types. As a result of analysis of hematoma content, there was no correlation among Ca ion concentration, total protein volume and types of hematoma, but there were some significant correlations among hemoglobin, hematocrit and types of hematoma. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were highest in hematoma content of the high density type and were lower in the order of the high density part of the mixed density type, isodensity type and low density type. However, the hematoma content in the low density type showed the highest value of LDH. (author)

  14. Chronic expanding hematoma in the retroperitoneal space: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic expanding hematoma is a rare condition that develops after surgery, trauma, or injury. It can also develop at any location in the body in the absence of trauma. Clinical findings and various diagnostic imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of this condition. In general, hematomas are naturally reabsorbed and rarely cause serious problems. However, hematomas that develop slowly without a history of trauma, surgery, or bleeding disorders could be difficult to differentiate from soft tissue neoplasms. In the present case, we describe a patient, without any history or physical evidence of trauma, who exhibited a large chronic expanding hematoma in the retroperitoneal space that resulted in hydronephrosis because of the pressure exerted on the left ureter. Case presentation A 69-year-old man presented to our hospital with a swollen lesion in the left flank. A mass, 19 cm in diameter, was detected in the retroperitoneal space by computed tomography. We suspected the presence of a chronic expanding hematoma, soft tissue tumor, or left renal artery aneurysm. Surgical treatment was performed. However, postoperative histopathological examination indicated that the mass was a nonmalignant chronic expanding hematoma. No recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. Conclusion In patients without a history of trauma who present slowly growing masses, the differential diagnosis should include chronic expanding hematoma in addition to cysts and soft tissue tumors. Moreover, the use of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography is essential to differentiate between chronic expanding hematoma and soft tissue tumors. PMID:24237992

  15. Spontaneous resolution of post-traumatic chronic subdural hematoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we present a case of spontaneously resolved post-traumatic bilateral chronic subdural hematoma within a period of one month in a 55-year-old male and we discuss the probable mechanisms of pathophysiology in the spontaneous resolution of chronic subdural hematoma. Keywords: Antiaggregation therapy, chronic ...

  16. Complications and results of subdural grid electrode implantation in epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W S; Lee, J K; Lee, S A; Kang, J K; Ko, T S

    2000-11-01

    We assessed the risk of delayed subdural hematoma and other complications associated with subdural grid implantation. Forty-nine patients underwent subdural grid implantation with/without subdural strips or depth electrodes from January 1994 to August 1998. To identify the risk associated with subdural grid implantation, a retrospective review of all patients' medical records and radiological studies was performed. The major complications of 50 subdural grid electrode implantations were as follows: four cases (7.8%) of delayed subdural hematoma at the site of the subdural grid, requiring emergency operation; two cases (3.9%) of infection; one case (2.0%) of epidural hematoma; and one case (2.0%) of brain swelling. After subdural hematoma removal, the electrodes were left in place. CCTV monitoring and cortical stimulation studies were continued thereafter. No delayed subdural hematoma has occurred since routine placement of subdural drains was begun. In our experience the worst complication of subdural grid implantation has been delayed subdural hematoma. Placement of subdural drains and close observation may be helpful to prevent this serious complication.

  17. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Motamedi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSHE is a rare entity can have several reasons. Its prevalence in population is 0.1 per 100,000 with the male to female ratio of 1/4:1. For the first time Jackson in 1869 reported a case of SSHE and after that it was declared as several hundred cases in literatures. Here, a case of SSHE was reported in a 52 year-old male referred to emergency department following severe low back pain.

  18. Hematoma subdural crónico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Martínez Rozo

    1981-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 169 pacientes con diagnóstico de Hematoma Subdural Crónico (H.S.C. admitidos en el Servicio Neurocirugía del Hospital San Juan de Dios desde 1959 a 1980. Los datos clínicos y paraclínicos fueron recopilados en un formato precodificado y luego perforados en tarjetas de computador. Usando el Computador 360/40 disponible en el Centro de Cálculo de la Universidad Nacional y el Computador Intel de el DANE y utilizando el programa SPSS se clasificó, ordenó y depuró.la información. Se analizaron en cuadro y gráficas los resultados que son los siguientes: el 75% de los pacientes hospitalizados por T.C.E. tenían Hematomas Subdurales Crónicos. El mayor número de casos estaba entre 50 y 60 años. La incidencia de H.S.C. era más elevada en el grupo de los hombres. La cefalea ocurrió en el 75% de los casos, el antecedente traumático estaba presente en 83% de casos y la alteración de la conciencia en el 71%. El 90% de los pacientes consultó dentro de los primeros 4 meses. La angiografía continúa siendo el examen de elección con el 100% de positividad. En la T.A.C.la isodensidad en diferentes etapas de evolución del H.S.C. dificulta el diagnóstico. El E.E.G. tiene una positividad del 93% . La frecuencia de H.S.C. bilateral fue de 20%. La anisocoria fue un índice poco confiable para indicar el sitio del Hematoma porque hubo 11 casos de anisocoria por midriasis derecha que tenían el hematoma contralateral. El predominio parietal en la localización del H.S,C. creemos que se deba a su mecanismo de producción. Se analiza la mortalidad que fue en el estudio de 8% , las secuelas aumentaron con la edad de los pacientes. El estudio de seguimiento se hizo en el 40% de los pacientes que sobrevivieron y demostró la baja morbilidad del H.S.C.

  19. Spontaneous subdural hematoma associated to Duret hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Alves Martins, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SH is a neurosurgical emergency, usually caused by head trauma. Non-traumatic causes include aneurysm or arterial–venous malformation rupture, coagulopathy and others. We report the case of a 66 year-old man who developed apparently unprovoked signs of increased intracranial pressure. Brain computed tomography scan showed an acute spontaneous SH, surgically treated. Throughout surgery, a ruptured cortical artery with intensive bleeding appeared and was cauterized. After surgery, patient remained comatose and a new CT demonstrated Duret hemorrhage at the brainstem. Acute spontaneous SH of arterial origin is rare and highly lethal, in which a good prognosis relies on early diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Naoki; Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    "Headbanging" is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma.

  1. Extramedullary Hematopoiesis: An Unusual Finding in Subdural Hematomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 59-year-old man who was found to have clusters of hyperchromatic, small, round nucleated cells within a subdural hematoma removed after a skull fracture. Immunohistochemistry study confirmed that the cells were hematopoietic components predominantly composed of normoblasts. In this paper, we describe the clinical and pathological findings. A brief review of published information on extramedullary hematopoiesis in subdural hematoma and the mechanisms of pathogenesis are also discussed. While extramedullary hematopoiesis is seen anecdotally by neuropathologists in chronic subdural hematomas, only a few cases are documented in the literature. Furthermore, extramedullary hematopoiesis in subdural hematoma can pose a diagnostic challenge for general pathologists who encounter subdural hematoma evacuations seldom in their surgical pathology practices.

  2. Hematomas na fossa craniana posterior Haematomata in the posterior fossa

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    Mário S. Cademartori

    1969-09-01

    Full Text Available São relatados 6 casos de hematomas sub-tentorias (um de hematoma subdural crônico, quatro de hematomas intra-cerebelares, um de hematoma extra-dural. Salientando a pequena freqüência dos hematomas da fossa craniana posterior, o autor mostra a necessidade de vários exames complementares para o diagnóstico exato, indispensável para a aplicação de terapêutica cirúrgica adequada.Six cases of sub-tentorial haematomata (one chronic sub-dural, four intra-cerebellar, one extra-dural are reported. Emphasizing the relative rarity of haematomata in the posterior cranial fossa, the author claims the necessity of complementary examinations for proper diagnosis, indispensable for adequate surgical treatment.

  3. Association of Antithrombotic Drug Use With Subdural Hematoma Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Hellfritzsch, Maja

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Incidence of subdural hematoma has been reported to be increasing. To what extent this is related to increasing use of antithrombotic drugs is unknown. Objectives: To estimate the association between use of antithrombotic drugs and subdural hematoma risk and determine trends in subdural...... hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use in the general population. Design, Setting, and Participants: Case-control study of 10 010 patients aged 20 to 89 years with a first-ever subdural hematoma principal discharge diagnosis from 2000 to 2015 matched by age, sex, and calendar year to 400...... 380 individuals from the general population (controls). Subdural hematoma incidence and antithrombotic drug use was identified using population-based regional data (population: 484 346) and national data (population: 5.2 million) from Denmark. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds...

  4. Rapid Clearance of Lateral Ventricular Hematoma via Frontal Eminence Puncture and Aspiration: A Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaojian; Yao, Weicheng; Han, Kun; Lan, Xiaolei; Bo, Yongli

    2017-01-01

    Background  Intraventricular extension of a parenchymal hemorrhage is an independent predictor of poor outcome and might be complicated by delayed hydrocephalus. We describe a method for the rapid and effective removal of a lateral ventricular hematoma via catheter-based puncture and aspiration. Methods  A catheter-based aspiration of a ventricular hematoma via a frontal eminence (FE) puncture was performed in 10 patients with thalamic and ganglionic hemorrhage perforating into the lateral ventricle. Paralleling the long axis of the lateral ventricle, a flexible silicone catheter was moved anteroposteriorly and rotated simultaneously to facilitate clot aspiration and removal. Computed tomography scans before and after surgery were compared for assessment of ventricular clot volume, Graeb score, and the ventriculocranial ratio (VCR). The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were assessed at 14 days and 12 months following surgery, respectively. Results  In all 10 patients, catheter-based aspiration resulted in substantial hematoma removal with a clearance rate of 64.9%, a reduced Graeb score by 61.8%, and an elevated GCS score by 52.7%. The procedure was performed safely without occurrence of another hemorrhage, infection, and catheter obstruction in any case. At 12-month follow-up, VCR was reduced by 22.5%, no delayed hydrocephalus occurred, and a favorable outcome with an average GOS of 4.6 was observed in this small cohort of patients. Conclusion  Catheter-based aspiration of a ventricular hematoma via FE puncture rapidly, efficiently, and safely reduced the clot in the ventricular system, prevented delayed hydrocephalus sufficiently, and produced a favorable outcome. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate in the Management of Spontaneous Hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozyer, Umut, E-mail: umutozyer@gmail.com [Baskent University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (Turkey)

    2017-01-15

    IntroductionSpontaneous hematoma refractory to conservative management is a potentially serious condition that requires prompt diagnosis and intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in the treatment planning and to report the effectiveness of transcatheter embolization with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA).Materials and MethodsForty-one interventions in 38 patients within a 12-year period were evaluated. CT and angiograms were reviewed for the location of the hematoma, the presence of extravasation, and the correlation of CT and angiography findings.ResultsArterial extravasation was present on 34/39 CT scans. Angiograms confirmed the CT scans in 29 cases. Angiograms revealed extravasation in four cases which CT showed venous bleeding (n = 2) or no bleeding (n = 2). Five patients with arterial and 1 patient with venous extravasation on CT images had no extravasation on angiograms. Embolization was performed to all arteries with extravasation on angiograms. Empiric embolization of the corresponding artery on the CT was performed when there was no extravasation on angiograms. Embolization procedures were performed with 15 % NBCA diluted with iodized oil. Technical success was achieved in 40/41 (97.6 %) interventions. Clinical success was achieved in 35 patients with a single, in 1 patient with 2, and in 1 patient with 3 interventions. No complications related to embolization procedure occurred. None of the patients died due to a progression of the hematoma.ConclusionNBCA is an effective and safe embolic agent to treat hematoma refractory to conservative management. Contrast-enhanced CT may provide faster and more effective intervention.Level of Evidence IIIRetrospective.

  6. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate in the Management of Spontaneous Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyer, Umut

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous hematoma refractory to conservative management is a potentially serious condition that requires prompt diagnosis and intervention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of computed tomography (CT) in the treatment planning and to report the effectiveness of transcatheter embolization with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA). Forty-one interventions in 38 patients within a 12-year period were evaluated. CT and angiograms were reviewed for the location of the hematoma, the presence of extravasation, and the correlation of CT and angiography findings. Arterial extravasation was present on 34/39 CT scans. Angiograms confirmed the CT scans in 29 cases. Angiograms revealed extravasation in four cases which CT showed venous bleeding (n = 2) or no bleeding (n = 2). Five patients with arterial and 1 patient with venous extravasation on CT images had no extravasation on angiograms. Embolization was performed to all arteries with extravasation on angiograms. Empiric embolization of the corresponding artery on the CT was performed when there was no extravasation on angiograms. Embolization procedures were performed with 15 % NBCA diluted with iodized oil. Technical success was achieved in 40/41 (97.6 %) interventions. Clinical success was achieved in 35 patients with a single, in 1 patient with 2, and in 1 patient with 3 interventions. No complications related to embolization procedure occurred. None of the patients died due to a progression of the hematoma. NBCA is an effective and safe embolic agent to treat hematoma refractory to conservative management. Contrast-enhanced CT may provide faster and more effective intervention. Retrospective.

  7. Arachnoid cysts with spontaneous intracystic hemorrhage and associated subdural hematoma: Report of management and follow-up of 2 cases

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    Mehmet Emin Adin, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are one of the most frequently encountered intracranial space-occupying lesions in daily neurosurgery and neuroradiology practice. Majority of arachnoid cysts, particularly those of smaller sizes, have a benign uneventful lifetime course. Certain symptoms may indicate serious complications related to underlying arachnoid cysts. Hemorrhage is one of the most fearsome complications of arachnoid cysts and almost all reported cases in the literature have undergone surgical correction. In this study, we aimed to present clinical and radiologic follow-up findings in two adult cases of intracranial arachnoid cyst with spontaneous intracystic hemorrhage and associated subdural hematoma, one of which was successfully treated conservatively. In addition, we broadly summarized and discussed pertinent studies in the English literature. Keywords: Arachnoid cyst, Subdural hematoma, Intracystic hemorrhage, Headache

  8. CT guided stereotactic evacuation for hypertensive intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideo

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-one cases of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma were evacuated by CT guided stereotactic method. The operation was performed in the CT room under general anesthesia using the KOMAI-NAKAJIMA STEREOTACTIC DEVICE. This instrument has a micromanipulater that can be used for various kinds of stereotactic procedures. Three dimensional position of the target point (aspiration point of the hematoma) was determined on the film obtained from CT scanning of the patient in the stereotactic system. If the hematoma was small, the target point was enough to be one point at the center of the hematoma, but in case of the large hematoma, several target points were given according to the shape of hematoma. The probe, ordinarily a steel tube 4 mm in outer diameter, was inserted through brain to the target point and the hematoma was aspirated through a silicon tube connected to a vacuum system. Among 61 cases examined, 30 cases of thalamic hemorrhage were operated upon and 36 cases were not operated. They were classified according to the volume of hematoma into 3 groups as follows: A=less than 10 ml, B=11-25 ml, C=more than 25 ml. The operated cases were compared with the non operated cases on the improvement of consciousness in each group. In the A group, the operated patients in the level I recovered more slowly than the non operated patients, but in the level II patients, this was reversed. In the B group, the operated patients improved more quickly except the level I patients. In the C group, almost all of non operated patients died. Thus, this operation was very useful in improving consciousness of level II or III patients independent of hematoma volume. It accelerated the recovery of motor function in the level I. This non inversive technique is considered effective for the removal of deep intracerebral hematoma. (author)

  9. CT-guided stereotaxic evacuation of cerebellar hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niizuma, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Taisuke; Ohyama, Hideki; Suzuki, Jiro

    1985-01-01

    Stereotaxic lateral approach for cerebellar hematoma is presented using Leksell's CT-stereotaxic system. All of the procedures are performed in the CT room. Patient's head is turned to contralateral side of the hematoma 30 to 40 0 with slight flexion of the neck. Stereotaxic apparatus is secured to the head under local anesthesia. Hematoma is confirmed by computerized tomograms. Three dimensional coordinates of the target point (center of the hematoma) are measured from the vertical and diagonal rods of Leksell's system. Linear skin incision 4 cm in length is made on retromastoid area. Burr-hole is put on just lateral position of the target point, usually 5 to 6 cm posterior and 1 cm above from the external auditory meatus. Transverse or sigmoid sinus does not appeared through the burr-hole by this approach. Specially made Dandy's cannula (3.0 mm in diameter, 220 mm in length) is inserted into the target point, and manual evacuation of the hematoma is performed carefully using a syringe. Then Dandy's cannula is replaced by silastic drainage tube (3.5 mm in diameter), and 6,000 Units of Urokinase solved in 2 ml of saline is administered to the hematoma cavity. Dissolved hematoma is aspirated every 24 hours until the most of the hematoma is evacuated. We operated three cases of cerebellar hematoma by this method with favorable results. Advantages of this method are as follows: Operative invasion is minimal; The surgeon can cbeck the residual hematoma and position of the tip of cannula even at operation, if necessary. (author)

  10. Contrast of artificial subcutaneous hematomas in MRI over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Eva Maria; Ogris, Kathrin; Petrovic, Andreas; Neumayer, Bernhard; Widek, Thomas; Yen, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2015-03-01

    In clinical forensic medicine, hematomas and other externally visible injuries build the basis for the reconstruction of events. However, dating of subcutaneous hematomas based on their external aspect is difficult. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven its use in dating intracranial hemorrhage. Thus, the aim was to investigate if MRI can also be used for dating subcutaneous hematomas and to analyze an eventual influence of the hematoma shape. In 20 healthy volunteers (11 females, 9 males, aged 26.9 ± 3.8 years), 4 ml of autologous blood were injected subcutaneously in the thigh. The hematoma was scanned immediately after the injection, after 3 and 24 h and 3, 7, and 14 days using three sequences with different contrast. Data was analyzed by measuring signal intensities of the hematoma, the muscle, and the subcutaneous tissue over time, and the Michelson contrast coefficients between the tissues were calculated. In the analysis, hematoma shape was considered. Signal intensity of blood in the proton density-weighted sequence reached its maximum 3 h after the injection with a subsequent decrease, whereas the signal intensities of muscle and fatty tissue remained constant. The time course of the Michelson coefficient of blood versus muscle decreased exponentially with a change from hyperintensity to hypointensity at 116.9 h, depending on hematoma shape. In the other sequences, either variability was large or contrast coefficients stayed constant over time. The observed change of contrast of blood versus muscle permits a quick estimate of a hematoma's age. The consideration of the hematoma shape is expected to further enhance dating using MRI.

  11. Prospects for conservative treatment of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Yoshio

    1982-01-01

    111 In-DTPA was injected into the hematoma cavity before and after hematoma evacuation and irrigation in 12 cases of chronic subdural hematoma with comparatively mild symptoms. The radioactivity in the head was measure with time using a scintillation counter and the attenuation rate was obtained. The value measured hourly were expressed as ratios of the 1st measured value. Because of the properties of 111 In-DTPA, this attenuation rate was considered to be the absorption rate of the liqid components of the hematoma. In 8 of the preoperative cases, the average measured values, were 84.8 +- 12.6% after 3 hours, 77.3 +- 12.1% after six hours, 34.5 +- 13.8% after 24 hours and 13.3 +- 13.5% after 48 hours. In six of the postoperative cases, the values were 70.4 +- 14.3% after 3 hours, 47.8 +- 10.8% after 6 hours, 12.4 +- 6.7% after 24 hours and 3.6 +- 2.0% after 48 hours. In a comparison between the two, the postoperative cases showed clearly advanced absorption with a significant difference at a risk factor of 0.1% or less in each case. This is because the osmotic pressure is the same for the liquid in the hematoma, the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid and an explanation based on this alone is difficult; it is neccessary to consider colloid osmotic pressure. When the radioactivities in the liquid in the hematoma, blood and cerebrospinal fluid were measured, the values for the blood were always higher than those for the cerebrospinal fluid and most of the absorption of the hematoma is considered to originate in the vascular bed in the hematoma cavity (sinusoidal channel layer). Therefore, for the conservative treatment of chronic subdural hematomas, it is necessary to consider methods which promote absorption of the hematoma. (J.P.N.)

  12. Subperiosteal Drainage versus Subdural Drainage in the management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma (A Comparative Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chih, Adrian Ng Wei; Hieng, Albert Wong Sii; Rahman, Noor Azman A; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) remain one of the most frequent diagnoses in current neurosurgical practice. Burr-hole craniostomy with irrigation and placement of close-system drainage is the current recommended surgery for symptomatic CSDH. The aim of this study is to perform a direct comparison between two surgical techniques in the treatment of symptomatic CSDH, which have been proven in previous studies to be efficient. Our main objective was to compare the efficacy of placement of a subperiosteal drain (SPD) and a subdural drain (SDD) following single burr-hole craniostomy and irrigation, and to demonstrate any significant differences in terms of overall surgical complications, functional outcome at three months and mortality rate. The study was carried out in two local neurosurgical centres. The SPD group was performed in Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) and the SDD group was performed in Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru (HSAJB), from 1 January 2012 till 30 January 2014 with a total of 30 patients in both treatment groups. Overall, there were no statistically significant difference in terms of patient general characteristics, pre-operative and post-operative symptoms, Markwalder grades, post-operative hematoma volume and recurrence, mortality and functional outcome at discharge and at three month follow-up between both groups. Albeit not achieving statistical significance, we observed a lower rate of surgical complication especially for post-operative intracranial hematoma with placement of the SPD system. Our study concludes that both treatment methods proved to be highly effective in the treatment of CSDH. However, with a lower overall surgical complication rate, treatment with single burr-hole craniostomy, irrigation and placement of the SPD system can be considered a treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic CSDH.

  13. [Infected subdural hematoma having a surgery of chronic subdural hematoma 1 year ago:a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Chikao; Ando, Shunpei; Haga, Daisuke; Kuroki, Takao; Sugo, Nobuo; Nagao, Takeki

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of an infected subdural hematoma that occurred 1 year after burr-hole irrigation for chronic subdural hematoma. A 78-year-old woman who had developed left hemiparesis was admitted to our hospital. A computed tomography(CT)scan revealed the presence of a chronic subdural hematoma in the right hemisphere. Her clinical symptoms improved immediately after emergency burr-hole irrigation, which allowed her discharge from the hospital. One year after the initial surgery, she developed an infection of the urinary tract infection, which led to severe pyelonephritis and septic shock. Treatment of the urological symptoms eliminated the systemic inflammation. One month after the urinary infection, the patient was readmitted to the hospital in a comatose state. A CT scan showed regrowth of a residual subdural hematoma surrounded by a thick capsule, causing a midline shift in the brain. An emergency operation for removal of the subdural hematoma by burr-hole irrigation was performed, and pus was drained from the subdural mass. Microbiological cultures of the abscess revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. After surgery, the patient was administered an antibiotic treatment for three weeks and she was discharged with no neurological deficits. Cultures of blood from the septic shock as well as from the abscess both revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. Therefore, a diagnosis of infected subdural hematoma, which was caused by hematogenous infection, was made. We conclude that attention should be paid to the risk of infection of the hematoma capsule in subdural hematomas.

  14. Hematoma de músculo iliopsoas na vigência de tratamento com varfarina Hematoma de músculo iliopsoas en la vigencia de tratamiento con warfarina Iliopsoas muscle hematoma during treatment with warfarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Zago

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A varfarina é droga amplamente utilizada na prevenção de fenômenos tromboembólicos e o conhecimento de seus efeitos adversos faz-se necessário para o acompanhamento dos pacientes. Embora o desenvolvimento de discrasias sanguíneas seja complicação potencial nesses pacientes, a ocorrência de sangramento retroperitoneal é rara. Este artigo discute o caso de um paciente que evoluiu com hematoma do músculo iliopsoas durante tratamento com a referida droga, pós-implante de prótese aórtica metálica, com quadro clínico envolvendo importantes diagnósticos diferenciais.La warfarina es un fármaco ampliamente utilizado en la prevención de fenómenos tromboembólicos, y el conocimiento de sus efectos adversos se hace necesario para el seguimiento de los pacientes. Aunque el desarrollo de discrasias sanguíneas es la complicación potencial en estos pacientes, la ocurrencia de sangrado retroperitoneal es rara. Este artículo discute el caso de un paciente que evolucionó con hematoma del músculo ileopsoas durante tratamiento con el referido fármaco en el postimplante de prótesis mitral metálica, con cuadro clínico implicando importantes diagnósticos diferenciales.Warfarin is a widely used drug for the prevention of thromboembolic events. Knowledge of its adverse effects is necessary for patient follow-up. Although the development of blood dyscrasias is a potential complication in these patients, retroperitoneal bleeding is rare. This article reports the case of a patient who developed iliopsoas muscle hematoma during treatment with warfarin after implantation of a metallic prosthetic aortic valve. The clinical manifestations involved important differential diagnoses.

  15. Catheter placement for lysis of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas: does a catheter position in the core of the hematoma allow more effective and faster hematoma lysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Vesna; Schlegel, Anna; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2017-07-01

    For the fibrinolytic therapy of intracerebral hematomas (ICH) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), a catheter position in the core of the hematoma along the largest clot diameter was assumed to be optimal for an effective clot lysis. However, it never had been proven that core position indeed enhances clot lysis if compared with less optimal catheter positions. In this study, the impact of the catheter position on the effectiveness and on the time course of clot lysis was evaluated. We analyzed the catheter position using a relative error calculating the distance perpendicular to the catheter's center in relation to hematoma's diameter and evaluated the relative hematoma volume reduction (RVR). The correlation of the RVR with the catheter position was evaluated. Additionally, we tried to identify patterns of clot lysis with different catheter positions. The patient's outcome at discharge was evaluated using the Glasgow outcome score. A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The mean hematoma volume was 56 ml. The overall RVR was 62.7 %. In 69 patients, a catheter position in the core of the clot was achieved. We found no significant correlation between catheter position and hematoma RVR (linear regression, p = 0.14). Core catheter position leads to more symmetrical hematoma RVR. Faster clot lysis happens in the vicinity of the catheter openings. We found no significant difference in the patient's outcome dependent on the catheter position (linear regression, p = 0.90). The catheter position in the core of the hematoma along its largest diameter does not significantly influence the effectiveness of clot lysis after rtPA application.

  16. Acute Spontaneous Posterior Fossa Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute posterior fossa subdural hematomas are rare and most of them are trauma-related. Non-traumatic ones have been reported in patients who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura or those who had been receiving anticoagulant therapy. We report on the case of 57-year-old Iranian man who developed sudden severe occipital headache, drowsiness, repeated vomiting, and instability of stance and gait. He was neither hypertensive nor diabetic. No history of head trauma was obtained and he denied illicit drug or alcohol ingestion. A preliminary diagnosis of acute intra-cerebellar hemorrhage was made. His CT brain scan revealed an acute right-sided, extra-axial, crescent-shaped hyperdense area at the posterior fossa. His routine blood tests, platelets count, bleeding time, and coagulation profile were unremarkable. The patient had spontaneous acute infratentorial subdural hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged home well after 5 days. Since then, we could not follow-up him, clinically and radiologically because he went back to Iran. Our patient’s presentation, clinical course, and imaging study have called for conservative management, as the overall presentation was relatively benign. Unless the diagnosis is entertained and the CT brain scan is well-interpreted, the diagnosis may easily escape detection.

  17. Developing a model of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jingyang; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition that has a high incidence in the increasing elderly population of many countries. Pathologically, it is defined as a persistent liquefied hematoma in the subdural space more than 3 weeks old that is generally encased by a membraneous capsule. CSDHs likely originate after minor head trauma, with a key factor in its development being the potential for a subdural cavity to permit its expansion within, which is usually due to craniocerebral disproportion. The pathogenesis of CSDH has been attributed to osmotic or oncotic pressure differences, although measurements of these factors in the CSDH fluid do not support this theory. Current belief is that CSDH arises from recurrent bleeding in the subdural space, caused by a cycle of local angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation and ongoing fibrinolysis. However, because of a lack of detailed knowledge about the precise mechanisms, treatment is often limited to surgical interventions that are invasive and often prone to recurrence. Thus, it is possible that an easily reproducible and representative animal model of CSDH would facilitate research in the pathogenesis of CSDH and aid with development of treatment options.

  18. Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Recurrent Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I; Jamros, Christine; Cogar, William

    2015-09-01

    Syncope is a common emergency department (ED) complaint. Recurrent syncope is less common, but may be concerning for serious underlying pathology. It often requires a broad diagnostic evaluation that may include neurologic imaging. We present the case of a 75-year-old man with non-small-cell carcinoma who presented to the ED for recurrent syncope after coughing spells over the 2 weeks preceding his arrival at the ED. He had a normal cardiac evaluation, however, he had some subacute neurologic changes that prompted obtaining a computed tomography (CT) scan of the head. This led to the diagnosis of atraumatic subdural hematoma that was causing transient transtentorial herniation leading to the recurrent syncope. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians should be aware that recurrent syncope is a possible presentation of increased intracranial pressure that may be due to a mass lesion, particularly if the patient has any acute or subacute neurologic changes. Although this association with a subdual hematoma is rare, other cases of mass lesions leading to syncope after coughing spells have been reported in the literature. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subdural hematoma (SDH is a rare but serious complication of spinal anesthesia. We report a case of intracranial SDH in a patient developing 11 days after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. The patient complained of headache on the 2nd post-operative day that was relieved by analgesics, bed rest and hydration. Later she presented with severe headache, vomiting, dizziness, dysarthria, irritability and somnolence. Diagnosis of the left sided SDH was confirmed radiologically and treated surgically. The patient recovered completely. The report highlights the need of considering the possibility of SDH in patients when postdural puncture headache is prolonged or recurs after a headache free period with neurological symptoms.

  20. Vertebroplasty and delayed subdural cauda equina hematoma: Review of literature and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropeano, Maria Pia; La Pira, Biagia; Pescatori, Lorenzo; Piccirilli, Manolo

    2017-08-16

    Vertebroplasy is considered an alternative and effective treatment of painful oncologic spine disease. Major complications are very rare, but with high morbidity and occur in less than 1% of patients who undergo vertebroplasty. Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is an extremely rare complication, usual developing within 12 h to 24 h after the procedure. We report the case of a tardive SDH in an oncologic patient who underwent VP for Myxoid Liposarcoma metastasis. Trying to explain the pathogenesis, we support the hypothesis that both venous congestion of the vertebral venous plexus of the vertebral body and venous congestion due to a traumatic injury can provoke SDH. To our best knowledge, only 4 cases of spinal subdural hematoma following a transpedicular vertebroplasty have been previously described in International literature and only one of them occurred two weeks after that surgical procedures. Percutaneous verteboplasty is a well-known treatment of pain oncologic spine disease, used to provide pain relief and improvement of quality life and is considered a simple surgical procedure, involving a low risk of complications, but related to high morbidity, such as SDH. Therefore it has to be performed by experienced and skilled surgeons, that should also recognize possible risk factors, making SDH more risky.

  1. Pneumomediastinum: An unusual complication of acute gastrointestinal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, III, W W; Merten, D F; Kirks, D R

    1985-02-01

    Atraumatic of primary pneumomediastinum is an uncommon complication of severe retching and vomiting associated with acute gastrointestinal disorders. In two cases pneumomediastinum was the presenting radiographic abnormality; one patient presented with acute gastroenteritis, and the other present with duodenal obstruction due to hematoma. The pathogenesis of pneumomediastinum in these patients is presented.

  2. Spontaneous liver rupture in pregnancy complicating HELLP syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sariyeh Golmahammadlou

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Spontaneous liver rupture associated with HELLP syndrome is a rare and life-threatening complication of pregnancy. Unruptured liver hematoma is also a rare condition during pregnancy with a very difficult diagnosis. Using clinical diagnostic tests such as CT scan or MRI would be helpful to improve clinical outcomes.

  3. Subdural Hematoma: An Adverse Event of Electroconvulsive Therapy—Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath R. Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is commonly used in the management of medication nonresponsive depressive disorder, with proven efficacy in psychiatric practice since many decades. A rare complication of intracranial bleed following this therapeutic procedure has been reported in sporadic case reports in the English literature. We report a case of such a complication in a 42-year-old male, a known case of nonorganic medication nonresponsive depressive disorder for the last two years who required ECT application. Presenting symptoms included altered mental state, urinary incontinence, and repeated episodes of vomiting; following ECT procedure with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain suggestive of bilateral acute subdural hematoma. Despite the view that it may be used in neurological conditions without raised intracranial tension, it will be worthwhile to be vigilant during post-ECT recovery for any emergent complications.

  4. The role of MR angiography before transjugular placement of a portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.F.; Siewert, B.; Kim, D.; Edelman, R.R.; Stokes, K.R.; Finn, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    The authors employed magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to guide catheter placement for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) procedures in 14 of 24 patients, and compared the results to the 10 patients who did not have prior panning based on MRA. Two-dimensional time-of-flight venography was performed during breath holding, and projection venograms were formatted in sagittal, coronal and axial planes. MRA defined venous anatomy sufficiently well to shorten the procedure and helped to minimize invasiveness. With MRA guidance, intrahepatic needle punctures were significantly fewer (without MRA guidance: mean 12.1; with MRA guidance: mean 3.5, p [de

  5. Pancreaticoportal Fistula and Disseminated Fat Necrosis After Revision of a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Seth J.; Saad, Nael; Korenblat, Kevin; Darcy, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year old man with alcohol related cirrhosis and portal hypertension was referred for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) to treat his refractory ascites. Ten years later, two sequential TIPS revisions were performed for shunt stenosis and recurrent ascites. After these revisions, he returned with increased serum pancreatic enzyme levels and disseminated superficial fat necrosis; an iatrogenic pancreaticoportal vein fistula caused by disruption of the pancreatic duct was suspected. The bare area of the TIPS was subsequently lined with a covered stent-graft, and serum enzyme levels returned to baseline. In the interval follow-up period, the patient has clinically improved.

  6. Hepatic Veins and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a Child Treated by Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with portal hypertension, due to Budd-Chiari syndrome, and retrohepatic inferior vena cava thrombosis, submitted to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) by connecting the suprahepatic segment of the inferior vena cava directly to the portal vein. After 3 months, the withdrawal of anticoagulants promoted the thrombosis of the TIPS. At TIPS revision, thrombosis of the TIPS and the main portal vein and clots at the splenic and the superior mesenteric veins were found. Successful angiography treatment was performed by thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty of a severe stenosis at the distal edge of the stent.

  7. Pancreaticoportal Fistula and Disseminated Fat Necrosis After Revision of a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Seth J., E-mail: kleins@mir.wustl.edu; Saad, Nael [Washington University School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology Section, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Korenblat, Kevin [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine (United States); Darcy, Michael D. [Washington University School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology Section, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States)

    2013-04-15

    A 59-year old man with alcohol related cirrhosis and portal hypertension was referred for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) to treat his refractory ascites. Ten years later, two sequential TIPS revisions were performed for shunt stenosis and recurrent ascites. After these revisions, he returned with increased serum pancreatic enzyme levels and disseminated superficial fat necrosis; an iatrogenic pancreaticoportal vein fistula caused by disruption of the pancreatic duct was suspected. The bare area of the TIPS was subsequently lined with a covered stent-graft, and serum enzyme levels returned to baseline. In the interval follow-up period, the patient has clinically improved.

  8. Clinical studies on cerebral blood flow in chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Atsuhiro; Akagi, Katsuhito; Horibe, Kunio; Yamasaki, Mami; Yuguchi, Takamichi

    1988-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and clinical symptoms were examined between pre- and post-operations in twenty-four patients with unilateral chronic subdural hematoma. The following results were obtained by intravenous /sup 133/Xe method : 1. There was a reducing tendency of the CBF (hemisphere) on hematoma side, in most cases. While, the groups of headache and disturbances of consciousness did not give a laterality between hematoma and opposite side without the group of hemiparesis. 2. The absolute values of the CBF in the groups of headache and disturbances of consciousness were correlated with the clinical symptoms. In the group of hemiparesis, the laterality between hematoma and opposite side was correlated with the clinical symptoms. 3. In the group of hemiparesis, the F-flow (fast-flow) had sensitive reaction more than the ISI (initial slope index) with symptomatic improvement. 4. It was found that there was not an increase in the absolute value of the CBF, which was under the normal limit between pre- and post-operations in the case without improvement. By SPECT (Method of IMP), the following results were obtained : 1. There was the area of defect at the location of hematoma and the CBF tended to reduce at the subcortical white matter and at the basal ganglia of hematoma side. 2. The CBF of the contralateral hematoma side in the hemisphere of cerebellum was also tended to reduce.

  9. Surgical Management of Aneurysmal Hematomas: Prognostic Factors and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghelli, P; Cozzi, F; Hasanbelliu, A; Locatelli, F; Pasqualin, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    From 1991 until 2013, 304 patients with intracranial hematomas from aneurysmal rupture were managed surgically in our department, constituting 17 % of all patients with aneurysmal rupture. Of them, 242 patents presented with isolated intracerebral hematomas (in 69 cases associated with significant intraventricular hemorrhage), 50 patients presented with combined intracerebral and subdural hematomas (in 11 cases associated with significant intraventricular hemorrhage), and 12 presented with an isolated subdural hematoma. The surgical procedure consisted of simultaneous clipping of the aneurysm and evacuation of the hematoma in all cases. After surgery, 16 patients (5 %) submitted to an additional decompressive hemicraniectomy, and 66 patients (21 %) submitted to a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Clinical outcomes were assessed at discharge and at 6 months, using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS); a favorable outcome (mRS 0-2) was observed in 10 % of the cases at discharge, increasing to 31 % at 6 months; 6-month mortality was 40 %. Applying uni- and multivariate analysis, the following risk factors were associated with a significantly worse outcome: age >60; preoperative Hunt-Hess grades IV-V; pupillary mydriasis (only on univariate); midline shift >10 mm; hematoma volume >30 cc; and the presence of hemocephalus (i.e., packed intraventricular hemorrhage). Based on these results, an aggressive surgical treatment should be adopted for most cases with aneurysmal hematomas, excluding patients with bilateral mydriasis persisting after rescue therapy.

  10. The role of postoperative hematoma on free flap compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faisal I; Gerecci, Deniz; Gonzalez, Javier D; Peck, Jessica J; Wax, Mark K

    2015-08-01

    Hematomas may develop in the postoperative setting after free tissue transfer. When hematomas occur, they can exert pressure on surrounding tissues. Their effect on the vascular pedicle of a free flap is unknown. We describe our incidence of hematoma in free flaps and outcomes when the flap is compromised. Retrospective chart review of 1,883 free flaps performed between July 1998 and June 2014 at a tertiary referral center. Patients with free flap compromise due to hematoma were identified. Etiology, demographic data, and outcomes were evaluated. Eighty-eight (4.7%) patients developed hematomas. Twenty (22.7%) of those had flap compromise. Twelve compromises (60%) showed evidence of pedicle thrombosis. The salvage rate was 75% versus 54% in 79 flaps with compromise from other causes (P = .12). Mean time to detection of the hematoma was 35.3 hours in salvaged flaps compared to 91.6 hours in unsalvageable flaps (P = .057). Time to operating room (OR) from detection was 2.8 hours in salvageable flaps compared to 12.4 hours in nonsalvageable flaps (P = .053). The salvage rate for flaps that returned to the OR in hematomas developed rarely. When they did, 23% went on to develop flap compromise. Prompt recognition and re-exploration allowed for a high salvage rate. Vessel thrombosis predicted inability to salvage the flap. 4 © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Chronic subdural hematoma: A survey of neurosurgeons’ practices in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Taopheeq B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a commonly encountered condition in neurosurgical practice. In Nigeria, a developing country, patients with CSDH are less likely to be diagnosed and treated by surgical drainage early. Aware of the reported variations in neurosurgeons’ practices regarding CSDH in many parts of the world, we sought to determine the current practices of Nigerian neurosurgeons in managing CSDH. Methods: An Internet-based survey was carried out in which all Nigerian neurosurgeons listed in the Nigerian Academy of Neurological Surgeons directory during the July–December 2012 time period were asked to participate. Questions asked in the survey were: (1) Type of treatment used in patients with CSDH, (2) Use of drains postoperatively, (3) Postoperative patient positioning, (4) Postoperative mobilization, (5) Postoperative complications, and (6) Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan monitoring. Results: Survey information was sent to the 25 practicing neurosurgeons in Nigeria who met the criteria listed above for being included in this study. Each of the 14 neurosurgeons who responded reported that CSDH is often misdiagnosed initially, usually as a stroke having occurred. Once a diagnosis of CSDH was made, the most common method of treatment reported was placement of one or two burr-holes for drainage of the hematoma. Reported, but used in only a few cases, were twist drill craniostomy, craniectomy, and craniotomy. Each neurosurgeon who responded reported irrigation of the subdural space with sterile saline, and in some cases an antibiotic had been added to the irrigation solution. Six of the 14 neurosurgeons left drains in the subdural space for 24-72 hours. Seven neurosurgeons reported positioning patients with their heads elevated 30° during the immediate postoperative period. No neurosurgeon responding reported use of steroids, and only one acknowledged routine use of anticonvulsive medication for patients with CSDH. Only 3 of

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma: A survey of neurosurgeons' practices in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Taopheeq B

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a commonly encountered condition in neurosurgical practice. In Nigeria, a developing country, patients with CSDH are less likely to be diagnosed and treated by surgical drainage early. Aware of the reported variations in neurosurgeons' practices regarding CSDH in many parts of the world, we sought to determine the current practices of Nigerian neurosurgeons in managing CSDH. An Internet-based survey was carried out in which all Nigerian neurosurgeons listed in the Nigerian Academy of Neurological Surgeons directory during the July-December 2012 time period were asked to participate. Questions asked in the survey were: (1) Type of treatment used in patients with CSDH, (2) Use of drains postoperatively, (3) Postoperative patient positioning, (4) Postoperative mobilization, (5) Postoperative complications, and (6) Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan monitoring. Survey information was sent to the 25 practicing neurosurgeons in Nigeria who met the criteria listed above for being included in this study. Each of the 14 neurosurgeons who responded reported that CSDH is often misdiagnosed initially, usually as a stroke having occurred. Once a diagnosis of CSDH was made, the most common method of treatment reported was placement of one or two burr-holes for drainage of the hematoma. Reported, but used in only a few cases, were twist drill craniostomy, craniectomy, and craniotomy. Each neurosurgeon who responded reported irrigation of the subdural space with sterile saline, and in some cases an antibiotic had been added to the irrigation solution. Six of the 14 neurosurgeons left drains in the subdural space for 24-72 hours. Seven neurosurgeons reported positioning patients with their heads elevated 30° during the immediate postoperative period. No neurosurgeon responding reported use of steroids, and only one acknowledged routine use of anticonvulsive medication for patients with CSDH. Only 3 of the 14 neurosurgeons taking part in

  13. Evolutionary Changes of Traumatic lntrahepatic Hematomas at Sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Nam Suk; Lee, Soo Kyung; Cho, Won Soo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the echo pattern of early stage intrahepatic hematoma and change of the echogenicity according to the time lapse. Twenty-four patents with blunt abdominal trauma underwent sonography. Intrahepatic hematomas were sonographic ally, clinically or operatively diagnosed. Sonograms were retrospectively reviewed by the three observers with consensus. We divided the time interval into 4 groups as follows; within 24 hours, 2 to 7 days, 8 to 30 days, and after one month. The echogenicity, shape and location of intrahepatic hematomas were analyzed. Intrapatic hematomas occurred in the right lobe of the liver in 91.6%, especially in the posterior segment. The margin of hematoma was irregular in 23 cases and well-defined in one case. The shape of intrahepatic hematoma was round in 75%. The echogenicity of hematoma was as follows: within24 hours, hyperechoic(6/14), mixed-echoic(6), hypoechoic(2): in 1∼7 days, hyperechoir(1/10), mixed-echoic(6),hypoechoic(3): in 8∼30 days, mixed-echoic(5/14), hypoechoic(9) respectively. Two cases were completely resolved.All 7 cases were hypoechoic on sonogram after 31 days. On available follow-up sonograms the lesion showed decreased echogenicity in 3 of 5 cases at 1∼7 days interval, 7 of 12 cases at 8∼30 days interval, and 5 of 6 cases after 1 month interval. The echogenicity of the early stage of intrahepatic hematoma was mainly hyperechoic or mixed-echoic. The echogenicity of hematoma decreased with time lapse

  14. Two cases of subdural hematoma with niveau formation on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Satoshi; Fukuda, Atsuhiro; Sato, Masaharu; Kohama, Akitsugu

    1984-01-01

    The authors report a case of a bilateral chronic subdural hematoma with niveau formation and another rare case of an acute subdural hematoma with niveau formation on plain CT. The different mechanisms of the niveau formation in these cases are speculated about. The first case was a 75-year-old male who showed a drowsy state, urinary incontinence, and muscle weakness of the bilateral lower limbs. No definite history of head trauma could be found. A plain CT scan showed a bilateral-crescent type fluid collection with niveau formation, consisting of a low-density area in the upper part and a high-density area in the lower part. An operation showed bilateral, moderately encapsulated subdural hematomas; they were evacuated. The second case was a 61-year-old male with head trauma due to a fall from a ladder. On admission, neurological examination revealed a decerebrate posture, a deep coma, and anisocoria. A plain CT scan twenty hours after the onset showed a crescent-type fluid collection with niveau formation in the left fronto-parietal region. The operation showed an acute subdural hematoma containing xanthochromic fluid and coagulated blood. No capsule of hematoma could be seen. The incidence of niveau formation in chronic subdural hematomas is not low (5 - 20%); such niveau formation is thought to be caused by rebleeding into the hematoma and the spending of considerable time in the supine position. On the other hand, no case of an acute subdural hematoma with niveau formation has previously been reported. With regard to this mechanism of niveau formation, we speculate that the hematoma is mixed with cerebrospinal fluid from the arachnoidal tear caused by the head trauma; also, a considerable time in the supine position is necessary. (author)

  15. Computerized tomography of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the tentorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Yasuhisa; Harada, Hideaki; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1987-01-01

    A case of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the cerebellar tentorium is presented. The clinical feature of this case was gait disturbance with trankial ataxia. An axial CT scan showed only a diffuse high-density area in the cerebellar tentorium, but a coronal CT scan revealed a characteristic high-density lesion just on the cerebellar tentorium. The hematoma was evacuated by opening a burrhole at the convex; the gait disturbance disappeared after this operation. The value of a coronal CT scan in this case is stressed, and the mechanism of gait disturbance in a chronic subdural hematoma is discussed. (author)

  16. Computerized tomography of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the tentorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Yasuhisa; Harada, Hideaki; Tamaki, Norihiko; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1987-06-01

    A case of chronic subdural hematoma extending to the cerebellar tentorium is presented. The clinical feature of this case was gait disturbance with trankial ataxia. An axial CT scan showed only a diffuse high-density area in the cerebellar tentorium, but a coronal CT scan revealed a characteristic high-density lesion just on the cerebellar tentorium. The hematoma was evacuated by opening a burrhole at the convex; the gait disturbance disappeared after this operation. The value of a coronal CT scan in this case is stressed, and the mechanism of gait disturbance in a chronic subdural hematoma is discussed.

  17. Endoscopic burr hole evacuation of an acute subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codd, Patrick J; Venteicher, Andrew S; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Kahle, Kristopher T; Jho, David H

    2013-12-01

    Acute subdural hematoma evacuations frequently necessitate large craniotomies with extended operative times and high relative blood loss, which can lead to additional morbidity for the patient. While endoscopic minimally invasive approaches to chronic subdural collections have been successfully demonstrated, this technique has not previously been applied to acute subdural hematomas. The authors report their experience with an 87-year-old patient presenting with a large acute right-sided subdural hematoma successfully evacuated via an endoscopic minimally invasive technique. The operative approach is outlined, and the literature on endoscopic subdural collection evacuation reviewed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Giant Chest Wall Hematoma Mimicking Elastofibroma Dorsi: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Park, Kuhn; Kim, Jong Ok; Choi, Eun Seok; Kang, Si Won

    2011-01-01

    Hematoma on the thoracic wall is very rare. We describe here a 63-year-old man with a huge chest wall hematoma and the man had no history of trauma. The patient was found to have a large mass located subjacent to the inferior angle of the right scapula area and the CT and MRI findings were similar to those of an elastofibroma dorsi. We describe the CT and MRI findings of this hematoma and how to make the differential diagnosis from elastofibroma dorsi

  19. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lädermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described.

  20. Spontaneously Developed Pulmonary Arterial Intramural Hematoma That Mimicked Thromboembolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ki Nam; Kim, In; Chane, Jong Min; Kim, Gun Jik; Yang, Dong Heon; Lee, Jong Min

    2012-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman visited our hospital with a complaint of acute onset dyspnea and radiological manifestations of pulmonary thromboembolism. The patient underwent an exploratory surgery to find a whitish-blue colored mass occupying almost the whole lumen of the main pulmonary arteries. Based on the pathological and radiological findings, the patient was diagnosed to have a pulmonary arterial intramural hematoma. Intramural hematomas are usually observed in the walls of the aorta, and we believe that an isolated intramural hematoma in the pulmonary artery has not been described previously.

  1. Giant Chest Wall Hematoma Mimicking Elastofibroma Dorsi: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Park, Kuhn; Kim, Jong Ok; Choi, Eun Seok; Kang, Si Won [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Hematoma on the thoracic wall is very rare. We describe here a 63-year-old man with a huge chest wall hematoma and the man had no history of trauma. The patient was found to have a large mass located subjacent to the inferior angle of the right scapula area and the CT and MRI findings were similar to those of an elastofibroma dorsi. We describe the CT and MRI findings of this hematoma and how to make the differential diagnosis from elastofibroma dorsi

  2. First report of hepatic hematoma after presumed Bothrops envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Cristina Cunha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIn Latin America, Bothrops envenomation is responsible for the majority of accidents caused by venomous snakes. Patients usually present local edema, bleeding and coagulopathy. Visceral hemorrhage is extremely rare and considered a challenge for diagnosis and management. We report the first case of hepatic hematoma owing to the bothropic envenomation in a 66-year-old man who was bitten in the left leg. He presented local edema, coagulopathy, and acute kidney injury. Radiological findings suggested hepatic hematoma, with a volume of almost 3 liters. The hepatic hematoma was gradually absorbed without the need for surgical intervention with complete resolution in 8 months.

  3. CD36-Mediated Hematoma Absorption following Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Negative Regulation by TLR4 Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Huang; Chen, Jing; Lin, Sen; Wang, PengFei; Wang, YanChun; Xiong, XiaoYi; Yang, QingWu

    2014-01-01

    Promoting hematoma absorption is a novel therapeutic strategy for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH); however, the mechanism of hematoma absorption is unclear. The present study explored the function and potential mechanism of CD36 in hematoma absorption using in vitro and in vivo ICH models. Hematoma absorption in CD36-deficient ICH patients was examined. Compared with patients with normal CD36 expression, CD36-deficient ICH patients had slower hematoma adsorption and aggravated neurologic defic...

  4. Imaging findings of biliary and nonbiliary complications following laparoscopic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Lim, Joon Seok; Oh, Young Taik; Kim, Ki Whang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Institute of Gastroenterology, Seoul (Korea); Park, Mi-Suk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    Laparoscopic techniques are evolving for a wide range of surgical procedures although they were initially confined to cholecystectomy and exploratory laparoscopy. Recently, surgical procedures performed with a laparoscope include splenectomy, adrenalectomy, gastrectomy, and myomectomy. In this article, we review the spectrum of complications and illustrate imaging features of biliary and nonbiliary complications after various laparoscopic surgeries. Biliary complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomy include bile ductal obstruction, bile leak with bile duct injury, dropped stones in the peritoneal cavity, retained CBD stone, and port-site metastasis. Nonbiliary complications are anastomotic leakage after partial gastrectomy, gangrenous cholecystitis after gastrectomy, hematoma at the anastomotic site following gastrectomy, gastric infarction after gastrectomy, port-site metastasis after gastrectomy, hematoma after splenectomy, renal infarction after adrenalectomy, and active bleeding after myomectomy of the uterus. (orig.)

  5. The low-field MRI and CT of chronic subdural hematomas; An analysis of 52 cases with 78 hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawanishi, Masahiro; Kajikawa, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoji; Hirota, Naoki; Takase, Takashi (Suisei-kai Kajikawa Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed at a field strength of 0.2 T in 52 patients with 78 surgery-proven chronic subdural hematomas. Signal intensities of the lesions, which were obtained on T1- (n=74), T2- (n=73), and proton density-weighted (n=64) spin-echo sequences, were compared with concurrently available CT densities. Of 74 hematomas, 60, 10, and 4 had hyperintensities, isointensities, and hypointensities, respectively, on T1-weighted images. Of 22 hematomas having high density on CT, 17 were hyperintense and 5 were isointense on T1-weighted images. Similarly, 25 isodensity hematomas on CT consisted of 23 hyperintensities and two isointensities; and 27 low density hematomas consisted of 20 hyperintensities, 3 isointensities, and 4 hypointensities. Both T2- and proton density-weighted images revealed hyperintensity in all hematomas. Two spin-echo images, T{sub 1} and proton density, were useful in differentiating chronic subdural hematoma from edema. (N.K.).

  6. Sciatica due to pelvic hematoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocaman Umit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sciatica is defined as pain in the sciatic nerve distribution. The most common reason of sciatica is radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia. Other causes can be congenital, acquired, infectious, neoplastic, or inflammatory. The piriformis syndrome is another cause. The pain starts in an insidious manner when the cause of sciatica is an extraspinal tumor. It is intermittent at first but a constant and progressive pain that does not decrease with position or rest gradually develops in all patients. The possibility of an intraabdominal or pelvic mass should always be considered and the relevant tests requested when the cause of the sciatica cannot be explained. We present an 83-year-old male who presented with non-traumatic and non-vascular lumbosacral plexopathy due to a large hematoma in the left adductor muscle following the use of warfarin sodium.

  7. Computed tomographic investigations on intraventricular hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laber-Szillat, S.

    1982-01-01

    This work investigated in 106 patients with intraventricular hematomas all the known factors which can have an influence on prognosis: age, sex, anamnesis of the patients, size, extent and localization of the intracranial bleeding, underlying angiopathy and differences between arterial and venous and spontaneous and traumatic bleedings. It was shown that the state of mind was the deciding prognostic factor, whereby viligance was the cumulative expression of all other investigated influences. A computed tomography (CT) examination is deciding in the question of operative hydrocephalus care. In 13 patients it was further shown, how clearly CT results and brain dissection allowed themselves to be compared. The computed tomographic examination method is best suited to achieve even physiological and more extensive prognostic possibilities. (orig.) [de

  8. Spontaneous rupture of pedunculate gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor into the gastrocelic ligament presenting as a stalked mass surrounded by loculated hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Ahn, Sung Eun; Park, Seong Jin; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Kim, Yong Ho [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the stomach, which may be asymptomatic or cause symptoms such as pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and obstruction. Hemoperitoneum due to spontaneous rupture of the tumor is an extremely rare complication. We described a case of a 52-year-old man with a large pedunculated GIST causing loculated hematoma within the gastrocolic ligament. The patient visited our hospital due to a 3 week history of epigastric pain. A computed tomography scan revealed a 10.3 x 7.5 x 9.4 cm sized mass that was growing exophytically from the greater curvature of the stomach and was surrounded by loculated hematoma within the gastrocolic ligament. Laparotomy revealed a large stalked gastric mass surrounded by loculated hematoma within the gastrocolic ligament and blood fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Pathologic examination confirmed a GIST, of the high risk group.

  9. Clinical analysis of long-term outcomes of re-intervention of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fuquan; Yue Zhendong; Zhao Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety,effectiveness and clinical factors of re-intervention of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: A retrospective study of safety and long-term outcomes of TIPS was made in 771 patients from August 1994 to August 2010. The 625 patients had follow-up data.The patients who received TIPS once, twice, and more than twice were divided into group 1, group 2 and group 3, respectively. Clinical symptoms, survival rate and restenosis rate of each group were analyzed. Clinical influencing factors of re-intervention effect were discussed. Results: The success rate of first intervention was 98.2% (757/771), the death rate was 0.7% (5/757) and severe complication rate was 2.5% (19/757). The success rate of re-intervention was 98.7% (457/463), no death and severe complications occurred. The restenosis rate in group 3 decreased significantly than group 1 (χ 2 =7.908, P<0.05) in the first year of TIPS. The restenosis rates in group 2 and group 3 were lower than group 1 from 2 to 5 years of TIPS (χ2 values were 27.046, 25.724, 37.002 and 19.046, respectively, P<0.05). The survival rate in group 3 was higher than group 1 (χ 2 =9.114, P<0.05)and group 2 was higher than group 1 (χ 2 =4.929, P<0.05) in the first year of TIPS, while there was no statistical difference between group 2 and group 3 (χ 2 =2.678, P>0.05). The patients in group 2 and group 3 also had higher survival rates than group 1 from 2 to 5 years of TIPS (χ 2 value were 41.314, 26.920, 13.692 and 6.713, respectively, P<0.05). 19.4% (79/406) of patients who received re-intervention had symptom recurrence and shunt stenosis or occlusion. 11.6% (47/406) of patients had symptom recurrence with portal hypertension signs, 62.8% (255/406) had shunt stenosis or occlusion with portal hypertension signs. Conclusions: Restenosis or occlusion of TIPS, symptom recurrence and portal hypertension signs were important factors for re-intervention. Re-intervention of TIPS was

  10. Intraoperative Ultrasonography during Drainage for Chronic Subdural Hematomas: A Technique to Release Isolated Deep-seated Hematomas—Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHIMIZU, Satoru; MOCHIZUKI, Takahiro; OSAWA, Shigeyuki; KUMABE, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    After the drainage of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), residual isolated deep-seated hematomas (IDHs) may recur. We introduce intraoperative ultrasonography to detect and remove such IDHs. Intra-operative ultrasonography is performed with fine transducers introduced via burr holes. Images obtained before dural opening show the CSDHs, hyper- and/or hypoechoic content, and mono- or multilayers. Images are also acquired after irrigation of the hematoma under the dura. Floating hyperechoic spots (cavitations) on the brain cortex created by irrigation confirm the release of all hematoma layers; areas without spots represent IDHs. Their overlying thin membranes are fenestrated with a dural hook for irrigation. Ultrasonographs were evaluated in 43 CSDHs (37 patients); 9 (21%) required IDH fenestration. On computed tomography scans, 17 were homogeneous-, 6 were laminar-, 16 were separated-, and 4 were trabecular type lesions. Of these, 2 (11.8%), 3 (50%), 4 (25%), and 0, respectively, manifested IDHs requiring fenestration. There were no technique-related complications. Patients subjected to IDH fenestration had lower recurrence rates (11.1% vs. 50%, p = 0.095) and required significantly less time for brain re-expansion (mean 3.78 ± 1.62 vs. 18 ± 5.54 weeks, p = 0.0009) than did 6 patients whose IDHs remained after 48 conventional irrigation and drainage procedures. Intraoperative ultrasonography in patients with CSDHs facilitates the safe release of hidden IDHs. It can be expected to reduce the risk of postoperative hematoma recurrence and to shorten the brain re-expansion time. PMID:26345671

  11. Perioperative complications in endovascular neurosurgery: Anesthesiologist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Megha U.; Ganjoo, Pragati; Singh, Daljit; Tandon, Monica S.; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Sharma, Durga P.; Jagetia, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background: Endovascular neurosurgery is known to be associated with potentially serious perioperative complications that can impact the course and outcome of anesthesia. We present here our institutional experience in the anesthetic management of various endovascular neurosurgical procedures and their related complications over a 10-year period. Methods: Data was obtained in 240 patients pertaining to their preoperative status, details of anesthesia and surgery, perioperative course and surgery-related complications. Information regarding hemodynamic alterations, temperature variability, fluid-electrolyte imbalance, coagulation abnormalities and alterations in the anesthesia course was specifically noted. Results: Among the important complications observed were aneurysm rupture (2.5%), vasospasm (6.67%), thromboembolism (4.16%), contrast reactions, hemodynamic alterations, electrolyte abnormalities, hypothermia, delayed emergence from anesthesia, groin hematomas and early postoperative mortality (5.14%). Conclusion: Awareness of the unique challenges of endovascular neurosurgery and prompt and appropriate management of the associated complications by an experienced neuroanesthesiologist is vital to the outcome of these procedures. PMID:28413524

  12. The Nelaton Catheter Guard for Safe and Effective Placement of Subdural Drain for Two-Burr-Hole Trephination in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Jens; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, A; Stieglitz, Lennart Henning

    2015-09-01

    For chronic subdural hematoma, placement of a Blake drain with a two-burr-hole craniotomy is often preferred. However, the placement of such drains carries the risk of penetrating the brain surface or damaging superficial venous structures. To describe the use of a Nelaton catheter for the placement of a subdural drain in two-burr-hole trephination for chronic subdural hematoma. A Nelaton catheter was used to guide placement of a Blake drain into the subdural hematoma cavity and provide irrigation of the hematoma cavity. With the two-burr-hole method, the Nelaton catheter could be removed easily via the frontal burr hole after the Blake drain was in place. We used the Nelaton catheters in many surgical procedures and found it a safe and easy technique. This method allows the surgeon to safely direct the catheter into the correct position in the subdural space. This tool has two advantages. First, the use of a small and flexible Nelaton catheter is a safe method for irrigation of a chronic subdural hematoma cavity. Second, in comparison with insertion of subdural drainage alone through a burr hole, the placement of the Nelaton catheter in subdural space is easier and the risk of damaging relevant structures such as cortical tissue or bridging veins is lower. Thus this technique may help to avoid complications when placing a subdural drain. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Hemorrhagic Shock as Complication of Intramural Intestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Ben Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mural intestinal hematoma (MIH is an uncommon complication of anticoagulant therapy. Hemorrhagic shock has been rarely reported as a revealing modality. Results. We report two cases of shock induced by mural intestinal hematoma in patients under oral anticoagulant for aortic prosthetic valve and atrial fibrillation. Patients were admitted to the ICU for gastrointestinal tract bleeding associated with hemodynamic instability. After resuscitation, an abdominal CT scan has confirmed the diagnosis showing an extensive hematoma. Medical treatment was sufficient and there was no need for surgery. Conclusion. Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with shock in patients treated by oral anticoagulant should alert physicians to research a probable MIH. Urgent diagnosis and appropriate medical treatment can avoid surgical interventions.

  14. Short-term complications for percutaneous ultrasound-guided biopsy of renal masses in adult outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars René; Loft, Martina; Nielsen, Tommy Kjaergaard

    2018-01-01

    intervention and two patients with septicemia. Minor complications occurred in 2.8% of cases (eight patients); six patients with self-limiting gross hematuria, one patient with small asymptomatic subcapsular hematoma, and one patient with vasovagal syncope. The timing of both minor and major complication onset...

  15. Chronic subdural hematoma with persistent hiccups: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushin Takemoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Supratentorial hiccup is a rare condition and no patients with persistent hiccups and chronic subdural hematoma have been reported. A 38-year-old man with intractable hiccups, headache, and nausea was admitted to our hospital. Computed tomography revealed a supratentorial chronic subdural hematoma on the left side. After burr hole surgery to remove the hematoma his hiccups disappeared immediately and he was discharged home on the 3rd postoperative day with no neurological deficits. Although the role of the supratentorial nervous system in hiccups is not clearly understood, supratentorial areas play an important role in the stimulation or suppression of the hiccup centers. Chronic hiccups may be a presenting symptom of chronic subdural hematoma attending headache with nausea if it has no gastrointestinal abnormality.

  16. Spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma: The utility of CT angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pierro, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We described the utility of computed tomography (CT angiography in detection of bleeding vessels for a rapid percutaneous arterial embolization of the spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma. A 70-year-old woman comes to our attention with acute abdominal pain and a low hemoglobin level. An unenhanced CT was performed demonstrating a large rectus sheath hematoma. A conservative management was initially established. Despite this therapy, the abdominal pain increased together with a further decrease of hemoglobin values. A CT angiography was then performed, demonstrating an active bleeding within the hematoma and addressing the patient to a rapid percutaneous arterial embolization. Keywords: Rectus sheath hematoma, Acute abdomen, Arterial embolization, CT angiography, Active bleeding

  17. Analysis of chronic subdural hematoma based on CT, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Mikami, Junichi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Takahiro

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-three cases of chronic subdural hematoma were observed soon after head injury for the relationship between its CT findings and clinical symptoms. It has been found that the chronic subdural hematoma is a slowly growing and expanding intracranial disease that starts in an early period of head injury. Chronic subdural hematoma did not present any signs or symptoms initially, except for the gradual occurrence of headache, but finally it presented signs of intracranial hypertension and focal signs. Chronic subdural hematoma in the hygroma-like period did not show any signs and symptoms. In the capsulated period, when changes in CT density suggested intracapsular hemorrhage, a heavy sensation of the head was noted. It was recognized as an abnormal feeling or a full sensation of the head. When the bleeding continued in the cavity, headache became continuous and focal signs gradually appeared. (author)

  18. Idiopathic intraparenchymal hematoma of the liver in a neonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amodio, John; Fefferman, Nancy; Rivera, Rafael; Pinkney, Lynne; Strubel, Naomi [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, New York University Medical Center, 560 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Hepatic hematomas in newborn infants are not frequently detected clinically, but are often found at perinatal autopsies. These hematomas of the liver are usually subcapsular in location. A variety of etiologies for such hematomas has been implicated, such as trauma, sepsis, and coagulopathies. We present a neonate who presented with jaundice and abdominal distention. Initial imaging studies revealed a large intraparenchymal lesion of the liver, which was at first thought to be suspicious for neoplasm; however, MRI showed the lesion to be hemorrhagic and follow-up sonographic studies showed total resolution of this lesion, compatible with hematoma. The intraparenchymal location and the idiopathic nature of this lesion distinguish this case from others previously reported. (orig.)

  19. Intracranial subdural hematoma coexisting with improvement in spontaneous intracranial hypotension after an epidural blood patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsi Chang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old male had spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH presenting with refractory headache for 4 months. Multiple epidural blood patches (EBPs yielded relief of symptoms, but the course was complicated, with asymptomatic intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH. Except for SDH, other radiological diagnostic signs of SIH were resolved and the patient’s headaches improved after EBP. Owing to a mass effect and persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage, surgical repair of the spinal leakage was performed, but no cranial procedures were carried out. Postoperatively, the SDH completely resolved, but there was still CSF leakage at the level where surgery was performed. The patient has remained free of headache or other events for 3 years. It was reduction rather than elimination of the spinal CSF leak that yielded remission of SIH. In summary, intracranial SDH can be a complication of inadequately treated SIH (i.e. persistent minor CSF leakage. Management of SDH should focus on correction of the underlying SIH rather than craniotomy for hematoma evacuation.

  20. Liver Hematoma Presented as Midgut Volvulus Due To Medical Error: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The use of an umbilical catheterization is a usual practice in neonatal units. The insertion of the catheter has potential complications. Case Presentation Here, we report on our observation of a seven-day-old female newborn admitted for an abdominal distention and vomiting bile. Initially, diagnosis was midgut volvulus, for which an operation was performed. During the surgery, no intestinal malrotation, mesenteric defect or atresia was observed. Postoperative diagnosis was abdominal wall hematoma and rand ligament and ileus, as well as, sub-capsular liver hematoma. The patient had been hospitalized at birth at a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. With the appearance of icterus on the first day of life, at the NICU tried to insert the umbilical catheter that had been filed. Conclusions The complication found in the patient was the result of an aggressive act (the umbilical catheter insertion. This intervention should not be carried out unless there are clear indications, and if so, it should be done with much care.

  1. Unilateral proptosis and extradural hematoma in a child with scurvy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Sumit; Sivanandan, Sindhu; Seth, Rachna; Kabra, Shushil [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Pediatrics, New Delhi (India); Aneesh, Mangalasseril K.; Gupta, Vaibhav [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India)

    2007-09-15

    We report a 3-year-old boy with unilateral proptosis, painful swelling of the right thigh and aphasia. He had radiographic evidence of scurvy in the limbs and bilateral frontal extradural hematomas with a mass lesion in the left orbit on MRI. He was treated with vitamin C and on follow-up 8 weeks later had recovered with no evidence of the orbital mass on clinical or radiological study. Scurvy manifesting as proptosis and extradural hematoma is rare. (orig.)

  2. Pathomechanism of ring enhancement in intracerebral hematomas on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, Shinsuke; Kageyama, Takefumi; Yamashita, Shigeru; Kusaka, Kazumasa; Ueda, Shin

    1980-01-01

    As a simulation of hypertensive intracerebral hematoma, about 3.5 ml of autologus venous blood were injected into an artificial cavity of a unilateral cerebral hemisphere in dogs. The cavity was made by the insertion and inflation of a balloon canula near the basal ganglia region of the dog. At the acute stage after the injection, the hematoma showed a round-shaped and homogeneous high density. 9 days later, a positive ring enhancement appeared around this high-density area in most of the cases. Subsequently, the hematoma changed into an isodensity with a tendency toward the concentric concentration of the ring enhancement and to the final low-density stage with a spotted enhancement in the center. That is our experimental intracerebral hematoma of the dog showed a pattern of the chronological course of the CT appearance quite similar to that of clinical cases of hypertensive intracerebral hematomas. At the onset of the ring enhancement, many new and immature capillaries were noted in the adjacent tissue of the hematoma, corresponding to the positive enhancement. The new capillaries were gradually shifted to the center of the hematoma; the enhancement also coincided with them. The ultrastructures of these new capillaries were examined electronmicroscopically. There was some resemblance to the capillaries of muscle with many pinocytotic vesicles and shallowed tight junctions. These experimental facts suggest that the enhancement phenomenon occurred in close relationship to the newly produced hypervascularization of the capillaries around the hematoma, which was a phenomenon of the healing process of the lesion. Therefore, the pathomechanism of the enhancement was thought to be involved the pooling of the contrast media in the increased vascular bed as well as a loss of blood brain barrier in these newly produced immature capillaries. (J.P.N.)

  3. Angiographic Embolization of a Postpartum Vulvovaginal Hematoma in a Patient with Situs Inversus Totalis: An Effective Second-Line Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias M. Dahdouh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Situs inversus totalis is a rare congenital anomaly where asymmetrical positioning of internal organs may affect the surgical and radiological management of certain conditions. Vulvovaginal hematoma is a life-threatening complication of vaginal delivery whose primary treatment usually consists of incision and drainage of the hematoma and ligation of the responsible vessels, followed by wound packing. Failure of these measures to control the bleeding was previously considered as an indication for laparotomy to perform bilateral hypogastric artery ligation and, if needed, a hysterectomy. Relative to major abdominal surgery, selective percutaneous angiographic embolization offers considerable advantages and significant less morbidity. Indeed, angiographic embolization is routinely used as a measure to control refractory pelvic bleeding, though the literature and experience in women with situs inversus totalis are scarce. In this paper, we report a case of postpartum vulvovaginal hematoma in a patient with situs inversus, refractory to conventional treatment, where arteriographic embolization was successfully used to control the bleeding. The management of this obstetrical complication and the use of this minimally invasive technique are also reviewed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature describing the feasibility of this technique in a patient with situs inversus totalis.

  4. Life-threatening subdural hematoma after aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tetsuro; Hamasaki, Azumi; Ohba, Eiichi; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hayashi, Jun; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2017-08-08

    Heyde syndrome is known as a triad of calcific aortic stenosis, anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding from angiodysplasia, and acquired type 2A von Willebrand disease. This acquired hemorrhagic disorder is characterized by the loss of the large von Willebrand factor multimers due to the shear stress across the diseased aortic valve. The most frequently observed type of bleeding in these patients is mucosal or skin bleeding, such as epistaxis, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding. On the other hand, intracranial hemorrhage complicating Heyde syndrome is extremely rare. A 77-year-old woman presented to our hospital with severe aortic stenosis and severe anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with Heyde syndrome. Although aortic valve replacement was performed without recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, postoperative life-threatening acute subdural hematoma occurred with a marked midline shift. Despite prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, she did not recover consciousness and she died 1 month after the operation. Postoperative subdural hematoma is rare, but it should be kept in mind as a devastating hemorrhagic complication, especially in patients with Heyde syndrome.

  5. Computerized tomography of the traumatic hematoma in the corpus callosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Isao; Hara, Makoto; Suzuki, Yoshio; Nakane, Toshichi; Watanabe, Masao.

    1982-01-01

    The value of the computerized tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of the intracerebral hematoma has been well documented. However, there is little report about the CT findings of the hematoma of the corpus callosum. This report presents two cases of the traumatic hematoma in the corpus callosum and is discussed about their CT findings. Two patients, 52 year-old male and 40 year-old male, respectively, are the cases of blunt mechanical head trauma which were accompanied neither by skull fracture nor by scalp injury. In all these cases, the findings that hematoma occupied from the genu to the body of the corpus callosum were verified by surgery and the axial CT revealed the following two similar findings. First; the hematoma in the genu of the corpus callosum was shown as a cresent-shaped high density mass. This finding seems to be due to the following anatomical structure, that is, the genu of the corpus callosum is located just in front of the anterior horn of the lateral ventricles in the shape of the convex towards posteriorly. Second; as the midportion of the body of the corpus callosum tends to be appeared narrow in width between both lateral ventricles, the hematoma which extended from the genu towards the body of the corpus callosum was shown as a dumbbell-shaped high density mass. (author)

  6. MRI findings in spinal subdural and epidural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Petra [Department of Radiology, Hospital La Plana, Ctra. De Vila-real a Borriana km. 0.5, 12540 Vila-real (Castello) (Spain)], E-mail: PetraBraun@gmx.de; Kazmi, Khuram [Department of Radiology, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Nogues-Melendez, Pablo; Mas-Estelles, Fernando; Aparici-Robles, Fernando [Department of Radiology, La Fe Hospital, Avenida Campanar, 21, 46009 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Spinal hematomas are rare entities that can be the cause of an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Therefore, an early diagnosis is of great importance. Patients and Methods: From 2001 to 2005 seven patients with intense back pain and/or acute progressive neurological deficit were studied via 1.5 T MRI (in axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences). Follow-up MRI was obtained in six patients. Results: Four patients showed the MRI features of a hyperacute spinal hematoma (two spinal subdural hematoma [SSH] and two spinal epidural hematoma [SEH]), isointense to the spinal cord on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. One patient had an early subacute SEH manifest as heterogeneous signal intensity with areas of high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Another patient had a late subacute SSH with high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The final patient had a SEH in the late chronic phase being hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Discussion: MRI is valuable in diagnosing the presence, location and extent of spinal hematomas. Hyperacute spinal hematoma and the differentiation between SSH and SEH are particular diagnostic challenges. In addition, MRI is an important tool in the follow-up in patients with conservative treatment.

  7. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Infected by Propionibacterium Acnes: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shusuke; Asahi, Takashi; Akioka, Naoki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We present a very rare case of a patient with an infected subdural hematoma due to Propionibacterium acnes. A 63-year-old male complained of dizziness and was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of left chronic subdural hematoma due to a traffic accident, which had been conservatively treated. Physical, neurological and laboratory examinations revealed no definite abnormality. Plain CT scan demonstrated a hypodense crescentic fluid collection over the surface of the left cerebral hemisphere. The patient was diagnosed with chronic subdural hematoma and underwent burr hole surgery three times and selective embolization of the middle meningeal artery, but the lesion easily recurred. Repeated culture examinations of white sedimentation detected P. acnes. Therefore, he underwent craniotomy surgery followed by intravenous administration of antibiotics. The infected subdural hematoma was covered with a thick, yellowish outer membrane, and the large volume of pus and hematoma was removed. However, the lesion recurred again and a low-density area developed in the left frontal lobe. Craniotomy surgery was performed a second time, and two Penrose drainages were put in both the epidural and subdural spaces. Subsequently, the lesions completely resolved and he was discharged without any neurological deficits. Infected subdural hematoma may be refractory to burr hole surgery or craniotomy alone, in which case aggressive treatment with craniotomy and continuous drainage should be indicated before the brain parenchyma suffers irreversible damage. PMID:25759659

  8. [A case of infected subdural hematoma accompanied by cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Norio; Naito, Yuichiro; Takanashi, Shigehiko; Ueno, Toshiaki; Nakagomi, Tadayoshi

    2013-05-01

    Infected subdural hematoma(ISH)is a rare disease caused by hematogenous infection of a preexisting subdural hematoma. We report a rare case of ISH accompanied by cerebral infarction. A 76-year-old man who had suffered a closed head injury 3 months before presented fever, headache and left hemiparesis during the medical treatment of acute cholangitis and obstructive jaundice with pancreatic cancer at the department of surgical gastroenterology. At the consultation, computed tomography(CT)scan indicated right chronic subdural hematoma. We performed a burr hole opening surgery on the same day. Abscess and hematoma was aspirated from the subdural space, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)was detected in this specimen. Thus the diagnosis of the infected subdural hematoma was confirmed. However, despite the antibiotics therapy, follow-up CT showed a low-density area close to the residual abscess, which suggested cerebral infarction. Cerebral angiography showed a vasospasm at the cortical segment of the right middle cerebral artery near the residual abscess. Eventually we carried out a small craniotomy to evacuate the abscess. Our case showed that prompt surgical treatment is required in case of ISH and the whole hematoma and abscess should be removed as soon as possible with an image diagnosis and an additional surgical operation.

  9. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  10. MRI findings in spinal subdural and epidural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Petra; Kazmi, Khuram; Nogues-Melendez, Pablo; Mas-Estelles, Fernando; Aparici-Robles, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Background: Spinal hematomas are rare entities that can be the cause of an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Therefore, an early diagnosis is of great importance. Patients and Methods: From 2001 to 2005 seven patients with intense back pain and/or acute progressive neurological deficit were studied via 1.5 T MRI (in axial and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences). Follow-up MRI was obtained in six patients. Results: Four patients showed the MRI features of a hyperacute spinal hematoma (two spinal subdural hematoma [SSH] and two spinal epidural hematoma [SEH]), isointense to the spinal cord on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. One patient had an early subacute SEH manifest as heterogeneous signal intensity with areas of high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Another patient had a late subacute SSH with high signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The final patient had a SEH in the late chronic phase being hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Discussion: MRI is valuable in diagnosing the presence, location and extent of spinal hematomas. Hyperacute spinal hematoma and the differentiation between SSH and SEH are particular diagnostic challenges. In addition, MRI is an important tool in the follow-up in patients with conservative treatment

  11. Prediction and observation of post-admission hematoma expansion in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Christian; Havsteen, Inger; Rosenbaum, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    within the hematoma along with the hematoma-size is reported to be predictive of hematoma expansion and outcome. Because patients tend to arrive earlier to the hospital, a larger fraction of acute ICH-patients must be expected to undergo hematoma expansion. This renders observation and radiological......Post-admission hematoma expansion in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) comprises a simultaneous major clinical problem and a possible target for medical intervention. In any case, the ability to predict and observe hematoma expansion is of great clinical importance. We review...... radiological concepts in predicting and observing post-admission hematoma expansion. Hematoma expansion can be observed within the first 24 h after symptom onset, but predominantly occurs in the early hours. Thus capturing markers of on-going bleeding on imaging techniques could predict hematoma expansion...

  12. Comparison of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt with covered stent and ballon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration in managing isolated gastric varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Kwon; Lee, Kristen A.; Sauk, Steven; Korenblat, Kevin [Washington University St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Although a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is commonly placed to manage isolated gastric varices, balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) has also been used. We compare the long-term outcomes from these procedures based on our institutional experience. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with isolated gastric varices who underwent either TIPS with a covered stent or BRTO between January 2000 and July 2013. We identified 52 consecutive patients, 27 who had received TIPS with a covered stent and 25 who had received BRTO. We compared procedural complications, re-bleeding rates, and clinical outcomes between the two groups. There were no significant differences in procedural complications between patients who underwent TIPS (7%) and those who underwent BRTO (12%) (p = 0.57). There were also no statistically significant differences in re-bleeding rates from gastric varices between the two groups (TIPS, 7% [2/27]; BRTO, 8% [2/25]; p = 0.94) or in developing new ascites following either procedure (TIPS, 4%; BRTO, 4%; p = 0.96); significantly more patients who underwent TIPS developed hepatic encephalopathy (22%) than did those who underwent BRTO (0%, p = 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in mean survival between the two groups (TIPS, 30 months; BRTO, 24 months; p = 0.16); median survival for the patients who received TIPS was 16.6 months, and for those who underwent BRTO, it was 26.6 months. BRTO is an effective method of treating isolated gastric varices with similar outcomes and complication rates to those of TIPS with a covered stent but with a lower rate of hepatic encephalopathy.

  13. CT finding of right retroperitoneal space : analysis of extension of right perirenal hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kwang Won; Kim, Kyung Rak; Lee, Hyeok; Kim, Young Hwa; Cho, Won Soo; Kim, Il Young

    1997-01-01

    To understand the structure and character of the right retroperitoneal space by analysis of the extension of retroperitoneal hematoma in patients with traumatic right renal injuries. We retrospectively reviewed CT scans of 13 patients with right retroperitoneal hematomas caused by right renal injury. At te renal level, we analyzed the relation of a hematoma contacting psoas muscle with other retroperitoneal compartmental hematomas. At the suprarenal level, a perirenal hematoma and a hematoma contacting the diaphragm were analyzed according to their relation with intrahepatic IVC and pericaval hematoma. Below renal hilar level, all hematomas contacting psoas muscle, observed in eight cases, were connected with retrorenal extension of anterior pararenal hematoma. At the suprarenal level, intrahepatic pericaval hematomas were not, in all 13 cases, connected with a hematoma contacting the diaphragm, but with a perirenal hematoma. At the upper suprarenal level, the only pericaval hematomas containing a medial component of perirenal hematoma extended superiorly to the upper one third of the tenth thoracic vertebral body. The anterior renal fascia envelops perirenal space except in its medial aspect. In the upper suprarenal region, the anterior and posterior planes of the anterior renal fascia unite to fuse with diaphragmatic fascia, but along the medial aspect they fuse with intrahepatic pericaval connective tissue and posteromedial diaphragm, respectively

  14. Organized Chronic Subdural Hematomas Treated by Large Craniotomy with Extended Membranectomy as the Initial Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevi, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy and incidence of complications of craniotomy and membranectomy in elderly patients for the treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed a series of 28 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computer tomography (CT) to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture including inner membrane ossification. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for nonliquefied OCSH with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance – mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity or inner membrane calcification CT appearance - hyperdense. These cases have been treated by a large craniotomy with extended membranectomy as the initial treatment. However, the technique of a burr hole with closed system drainage for 24–72 h was chosen for cases of nonseptated and mostly liquefied Chronic Subdural Hematoma (CSDH). Results: Between 1998 and 2015, 148 consecutive patients were surgically treated for CSDH at our institution. Of these, 28 patients which have OSDH underwent a large craniotomy with extended membranectomy as the initial treatment. The average age of the patients was 69 (69.4 ± 12.1). Tension pneumocephalus (TP) has occurred in 22.8% of these patients (n = 28). Recurring subdural hemorrhage (RSH) in the operation area has occurred in 11.9% of these patients in the first 24 h. TP with RSH was seen in 4 of 8 TP patients (50%). Large epidural air was seen in one case. Postoperative seizures requiring medical therapy occurred in 25% of our patients. The average stay in the department of neurosurgery was 11 days, ranging from 7 to 28 days. Four patients died within 28 days after surgery; mortality rate was 14.28%. Conclusion

  15. CT imaging of aortic intramural hematoma: Report of two cases, and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Marzec, Małgorzata; Lasek, Władysław

    2011-01-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is a relatively rare, but potentially fatal pathology, which is most commonly diagnosed under emergency conditions with computed tomography angiography (CTA). We present two cases of IMH examined with different CTA protocols, which resulted in diverse diagnoses.In the first patient, contrast-enhanced CTA revealed dilatation of thoracic aorta and polymorphic wall thickening. It was misdiagnosed as being a mural thrombus and was complicated by acute dissection. In the second patient, non-enhanced CT revealed hyperdense aortic wall thickening. The patient was diagnosed as having type B IMH but he died due to aortic rupture.In our opinion, CT examination of the aorta in emergency cases should always include non-enhanced scanning. Any delay in proper diagnosis and treatment of IMH may result in serious complications.

  16. CT imaging of aortic intramural hematoma: Report of two cases, and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafin, Z.; Laskowska, K.; Marzec, M.; Lasek, W.

    2011-01-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is a relatively rare, but potentially fatal pathology, which is most commonly diagnosed under emergency conditions with computed tomography angiography (CTA). We present two cases of IMH examined with different CTA protocols, which resulted in diverse diagnoses. In the first patient, contrast-enhanced CTA revealed dilatation of thoracic aorta and polymorphic wall thickening. It was misdiagnosed as being a mural thrombus and was complicated by acute dissection. In the second patient, non-enhanced CT revealed hyperdense aortic wall thickening. The patient was diagnosed as having type B IMH but he died due to aortic rupture. In our opinion, CT examination of the aorta in emergency cases should always include non enhanced scanning. Any delay in proper diagnosis and treatment of IMH may result in serious complications. (authors)

  17. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS): Current Status and Future Possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, Jose Ignacio; Quiroga, Jorge; Herrero, Jose Ignacio; Benito, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Since the insertion of the first TIPS in 1989 much has been learned about this therapeutic procedure. It has an established role for the treatment of some complications of portal hypertension: prevention of recurrent variceal bleeding and rescue of patients with acute uncontrollable variceal bleeding. In addition TIPS is useful for Budd-Chiari syndrome, refractory ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, although its specific role in these indications remains to be definitively established. However, the decrease in sinusoidal blood flow induced by TIPS can lead to the patient developing hepatic encephalopathy and liver failure in some cases. Therefore, TIPS should be used with caution in patients with very poor liver function. From a technical point of view, successful placement of TIPS is achieved in more than 98% of cases by experienced groups. At present, evaluation of TIPS dysfunction based on morphology probably leads to an overdiagnosis of this complication since most of these cases are not associated with clinical manifestations (recurrent bleeding or refractory ascites). The major disadvantage of TIPS remains its poor long-term patency requiring a mandatory surveillance program. The indicator for shunt function/malfunction should be the portosystemic pressure gradient, which is best assessed by intravascular measurements. Shunt obstructions may be prevented or reduced by the use of stent-grafts in the future

  18. [Postoperative complications after larynx resection: assessment with video-cinematography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, S; Schima, W; Schober, E; Strasser, G; Denk, D M; Swoboda, H

    1998-02-01

    In past decades, the surgical techniques for treating laryngeal carcinoma have been vastly improved. For circumscribed tumors, voice-conserving resections are possible and for extensive neoplasms, radical laryngectomy, sometimes combined with chemoradiation, has been developed. Postoperative complications regarding swallowing function are not uncommon. Radiologic examinations, especially pharyngography and videofluoroscopy, are most often used to evaluate patients with complications after laryngeal surgery. An optimized videofluoroscopic technique for evaluation of complications is described. The radiologic appearance of early and late complications, such as fistulas, hematomas, aspiration, strictures, dysfunction of the pharyngoesophageal sphincter, tumor recurrence, and metachronous tumors is demonstrated.

  19. Correlation between CT and MRI findings of chronic subdural hematomas, and total hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin concentrations in hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tane, Kazuyuki [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    The authors investigated the correlation between the neuroradiological findings (computerized tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance (MR) image) of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) and the fractions in those hematomas (hemoglobin (Hb), oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb), and methemoglobin (met-Hb)). Thirty-three patients with a total of forty lesions were chosenas subjects, all with CSDH showing almost homogenous findings in CT scans and MR images. The density in the patients' CT scans was divided into high density, iso-density and low density. The intensity in their MR images was also divided into high intensity, isointensity and low intensity, and the correlation of these to the Hb, oxy-Hb and met-Hb concentrations calculated from the absorption spectrum of the hematoma sampled during the operation was examined. The CT findings were highly correlated to the Hb and oxy-Hb, concentrations and the CT scans of the hematomas with an Hb concentration above 9.4 g/dl all showed high density. The T1-weighted MR image and met-Hb concentration also showed a high correlation, and the images of the hematomas with a met-Hb concentration above 0.4 g/dl all showed high intensity. These results indicated that the fraction in the content of CSDH was predictable from the image findings. To obtain prior knowledge of the content of a hematoma seemed extremely useful for the clucidation of the pathogenesis of CSDH and for deciding its therapeutic policy. (author)

  20. Correlation between CT and MRI findings of chronic subdural hematomas, and total hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin concentrations in hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tane, Kazuyuki

    2000-01-01

    The authors investigated the correlation between the neuroradiological findings (computerized tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance (MR) image) of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) and the fractions in those hematomas (hemoglobin (Hb), oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb), and methemoglobin (met-Hb)). Thirty-three patients with a total of forty lesions were chosenas subjects, all with CSDH showing almost homogenous findings in CT scans and MR images. The density in the patients' CT scans was divided into high density, iso-density and low density. The intensity in their MR images was also divided into high intensity, isointensity and low intensity, and the correlation of these to the Hb, oxy-Hb and met-Hb concentrations calculated from the absorption spectrum of the hematoma sampled during the operation was examined. The CT findings were highly correlated to the Hb and oxy-Hb, concentrations and the CT scans of the hematomas with an Hb concentration above 9.4 g/dl all showed high density. The T1-weighted MR image and met-Hb concentration also showed a high correlation, and the images of the hematomas with a met-Hb concentration above 0.4 g/dl all showed high intensity. These results indicated that the fraction in the content of CSDH was predictable from the image findings. To obtain prior knowledge of the content of a hematoma seemed extremely useful for the clucidation of the pathogenesis of CSDH and for deciding its therapeutic policy. (author)

  1. Complications after mesial temporal lobe surgery via inferiortemporal gyrus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Fernando L; Reintjes, Stephen; Garcia, Hermes G

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the complications associated with the inferior temporal gyrus approach to anterior mesial temporal lobe resection for temporal lobe epilepsy. This retrospective study examined complications experienced by 483 patients during the 3 months after surgery. All surgeries were performed during 1998-2012 by the senior author (F.L.V.). A total of 13 complications (2.7%) were reported. Complications were 8 delayed subdural hematomas (1.6%), 2 superficial wound infections (0.4%), 1 delayed intracranial hemorrhage (0.2%), 1 small lacunar stroke (0.2%), and 1 transient frontalis nerve palsy (0.2%). Three patients with subdural hematoma (0.6%) required readmission and surgical intervention. One patient (0.2%) with delayed intracranial hemorrhage required readmission to the neuroscience intensive care unit for observation. No deaths or severe neurological impairments were reported. Among the 8 patients with subdural hematoma, 7 were older than 40 years (87.5%); however, this finding was not statistically significant (p = 0.198). The inferior temporal gyrus approach to mesial temporal lobe resection is a safe and effective method for treating temporal lobe epilepsy. Morbidity and mortality rates associated with this procedure are lower than those associated with other neurosurgical procedures. The finding that surgical complications seem to be more common among older patients emphasizes the need for early surgical referral of patients with medically refractory epilepsy.

  2. Predictors for Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Alexander; Tregubow, Alexander; Kerry, Ghassan; Schrey, Michael; Hammer, Christian; Steiner, Hans-Herbert

    2017-01-01

    This prospective study was designed to analyze the dependence of different factors on the recurrence rate of chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) after surgical treatment. Seventy-three consecutive patients, who were surgically treated at our department due to cSDH between 2009 and 2012, were included. The following parameters were analyzed: patient age and gender, occurrence of trauma, time between trauma and admission, neurological symptoms, presence of minor diseases, intake of anticoagulation medication. We classified the results of diagnostic imaging and determined the space-consuming effect via the cerebral midline shift. In addition, we scrutinized intraoperative findings and the dependence of the position of subdural drainage on the recurrence rate of cSDH. In our patient group, cSDH recurrence was significantly associated with aphasia (p=0.008). Moreover an increased cSDH recurrence rate was observed in the patient group that had a separated manifestation of the cSDH in the preoperative diagnostic imaging (p=0.048) and received no drainage implant (p=0.016). Homogeneous isodense cSDH was associated with no apparent recurrence (p=0.037). Within the scope of this study, we detected aphasia and separated cSDH as predictors of cSDH recurrence. Homogeneous isodense cSDH seems to be a good prognostic sign regarding the risk of recurrence development. Furthermore, our data clearly emphasize the importance of surgically applied drainage implants to prevent a recurrence of cSDH.

  3. Chronic subdural hematoma fluid and its computerized tomographic density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuzawa, Hideaki; Sato, Jinichi; Kamitani, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Midori

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory and in vivo CT analysis were performed on 19 chronic subdural hematomas and five subdural hygromas. In these 25 hematoma samples, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, and hemoglobin (Hgb) varied greatly, though, these values correlated well with the CT densities. Plasma protein content was fairly constant with an average of 7.1+-0.8g/dl. There were four hematoma samples with RBC of less than 20x10 4 μl or Hgb of less than 2.0g/dl. Their CT values ranged between 18 and 23 H.U., which were considered close to the in vivo serum level CT density. Five hygroma fluid showed no RBC and very little protein content of less than 0.4g/dl. CT density ranged between -2 and 13 H.U. The edge effect of the skull was experimentally studied using a phantom skull filled with water. This revealed a remarkable overshoot of the CT values within ten pixels from the inner wall of the skull. Visual observation of the original CT pictures revealed four low density hematomas and seven mixed density ones. When compared to the density of the ventricular cavity, all of the low density hematomas and the supernatant part of the mixed density ones were clearly higher in density. All five hygromas appeared CSF dense or lower. In conclusion, because of the edge effect by the skull, thin subdural fluids could not be diagnosed by CT alone. Thick subdural fluids could be differentiated as either hematoma or hygroma by their CT densities. Subdural hematomas had in vivo CT densities of at least serum level or approximately 20 H.U., while subdural hygromas had densities close to CSF. These characteristics were best appreciated by visual observation of the CT scan films. (J.P.N.)

  4. Evaluation of intracerebral hematoma resorption dynamics with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzesniewski, P.; Lasek, W.; Serafin, Z.; Ksiazkiewicz, B.; Wanat-Slupska, E.

    2004-01-01

    High mortality and severe grade of disability observed in patients after intracerebral hemorrhage provide efforts to improve diagnostics and therapy of the hemorrhagic cerebral stroke. An aim of this paper was an evaluation of blood resorption dynamics in patients with intracerebral hematoma, performed with computed tomography of the head and an analysis of clinical significance of this process. An examined group included 133 patients with intracerebral hematoma proven by a CT exam. In 97 patients resorption of the hematoma was measured, based on control scans taken on 15 th and 30 th day on average. Volume of the hemorrhagic foci was measured as well as the width of ventricles and the displacement of medial structures. The mean hematoma volume reached 11,59 ml after 15 days, and 3,16 m after 30 days (average decrease of the volume 0,67 ml/day). There was a significant difference in the rate of resorption between the first (0-15 days) and the second (15-30 days) observation period - 0,78 and 0,62 ml/day respectively. The dynamics of the process was dependent on volume and localization of the hematoma and independent of the grade of displacement and compression of the ventricles. The calculated mean rate of the hematomas resorption enables to schedule control examinations precisely. The significant differences of the dynamics of blood resorption depending on hematomas size and the independence of compression and displacement of ventricular system suggest, that the most important factor in therapeutic decision-making should be a clinical status of the patient. (author)

  5. Computed tomography(CT) of the spontaneous resolution of traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Sang Gil [Hanyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    During the period of four years and three months from January 1985 to March 1989, 29 cases in 27 patients with traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas which resolved spontaneously on sequential CT examinations, at the Hanyang University Hospital, show the following results. 1. Of 29 hematomas, there are 20 epidural hematomas including 9 cases (45%) in parietal area, and 4 cases (20%) in frontal area, and 9 subdural hematomas including 6 cases (66%) in temporal area. 2. The thickness of all hematomas in less than 2 cm. The thickness of hematoma is 1.0{approx}2.0 cm in 10 epidural hematomas (50%), and less than 0.5 cm in 5 subdural hematomas (56%). 3. The size decrease and complete resolution of hematomas within 4 weeks show 24 of 29 hematomas (83%), of which 18 hematomas (62%) show that between 2 and 4 weeks. 4. No difference between absorption rates of hematomas as the degrees of type or size of hematomas is present.

  6. Computed tomography(CT) of the spontaneous resolution of traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Lee, Sang Gil

    1989-01-01

    During the period of four years and three months from January 1985 to March 1989, 29 cases in 27 patients with traumatic epidural and subdural hematomas which resolved spontaneously on sequential CT examinations, at the Hanyang University Hospital, show the following results. 1. Of 29 hematomas, there are 20 epidural hematomas including 9 cases (45%) in parietal area, and 4 cases (20%) in frontal area, and 9 subdural hematomas including 6 cases (66%) in temporal area. 2. The thickness of all hematomas in less than 2 cm. The thickness of hematoma is 1.0∼2.0 cm in 10 epidural hematomas (50%), and less than 0.5 cm in 5 subdural hematomas (56%). 3. The size decrease and complete resolution of hematomas within 4 weeks show 24 of 29 hematomas (83%), of which 18 hematomas (62%) show that between 2 and 4 weeks. 4. No difference between absorption rates of hematomas as the degrees of type or size of hematomas is present

  7. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Soo; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH. PMID:27169052

  8. Complications associated with radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Pérez, J M; García Barquín, P M; Villanueva Marcos, A J; García Bolao, J I; Bastarrika Alemañ, G

    Radiofrequency ablation is an efficacious alternative in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who do not respond to or are intolerant to at least one class I or class III antiarrhythmic drug. Although radiofrequency ablation is a safe procedure, complications can occur. Depending on the location, these complications can be classified into those that affect the pulmonary veins themselves, cardiac complications, extracardiac intrathoracic complications, remote complications, and those that result from vascular access. The most common complications are hematomas, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms at the puncture site. Some complications are benign and transient, such as gastroparesis or diaphragmatic elevation, whereas others are potentially fatal, such as cardiac tamponade. Radiologists must be familiar with the complications that can occur secondary to pulmonary vein ablation to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in a patient with cavernomatous portal vein occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamata, Hiroshi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shuji; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hiromitsu

    2000-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis secondary to primary sclerosing cholangitis was referred to us for the treatment of recurrent bleeding from esophageal varices that had been refractory to endoscopic sclerotherapy. Her portal vein was occluded, associated with cavernous transformation. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed after a preprocedural three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography evaluation to determine feasibility. The portal vein system was recanalized and portal blood flow increased markedly after TIPS. Esophageal varices disappeared 3 weeks after TIPS. Re-bleeding and hepatic encephalopathy were absent for 3 years after the procedure. We conclude that with adequate preprocedural evaluation, TIPS can be performed safely even in patients with portal vein occlusion associated with cavernous transformation.

  10. Chronic subdural hematoma secondary to traumatic subdural hygroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Deok Hwa; Lim, Han Hyuk; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok [Soonchunhyang University Chonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    Sometimes chronic subdural hematoma can be developed following posttraumatic subdural hygroma. The purpose of this study is to investigate its incidence, the duration required for their conversion, and characteristic CT and MR findings of subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hamatoma. We studied 8 patients with persistent posttraumatic subdural hygroma which consequently developed chronic subdural hamatoma. The patients were examined with CT initially and followed-up with CT in 3 and MR in 5. We analyzed the location of the lesion, the change of the density or signal intensity, the change of the size, and the degree of enhancement and mass effect. The duration required for the formation of hematoma was 48-166 days (mean, 76 days). The characteristic CT findings of subdural hygroma were a crescentric lesion with CSF density along the inner table with-out contrast enhancement. The mass effect was minimal. The CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma were higher density than that of hygroma in all cases, increase in thickness and size in 3 cases, and contrast enhancement along the inner membrane of the hematoma in 5 cases. The signal intensities of the subdural hygroma were identical to those of CSF on both T1 and T2 weighted images, whereas, those of chronic subdural hamatoma were higher. The increased signal intensity on T1 weighted MR images and increased attenuation or contrast enhancement of the lesion on CT may suggest the conversion of subdural hygroma into chronic subdural hematoma.

  11. CT-guided stereotactic operation for hypertensive intracerebral hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shinichiro; Sonobe, Makoto; Koshu, Keiji; Kusunose, Mutsuo; Tsumura, Kotaro

    1989-01-01

    CT-guided stereotactic operation was performed in 55 patients with hypertensive intracerebral hematoma. Location of the hematoma was putamen in 28 cases, thalamus in 14 cases, subcortical area in 9 cases, cerebellum in 3 cases and pons in one case. Ages ranged from 36 to 85 years (mean 59.5). The mean timing of the surgery after bleeding was 4.2 days. The estimated volume of the hematoma on CT was 8 ml to 57 ml in putaminal, 9 ml to 40 ml in thalamic, 18 ml to 77 ml in subcortical, 17 ml to 26 ml in cerebellar and 5 ml in pontine hemorrhage. Aspiration rate at surgery was 60.4% in putaminal, 37.9% in thalamic, 41.7% in subcortical, 45.2% in cerebellar and 30% in pontine hemorrhage. In addition, we evaluated ADL at 6 months postoperatively in patients with putaminal and thalamic hamorrhage. It is concluded that stereotactic operation is advisable in those cases with 10 to 50 ml hematoma volumes in putamen or thalamus. On the other hand, in cases with over 50ml volume, hematoma should be evacuated by craniotomy. (author)

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma secondary to traumatic subdural hygroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Deok Hwa; Lim, Han Hyuk; Bae, Won Kyung; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Lee, Kyeong Seok

    1994-01-01

    Sometimes chronic subdural hematoma can be developed following posttraumatic subdural hygroma. The purpose of this study is to investigate its incidence, the duration required for their conversion, and characteristic CT and MR findings of subdural hygroma and chronic subdural hamatoma. We studied 8 patients with persistent posttraumatic subdural hygroma which consequently developed chronic subdural hamatoma. The patients were examined with CT initially and followed-up with CT in 3 and MR in 5. We analyzed the location of the lesion, the change of the density or signal intensity, the change of the size, and the degree of enhancement and mass effect. The duration required for the formation of hematoma was 48-166 days (mean, 76 days). The characteristic CT findings of subdural hygroma were a crescentric lesion with CSF density along the inner table with-out contrast enhancement. The mass effect was minimal. The CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma were higher density than that of hygroma in all cases, increase in thickness and size in 3 cases, and contrast enhancement along the inner membrane of the hematoma in 5 cases. The signal intensities of the subdural hygroma were identical to those of CSF on both T1 and T2 weighted images, whereas, those of chronic subdural hamatoma were higher. The increased signal intensity on T1 weighted MR images and increased attenuation or contrast enhancement of the lesion on CT may suggest the conversion of subdural hygroma into chronic subdural hematoma

  13. Ligamentum flavum hematomas of the cervical and thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Florian; Tuettenberg, Jochen; Grau, Armin; Weis, Joachim; Krauss, Joachim K

    2014-01-01

    To report extremely rare cases of ligamentum flavum hematomas in the cervical and thoracic spine. Only six cases of thoracic ligamentum flavum hematomas and three cases of cervical ligamentum flavum hematomas have been reported so far. Two patients presented with tetraparesis and one patient presented with radicular pain and paresthesias in the T3 dermatome. MRI was performed in two patients, which showed a posterior intraspinal mass, continuous with the ligamentum flavum. The mass was moderately hypointense on T2-weighted images and hyperintense on T1-weighted images with no contrast enhancement. The third patient underwent cervical myelography because of a cardiac pacemaker. The myelography showed an intraspinal posterior mass with compression of the dural sac at C3/C4. All patients underwent a hemilaminectomy to resect the ligamentum flavum hematoma and recovered completely afterwords, and did not experience a recurrence during follow-up of at least 2 years. This case series shows rare cases of ligamentum flavum hematomas in the cervical and thoracic spine. Surgery achieved complete recovery of the preoperative symptoms in all patients within days. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hematoma Locations Predicting Delirium Symptoms After Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidech, Andrew M; Polnaszek, Kelly L; Berman, Michael D; Voss, Joel L

    2016-06-01

    Delirium symptoms are associated with later worse functional outcomes and long-term cognitive impairments, but the neuroanatomical basis for delirium symptoms in patients with acute brain injury is currently uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that hematoma location is predictive of delirium symptoms in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, a model disease where patients are typically not sedated or bacteremic. We prospectively identified 90 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage who underwent routine twice-daily screening for delirium symptoms with a validated examination. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping with acute computed tomography was used to identify hematoma locations associated with delirium symptoms (N = 89). Acute delirium symptoms were predicted by hematoma of right-hemisphere subcortical white matter (superior longitudinal fasciculus) and parahippocampal gyrus. Hematoma including these locations had an odds ratio for delirium of 13 (95 % CI 3.9-43.3, P delirium symptoms. Higher odds ratio for delirium was increased due to hematoma location. The location of neurological injury could be of high prognostic value for predicting delirium symptoms.

  15. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst. Two case histories with pathological observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, Takeshi; Harada, Kunyu; Nishimura, Shigeru; Onda, Jun; Nishi, Tohru; Takagaki, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are well known to induce chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) after head injury. However, histological observations of the arachnoid cyst and hematoma membrane have only been rarely described. An 8-year-old boy and a 3-year-old boy presented with CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst. Surgical removal of the hematoma and biopsy of the hematoma membrane and cyst wall were performed. Clinical courses were good and without recurrence more than 1.5 years after surgery. Histological examination suggested that the cysts did not contribute to hematoma development. Pediatric hematoma membranes, similar to adult hematoma membranes, are key in the growth of CSDH. Therefore, simple hematoma evacuation is adequate as a first operation for CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst.

  16. How to distinguish between bleeding and coagulated extradural hematomas on the plain CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, O.F.; Espersen, J.O.

    1984-01-01

    Four types of extradural hematoma could be separated at examination of the plain CT scan in 54 extradural hematomas. Two major groups appear: the still bleeding hematoma showing either generally low attenuation values of ''holes'', and a coagulated homogenous type with generally high attenuation values. The attenuation values of the bleeding-liquid part of hematoma - were correlated to hemoglobin concentration in blood, to which clots were not related. Seven extradural hematomas grew and coagulated on repeated preoperative CT scans. In two cases intravenous contrast was given to the bleeding type of hematoma, and the contrast media appeared in ''holes'', but not in areas of high attenuation value. It is easy to distinguish between the different types of hematoma on the plain CT scan, and the separation by eye between the still bleeding and the coagulated extradural hematoma seems reliable. (orig.)

  17. Time Course of Early Postadmission Hematoma Expansion in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Christian; Christensen, Anders Fogh; Krieger, Derk W

    2014-01-01

    spontaneous intracerebral hematoma within 4.5 hours. On admission, patients underwent noncontrast computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography. Serial hematoma volume estimations by transcranial B-mode ultrasound were effected through the contralateral transtemporal bone window by obtaining sagittal...

  18. Computed tomographic demonstration of a spontaneous subcapsular hematoma due to a small renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, S.; Bosniak, M.A.; Megibow, A.J.; Ambos, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was able to demonstrate a small renal cell carcinoma as the cause of a spontaneous subcapsular hematoma. Angiographic and pathologic correlation were obtained. A review of the causes for nontraumatic renal subcapsular hematoma is included

  19. Operative treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas : a study of the factors determining postoperative outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; van Alphen, H A

    OBJECTIVE: We clarify the factors affecting postoperative outcomes in patients who have suffered spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas. METHODS: We review 330 cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas from the international literature and three unpublished cases of our own. Attention was

  20. Outcome of pregnancy complicated by threatened abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongol, A; Mool, S; Tiwari, P

    2011-01-01

    Threatened abortion is the most common complication in the first half of pregnancy. Most of these pregnancies continue to term with or without treatment. Spontaneous abortion occurs in less than 30% of these women. Threatened abortion had been shown to be associated with increased incidence of antepartum haemorrhage, preterm labour and intra uterine growth retardation. This study was to asses the outcome of threatened abortion following treatment. This prospective study was carried out in Dhulikhel Hospital - Kathmandu University Hospital from January 2009 till May 2010. Total 70 cases of threatened abortion were selected, managed with complete bed rest till 48 hrs of cessation of bleeding, folic acid supplementation, uterine sedative, and hormonal treatment till 28 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonogram was performed for diagnosis and to detect the presence of subchorionic hematoma. Patients were followed up until spontaneous abortion or up to delivery of the fetus. The measures used for the analysis were maternal age, parity, gestational age at the time of presentation, previous abortions, presence of subchorionic hematoma, complete abortion, continuation of pregnancy, antepartum hemorrhage, intrauterine growth retardation and intrauterine death of fetus. Out of 70 cases subchorionic haematoma was found in 30 (42.9%) cases. There were 12 (17.1%) patients who spontaneously aborted after diagnosis of threatened abortion during hospital stay, 5 (7.1%) aborted on subsequent visits while 53 (75.8%) continued pregnancy till term. Among those who continued pregnancy intrauterine growth retardation was seen in 7 (13.2%), antepartum hemorrhage in 4 (7.5%), preterm premature rupture of membrane in 3 (5.66%) and IUD in 3 (5.66%). Spontaneous abortion was found more in cases with subchorionic hematoma of size more than 20 cm2. In cases of threatened abortion with or without the presence of subchorionic hematoma, prognostic outcome is better following treatment with bed rest

  1. Epidural hematoma in the pediatric population – case study = Krwiak nadtwardówkowy w populacji pediatrycznej - opis przypadku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Woźniak

    2015-08-01

        Streszczenie Urazy głowy są głównymi przyczynami zgonu i nabytych zaburzeń neurologicznych. Odmienny niż u dorosłych przebieg urazu głowy w populacji dziecięcej powoduje, że w tej grupie zdarza się najwięcej nieoczekiwanych powikłań. Z uwagi na brak specyficznych objawów klinicznych krwiak nadtwardówkowy w populacji pediatrycznej stanowi duże wyzwanie zarówno diagnostyczne jak i lecznicze. Autorzy przedstawiają opis przypadku i postępowania u 6- letniego dziecka po urazie głowy,  z rozpoznanym w badaniu obrazowym krwiakiem nadtwardówkowym.   Słowa kluczowe: uraz czaszkowo-mózgowy, krwiak nadtwardówkowy, populacja pediatryczna.   Abstract Head injuries are the main causes of death and acquired neurological disorders. Differently than adults mileage head injury in the pediatric population means that in this group it happens most unexpected complications. Given the lack of specific clinical symptoms epidural hematoma in the pediatric population is a major challenge for both diagnostic and therapeutic. The authors present a case and proceedings in a child 6 years old after a head injury diagnosed in the study imaging epidural hematoma.   Key words: cephalo-cerebral trauma, epidural hematoma, pediatric population.

  2. Acute dystonic reaction leading to lingual hematoma mimicking angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Özgür; Aydin, Ali Attila; Bilge, Sedat; Arslan, Fatih; Arslan, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Lingual hematoma is a severe situation, which is rare and endangers the airway. It can develop due to trauma, vascular abnormalities, and coagulopathy. Due to its sudden development, it can be clinically confused with angioedema. In patients who applied to the doctor with complaints of a swollen tongue, lingual hematoma can be confused with angioedema, in particular, at the beginning if the symptoms occurred after drug use. It should especially be considered that dystonia in the jaw can present as drug-induced hyperkinetic movement disorder. Early recognition of this rare clinical condition and taking precautions for providing airway patency are essential. In this case report, we will discuss mimicking angioedema and caused by a bite due to dystonia and separation of the tongue from the base of the mouth developing concurrently with lingual hematoma. PMID:29326495

  3. Giant splenic hematoma can be a hidden condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Hangaard, Stine

    2014-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 28-year old male presented to his general practitioner with dyspnoea in the morning and abdominal discomfort through months. Four months earlier, he had experienced a blunt trauma to the left side of his abdomen. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a splenic hematoma and the p......An otherwise healthy 28-year old male presented to his general practitioner with dyspnoea in the morning and abdominal discomfort through months. Four months earlier, he had experienced a blunt trauma to the left side of his abdomen. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a splenic hematoma...... and the patient was admitted to hospital. Vital signs were normal, and blood samples revealed a marginal anaemia and elevated C-reactive protein, but were otherwise normal. Computed tomography showed an 18 centimetre wide splenic hematoma. The patient was referred to another hospital for conservative treatment...

  4. Clinical Course and Outcomes of Small Supratentorial Intracerebral Hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrouz, Réza; Misra, Vivek; Godoy, Daniel A; Topel, Christopher H; Masotti, Luca; Klijn, Catharina J M; Smith, Craig J; Parry-Jones, Adrian R; Slevin, Mark A; Silver, Brian; Willey, Joshua Z; Masjuán Vallejo, Jaime; Nzwalo, Hipólito; Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Malek, Ali R; Hafeez, Shaheryar; Di Napoli, Mario

    2017-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) volume, particularly if ≥30 mL, is a major determinant of poor outcome. We used a multinational ICH data registry to study the characteristics, course, and outcomes of supratentorial hematomas with volumes hematoma expansion, Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), and in-hospital death. Poor outcome was defined as composite of in-hospital death and severe disability (GOS ≤ 3). Comparison was conducted based on hemorrhage location. Logistic regression using dichotomized outcome scales was applied to determine predictors of poor outcome. Among 375 cases of supratentorial ICH with volumes hematomas <30 mL expands, leading to END or death. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute cervical epidural hematoma: case report Hematoma epidural cervical agudo: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUILHERME BORGES

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A 74 year-old patient with a nocturnal onset of neck and chest pain was brought to an emergency clinic. Physical examination and cardiac assessment were normal. Three hours after the addmittance, a flaccid paralysis of the four limbs supervened. Suspecting of an unusual onset of central nervous system infection, a lumbar puncture was performed, yielding 20 ml of normal cerebrospinal fluid. Thirty oinutes after the puncture, the patient completely regained neurological funcion. He was then referred to a General Hospital where a computed tomography (CT scan was done showing a large cervical epidural bleeding in the posterolateral region of C4/C5 extending to C7/Th1, along with a C6 vertebral body hemangioma. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed the same CT findings. A normal selective angiography of vertebral arteries, carotid arteries and thyreocervical trunk was carried out. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (ASSEH is a rare but dramatic cause of neurological impairment. In this article we report a fortunate case of complete recovery after an unusual spine cord decompression. We also review the current literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of ASSEH.Paciente de 74 anos acordou à noite sentindo fortes dores na região da nuca acompanhadas de ansiedade e desconforto torácico e respiratório. A internação emergencial em clinica cardiológica não demonstrou problemas cardíacos. Com a progressão do quadro neurológico traduzida por quadriplegia severa foi realizada uma punção lombar para afastar hipótese de meningite, sendo retirados cerca de 20 ml de liquor. Trinta minutos imediatamente após a punção lombar foi observada completa remissão do déficit neurológico. Transferido para um hospital geral a tomografia computadorizada demonstrou extenso hematoma epidural espinal em nivel C4/C5 com extensão a C7/Th1, bem como hemangioma do sexto corpo vertebral (C6. A ressonância magnética demonstrou as mesmas lesões. Observando

  6. Prediction and Observation of Post-Admission Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovesen, Christian; Havsteen, Inger; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Christensen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Post-admission hematoma expansion in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) comprises a simultaneous major clinical problem and a possible target for medical intervention. In any case, the ability to predict and observe hematoma expansion is of great clinical importance. We review radiological concepts in predicting and observing post-admission hematoma expansion. Hematoma expansion can be observed within the first 24 h after symptom onset, but predominantly occurs in the early hours. Thus capturing markers of on-going bleeding on imaging techniques could predict hematoma expansion. The spot sign observed on computed tomography angiography is believed to represent on-going bleeding and is to date the most well investigated and reliable radiological predictor of hematoma expansion as well as functional outcome and mortality. On non-contrast CT, the presence of foci of hypoattenuation within the hematoma along with the hematoma-size is reported to be predictive of hematoma expansion and outcome. Because patients tend to arrive earlier to the hospital, a larger fraction of acute ICH-patients must be expected to undergo hematoma expansion. This renders observation and radiological follow-up investigations increasingly relevant. Transcranial duplex sonography has in recent years proven to be able to estimate hematoma volume with good precision and could be a valuable tool in bedside serial observation of acute ICH-patients. Future studies will elucidate, if better prediction and observation of post-admission hematoma expansion can help select patients, who will benefit from hemostatic treatment. PMID:25324825

  7. Surgery for bilateral large intracranial traumatic hematomas: evacuation in a single session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompheak, Heng; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kim, Dong-Sung; Shin, Dong-Sung; Kim, Bum-Tae

    2014-06-01

    Management guidelines for single intracranial hematomas have been established, but the optimal management of multiple hematomas has little known. We present bilateral traumatic supratentorial hematomas that each has enough volume to be evacuated and discuss how to operate effectively it in a single anesthesia. In total, 203 patients underwent evacuation and/or decompressive craniectomies for acute intracranial hematomas over 5 years. Among them, only eight cases (3.9%) underwent operations for bilateral intracranial hematomas in a single session. Injury mechanism, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, types of intracranial lesions, surgical methods, and Glasgow outcome scale were evaluated. The most common injury mechanism was a fall (four cases). The types of intracranial lesions were epidural hematoma (EDH)/intracerebral hematoma (ICH) in five, EDH/EDH in one, EDH/subdural hematoma (SDH) in one, and ICH/SDH in one. All cases except one had an EDH. The EDH was addressed first in all cases. Then, the evacuation of the ICH was performed through a small craniotomy or burr hole. All patients except one survived. Bilateral intracranial hematomas that should be removed in a single-session operation are rare. Epidural hematomas almost always occur in these cases and should be removed first to prevent the hematoma from growing during the surgery. Then, the other hematoma, contralateral to the EDH, can be evacuated with a small craniotomy.

  8. Jejunal Intramural Hematoma with Bowel Obstruction in a 5-year-old Boy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Tong

    2009-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of the jejunum is rare and can be classified as trauma-related or occurring spontaneously. Spontaneous intramural hematoma commonly occurs in patients treated with warfarin. We report a case of intramural hematoma of the jejunum with intestinal obstruction in a 5-year-old boy who had neither a definite history of trauma nor the tendency to bleed

  9. Jejunal Intramural Hematoma with Bowel Obstruction in a 5-year-old Boy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Tong [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Intramural hematoma of the jejunum is rare and can be classified as trauma-related or occurring spontaneously. Spontaneous intramural hematoma commonly occurs in patients treated with warfarin. We report a case of intramural hematoma of the jejunum with intestinal obstruction in a 5-year-old boy who had neither a definite history of trauma nor the tendency to bleed.

  10. Retrobulbar Hematoma from Warfarin Toxicity and the Limitations of Bedside Ocular Sonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    worldwide. Peer Reviewed Title: Retrobulbar Hematoma from Warfarin Toxicity and the Limitations of Bedside Ocular Sonography Journal Issue: Western...Preferred Citation: Thompson D, Stanescu C, Pryor P, Laselle B. Retrobulbar Hematoma from Warfarin Toxicity and the Limitations of Bedside Ocular...nontrauamtic retrobulbar hematoma associated with warfarin toxicity. The application and limitations of focused bedside ocular sonography for this

  11. Outcomes after endoscopic port surgery for spontaneous intracerebral hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochalski, Pawel; Chivukula, Srinivas; Shin, Samuel; Prevedello, Daniel; Engh, Johnathan

    2014-05-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) cause significant morbidity and mortality. Traditional open surgical management strategies offer limited benefit except for the most superficial hemorrhages in select patients. Recent reports suggest that endoscopic approaches may improve outcomes, particularly for deep subcortical hemorrhages. However, the management of these patients remains controversial. We reviewed our experience using endoscopic port surgery to identify characteristics that may predict acceptable outcomes. We completed a retrospective chart and imaging review of patients who underwent endoscopic port surgery for evacuation of spontaneous ICH at a single center. Data were gathered regarding patient demographics, hemorrhage locations, operative findings, and clinical outcomes. From 2007 to 2011, 18 patients underwent evacuation of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas using an endoscopic port. The mean age in years was 62 years (range, 43-84 years). Six of 18 patients (33%) died before discharge, and 2 others (11%) died after at least 1 month of survival. Of 12 initial survivors, all were discharged to a rehabilitation or nursing facility. Complete hematoma evacuation was achieved in 7 of 18 patients, with the remaining 11 having a partial evacuation. The patients who died (n = 6) before discharge were statistically more likely to have a left-sided hemorrhage, partial evacuation, or older age than the survivors; death at least 1  month after evacuation was additionally associated with greater preoperative hematoma volumes. Our series demonstrates that endoscopic port surgery for acute intracerebral hematoma evacuation has the ability to achieve significant decompression of large and deep-seated hematomas. Patient age, extent of evacuation, laterality, and preoperative hematoma volume appear to influence patient outcome. Most overall outcomes remain poor. Future studies are necessary to determine if surgical evacuation is in fact superior to best

  12. Analysis of chronic subdural hematoma based on CT, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Mikami, Junichi; Ueda, Mikiya; Ito, Kazunori; Sato, Hiroyuki

    1984-01-01

    Forty-nine cases of chronic subdural hematoma experienced during the past 5 years were analyzed as to the number of days elapsed following head injury, symptoms, and computerized tomography (CT) findings. As a result, the clinical course of chronic subdural hematoma was devided into the following 5 stages on the basis of the presumed pathologic processes. The initial stage corresponded to a period of about 2 weeks after the precipitating injury; symptoms were absent; plain CT showed low-density areas (LDA); and metrizamide CT revealed metrizamide penetration into the LDA. The premature stage corresponded to a period of 2-4 weeks after trauma; no symptoms were present; plain CT showed LDA; and metrizamide CT revealed that metrizamide penetrated into the LDA with difficulty. The mature stage corresponded to a period of 30-60 days after trauma; CT showed iso-density areas (IDA) or high-density areas (HDA) with occasional enhancement effect; metrizamide penetration was not detected; and symptoms such as headache may have been present. The progressive stage typified chronic subdural hematoma; headache and focal symptoms were present; plain CT showed relative LDA, IDA, HDA or mixed-density areas (MDA); and enhancement of the contents of hematoma was observed in roughly half of the cases. The resolving stage was the stage in which hematoma had disappeared; plain CT showed relative LDA or LDA without mass sign; and metrizamide penetration was not detected. This clinical staging was useful in evaluating the pathologic picture of the chronic subdural hematoma and in determining suitable treatment. (author)

  13. Postpartum complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronthal, A.J.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the CT findings of major postpartum complications and determine what role CT plays in their evaluation. The CT scans of nine patients with major postpartum complications were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had been referred to CT for evaluation of postpartum fever, abdominal pain, and elevated results of liver function tests. Complications identified at CT included hepatic infarctions (n = 2), endometritis (n = 2), postoperative wound abscess (n = 1), massive abdominal hemorrhage (n = 1), septic thrombophlebitis (n = 1), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). CT findings of hepatic infarction included wedge-shaped areas of decreased enhancement conforming to a vascular distribution

  14. Can femoral dialysis catheter insertion cause a life threatening complication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurkay Katrancıoğlu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous catheter (VC insertion may be necessary for the patients with renal failure facing vascular access problem. Femoral VCs are commonly used for their lower complication rates especially in emergency clinics. The incidence of bleeding associated with VC is reported 0.5-1.6%, however, life threatening hemorrhage and complications requiring surgical intervention are very rare. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated with retroperitoneal hematoma after femoral VC insertion. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 472-474

  15. Differential diagnostic problems in elderly chronic subdural hematoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Valentin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH are recognized as common in older people (over 70 years. They are produced in minor injuries (falls on the same level. These CSDH have minor symptoms (headache, memory disorders, balance disorders, cognitive disorders, etc. and are classified as signs for the onset of dementia, circulatory failure - basilar vertebra, Alzheimer, etc. A simple brain CT scan can highlight these hematomas and a neurosurgical intervention will achieve extremely favorable prognosis. There are many pitfalls in the differential diagnosis of CSH especially with strokes being so common at this age.

  16. Spontaneous retropharynegeal hematoma: A case report and literature overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ji Hwa [Dept. of Radiology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A spontaneous retropharyngeal hematoma is a rare condition with a difficult diagnostic. This disease may rapidly progress to an airway obstruction. The author reports about a case of a 56-year-old man with an acute onset of sore throat, dysphonia and dyspnea. A retropharyngeal high attenuated soft tissue density could be seen on the neck CT. A rapid improvement of the retropharyngeal abnormality was seen on the 3 days follow-up MR imaging. Signal changes caused by blood products which were visible on the MRI images suggested the diagnosis of retropharyngeal hematoma. The patient was conservatively managed.

  17. Spontaneous retropharynegeal hematoma: A case report and literature overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ji Hwa

    2014-01-01

    A spontaneous retropharyngeal hematoma is a rare condition with a difficult diagnostic. This disease may rapidly progress to an airway obstruction. The author reports about a case of a 56-year-old man with an acute onset of sore throat, dysphonia and dyspnea. A retropharyngeal high attenuated soft tissue density could be seen on the neck CT. A rapid improvement of the retropharyngeal abnormality was seen on the 3 days follow-up MR imaging. Signal changes caused by blood products which were visible on the MRI images suggested the diagnosis of retropharyngeal hematoma. The patient was conservatively managed.

  18. Skin Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  19. Diphtheria Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  20. Drug eluting stents trapping intramural hematoma in spontaneous coronary artery dissection and healing pattern at six months: Optical coherence tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, Karl, E-mail: karlkpoon@gmail.com; Incani, Alexander; Small, Andrew; Raffel, O. Christopher

    2013-05-15

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissections (SCAD) are often difficult to diagnose and manage. Intravascular imaging such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) improves diagnosis and may assist in management. Recent data suggest that percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in in SCAD are associated with poor outcomes. This report provides striking OCT images of potential complications associated with PCI in SCAD, as well as demonstrates medium term OCT data in residual hematoma healing and stent coverage in SCAD.

  1. Growth Potential of Subdural Hematomas Under Clinical Observation: Which Subdural Hematomas Tend to Grow and Why They Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asan, Ziya

    2018-05-01

    To study the prognoses of patients with subdural hematoma (SDH) who were not operated on at the time of the first diagnosis and the causes of enlarged hematomas in some patients during the follow-up period. The records, service files, and radiologic examination results of the patients with diagnoses of SDH were reviewed. The SDH patients were recorded under 5 different categories: acute SDH (ASDH), subacute SDH (SSDH), chronic SDH (CSDH), acute component with chronic SDH (A-CSDH), and subacute component with chronic SDH (S-CSDH). The symptoms, clinical findings, and progression in the patients were correlated with radiologic examinations. A total of 291 patients received diagnoses of SDHs: 80 patients with acute, 29 patients with subacute, and 163 patients with chronic hematoma. Thirty-five patients had diagnoses of SDH with a combination of different components. It was determined that in the follow-up period, patients with A-CSDH showed the greatest increase in hematoma size over time and required surgical intervention the most often. SDHs reveal different prognoses in different age groups. Multicomponent SDHs are within the group that shows the greatest increase in size in the follow-up period. SDHs and CSDHs cause recurrent hemorrhages by sustaining the tension on the bridging veins. The greater the hematoma volume, the greater the growth potential of the hematoma tends to be. CSDHs that do not manifest changes in volume for a long time can be monitored without surgical intervention as long as the clinical picture remains stable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Severe Vertex Epidural Hematoma in a Child: A Case Report of a Management without Expert Neurosurgical Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Brévart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertex epidural hematomas (VEDHs are an uncommon situation and difficulties may be encountered in their diagnosis and management. This is more complicated when the surgical management has to be performed by general surgeons, not specialized in neurosurgery, in a remote location. It was in this context that we were brought to care in charge a 2-year-old boy who required a neurosurgical emergency rescue for a severe VEDH in Djibouti. Through the description of this case, we want to emphasize the value of developing a network of teleconsultation for the benefit of remote and isolated locations and learning basic techniques of emergency neurosurgery.

  3. Role of antithrombotic therapy in the risk of hematoma recurrence and thromboembolism after chronic subdural hematoma evacuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornebo, Ida; Sjåvik, Kristin; Alibeck, Mark

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the risk of recurrence in patients with chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) on antithrombotic treatment (AT, i.e., antiplatelets and anticoagulants). Secondary end points were perioperative morbidity and mortality between groups (AT vs. no-AT group) and exploration if timing...... of resumption of AT treatment (i.e., prophylactic early vs. late resumption) influenced the occurrence of thromboembolism and hematoma recurrence. MATERIALS: In a population-based consecutive cohort, we conducted a retrospective review of 763 patients undergoing primary burr hole procedures for cSDH between...

  4. A Case of Ruptured Aneurysm of the Proper Esophageal Artery with Symptomatic Mediastinal Hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Sato, Yusuke, E-mail: yusuke@doc.med.akita-u.ac.jp [Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Thoracic Surgery (Japan); Takahashi, Satoshi [Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Motoyama, Satoru; Yoshino, Kei; Sasaki, Tomohiko; Imai, Kazuhiro; Saito, Hajime; Minamiya, Yoshihiro [Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Thoracic Surgery (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Mediastinal aneurysms are rare but potentially life-threatening. Among these, bronchial artery aneurysms are most frequently reported, whereas up to now aneurysms of the proper esophageal artery had never been reported. A 69-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for treatment of a massive mediastinal hematoma. Enhanced computed tomography and selective proper esophageal arteriography revealed a 5-mm aneurysm in the proper esophageal artery that arises from the thoracic aorta at the Th8 level and has an anastomotic branch with the bronchial artery peripherally. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed using a mixture of N-butyl cyanoacrylate and lipiodol (1:3 ratio, 0.3 ml). Post-embolization angiography showed no filling into the aneurysm. The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on the 25th post-procedure day.

  5. Esophageal dissection and hematoma associated with obstruction in an Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phair, Kristen A; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Pye, Geoffrey W; Pessier, Allan P; Clippinger, Tracy L

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old female Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus) developed a sudden onset of excessive salivation and dysphagia. Esophageal obstruction was suspected; possibly related to palm frond ingestion. Esophageal endoscopy revealed a mat of plant material in the distal esophagus. An initial attempt at relieving the obstruction was unsuccessful, but subsequent use of custom-made instruments along with insufflation and hydropulsion enabled partial removal of the material. Postimmobilization care included aggressive intravenous and rectal fluids, anti-inflammatory and antibiotic administration, and fasting. Despite treatment, the dysphagia persisted and the elephant was euthanized due to lack of improvement and grave prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed remaining plant material in the esophagus, complicated by an esophageal dissection, mural hematoma, and secondary bacterial infection. Iatrogenic trauma may have contributed to the extent of esophageal injury. Although treatment was ultimately unsuccessful, the supportive care employed could potentially aid recovery in cases of less severe esophageal trauma.

  6. Unoperated subdural hematomas. Long-term follow-up study by brain scan and electroencephalography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusins, J.; Jaffe, R.; Bender, M.B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors report nine patients selected from over 100 patients with subdural hematomas successfully treated without surgery. These patients were followed for as long as 5 years. All had angiographically demonstrated subdural hematomas. Electroencephalograms (EEG) documented well the clinical improvement of the patient, but were poor guides to the true size of the hematoma, since EEG returns to normal early in the patient's course. Static scans are a better guide to the presence of a subdural hematoma, but they lag behind clinical improvement and usually remain abnormal for considerable periods of time after a major portion of the hematoma has been reabsorbed, and the patient is asymptomatic

  7. Subdural haemorrhage following endoscopic third ventriculostomy. A rare complication.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, M H

    2012-02-03

    Subdural collections or hematomas are frequently observed after shunt placement [7-9, 13], but rarely after ETV [6]. A review of literature revealed 7 cases [1, 5, 6, 10, 12], of which only 1 was symptomatic [5]. We will discuss the causes, management, and methods of prevention of this complication and we will present a case of symptomatic subdural haematoma, following endoscopic third ventriculostomy for illustration.

  8. The role of external drains and peritoneal conduits in the treatment of recurrent chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarius, Thomas; Qureshi, Hammad U; Sivakumaran, Ram; Kirkpatrick, Peter J; Kirollos, Ramez W; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    A considerable body of evidence supporting the use of external drainage after evacuation of primary chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) exists in the literature. However, no systematic study of the value of postoperative drainage in the treatment of recurrent CSDH has been published. The aim of the study was to investigate external drains and subdural-to-peritoneal conduit in the treatment of recurrent CSDH. A retrospective review of cases of CSDH treated in our institution between October 2002 and October 2006 was conducted. During the study period, 408 patients had burr hole evacuation. Sixty-four patients (15.9%) had treatment for recurrence. One patient had craniotomy, and the remaining 63 had another burr hole evacuation: 36 without placement of a drain (BHO), 14 with external drainage (SED), and 13 with placement of subdural-peritoneal catheter (SPC). Fifteen patients (24%) developed a secondary recurrence requiring a third drainage procedure. Postoperative drainage (SED or SPC) was associated with a significantly lower secondary recurrence rate when compared to BHO: 3/27 (11%) versus 12/36 (33%) (χ(2), P=.040). There was no significant difference in recurrence rates between SED and SPC. Postoperative complications included acute subdural hematoma (2), subdural empyema (2), brain edema (2), pneumonia (3), and in-hospital death (2). None of the complications was associated with the use of a specific technique. The results indicate that, as in the treatment of primary CSDHs, the use of drain (SED or SPC) with burr hole evacuation is safe and is associated with lower recurrence rate. Further investigation is needed to clarify the indications of currently available surgical techniques in the treatment of recurrent CSDH. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Noninfectious prevertebral soft-tissue inflammation and hematoma eliciting swelling after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kenji; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Toshiyuki; Irie, Shinsuke; Inagaki, Toru; Saito, Osamu; Nagahiro, Shinji; Saito, Koji

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures are performed to treat patients with cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy. Dysphagia is a post-ACDF complication. When it coincides with prevertebral space enlargement and inflammation, surgical site infection and pharyngoesophageal perforation must be considered. The association between dysphagia and prevertebral inflammation has not been reported. The authors investigated factors eliciting severe dysphagia and its relationship with prevertebral inflammation in patients who had undergone ACDF. MATERIALS The clinical data of 299 patients who underwent 307 ACDF procedures for cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy at Kushiro Kojinkai Memorial Hospital and Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital between December 2007 and August 2014 were reviewed. RESULTS After 7 ACDF procedures (2.3%), 7 patients suffered severe prolonged and/or delayed dysphagia and odynophagia that prevented ingestion. In all 7 patients the prevertebral space was enlarged. In 5 (1.6%) the symptom was thought to be associated with prevertebral soft-tissue edema; in all 5 an inflammatory response, hyperthermia, and an increase in the white blood cell count and in C-reactive protein level was observed. After 2 procedures (0.7%), we noted prevertebral hematoma without an inflammatory response. None of the patients who had undergone 307 ACDF procedures manifested pharyngoesophageal perforation or surgical site infection. CONCLUSIONS Severe dysphagia and odynophagia are post-ACDF complications. In most instances they are attributable to prevertebral soft-tissue edema accompanied by inflammatory responses such as fever and an increase in the white blood cell count and in C-reactive protein. In other cases these anomalies are elicited by hematoma not associated with inflammation.

  10. Early and long-term clinical and radiological follow-up results of expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Thijs, Maria; Wilms, Guy; Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris; Wilmer, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy and immediate and long-term safety of expanded-tetrafluoroethylene covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in patients with portal hypertension-related complications. A cohort of 56 patients suffering from severe portal hypertension-related complications underwent implantation of an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-graft. All patients suffered from severe liver cirrhosis graded Child-Pugh A (n=8; 16%), B (n=13; 21%) or C (n=35; 63%). In 44 patients, the stent-graft was placed during the initial TIPS procedure (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients, the stent-graft was placed to repermeabilize the previously placed bare stent (TIPS revision). Follow-up was performed with clinical assessment, duplex ultrasound and, if abnormal or inconclusive, with invasive venography and pressure measurements. Per- en immediate post-procedural complications occurred in four patients (4/56, 7%). None of them was lethal. During follow-up, stent occlusion appeared in one patient and stenosis in two; no recurrence of bleeding was noted in all patients treated for variceal bleeding (n=28), and 24 of the 28 patients (86%) suffering from refractory ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were free of regular paracenteses and/or drainage of pleural effusion after shunt creation. The 30-day and global mortality for the total study population (n=56) was, respectively, 7% (n=4) and 28.5% (n=16). In the patient subgroup with variceal bleeding (n=28), 30-day mortality was 3.5% (n=1) and global mortality 14.2% (n=4). In the ascites and/or hydrothorax subgroup (n=28), 8.1% (n=3) mortality at 30 days was found and global mortality was 32.4% (n=12). In 10 patients of the 56 studied patients (18%), isolated hepatic encephalopathy occurred, which was lethal in 4 (Child C) patients (7%). Three of these four patients died within the 1st month after TIPS placement. A very high primary patency rate

  11. Early and long-term clinical and radiological follow-up results of expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maleux, Geert; Heye, Sam; Thijs, Maria; Wilms, Guy [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Nevens, Frederik; Verslype, Chris [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Hepatology, Leuven (Belgium); Wilmer, Alexander [University Hospitals Gasthuisberg, Department of Medical Intensive Care Unit, Leuven (Belgium)

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the therapeutic efficacy and immediate and long-term safety of expanded-tetrafluoroethylene covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts in patients with portal hypertension-related complications. A cohort of 56 patients suffering from severe portal hypertension-related complications underwent implantation of an expanded-polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-graft. All patients suffered from severe liver cirrhosis graded Child-Pugh A (n=8; 16%), B (n=13; 21%) or C (n=35; 63%). In 44 patients, the stent-graft was placed during the initial TIPS procedure (de novo TIPS); in the other 12 patients, the stent-graft was placed to repermeabilize the previously placed bare stent (TIPS revision). Follow-up was performed with clinical assessment, duplex ultrasound and, if abnormal or inconclusive, with invasive venography and pressure measurements. Per- en immediate post-procedural complications occurred in four patients (4/56, 7%). None of them was lethal. During follow-up, stent occlusion appeared in one patient and stenosis in two; no recurrence of bleeding was noted in all patients treated for variceal bleeding (n=28), and 24 of the 28 patients (86%) suffering from refractory ascites and/or hepatic hydrothorax were free of regular paracenteses and/or drainage of pleural effusion after shunt creation. The 30-day and global mortality for the total study population (n=56) was, respectively, 7% (n=4) and 28.5% (n=16). In the patient subgroup with variceal bleeding (n=28), 30-day mortality was 3.5% (n=1) and global mortality 14.2% (n=4). In the ascites and/or hydrothorax subgroup (n=28), 8.1% (n=3) mortality at 30 days was found and global mortality was 32.4% (n=12). In 10 patients of the 56 studied patients (18%), isolated hepatic encephalopathy occurred, which was lethal in 4 (Child C) patients (7%). Three of these four patients died within the 1st month after TIPS placement. A very high primary patency rate

  12. Twist-Drill or Burr Hole Craniostomy for Draining Chronic Subdural Hematomas: How to Choose It for Chronic Subdural Hematoma Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Im, Soo Bin

    2016-10-01

    Although twist-drill craniostomy (TDC) has a number of procedural advantages and an equivalent outcome compared to burr hole craniostomy (BHC) for the treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), the latter technique remains the preferred method. We analyzed symptomatic CSDHs in whom TDC at the pre-coronal suture entry point (PCSEP) was the primary method for hematoma drainage and BHC on the parietal was the secondary option. CSDHs in 86 consecutive patients were included. TDC at the PCSEP, which is 1 cm anterior to coronal suture at the level of the superior temporal line, was the primary operational technique when the hematoma thickness was suitable, and BHC was performed via the parietal when TDC was unreasonable or failed. The clinical feasibility and outcomes of these approaches were analyzed. Of the 86 patients, 68 (79.1%) were treated by TDC, and 18 (20.9%) by BHC. All patients showed improvements in their symptoms after hematoma drainage. Neither morbidity nor mortality was associated with either technique, and there were no differences in drainage days between the groups. Ten patients had bilateral hematomas and were treated using TDC. Two patients were not sufficiently treated by TDC and, as a result, BHC was applied. Only six hematomas (7% of 86 hematomas) exhibited insufficient thickness on the computed tomography to perform TDC. When the hematoma was thick enough, a majority of the CSDHs were drained using TDC at the PCSEP as the first procedure, which was especially useful for bilateral hematomas and in elderly patients.

  13. iPhone-Assisted Augmented Reality Localization of Basal Ganglia Hypertensive Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, YuanZheng; Ma, LiChao; Zhu, RuYuan; Chen, XiaoLei

    2016-10-01

    A low-cost, time-efficient technique that could localize hypertensive hematomas in the basal ganglia would be beneficial for minimally invasive hematoma evacuation surgery. We used an iPhone to achieve this goal and evaluated its accuracy and feasibility. We located basal ganglia hematomas in 26 patients and depicted the boundaries of the hematomas on the skin. To verify the accuracy of the drawn boundaries, computed tomography (CT) markers surrounding the depicted boundaries were attached to 10 patients. The deviation between the CT markers and the actual hematoma boundaries was then measured. In the other 16 patients, minimally invasive endoscopic hematoma evacuation surgery was performed according to the depicted hematoma boundary. The deflection angle of the actual trajectory and deviation in the hematoma center were measured according to the preoperative and postoperative CT data. There were 40 CT markers placed on 10 patients. The mean deviation of these markers was 3.1 mm ± 2.4. In the 16 patients who received surgery, the deflection angle of the actual trajectory was 4.3° ± 2.1. The deviation in the hematoma center was 5.2 mm ± 2.6. This new method can locate basal ganglia hematomas with a sufficient level of accuracy and is helpful for minimally invasive endoscopic hematoma evacuation surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spontaneous Cervical Epidural Hematoma with Hemiparesis Mimicking Cerebral Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Tiryaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH is defined as an epidural hematoma that does not have an etiological explanation. The most common site for SCEH is cervicothoracic area. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for prognosis and good results. In this paper, we aimed to present a case who complains of sudden weakness on right extremities imitating cerebral stroke and that neuroimaging reveals spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma. Case. A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with acute neck pain and loss of strength on right extremities. On neurological examination, the patient had right hemiparesis. PT, aPTT, and INR results were 50.5, 42.8, and 4.8, respectively. Cranial MRI was in normal limits. Spinal MRI revealed a lesion that extends from C4 to C7 located on the right side and compatible with epidural hematoma. The patient was operated after normalization of INR values. Conclusion. Even though SCEH is a rare condition, it can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment are quiet important for prognosis. SCEH can easily be mistaken for stroke as with other pathologies and this diagnosis should come to mind especially in patients who have diathesis of bleeding.

  15. Apparently Ipsilateral Parkinsonism in a Patient with Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hwan Roh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic parkinsonism secondary to ipsilateral lesion is rarely reported. Although the contribution of the contralateral lesions was assumed in some cases, the pathomechanism remains undetermined. Herein we report a patient with a subdural hematoma, who developed parkinsonism in the ipsilateral hemibody. Structural and functional imaging suggests the contralateral dopaminergic dysfunction as the major culprit of apparently ipsilateral parkinsonism.

  16. Evaluation of subdural space after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odake, Genya

    1988-09-01

    Subdural low density lesions of two cases were reexplored after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma and thickening of the outer membrane was found in both cases. 1st case was a 88 year-old male, who had shown at least 7 months history of chronic subdural fluid accumulation. Reexploration of residual subdural low density space on CT after 14 days following the evacuation disclosed thickening of the outer membrane and none of fluid. 2nd case was a 71 year-old male who had a history of head injury 2 months before. Reexploration of residual low density lesion 14 days later disclosed a similar thickening of the outer membrane without fluid accumulation. The postoperative low density area in both cases was suspected to be a residual hematoma before reexploratin, but only thickening of the outer membrane of the hematoma was found. The outer membrane of 2nd case was histologically composed of layers of matured granulation, contiguous to the dura and a layer of immature granulation with microhemorrhage, facing the cavity. Thickening of the outer membrane seems to play an important role not only to develope, but to resolve the chronic subdural hematoma. It is neccessary to evaluate other factors than low density space per se to eliminate a needless reexploration.

  17. Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hematoma: A report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Grewal, Sarvpreet Singh; Gupta, Bharat; Jain, Vikas; Sobti, Harman

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Basal ganglia hemorrhage is relatively uncommon. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma after trauma is extremely rare and is limited to case reports. We report two cases of traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage, and review the literature in brief. Both cases were managed conservatively.

  18. The spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma : a study of the etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Ponssen, H

    From the literature 199 cases of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) are analyzed. With these data and the vascular anatomical characteristics of the spinal epidural space, the theories on the etiology of the SSEH are discussed. There seems to be no relationship between the SSEH and arterial

  19. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Beom [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  20. Evaluation of subdural space after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odake, Genya

    1988-01-01

    Subdural low density lesions of two cases were reexplored after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma and thickening of the outer membrane was found in both cases. 1st case was a 88 year-old male, who had shown at least 7 months history of chronic subdural fluid accumulation. Reexploration of residual subdural low density space on CT after 14 days following the evacuation disclosed thickening of the outer membrane and none of fluid. 2nd case was a 71 year-old male who had a history of head injury 2 months before. Reexploration of residual low density lesion 14 days later disclosed a similar thickening of the outer membrane without fluid accumulation. The postoperative low density area in both cases was suspected to be a residual hematoma before reexploratin, but only thickening of the outer membrane of the hematoma was found. The outer membrane of 2nd case was histologically composed of layers of matured granulation, contiguous to the dura and a layer of immature granulation with microhemorrhage, facing the cavity. Thickening of the outer membrane seems to play an important role not only to develope, but to resolve the chronic subdural hematoma. It is neccessary to evaluate other factors than low density space per se to eliminate a needless reexploration. (author)

  1. Spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma associated with caliceal diverticula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, C.; Fernandez Hidalgo, J.M.; Fernandez Martinez, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma in which the only abnormal finding was the presence of two caliceal diverticula. The study involved ultrasoun, IVU, CT, MR and arteriography. We briefly discuss the role of diagnostic imaging in these cases, providing a short review of the literature. (Author) 10 refs

  2. Treatment of septal hematomas and abscesses in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menger, Dirk Jan; Tabink, Ivar; Nolst Trenité, Gilbert J.

    2007-01-01

    The cartilaginous part of the nasal septum of a child with a septal hematoma or abscess is at risk of destruction. Consequently, the noses of these children can collapse, causing a saddle nose deformity, and in time, the normal outgrowth of both the nose and maxilla win be disturbed. In adulthood,

  3. Assessment of drainage techniques for evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjåvik, Kristin; Bartek, Jiri; Sagberg, Lisa Millgård

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical procedures. The benefit of postoperative passive subdural drainage compared with no drains has been established, but other drainage techniques are common, and their effectiveness compared with passive...

  4. HEMATOMA OF THE PROXIMAL NAIL FOLD. REPORT OF 41 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Patricia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The proximal fold is an important part of the nail apparatus it contributes to the formation of the nail plate and through the cuticle acts as an impermeable barrier protecting it from any cause.Objective: To know the proximal nail fold hematoma caused by the use of pulse oximeter.Material and Methods: A descriptive study was conducted in 41 patients with proximal nail hematoma secondary to the use of oximetry in patients hospitalized in the Intermediate and Intensive Care Unit at the Hospital General de Enfermedades from December 1, 2007 to December 31, 2010.Results: We studied 41 patients with proximal nail fold hematoma secondary to the use of oximeter, 30 (73.1% were males and 11 (26.8% females. The numbers of fingers affected by pulse oximeter were in one digit. 30 (73.1% cases, in two digits 6 (14.6%, in three digits 3 (7.3%, in 4 digits 1 (2.4% and in 5 digits 1 (2.4% case. The most affected proximal nail fold was right index: 24 (58.5%, right middle 11 (26.8%, right ring 6 (14.6%, left index 12 (29.2%, and left middle 6 (14.6% cases.Conclusions: Hematomas of the proximal nail fold may be caused by different traumatisms. The use of pulse oximeter is one of them.

  5. Clinical Course and Outcomes of Small Supratentorial Intracerebral Hematomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrouz, R.; Misra, V.; Godoy, D.A.; Topel, C.H.; Masotti, L.; Klijn, C.J.M.; Smith, C.J.; Parry-Jones, A.R.; Slevin, M.A.; Silver, B.; Willey, J.Z.; Vallejo, J. Masjuan; Nzwalo, H.; Popa-Wagner, A.; Malek, A.R.; Hafeez, S.; Napoli, M. Di

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) volume, particularly if >/=30 mL, is a major determinant of poor outcome. We used a multinational ICH data registry to study the characteristics, course, and outcomes of supratentorial hematomas with volumes <30 mL. METHODS: Basic

  6. Diagnosis of subcapsular hematoma of the liver by scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchamp, J.M.; Belanger, M.A.; Neitzschman, H.R.

    1976-01-01

    The diagnosis of subcapsular hematoma of the liver following blunt abdominal trauma has assumed clinical importance with recent reports of improved mortality with conservative management. There is increasing use of hepatic scintigraphy in evaluation of upper abdominal trauma. Two recently observed cases are used to illustrate the typical findings in this entity

  7. Chronic spinal epidural hematoma in hemophilia A in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, P.; McComb, J.G.; University of Southern California, Los Angeles

    1983-01-01

    A case of chronic spinal epidural hematoma in a thirteen-year-old male, subsequently found to have hemophilia A is reported. Following myelography, surgery was undertaken with clotting factor replacement with relief of cord compression. The patient made an uneventful recovery. (orig.)

  8. Chronic spinal epidural hematoma in hemophilia A in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, P.; McComb, J.G.

    1983-06-01

    A case of chronic spinal epidural hematoma in a thirteen-year-old male, subsequently found to have hemophilia A is reported. Following myelography, surgery was undertaken with clotting factor replacement with relief of cord compression. The patient made an uneventful recovery.

  9. Hypothalamo-Pituitary Dysfunction in Patients With Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hána, V.; Kosák, M.; Masopust, V.; Netuka, D.; Lacinová, Z.; Kršek, M.; Marek, J.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2012), s. 161-167 ISSN 0862-8408 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NS9794 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : hypopituitarism * subdural hematoma * brain injury * growth hormone deficiency Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  10. Butterfly hematoma after traumatic intercourse | Hajji | Pan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Butterfly hematoma after traumatic intercourse. F Hajji, A Ameur. Abstract. No Abstract. http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2015.20.317.6660 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact ...

  11. Intracranial epidural hematoma in a newborn with DIC secondary to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidural hematoma in newborns is rare, it occurs more frequently in infants born from nulliparous mothers with delivery difficulties. Intracranial hemorrhage in infants is usually secondary to vascular malformations, anticoagulation, inherited or acquired coagulopathy. Hematological disorders are infrequently associated with ...

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Supralevator Hematoma in a Hemodynamically Stable Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Debjani; Jennings, Paul E; Banerjee, Mamta; Gada, Ruta

    2015-12-01

    Paravaginal hematomas can be life-threatening. In patients with intact vaginal walls and perineum, they may pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Supralevator hematomas are much less common than infralevator hematomas. We present a case of puerperal hemorrhagic shock after a normal vaginal delivery in a low-risk parous woman resulting from an occult supralevator hematoma. Because the woman was hemodynamically unstable initially, she underwent a vaginal surgical drainage. A week later, the supravaginal hematoma reformed. At this time the patient was hemodynamically stable, and ultrasound-guided drainage was performed, which resulted in complete resolution of the hematoma within 10 days. In a clinically stable puerperal patient, ultrasound-guided drainage of a supralevator hematoma resulted in rapid and complete resolution of symptoms.

  13. Comparison of Technical and Clinical Outcome of Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement Between a Bare Metal Stent and a PTFE-Stentgraft Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauermann, J; Potthoff, A; Mc Cavert, M; Marquardt, S; Vaske, B; Rosenthal, H; von Hahn, T; Wacker, F; Meyer, B C; Rodt, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    To analyse technical and clinical success of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with portal hypertension and compare a stent and a stentgraft with regard to clinical and technical outcome and associated costs. 170 patients (56 ± 12 years, 32.9% females) treated with TIPS due to portal hypertension were reviewed. 80 patients received a stent (group 1) and 83 a stentgraft (group 2), and seven interventions were unsuccessful. Technical data, periprocedural imaging, follow-up ultrasound and clinical data were analysed with focus on technical success, patency, clinical outcome and group differences. Cost analysis was performed. Portal hypertension was mainly caused by ethyltoxic liver cirrhosis with ascites as dominant symptom (80%). Technical success was 93.5% with mean portosystemic gradient decrease from 16.1 ± 4.8 to 5.1 ± 2.1 mmHg. No significant differences in technical success and portosystemic gradient decrease between the groups were observed. Kaplan-Meier analysis yielded significant differences in primary patency after 14 days, 6 months and 2 years in favour of the stentgraft. Both groups showed good clinical results without significant difference in 1-year survival and hepatic encephalopathy rate. Costs to establish TIPS and to manage 2-year follow-up with constant patency and clinical success were 8876 € (group 1) and 9394 € (group 2). TIPS is a safe and effective procedure to manage portal hypertension. Stent and stentgraft enabled good technical and clinical results with a low complication rate. Primary patency rates are clearly in favour of the stentgraft, whereas the stent was more cost effective with similar clinical results in both groups.

  14. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Flow Reduction with Adjustable Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Balloon-Expandable Stents Using the “Sheath Control” Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Robert C., E-mail: Robert.c.blue@gmail.com; Lo, Grace C.; Kim, Edward; Patel, Rahul S.; Scott Nowakowski, F.; Lookstein, Robert A.; Fischman, Aaron M. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Interventional Radiology Section, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeA complication of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) placement is refractory portosystemic encephalopathy (PSE) often requiring TIPS reduction. We report the results of a “sheath control technique” utilizing constraining sheaths during deployment of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered balloon-expandable stents, minimizing stent migration, and providing additional procedural control.MethodsTIPS reduction was performed in 10 consecutive patients for PSE using Atrium iCast covered stents (Atrium Maquet Getinge Group, Germany). Within the indwelling TIPS stent, a 9 mm × 59 mm iCast stent was deployed with 2 cm exposed from the sheath’s distal end and the majority of the stent within the sheath to create the distal hourglass shape. During balloon retraction, the stent was buttressed by the sheath. The proximal portion of the stent was angioplastied to complete the hourglass configuration, and the central portion of the stent was dilated to 5 mm. Demographics, pre- and post-procedure laboratory values, and outcomes were recorded.ResultsTen patients underwent TIPS reduction with 100 % technical success. There was no stent migration during stent deployment. All patients experienced initial improvement of encephalopathy. One patient ultimately required complete TIPS occlusion for refractory PSE, and another developed TIPS occlusion 36 days post-procedure. There was no significant trend toward change in patients’ MELD scores immediately post-procedure or at 30 days (p = 0.46, p = 0.47, respectively).ConclusionTIPS reduction using Atrium iCast PTFE balloon-expandable stents using the “sheath control technique” is safe and effective, and minimizes the risk of stent migration.

  15. Comparison of Technical and Clinical Outcome of Transjugular Portosystemic Shunt Placement Between a Bare Metal Stent and a PTFE-Stentgraft Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauermann, J., E-mail: jostlauermann@gmail.com [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Potthoff, A. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology (Germany); Mc Cavert, M. [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Ireland); Marquardt, S. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Vaske, B. [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Biometry (Germany); Rosenthal, H. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Hahn, T. von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology (Germany); Wacker, F.; Meyer, B. C.; Rodt, Thomas, E-mail: rodt.thomas@mh-hannover.de [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeTo analyse technical and clinical success of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with portal hypertension and compare a stent and a stentgraft with regard to clinical and technical outcome and associated costs.Materials and Methods170 patients (56 ± 12 years, 32.9 % females) treated with TIPS due to portal hypertension were reviewed. 80 patients received a stent (group 1) and 83 a stentgraft (group 2), and seven interventions were unsuccessful. Technical data, periprocedural imaging, follow-up ultrasound and clinical data were analysed with focus on technical success, patency, clinical outcome and group differences. Cost analysis was performed.ResultsPortal hypertension was mainly caused by ethyltoxic liver cirrhosis with ascites as dominant symptom (80 %). Technical success was 93.5 % with mean portosystemic gradient decrease from 16.1 ± 4.8 to 5.1 ± 2.1 mmHg. No significant differences in technical success and portosystemic gradient decrease between the groups were observed. Kaplan–Meier analysis yielded significant differences in primary patency after 14 days, 6 months and 2 years in favour of the stentgraft. Both groups showed good clinical results without significant difference in 1-year survival and hepatic encephalopathy rate. Costs to establish TIPS and to manage 2-year follow-up with constant patency and clinical success were 8876 € (group 1) and 9394 € (group 2).ConclusionTIPS is a safe and effective procedure to manage portal hypertension. Stent and stentgraft enabled good technical and clinical results with a low complication rate. Primary patency rates are clearly in favour of the stentgraft, whereas the stent was more cost effective with similar clinical results in both groups.

  16. Is sonographic surveillance of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) necessary? A single centre experience comparing both types of stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, J.-J.; Chen, C. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Section of Hepatobiliary Disease, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Geller, B. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Firpi, R.; Machicao, V.I. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Section of Hepatobiliary Disease, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Caridi, J.G. [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Nelson, D.R. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Section of Hepatobiliary Disease, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Morelli, G. [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Section of Hepatobiliary Disease, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)], E-mail: morelgj@medicine.ufl.edu

    2008-10-15

    Aim: To investigate whether sonographic (US) surveillance of polytetrafluoroethylene covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) is necessary. Materials and methods: We identified 128 patients who underwent TIPS for complications of portal hypertension between January 2001 and December 2005 at a large tertiary centre. Procedural data were retrospectively analysed. US surveillance of the TIPS was performed at baseline with scheduled follow-up or whenever shunt dysfunction was suspected. Clinical and radiology reports were compared to assess US surveillance of the TIPS. Results: Four hundred and twenty-six US studies were performed, with a median of three per patient (range 1-5). The median follow-up period was 378 days (range 1-1749 days). Twenty-three patients (18%) had baseline US studies performed only whereas 105 (82%) also had follow-up studies. Forty-one (32%) of 128 patients [32 (78%) Wallstent, nine (22%) Viatorr] had Doppler ultrasound abnormalities noted. Venography was performed in all 41 patients. Abnormal venography and elevated hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) was seen in 34 (82.9%) of the 41 patients [29 (85.3%) Wallstent, five (14.7%) Viatorr]. Among the 34 patients, 17 (50%) [13 (76.5%) Wallstent, four (23.5%) Viatorr] had venographic abnormalities noted at the hepatic venous end accompanied by increased HVPG. All four of the Viatorr patients had minor narrowing at the hepatic venous end and HVPG measurements that ranged 3-4 mm Hg above 12 mm Hg. Conclusion: Considering the improved patency of covered stents in TIPS, US surveillance may be superfluous after the baseline study.

  17. Retrospective analysis of operative treatment of a series of 100 patients with subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Bartosz; Pawelczyk, Agnieszka; Pawelczyk, Tomasz; Ceranowicz, Katarzyna; Wojdyn, Maciej; Radek, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective study of medical records, surgical protocols, patient observation cards, and imaging files of 100 patients treated for subdural hematoma analyzed the type of hematoma, patient age and sex, operative technique, neurological status, cause of injury, duration of hospital stay, mortality rate, and the number of and reasons for reoperations to determine the effects on treatment outcomes. The time between the head injury and onset of neurological symptoms was analyzed versus the type of hematoma determined from computed tomography (CT) scans. Acute hematomas accounted for 38% of the cases, with subacute hematomas representing 20%, and chronic ones accounting for 42%. In trauma patients, the mean time interval between the injury and onset of neurological symptoms was 0.38 days for acute hematomas, 13.8 days for subacute hematomas, and 23.75 days for chronic hematomas. Repeat surgery was carried out in 26% of the cases. Improvement was obtained in 44% of cases, deterioration in 20%, and no change in neurological status in 36%. Timing of the operations was between 15:00 and 23:00 in 45%, between 23:00 and 7:00 in 33%, and between 7:00 and 15:00 in 22%. The classification of hematomas based on CT presentation corresponds to the classification based on the time elapsed between injury and onset of symptoms, and appears to be appropriate and useful in everyday practice. No preceding injury was identified in 31.6% of acute hematomas, 50% of subacute hematomas, and 61.9% of chronic hematomas. Analysis of reoperations indicates that trepanation may be superior to craniotomy as primary surgery for subacute and chronic hematomas. Subdural hematoma surgeries take place at all times of the day, with most carried out outside the usual working hours.

  18. Follow up study and interested cases in subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Mitsumasa; Goh, Jyunto; Koomura, Eiji; Nakao, Kazutami

    1983-01-01

    1. Out of 67 patients ranging from 16 to 82 years old, 20 were followed up by CT scan after operation. 2. Five patients presented hematoma on the both sides after operation, though they had suffered from the lesion of one side before operation. In four patients, hematoma was observed on the both sides before and after operation. Neither preoperative involved side changed nor hematoma appeared on the opposite side after operation in 11 patients. Follow-up examinations lasted up almost three months. 3. The maximum width of the subdural space was divided by the maximum intracranial width. These two factors were measured on horizontal CT scan. The calculated value was expressed in percentage and then, the result was regarded as Subdural Space (SDS) Index. Dividing a difference between the largest SDS Index (before operation) and the smallest by the number of days between the two points gave us a reduction rate of SDS Index. As a result, a reduction rate of 0.4 or less was obtained in all the patients less than 65 years old. There were three patients within the range from 0.7 to 1.0 of the rate. 76-year-old patients showed 2.6 and 5.7. Except the 76-old patients, mean duration of 35.5 days was calculated in Group I and SDS Index was 0, while Group II showed mean duration of 52.4 days, resulting in SDS Index of 0. 4. Specific progresses are shown below: 1) Hemorrhage of the caudate nucleus after operation 2) Subdural effusion of the both sides 3) Appearance of abscess 4) Subtentrial hemorrhage after operation 5) Postoperative epidural hematoma 6) Traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage, resulting in chronic subdural hematoma six months afterward (author)

  19. Large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy of renal calculi in a spina bifida patient: lessons we learn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan S

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Subramanian Vaidyanathan,1 Azi Samsudin,2 Gurpreet Singh,3 Peter L Hughes,4 Bakul M Soni,1 Fahed Selmi1 1Regional Spinal Injuries Center, Southport and Formby District General Hospital, Southport, UK; 2Department of Urology, Whiston Hospital, Prescot, UK; 3Department of Urology, 4Department of Radiology, Southport and Formby District General Hospital, Southport, UK Introduction: Paraplegic patients are at greater risk of developing complications following ureteroscopic lithotripsy because of urine infection associated with neuropathic bladder, difficulties in access due to altered anatomy of urinary bladder and urethra, spinal curvature, spasticity, and contractures. We report the occurrence of large subcapsular hematoma following ureteroscopy and discuss lessons we learn from this case.Case report: A 48-year-old male patient with spina bifida underwent ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy and ureteric stenting for left ureteric stone and staghorn calculus with hydronephrosis; laser lithotripsy was repeated after 3 months; both procedures were performed by a senior urologist and did not result in any complications. Ureteroscopic laser lithotripsy was performed 5 months later by a urological trainee; it was difficult to negotiate the scope as vision became poor because of bleeding (as a result of the procedure. Postoperatively, hematuria persisted; temperature was 39°C. Cefuroxime was given intravenously followed by gentamicin for 5 days; hematuria subsided gradually; he was discharged home. Ten days later, this patient developed temperature, the urine culture grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ciprofloxacin was given orally. Computed tomography (CT of the urinary tract, performed 4 weeks after ureteroscopy, revealed a 9×7 cm subcapsular collection on the left kidney compressing underlying parenchyma. Percutaneous drainage was not feasible because of severe curvature of spine. Isotope renogram revealed deterioration in left renal function from 30

  20. A Comparison of Transjugular and Plugged-Percutaneous Liver Biopsy in Patients with Contraindications to Ordinary Percutaneous Liver Biopsy and an 'In-House' Protocol for Selecting the Procedure of Choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atar, Eli; Ben Ari, Ziv; Bachar, Gil N.; Amlinski, Yelena; Neyman, Chaim; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Schmilovitz-Weiss, Hemda; Shapiro, Riki; Bruckhaimer, Elchanan; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Belenky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) and plugged-percutaneous liver biopsy (PB) in consecutive patients with severe liver disease associated with impaired coagulation, ascites, or both and to verify the in-house protocol used to select the appropriate procedure. In 2000-2006, 329 patients (208 male [62.8%] and 121 female [37.2%]), aged 1 month to 81 years (mean, 46.8 years), underwent 150 TJLBs (39.1%) or 233 PBs (60.9%) procedures at a major tertiary center, as determined by an in-house protocol. The groups were compared for specimen characteristics, technical success, and complications. Technical success rates were 97.4% for TJLB (146/150) and 99.1% for PB (231/233). TJLB was associated with a lower average core length (1.29 vs. 1.43 cm) and lower average number of specimens obtained (2.44 vs. 2.8), but both methods yielded sufficient tissue for a definitive diagnosis. There were no major complications in either group. TJLB and PB can be safely and effectively performed for the diagnosis of hepatic disease in patients with contraindications for standard percutaneous liver biopsy. When both are technically available, we suggest PB as the procedure of choice, especially in transplanted livers.