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Sample records for hematology oncology patients

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Clinical Study in 1,016 Hematology/Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierl, Marina; Pfirstinger, Jochen; Andreesen, Reinhard; Holler, Ernst; Mayer, Stephanie; Wolff, Daniel; Vogelhuber, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Surveys state a widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with malignant diseases. CAM methods might potentially interfere with the metabolization of tumor-specific therapy. However, there is little communication about CAM use in hematology/oncology patients between patients, CAM providers, and oncologists. A self-administered questionnaire was handed out to all patients attending to the hematology/oncology outpatient clinic of Regensburg University Hospital. Subsequently, a chart review of all CAM users was performed. Questionnaires of 1,016 patients were analyzed. Of these patients, 30% used CAM, preferably vitamins and micronutrients. Main information sources for CAM methods were physicians/nonmedical practitioners and friends/relatives. CAM therapies were provided mainly by licensed physicians (29%), followed by nonmedical practitioners (14%) and the patients themselves (13%). Although 62% of the CAM users agreed that the oncologist may know about their CAM therapy, a chart entry about CAM use was found only in 41%. CAM is frequently used by hematology/oncology patients. Systematic communication about CAM is essential to avoid possible drug interactions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Patients' reflections on communication in the second-opinion hematology-oncology consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Roberta E; Sullivan, Amy; Back, Anthony L; Alexander, Stewart C; Matsuyama, Robin K; Lee, Stephanie J

    2009-07-01

    The nature of communication between patients and their second-opinion hematology consultants may be very different in these one-time consultations than for those that are within long-term relationships. This study explored patients' perceptions of their second-opinion hematology-oncology consultation to investigate physician-patient communication in malignant disease at a critical juncture in cancer patients' care and decision-making. In-depth telephone interviews with a subset of 20 patients from a larger study, following their subspecialty hematology consultations. Most patients wanted to contribute to the consultation agenda, but were unable to do so. Patients sought expert and honest advice delivered with empathy, though most did not expect the consultant to directly address their emotions. They wanted the physician to apply his/her knowledge to the specifics of their individual cases, and were disappointed and distrustful when physicians cited only general prognostic statistics. In contrast, physicians' consideration of the unique elements of patients' cases, and demonstrations of empathy and respect made patients' feel positively about the encounter, regardless of the prognosis. Patients provided concrete recommendations for physician and patient behaviors to enhance the consultation. Consideration of these recommendations may result in more effective communication and increased patient satisfaction with medical visits.

  3. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Explore career opportunities in pediatric hematology/oncology Visit the ASPHO Career Center. Learn More Join ... Privacy Policy » © The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

  4. Improving Patient Satisfaction in a Midsize Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustino, Nicholas J; Kochanski, Justin J

    2015-09-01

    The study of patient satisfaction is a rapidly emerging area of importance within health care. High levels of patient satisfaction are associated with exceptional physician-patient communication, superior patient compliance, reduced risk of medical malpractice, and economic benefit in the value-based purchasing era. To our knowledge, no previous reports have evaluated methods to improve the patient experience within the pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) outpatient clinic. Patient satisfaction was measured using returned Press-Ganey surveys at Blank Children's Hospital PHO outpatient clinic (UnityPoint Health). The aim of this study was to raise the overall patient satisfaction score to the 75th percentile and raise the care provider score (CP) to the 90th percentile nationally. After analyzing data from 2013, interventions were implemented in January 2014, including weekly review of returned surveys, review of goals and progress at monthly staff meetings, distribution of written materials addressing deficiencies, score transparency among providers, provider use of Web-based patient satisfaction training modules, devotion of additional efforts to address less satisfied demographics (new patient consultations), and more liberal use of service recovery techniques. In the PHO outpatient clinic, overall patient satisfaction improved from the 56th to 97th percentile. Care provider scores improved from the 70th to 99 th percentile. For new patients, overall satisfaction improved from the 27th to 92 nd percentile, and care provider scores improved from the 29th to 98 th percentile. Patient satisfaction was improved in a midsize PHO clinic by implementing provider- and staff-driven initiatives. A combination of minor behavioral changes among care providers and staff in conjunction with systems-related modifications drove improvement. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Measles Outbreak in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients in Shanghai, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yan-Ling; Zhai, Xiao-Wen; Zhu, Yan-Feng; Wang, Xiang-Shi; Xia, Ai-Mei; Li, Yue-Fang; Zeng, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite substantial progress toward measles control are making in China, measles outbreaks in immunocompromised population still pose a challenge to interrupt endemic transmission. This study aimed to investigate the features of measles in pediatric hematology and oncology patients and explore the reasons behind the outbreak. Methods: We collected demographic, epidemiological, and clinical data of immunocompromised measles children. All suspected measles cases were laboratory-confirmed based on the presence of measles IgM and/or identification of measles RNA. The clinical data were statistically analyzed by t-test for continuous variables and Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Results: From March 9 to July 25 in 2015, a total of 23 children with malignancies and post hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (post-HSCT) were notified to develop measles in Shanghai. Of these 23 patients with the median age of 5.5 years (range: 11 months–14 years), 20 (87.0%) had received 1–3 doses of measles vaccine previously; all patients had fever with the median fever duration of 8 days; 21 (91.3%) had cough; 18 (78.3%) had rash; 13 (56.5%) had Koplik's spot; 13 (56.5%) had complications including pneumonia and acute liver failure; and five (21.7%) vaccinated patients died from severe pneumonia or acute liver failure. Except the first patient, all patients had hospital visits within 7–21 days before measles onset and 20 patients were likely to be exposed to each other. Conclusions: The outcome of measles outbreak in previously vaccinated oncology and post-HSCT pediatric patients during chemotherapy and immunosuppressant medication was severe. Complete loss of protective immunity induced by measles vaccine during chemotherapy was the potential reason. Improved infection control practice was critical for the prevention of measles in malignancy patients and transplant recipients. PMID:28524832

  6. Subjective nutritional val oration generated by the patient in the hematology oncology users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrada, D.

    2004-01-01

    Everybody knows that all protein calorie malnutrition is not only the cause of death in cancer patients but also affects the good performance treatment as well as their quality of life. Because of that common complication, it is necessary the use of simple tools to detect its occurrence. A recent study called NUPAC perceive that 52% of patients in advanced stages presents protein calorie malnutrition. The tool used was the subjective global valuation which is generated by the patient and is based on clinical parameters. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group showed that a weight loss predicts the treatment response reducing the survival and quality of life. In 2002 a study carried out in the Nutritional Support Unit, University Hospital Vall d'Hebron in Barcelona recorded that at admission only 16,7% of patients were within normal nutritional values, 38.9% were undernourished moderate and 44.4% severe malnutrition, nutritional assessment at discharge showed no significant changes in relation to income hospital. 81.2% of these patient had a prescribed diet v / o of which 43.1% needed some supplements type and only 23% an artificial diet. The valuation method used was also generated by the subjective global valuation patient. Considering the impact that the nutritional status has in the evolution of neoplastic disease we saw the need to make a job using the above tool applied by personnel out of the nutrition in order to evaluate and identify patients who need or no simple nutritional intervention. Our study was conducted in the period of August-October in 2004 and included 50 users, of both sexes (26 males and 24 females) treated with polychemotherapy (which were excluded in the first series of MDT) and either ambulatory or hospitalized at transplant unit or conventional sector in Hematology-Oncology Service at the Asociacion Espanola Primera de Socorros Mutuos. Part of the questionnaire was completed by the own user and It also were performed by anthropometric

  7. Evaluation of How Integrative Oncology Services Are Valued between Hematology/Oncology Patients and Hematologists/Oncologists at a Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Hansra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence regarding opinions on integrative modalities by patients and physicians is lacking. Methods. A survey study was conducted assessing how integrative modalities were valued among hematology/oncology patients and hematologists and oncologists at a major tertiary medical center. Results. 1008 patients and 55 physicians were surveyed. With the exception of support groups, patients valued nutrition services, exercise therapy, spiritual/religious counseling, supplement/herbal advice, support groups, music therapy, and other complimentary medicine services significantly more than physicians (P≤0.05. Conclusion. With the exception of support groups, patients value integrative modalities more than physicians. Perhaps with increasing education, awareness, and acceptance by providers and traditional institutions, integrative modalities could be equally valued between patients and providers. It is possible that increased availability and utilization of integrative oncology modalities at tertiary hospital sites could improve patient satisfaction, quality of life, and other clinical endpoints.

  8. Acute hematologic emergencies in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristof, L.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant disease and its treatment are often being complicated by development of serious and at times life-threatening emergencies. Early recognition and treatment of these acute events are important to reduce morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. The following article provides an overview of several hematologic emergencies, which occur due abnormal hemopoiesis (e.g. hyperleukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytopenia), abnormal hemo stasis (e.g. hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, disseminated intravascular coagulation), or are related to blood products transfusions (transfuse reactions). (author)

  9. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients at the University of Mississippi Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Hanny C; Karlson, Cynthia W; Hsu, Johann H; Ostrenga, Andrew; Gordon, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    To examine the prevalence and modalities of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children with cancer and sickle cell disease; the reasons for use of CAM; and the use of CAM before, during, and after treatment in children with cancer. This single-center, observational study administered caregivers a written questionnaire regarding the use of CAM therapies. A total of 101 caregivers completed questionnaires. Including prayer, total CAM use in oncology and sickle cell disease was 64% and 63%, respectively. Non-prayer CAM use was 30% in oncology and 23% in sickle cell disease. Of respondents who reported using any CAM, the three most commonly used types were prayer (62.3% oncology; 60.0% sickle cell disease), vitamins/minerals (14.8% oncology; 10.0% sickle cell disease), and massage (9.8% oncology; 7.5% sickle cell disease). The primary reasons for using CAM were to provide hope, to improve quality of life, and to lessen adverse effects. In oncology patients, CAM use tended to increase during treatment compared with before and after treatment. The reported prevalence of non-prayer CAM use was lower (23%-30%) in this sample than has been reported in national samples or other geographic regions of the United States. Nonetheless, participants reported many positive reasons for using CAM, including to gain hope, improve quality of life, and control pain. Thus, CAM use appears to be an important aspect of medical care for many pediatric hematology/oncology families and should be a consideration when providers are discussing treatment and quality of care with families.

  10. Results of high-risk neutropenia therapy of hematology-oncology patients in a university hospital in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Boada Burutaran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile neutropenia is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in hematology-oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. The management of febrile neutropenia is typically algorithm-driven. The aim of this study was to assess the results of a standardized protocol for the treatment of febrile neutropenia. Methods: A retrospective cohort study (2011-2012 was conducted of patients with high-risk neutropenia in a hematology-oncology service. Results: Forty-four episodes of 17 patients with a median age of 48 years (range: 18-78 years were included. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 61.4%. The presence of febrile neutropenia was associated with both the duration and severity of neutropenia. Microbiological agents were isolated from different sources in 59.3% of the episodes with bacteremia iso- lated from blood being the most prevalent (81.3%. Multiple drug-resistant gram-negative bacilli were isolated in 62.5% of all microbiologically documented infections. Treatment of 63% of the episodes in which the initial treatment was piperacillin/tazobactam needed to be escalated to meropenem. The mortality rate due to febrile neutropenia episodes was 18.5%. Conclusion: The high rate of gram-negative bacilli resistant to piperacillin/tazobactam (frontline antibiotics in our protocol and the early need to escalate to carbapenems raises the question as to whether it is necessary to change the current protocol.

  11. Determinants of hematology-oncology trainees' postfellowship career pathways with a focus on nonmalignant hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sarah; Mikhael, Joseph; Gitlin, Scott D.

    2018-01-01

    Nonmalignant hematologic conditions are extremely prevalent and contribute significantly to the global burden of disease. The US health care system may soon face a shortage of specialists in nonmalignant hematology. We sought to identify factors that lead hematology-oncology fellows to pursue (or not to pursue) careers in nonmalignant hematology. Cross-sectional, web-based survey distributed to 149 graduates of a hematology-oncology fellowship program at a large academic medical center between 1998 and 2016. Eighty-six out of 149 graduates responded (57.7%); most (59 [68.6%]) practice at an academic medical center. Respondents spend a mean of 61% of their time in clinical practice, 23.7% conducting research, 5.2% in education, and 5.2% in administration. Those in clinical practice spend a mean of 52.1% of their time in solid tumor oncology, 37.5% in hematologic malignancies, and 10% in nonmalignant hematology; only 1 spent >50% of time practicing nonmalignant hematology. Factors most significantly affecting choice of patient population included clinical experience during fellowship and intellectual stimulation of the patient population/disease type. Factors that could have most significantly influenced a decision to spend more time in nonmalignant hematology included increased exposure/access to role models and mentors and opportunities for better career growth/advancement. Fellowship graduates spend >50% of their time in clinical practice, but almost none spend a significant amount of time practicing nonmalignant hematology. Given the growing number of patients with nonmalignant hematologic conditions and a possible future provider shortage, medical trainees should be encouraged to pursue careers in nonmalignant hematology. PMID:29463548

  12. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology

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    Ahmed, Awad A. [Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chapman, Christina H.; Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Deville, Curtiland, E-mail: cdeville@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Methods and Materials: Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Results: Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Conclusion: Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves.

  13. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Holliday, Emma B.; Chapman, Christina H.; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R.; Deville, Curtiland

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Methods and Materials: Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Results: Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Conclusion: Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves.

  14. Female Representation in the Academic Oncology Physician Workforce: Radiation Oncology Losing Ground to Hematology Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Awad A; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Holliday, Emma B; Chapman, Christina H; Jagsi, Reshma; Thomas, Charles R; Deville, Curtiland

    2017-05-01

    Our purpose was to assess comparative female representation trends for trainees and full-time faculty in the academic radiation oncology and hematology oncology workforce of the United States over 3 decades. Simple linear regression models with year as the independent variable were used to determine changes in female percentage representation per year and associated 95% confidence intervals for trainees and full-time faculty in each specialty. Peak representation was 48.4% (801/1654) in 2013 for hematology oncology trainees, 39.0% (585/1499) in 2014 for hematology oncology full-time faculty, 34.8% (202/581) in 2007 for radiation oncology trainees, and 27.7% (439/1584) in 2015 for radiation oncology full-time faculty. Representation significantly increased for trainees and full-time faculty in both specialties at approximately 1% per year for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty and 0.3% per year for radiation oncology trainees and full-time faculty. Compared with radiation oncology, the rates were 3.84 and 2.94 times greater for hematology oncology trainees and full-time faculty, respectively. Despite increased female trainee and full-time faculty representation over time in the academic oncology physician workforce, radiation oncology is lagging behind hematology oncology, with trainees declining in recent years in radiation oncology; this suggests a de facto ceiling in female representation. Whether such issues as delayed or insufficient exposure, inadequate mentorship, or specialty competitiveness disparately affect female representation in radiation oncology compared to hematology oncology are underexplored and require continued investigation to ensure that the future oncologic physician workforce reflects the diversity of the population it serves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute empathy decline among resident physician trainees on a hematology-oncology ward: an exploratory analysis of house staff empathy, distress, and patient death exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C; Malone, Adriana K; Roth, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    A reason for empathy decline during medical training has not been fully elucidated. Empathy may decrease acutely during an inpatient hematology-oncology rotation because of the acuity of death exposures. This study aimed to explore physician trainee empathy, distress, death exposures, and their attributed meaning for the trainee. Internal medicine interns and residents at a single academic center were evaluated before and after hematology-oncology ward rotations using Interpersonal Reactivity Index for empathy, previously cited reasons for empathy decline, Impact of Event Scale-Revised for distress, death exposures (no. of dying patients cared for) and attributed sense of meaning (yes/no) (post-rotation). Fifty-six trainees completed both pre-rotation and post-rotation questionnaires (58% response). Empathy averaged 58.9 (SD 12.0) before and 56.8 (SD 11.1) after the rotation (2.1 point decrease) (p = 0.018). Distress was elevated but did not change significantly during the rotation. Residents cared for 4.28 dying patients. Seventy-three percent reported that death was the most stressful event during the rotation, yet 68% reported that they derived a sense of meaning from caring for dying patients. Empathy and distress scales were positively correlated before the rotation (r = 0.277, p = 0.041) but not after (r = .059, p = 0.69). This study suggests that an acute drop in empathy can occur over several weeks in residents rotating through inpatient hematology-oncology, similar to empathy decline associated with years of training in other studies. Empathy decline may be associated with elevated distress and death exposures on the hematology-oncology ward and should be explored further in other medical training environments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A Prospective, Holistic, Multicenter Approach to Tracking and Understanding Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Aditya H; Bundy, David G; Werner, Eric J; Hord, Jeffrey D; Miller, Marlene R; Tang, Li; Lawlor, John P; Billett, Amy L

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the burden of bloodstream infections (BSIs) among pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) inpatients, to propose a comprehensive, all-BSI tracking approach, and to discuss how such an approach helps better inform within-center and across-center differences in CLABSI rate DESIGN Prospective cohort study SETTING US multicenter, quality-improvement, BSI prevention network PARTICIPANTS PHO centers across the United States who agreed to follow a standardized central-line-maintenance care bundle and track all BSI events and central-line days every month. METHODS Infections were categorized as CLABSI (stratified by mucosal barrier injury-related, laboratory-confirmed BSI [MBI-LCBI] versus non-MBI-LCBI) and secondary BSI, using National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) definitions. Single positive blood cultures (SPBCs) with NHSN defined common commensals were also tracked. RESULTS Between 2013 and 2015, 34 PHO centers reported 1,110 BSIs. Among them, 708 (63.8%) were CLABSIs, 170 (15.3%) were secondary BSIs, and 232 (20.9%) were SPBCs. Most SPBCs (75%) occurred in patients with profound neutropenia; 22% of SPBCs were viridans group streptococci. Among the CLABSIs, 51% were MBI-LCBI. Excluding SPBCs, CLABSI rates were higher (88% vs 77%) and secondary BSI rates were lower (12% vs 23%) after the NHSN updated the definition of secondary BSI (Papproach that could help better assess across-center and within-center differences in infection rates, including CLABSI. This approach enables informed decision making by healthcare providers, payors, and the public. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:690-696.

  17. Exploring communication difficulties in pediatric hematology: oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, Ebru Akgun; Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Gunes, Nebahat Bora

    2013-01-01

    Communication plays an important role for the well being of patients, families and also health care professionals in cancer care. Conversely, ineffective communication may cause depression, increased anxiety, hopelessness and decreased of quality life for patients, families and also nurses. This study aimed to explore communication difficulties of pediatric hematology/oncology nurses with patients and their families, as well as their suggestions about communication difficulties. It was conducted in a pediatric hematology/oncology hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Qualitative data were collected by focus groups, with 21 pediatric hematology/oncology nursing staff from three groups. Content analysis was used for data analysis. Findings were grouped in three main categories. The first category concerned communication difficulties, assessing problems in responding to questions, ineffective communication and conflicts with the patient's families. The second was about the effects of communication difficulties on nurses and the last main category involved suggestions for empowering nurses with communication difficulties, the theme being related to institutional issues. Nurses experience communication difficulties with children and their families during long hospital stays. Communication difficulties particularly increase during crisis periods, like at the time of first diagnosis, relapse, the terminal stage or on days with special meaning such as holidays. The results obtained indicate that pediatric nurses and the child/family need to be supported, especially during crisis periods. Feeling of empowerment in communication will improve the quality of care by reducing the feelings of exhaustion and incompetence in nurses.

  18. The Intensive Care Medicine research agenda on critically ill oncology and hematology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azoulay, E.; Schellongowski, P.; Darmon, M.; Bauer, P.R.; Benoit, D.; Depuydt, P.; Divatia, J.V.; Lemiale, V.; Vliet, M. van; Meert, A.P.; Mokart, D.; Pastores, S.M.; Perner, A.; Pene, F.; Pickkers, P.; Puxty, K.A.; Vincent, F.; Salluh, J.; Soubani, A.O.; Antonelli, M.; Staudinger, T.; Bergwelt-Baildon, M. von; Soares, M.

    2017-01-01

    Over the coming years, accelerating progress against cancer will be associated with an increased number of patients who require life-sustaining therapies for infectious or toxic chemotherapy-related events. Major changes include increased number of cancer patients admitted to the ICU with full-code

  19. The Intensive Care Medicine research agenda on critically ill oncology and hematology patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azoulay, Elie; Schellongowski, Peter; Darmon, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Over the coming years, accelerating progress against cancer will be associated with an increased number of patients who require life-sustaining therapies for infectious or toxic chemotherapy-related events. Major changes include increased number of cancer patients admitted to the ICU with full-co...

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes Labeling for Products Approved by the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products of the US Food and Drug Administration (2010-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasakthy, Ari; DeMuro, Carla; Clark, Marci; Haydysch, Emily; Ma, Esprit; Bonthapally, Vijayveer

    2016-06-01

    To review the use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data in medical product labeling granted by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for new molecular entities and biologic license applications by the FDA Office of Hematology and Oncology Products (OHOP) between January 2010 and December 2014, to elucidate challenges faced by OHOP for approving PRO labeling, and to understand challenges faced by drug manufacturers to include PRO end points in oncology clinical trials. FDA Drug Approval Reports by Month were reviewed to obtain the number of new molecular entities and biologic license applications approved from 2010 to 2014. Drugs approved by the FDA OHOP during this period were selected for further review, focusing on brand and generic name; approval date; applicant; indication; PRO labeling describing treatment benefit, measures, end point status, and significant results; FDA reviewer feedback on PRO end points; and study design of registration trials. First in class, priority review, fast track, orphan drug, or accelerated approval status was retrieved for selected oncology drugs from 2011 to 2014. Descriptive analyses were performed by using Microsoft Excel 2010. Of 160 drugs approved by the FDA (2010-2014), 40 were approved by OHOP. Three (7.5%) of the 40 received PRO-related labeling (abiraterone acetate, ruxolitinib phosphate, and crizotinib). Compared with nononcology drugs (2011-2014), oncology drugs were more likely to be orphan and first in class. The majority of oncology drug reviews by FDA were fast track, priority, or accelerated. Although symptoms and functional decrements are common among patients with cancer, PRO labeling is rare in the United States, likely because of logistical hurdles and oncology study design. Recent developments within the FDA OHOP to capture PROs in oncology studies for the purpose of product labeling are encouraging. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Neutropenia in pediatric hematology/oncology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Deordieva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acquired neutropenia is one of the most common conditions in pediatric hematology practice. These conditions usually are benign. In contrast, congenital neutropenia are rare conditions, but in the absence of pathogenic therapy can cause fatal complications. Approach to the differential diagnosis and management of these patients are discussed in this review.

  2. Inpatient Hematology-Oncology Rotation Is Associated With a Decreased Interest in Pursuing an Oncology Career Among Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C; Holland, Jimmie; Holcombe, Randall F

    2015-07-01

    The demand for hematologists and oncologists is not being met. We hypothesized that an inpatient hematology-oncology ward rotation would increase residents' interest. Potential reasons mitigating interest were explored and included differences in physician distress, empathy, resilience, and patient death experiences. Agreement with the statement "I am interested in pursuing a career/fellowship in hematology and oncology" was rated by residents before and after a hematology-oncology rotation, with 0 = not true at all, 1 = rarely true, 2 = sometimes true, 3 = often true, and 4 = true nearly all the time. House staff rotating on a hematology-oncology service from November 2013 to October 2014 also received questionnaires before and after their rotations containing the Connors-Davidson Resilience Scale, the Impact of Events Scale-Revised, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, demographic information, and number of dying patients cared for and if a sense of meaning was derived from that experience. Fifty-six residents completed both before- and after-rotation questionnaires (response rate, 58%). The mean interest score was 1.43 initially and decreased to 1.24 after the rotation (P = .301). Female residents' mean score was 1.13 initially and dropped to 0.81 after the rotation (P = .04). Male residents' mean score was 1.71 initially and 1.81 after the rotation (P = .65). Decreased hematology-oncology interest correlated with decreased empathy; male interest decrease correlated with decreased resilience. An inpatient hematology-oncology ward rotation does not lead to increased interest and, for some residents, may lead to decreased interest in the field. Encouraging outpatient hematology-oncology rotations and the cultivation of resilience, empathy, and meaning regarding death experiences may increase resident interest. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Perceptions, attitudes, and experiences of hematology/oncology fellows toward incorporating geriatrics in their training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Ronald J; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Levine, Stacie K; Dale, William

    2014-01-01

    The aging of the U.S. population continues to highlight emerging issues in providing care generally for older adults and specifically for older adults with cancer. The majority of patients with cancer in the U.S. are currently 65 years of age or older; therefore, training and research in geriatrics and geriatric oncology are viewed to be integral in meeting the needs of this vulnerable population. Yet, the ways to develop and integrate best geriatrics training within the context of hematology/oncology fellowship remain unclear. Toward this end, the current study seeks to evaluate the prior and current geriatric experiences and perspectives of hematology/oncology fellows. To gain insight into these experiences, focus groups of hematology/oncology fellows were conducted. Emergent themes included: 1) perceived lack of formal geriatric oncology didactics among fellows; 2) a considerable amount of variability exists in pre-fellowship geriatric experiences; 3) shared desire to participate in a geriatric oncology-based clinic; 4) differences across training levels in confidence in managing older adults with cancer; and 5) identification of specific criteria on how best to approach older adults with cancer in a particular clinical scenario. The present findings will help guide future studies in evaluating geriatrics among hematology/oncology fellows across institutions. They will also have implications in the development of geriatrics curricula and competencies specific to hematology/oncology training. © 2013.

  4. Anti-infective Vaccination Strategies in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies or Solid Tumors - Guideline of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society for Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, C T; Liss, B; Mellinghoff, S; Buchheidt, D; Cornely, O A; Egerer, G; Heinz, W J; Hentrich, M; Maschmeyer, G; Mayer, K; Sandherr, M; Silling, G; Ullmann, A; Vehreschild, M J G T; von Lilienfeld-Toal, M; Wolf, H H; Lehners, N

    2018-04-24

    Infectious complications are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with malignancies specifically when receiving anticancer treatments. Prevention of infection through vaccines is an important aspect of clinical care of cancer patients. Immunocompromising effects of the underlying disease as well as of antineoplastic therapies need to be considered when devising vaccination strategies. This guideline provides clinical recommendations on vaccine use in cancer patients including autologous stem cell transplant recipients, while allogeneic stem cell transplantation is subject of a separate guideline. The document was prepared by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society for Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) by reviewing currently available data and applying evidence-based medicine criteria.

  5. [Effects of self-adapting G-DRG system 2004 to 2006 on in-patient services payment in pediatric hematology and oncology patients of a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christaras, A; Schaper, J; Strelow, H; Laws, H-J; Göbel, U

    2006-01-01

    Reimbursement of inpatient treatment by daily constant charges is replaced by diagnosis- and procedure-related group system (G-DRG) in German acute care hospitals excerpt for psychiatry since 2004. Re-designs of G-DRG system were undertaken in 2005 and 2006. Parallel to implementation requirement- and resource-based self-adjustment of this new reimbursement system has been established by law. Adjustments performed in 2005 and 2006 are examined with respect to their effect on reimbursements in treatments of children with oncological, hematological, and immunological diseases. An unchanged population of 349 patients associated with 1,731 inpatient stays of a Clinic of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology, and Immunology in 2004 was analyzed by methods and means of G-DRG systems 2004, 2005, and 2006. DRGs and additional payments for drugs and procedures eligible for all and/or individual hospitals were calculated. G-DRG system 2005 resulted in overall reimbursement loss of 3.77 % compared to G-DRG 2004. G-DRG 2006 leads to slightly improved overall reimbursements compared to G-DRG 2005 by increasing DRG-based revenues. G-DRG 2006 effects 2.40 % reduction in overall reimbursement compared to G-DRG 2004. This loss includes ameliorating effects of additional payments for drugs and blood products already. Despite introduction of additional payments especially designed for children and teenagers in 2006, additional payment volume is decreased by 21.71 % from 2005 to 2006. G-DRG 2006 yields over-all reimbursement losses of 1.45 % in comparison to G-DRG 2004. Overall reimbursements include introduced additional payments for drugs and blood products. (Reimbursements resulting out of DRG payment alone drop by 14.73 % from 2004 to 2005, and increase by 3.26 % from 2005 to 2006 (2004 vs. 2006 11.95 %). Introduction of additional payments for drugs and blood products on a Germany-wide basis introduced in 2005 dampens DRG-based reimbursement losses. Despite introduction of dosage

  6. Assessment of Serologic Immunity to Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis After Treatment of Korean Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyo Jin; Lee, Jae-Wook; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Kim, Hack-Ki

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis antibody titers after antineoplastic treatment and to suggest an appropriate vaccination approach for pediatric hemato-oncologic patients. A total of 146 children with either malignancy in remission after cessation of therapy or bone marrow failure were recruited. All children had received routine immunization including diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccination before diagnosis of cancer. The serologic immunity to diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was classified as: completely protective, partially protective, or non-protective. Non-protective serum antibody titer for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was detected in 6.2%, 11.6%, and 62.3% of patients, respectively, and partial protective serum antibody titer for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was seen in 37%, 28.1%, and 8.9% of patients. There was no significant correlation between the severity of immune defect and age, gender or underlying disease. Revaccination after antineoplastic therapy showed significantly higher levels of antibody for each vaccine antigen. Our data indicates that a large proportion of children lacked protective serum concentrations of antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. This suggests that reimmunization of these patients is necessary after completion of antineoplastic treatment. Also, prospective studies should be undertaken with the aim of devising a common strategy of revaccination. PMID:22219618

  7. Development of the family symptom inventory: a psychosocial screener for children with hematology/oncology conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, Cynthia W; Haynes, Stacey; Faith, Melissa A; Elkin, Thomas D; Smith, Maria L; Megason, Gail

    2015-03-01

    A growing body of literature has begun to underscore the importance of integrating family-based comprehensive psychological screening into standard medical care for children with oncology and hematology conditions. There are no known family-based measures designed to screen for clinically significant emotional and behavioral concerns in pediatric oncology and hematology patients. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the Family Symptom Inventory (FSI), a brief screener of patient and family member psychological symptoms. The FSI also screens for common comorbid physical symptoms (pain and sleep disturbance) and is designed for use at any point during treatment and follow-up. A total of 488 caregivers completed the FSI during regular hematology/oncology visits for 193 cancer, 219 sickle cell disease, and 76 hematology pediatric patients. Exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and tests of reliability and preliminary validity were conducted. Exploratory factor analysis suggested a 34-item, 4-factor solution, which was confirmed in an independent sample using confirmatory factor analysis (factor loadings=0.49 to 0.88). The FSI demonstrated good internal reliability (α's=0.86 to 0.92) and good preliminary validity. Regular psychosocial screening throughout the course of treatment and follow-up may lead to improved quality of care for children with oncology and hematology conditions.

  8. Preclinical Medical Student Hematology/Oncology Education Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumberg, Marc S; Broudy, Virginia C; Bengtson, Elizabeth M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    To better prepare medical students to care for patients in today's changing health-care environment as they transition to continuing their education as residents, many US medical schools have been reviewing and modifying their curricula and are considering integration of newer adult learning techniques, including team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and other active learning approaches (Assoc Am Med Coll. 2014). Directors of hematology/oncology (H/O) courses requested an assessment of today's H/O education environment to help them respond to the ongoing changes in the education content and environment that will be necessary to meet this goal. Several recommendations for the improvement of cancer education resulted from American Association for Cancer Education's (ACCE's) "Cancer Education Survey II" including a call for medical schools to evaluate the effectiveness of current teaching methods in achieving cancer education objectives (Chamberlain et al. J Cancer Educ 7(2):105-114.2014). To understand the current environment and resources used in medical student preclinical H/O courses, an Internet-based, Survey Monkey®-formatted, questionnaire focusing on nine topic areas was distributed to 130 United States Hematology/Oncology Course Directors (HOCDs). HOCDs represent a diverse group of individuals who work in variably supportive environments and who are variably satisfied with their position. Several aspects of these courses remain relatively unchanged from previous assessments, including a predominance of traditional lectures, small group sessions, and examinations that are either written or computer-based. Newer technology, including web-based reproduction of lectures, virtual microscopes, and availability of additional web-based content has been introduced into these courses. A variety of learner evaluation and course assessment approaches are used. The ultimate effectiveness and impact of these changes needs to be determined.

  9. Relationship between physicians' perceived stigma toward depression and physician referral to psycho-oncology services on an oncology/hematology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Hyoung; Bae, Jae-Nam; Lim, Joohan; Lee, Moon-Hee; Hahm, Bong-Jin; Yi, Hyeon Gyu

    2018-03-01

    This study was performed to identify relationships between physicians' perceived stigma toward depression and psycho-oncology service utilization on an oncology/hematology ward. The study participants were 235 patients in an oncology/hematology ward and 14 physicians undergoing an internal medicine residency training program in Inha University Hospital (Incheon, South Korea). Patients completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and residents completed the Perceived Devaluation-Discrimination scale that evaluates perceived stigma toward depression. A total PHQ-9 score of ≥5 was defined as clinically significant depression. Physicians decided on referral on the basis of their opinions and those of their patients. The correlates of physicians' recommendation for referral to psycho-oncology services and real referrals psycho-oncology services were examined. Of the 235 patients, 143 had PHQ-9 determined depression, and of these 143 patients, 61 received psycho-oncology services. Physicians recommended that 87 patients consult psycho-oncology services. Multivariate analyses showed that lower physicians' perceived stigma regarding depression was significantly associated with physicians' recommendation for referral, and that real referral to psycho-oncology services was significantly associated with presence of a hematologic malignancy and lower physicians' perceived stigma toward depression. Physicians' perceived stigma toward depression was found to be associated with real referral to psycho-oncology services and with physician recommendation for referral to psycho-oncology services. Further investigations will be needed to examine how to reduce physicians' perceived stigma toward depression. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Efficacy of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training on Anxiety, Depression and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy at Tabriz Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Iran in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shabanlui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemotherapy is an important treatment for cancer, yet some of its side effects are serious and painful. Many patients with cancer suffer from psychiatric disorders that most likely result from therapeutic drugs or mental strategies to cope with their illness. Progressive muscle relaxation is one of the cost effective, self-help methods that promotes mental health in healthy participants. Thisstudy aims to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation training on anxiety and depression in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.Methods: This was a randomized, clinical study that enrolled 60 patients who received inpatient chemotherapy in the Tabriz Hematology and Oncology Research Center in 2010. We divided patients into two groups, intervention and control. All participants signed written formal consents and completed the Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale questionnaires. Intervention group participants were trained inprogressive muscle relaxation in groups of 3-6 to enable participants to perform this technique when they were alone in the hospital and after discharge, two to three times each day. After one and three months, questionnaires were completed again by both groups and the results compared. 17th version of SPSS software was used fordata analysis.Results: After data analysis, most participants were satisfied with learning and experiencing this technique. There was no significant difference between scales in the case and control groups after one month (P>0.05. However after three months, anxiety and depression considerably improved in patients who underwent progressive muscle relaxation training (P<0.05.Conclusion: Progressive muscle relaxation training can improve anxietyand depression in cancer patients.

  11. The feasibility of implementing a communication skills training course in pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Lauren; Figueiredo, Lisa; Roth, Michael; Levy, Adam

    Communication skills are a competency highlighted by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education; yet, little is known about the frequency with which trainees receive formal training or what programs are willing to invest. We sought to answer this question and designed a program to address identified barriers. We surveyed pediatric fellowship program directors from all disciplines and, separately, pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship program directors to determine current use of formal communication skills training. At our institution, we piloted a standardized patient (SP)-based communication skills training program for pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Twenty-seven pediatric hematology/oncology program directors and 44 pediatric program directors participated in the survey, of which 56% and 48%, respectively, reported having an established, formal communication skills training course. Multiple barriers to implementation of a communication skills course were identified, most notably time and cost. In the pilot program, 13 pediatric hematology/oncology fellows have participated, and 9 have completed all 3 years of training. Precourse assessment demonstrated fellows had limited comfort in various areas of communication. Following course completion, there was a significant increase in self-reported comfort and/or skill level in such areas of communication, including discussing a new diagnosis (p =.0004), telling a patient they are going to die (p =.005), discussing recurrent disease (p communicating a poor prognosis (p =.002), or responding to anger (p ≤.001). We have designed a concise communication skills training program, which addresses identified barriers and can feasibly be implemented in pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship.

  12. Overview of pediatric oncology and hematology in Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Halbert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myanmar is a country in southeast Asia in political, economic and healthcare transition. There are currently only two pediatric oncology centers serving a population of almost 19 million children. An estimated 85-92% of children with cancer are undiagnosed or not receiving treatment. Abandonment of treatment is as high as 60%. Although a number of chemotherapy agents are available, difficulties remain concerning treatment costs, quality control and the availability of supportive care. Radiotherapy services are also limited and not usually included in pediatric protocols. Healthcare professional training, improved diagnostics, strategies to tackle abandonment of treatment and the development of a parents′ support group are major priorities. Local and international partnerships including a recent partnership with world child cancer are essential in the interim to support the development of pediatric oncology and hematology in Myanmar. A unique opportunity exists to support the development of preventive, diagnostic, curative and palliative care for children′s cancer in Myanmar from the outset.

  13. Regulating hematology/oncology research involving human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Marshall B

    2002-12-01

    The conduct of hematology/oncology research, particularly clinical trials involving human participants, is an extensively regulated enterprise. Professionals in the specialty of hematology/oncology have important stakes in the success of biomedical research endeavors. Knowledge about and compliance strategies regarding the pertinent regulatory parameters are essential for avoiding negative legal repercussions for involved professionals. At the same time, there is a need to be aware of and actively resist the danger that strong [legal] protectionism might inadvertently result in undermining physician investigators' sense of personal moral responsibility in the conduct of human experiments. For all the limitations of that virtue in the protection of human subjects, it is surely not one that we would want medical scientists to be without [47]. Members of the potential participant pool, financial sponsors, and the general public must be convinced that everyone involved in the research enterprise is committed to operating within acceptable legal and ethical boundaries if the atmosphere of confidence and trust that is indispensable to the continued process and progress of investigation aimed at extending and improving quality of life for all of us in the future is to continue and flourish [48].

  14. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Josh; Burrows, James F; Ben Khallouq, Bertha; Rosen, Paul

    To understand key drivers of patient satisfaction in pediatric hematology/oncology. The "top-box" scores of patient satisfaction surveys from 4 pediatric hematology/oncology practices were collected from 2012 to 2014 at an integrated Children's Health Network. One item, "Likelihood of recommending practice," was used as the surrogate for overall patient satisfaction, and all other items were correlated to this item. A total of 1244 satisfaction surveys were included in this analysis. The most important predictors of overall patient satisfaction were cheerfulness of practice ( r = .69), wait time ( r = .60), and staff working together ( r = .60). The lowest scoring items were getting clinic on phone, information about delays, and wait time at clinic. Families bringing their children for outpatient care in a hematology/oncology practice want to experience a cheerful and collaborative medical team. Wait time at clinic may be a key driver in the overall experience for families with children with cancer. Future work should be directed at using this evidence to drive patient experience improvement processes in pediatric hematology/oncology.

  15. Outbreaks caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in hematology and oncology departments: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Ulrich

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: A rational use of antibiotics in hematology and oncology units is recommended in order to reduce selection pressure on resistant pathogens such as VRE. In addition the importance of hand hygiene should be stressed to all staff whenever possible.

  16. Use of Electronic Consultation System to Improve Access to Care in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Donna L; Murto, Kimmo; Kurzawa, Julia; Liddy, Clare; Keely, Erin; Lai, Lillian

    2017-10-01

    Electronic consultations (eConsult) allow for communication between primary care providers and specialists in an asynchronous manner. This study examined provider satisfaction, topics of interest, and efficiency of eConsult in pediatric hematology/oncology in Ottawa, Canada. We conducted a cross-sectional assessment of all eConsult cases directed to pediatric hematology/oncology specialists using the Champlain BASE (Building Access to Specialists through eConsultation) eConsult service from June 1, 2014 to May 31, 2016. There were 1064 eConsults to pediatrics during the study timeperiod and pediatric hematology/oncology consults accounted for 8% (85). During the same study timeperiod, 524 consults were seen in the pediatric hematology/oncology clinic. The majority of the eConsults were for hematology (90.5%) in contrast to oncology topics (9.5%). The most common topics were anemia, hemoglobinopathy, bleeding disorder, and thrombotic state. Primary care providers rated the eConsult service very highly, and their comments were very positive. The eConsult service resulted in deferral of 40% of consults originally contemplated to require a face-to-face specialist visit. This study showed successful implementation and use of the eConsult service for pediatric hematology/oncology and resulted in avoidance of a large number of face-to-face consultation. The common topics identified areas for continuing medical education.

  17. [Diagnosis-related groups as an instrument to develop suitable case-based lump sums in hematology and oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalheimer, Markus

    2011-01-01

    In 2003 a new reimbursement system was established for German hospitals. The approximately 17 million inpatient cases per year are now reimbursed based on a per-case payment regarding diagnoses and procedures, which was developed from an internationally approved system. The aim was a better conformity of costs and efforts in in-patient cases. In the first 2 years after implementation, the German diagnosis-related group (DRG) system was not able to adequately represent the complex structures of treatment in hematological and oncological in-patients. By creating new diagnoses and procedures (International Classification of Diseases 10 (ICD-10) and Surgical Operations and Procedures Classification System (OPS) catalogues), generating new DRGs and better splitting of existing ones, the hematology and oncology field could be much better described in the following years. The implementation of about 70 'co-payment structures' for new and expensive drugs and procedures in oncology was also crucial. To reimburse innovations, an additional system of co-payments for innovations was established to bridge the time until innovations are represented within the DRG system itself. In summary, hematological and oncological in-patients, including cases with extraordinary costs, are meanwhile well mapped in the German reimbursement system. Any tendencies to rationing could thereby be avoided, as most of the established procedures and costly drugs are adequately represented in the DRG system. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology workforce assessment: Part 2-Implications for fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, P J; Hilden, J M; Matthews, D; Dandoy, C; Badawy, S M; Shah, M; Wayne, A S; Hord, J

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) solicited information from division directors and fellowship training program directors to capture pediatric hematology/oncology (PHO) specific workforce data of 6 years (2010-2015), in response to an increase in graduating fellows during that time. Observations included a stable number of physicians and advanced practice providers (APPs) in clinical PHO, an increased proportion of APPs hired compared to physicians, and an increase in training-level first career positions. Rapid changes in the models of PHO care have significant implications to current and future trainees and require continued analysis to understand the evolving discipline of PHO. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Invasive Aspergillosis in Hematological Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is still one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in hematological patients, although its outcome has been improving. Prolonged and profound neutropenia in patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for acute leukemia and stem cell transplantation is a major risk factor for IA. Allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients with graft-versus-host disease and corticosteroid use are also at high risk. Management in a protective environment with high efficiency particular air (HEPA) filter is generally recommended to prevent aspergillosis in patients with prolonged and profound neutropenia. Antifungal prophylaxis against Aspergillus species should be considered in patients with past history of aspergillosis or colonization of Aspergillus species, at facilities with high incidence of IA and those without a protective environment. Early diagnosis and prompt antifungal treatment is important to improve outcome. Imaging studies such as computed tomography and biomarkers such as galactomannan antigen and β-D-glucan are useful for early diagnosis. Empirical antifungal treatment based on persistent or recurrent fever during neutropenia despite broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy is generally recommended in high-risk patients. Alternatively, a preemptive treatment strategy has recently been proposed in the context of progress in the early diagnosis of IA based on the results of imaging studies and biomarkers. Voriconazole is recommended for initial therapy for IA. Liposomal amphotericin B is considered as alternative initial therapy. Combination antifungal therapy of echinocandin with voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin B could be a choice for refractory cases.

  20. Pattern of Duplicate Presentations at National Hematology-Oncology Meetings: Influence of the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Schiffer, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    The major large US hematology-oncology meetings sponsored by the American Society of Hematology (ASH) and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) have specific guidelines in place discouraging submission of scientific information presented previously at other meetings. Nonetheless, duplicate submissions are frequent. The incidence and motivations for duplicate hematologic presentations and the influence of the pharmaceutical industry on this process have not been thoroughly analyzed. Therefore, were viewed four consecutive ASH and ASCO meetings to assess the frequency of duplicate abstract presentations. All abstracts presented at ASCO2010 in the area of malignant hematology were compared with abstracts from ASCO and ASH 2009 and ASH 2010, and funding sources were reviewed. More than half (54%) of all abstracts submitted to ASCO 2010 acknowledged pharmaceutical company support. Almost one third (31%) of ASCO 2010 abstracts were resubmitted in the 2-year time period, and it was notable that a high fraction (75%) of these duplicate abstracts had pharmaceutical industry sponsorship, compared with 42% of the abstracts that were submitted only once. Despite current guidelines prohibiting duplicate abstract presentation, a substantial proportion (31%) of abstracts at large international hematology-oncology meetings are duplicative, with potential negative consequences. In addition, a disproportionate percentage of the duplicate abstracts rely on pharmaceutical industry support (75%), suggesting that marketing strategies may be a motivation for some of these repetitive submissions.

  1. A Comparison of Computer-Assisted Instruction and Tutorials in Hematology and Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study comparing the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and small group instruction found no significant difference in medical student achievement in oncology but higher achievement through small-group instruction in hematology. Students did not view CAI as more effective, but saw it as a supplement to traditional methods. (MSE)

  2. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak at Camp for Children with Hematologic and Oncologic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Cori; Maurtua-Neumann, Paola; Myint, Myo Thwin; Drury, Stacy S.

    2011-01-01

    An outbreak of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 occurred among campers and staff at a summer camp attended by children with hematologic and oncologic conditions. The overall attack rate was 36% and was highest among children and adolescents (43%), persons with cancer (48%), and persons with sickle cell disease (82%). PMID:21192861

  3. Hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konrad, H.

    1976-01-01

    The latest state of nuclear medical functional diagnostics in hematology is reviewed. In addition to methods for determining the blood volume, iron kinetics, the survival time of erythrocytes as well as resorption and serum levels of vitamin B 12 kinetic investigations of thrombocytes, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and the spleen with the aid of radioisotopes are described in detail. Also included are tables with data about radiation doses to patients due to medical application of radioisotopes as well as a compilation of physical properties of radioisotopes which are used in hematological diagnosis such as 59 Fe, 51 Cr, 131 I, 125 I, 58 Co, 57 Co, 32 P, 3 H, sup(99m)Tc, 113 In. Finally, radiopharmaceuticals for hematological diagnostics are listed, which are commercially available in the German Democratic Republic. The booklet is intended for physicians working in outpatient departments and hospitals

  4. Building a National Framework for Adolescent and Young Adult Hematology and Oncology and Transition from Pediatric to Adult Care: Report of the Inaugural Meeting of the "AjET" Working Group of the German Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherich, Gabriele; Bielack, Stefan; Maier, Stephan; Braungart, Ralf; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Freund, Mathias; Grosse, Regine; Hoferer, Anette; Kampschulte, Rebecca; Koch, Barbara; Lauten, Melchior; Milani, Valeria; Ross, Henning; Schilling, Freimut; Wöhrle, Dieter; Cario, Holger; Dirksen, Uta

    2017-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with hemato-oncological problems constitute a heterogenous group with characteristic particularities, specific needs, and age-related clinical and unique psychosocial features. Strong collaboration between pediatric and adult hemato-oncology settings is essential to address their needs appropriately. This is not only true for patients who first become ill during adolescence or young adulthood, but equally so for people who contract hemato-oncological diseases congenitally or as younger children and who are now becoming old enough to leave the pediatric setting and have to transit into "adult" medical care. Efforts to create environments that meet the specific needs of the AYA population affected by hemato-oncological diseases have been initiated in many countries. Due to international variations between societies in general and healthcare infrastructures in particular, the challenges posed to creating such environments vary considerably from country to country. Aiming at addressing these on a national basis for Germany, a dedicated Working Group on Adolescents, Young Adults, and Transition (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Adoleszenten, junge Erwachsene, Transition, AjET) was established. This meeting report depicts the content and discussions of the first interdisciplinary conference on treatment, transition, and long-term follow-up in AYAs with cancer or chronic/inborn hematological diseases. The AjET group of the German Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology (GPOH) intends to increase the national awareness for AYAs; strengthen the collaboration of pediatric and adult care givers; and initiate, promote, and coordinate collaborative activities in the fields of basic and translational research, clinical care, and long-term follow-up aimed at improving the current situation.

  5. Management of sepsis in neutropenic patients: 2014 updated guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penack, Olaf; Becker, Carolin; Buchheidt, Dieter; Christopeit, Maximilian; Kiehl, Michael; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Hentrich, Marcus; Reinwald, Marc; Salwender, Hans; Schalk, Enrico; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Weber, Thomas; Ostermann, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality during the neutropenic phase after intensive cytotoxic therapies for malignancies. Improved management of sepsis during neutropenia may reduce the mortality of cancer therapies. Clinical guidelines on sepsis treatment have been published by others. However, optimal management may differ between neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients. Our aim is to give evidence-based recommendations for haematologist, oncologists and intensive care physicians on how to manage adult patients with neutropenia and sepsis.

  6. Hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.C.; Ries, C.

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews the wide variety of radioisotopic techniques available to pediatricians in hematologic evaluation of their patients, with comments on the tracer techniques, and an indication of some new territory in splenic evaluation and nonradioactive tracers which may prove to be of considerable interest in the future. The only differences in applying these techniques to the pediatric population, compared with the adult population, lie in the different spectrum of hematologic diseases under consideration in this age group and the greater sensitivity to problems of radiation exposure which the pediatrician and the nuclear medicine physician must have in administering the isotopes in vivo. With these considerations in mind, the usefulness of such radioisotopic techniques in the evaluation of pediatric hematologic disease remains unquestionable. Radiopharmaceuticals and the radiation doses associated with the various procedures are listed. It is hoped in the future that fluorescent excitation techniques will replace at least s []me of the radioisotope techniques, obviating all considerations of patient irradiation in such instances. (auth)

  7. Exploring the evidence in pediatric hematology and oncology nursing through the "article of the month".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    As the scope of pediatric hematology and oncology nursing expands, nurses are challenged with staying current in the evidence guiding their practice. Nurse-reported barriers to accessing and utilizing research include lack of time as well as difficulty in accessing, understanding, and synthesizing findings. Journal clubs provide a process to guide nurses in the review of current literature related to their practice and promote utilization of research and evidence-based practice among nurses. This article describes the transition of an in-person journal club to an electronically delivered "Article of the Month." The "Article of the Month" is offered six times each year and is posted on the service line's password-protected intranet website. Oversight of the "Article of the Month" is provided by the service line clinical nurse specialist who selects articles based on an annual learning needs assessment and develops a quiz to assess learning and promote critical thinking among nursing staff. Outcomes include anecdotal reports of increased staff confidence in managing emergent patient care needs and greater appreciation of nursing care issues for children with cancer. Areas for future development include exploring options for increasing in-person discussion of issues addressed in the "Article of the Month" among staff members, extending the "Article of the Month" to nurses in other service areas who care for children with cancer, and increasing staff participation in article selection and quiz item development. An ultimate goal is to develop formal evaluation strategies to link this educational strategy to clinical outcomes.

  8. Central venous catheter-related infections in hematology and oncology: 2012 updated guidelines on diagnosis, management and prevention by the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentrich, M; Schalk, E; Schmidt-Hieber, M; Chaberny, I; Mousset, S; Buchheidt, D; Ruhnke, M; Penack, O; Salwender, H; Wolf, H-H; Christopeit, M; Neumann, S; Maschmeyer, G; Karthaus, M

    2014-05-01

    Cancer patients are at increased risk for central venous catheter-related infections (CRIs). Thus, a comprehensive, practical and evidence-based guideline on CRI in patients with malignancies is warranted. A panel of experts by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) has developed a guideline on CRI in cancer patients. Literature searches of the PubMed, Medline and Cochrane databases were carried out and consensus discussions were held. Recommendations on diagnosis, management and prevention of CRI in cancer patients are made, and the strength of the recommendation and the level of evidence are presented. This guideline is an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis, management and prevention of CRI in cancer patients.

  9. Measuring pediatric hematology-oncology fellows' skills in humanism and professionalism: A novel assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Agrawal, Anurag K; Bhatia, Nita; Cronin, Angel; Jubran, Rima; Kent, Paul; Kersun, Leslie; Rao, Amulya Nageswara; Rose, Melissa; Savelli, Stephanie; Sharma, Mukta; Shereck, Evan; Twist, Clare J; Wang, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Educators in pediatric hematology-oncology lack rigorously developed instruments to assess fellows' skills in humanism and professionalism. We developed a novel 15-item self-assessment instrument to address this gap in fellowship training. Fellows (N = 122) were asked to assess their skills in five domains: balancing competing demands of fellowship, caring for the dying patient, confronting depression and burnout, responding to challenging relationships with patients, and practicing humanistic medicine. An expert focus group predefined threshold scores on the instrument that could be used as a cutoff to identify fellows who need support. Reliability and feasibility were assessed and concurrent validity was measured using three established instruments: Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Flourishing Scale (FS), and Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE). For 90 participating fellows (74%), the self-assessment proved feasible to administer and had high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.81). It was moderately correlated with the FS and MBI (Pearson's r = 0.41 and 0.4, respectively) and weakly correlated with the JSPE (Pearson's r = 0.15). Twenty-eight fellows (31%) were identified as needing support. The self-assessment had a sensitivity of 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 31-69) and a specificity of 77% (95% CI: 65-87) for identifying fellows who scored poorly on at least one of the three established scales. We developed a novel assessment instrument for use in pediatric fellowship training. The new scale proved feasible and demonstrated internal consistency reliability. Its moderate correlation with other established instruments shows that the novel assessment instrument provides unique, nonredundant information as compared to existing scales. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Modern concepts of biosimilars in hematology and oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biologics are large protein or polypeptide molecules produced by living organisms, which largely determine the efficiency of modern anticancertherapy. Biological products that destroy cancer cells and protect normal patient tissue led to progress in the treatment of breast cancer, colon cancer, kidney cancer, malignant lymphomas and other diseases. But the high cost and complexity of production limit their use. The expiration of patent protection for a number of biological products resulting to the possibility of reduces their costs when issuing an alternative manufacturer. At the same time, biosimilars are produced by living cells (as the original protein molecules, which led to serious difficulties in reaching their identity. The European Union has developed special registration rules for these preparations in order to avoid lack of efficacy or increased toxicity. They include regulations to determine the quality of biological products, requirements for pre-clinical and clinical studies, according to its specific characteristics, as well as the requirements for pharmacovigilance. Implementation of such a strategy has to register in the EU several biosimilars of granulocyte colonytimulating factor. For one of them – Zarzio – in several clinical studies fully comparable efficacy and tolerability with the original preparation was shown, thus providing a significant reduction of treatment cost with equal efficacy and toxicity.

  11. Modern concepts of biosimilars in hematology and oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ptushkin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biologics are large protein or polypeptide molecules produced by living organisms, which largely determine the efficiency of modern anticancertherapy. Biological products that destroy cancer cells and protect normal patient tissue led to progress in the treatment of breast cancer, colon cancer, kidney cancer, malignant lymphomas and other diseases. But the high cost and complexity of production limit their use. The expiration of patent protection for a number of biological products resulting to the possibility of reduces their costs when issuing an alternative manufacturer. At the same time, biosimilars are produced by living cells (as the original protein molecules, which led to serious difficulties in reaching their identity. The European Union has developed special registration rules for these preparations in order to avoid lack of efficacy or increased toxicity. They include regulations to determine the quality of biological products, requirements for pre-clinical and clinical studies, according to its specific characteristics, as well as the requirements for pharmacovigilance. Implementation of such a strategy has to register in the EU several biosimilars of granulocyte colonytimulating factor. For one of them – Zarzio – in several clinical studies fully comparable efficacy and tolerability with the original preparation was shown, thus providing a significant reduction of treatment cost with equal efficacy and toxicity.

  12. Childhood cancer survivorship educational resources in North American pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship training programs: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Paul C; Schiffman, Joshua D; Huang, Sujuan; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Eshelman-Kent, Debra; Wright, Jennifer; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Hudson, Melissa M

    2011-12-15

    Childhood cancer survivors require life-long care by clinicians with an understanding of the specific risks arising from the prior cancer and its therapy. We surveyed North American pediatric hematology/oncology training programs to evaluate their resources and capacity for educating medical trainees about survivorship. An Internet survey was sent to training program directors and long-term follow-up clinic (LTFU) directors at the 56 US and Canadian centers with pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship programs. Perceptions regarding barriers to and optimal methods of delivering survivorship education were compared among training program and LTFU clinic directors. Responses were received from 45/56 institutions of which 37/45 (82%) programs require that pediatric hematology/oncology fellows complete a mandatory rotation focused on survivorship. The rotation is 4 weeks or less in 21 programs. Most (36/45; 80%) offer didactic lectures on survivorship as part of their training curriculum, and these are considered mandatory for pediatric hematology/oncology fellows at 26/36 (72.2%). Only 10 programs (22%) provide training to medical specialty trainees other than pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Respondents identified lack of time for trainees to spend learning about late effects as the most significant barrier to providing survivorship teaching. LTFU clinic directors were more likely than training program directors to identify lack of interest in survivorship among trainees and survivorship not being a formal or expected part of the fellowship training program as barriers. The results of this survey highlight the need to establish standard training requirements to promote the achievement of basic survivorship competencies by pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology workforce assessment: Part 1-Current state of the workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Jeffrey; Shah, Mona; Badawy, Sherif M; Matthews, Dana; Hilden, Joanne; Wayne, Alan S; Salsberg, Edward; Leavey, Patrick S

    2018-02-01

    The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) recognized recent changes in medical practice and the potential impact on pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) workforce. ASPHO surveyed society members and PHO Division Directors between 2010 and 2016 and studied PHO workforce data collected by the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Medical Association to characterize the current state of the PHO workforce. The analysis of this information has led to a comprehensive description of PHO physicians, professional activities, and workplace. It is important to continue to collect data to identify changes in composition and needs of the PHO workforce. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Acute Thoracic Findings in Oncologic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Brett W; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of mortality in the United States, with >500,000 deaths reported annually. Acute or emergent findings in this group of patients can be a life-threatening phenomenon that results from malignancy or as a complication of therapy. In many cases, these events can be the first clinical manifestation of malignant disease. Oncologic emergencies have been classified as metabolic, hematologic, and structural emergencies. Within the thorax, most acute oncologic findings involve the lungs and airways in the form of drug toxicity, pulmonary infections, or malignant airway compression; the cardiovascular system in the form of pulmonary embolism, superior vena cava syndrome, cardiac tamponade, or massive hemoptysis; the mediastinum in the form of esophageal perforation, acute mediastinitis, or esophagorespiratory fistula; and the osseous spine and spinal cord in the form of invasion and cord compression. Given the life-threatening nature of many of these disease processes, awareness of such complications is critical to making an accurate diagnosis and formulating appropriate treatment strategies.

  15. Subspeciality training in hematology and oncology, 2003: results of a survey of training program directors conducted by the American Society of Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Robert F; Gitlin, Scott D; Burns, Linda J

    2004-06-15

    A survey of directors of adult and pediatric hematology/oncology subspecialty training programs in the United States and Canada was conducted to assess the environment in which recruitment and training is conducted in these medical disciplines. A total of 107 program directors responded to the survey, representing 66% of internal medicine and 47% of pediatric subspecialty programs in hematology or hematology/oncology. Specific areas covered in the web-based questionnaire included the type and demographics of the training program, profile of the training program director, characteristics of the applicant pool and existing trainee recruits, characteristics of the training program environment and curricula, research productivity of trainees, and the career pathways taken by recent training program graduates (including dominant areas of clinical interest). The results of this survey show considerable heterogeneity in the recruiting practices and the environment in which subspecialty training occurs, leading the authors to recommend improvements in or a heightened attention to issues, including recruitment of minority trainees, flexibility to recruit international medical school graduates, timing of trainee acceptance, maintaining the financial support of Medicare graduation medical education (GME), training of physician scientists, organization of the continuity clinic experience, visibility of nonmalignant hematology as a career path, and level of training program director support.

  16. Patient satisfaction in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zissiadis, Y.; Provis, A.; Dhaliwal, S.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this current economic climate where the costs of providing a good medical service are escalating, patients are demanding a higher level of service from the Radiation Oncology providers. This coupled with the rising level of patients' expectations make it absolutely paramount for Radiation Oncology providers to offer the best possible service to their patients. In order to do this, it is essential to assess the present level of patient satisfaction prior to deciding which aspects of the current service need to be changed. In this pilot study, we assess the level of patient satisfaction with aspects of the radiotherapy service and the level of patient anxiety both prior to and following radiotherapy at the Perth Radiation Oncology Centre. A questionnaire was created using a combination of the Information Satisfaction Questionnaire-1 (ISQ-1), the Very Short Questionnaire 9 (VSQ 9) and the State Trait Anxiety Index (STAI). One hundred new patients were studied, all of whom were to have radiotherapy with curative intent. The results of this study are reviewed in this presentation

  17. Diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in hematology and oncology--guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Working Party in Haematology and Oncology of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology (AGIHO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, M; Böhme, A; Buchheidt, D; Cornely, O; Donhuijsen, K; Einsele, H; Enzensberger, R; Hebart, H; Heussel, C P; Horger, M; Hof, H; Karthaus, M; Krüger, W; Maschmeyer, G; Penack, O; Ritter, J; Schwartz, S

    2012-04-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hematological malignancies. Establishing a definite diagnosis of IFI in immunocompromised patients is particularly challenging and time consuming, but delayed initiation of antifungal treatment increases mortality. The limited overall outcome has led to the strategy of initiating either 'empirical' or 'preemptive' antifungal therapy before the final diagnosis. However, diagnostic procedures have been vastly improved in recent years. Particularly noteworthy is the introduction of newer imaging techniques and non-culture methods, including antigen-based assays, metabolite detection and molecular detection of fungal DNA from body fluid samples. Though varying widely in cancer patients, the risk of IFI is highest in those with allogeneic stem cell transplantation and those with acute leukemia. The AGIHO presents recommendations for the diagnosis of IFIs with risk-adapted screening concepts for febrile episodes in patients with haemato-oncological disorders.

  18. [Oral nutritional supplementation in hematologic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalva, A; San Martín, A; Rosselló, J; Pérez-Portabella, C; Palacios, A; Julià, A; Planas, M

    2009-01-01

    Hematological patients often present anorexia which along with other secondary effects from the chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy treatments compromise their nutritional status. Oral supplementation can aid to fulfill the energy and protein requirements of these patients. Nevertheless, the use of commercial nutritional supplements normally available, is limited by its poor intake. To evaluate the degree of fulfillment of the prescribed supplements and fulfillment of energy requirements, as well as the development of nutritional status in hematological patients hospitalized for treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Prospective, randomized and open study of inpatients at the hematological ward. Patients were randomized sequentially and they were assigned into 3 different nutritional interventions providing: Group 1 (G1), a flavored supplement; Group 2 (G2): a non flavored (neutral) supplement and Group 3 (G3): "kitchen" foods as supplements. Need and amount of nutritional supplements were provided according to the oral intake previously analyzed. Nutritional assessment (at admission and discharge) was based in the Subjective Global Assessment test (SGA), Risk Nutritional Index (RNI) and percentage of lost weight. Both fulfillment of supplement intake and achievement of energetic requirements were analyzed. 125 patients of 51.3 +/- 16.8 years; 45% men and 55% women. 54% lymphoma, 33% leukemia, 8% myeloma and others 4%. Length of stay (LOS): 7.0 +/- 3.6 d. The nutritional assessment done by SGA showed significant negative changes in G2 and G3 (G1: 30% developed malnutrition and 28% improved their nutritional status, p = NS; G2: 50% developed malnutrition against 7% whom improved their nutritional status, p = 0.002; y G3: 37% developed malnutrition against 21% whom improved their nutritional status, p = 0.02). According to RNI, patients evolved negatively from their nutritional state but no significant differences were found within groups (G1, from 81% of

  19. Proper use of social media by health operators in the pediatric oncohematological setting: Consensus statement from the Italian Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Association (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Quarello, Paola; Bergadano, Anna; Veneroni, Laura; Bertolotti, Marina; Guadagna, Paola; Ricci, Angelo; Galdi, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Ferrari, Andrea

    2018-05-01

    Social media are powerful means of communication that can also have an important role in the healthcare sector. They are sometimes seen with diffidence in the healthcare setting, partly because they risk blurring professional boundaries. This issue is particularly relevant to relations between caregivers and adolescent patients. The Italian Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Association created a multidisciplinary working group to develop some shared recommendations on this issue. After reviewing the literature, the working group prepared a consensus statement in an effort to suggest an analytical approach rather than restrictive rules. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Disease-specific hashtags and the creation of Twitter medical communities in hematology and oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, Naveen; Thompson, Michael A; Qazilbash, Muzaffar

    2017-10-01

    Twitter is being increasingly used for information gathering and dissemination of ideas in both medical practice and scientific research. A major limitation to its use has been the surplus of available information and difficulty in categorizing that information into topics of individual interest. However, a Twitter feature known as the hashtag (#), which denotes a specific category or topic, helps in streamlining this wealth of information. The creation and adoption of disease-specific hashtags by healthcare stakeholders has led to a greater uniformity of medical discussions that can be retrieved and referenced at later time-points. As new disease-specific hashtags are created for hematologic and oncologic diseases, more users can connect across the world, even for the rarest of cancer subtypes. A major challenge for this emerging application will be the development of specific and easily identifiable hashtags over time to add more clarity, while still trying to grow Twitter users and expand its reach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Canine as a biomedical research model: immunological, hematological, and oncological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifrine, M.; Wilson, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    The canine has been used as a biomedical research model in radiation studies by a number of laboratories supported primarily by the US Department of Energy and its predecessors. These studies were unique in that they covered the life spans of the canines and permitted the collection of data from birth to death under controlled conditions. Since these were multiparametric studies, an extensive data base has been established, not the least of which are normative values covering all biologic systems, including immunohematology. The canine model has also been extensively used by other groups, such as transplantation biologists. The virtues of the canine as a model in these and many other endeavors are becoming increasingly more apparent with the passing of time. One of the primary goals of this volume was to compile the knowledge and experience of researchers using the canine model and to focus their expertise on furthering the use of the canine for studies in immunology, hematology, and oncology. We have attempted to present some of the contemporary, diverse uses of the canine in biomedical research, emphasizing immunologic endpoints, and also to present in detail some of the latest technology used in such studies

  2. Integrating Collaborative Learning and Competition in a Hematology/Oncology Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Issam; Motwani, Pooja; Schafer, Liudmila; Arnaoutakis, Konstantinos; Mahmoud, Fade; Safar, Mazin; Graves, Dorothy; Mehta, Paulette; Govindarajan, Rang; Hutchins, Laura; Thrush, Carol

    2018-02-01

    New educational methods and structures to improve medical education are needed to face the challenge of an exponential increase and complexity of medical knowledge. Collaborative learning has been increasingly used in education, but its use in medical training programs is in its infancy, and its impact is still unknown; the role of competition in education is more controversial. We introduced these pedagogical methods to the hematology/oncology fellowship program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences to improve attendance and performance at didactic activities and different educational outcomes. One year after the adoption of these methods, the fellowship program has reached many of the expected goals from this intervention without the negative consequences of competition observed in younger learners. The most important conclusion of this project is that collaboration and cross-generational team work provide a healthy and effective learning environment and competition may not add further benefit. Analysis, interpretation, and discussion of our experience are provided. This study was approved by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences IRB as a low risk educational intervention not requiring a consent form.

  3. Palliative Care Office Hours for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: An Innovative Model for Symptom Management and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxwell, Anessa M; Moyer, Mary E; Casarett, David J; O'Connor, Nina R

    2017-10-01

    Palliative care programs are experiencing rapid growth, with demand for consults surpassing staffing. Innovative models are needed to equip nonpalliative care providers to manage basic palliative care issues. To develop a novel program of palliative care office hours for hematologic oncology advanced practice providers, and to evaluate its impact on palliative care consult volume and composition. A palliative care nurse practitioner or pharmacist was available for weekday office hours to all inpatient hematologic oncology advanced practice providers at an academic medical center to offer advice on pain, nonpain symptoms, and psychosocial distress. A retrospective study looking at outcome measures after six months of office hour utilization and palliative care consults from the hematologic oncology services. Palliative care office hours had a mean duration of 16 minutes per day (range 5 to 55). A mean of 11 patients were discussed per week (range 4 to 20). Pain, nausea, and anxiety were the issues most frequently raised. Of 299 patients discussed during office hours, 44 (14.7%) subsequently required a full palliative care consult. Overall, palliative care consults from the hematologic oncology services decreased from 19.6% to 10.2% of admissions (87/445 vs. 61/594, p Office hours are an efficient way to address palliative care needs when demand for palliative care consults exceeds capacity. Office hours may serve an educational function as well, enabling primary teams to manage basic palliative care issues with increasing independence over time.

  4. Radiation therapy in patients with hematologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Maylin, C.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation therapy has a significant place in the treatment of hematologic diseases. Irradiation is a key component of the treatment strategy for Hodgkin's disease and has benefited from clinical studies aimed at improving its therapeutic index. There have been many recent improvements, in particular with regard to accuracy of techniques, imagery, dosimetry, and implementation of quality-control procedures. In localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the gold-standard treatment is radiation therapy coupled with a short course of chemotherapy. In contrast, the place of irradiation in disseminated lymphomas remains to be defined. Prophylactic irradiation of the brain is still used in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Radiation therapy is of value as palliative treatment of bone lesions of myeloma, in chemo-resistant lymphomas, and in relapses of leukemia. Total body irradiation is a cumbersome but irreplaceable method, which has also benefited from recent clinical and biological studies. Optimal radiation therapy with the best possible therapeutic index requires adequate technological and human resources. (authors). 30 refs., 1 tab

  5. Cancer Patients and Oncology Nursing: Perspectives of Oncology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... findings of this study, nurses declared that working with cancer patients increase burnout, they are ..... of working in oncology to entire work life was 75.8% for nurses in the study .... This professional balance is important for ...

  6. [Role of multicenter study groups for clinical research in hematology and oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökbuget, N; Hoelzer, D

    2009-04-01

    During the past 25 years a highly effective infrastructure for clinical trials was developed in hematology. Following initial funding by the BMFT (Ministry for Research and Technology) a number of large multicenter study groups for leukemia and lymphoma were developed. Treatment results from these studies often represent the"gold standard". However, since no standard therapy is defined for these diseases, the study groups aim to treat all patients within treatment optimization trials (TOT) to combine research and care. They contribute considerably to quality control in therapy and diagnostics, e.g., by establishing central reference laboratories. The regulatory requirements for clinical trials were extended considerably after the activation of the 12th drug law and TOTs now have to fulfill requirements similar to registration trials in the pharmaceutical industry. Due to the considerable bureaucratic effort and increased costs, only few large multicenter trials could thereafter be initiated and a substantial disadvantage for independent academic research becomes clearly evident.

  7. Hematological abnormalities in adult patients with Down's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLean, S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of data regarding hematological abnormalities in adults with Down\\'s syndrome (DS). AIMS: We aimed to characterize hematological abnormalities in adult patients with DS and determine their long-term significance. METHODS: We retrospectively studied a cohort of nine DS patients referred to the adult hematology service in our institution between May 2001 and April 2008. Data collected were: full blood count (FBC), comorbidities, investigations performed, duration of follow-up and outcome to most recent follow-up. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 26 months (9-71). Of the nine patients, two had myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) at presentation. Of these, one progressed, with increasing marrow failure, and requiring support with transfusions and gCSF. The remaining eight patients, with a variety of hematological abnormalities including leukopenia, macrocytosis, and thrombocytopenia, had persistently abnormal FBCs. However there was no evidence of progression, and no patient has evolved to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). CONCLUSIONS: MDS is a complication of DS and may require supportive therapy. However, minor hematological abnormalities are common in adult DS patients, and may not signify underlying marrow disease.

  8. Cancer Patients and Oncology Nursing: Perspectives of Oncology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Burnout and exhaustion is a frequent problem in oncology nursing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the aspects of oncology nurses about their profession in order to enhance the standards of oncology nursing. Materials and Methods: This survey was conducted with 70 oncology nurses working at ...

  9. Hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbe, S.N.; Brecher, G.; Cohen, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The program at the Donner Clinic in experimental megakaryocytopoiesia is described. Studies are being initiated to analyze blood gases and acid-base balance in patients with erythrocytosis and to correlate these measurements with levels of erythropoietin in blood and urine. The regulation of platelet production in humans and ways in which it may be aberrant in disease states are being investigated. Tracers used in this study include 75 Se-selenomethionine and 35 S-sodium sulfate

  10. Kytococcus schroeteri Pneumonia in Two Patients with a Hematological Malignancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodiamont, C. J.; Huisman, C.; Spanjaard, L.; van Ketel, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Neutropenic patients are susceptible to infections with usually harmless microorganisms. We report two cases of severe pneumonia in hematological patients due to Kytococcus schroeteri, a saprophyte of the human skin. When blood cultures or respiratory specimens yield micrococcus-like colonies,

  11. Hematological values in juvienile periodontitis patients in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, clinical and hematological examinations of forty adolescent patients in the group (15-22) years with established clinical features of chronic periodontitis but without any diagnosable medical disease were done. The patients were divided into two Groups (A &B). Group A were diagnosed as having juvenile ...

  12. Two cases of paralitic ileus in onco-hematologic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Carraro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ileus is a severe complication resulting from a variety of disorders. It occurs most commonly in patients with serious underlying medical or surgical conditions. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate management may improve the outcome. We describe 2 cases of onco-hematologic patients who presented this complication after intensive chemotherapy.

  13. Two cases of paralitic ileus in onco-hematologic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Francesca; Rivetti, Elisa; Romano, Erica; Fagioli, Franca

    2012-01-01

    Paralytic ileus is a severe complication resulting from a variety of disorders. It occurs most commonly in patients with serious underlying medical or surgical conditions. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate management may improve the outcome. We describe 2 cases of onco-hematologic patients who presented this complication after intensive chemotherapy. PMID:22690309

  14. Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This paper collects some scientific research works on nuclear medicine developed in Ecuador. The main topics are: Brain metastases, computed tomography assessment; Therapeutic challenge in brain metastases, chemotherapy, surgery or radiotherapy; Neurocysticercosis and oncogenesis; Neurologic complications of radiation and chemotherapy; Cerebral perfusion gammagraphy in neurology and neurosurgery; Neuro- oncologic surgical patient anesthesic management; Pain management in neuro- oncology; Treatment of metastatic lesions of the spine, surgically decompression vs radiation therapy alone; Neuroimagining in spinal metastases

  15. Evaluation of febrile neutropenic patients hospitalized in a hematology clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mücahit Görük

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Febrile neutropenia is still a problem in patients with hematological malignancies. The documentation of the flora and detection of causative agents of infections in each unit would help to decide appropriate empirical therapy. Infection control procedures should be applied for preventing infections and transmissions.

  16. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Potenza, L; Vallerini, D; Barozzi, P; Riva, G; Gilioli, A; Forghieri, F; Candoni, A; Cesaro, S; Quadrelli, C; Maertens, J; Rossi, G; Morselli, M; Codeluppi, M; Mussini, C; Colaci, E

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. Method...

  17. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy for Kidney Stones in Patients with Hematological Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Kuzgunbay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To define the alterations in the outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL operations for kidney stones in patients with history of hematological malignancy (HM. Material and Method: Between 2000 and 2013, 1700 adult patients underwent PNL for the treatment of kidney stones in our institution. Four of these patients had a history of HM and considered to be HM group (n=4. Ten elderly (>65 years patients who had no history of operation, HM or any other co-morbide diseases were chosen as the control group (n=10. Surgical parameters, success rates, additional treatments and complications were evaluated. Results: Statistical analyses showed no significant differences between HM and control group according to stone area, operation time, fluoroscopy time, hospitalization time, %u2206Hb, blood transfusion rates and INR values (p>0.05. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences between HM and control groups according to the success rates (p=0.470. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference between groups for additional treatment requirements (p=0.882. No major perioperative complication was seen in both of the groups. Discussion: The treatment of kidney stone disease by PNL in patients with hematological malignancy is feasible, safe and effective. However, close cooperation with the Hematology Department before the operation is mandatory.

  18. The quality of life of hematological malignancy patients with major depressive disorder or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Omid; Sharifian, Ramezan-Ali; Soleimani, Mehdi; Jahanian, Amirabbas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the quality of life of hematological malignancy patients with major depressive disorder or subsyndromal depression. Sample consisted of 93 hematological malignancy patients recruited from oncology ward of Valieasr hospital for Imam Khomeini complex hospital at Tehran through purposeful sampling. Participants were divided into three groups through diagnostic interview based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and the Beck Depression Inventory-2 (BDI-II): Major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 41; 44.1%); subsyndromal depression (SSD) (n = 23; 24.7%), and without depression (WD) (n = 29; 31.2%). Participants completed the short-form health survey (SF-36) as a measure of the quality of life. We carried out an analysis of covariance to examine the collected data. Findings showed that there was not a significant difference between patients with MDD and SSD based on measure of quality of life. But patients with MDD and SSD showed significantly worse quality of life than patients with WD. This finding highlights the clinical importance of subsyndromal depressive symptoms and casts doubt on the clinical utility of separation between MDD and subsyndromal depression in terms of important clinical outcomes.

  19. Radiotherapy and immune reaction of oncologic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankina, V.Kh.; Sarkisyan, Yu.KH.

    1978-01-01

    Represented is a review of data accumulated in literature (1970-1976) on oppression of protection of oncologic patients and more oppression of immune reactions during radiotherapy. Underlined is the significance of studying immune homeostasis in a clinic of radiotherapy to evaluate total resistance of patients before the beginning and in the process of treatment. The prognostic significance of immunodepressive disturbances in patients with malignant tumors is elucidated

  20. Oncology healthcare professionals' perspectives on the psychosocial support needs of cancer patients during oncology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaz, Bruno E; Treharne, Gareth J; Knight, Robert G; Conner, Tamlin S; Perez, David

    2017-09-01

    This study explored oncology healthcare professionals' perspectives on the psychosocial support needs of diverse cancer patients during oncology treatment. Six themes were identified using thematic analysis. Healthcare professionals highlighted the importance of their sensitivity, respect and emotional tact during appointments in order to effectively identify and meet the needs of oncology patients. Participants also emphasised the importance of building rapport that recognises patients as people. Patients' acceptance of treatment-related distress and uncertainty was described as required for uptake of available psychosocial supportive services. We offer some practical implications that may help improve cancer patients' experiences during oncology treatment.

  1. Viral findings in adult hematological patients with neutropenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Ohrmalm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Until recently, viral infections in patients with hematological malignancies were concerns primarily in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients. During the last years, changed treatment regimens for non-transplanted patients with hematological malignancies have had potential to increase the incidence of viral infections in this group. In this study, we have prospectively investigated the prevalence of a broad range of respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA as well as viruses that commonly reactivate after allogeneic HSCT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients with hematological malignancies and therapy induced neutropenia (n = 159 were screened regarding a broad range of common respiratory viruses in the nasopharynx and for viruses commonly detected in severely immunosuppressed patients in peripheral blood. Quantitative PCR was used for detection of viruses. A viral pathogen was detected in 35% of the patients. The detection rate was rather similar in blood (22% and NPA (18% with polyoma BK virus and rhinovirus as dominating pathogens in blood and NPA, respectively. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL (p<0.01 and patients with fever (p<0.001 were overrepresented in the virus-positive group. Furthermore, viral findings in NPA were associated with upper respiratory symptoms (URTS (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both respiratory viral infections and low titers of viruses in blood from patients with neutropenia were common. Patients with CLL and patients with fever were independently associated to these infections, and viral findings in NPA were associated to URTS indicating active infection. These findings motivate further studies on viruses' impact on this patient category and their potential role as causative agents of fever during neutropenia.

  2. Psycho-Oncology: A Patient's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Prieto, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    Culturally the most important, valued, and less stigmatized part of cancer care is the medical part: The surgeon cutting the tumors out and the oncologist leading the strategic decision-making of the medical treatments available. The least valued and stigmatized part of cancer remains the psychosocial care. This chapter describes-through the eyes of an academic, psychologist, stage IV melanoma patient, and patient advocate-how one patient navigated changing psycho-oncological needs from early stage-to-stage IV through a whole range of psychological interventions available. Her voice joins that of all cancer patients around the world whom are urgently calling for psycho-oncological care to be fully recognized as a central part of cancer treatment.

  3. Hypogammaglobulinemia and Poor Performance Status are Predisposing Factors for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Colonization in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Gülsüm Ümit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE are common pathogens of hospital-acquired infection. Long hospitalization periods, use of broadspectrum antibiotics, and immunosuppression are major risks for VRE colonization. We aimed to evaluate patients’ characteristics and factors that may contribute to VRE colonization. Materials and Methods: Data of 66 patients with colonization and 112 patients without colonization who were hospitalized in the hematology clinic were collected. Hematological malignancies, preexisting gastrointestinal complaints, the presence of hypogammaglobulinemia at the time of diagnosis, complications like neutropenic enterocolitis (NEC, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG and Karnofsky performance statuses were recorded. Results: Ages of the patients ranged between 19 and 95 years (mean: 55.99. Karnofsky and ECOG scores were statistically related to VRE colonization (p7 days may also be accepted as a risk factor, independent of diagnosis or antibiotic use. Performance status is also an important factor for colonization, which may be related to poorer hygiene and increased external help.

  4. Internet utilization by radiation oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, J.M.; Devine, P.; DeNittis, A.; Stambaugh, M.; Jones, H.; Goldwein, J.; Whittington, R.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Studies describing the use of the Internet by radiation oncology patients are lacking. This multi-institutional study of cancer patients presenting to academic (AC), community (CO) and veterans (VA) radiation oncology centers was designed to analyze the use of the Internet, predictive factors for utilization, and barriers to access to the Internet. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire evaluating the use of the Internet was administered to 921 consecutive patients presenting to radiation oncology departments at AC, CO and VA Medical Centers. The study included 436 AC patients (47%), 284 CO patients (31%), and 201 VA patients (22%). A computer was available at home to 427 patients (46%) and 337 patients (37%) had Email access. The mean age of the patient population was 64 years (range=14-93). Males represented 70% of the patient population. The most common diagnoses included prostate cancer (33%), breast cancer (13%), and lung cancer (11%). Results: Overall, 265/921 patients (29%) were using the Internet to find cancer related information. The Internet was used by 42% of AC patients, 25% of CO patients and only 5% of VA patients (p<.0001). A computer was available at home in 62% AC vs. 45% CO vs. 12% VA patients (p<.0001). Patients < 60 years were much more likely to use the Internet than older patients (p<.0001). Most of the Internet users considered the information either very reliable (22%) or somewhat reliable (70%). Most patients were looking for information regarding treatment of their cancer (90%), management of side effects of treatment (74%), alternative/complementary treatments (65%) and clinical trials (51%). Unconventional medical therapies were purchased over the Internet by 12% of computer users. Products or services for the treatment or management of cancer were purchased online by 12% of Internet users. Conclusion: A significant number of cancer patients seen in radiation oncology departments at academic and community medical centers

  5. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, William R.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled ''Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action''. The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  6. Hematologic disorders in trauma patients during parenteral alimentation with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faintuch, J; Machado, F K; Freire, A N; Reis, J R; Machado, M; Pinto, L P; Ramos, S M; Loebens, M; Jovchelevich, V; Pinotti, H W

    1996-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition with lipids is a well-accepted modality of metabolic support in seriously ill trauma patients. Intolerance to lipid administration is unusual when dosage limits are not exceeded, and few hematologic disturbances have been recorded with modern fat emulsions. In the course of intravenous alimentation of six adults admitted for traumatic lesions, eosinophilia with or without leukocytopenia was noticed after periods of four days to five weeks. Principal clinical events and hematologic derangements were documented in this population. Sepsis was not always present in the patients by the time of the complication, and in those that did require antibiotics and other drugs, the prescription remained unchanged along the episode. Discontinuation of the nutritional regimen with lipids was followed by normalization of the hematologic profile, suggesting that an acute or sub-acute allergic reaction was responsible. The appearance of skin rash in two occasions reinforces this hypothesis, and the possibility of hemophagocytosis merits consideration in two of the cases who displayed reversible acute leukocytopenia. It is concluded that blood cell aberrations are possible during intravenous feeding with lipids in trauma subjects, but tend to respond to suppression of the lipid-containing nutritional prescription.

  7. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Leonardo; Vallerini, Daniela; Barozzi, Patrizia; Riva, Giovanni; Gilioli, Andrea; Forghieri, Fabio; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Quadrelli, Chiara; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Mussini, Cristina; Colaci, Elisabetta; Messerotti, Andrea; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Fantuzzi, Valeria; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Maffei, Rossana; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Fanin, Renato; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Beauvais, Anne; Viale, Pier Luigi; Latgè, Jean Paul; Lewis, Russell E; Luppi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB) samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3%) of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3%) of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD): 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD. Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM.

  8. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Potenza

    Full Text Available Invasive mucormycosis (IM is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients.By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3% of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3% of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD, showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD: 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD.Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM.

  9. Nuclear oncology: From genotype to patient care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is the medical specialty best suited to translate the exploding body of knowledge obtained from research in genetics and molecular biology into the care of patients. This fourth annual nuclear oncology conference will address how this can be done and how positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) can be used in the care of patients with cancer or with increased genetic risk of developing cancer. The course will include illustrative patient studies showing how PET and SPECT can help in diagnosis, staging and treatment planning and monitoring of patients with cancer

  10. Malnutrition in paediatric oncology patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional status of paediatric cancer patients at diagnosis ... Professor and Executive Head, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Stellenbosch University and Tygerberg Hospital, .... can lead to decreased oral intake, weight loss.

  11. Diagnostic value of hematological parameters in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Hira

    2017-03-01

    Results: There were no significant differences in WBC, RDW, PLT, RPR levels between two groups. NLR and PLR values were significantly higher in the osteoarthritis group than in the control group. RBC, MPV and PDW values were significantly lower in the osteoarthritis group than in the control group (all . MPV and RBC were negatively correlated with ESR and CRP in osteoarthritis patients. Conclusion: Hematological inflammatory markers might be useful parameters that could be used in patients with osteoarthritis. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 120-125

  12. Profile and scientific production of the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) researchers in the field of Hematology/Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria Christina Lopes Araujo; Martelli, Daniella Reis; Quirino, Isabel Gomes; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio; Silva, Ana Cristina Simões e; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio; Oliveira, Eduardo Araujo de

    2014-01-01

    several studies have examined the academic production of the researchers at the CNPq, in several areas of knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the scientific production of researchers in Hematology/Oncology who hold scientific productivity grants from the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development. the Academic CVs of 28 researchers in Hematology/Oncology with active grants in the three-year period from 2006 to 2008 were included in the analysis. The variables of interest were: institution, researchers' time after doctorate, tutoring of undergraduate students, masters and PhD degree, scientific production and its impact. from a total of 411 researchers in Medicine, 28 (7%) were identified as being in the area of Hematology/Oncology. There was a slight predominance of males (53.6%) and grant holders in category 1. Three Brazilian states are responsible for approximately 90% of the researchers: São Paulo (21,75%), Rio de Janeiro (3,11%), and Minas Gerais (2, 7%). During their academic careers, the researchers published 2,655 articles, with a median of 87 articles per researcher (IQR = 52 to 122). 65 and 78% of this total were indexed on the Web of Science and Scopus databases, respectively. The researchers received 14,247 citations on the WoS database with a median of 385 citations per researcher. The average number of citations per article was 8.2. in this investigation, it was noted that researchers in the field of Hematology/Oncology have a relevant scientific output from the point of view of quantity and quality compared to other medical specialties.

  13. АВ0-INCOMPATIBILITY IN ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION: 15-YEARS EXPERIENCE OF R.M. GORBACHEVA MEMORIAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR CHILDREN ONCOLOGY, HEMATOLOGY AND TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kucher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. AB0-incompatibility in different types of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT may be an additional aggravating factor for the development of immunological complications and decrease treatment efficacy.Materials and methods. From May 1999 to December 2015 in R.M. Gorbacheva Memorial Research Institute for Children Oncology, Hematology and Transplantation 1131 patients with malignancies and hereditary diseases were included to the study, which were performed 1428 allogeneic HSCT: allogeneic unrelated – 814 (57.0 %, allogeneic related – 344 (24.1 %, haploidentical – 267 (18.7 %, umbilical cord blood in 3 patients (0.2 %. Age was 0–76 years, median – 25 years.Results. In 54.6 % of cases (n = 780 АВ0-incompatibility was determined: major – 37.8 % (n = 295; minor – 45.4 % (n = 354; combined – 16.8 % (n = 131. АВ0-incompatibility in allogeneic HSCT did not influence overall survival (p = 0.56, frequency of acute graftversus-host disease (GVHD (p = 0.2. There was an increased frequency of acute GVHD in combination with reduced intensity conditioning regimens and АВ0-incompatibility (30.8 % compared with myeloablative regimens (15.3 %; p = 0.002.Conclusion. The presence of АВ0-incompatibility is not a limiting factor to perform allogeneic HSCT, however, it demands high quality prophylaxis and sophisticated transfusion therapy to prevent immune complications.

  14. The oncologic and the geriatric patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philotheou, Geraldine M

    2002-01-01

    The oncologic and the geriatric patient have special needs in the nuclear medicine department. The nuclear medicine technologists must be knowledgeable and compassionate when dealing with these patients. The diagnosis of cancer will have a sociological and psychological impact on the patient, to which the technologist must relate in an empathetic way. Furthermore, the technologist should take cognisance of the patient's physical condition and be able to modify the examination accordingly. Dealing with the geriatric patient should be correctly placed on the continuum between a gerontological and geriatric approach taking into consideration normal changes due to aging. The patient experience when undergoing the high technology nuclear medicine diagnostic procedure is unique and all effort must be made to ensure the success of the examination and the satisfaction of the patient (Au)

  15. Alternative Donor Graft Sources for Adults with Hematologic Malignancies: A Donor for All Patients in 2017!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L; Ballen, Karen K

    2017-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is potentially curative for a wide variety of malignant diseases, including acute and leukemias, lymphoma, and myelodysplasia. Choice of a stem cell donor is dependent on donor availability, donor compatibility and health, recipient disease type, and recipient condition. Current sources of stem cell donation for HSCT are matched sibling donors (MSDs), matched unrelated donors (MUDs), 1-antigen mismatched unrelated donors (MMUDs), haploidentical donors (haplo), and umbilical cord blood (UCB) units. Historically, preferred donors for HSCT have been human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donors; however, only about 30% of U.S. patients will have a MSD available. The majority of patients referred for HSCT will require an alternative donor graft: MUD, MMUD, UCB, or haplo. The likelihood of finding a MUD varies depending on the ethnicity of the recipient. White Caucasians of European descent have the greatest chance of finding a MUD. Chances of finding a MUD are significantly less for African-American or Hispanic recipients due to HLA polymorphisms. Therefore, MMUD, UCB, and haplo donor graft sources expand the donor pool for recipients who do not have a MSD or MUD available. Given the variety of different donor stem cell sources available today, nearly every patient who needs an allogeneic HSCT has a potential donor in 2017. All transplant-eligible patients with hematologic malignancies should be evaluated by a transplant center to determine if HSCT is a viable treatment option for their underlying disease process. The goal of this review is to increase the awareness of oncology practitioners to the availability of alternative donor stem cell transplants for patients with hematologic malignancies. Despite new agents, stem cell transplant remains the only curative therapy for many patients with acute and chronic leukemia, myelodysplasia, and lymphoma. Given the variety of different donor stem cell sources available today

  16. Bioengineering targeted nanodrugs for hematologic malignancies: An innovation in pediatric oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vinu

    Chemotherapy for pediatric cancers employs combinations of highly toxic drugs. This has achieved 5-year survival rates exceeding 90% in children treated for leukemia -- the most prominent form of pediatric cancer. However, delayed onset of harmful side effects in more than 60% of survivors result in death or low quality of life post therapy. This is primarily due to the non-specific effect of drugs on healthy dividing cells in a growing child. Nanomedicine has advanced tremendously to improve adult cancer therapy, but as yet has had minimal impact in pediatric oncology. There is a pressing need for innovative therapeutic strategies that can reduce life-threatening side effects caused by conventional chemotherapy in the clinic. Targeting chemotherapeutic agents specifically to leukemia cells may alleviate treatment-related toxicity in children. The research objective of this dissertation is to bioengineer and advance preclinically a novel nanotherapeutic approach that can specifically target and deliver drugs into leukemic cells. Dexamethasone (Dex) is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs in treating pediatric leukemia. For the first part in this study, we encapsulated Dex in polymeric NPs and validated its anti-leukemic potential in vitro and in vivo. NPs with an average diameter of 110 nm were assembled from an amphiphilic block copolymer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly-caprolactone (PCL) bearing pendant cyclic ketals (ECT2). The blank NPs were nontoxic to cultured cells in vitro and to mice in vivo. Encapsulation of Dex into the NPs (Dex-NP) did not compromise the bioactivity of the drug. Dex-NPs induced glucocorticoid phosphorylation and showed cytotoxicity similar to free drug when treated with leukemic cells. Studies using NPs labeled with fluorescent dyes revealed leukemic cell surface binding and internalization. In vivo biodistribution studies showed NP accumulation in the liver and spleen with subsequent clearance of particles with

  17. Patient/Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landier, Wendy; Ahern, JoAnn; Barakat, Lamia P; Bhatia, Smita; Bingen, Kristin M; Bondurant, Patricia G; Cohn, Susan L; Dobrozsi, Sarah K; Haugen, Maureen; Herring, Ruth Anne; Hooke, Mary C; Martin, Melissa; Murphy, Kathryn; Newman, Amy R; Rodgers, Cheryl C; Ruccione, Kathleen S; Sullivan, Jeneane; Weiss, Marianne; Withycombe, Janice; Yasui, Lise; Hockenberry, Marilyn

    There is a paucity of data to support evidence-based practices in the provision of patient/family education in the context of a new childhood cancer diagnosis. Since the majority of children with cancer are treated on pediatric oncology clinical trials, lack of effective patient/family education has the potential to negatively affect both patient and clinical trial outcomes. The Children's Oncology Group Nursing Discipline convened an interprofessional expert panel from within and beyond pediatric oncology to review available and emerging evidence and develop expert consensus recommendations regarding harmonization of patient/family education practices for newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients across institutions. Five broad principles, with associated recommendations, were identified by the panel, including recognition that (1) in pediatric oncology, patient/family education is family-centered; (2) a diagnosis of childhood cancer is overwhelming and the family needs time to process the diagnosis and develop a plan for managing ongoing life demands before they can successfully learn to care for the child; (3) patient/family education should be an interprofessional endeavor with 3 key areas of focus: (a) diagnosis/treatment, (b) psychosocial coping, and (c) care of the child; (4) patient/family education should occur across the continuum of care; and (5) a supportive environment is necessary to optimize learning. Dissemination and implementation of these recommendations will set the stage for future studies that aim to develop evidence to inform best practices, and ultimately to establish the standard of care for effective patient/family education in pediatric oncology.

  18. Oncology patients hospitalized in the Clinicas Hospital Dr. Manuel Quintela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arostegui, M.; Borba, M.; Caldarelli, D.; Eguiia, A.; Fernandez, E.; Peleteiro, M.; Pereira, C.; Vico, M.

    2004-01-01

    This work was carried out by a nursery licensed group in the Clinicas Hospital - Dr. Manuel Quintela.The nature and functioning of Services and the allocation of resources, are essential for the analysis of the Survey of the hospitalized oncology patients in the Institution. To develop a model of care that constitutes a health care as well as teaching and research in the country regarding the quality of care was defined the following topics: lower risks for the patient, safer care, personal trained and specialized to promote relationship between the offering and the person receiving the service. The assessment and management performance of the services involved in the operation are the result of the degree of user satisfaction. Objective: To determine the human and material necessary for the care of cancer resources users, considering their number, treatment, complications and nursing care derived from each pathology and stage of disease. Methodology: A comparative descriptive study of the same population was conducted in two transverse sections in relation to two different times which are based on the design of a form that allowed hospitalized to collect information on users 6/12/03 and 6/16/04. Other instruments used were the clinical history and the daily census staff Patients and Nursing Division. Results and conclusions: A comparative descriptive analysis already mentioned are: increased internships and cancer patients; between 50 and 64 is the highest number of patients; diagnoses Face and Neck and maintain the Digestive System more cases; the number of patients doubles and Hematology Neurological from one to another period. Chemotherapy is the treatment choice and there is a decrease in the surgical and medical; more patients in the study; in the origin, Montevideo has the largest number of patients followed by Canelones. Line of nursing intervention will be carried out in short, medium and long term

  19. Board-Certified Oncology Pharmacists: Their Potential Contribution to Reducing a Shortfall in Oncology Patient Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignoffo, Robert; Knapp, Katherine; Barnett, Mitchell; Barbour, Sally Yowell; D'Amato, Steve; Iacovelli, Lew; Knudsen, Jasen; Koontz, Susannah E; Mancini, Robert; McBride, Ali; McCauley, Dayna; Medina, Patrick; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Scarpace, Sarah; Stricker, Steve; Trovato, James A

    2016-04-01

    With an aging US population, the number of patients who need cancer treatment will increase significantly by 2020. On the basis of a predicted shortage of oncology physicians, nonphysician health care practitioners will need to fill the shortfall in oncology patient visits, and nurse practitioners and physician assistants have already been identified for this purpose. This study proposes that appropriately trained oncology pharmacists can also contribute. The purpose of this study is to estimate the supply of Board of Pharmacy Specialties-certified oncology pharmacists (BCOPs) and their potential contribution to the care of patients with cancer through 2020. Data regarding accredited oncology pharmacy residencies, new BCOPs, and total BCOPs were used to estimate oncology residencies, new BCOPs, and total BCOPs through 2020. A Delphi panel process was used to estimate patient visits, identify patient care services that BCOPs could provide, and study limitations. By 2020, there will be an estimated 3,639 BCOPs, and approximately 62% of BCOPs will have completed accredited oncology pharmacy residencies. Delphi panelists came to consensus (at least 80% agreement) on eight patient care services that BCOPs could provide. Although the estimates given by our model indicate that BCOPs could provide 5 to 7 million 30-minute patient visits annually, sensitivity analysis, based on factors that could reduce potential visit availability resulted in 2.5 to 3.5 million visits by 2020 with the addition of BCOPs to the health care team. BCOPs can contribute to a projected shortfall in needed patient visits for cancer treatment. BCOPs, along with nurse practitioners and physician assistants could substantially reduce, but likely not eliminate, the shortfall of providers needed for oncology patient visits. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  20. Cancer patients and oncology nursing: Perspectives of oncology nurses in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisli, S; Yuce, D; Karakilic, B; Kilickap, S; Hayran, M

    2017-09-01

    Burnout and exhaustion is a frequent problem in oncology nursing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the aspects of oncology nurses about their profession in order to enhance the standards of oncology nursing. This survey was conducted with 70 oncology nurses working at Hacettepe University Oncology Hospital. Data were collected between January-April 2012. Each participant provided a study form comprising questions about sociodemographic information; about difficulties, positive aspects and required skills for oncology nursing; and questions evaluating level of participation and clinical perception of oncology nursing. Mean age of nurses was 29.9 ± 5.7 years. More than half of the participants were married (51.4%) and 30% had at least one child. Percent of nurses working in oncology for their entire work life was 75.8%. Most frequently expressed difficulties were exhaustion (58.6%), coping with the psychological problems of the patients (25.7%), and frequent deaths (24.3%); positive aspects were satisfaction (37.1%), changing the perceptions about life (30%), and empathy (14.3%); and required skills were patience (60%), empathy (57.1%), and experience (50%). For difficulties of oncology nursing, 28.3% of difficulties could be attributed to job-related factors, 30.3% to patient-related factors, and 77% of difficulties to individual factors. The independent predictors of participation level of the nurses were self-thoughts of skills and positive aspects of oncology nursing. According to the findings of this study, nurses declared that working with cancer patients increase burnout, they are insufficient in managing work stress and giving psychological care to patients, but their job satisfaction, clinical skills and awareness regarding priorities of life has increased.

  1. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  2. Hematologic Abnormalities in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Chamanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with cyanotic heart disease may have an acceptable quality of life. However, they are invariably prone to several complications. The aim of this study is search about hematologic abnormalities in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study every cyanotic congenital heart disease patients who was referred to the adult congenital heart disease clinic was selected and asked of any possible hyperviscosity symptoms, gingival bleeding, Epistaxis, hemoptysis, hypermenorrhagia and gouty arthritis irrespective of their age, gender and primary diagnosis in a six-month period. In this regard, 02 saturation was obtained via pulse oximetry, an abdominal ultrasound was done in order to discover any gallstones and lab tests including CBC, coagulation parameters (bleeding time(BT,clotting time(CT, prothrombin time(PT,international ratio( INR, Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr were provided as well. Results:  A total of 69 patients were enrolled in the present study. The mean age of the patients was 22.44±5.72 with a minimum of 15 and the maximum of 46 years old. Twenty two (34.4% of them were female and 45(65.6% were male. Conclusion: Our patients had less hyperuricemia, there is no correlation between hyperviscosity symptoms and haematocrit level and an inverse correlation between the Ferritin level and hyperviscosity symptoms were seen.  

  3. [Complications associated to central venous catheters in hematology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gabás, Carmen; Castillo-Ayala, Ana; Hinojo-Marín, Begoña; Muriel-Abajo, M Ángeles; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Isabel; de Mena-Arenas, Ana M; Rodríguez-Gonzalo, Ana; Chao-Lozano, Cristina; García-Menéndez, Carmen; Madroñero-Agreda, M Antonia

    2015-01-01

    To discover the incidence of central venous catheters (tunnelled, subcutaneous and PICC) in patients with onco-hematological conditions, hospitalized in the Hematology or Transplantations of Hematopoietic Stem Cells Units, in two tertiary care hospitals. A cross-sectional, descriptive study form was developed in order to gather sociodemographic, clinical data as well as complications and follow-up of the care protocol. Each catheter was assigned a correlative identification number. Information was collected on 366 catheters: 185 in the University Hospital Ramón y Cajal (HURYC), 80 tunnelled, 40 subcutaneous venous access and 65 PICC, and 181 in the University Hospital Gregorio Marañón (HUGM), 101 tunnelled and 80 subcutaneous venous access. Major complications in the tunnellized were infections (13.7% in HURYC vs. 6.8% in HUGM - p<0.001) and occlusions (at least once in 3.8% vs. 21.8%). In subcutaneous venous access, infections were confirmed in 5% in HURYC vs. 1.2% in HUGM. There were occlusions at least once in 10% in HUGM and no other significant complications were detected. Regarding PICC, information was only collected in HURYC, where complications were phlebitis 10.8%, thrombosis 7.7%, confirmed or suspected infection 4.6%, occlusion at least once 7.7%. Differences between hospitals with regard to major complications, infection and occlusion may be related to different care protocol. We need to stress the high incidence of phlebitis and thrombosis in PICC catheters, compared with data of lower incidence of other papers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Procedural pain management in Italy: learning from a nationwide survey involving centers of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

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    Chiara Po'

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Procedural pain is an important aspect of care in pediatrics, and particularly in pediatric oncology where children often consider this to be the most painful experience during their illness. Best recommended practice to control procedural pain includes both sedative-analgesic administration and non-pharmacological treatments, practiced in an adequate and pleasant setting by skilled staff. A nationwide survey has been conducted among the Italian Centers of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology to register operators’ awareness on procedural pain, state of the art procedural pain management, operators’ opinions about pain control in their center, and possible barriers impeding sedation-analgesia administration. Based on indications in the literature, we discuss the results of the survey to highlight critical issues and suggest future directions for improvement. Future objectives will be to overcome differences depending on size, improve operators’ beliefs about the complexity of pain experience, and promote a global approach to procedural pain.

  5. Metabolic complications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sycova-Mila, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, a lot of space and time is devoted to the therapy of oncologic diseases itself. To reach the good therapy results, complex care of the oncologic patient is needed. Management of complications linked with the disease itself and management of complications emerged after administration of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or targeted therapy, plays a significant role. In addition to infectious, hematological, neurological, cardiac or other complications, metabolic complications are relatively extensive and serious. One of the most frequent metabolic complications in oncology is tumor lysis syndrome, hyperuricemia, hypercalcaemia and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. (author)

  6. Evaluating application of the National Healthcare Safety Network central line-associated bloodstream infection surveillance definition: a survey of pediatric intensive care and hematology/oncology units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Aditya H; Miller, Marlene R; Gao, Cuilan; Rosenberg, Carol; Morrell, Gloria C; Coffin, Susan E; Huskins, W Charles

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the application of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) definition in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) and pediatric hematology/oncology units (PHOUs) participating in a multicenter quality improvement collaborative to reduce CLABSIs; to identify sources of variability in the application of the definition. Online survey using 18 standardized case scenarios. Each described a positive blood culture in a patient and required a yes- or-no answer to the question "Is this a CLABSI?" NHSN staff responses were the reference standard. Sixty-five US PICUs and PHOUs. Staff who routinely adjudicate CLABSIs using NHSN definitions. Sixty responses were received from 58 (89%) of 65 institutions; 78% of respondents were infection preventionists, infection control officers, or infectious disease physicians. Responses matched those of NHSN staff for 78% of questions. The mean (SE) percentage of concurring answers did not differ for scenarios evaluating application of 1 of the 3 criteria ("known pathogen," 78% [1.7%]; "skin contaminant, >1 year of age," 76% [SE, 2.5%]; "skin contaminant, ≤1 year of age," 81% [3.8%]; [Formula: see text]). The mean percentage of concurring answers was lower for scenarios requiring respondents to determine whether a CLABSI was present or incubating on admission (64% [4.6%]; [Formula: see text]) or to distinguish between primary and secondary bacteremia (65% [2.5%]; [Formula: see text]). The accuracy of application of the CLABSI definition was suboptimal. Efforts to reduce variability in identifying CLABSIs that are present or incubating on admission and in distinguishing primary from secondary bloodstream infection are needed.

  7. [Hematological Evaluation and Monitoring in Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Ávila, Mauricio J; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Arenas González, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    To guide the clinician in taking decisions on the best strategies for assessing and monitoring the risk of blood disorders in adults diagnosed with schizophrenia in pharmacological treatment. A clinical practice guideline was developed following the guidelines of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection to collect evidence and grade recommendations. De novoliterature researchwas performed. With the use of antipsychotics there isriskofreducción in the leukocyte count and the risk of agranulocytosis,the later associated with the use of clozapine, although it is a rare event(0.8%) can be fatal; this effect occurs most frequently in the first twelve weeks of treatment and the risk is maintained aroundthe first year of it. The recommendations were considered strongin all hematologic related monitoring.A blood count should be taken at the start of pharmacological treatment. If the patient is started on clozapine one shouldbe taken weekly during the first three months, monthly until completing one year and every six months thereafter. If there is a decrease in white blood cell count the patient should be monitored regularly, stopping if is a less than 3,500 cells/mm(3) and consider referral if is less than 2,000 cells/mm(3). Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Informal patient payments in oncology practice

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    Fomenko, Tetiana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Europe, new cases of cancer are diagnosed in 4 million people yearly, of whom 837 000 die. In Ukraine of 160 000 new cases almost 100 000 die. With proper treatment, one third of cancer cases is curable, but informal payments (IPP in health care limit access to treatment. We aimed to explore the experience of people treated for cancer to identify obstacles in obtaining health care and the expert opinion about health care for cancer patients in Ukraine.METHODS: The study is exploratory. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 convenience sample patients or their relatives as well as with three experts between October 2011 – April 2012. RESULTS. Solicitation or receipt of IPP depends on the organizational culture. Respondents do not mind about IPP, but want this to be their own decision. IPP are often considered a “thank” to the medical staff for the service. The significant percentage of expenditures while in treatment for patients is due to purchases of medicines at their own expense. The problem of a long process of diagnostics and incomplete information by the medical staff about the stage of cancer and possible prognoses are essential for the respondents. According to experts not sufficient number of specialists and equipment for proper diagnosis and treatment is another problem. The attitude of medical staff to the patient with cancer largely depends on the personal features of the staff.CONCLUSIONS: Significant problems perceived by cancer patients are related to purchase of medicines at their own expense, structural and organizational features of hospitals, where they are staying for the treatment. Informal payments largely depend on the personal qualities of medical staff. The government must ensure fairness and equal access in getting care in oncology practice because it mainly affects the health of the nation.

  9. Informational needs of gastrointestinal oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakos, Janet; Urowitz, Sara; Olmstead, Craig; Jusko Friedman, Audrey; Zhu, Jason; Catton, Pamela

    2015-12-01

    In response to the dearth of consumer health information for patients with gastrointestinal cancers, this study examined the informational needs of these patients to build a plan for future resource development. Although studies have examined informational needs of some such cancers, no published literature has investigated the comprehensive informational needs across all sites of gastrointestinal cancer. A cross-sectional needs assessment comprising a self-administered questionnaire was conducted at an ambulatory gastrointestinal oncology clinic in Toronto, Canada. Patient informational needs were measured, including importance of information, amount desired and preferred mode of delivery. Informational needs were grouped into six domains: medical, practical, physical, emotional, social and spiritual. Eighty-two surveys were analysed. The majority of the respondents were male (53.8%), over the age of 50 (77.8%), and born outside of Canada (51.9%). While many did not speak English as a child (46.3%), and do not speak English at home (22.2%), nearly all indicated comfort with receiving health information in English (97.5%). The majority of respondents were college educated (79.3%) and married (73%). Multiple cancer types were reported; the most common being colorectal (39%), followed by pancreatic (12%) and cancers of the gallbladder or bile duct (12%). Overall, respondents placed highest importance on medical information (P < 0.001). Preferred education modalities were pamphlets, websites and one-on-one discussions with health-care professionals. This study highlights the principal informational needs of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies, along with preferred modality for information delivery. This information will guide the development of educational resources for future patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Do Elderly Patients With Non-hematologic Malignancies Have A Worse Outcome in the ICU?

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    Tzu-Tao Chen

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: The main cause of death and survival rates, both short-term and long-term, were not worse in elderly patients with non-hematologic malignancies in the ICU, and the main reasons for patient death were sepsis and respiratory failure, rather than the malignancy itself. Therefore, an ICU admission policy should not exclude elderly patients with non-hematologic malignancies merely because of concerns about survival rate or life expectancy.

  11. What do cardiovascular nurses know about the hematological management of patients with Eisenmenger syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, Philip; Fleck, Desiree; Jaarsma, Tiny; Norekval, Tone M.; Smith, Karen; Stromberg, Anna; Thompson, David R.; Budts, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We investigated the level of knowledge of hematological management of patients with Eisenmenger syndrome among general cardiovascular nurses and nurses who specialize in congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: We conducted a survey at two international conferences attended by cardiovascular

  12. The need for psycho-oncological support for melanoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Simone; Teufel, Martin; Schaeffeler, Norbert; Keim, Ulrike; Garbe, Claus; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Zipfel, Stephan; Forschner, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Despite an increasing number of promising treatment options, only a limited number of studies concerning melanoma patients’ psycho-oncological distress have been carried out. However, multiple screening tools are in use to assess the need for psycho-oncological support. This study aimed first to identify parameters in melanoma patients that are associated with a higher risk for being psycho-oncologically distressed and second to compare patients’ self-evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support with the results of established screening tools. We performed a cross-sectional study including 254 melanoma patients from the Center for Dermatooncology at the University of Tuebingen. The study was performed between June 2010 and February 2013. Several screening instruments were included: the Distress Thermometer (DT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the patients’ subjective evaluation concerning psycho-oncological support. Binary logistic regression was performed to identify factors that indicate the need for psycho-oncological support. Patients’ subjective evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support, female gender, and psychotherapeutic or psychiatric treatment at present or in the past had the highest impact on values above threshold in the DT. The odds ratio of patients’ self-evaluation (9.89) was even higher than somatic factors like female gender (1.85), duration of illness (0.99), or increasing age (0.97). Patients’ self-evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support indicated a moderate correlation with the results of the screening tools included. In addition to the results obtained by screening tools like the DT, we could demonstrate that patients’ self-evaluation is an important instrument to identify patients who need psycho-oncological support. PMID:28906378

  13. Sport and oxidative stress in oncological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, K; Schwan, R; Bongartz, M; Bloch, W; Brixius, K; Baumann, F

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be an important factor in the onset, progression and recurrence of cancer. In order to investigate how it is influenced by physical activity, we measured oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity (aoC) in 12 women with breast cancer and 6 men with prostate cancer, before and after long hiking trips. Before the hike, the men had a ROS-concentration of 1.8±0.6 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 0.7±0.6 mM Trolox-equivalent (Tro), while the women had a ROS-concentration of 3.1±0.7 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 1.2±0.2 mM Tro. After the hike, women showed no significant change in ROS and a significant increase in aoC (1.3±0.2 mM Tro), while the ROS concentration in men increased significantly (2.1±0.3 mM H2O2) and their aoC decreased (0.25±0.1 mM Tro). After a regenerative phase, the ROS concentration of the men decreased to 1.7±0.4 mM H2O2 and their aoC recovered significantly (1.2±0.4 mM Tro), while the women presented no significant change in the concentration of H2O2 but showed an ulterior increase in antioxidant capacity (2.05±0.43 mM Tro). From this data we conclude that physical training programs as for example long distance hiking trips can improve the aoC in the blood of oncological patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. [Rationalization, rationing, prioritization: terminology and ethical approaches to the allocation of limited resources in hematology/oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The field of oncology with its numerous high-priced innovations contributes considerably to the fact that medical progress is expensive. Additionally, due to the demographic changes and the increasing life expectancy, a growing number of cancer patients want to profit from this progress. Since resources are limited also in the health system, the fair distribution of the available resources urgently needs to be addressed. Dealing with scarcity is a typical problem in the domain of justice theory; therefore, this article first discusses different strategies to manage limited resources: rationalization, rationing, and prioritization. It then presents substantive as well as procedural criteria that assist in the just distribution of effective health benefits. There are various strategies to reduce the utilization of limited resources: Rationalization means that efficiency reserves are being exhausted; by means of rationing, effective health benefits are withheld due to cost considerations. Rationing can occur implicitly and thus covertly, e.g. through budgeting or the implementation of waiting periods, or explicitly, through transparent rules or policies about healthcare coverage. Ranking medical treatments according to their importance (prioritization) is often a prerequisite for rationing decisions. In terms of requirements of justice, both procedural and substantive criteria (e.g. equality, urgency, benefit) are relevant for the acceptance and quality of a decision to limit access to effective health benefits. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Bacteremia due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satlin, Michael J; Cohen, Nina; Ma, Kevin C; Gedrimaite, Zivile; Soave, Rosemary; Askin, Gülce; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Walsh, Thomas J; Seo, Susan K

    2016-10-01

    To determine the prevalence, risk factors, treatments, and outcomes of bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in adult neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. We reviewed all BSIs between 2008 and 2012 in this population at two New York City oncology centers. A case-control study was conducted to identify CRE BSI risk factors, using three controls of non-CRE BSIs per case. CRE caused 43 (2.2%) of 1992 BSIs overall and 4.7% of Gram-negative bacteremias. Independent risk factors for CRE BSI were prior β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.2; P = 0.03) or carbapenem (aOR 3.0; P = 0.05) use, current trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (aOR 24; P = 0.001) or glucocorticoid (aOR 5.4, P = 0.004) use, and having a prior CRE culture (aOR 12; P = 0.03). Patients with CRE bacteremia had a median of 52 h from culture collection until receipt of active therapy. They had a 51% BSI-related mortality rate, with a median of 4 days from bacteremia onset until death. CRE-active empirical therapy was associated with a lower 30-day mortality rate (17% vs. 59%; P = 0.08). CRE are lethal emerging causes of bacteremia in neutropenic patients. New strategies are needed to shorten the delay in administration of CRE-active agents and improve outcomes in this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pretreatment long interspersed element (LINE-1 methylation levels, not early hypomethylation under treatment, predict hematological response to azacitidine in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia

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    Cross M

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Cross,1 Enrica Bach,1 Thao Tran,1 Rainer Krahl,1 Nadja Jaekel,1 Dietger Niederwieser,1 Christian Junghanss,2 Georg Maschmeyer,3 Haifa Kathrin Al-Ali11Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany; 2Clinic for Hematology, Oncology and Palliative Medicine, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany; 3Clinic for Hematology, Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Ernst-von-Bergmann Clinic, Potsdam, GermanyBackground: Epigenetic modulations, including changes in DNA cytosine methylation, are implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Azacitidine is a hypomethylating agent that is incorporated into RNA as well as DNA. Thus, there is a rationale to its use in patients with AML. We determined whether baseline and/or early changes in the methylation of long interspersed element (LINE-1 or CDH13 correlate with bone marrow blast clearance, hematological response, or survival in patients with AML treated with azacitidine.Methods: An open label, phase I/II trial was performed in 40 AML patients (median bone marrow blast count was 42% unfit for intensive chemotherapy treated with azacitidine 75 mg/m2/day subcutaneously for 5 days every 4 weeks. Bone marrow mononuclear cell samples were taken on day 0 (pretreatment and day 15 during the first treatment cycle; LINE-1 and CDH13 methylation levels were quantified by methylation-specific, semiquantitative, real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: Treatment with azacitidine significantly reduced LINE-1 but not CDH13 methylation levels over the first cycle (P < 0.0001. Absolute LINE-1 methylation levels tended to be lower on day 0 (P = 0.06 and day 15 of cycle 1 (P = 0.03 in patients who went on to achieve subsequent complete remission, partial remission or hematological improvement versus patients with stable disease. However, the decrease in LINE-1 methylation over the first treatment cycle did not correlate with subsequent response (P = 0

  17. Time to look beyond one-year mortality in critically ill hematological patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moors, Ine; Benoit, Dominique D

    2014-02-11

    The spectacular improvement in long-term prognosis of patients with hematological malignancies since the 1980s, coupled with the subsequent improvement over the past decade in short- and mid-term survival in cases of critical illness, resulted in an increasing referral of such patients to the ICU. A remaining question, however, is how these patients perform in the long term with regard to survival and quality of life. Here we discuss the present multicenter study on survival beyond 1 year in critically ill patients with hematological malignancies. We conclude with suggestions on how we can further improve the long-term outcome of these patients.

  18. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. PRIMARY OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA IN ONCOLOGIC PATIENTS

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    A. A. Ryabtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glaucoma-induced visual impairment negatively influences quality of life of oncologic patients. Yet, tumor in itself and methods of its treatment may promote glaucoma progression. Aim: To study characteristics and course of primary open-angle glaucoma in oncologic patients. Materials and methods: We analyzed case reports of 19 oncologic patients after primary open-angle glaucoma-related sinus trabeculectomy (34 eyes and laser cyclopexy (1 eye. Diagnosed malignancies included colorectal cancer in 5 patients, uterine body and cervical cancer in 4 patients, chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 1 patient, renal cell carcinoma in 1 patient, adrenal cancer in 1 patient, prostatic cancer in 1 patient, breast cancer in 1 patient, vulvar cancer in 1 patient, tongue root cancer in 1 patient. Antiglaucomatous surgery was accomplished during the first 5 years from the diagnosis of tumor in 14 patients. In 9 patients, chemotherapy or hormone therapy was continued by the time of surgery. Follow-up of the patients was undertaken in 4–12 months after the antiglaucomatous operation; it included routine ophthalmological examination and dry eye syndrome functional tests. Results: Duration of postoperative period was 4 months or more. All patients had uveitis postoperatively. During late postoperative period, choroidal detachment was diagnosed in 4 patients. Bleb scarring was found in 2 patients. All patients received hypotensive treatment postoperatively including selective and non-selective beta-adrenergic blockers. Conjunctival and corneal xerosis was observed in all patients. Conclusion: In oncologic patients undergoing antiglaucomatous surgery, long-term (4 months or more postoperative anti-inflammatory therapy is needed along with monthly ophthalmological follow-up during the first year after the operation. In patients with ongoing cytostatic drug treatment, artificial tear should be administrated.

  20. Managing patients with oncologic complications in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, David; McCurdy, Michael T; Nusbaum, Jeffrey; Gupta, Nachi

    2018-01-22

    As the prevalence of cancer continues to increase in the general population and improvements in cancer treatment prolong survival, the incidence of patients presenting to the emergency department with oncologic complications will, similarly, continue to rise. This issue reviews 3 of the more common presentations of oncology patients to the emergency department: metastatic spinal cord compression, tumor lysis syndrome, and febrile neutropenia. Signs and symptoms of these conditions can be varied and nonspecific, and may be related to the malignancy itself or to an adverse effect of the cancer treatment. Timely evidence-based decisions in the emergency department regarding diagnostic testing, medications, and arrangement of disposition and oncology follow-up can significantly improve a cancer patient's quality of life. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  1. [Assessment of Work Engagement in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Psychometric Properties of the German Version of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale 9 (UWES-9)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautier, L P; Scherwath, A; Weis, J; Sarkar, S; Bosbach, M; Schendel, M; Ladehoff, N; Koch, U; Mehnert, A

    2015-10-01

    Our purpose was the psychometric evaluation of the German version of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-9 (UWES-9), a self-assessment tool measuring work-related resources consisting of 9 items. Based on a sample of 179 patients with hematological malignancies in in-patient and rehabilitative oncological settings, we tested the dimensional structure by confirmatory and explorative factor analysis. We further evaluated reliability, item characteristics, and construct validity of the UWES-9. The confirmatory factor analysis showed acceptable fit for both a 1-dimensional factor structure and the original 3-factor model. Based on an explorative principal component analysis, we were able to replicate the 1-dimensional factor accounting for 67% of the total variance and showing very high internal consistency (α=0.94) and high factor loads (0.73-0.88). The construct validity was further supported by significant positive correlations between work engagement and meaning of work, corporate feeling, commitment to the workplace, and job satisfaction. The German version of the UWES-9 shows good psychometric qualities in measuring dedication to work in patients with hematological malignancies in in-patient and rehabilitative oncological settings. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Nonspecialty Nurse Education: Evaluation of the Oncology Intensives Initiative, an Oncology Curriculum to Improve Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Kimberly A; Dunn, Sarah E; Chuang, Eliseu Y; Dorr, Victoria J; Thompson, Julie A; Smith, Sophia K

    2018-04-01

    A community hospital combined its medical and surgical patients with cancer on one unit, which resulted in nurses not trained in oncology caring for this patient population. The Oncology Intensives Initiative (ONCii) involved the (a) design and implementation of a daylong didactic boot camp class and a four-hour simulation session and (b) the examination of nurses' worries, attitudes, self-efficacy, and perception of interdisciplinary teamwork. A two-group, pre-/post-test design was implemented. Group 1 consisted of nurses who attended the didactic boot camp classes alone, whereas group 2 was comprised of nurses who attended the didactic boot camp classes and the simulation sessions. Results of data analysis showed a decrease in worries and an increase in positive attitudes toward chemotherapy administration in both groups, as well as an increase in self-efficacy among members of group 2.

  3. The risk of melanoma and hematologic cancers in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Shivani P; Martires, Kathryn; Wu, Jashin J

    2017-04-01

    The risk of melanoma and hematologic cancers in patients with psoriasis is controversial. We sought to assess the risk of melanoma and hematologic cancers in patients with psoriasis, and the association with different treatments. We used case-control and retrospective cohort designs to determine melanoma or hematologic cancer risk in patients with psoriasis. Risk with treatment type was assessed using Fisher exact test. Patients with psoriasis had 1.53 times greater risk of developing a malignancy compared with patients without psoriasis (P < .01). There were no significant differences in malignancy risk among patients treated with topicals, phototherapy, systemics, or biologic agents. Patients with psoriasis and malignancy did not have significantly worse survival than patients without psoriasis. It is possible that patients developed malignancy subsequent to the follow-up time included in the study. Patients with psoriasis may experience an elevated risk of melanoma and hematologic cancers, compared with the general population. The risk is not increased by systemic or biologic psoriasis therapies. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Preventing transmission of infectious agents in the pediatric in-patients hematology–oncology setting: what is the role for non-pharmacological prophylaxis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Désirée Caselli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite a continuous will to protect the immune compromised host from infections, evidence based indications for intervention by non-pharmacological toools are still lacking in oncology. Nevertheless, guidelines on standard precaution and trasmission base precaution are available. They may be important in order to reduce the risk of trasmission of infection in selected healthcare settings, such as the pediatric hematology-oncology wards. . AIEOP Centers agree that for children treated with chemotherapy both of these approaches should be implemented and vigorously enforced, while additional policies, including strict environmental isolation should be restricetd to patients with selected clinical conditions or complications.

  5. Qualidade de vida de pacientes com câncer hematológico em tratamento quimioterápico Calidad de vida de pacientes con cáncer hematológico en tratamiento quimioterápico Quality of life in hematologic oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Andrade

    2013-04-01

    64,57, seguida de insomnio (56,90 y pérdida del apetito (50,71. Tales síntomas interfirieron en las funciones físicas, emocionales y cognitivas, demostrando que los efectos colaterales del tratamiento influyen negativamente en la QVRS del paciente.This descriptive and cross-sectional study aimed to examine the socio-demographic/clinical aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL and assess the HRQoL of onco- hematological patients undergoing chemotherapy. The data collection instrument was a socio-demographic/clinical questionnaire, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C-30. The sample consisted of 32 patients, eight of whom (25% were diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma; nine (28.12%, with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and 15 (46.87%, with leukemia. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. For the functional scales of the QLQ-C-30 (physical, cognitive, emotional, social and role performance, the mean scores ranged from 54.81 to 41.18, demonstrating an unsatisfactory level of functioning. In the symptom scales, there was a predominance of fatigue (64.57, insomnia (56.90 and loss of appetite (50.71. These symptoms interfered with the patients' physical functioning, demonstrating that the emotional and cognitive side effects of the treatment negatively influenced the HRQoL of the patients.

  6. Invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a young patient with hematological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Rabelo de Carvalho Parahym

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of invasive infection due to Saprochaete capitata in a patient with hematological malignancies after chemotherapy treatment and empiric antifungal therapy with caspofungin. Although severely immunocompromised the patient survived been treated with amphotericin B lipid complex associated with voriconazole.

  7. Urine Galactomannan-to-Creatinine Ratio for Detection of Invasive Aspergillosis in Patients with Hematological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischies, Frederike M J; Raggam, Reinhard B; Prattes, Juergen; Krause, Robert; Eigl, Susanne; List, Agnes; Quehenberger, Franz; Strenger, Volker; Wölfler, Albert; Hoenigl, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Galactomannan (GM) testing of urine specimens may provide important advantages, compared to serum testing, such as easy noninvasive sample collection. We evaluated a total of 632 serial urine samples from 71 patients with underlying hematological malignancies and found that the urine GM/creatinine ratio, i.e., (urine GM level × 100)/urine creatinine level, which takes urine dilution into account, reliably detected invasive aspergillosis and may be a promising diagnostic tool for patients with hematological malignancies. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01576653.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Breast cancer patients' presentation for oncological treatment: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries' breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Methods: Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer ...

  9. Characteristics of potential drug-related problems among oncology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulsink, Arjan; Imholz, Alex L. T.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Jansman, Frank G. A.

    Background Oncology patients are more at risk for drug related problems because of treatment with (combinations of) anticancer drugs, as they have a higher risk for organ failure or altered metabolism with progression of their disease. Objective The aim of this study was to characterize and to

  10. Can dosimetric parameters predict acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Juefeng; Liu, Kaitai; Li, Kaixuan; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    To identify dosimetric parameters associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy. Ninety-three rectal cancer patients receiving concurrent capecitabine and pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were analyzed. Pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was contoured for each patient and divided into three subsites: lumbosacral spine (LSS), ilium, and lower pelvis (LP). The volume of each site receiving 5–40 Gy (V 5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and V40, respectively) as well as patient baseline clinical characteristics was calculated. The endpoint for hematologic toxicity was grade ≥ 2 (HT2+) leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia or thrombocytopenia. Logistic regression was used to analyze correlation between dosimetric parameters and grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Twenty-four in ninety-three patients experienced grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Only the dosimetric parameter V40 of lumbosacral spine was correlated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Increased pelvic lumbosacral spine V40 (LSS-V40) was associated with an increased grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity (p = 0.041). Patients with LSS-V40 ≥ 60 % had higher rates of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than did patients with lumbosacral spine V40 < 60 % (38.3 %, 18/47 vs.13 %, 6/46, p =0.005). On univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis, lumbosacral spine V40 and gender was also the variable associated with grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Female patients were observed more likely to have grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity than male ones (46.9 %, 15/32 vs 14.8 %, 9/61, p =0.001). Lumbosacral spine -V40 was associated with clinically significant grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity. Keeping the lumbosacral spine -V40 < 60 % was associated with a 13 % risk of grade ≥ 2 hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  11. Management of patients with hematological malignancies undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Borde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with a previously diagnosed malignancy who need cardiac surgery is increasing. Patients with hematological malignancies represent only 0.38% of all patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The literature in this subset of patients is limited to only a few retrospective case series, with limited number of patients undergoing emergency cardiac surgery. We describe three cases with hematological malignancies namely chronic myelogenous leukemia, acute promyelocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia presenting for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Two patients were taken up for emergency CABG in view of ongoing ischemia, one of them was on preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump support. No mortality was observed. Two patients needed transfusion of blood products which was guided by thromboelastography. One patient developed superficial sternal wound infection requiring antibiotic therapy.

  12. A Feasibility Study of Virtual Reality Exercise in Elderly Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Receiving Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kenji; Sudo, Kazuaki; Goto, Goro; Takai, Makiko; Itokawa, Tatsuo; Isshiki, Takahiro; Takei, Naoko; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Komatsu, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to rehabilitation exercise is much lower in patients with hematologic malignancies (22.5-45.8%) than in patients with solid tumors (60-85%) due to the administration of more intensive chemotherapeutic regimens in the former. Virtual reality exercise can be performed even in a biological clean room and it may improve the adherence rates in elderly patients with hematologic malignancies. Thus, in this pilot study, we aimed to investigate the feasibility and safety of virtual reality exercise intervention using Nintendo Wii Fit in patients with hematologic malignancies receiving chemotherapy. In this feasibility study, 16 hospitalized patients with hematologic malignancies aged ≥60 years performed virtual reality exercise for 20 minutes using the Nintendo Wii Fit once a day, five times a week, from the start of chemotherapy until hospital discharge. The adherence rate, safety, and physical and psychological performances were assessed. The adherence rate for all 16 patients was 66.5%. Nine patients completed the virtual reality exercise intervention with 88 sessions, and the adherence rate was 62.0%. No intervention-related adverse effects >Grade 2, according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, were observed. We noted maintenance of the physical performance (e.g., Barthel index, handgrip strength, knee extension strength, one-leg standing time, and the scores of timed up and go test and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living) and psychosocial performance (e.g., score of hospital anxiety and depression scale). Virtual reality exercise using the Wii Fit may be feasible, safe and efficacious, as demonstrated in our preliminary results, for patients with hematologic malignancies receiving chemotherapy.

  13. Long-term outcomes among older patients following nonmyeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for advanced hematologic malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E

    2011-01-01

    A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions.......A minimally toxic nonmyeloablative regimen was developed for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with advanced hematologic malignancies who are older or have comorbid conditions....

  14. Hospitalization and other risk factors for depressive and anxious symptoms in oncological and non-oncological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Cerminara, Gregorio; Ruberto, Stefania; Caroleo, Mariarita; Puca, Maurizio; Rania, Ornella; Suffredini, Elina; Procopio, Leonardo; Segura-Garcìa, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Depression and anxiety are common in hospitalized patients. In particular, oncological patients might be vulnerable to depression and anxiety. The aim of this study is to assess and compare different variables and the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms between oncological and medically ill inpatients and to identify variables that can influence depressive and anxious symptoms during hospitalization of patients. A total of 360 consecutive hospitalized patients completed the following questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Patients Health Questionnaire-9, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), 12-Item Short-Form Survey: physical component summary (PCS), and mental component summary (MCS). Patients were divided into oncological patients and non-oncological patients: groups 1 and 2. Only two significant differences were evident between the groups: the PCS of 12-item Short-form Survey was higher in non-oncological patient (p < 0.000), and the GHQ total score was higher in oncological patients. Variables significantly associated with HADS-D ≥ 8 were lower MCS, higher GHQ-12 score, lower PCS, more numerous previous hospitalizations, longer duration of hospitalization, and positive psychiatric family history. Variables significantly associated with HADS-A ≥ 8 were lower MCS, higher GHQ-12 score, positive psychiatric family history, longer duration of hospitalization, and younger age. Anxiety and depression symptoms in concurrent general medical conditions were associated with a specific sociodemographic profile, and this association has implications for clinical care. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. [The use of galactomannan detection in diagnosing invasive aspergillosis in hemato-oncological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácil, Z; Kocmanová, I; Wagnerová, B; Winterová, J; Lengerová, M; Moulis, M; Mayer, J

    2008-01-01

    PREMISES AND OBJECTIVES: Timely diagnosis is of critical importance for the prognosis of invasive aspergilosis (IA) patients. Over recent years, IA detection of galactomannan using the ELISA method has assumed growing importance. The objective of the study was to analyse the usability of the method in current clinical practice of a hemato-oncological ward. From May 2003 to October 2006, blood samples were taken from patients at IA risk to detect galactomannan (GM) in serum using the ELISA method. The patients who underwent the tests were classified by the probability of IA presence on the basis of the results of conventional diagnostic methods and section findings. A total of 11,360 serum samples from 911 adult patients were tested for GM presence. IA (probable/proven) was diagnosed in 42 (4.6%) of them. The rates of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of galactomannan detection for IA diagnosis in our ward were, respectively, 95.2%, 90.0%, 31.5% and 99.7%. The principal causes of the limited positive predictive value of the test were the high percentage of false-positive test results (mainly caused by concomitant administration of some penicillin antibiotics or Plasma-Lyte infusion solution), as well as the fact that a large percentage of patients we examined fell within the group of patients with hematological malignity with a very low prevalence of IA. GM detection in serum is associated with high sensitivity and excellent negative predictive value in IA diagnosis in hemato-oncological patients. Knowledge and elimination of possible causes of false-positive results as well as focusing the screening on patients at greatest risk of infection are necessary for an even better exploitation of the test.

  16. Affirming the Connection: Comparative Findings on Communication Issues from Hospice Patients and Hematology Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Pam

    2004-01-01

    The following discussion presents comparative findings from hospice patients and hematology survivors on the topic of talking about dying to significant others within their network of family and friends. The insights have been gathered from an Australian research program that is exploring the notion of spirituality in relation to serious illness.…

  17. Infiltrative Lung Diseases: Complications of Novel Antineoplastic Agents in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobbak Vahid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Infiltrative lung disease is a well-known complication of antineoplastic agents in patients with hematological malignancies. Novel agents are constantly being added to available treatments. The present review discusses different pulmonary syndromes, pathogenesis and management of these novel agents.

  18. Bronchoscopic diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in granulocytopenic patients with hematologic malignancies : BAL versus PSB and PBAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Wim G.; Erjavec, Zoran; van der Werf, Tjip S.; de Vries-Hosper, Hilly G.; Gouw, Annette S. H.; Manson, Willem L.

    Background: Treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies is often complicated by severe respiratory infections. Bronchoscopy is generally to be used as a diagnostic tool in order to find a causative pathogen. Objectives: In a prospective study the combination of protected specimen brush (PSB)

  19. [Clinical significance of determination of serum B7-H4 in patients with malignant hematologic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Mei; Hu, Guo-Yan; Liu, Wei; Zheng, Shu-Hua; Lv, Jing; Wang, Hong-Mei; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2010-09-01

    To study the clinical significance of determination of serum B7-H4 in patients with malignant hematologic diseases. Serum B7-H4 levels were determined in 65 patients with leucemia, 34 patients with lymphoma, 12 patients with multiple myeloma as well as in 50 healthy controls. The serum B7-H4 levels in patients with lymphoma [(38.81+/-10.34) kappag/L] were significantly higher than healthy controls [(31.62+/-9.850) kappag/L] (Pleucemia, patients with multiple myeloma and healthy controls. These results suggest that the B7-H4 may correlated with lymphoma, but uncorrelated with leucemia and multiple myeloma. Measurement of serum B7-H4 level provide useful information for distinctive diagnosis of different kinds of malignant hematologic diseases.

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with hematological cancers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, G G; Leong, Y C; Bee, P C; Chin, E; Teh, A K H

    2015-08-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is often used by cancer patients, but not many studies had been published on the prevalence of CAM use in patients with hematological cancers. This study aims to determine the prevalence of CAM and type of CAM used in this group of patients in a multiracial and multicultural country. This is a cross-sectional survey carried out in two hospitals in Malaysia. Patients with underlying hematological cancers were asked to complete the questionnaires on CAM and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. A total of 245 patients participated. The prevalence of CAM use was 70.2 %. The most common types of CAM used are biological-based therapies (90.2 %) and mind-body interventions (42 %). Vitamin and diet supplements (68.6 %) and folk/herb remedies (58 %) are the most common biological-based therapies used. There is no significant association of CAM use with age, gender, education level, and household income. Female patients are more likely to use more than one CAM therapies. The most common reason reported for CAM use was to boost immunity (57 %) and cure (24 %). Majority of patients (65 %) felt CAM was effective, and 60 % did not inform their physicians regarding CAM usage. In view of the high prevalence of CAM use in patients with hematological cancers, it is important that the physicians play an active role in seeking information from patients and to monitor possible drug-vitamin-herbal interactions.

  1. Radiation oncology: An Irish hospitals approach to supporting patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Caragh [Cork University Hospital (Ireland)], E-mail: caragh.miller@tcd.ie

    2009-02-15

    Despite advances in medical technology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death globally, leaving many patients to deal with the emotional and psychological aspects associated with cancer and its treatment [Department of Health and Children. A strategy for cancer control in Ireland. National Cancer Forum. Dublin; 2006]. The recognition and management of psychological conditions are an integral part of comprehensive cancer care. As a result, the Health Services Executive as part of the continuing expansion of Cork Radiation Oncology Department created the role of Information and Support Radiation Therapist. This post was specially created during June 2005 to facilitate the smooth entry into the treatment for patients and family members experiencing radiotherapy for the first time. Working alongside the oncology nurses and other health professionals the Information and Support Radiation Therapist aims to provide vital education/information and support to patients and their families. The provision of this new service for patients enables departments to adopt a holistic approach to treatment. This research identifies the cancer services and psychological support services in Ireland. Up-to-date audits of the new patient services established in the Cork Radiation Oncology Department and their psychological contribution towards cancer development and treatment are also discussed.

  2. Radiation oncology: An Irish hospitals approach to supporting patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Caragh

    2009-01-01

    Despite advances in medical technology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death globally, leaving many patients to deal with the emotional and psychological aspects associated with cancer and its treatment [Department of Health and Children. A strategy for cancer control in Ireland. National Cancer Forum. Dublin; 2006]. The recognition and management of psychological conditions are an integral part of comprehensive cancer care. As a result, the Health Services Executive as part of the continuing expansion of Cork Radiation Oncology Department created the role of Information and Support Radiation Therapist. This post was specially created during June 2005 to facilitate the smooth entry into the treatment for patients and family members experiencing radiotherapy for the first time. Working alongside the oncology nurses and other health professionals the Information and Support Radiation Therapist aims to provide vital education/information and support to patients and their families. The provision of this new service for patients enables departments to adopt a holistic approach to treatment. This research identifies the cancer services and psychological support services in Ireland. Up-to-date audits of the new patient services established in the Cork Radiation Oncology Department and their psychological contribution towards cancer development and treatment are also discussed

  3. Hepatitis C among Egyptian Patients Referred for Bone Marrow Examination: Seroprevalence and Analysis of Hematological Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaia Mohammed Mousa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C is a significant public health problem in Egypt where the highest prevalence (14.7% of hepatitis C virus (HCV exists. HCV prevalence is even higher among clinical populations and groups at risk of exposure to infection. Chronic HCV infection is associated with several hematological complications that may necessitate bone marrow (BM examination. The aim of this study is to estimate HCV prevalence among patients referred for BM examination and to explore hematological and BM findings among HCV positive patients. One hundred adult patients referred for BM examination were included in the study and screened for HCV antibodies. Patients’ clinical, hematological, and BM findings were recorded. The seroprevalence of HCV among patients referred for BM examination was 42%. The most common indication for BM examination among HCV positive patients was peripheral cytopenias (88.1%. The most common cytopenia detected was thrombocytopenia (85.7%. The most common diagnosis among HCV positive patients was hypersplenism (52.4% followed by B-lymphoproliferative disorders (19% and then immune thrombocytopenic purpura (11.9%. In conclusion, HCV prevalence among patients referred for BM examination is higher than that estimated in the general population. Patients with unexplained peripheral cytopenias should be tested for HCV.

  4. Patient participation during oncological encounters: barriers and facilitators experienced by elderly cancer patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Driesenaar, J.A.; Henselmans, I.; Heijmans, M.; Verboom, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To enhance patient participation during (oncological) encounters, this study aims to gain insight into communication barriers and supportive interventions experienced by elderly patients with cancer. Method: A mixed method design, including both quantitative (secondary survey data

  5. Cardiac management of oncology patients clinical handbook for cardio-oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Baron Esquivias, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    This book is designed for clinical cardiologists and other physicians working with cardiac patients, where specific specialized teams of cardio-oncologists are not available and who are called to perform a clinical consultation to evaluate both the cardiac condition and the eligibility for chemotherapy or radiotherapy treatment, and to evaluate if a cancer treatment produces toxic effects on a patient treated with chemo or radiotherapy and if appearance of new symptoms is due to this treatment. In recent years, progress in oncologic therapy has resulted in important developments and the prognostic improvement of patients with malignancy. The cornerstone of chemotherapy are the anthracyclines (and the analogue Mitoxantrone), that are direct cellular toxic agents and that are among the most powerful anti-neoplastic drugs, but their cardiac toxicity is well known. Significant breakthroughs in cancer therapy have also been achieved with the introduction of signalling inhibitors, such as VEGF inhibitors, HERB2 inh...

  6. ONCOLOGY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer is characterized by a later stage of presentation.6 ... may be done as a result of the patient's age or family history on presentation to a ... This may frequently be the first time that the patient has a clinical breast ... and the diagnosis and treatment of their DCIS. ... conservation therapy (either ROLL or WLE), 10 required.

  7. A risk prediction score for invasive mold disease in patients with hematological malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Stanzani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A risk score for invasive mold disease (IMD in patients with hematological malignancies could facilitate patient screening and improve the targeted use of antifungal prophylaxis. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 1,709 hospital admissions of 840 patients with hematological malignancies (2005-2008 to collect data on 17 epidemiological and treatment-related risk factors for IMD. Multivariate regression was used to develop a weighted risk score based on independent risk factors associated with proven or probable IMD, which was prospectively validated during 1,746 hospital admissions of 855 patients from 2009-2012. RESULTS: Of the 17 candidate variables analyzed, 11 correlated with IMD by univariate analysis, but only 4 risk factors (neutropenia, lymphocytopenia or lymphocyte dysfunction in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, malignancy status, and prior IMD were retained in the final multivariate model, resulting in a weighted risk score 0-13. A risk score of 5% of IMD, with a negative predictive value (NPV of 0.99, (95% CI 0.98-0.99. During 2009-2012, patients with a calculated risk score at admission of 6 (0.9% vs. 10.6%, P <0.001. CONCLUSION: An objective, weighted risk score for IMD can accurately discriminate patients with hematological malignancies at low risk for developing mold disease, and could possibly facilitate "screening-out" of low risk patients less likely to benefit from intensive diagnostic monitoring or mold-directed antifungal prophylaxis.

  8. Urine Galactomannan-to-Creatinine Ratio for Detection of Invasive Aspergillosis in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Reischies, Frederike M. J.; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Prattes, Juergen; Krause, Robert; Eigl, Susanne; List, Agnes; Quehenberger, Franz; Strenger, Volker; Wölfler, Albert; Hoenigl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Galactomannan (GM) testing of urine specimens may provide important advantages, compared to serum testing, such as easy noninvasive sample collection. We evaluated a total of 632 serial urine samples from 71 patients with underlying hematological malignancies and found that the urine GM/creatinine ratio, i.e., (urine GM level × 100)/urine creatinine level, which takes urine dilution into account, reliably detected invasive aspergillosis and may be a promising diagnostic tool for patients with...

  9. Management of acute perianal sepsis in neutropenic patients with hematological malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B; Al-Salman, M; Daoud, F

    2014-04-01

    In neutropenic patients with acute perianal sepsis in the setting of hematological malignancy, the classical clinical features of abscess formation are lacking. Additionally, the role of surgical intervention is not well established. In this review, we discuss the challenges and controversy regarding diagnosis and optimal management when clear surgical guidelines are absent. In the literature, there is great diversity in the surgical approach to these patients, which leads to a high percentage of diagnostic errors, risks of complications, and unnecessary interventions. We review the literature and assess whether surgical intervention produces better outcomes than a non-surgical approach. Studies published on perianal sepsis in neutropenic cancer patients were identified by searching PubMed using the following key words: "perianal sepsis/abscesses, anorectal sepsis/abscess, neutropenia, hematological malignancy, cancer". No randomized or prospective studies on the management of acute perianal sepsis in hematological malignancies were found. The largest retrospective study and most comprehensive clinical data demonstrated that 42% of patients were treated successfully without surgical intervention and without morbidity or mortality related to treatment chosen. Small retrospective studies advocated surgical intervention, while the majority of successes were in a non-operative treatment. It is difficult to formulate a conclusion given the small retrospective series on management of neutropenic patients with hematological malignancies. While there is no evidence mandating a routine surgical approach in this category of patients, non-surgical management including careful follow-up to determine whether the patient's condition is deteriorating or treatment has failed is an acceptable approach in selected patients without pathognomonic features of abscess. Comprehensive and well-designed prospective studies are needed to firmly establish the guidelines of treatment

  10. Cognitive rehabilitation in neuro-oncological patients: three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Zucchella

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment is one of the most common neurological disorders in neuro-oncological patients, linked with morbidity, disability, and poor quality of life. As pharmacologic interventions have not yet proven effective in the treatment of cognitive deficits, cognitive rehabilitation could represent an alternative approach. This paper presents three case studies, describing the cognitive intervention and discussing its effectiveness in the light of current evidence.

  11. Karyotype in secondary hematologic disorders after treatment for Hodgkin's disease. A study of 19 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurlo, A.; Mecucci, C.; Van Orshoven, A.; Michaux, J.L.; Boogaerts, M.; Van den Berghe, H.

    1988-01-01

    In 19 cases of secondary hematologic disorders in patients previously treated for Hodgkin's disease, chromosome aberrations were analyzed in relation to the type of previous chemo- and/or radiotherapy, age of the patients, histopathologic features of the Hodgkin's disease at diagnosis, time interval between the treatment and the occurrence of the secondary disorder, and survival. The karyotype was of significant prognostic value when three cytogenetic groups were considered: patients with normal karyotypes; patients with aberrations of chromosome 7 as the sole anomaly; and patients with complex rearrangements and translocations. The last group showed the lowest rate of survival. Bone marrow transplantation was successful in two patients with a normal karyotype

  12. Information Needs of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgical Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Jacqueline; Kacikanis, Anna; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Gallinger, Steven; Ruthig, Elke

    2017-09-01

    A marked knowledge gap exists concerning the information needs of hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) surgical oncology patients. We investigated the comprehensive information needs of this patient population, including the type and amount of information desired, as well as the preferred method of receiving information. A questionnaire was administered to patients being treated surgically for cancers of the liver, pancreas, gallbladder, or bile ducts at Toronto General Hospital, part of the University Health Network, in Toronto, Canada. The questionnaire examined patients' information needs across six domains of information: medical, practical, physical, emotional, social, and spiritual. Among 36 respondents, the importance of information and amount of information desired differed significantly by domain (both p < 0.001). This group of patients rated information in the medical and physical domains as most important, though they also desired specific items of information from the emotional, practical, and social domains. Patients' overwhelming preference was to receive information via a one-on-one consultation with a healthcare provider. It is important for healthcare providers working with HPB surgical oncology patients to be comprehensive when providing information related to patients' cancer diagnosis, prognosis, associated symptoms, and side effects of treatment. Certain emotional, practical, and social issues (e.g., fears of cancer recurrence, drug coverage options, relationship changes) should be addressed as well. Face-to-face interactions should be the primary mode of delivering information to patients. Our findings are being used to guide the training of healthcare providers and the development of educational resources specific to HPB surgical oncology patients.

  13. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium species and subtypes in paediatric oncology and non-oncology patients with diarrhoea in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Zahedi, Alireza; Kazaleh, Mahmoud; Ryan, Una

    2017-11-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a protozoan parasitic disease which affects human and animals worldwide. In adult immunocompetent individuals, cryptosporidiosis usually results in acute and self-limited diarrhoea; however, it can cause life threatening diarrhoea in children and immunocompromised individuals. In the present study, we compared the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species and gp60 subtypes amongst paediatric oncology patients with diarrhoea (n=160) from King Hussein Medical Centre for Cancer in Jordan, and non-oncology paediatric patients with diarrhoea (n=137) from Al-Mafraq paediatric hospital. Microscopy results using modified acid fast staining identified a significantly (p≤0.05) higher prevalence of Cryptosporidium in paediatric oncology patients with diarrhoea (14.4% - 23/160), compared to non-oncology paediatric patients with diarrhoea only (5.1% - 7/137). With the exception of one sample, all microscopy-positive samples (n=29) and an additional 3/30 microscopy-negative controls were typed to species and subtype level at the 18S and gp60 loci, respectively. All Cryptosporidium positives were typed as C. parvum. Of the 22 typed Cryptosporidium positives from the paediatric oncology patients, 21 were subtyped as IIaA17G2R1 and one as IIaA16G2R1 C. parvum subtypes. The 7 typed positives from the paediatric patients from Al-Mafraq hospital were subtyped as IIaA17G2R1 (n=5) and IIaA16G2R1 (n=2). The 3 additional positives from the 30 microscopy negative control samples were subtyped as IIaA17G2R1. The high prevalence of the IIaA17G2R1 subtype, particularly amongst oncology patients, suggests that an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis may have been occurring in oncology patients during the collection period (April to December, 2016). New therapies for cryptosporidiosis in immunocompromised patients are urgently required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hematological consequences of a FANCG founder mutation in Black South African patients with Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feben, Candice; Kromberg, Jennifer; Wainwright, Rosalind; Stones, David; Poole, Janet; Haw, Tabitha; Krause, Amanda

    2015-03-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare disorder of DNA repair, associated with various somatic abnormalities but characterized by hematological disease that manifests as bone marrow aplasia and malignancy. The mainstay of treatment, in developed nations, is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with subsequent surveillance for solid organ and non-hematological malignancies. In South Africa, FA in the Black population is caused by a homozygous deletion mutation in the FANCG gene in more than 80% of cases. Many affected patients are not diagnosed until late in the disease course when severe cytopenia and bone marrow aplasia are already present. Most patients are not eligible for HSCT at this late stage of the disease, even when it is available in the state health care system. In this study, the hematological presentation and disease progression in 30 Black South African patients with FA, confirmed to have the FANCG founder mutation, were evaluated and compared to those described in other FA cohorts. Our results showed that patients, homozygous for the FANCG founder mutation, present with severe cytopenia but progress to bone marrow failure at similar ages to other individuals affected with FA of heterogeneous genotype. Further, the incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome is similar to that which has been previously described in other FA cohorts. Although severe cytopenia at presentation may be predicted by a higher number of somatic anomalies, the recognition of the physical FA phenotype in Black South African patients is challenging and may not be useful in expediting referral of suspected FA patients for tertiary level investigations and care. Given the late but severe hematological presentation of FA in Black South African patients, an investigative strategy is needed for earlier recognition of affected individuals to allow for possible HSCT and management of bone marrow disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hematology Expert System (HES) For Tonsillectomy/Adenoidectomy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Nicolino J.; Kapoor, Sandhya; Gerrard, Jon M.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this expert system is to assess a predisposition to bleeding in a patient undergoing a tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy as may occur with patients who have certain blood conditions such as hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease. This goal is achieved by establishing a correlation between the patients' responses to a medical questionnaire and the relative quantities of blood lost during the operation.

  16. Opioids and immunosupression in oncological postoperative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Bonilla-García

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Recent animal studies demonstrated immunosuppressive effects of opioid withdrawal resulting in a higher risk of infection. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of remifentanil discontinuation on Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU-acquired infection after a schedule of sedoanalgesia of at least 6 days. Method: All patients over 18 years of age with a unit admission of more than 4 days were consecutively selected. The study population was the one affected by surgical pathology of any origin where sedation was based on any hypnotic and the opioid remifentanil was used as analgesic for at least 96 hours in continuous perfusion. Patients who died during admission to the unit and those with combined analgesia (peripheral or neuroaxial blocks were excluded. Bivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors for infection acquired in the unit. A comparative study between periods of 6 days before and after the cessation of remifentanil was performed. Paired samples test and McNemar test was used for quantitative and categorical variables, respectively. Results: There were 1,789 patients admitted to the PACU during the study and the population eligible was constituted for 102 patients. The incidence rate of PACU-acquired infection was 38 per 1,000 PACU days. Ventilator-associated pneumonia was the most frequently diagnosed PACU-acquired infection. Pseudomona aeruginosa was the most frequently isolated microorganism. Hospital mortality was 36.27%. No statistically significant differences were seen in the incidence of HAI in cancer patients in relation to discontinuation of remifentanil (p=0.068. Conclusion: The baseline state of immunosuppression of cancer patients does not imply a higher incidence of HAI in relation to the interruption of remifentanil. It would be of interest to carry out a multicenter PACU study that included immunological patterns.

  17. The Growing Threat of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Infections in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas M.; Satlin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged neutropenia and chemotherapy-induced mucositis render patients with hematologic malignancies highly vulnerable to Gram-negative bacteremia. Unfortunately, multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria are increasingly encountered globally, and current guidelines for empirical antibiotic coverage in these patients may not adequately treat these bacteria. This expansion of resistance, coupled with traditional culturing techniques requiring 2-4 days for bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility results, have grave implications for these immunocompromised hosts. This review characterizes the epidemiology, risk factors, resistance mechanisms, recommended treatments, and outcomes of the MDR Gram-negative bacteria that commonly cause infections in patients with hematologic malignancies. We also examine infection prevention strategies in hematology patients, such as infection control practices, antimicrobial stewardship, and targeted decolonization. Finally, we assess strategies to improve outcomes of infected patients, including gastrointestinal screening to guide empirical antibiotic therapy, new rapid diagnostic tools for expeditious identification of MDR pathogens, and use of two new antimicrobial agents, ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam. PMID:27339405

  18. Invasive aspergillosis in paediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Z; Ibrahim, H; Abdulrahman, E J; Menon, B S; Zahari, Z; Zaleha, A M; Talib, A

    2008-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis predominantly occurs in immunocompromised patients and is often resistant to different therapeutically strategies. However, mortality significantly increases if the central nervous system is affected. In this report we describe two cases of invasive aspergilosis, one with kidney involvement with a successful treatment while the other with pulmonary and cerebral involvement with a grave outcome.

  19. The effects of music therapy on oncological patients

    OpenAIRE

    Virbalienė, Akvilė; Račkauskienė, Skaidrė; Kasnauskienė, Jolanta; Šumskienė, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    The research shows the effects of music therapy on oncological patients. Music therapy is one of the tools that help patients to cope with the stress and improves self-confidence, encourages them to live valuable life. It also has a dramatic effect on quality of life as patients who participate in music therapy sessions start to express their feelings in a more active way and also start to solve their own problems. Moreover, music therapy reduces the level of stress and anxiety in the minds a...

  20. Specifics of geriatric patients in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, P.; Krizanova, M.

    2012-01-01

    Prolonging human life by the growing number of seniors in the population is accompanied by an increased incidence of cancer in this population. The incidence of cancer in the elderly accounts for 50% of all cancers and is a steeper increase in the male population than female. In Slovakia, the incidence and spread of cancer identical to that in most EU countries. Early cancer detection rate among the elderly is limited poly morbidity and reluctance of patients to undergo preventative as well as diagnostic action. Early diagnosis of cancer allows selection of the appropriate treatment modality that takes into account performance status and co morbidities. Some of these patients require intensive training and so on and aftercare in the treatment of cancer. Failure when treatment when sick or getting into health care already at an advanced stage of the disease is suitable for palliative care. Palliative care is a complex of measures to improve the quality of life of patients and their families in the face of life-threatening disease so that timely identify and promptly diagnose and treat pain and other physical, psychosocial and spiritual problems, reducing suffering. (author)

  1. Relationships between personal attitudes about death and communication with terminally ill patients: How oncology clinicians grapple with mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbach, Rachel A; Rodenbach, Kyle E; Tejani, Mohamedtaki A; Epstein, Ronald M

    2016-03-01

    Clinician discomfort with death may affect care of patients but has not been well-studied. This study explores oncology clinicians' attitudes surrounding their own death and how these attitudes both affect and are affected by their care of dying patients and their communication with them. Qualitative interviews with physicians (n=25), nurse practitioners (n=7), and physician assistants (n=1) in medical or hematologic oncology clinical practices about communication styles, care of terminally ill patients, and personal perspectives about mortality. Clinicians described three communication styles used with patients about death and dying: direct, indirect, or selectively direct. Most reported an acceptance of their mortality that was "conditional," meaning that that they could not fully know how they would respond if actually terminally ill. For many clinicians, caring for dying patients affected their outlook on life and death, and their own perspectives on life and death affected their approach to caring for dying patients. An awareness of personal mortality may help clinicians to discuss death more openly with patients and to provide better care. Efforts to promote self-awareness and communication training are key to facilitating clear communication with and compassionate care of terminally ill patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Oncology patient-reported claims: maximising the chance for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, H; Rofail, D; Caron, M; Emery, M-P

    2011-01-01

    To review Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) labelling claims achieved in oncology in Europe and in the United States and consider the benefits, and challenges faced. PROLabels database was searched to identify oncology products with PRO labelling approved in Europe since 1995 or in the United States since 1998. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) websites and guidance documents were reviewed. PUBMED was searched for articles on PRO claims in oncology. Among all oncology products approved, 22 were identified with PRO claims; 10 in the United States, 7 in Europe, and 5 in both. The language used in the labelling was limited to benefit (e.g. "…resulted in symptom benefits by significantly prolonging time to deterioration in cough, dyspnoea, and pain, versus placebo") and equivalence (e.g. "no statistical differences were observed between treatment groups for global QoL"). Seven products used a validated HRQoL tool; two used symptom tools; two used both; seven used single-item symptom measures (one was unknown). The following emerged as likely reasons for success: ensuring systematic PRO data collection; clear rationale for pre-specified endpoints; adequately powered trials to detect differences and clinically significant changes; adjusting for multiplicity; developing an a priori statistical analysis plan including primary and subgroup analyses, dealing with missing data, pooling multiple-site data; establishing clinical versus statistical significance; interpreting failure to detect change. End-stage patient drop-out rates and cessation of trials due to exceptional therapeutic benefit pose significant challenges to demonstrating treatment PRO improvement. PRO labelling claims demonstrate treatment impact and the trade-off between efficacy and side effects ultimately facilitating product differentiation. Reliable and valid instruments specific to the desired language, claim, and target population are required. Practical

  3. DIGITAL ONCOLOGY PATIENT RECORD - HETEROGENEOUS FILE BASED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Sapundzhiev

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oncology patients need extensive follow-up and meticulous documentation. The aim of this study was to introduce a simple, platform independent file based system for documentation of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in oncology patients and test its function.Material and methods: A file-name based system of the type M1M2M3.F2 was introduced, where M1 is a unique identifier for the patient, M2 is the date of the clinical intervention/event, M3 is an identifier for the author of the medical record and F2 is the specific software generated file-name extension.Results: This system is in use at 5 institutions, where a total of 11 persons on 14 different workstations inputted 16591 entries (files for 2370. The merge process was tested on 2 operating systems - when copied together all files sort up as expected by patient, and for each patient in a chronological order, providing a digital cumulative patient record, which contains heterogeneous file formats.Conclusion: The file based approach for storing heterogeneous digital patient related information is an reliable system, which can handle open-source, proprietary, general and custom file formats and seems to be easily scalable. Further development of software for automatic checks of the integrity and searching and indexing of the files is expected to produce a more user-friendly environment

  4. Alpha-fetoprotein determination and liver scintigraphy, in patients with hematologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, W.M.

    1977-12-01

    The serum alpha-fetoprotein is quantified in 30 patients by means of the radioimmunoassay method. They are divided into 2 newborn bobies, 5 control subjects, 1 pregnant woman and 22 with hematologic deseases. Liver scanning is also performed in all of them except the newborn bobies and the control subjects. In these last patients, the alpha - fetoprotein levels vary from below 6.25 to 14.0 mg/ml. High values are only found in the newborn babies, in the pregnant woman and in the patient with hysticcitic lymphoma. In these patients the alpha - fetoprotein levels are over 14,0 mg/ml [pt

  5. Long-term molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus epidermidis blood culture isolates from patients with hematological malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Ahlstrand

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis is an important cause of bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies. Knowledge of the long-term epidemiology of these infections is limited. We surveyed all S. epidermidis blood culture isolates from patients treated for hematological malignancies at the University Hospital of Örebro, Sweden from 1980 to 2009. A total of 373 S. epidermidis isolates were identified and multilocus sequence typing, staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec typing and standard antibiotic susceptibility testing were employed to characterize these isolates. The majority of the isolates 361/373 (97% belonged to clonal complex 2, and the 373 isolates were divided into 45 sequence types (STs; Simpson's Diversity Index was 0.56. The most prevalent STs were ST2 (243/373, 65% and ST215 (28/373, 8%. Ninety three percent (226/243 of the ST2 isolates displayed either SCCmec type III or IV. ST2 and 215 were isolated during the entire study period, and together these STs caused temporal peaks in the number of positive blood cultures of S. epidermidis. Methicillin resistance was detected in 213/273 (78% of all isolates. In the two predominating STs, ST2 and ST215, methicillin resistance was detected in 256/271 isolates (95%, compared with 34/100 (34% in other STs (p<0.001. In conclusion, in this long-term study of patients with hematological malignancies, we demonstrate a predominance of methicillin-resistant ST2 among S. epidermidis blood culture isolates.

  6. Music therapy in relief of pain in oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Franco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the perception of oncology patients with chronic pain as to the effects of music in alleviating pain, to identify if there are changes in the vital signs of these patients before and after the musicotherapy session, and to identify whether the intensity of pain is diminished after the music session as per an analogic scale of pain. Methods: This level II, descriptive-exploratory and cross-sectional study used a quantitative and qualitative approach. The sample consisted of ten oncology patients with chronic pain. Rresults: There was a reduction in vital signs and in intensity of pain in ten patients of the sample; after the music sessions, the patients reported a sensation of relief of pain, relaxation, and a belief in the power of music as a supplementary therapy. Cconclusions: Music showed an influence in reducing vital signs and pain intensity, and the patients perceived a reduction of pain and anxiety, and began to believe in music as a form of therapy.

  7. "Society of Hematologic Oncology (SOHO) State of the Art Updates and Next Questions"-Treatment of ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, Sabina; Jabbour, Elias; Hoelzer, Dieter

    2018-04-03

    The outcome of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has substantially improved by adopting pediatric-inspired regimens, and approximately half of the patients are nowadays cured. The evaluation of minimal residual disease currently represents the most important prognostic indicator, which drives treatment algorithms, which include allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) allocation. Indeed, for high-risk patients, allo-SCT should be pursued as soon as possible, whereas in standard-risk patients this procedure should be avoided also in light of related toxicity and because there are no significant benefits. Furthermore, better characterization of the molecular genetic events can drive therapeutic decisions: a historical example in this respect is represented by the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL; in the upcoming future, TKIs might be used also in other subgroups, such as breakpoint cluster region/Abelson 1-like cases and others with deregulated tyrosine kinases. Finally, the greatest progress is currently achieved with new immunotherapies targeting frequently expressed surface antigens in ALL. It is also a new chance for elderly ALL patients, so far spared from intensive chemotherapy and allo-SCT. These targeted therapies will substantially change this treatment algorithm and the great challenge is to find optimal sequence of the extended therapy options in an individual patient. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Bleeding frequency and characteristics among hematologic malignancy inpatient rehabilitation patients with severe thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jack B; Tennison, Jegy M; Rutzen-Lopez, Isabel M; Silver, Julie K; Morishita, Shinichiro; Dibaj, Seyedeh S; Bruera, Eduardo

    2018-03-28

    To identify the frequency and characteristics of bleeding complications during acute inpatient rehabilitation of hematologic malignancy patients with severe thrombocytopenia. Retrospective descriptive analysis. Comprehensive cancer center acute inpatient rehabilitation unit. Consecutive hematologic malignancy patients with a platelet count of less than or equal to 20,000/microliter (μL) on the day of acute inpatient rehabilitation admission from 1/1/2005 through 8/31/2016. Medical records were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, laboratory, and medical data. Patients were rehabilitated using the institutional exercise guidelines for thrombocytopenic patients. Bleeding events noted in the medical record. Out of 135 acute inpatient rehabilitation admissions, 133 unique patients were analyzed with a total of 851 inpatient rehabilitation days. The mean platelet count was 14,000/μL on the day of admission and 22,000/μL over the course of the rehabilitation admission. There were 252 days of inpatient rehabilitation where patients had less than 10,000/μL platelets. A total of 97 bleeding events were documented in 77/135 (57%) admissions. Of the 97 bleeding events, 72 (74%), 14 (14%), and 11 (11%) were considered to be of low, medium, and high severity, respectively. There were 4/97 (4%) bleeding events that were highly likely attributable to physical activity but only 1/4 was considered high severity. Bleeding rates were .09, .08, .17, and .37 for > 20,000, 15-20,000, 10-15,000, and rehabilitation in severely thrombocytopenic hematologic cancer patients. Bleeding rates increased with lower platelet counts. However, using the exercise guidelines for severely thrombocytopenic patients, the risk of severe exercise-related bleeding events was low.

  9. Bronchoscopic diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in granulocytopenic patients with hematologic malignancies: BAL versus PSB and PBAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Wim G; Erjavec, Zoran; van der Werf, Tjip S; de Vries-Hosper, Hilly G; Gouw, Annette S H; Manson, Willem L

    2007-02-01

    Treatment of patients with hematologic malignancies is often complicated by severe respiratory infections. Bronchoscopy is generally to be used as a diagnostic tool in order to find a causative pathogen. In a prospective study the combination of protected specimen brush (PSB) and protected bronchoalveolar lavage (PBAL) was compared with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for evaluated feasibility and diagnostic yield in granulocytopenic patients with hematologic malignancies and pulmonary infiltrates. All specimens from 63 bronchoscopic procedures (35 BAL and 28 PSB-PBAL) were investigated by cytological examination and various microbiological tests. If clinically relevant and feasible, based on the clinical condition and/or the presence of thrombocytopenia, lung tissue samples were obtained. The majority of the 58 included patients were diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukaemia and developed a severe neutropenia (BAL-group: 27 days; PSB-PBAL group: 30 days). Microbiological and cytological examination of 63 bronchoscopic procedures (35 BAL and 28 PSB-PBAL) yielded causative pathogens in 9 (26%) patients of the BAL-group and 8 (29%) patients of the PSB-PBAL group (PSB and PBAL 4 each). Aspergillus fumigatus was the pathogen most frequently (13%) detected. Using all available examinations including the results of autopsy, a presumptive diagnosis was established in 43% of the patients in the BAL group and 57% of those in the PSB-PBAL group; in these cases microbial aetiology was correctly identified in 67% and 57%, respectively. The complication rate was of these procedures were low, and none of the patients experienced serious complications due to the invasive techniques. Our results showed that modern bronchoscopic techniques such as PSB and PBAL did not yield better diagnostic results compared to BAL in granulocytopenic patients with hematologic malignancies and pulmonary infiltrates. In approximately half of the cases a presumptive diagnosis was made by bronchoscopic

  10. [Nutritional status in patients first hospital admissions service hematology National Cancer Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar Luna, E; Omaña Guzmán, L I; Ortiz Hernández, L; Ñamendis-Silva, S A; De Nicola Delfin, L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the nutritional status of patients admitted to hospital for the first time the hematology service and who have not received treatment for cancer, to know if the nutritional status assessed by the EGS-GP and serum albumin related mortality of patients A longitudinal, prospective, analytical. EGS-Through GP assessed the nutritional status of patients, we used SPSS 19.0 for data analysis. Evaluaron 119 patients, 52.1% female and 47.9% male. The most common diagnosis was non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 43.7%. According to the EGS-GP 50.4% of patients had some degree of malnutrition or was at risk of suffering of which: 31.1% had moderate and 19.3% had severe malnutrition. The 49.6% of patients had an adequate nutritional status. 30.3% of the patients who died, 37% had severe malnutrition and 50% severe decrease in albumin concentration. The prevalence of malnutrition in hematological patients treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico that have not received medical treatment was high. There is an association between nutritional status and mortality in this patient group. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy in the diagnosis and therapeutic decision for respiratory infections in hematological febrile neutropenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Bento

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile neutropenia is a common complication in patients undergoing chemotherapy or hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT. Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy has been used to aid in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. However, there is no consensus regarding the benefit of the exam in establishing diagnosis and in changing the treatment of lung disease in this context. Previous retrospective studies, quite heterogeneous and with non-HIV immunocompromised patients, showed that the yield of fiberoptic bronchoscopy in establishing etiology ranges from 13% to 81%, and in changing therapy, from 5% to 51%. Aim: To evaluate the efficiency of Fiberoptic bronchoscopy and the procedure-related risk for neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancy. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study analyzed the medical records of patients with hematologic malignancy with febrile neutropenia who had undergone diagnostic fiberoptic bronchoscopy between January 2011 and December 2012 at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Results: A total of 45 patients were included: 18 (36% tested positive for bronchoalveolar lavage, with change in therapeutic management occurring for 95% of them. The procedure-related risk was 2.2%, with one patient showing desaturation immediately after the procedure. Conclusion:  Despite the limited number of patients, our findings indicate that fiberoptic bronchoscopy in neutropenic patients is safe, and the results are similar to those previously reported.

  12. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Brent S.; Aydogan, Bulent; Liang, Yun; Yeginer, Mete; Hasselle, Michael D.; Dandekar, Virag; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Roeske, John C.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased pelvic bone marrow (BM) irradiation is associated with increased hematologic toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy and to develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for HT. Methods and Materials: We tested associations between hematologic nadirs during chemoradiotherapy and the volume of BM receiving ≥10 and 20 Gy (V 10 and V 20 ) using a previously developed linear regression model. The validation cohort consisted of 44 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent cisplatin and pelvic radiotherapy. Subsequently, these data were pooled with data from 37 identically treated patients from a previous study, forming a cohort of 81 patients for normal tissue complication probability analysis. Generalized linear modeling was used to test associations between hematologic nadirs and dosimetric parameters, adjusting for body mass index. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to derive optimal dosimetric planning constraints. Results: In the validation cohort, significant negative correlations were observed between white blood cell count nadir and V 10 (regression coefficient (β) = -0.060, p = 0.009) and V 20 (β = -0.044, p = 0.010). In the combined cohort, the (adjusted) β estimates for log (white blood cell) vs. V 10 and V 20 were as follows: -0.022 (p = 0.025) and -0.021 (p = 0.002), respectively. Patients with V 10 ≥ 95% were more likely to experience Grade ≥3 leukopenia (68.8% vs. 24.6%, p 20 > 76% (57.7% vs. 21.8%, p = 0.001). Conclusions: These findings support the hypothesis that HT increases with increasing pelvic BM volume irradiated. Efforts to maintain V 10 20 < 76% may reduce HT.

  13. Hematological and Biochemistry Profile and Risk Factors Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Guyana

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    Rajini Kurup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the hematological and biochemistry profile of patients with or without HIV-TB at the Georgetown Chest Clinic, Guyana. Methods. An observational, laboratory based study was designed to assess the relationship of PTB and HIV with patients routine biochemical and hematological values. The study was conducted during the period January 2013 to December 2014; a total sample size of 316 patients was enrolled following exclusion and inclusion criteria. Results. Mean age of study population was 40.1 ± 13.8 (95% CI 38.6–41.7 and most were between 40 and 49 age group (27.8%, 95% CI 23.2–33.0. More males were in the study 74.4% (95% CI 69.3–78.8 than females 81% (95% CI 21.1–30.7. 30% (95% CI 25.3–35.3 had a sputum smear grade of 3+ and 62.5% (95% CI 47.0–75.7 showed a CD4 count <200. The study demonstrated significantly low hemoglobin (Hb 91.7% (95% CI 78.2–97.1, low WBC 27.8% (95% CI 15.8–44.0, high indirect bilirubin 7.4% (95% CI 2.1–23.3, ALT 41.8% (95% CI 28.4–56.7, and AST 72.2% (95% CI 57.3–83.3 among TB-HIV patients. Homelessness RR (relative risk 2.2 (95% CI 0.48–12.3, smoking RR 1.09 (95% CI 1.01–1.19, and gender (male RR 1.2 (95% CI 0.61–2.26 were main associated risk factors. Conclusions. There is slight variation among PTB and PTB-HIV coinfected patients in some hematological and biochemistry parameters.

  14. Prevalence of invasive fungal disease in hematological patients at a tertiary university hospital in Singapore

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    Koh Liang-Piu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of newer azoles as prophylaxis in hematological patients undergoing stem cell transplantation or immunosuppressive chemotherapy has been shown to decrease the risk of developing invasive fungal disease (IFD. However, the cost-effectiveness of such a strategy is dependent on the local epidemiology of IFD. We conducted an audit of hematological patients with IFD in our institution in order to derive the prevalence and types of IFD that occur locally. Findings We conducted a retrospective chart review of all hematological patients who developed possible, probable or definite IFD according to EORTC/MSG criteria in the period from Oct 2007 to Apr 2010. The prevalence of IFD was determined via correlation with institutional database records of all hematological patients treated at our institution over the same time period. There were 39 cases of IFD diagnosed during the study period, with 8 (20.5% possible, 19 (48.7% probable and 12 (30.8% definite cases of IFD. Aspergillus spp. accounted for 83.9% of all probable and definite infections. There was 1 case each of Rhinocladelia spp., Coprinopsis cinerea, Exserohilum spp. sinusitis and Rhizopus spp. sinusitis. IFD occurred in 12 of 124 (9.7% AML and 4 of 103 (3.9% ALL patients treated at our institution respectively. There were 10 (16.1% infections among 62 allogeneic HSCT recipients, six of whom were having concurrent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Five other cases occurred after allogeneic HSCT failure, following salvage chemotherapy for disease relapse. The prevalence of IFD during induction chemotherapy was 8.9% (11 of 124 cases for AML and 1.0% (1 of 103 cases for ALL. Fluconazole prophylaxis had been provided for 28 out of the 39 (71.8% cases, while 4 (10.3% were on itraconazole prophylaxis. The in-hospital mortality was 28.2% (11 of 39 cases, of which 5 (12.8% deaths were attributed to IFD. Conclusions The burden of IFD is high in our institution, especially in

  15. Do Patients Feel Well Informed in a Radiation Oncology Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Jimenez, Esther; Mateos, Pedro; Ortiz, Irene; Aymar, Neus; Vidal, Meritxell; Roncero, Raquel; Pardo, Jose; Soto, Carmen; Fuentes, Concepción; Sabater, Sebastià

    2018-04-01

    Information received by cancer patients has gained importance in recent decades. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of information received by oncological patients in a radiotherapy department and to measure the importance of the other information sources. A cross-sectional study was conducted, evaluating patients who received radiotherapy. All the patients were asked two questionnaires: the EORTC QLQ-INFO26 module evaluating their satisfaction with received information, and a questionnaire analyzing other sources of information search. One hundred patients between 27 and 84 years were enrolled. Breast cancer (26 %) was the commonest cancer. Patients felt better informed about the medical tests and secondly about the performed treatment. The younger patients were those who were more satisfied with the information received and patients with no formal education felt less satisfied, with statistically significant differences. Patients did not seek external information; at the most, they asked relatives and other people with cancer. Patients were satisfied with the received information, although a high percentage would like more information. In general, patients did not search for external information sources. Age and educational level seem to influence in the satisfaction with the received information.

  16. Clinical and Radiation Oncology. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurga, L.; Adam, Z.; Autrata, R.

    2010-01-01

    The work is two-volume set and has 1,658 pages. It is divided into 5 sections: I. Principles Clinical and radiation oncology. II. Hematological Malignant tumors. III. Solid tumors. IV. Treatment options metastatic Disease. V. Clinical practice in oncology. First volume contains following sections a chapters: Section I: Principles of clinical and radiation oncology, it contains following chapters: (1) The history of clinical/experimental and radiation oncology in the Czech Republic; (2) The history of clinical/experimental and radiation oncology in the Slovak Republic - development and development of oncology in Slovakia; (3) Clinical and radiation oncology as part of evidence-based medicine; (4) Molecular biology; (5) Tumor Disease; (6) Epidemiology and prevention of malignant tumors; (7) Diagnosis, staging, stratification and monitoring of patients in oncology; (8) Imaging methods in oncology; (9) Principles of surgical treatment of cancer diseases; (10) Symptomatology and signaling of malignant tumors - systemic, paraneoplastic and paraendocrine manifestations of tumor diseases; (11) Principles of radiation oncology; (12 Modeling radiobiological effects of radiotherapy; (13) Principles of anticancer chemotherapy; (14) Hormonal manipulation in the treatment of tumors; (15) Principles of biological and targeted treatment of solid tumors; (16) Method of multimodal therapy of malignant tumors; (17) Evaluation of treatment response, performance evaluation criteria (RECIST); (18) Adverse effects of cancer chemotherapy and the principles of their prevention and treatment; (19) Biological principles of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; (20) Design, analysis and ethical aspects of clinical studies in oncology; (21) Fundamentals of biostatistics for oncologists; (22) Information infrastructure for clinical and radiological oncology based on evidence; (23) Pharmacoeconomic aspects in oncology; (24) Respecting patient preferences when deciding on the strategy and

  17. Pediatric oncology in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereb, B; Anzic, J

    1996-01-01

    Slovenia, a new country and formerly a part of Yugoslavia, has had its Childrens Hospital in Ljubljana since 1865. This became a part of the University Hospital in 1945, and in the early 1960s the Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology was established. The Oncological Institute of Slovenia was established in 1938 and has developed into a modern facility for comprehensive cancer care, research, and teaching. In close cooperation, established in the 1960s, a team from these two institutions takes care of the approximately 60 children per year who develop cancer in Slovenia. Consisting of pediatricians, radiation oncologists, pathologists, cytologists, surgeons, and other ad hoc specialists, the team meets at least twice weekly to plan treatment, follow the patients, discuss the results, and teach. All patients are subject to regular follow-up indefinitely. A separate team has been formed to study the late effects of cancer treatment on survivors, who by now are mostly adults.

  18. Nutritional intervention and quality of life in adult oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Caro, Mónica María; Laviano, Alessandro; Pichard, Claude

    2007-06-01

    The evaluation of quality of life (QoL) assesses patients' well-being by taking into account physical, psychological and social conditions. Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of QoL. These metabolic changes lead to decreased food intake and promote wasting. Cancer-related malnutrition can evolve to cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and host metabolism. Beside and beyond the physical and the metabolic effects of cancer, patients often suffer as well from psychological distress, including depression. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative) and on patients' clinical conditions and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be prescribed (diet counselling, oral supplementation, enteral or total parenteral nutrition). Such an approach, which should be started as early as possible, can reduce or even reverse their poor nutritional status, improve their performance status and consequently their QoL. Nutritional intervention accompanying curative treatment has an additional and specific role, which is to increase the tolerance and response to the oncology treatment, decrease the rate of complications and possibly reduce morbidity by optimizing the balance between energy expenditure and food intake. In palliative care, nutritional support aims at improving patient's QoL by controlling symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and pain related to food intake and postponing loss of autonomy. The literature review supports that nutritional care should be integrated into the global oncology care because of its significant contribution to QoL. Furthermore, the assessment of QoL should be part of the evaluation of any nutritional support to optimize its adequacy to the patient's needs and expectations.

  19. Implanted Cardiac Defibrillator Care in Radiation Oncology Patient Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Amols, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To review the experience of a large cancer center with radiotherapy (RT) patients bearing implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) to propose some preliminary care guidelines as we learn more about the devices and their interaction with the therapeutic radiation environment. Methods and Materials: We collected data on patients with implanted ICDs treated with RT during a 2.5-year period at any of the five Memorial Sloan-Kettering clinical campuses. Information regarding the model, location, and dose detected from the device, as well as the treatment fields, fraction size, and treatment energy was collected. During this time, a new management policy for these patients had been implemented requiring treatment with low-energy beams (6 MV) and close surveillance of the patients in partnership with their electrophysiologist, as they received RT. Results: During the study period, 33 patients were treated with an ICD in place. One patient experienced a default of the device to its initial factory setting that was detected by the patient hearing an auditory signal from the device. This patient had initially been treated with a 15-MV beam. After this episode, his treatment was replanned to be completed with 6-MV photons, and he experienced no further events. Conclusion: Patients with ICDs and other implanted computer-controlled devices will be encountered more frequently in the RT department, and proper management is important. We present a policy for the safe treatment of these patients in the radiation oncology environment.

  20. Oncological emergencies for the internist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An oncologic emergency is defined as any acute, potentially life-threatening event, either directly or indirectly related to a patient′s cancer (ca or its treatment. It requires rapid intervention to avoid death or severe permanent damage. Most oncologic emergencies can be classified as metabolic, hematologic, structural, or side effects from chemotherapy agents. Tumor lysis syndrome is a metabolic emergency that presents as severe electrolyte abnormalities. The condition is treated with aggressive hydration, allopurinol or urate oxidase to lower uric acid levels. Hypercalcemia of malignancy is treated with aggressive rehydration, furosemide, and intravenous (IV bisphosphonates. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone should be suspected if a patient with ca presents with normovolemic hyponatremia. This metabolic condition usually is treated with fluid restriction and furosemide. Febrile neutropenia is a hematologic emergency that usually requires inpatient therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics, although outpatient therapy may be appropriate for low-risk patients. Hyperviscosity syndrome usually is associated with Waldenstrφm′s macroglobulinemia, which is treated with plasmapheresis and chemotherapy. Structural oncologic emergencies are caused by direct compression of surrounding structures or by metastatic disease. Superior vena cava syndrome is the most common structural oncological emergency. Treatment options include chemotherapy, radiation, and IV stenting. Epidural spinal cord compression can be treated with dexamethasone, radiation, or surgery. Malignant pericardial effusion, which often is undiagnosed in ca patients, can be treated with pericardiocentesis or a pericardial window procedure.

  1. Viral Pneumonia in Patients with Hematologic Malignancy or Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Erik; Evans, Scott E

    2017-03-01

    Viral pneumonias in patients with hematologic malignancies and recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation cause significant morbidity and mortality. Advances in diagnostic techniques have enabled rapid identification of respiratory viral pathogens from upper and lower respiratory tract samples. Lymphopenia, myeloablative and T-cell depleting chemotherapy, graft-versus-host disease, and other factors increase the risk of developing life-threatening viral pneumonia. Chest imaging is often nonspecific but may aid in diagnoses. Bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is recommended in those at high risk for viral pneumonia who have new infiltrates on chest imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of renal function in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estorch, M.; Tembl, A.; Camacho, V.; Sancho, G.; Mena, E.; Flotats, A.; Carrio, I.; Keller, A.; Miralbell, R.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may develop renal insufficiency. Isotopic determinations of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) are established methods to evaluate renal function. Aim: To asses renal function changes of patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing BMT by measurements of GFR and ERPF using 51Cr-EDTA and 131I-OIH respectively. Methods: Seventy-one patients (mean age 41 years) were studied prospectively. All patients underwent BMT for hematologic malignancies and had previous normal renal function. Their conditioning included chemotherapy and 12 Gy or 13.5 Gy fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). Kidney shielding blocks fabricated after renal opacification with non-ionic, hypo-osmolar contrast medium were used in 21 patients to limit kidney dose to 10 Gy. GFR and ERPF were measured before conditioning and at 4, 12, and 18 months, using 51Cr-EDTA and 131I-OIH respectively. A decrease of 30% in GFR or ERPF, compared with baseline values, was used to define renal insufficiency. The potential influence of patient- and treatment-related variables on renal dysfunction was assessed. Results: At 4 (early) and 12-18 (late) months, a 30% GFR decrease was observed in 54% and 49% of patients, and a 30% ERPF decrease in 44% and 34% of patients, respectively. GFR decrease at 4 months significantly correlated with age (greatest decrease if <40 years), TBI using kidney blocks (kidney shielding to 10 Gy was associated with a higher rate of renal dysfunction at 4 months compared with full TBI dose), and days of treatment with aminoglycosides/vancomycin. ERPF decrease at 4 months was independently related with amphotericin and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) treatments. GFR and ERPF decrease at 12-18 months correlated with amphotericin and PGE1 treatments. Conclusion: Early post-BMT renal dysfunction is associated with the administration of potentially nephrotoxic drugs. Younger

  3. Prediction of Clinical Deterioration in Hospitalized Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Using a Neural Network Model.

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    Scott B Hu

    Full Text Available Clinical deterioration (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest occurs during approximately 5-10% of hospital admissions. Existing prediction models have a high false positive rate, leading to multiple false alarms and alarm fatigue. We used routine vital signs and laboratory values obtained from the electronic medical record (EMR along with a machine learning algorithm called a neural network to develop a prediction model that would increase the predictive accuracy and decrease false alarm rates.Retrospective cohort study.The hematologic malignancy unit in an academic medical center in the United States.Adult patients admitted to the hematologic malignancy unit from 2009 to 2010.None.Vital signs and laboratory values were obtained from the electronic medical record system and then used as predictors (features. A neural network was used to build a model to predict clinical deterioration events (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest. The performance of the neural network model was compared to the VitalPac Early Warning Score (ViEWS. Five hundred sixty five consecutive total admissions were available with 43 admissions resulting in clinical deterioration. Using simulation, the neural network outperformed the ViEWS model with a positive predictive value of 82% compared to 24%, respectively.We developed and tested a neural network-based prediction model for clinical deterioration in patients hospitalized in the hematologic malignancy unit. Our neural network model outperformed an existing model, substantially increasing the positive predictive value, allowing the clinician to be confident in the alarm raised. This system can be readily implemented in a real-time fashion in existing EMR systems.

  4. Hematological differences between patients with different subtypes of sickle cell disease on hydroxyurea treatment

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    Fabia Neves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sickle cell anemia and the interaction S/Beta thalassemia differ in hematological values due to microcytosis and hypochromia caused by the thalassemic mutation. The clinical benefit of long-term hydroxyurea treatment is undeniable in sickle cell disease with monitoring of the biological action of the drug being by the complete blood count. The objective of this work is to compare changes in some of the erythrocytic indexes between S/Beta thalassemia and sickle cell anemia patients on long-term hydroxyurea treatment. METHODS: The values of erythrocyte indexes (mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin were compared in a retrospective study of two groups of patients (Sickle cell anemia and S/Beta thalassemia on hydroxyurea treatment over a mean of six years. RESULTS: The quantitative values of the two parameters differed between the groups. Increases in mean corpuscular volume and reductions in mean corpuscular hemoglobin delay longer in S/Beta thalassemia patients (p-value = 0.018. CONCLUSION: Hematological changes are some of the beneficial effects of hydroxyurea in sickle cell disease as cellular hydration increases and the hemoglobin S concentration is reduced. The complete blood count is the best test to monitor changes, but the interpretation of the results in S/Beta thalassemia should be different.

  5. Study on peripheral expansion of bone marrow in hematologic patients and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Liu Dai; Kang Fu

    1995-01-01

    It is found previously that the changing patterns of bone marrow scintigraphy resulting from hematologic disorders were various. This study focused on discussing the imaging features and regularity of expanded peripheral bone marrow (PBM) in some blood diseases as well as their clinical usefulness. Bone marrow scintigraphy with 99m Tc-sulfur colloid 370∼550 MBq was performed in 130 cases with different types of blood diseases (iron-deficiency anemia 17 cases, chronic hemolytic 13 cases, aplastic 41 cases; leukemia 37 cases, marrow dyshyperplasia syndrome 22 cases) and various stages of the disease (19 cases). The aspiration in PBM comparing with central bone marrow (CBM) was made in 12 aplastic anemia and 10 leukemia patients. The expansion rate of PBM was 58.5% and the various blood diseases had different expansion regions. Repeated imaging showed that the expanded PBM tended to retract during clinical recovery. Aspiration from the expanding PBM defined more active hematopoiesis and higher count of leukemia blast cells than that from iliac crest. The results indicated the presence of 'focal residual leukemia' (FRL) in PBM of complete remission leukemia patient. The result of this study suggested that the expansion patterns of PBM in various hematologic disorders have definite features, which are helpful for the differential diagnosis, valuable for evaluation of the reserved capability of active marrow and prognosis of the patients according to the further analysis of the PBM state. The bone marrow imaging is also an indispensable technique for finding FRL

  6. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  7. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information.

  8. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc., to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc., and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.. These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person′s job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information.

  9. Effect of Linezolid on Hematologic Recovery in Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Following Induction Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedved, Adrienne N; DeFrates, Sean R; Hladnik, Lindsay M; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E

    2016-10-01

    Assess the effects of linezolid on hematologic outcomes in newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) following induction chemotherapy. Single-center, retrospective, observational, cohort study. Large, tertiary care academic medical center. A total of 225 patients ≥ 18 years admitted between December 2010 and 2013 with newly diagnosed AML were assessed for inclusion. Patients were identified through the use of ICD-9 codes and chemotherapy ordered via the computerized physician order entry system. Sixty-eight patients met inclusion criteria and were grouped into two arms based on antimicrobial treatment: LZD group (linezolid plus gram-negative antimicrobial, n=21) or control group (vancomycin or daptomycin plus gram-negative antimicrobial, n=47). The LZD group received linezolid ≥ 72 hours. The control group received vancomycin or daptomycin ≥ 72 hours. If patients switched extended gram-positive therapy, they were included in the LZD group as long as they had received ≥ 72 hours of linezolid. The primary end point of time to neutrophil recovery was not statistically different (28 days for LZD group vs 26 days for control group; p=0.675). The preplanned subgroup analysis of patients who received ≥ 14 days of linezolid demonstrated statistically similar median times to neutrophil recovery (29 days for LZD group vs 26 days for control group; p=0.487). Total duration of extended gram-positive antimicrobial therapy was significantly longer in the LZD group (27 days vs 16 days; plinezolid for extended gram-positive antimicrobial coverage following induction chemotherapy. This study provides new insight with a primary focus on the effects of hematologic outcomes when using linezolid in a well-defined acute leukemia population. Further study is warranted with larger populations to assess the potential adverse effects linezolid may have in patients with acute leukemia. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  10. Cognitive dysfunction among newly diagnosed older patients with hematological malignancy: frequency, clinical indicators and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiki, Sayo; Okuyama, Toru; Sugano, Koji; Kubota, Yosuke; Imai, Fuminobu; Nishioka, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshinori; Iida, Shinsuke; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Ishida, Takashi; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2018-01-01

    Medical staff often overlook or underestimate the presence or severity of cognitive dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to clarify the frequency, clinical indicators and predictors of cognitive dysfunction among newly diagnosed older patients with hematologic malignancy receiving first-line chemotherapy. Patients aged 65 years or over with a primary diagnosis of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma were consecutively recruited. Cognitive dysfunction was evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) twice: before starting chemotherapy (T1) and 1 month later (T2). Participants also underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment at T1. Potential clinical indicators that were associated with cognitive dysfunction were explored via cross-sectional analysis at T1. Predictors of cognitive dysfunction at T2 were also investigated among patients without cognitive dysfunction at T1. A total of 145 participants participated in the study; cognitive dysfunction at T1 was present in 20%. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that lower educational attainment and poorer instrumental activities of daily living were significant clinical indicators of cognitive dysfunction. Among 99 patients who did not have cognitive dysfunction at T1 and underwent cognitive assessment at T2, 7% developed dysfunction. Subjective perception of difficulty remembering at T1 was the only factor which significantly predicted new-onset cognitive dysfunction at T2. The prevalence rate of cognitive dysfunction was non-negligible among older patients with hematologic malignancy before and immediately after initial chemotherapy. Attention to the clinical indicators and predictors found in this study may provide facilitate the identification of cognitive dysfunction in patients with cancer. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The situation of radiation oncology patients' relatives. A stocktaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momm, Felix; Lingg, Sabine; Adebahr, Sonja; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Xander, Carola; Becker, Gerhild

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Recent studies have shown a very high importance of relatives in decisions about medical interventions. Therefore, the situation of this group was investigated in the sense of a stocktaking by interviewing the closest relatives of radiotherapy patients. Interviewed Persons and Methods: In a defined span of time (6 weeks), a total of 470 relatives (evaluable: n = 287, 61%) of radiotherapy patients were interviewed by a newly developed questionnaire about their contentment with their inclusion in the therapy course. Further, they gave information about specific needs of relatives as well as proposals for direct improvements in the context of a radiation therapy. Results: In total, the relatives were satisfied with their inclusion in the radiotherapy course and with the patient care. As an example, more than 95% of the relatives agreed with the statement ''Here in the hospital my ill relative is cared for well.'' Nevertheless, direct possibilities for improvements were found in the interdisciplinary information about oncologic topics and in the organization of the therapy course. Conclusion: In the stocktaking the situation of radiotherapy patients' relatives was generally satisfactory. Further improvements for the future can be expected mainly from interdisciplinary cancer centers having the best suppositions to care for the relatives, if necessary. Structures known from palliative care can be used as a model. (orig.)

  12. Survey of sexual educational needs in radiation oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Sweeney, P.; Wallace, G.; Neish, P.; Vijayakumar, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the knowledge of and need for education about sexuality in oncology patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Patients who received radiation therapy for any disease site were given a self-assessment survey to complete to determine their opinions on sexuality and needs for sexual education. The surveys were given to patients on follow-up visit seen approximately 6 months to 2 years after radiation therapy. All patients were diagnosed with a malignancy and asked to participate on a voluntary basis; confidentiality was ensured by excluding any identifying patient information on the survey form. Respondents were polled with a survey that consisted of 17 questions about their sexual activity. Questions were broadly categorized into the following: definition of sexual activity, frequency of sexual activity prior to and after diagnosis and treatment of cancer, perception of sexual attractiveness, sexual satisfaction in the relationship, patient perception of partner's sexual satisfaction in the relationship, educational needs with regard to sexuality after therapy for cancer, and demographic information. Results: All patients were over age 18, and received radiation therapy as part of the treatment. Patients with all disease sites were included in the survey, regardless of stage or diagnosis. A total of 28 patients completed the survey form, which was approved by our institutional review board. Forty-three percent of patients felt that the cancer diagnosis or treatment effect was the cause of not engaging in sexual intercourse. Fifty percent reported not having the same sexual desire as before the diagnosis of cancer, while 46% reported having the same sexual desire as prior to the diagnosis of cancer. Forty-six percent felt less attractive than before the diagnosis of cancer, while 43% felt the same as before diagnosis. Thirty-six percent of patients received no information with regards to sexuality and cancer, while 18% received

  13. Time-Dependent Changes Of Hematological Parameters In Patients With Acute Organophosphate Poisoning

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    Zerrin Defne Dündar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the prognostic value of the time-dependent changes of hematological parameters in patients with acute organophosphate poisoning. Methods: All patients admitted to emergency departments from 2010 through 2013 due to organophosphate poisoning were enrolled in the study. Demographic data, route of exposure, serum cholinesterase levels, complete blood count results of 5 consecutive days, mechanical ventilation requirement, length of stay in hospital, and outcomes were recorded. Results: Mechanically ventilated patients had higher leukocyte and neutrophil counts than nonventilated patients during the whole follow-up period, and both of them had a trend of decrease in both patient groups. There was no difference between patient groups in terms of lymphocyte counts at day 1, but mechanically ventilated patients had lower lymphocyte counts than nonventilated patients after day 2. Hemoglobin levels had a trend of decrease during the whole follow-up period in both patient groups. Conclusion: The parameters obtained from complete blood count can be used as sensitive follow-up parameters in patients with acute organophosphate poisoning by serial measurement.

  14. Gynecologic oncology patients' satisfaction and symptom severity during palliative chemotherapy

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    Gibbons Heidi E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on quality and satisfaction with care during palliative chemotherapy in oncology patients has been limited. The objective was to assess the association between patient's satisfaction with care and symptom severity and to evaluate test-retest of a satisfaction survey in this study population. Methods A prospective cohort of patients with recurrent gynecologic malignancies receiving chemotherapy were enrolled after a diagnosis of recurrent cancer. Patients completed the Quality of End-of-Life care and satisfaction with treatment scale (QUEST once upon enrollment in an outpatient setting and again a week later. Patients also completed the Mini-Mental Status Exam, the Hospital Anxiety/Depression Scale, a symptom severity scale and a demographic survey. Student's t-test, correlation statistics and percent agreement were used for analysis. Results Data from 39 patients were analyzed. Mean (SD quality of care summary score was 41.95 (2.75 for physicians and 42.23 (5.42 for nurses (maximum score was 45; p = 0.76 for difference in score between providers. Mean (SD satisfaction of care summary score was 29.03 (1.92 for physicians and 29.28 (1.70 for nurses (maximum score was 30; p = 0.49 for difference between providers. Test-retest for 33 patients who completed both QUEST surveys had high percent agreement (74–100%, with the exception of the question regarding the provider arriving late (45 and 53%. There was no correlation between quality and satisfaction of care and symptom severity. Weakness was the most common symptom reported. Symptom severity correlated with depression (r = 0.577 p Conclusion The QUEST Survey has test-retest reliability when used as a written instrument in an outpatient setting. However, there was no correlation between this measure and symptom severity. Patient evaluation of care may be more closely related to the interpersonal aspects of the health care provider relationship than it is to physical

  15. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the

  16. A remarkable hematological and molecular response pattern in a patient with polycythemia vera during combination therapy with simvastatin and alendronate

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    Anders Lindholm Sørensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 57-year old man with polycythemia vera, who had a remarkable hematological and molecular response during treatment with simvastatin and alendronate. The patient was treated with this combination for 56 months, and during this period the patient has been in complete hematological remission. The JAK2-V617F allele burden has dropped from 64% to sustained values below 20%, and follow-up bone marrow biopsies have revealed no change in PV features, without any regular cytoreductive treatment.

  17. Initial psycho-oncological counselling in neuro-oncology: analysis of topics and needs of brain tumour patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipmann, Stephanie; Suero Molina, Eric; Frasch, Anna; Stummer, Walter; Wiewrodt, Dorothee

    2018-02-01

    Diagnosis of a brain tumour is associated with a tremendous disruption of emotional, physical and social well-being. Due to the complexity of the disease and the affection of the central organ, the brain, brain tumour patients differ from other cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the concerns and burdens presented by brain tumour patients during their initial psycho-oncological consultation. We performed a retrospective analysis of 53 patients with the diagnosis of either benign or malignant brain tumour, seeking counsel by a neurosurgeon specialised in psycho-oncology. We performed a thematic analysis of the interviews at first consultation identifying themes and patterns and created thematic categories. The main concerns of the patients presented during the first consultations were psychological problems, reported by 40 patients (75.5%). Death and dying was mentioned by more than half of the patients (n = 30, 56.6%). In addition, 62.3% of the patients (n = 33) asked for information regarding the medical treatment and diagnosis. With our study, we created greater awareness of the psychological needs of brain tumour patients in order to define treatment strategies for this important aspect of disease. We showed that there is a need for patients to talk about death even during the initial consultation. Psycho-oncologist in a neuro-oncological setting should be prepared for topics like that and should have a neurosurgical background or collaborate with members of the surgical team in order to provide the patients with medical details and to better understand the impact of the disease.

  18. Impact of Interstitial Pneumonia on the Survival and Risk Factors Analysis of Patients with Hematological Malignancy

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    Wei-Liang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The emergence of interstitial pneumonia (IP in patients with hematological malignancy (HM is becoming a challenging scenario in current practice. However, detailed characterization and investigation of outcomes and risk factors on survival have not been addressed. Methods. We conducted a retrospective study of 42,584 cancer patients covering the period between 1996 and 2008 using the institutional cancer registry system. Among 816 HM patients, 61 patients with IP were recognized. The clinical features, laboratory results, and histological types were studied to determine the impact of IP on survival and identify the profile of prognostic factors. Results. HM patients with IP showed a significant worse survival than those without IP in the 5-year overall survival (P=0.027. The overall survival showed no significant difference between infectious pneumonia and noninfectious interstitial pneumonia (IIP versus nIIP (P=0.323. In a multivariate Cox regression model, leukocyte and platelet count were associated with increased risk of death. Conclusions. The occurrence of IP in HM patients is associated with increased mortality. Of interest, nIIP is a prognostic indicator in patients with lymphoma but not in patients with leukemia. However, aggressive management of IP in patients with HM is strongly advised, and further prospective survey is warranted.

  19. High prevalence of malnutrition among patients with solid non-hematological tumors as found by using skinfold and circumference measurements

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    Adriana Garófolo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Malnutrition in cancer patients has many causes. Nutritional status is usually assessed from weight/height indices. These present limitations for the nutritional assessment of cancer patients: their weights include tumor mass, and lean mass changes are not reflected in weight/height indices. The objective was to evaluate differences between two anthropometric methods and compare deficits, in non-hematological tumor patients and hematological disease patients. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study at Instituto de Oncologia Pediátrica, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Children and adolescents were evaluated between March 1998 and January 2000. Traditional anthropometric measurements were obtained in the first month of treatment (induction therapy, by weight-for-height (W/H using z-scores index for children and body mass index (BMI for adolescents. Body composition evaluations consisted of specific anthropometric measurements: triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC and arm muscle circumference (AMC. Data were analyzed to compare nutritional assessment methods for diagnosing malnutrition prevalence. The chi-squared test was used for comparative analyses between tumor patients and hematological disease patients. RESULTS: Analysis was done on 127 patients with complete data. Higher percentages of deficits were found among tumor patients, by W/H z-scores or BMI and by MUAC and AMC. Higher percentages of deficits were shown by TSFT (40.2% and MUAC (35.4% than by W/H z-scores or BMI (18.9%. CONCLUSION: Non-hematological tumor patients presented higher malnutrition prevalence than did hematological disease patients. Body composition measurements by TSFT and MUAC detected more patients with malnutrition than did W/H or BMI.

  20. Obturator prostheses in post-oncological maxillofacial patients: our experience

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    Edoardo Brauner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical procedures for tumors of the paranasal sinus, palatal epithelium, minor salivary glands or osteosarcoma of the upper jaw require a partial or total maxillectomy of the upper jaw. When the surgical procedure and/or radiation therapy result in a communication, the solution is necessarily prosthetical, through a palatal obturator that recreates a partition between the oral and nasal cavities. Methods: Authors selected 32 post-oncological patients with the upper maxilla completely edentulous prosthetically rehabilitated with a palatal obturator. Results: No serious complications or adverse reactions were reported during the fabrication of surgical or definitive obturators. All patients stated to benefit the palatal obturator in terms of quality of life. Conclusion: Prosthetic rehabilitation of edentulous maxillectomy with oral communication is a demanding challenge for the prosthodontist. The goals of prosthetic rehabilitation include separation of oral and nasal cavities to allow adequate deglutition and articulation of teeth, restore midfacial soft tissue contour and a satisfactory esthetic outcome. When, for any reason, the patient is not a suitable candidate for an implant-retained overdenture, a total removable prosthesis should ensure the most comfort in terms of swallowing, phonation and aesthetics.

  1. (1, 3)-β-D-glucan assay for diagnosing invasive fungal infections in critically ill patients with hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, Elie; Guigue, Nicolas; Darmon, Michael; Mokart, Djamel; Lemiale, Virginie; Kouatchet, Achille; Mayaux, Julien; Vincent, François; Nyunga, Martine; Bruneel, Fabrice; Rabbat, Antoine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Lebert, Christine; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Benoit, Dominique; Pene, Frédéric

    2016-04-19

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are life-threatening complications of hematological malignancies that must be diagnosed early to allow effective treatment. Few data are available on the performance of serum (1-3)-β-D-glucan (BG) assays for diagnosing IFI in patients with hematological malignancies admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, 737 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies admitted to 17 ICUs routinely underwent a BG assay at ICU admission. IFIs were diagnosed using standard criteria applied by three independent specialists. Among the 737 patients, 439 (60%) required mechanical ventilation and 273 (37%) died before hospital discharge. Factors known to alter BG concentrations were identified in most patients. IFIs were documented in 78 (10.6%) patients (invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, n = 54; Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, n = 13; candidemia, n = 13; and fusarium infections, n = 3). BG concentrations (pg/mL) were higher in patients with than without IFI (144 (77-510) vs. 50 (30-125), 80 pg/mL were IFI, admission SOFA score, autologous bone-marrow or hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, and microbiologically documented bacterial infection. In conclusion, in unselected critically ill hematology patients with factors known to affect serum BG, this biomarker showed only moderate diagnostic performance and rarely detected IFI. However, the negative predictive value was high. Studies are needed to assess whether a negative BG test indicates that antifungal de-escalation is safe.

  2. Oncology in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Patient/Family Education for Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patients: Consensus Recommendations from a Children’s Oncology Group Expert Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landier, Wendy; Ahern, JoAnn; Barakat, Lamia P.; Bhatia, Smita; Bingen, Kristin M.; Bondurant, Patricia G.; Cohn, Susan L.; Dobrozsi, Sarah K.; Haugen, Maureen; Herring, Ruth Anne; Hooke, Mary C.; Martin, Melissa; Murphy, Kathryn; Newman, Amy R.; Rodgers, Cheryl C.; Ruccione, Kathleen S.; Sullivan, Jeneane; Weiss, Marianne; Withycombe, Janice; Yasui, Lise; Hockenberry, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data to support evidence-based practices in the provision of patient/family education in the context of a new childhood cancer diagnosis. Since the majority of children with cancer are treated on pediatric oncology clinical trials, lack of effective patient/family education has the potential to negatively affect both patient and clinical trial outcomes. The Children’s Oncology Group Nursing Discipline convened an interprofessional expert panel from within and beyond pediatric oncology to review available and emerging evidence and develop expert consensus recommendations regarding harmonization of patient/family education practices for newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients across institutions. Five broad principles, with associated recommendations, were identified by the panel, including recognition that (1) in pediatric oncology, patient/family education is family-centered; (2) a diagnosis of childhood cancer is overwhelming and the family needs time to process the diagnosis and develop a plan for managing ongoing life demands before they can successfully learn to care for the child; (3) patient/family education should be an interprofessional endeavor with 3 key areas of focus: (a) diagnosis/treatment, (b) psychosocial coping, and (c) care of the child; (4) patient/family education should occur across the continuum of care; and (5) a supportive environment is necessary to optimize learning. Dissemination and implementation of these recommendations will set the stage for future studies that aim to develop evidence to inform best practices, and ultimately to establish the standard of care for effective patient/family education in pediatric oncology. PMID:27385664

  4. CT features of neutropenic enterocolitis in adult patients with hematological diseases undergoing chemotherapy

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    Vogel, M.N.; Brodoefel, H.; Claussen, C.D.; Horger, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Goeppert, B. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Pathology; Maksimovic, O.; Faul, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the features of neutropenic enterocolitis (NE) in adults. Materials and Methods: Chart and radiology report reviews were used to identify neutropenic patients with hematological diseases undergoing chemotherapy, who had CT scans for the clarification of abdominal symptoms between October 2003 and October 2009. Patients with any cause for enteritis other than NE were excluded. The scans were analyzed with respect to imaging features and location. Morphological findings were correlated with clinical data. Results: Thirty-one patients with NE (median age 46 years; range 20 - 75) could be identified. Wall thickening and hyperemia could be found in all bowel segments from jejunum to rectum. The right hemicolon was the most frequent location in 19 patients (61 %). Involvement was generalized in 6 patients (19 %) and segmental in 25 cases (81 %). The longer the duration of neutropenia, the more likely generalized involvement of the bowel was. In 8 patients who underwent CT follow-up, the appearance of bowel segments had completely (n = 5) or partially (n = 3) returned to normal at the latest 14 days after the initial diagnosis. Eight patients (26 %) died 1 - 78 days after NE, 7 of who had previously recovered from NE. Conclusion: CT findings are useful for the diagnosis of NE and should be considered even in the presence of isolated small bowel involvement. The terms NE and typhlitis should thus no longer be used synonymously. (orig.)

  5. Hematological parameters in sick cell anemia patients with and without priapism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Sagir G.; Ibrahim, Umma A.; Hassan, Abba W.

    2006-01-01

    Priapism was associated with certain hematological parameters in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients in one report but not in another. We studied differences haematological parameters between SCA patients with and without priapism. Eighteen patients with SCA who presented with acute priapism during the years 2001-2004 were compared with age-and sex-matched SCA patients without priapism with respect to hematocrit, reticulocyte count, level of irreversibly sickled cells (ISC), percentage of haemoglobin (Hb F), total leukocyte and platelet counts. SCA patients with priapism had a mean hematocrit of 0.28 L/L, which was significantly higher than mean hematocrit value of 0.24 L/L (P<0.05) in patients without priapism. The mean reticulocyte count of 8% in patients with priapism was siginificantly lower than mean reticulocyte count of 12% (P<0.05) in patients without priapism. The level of ISC of 3% in patients with priapism was significantly lower than the level of 6.5% (P<0.05) in patients without priapism. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean levels of Hb F (7% vs. 6%). Patients with priapism had a mean leukocyte count that did not significantly differ from values in patients without priapism. SCA patients with priapism had a lower rate of hemolysis resulting in a higher hematocrit and greater blood viscosity, which increased the risk of corpora cavernosal sickling and blockade. Hence, a relatively higher hematocrit is risk factor for the development priapism in patients with sickle cell anemia. (author)

  6. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  7. Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients with Hematological Malignancies: Emergence of Resistant Pathogens and New Antifungal Therapies

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    Maria N. Gamaletsou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections caused by drug-resistant organisms are an emerging threat to heavily immunosuppressed patients with hematological malignancies. Modern early antifungal treatment strategies, such as prophylaxis and empirical and preemptive therapy, result in long-term exposure to antifungal agents, which is a major driving force for the development of resistance. The extended use of central venous catheters, the nonlinear pharmacokinetics of certain antifungal agents, neutropenia, other forms of intense immunosuppression, and drug toxicities are other contributing factors. The widespread use of agricultural and industrial fungicides with similar chemical structures and mechanisms of action has resulted in the development of environmental reservoirs for some drug-resistant fungi, especially azole-resistant Aspergillus species, which have been reported from four continents. The majority of resistant strains have the mutation TR34/L98H, a finding suggesting that the source of resistance is the environment. The global emergence of new fungal pathogens with inherent resistance, such as Candida auris, is a new public health threat. The most common mechanism of antifungal drug resistance is the induction of efflux pumps, which decrease intracellular drug concentrations. Overexpression, depletion, and alteration of the drug target are other mechanisms of resistance. Mutations in the ERG11 gene alter the protein structure of C-demethylase, reducing the efficacy of antifungal triazoles. Candida species become echinocandin-resistant by mutations in FKS genes. A shift in the epidemiology of Candida towards resistant non-albicans Candida spp. has emerged among patients with hematological malignancies. There is no definite association between antifungal resistance, as defined by elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations, and clinical outcomes in this population. Detection of genes or mutations conferring resistance with the use of molecular methods

  8. Determinaton of Depression, Anxiety and Hopelessness Situations at Parents whose Children Are Followed in Gulhane Military Medical Faculty, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Clinics Due to Any Malignancy or Chronic Disease

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    Mustafa Kamil Tuna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic systemic diseases in childhood have negatively affecting the quality of life and debilitating effects for both children and parents. In our study, we investigated depression, anxiety and hopelessness situations at parents of children with these diseases. Materials and methods: The study was done at parents of children diagnosed with malignancy or chronic disease in GATA Department of Pediatrics Heath and Disease, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Clinics. Beck Depression Scale, Beck Anxiety Scale and Beck Hopelessness Scale were applied to the participants. Results: Parents of children, who are followed due to malignancy or chronic disease in department of pediatrics heath and disease, pediatric hematology and oncology clinics, constituted the study group. 60 mothers and 51 fathers as study group and 64 mothers and 45 fathers as control group were enrolled in the study between 1st July 2009 and 1st June 2010. The mean age of the parents in study group was 35,7±5,1 and 33,3 5,6 age in control group. The depression score was significantly higher statistically in study group (p=0,035. No difference was fond for the anxiety and hopelessness scores between the groups (p=0,064 and p=0,695 respectively. There was no difference for depression, hopelessness and anxiety scores between mothers and fathers of the children (p=0,217, p=0,447, p=0,102, respectively. Conclusion: Without gender discrimination the parents of children with malignancy and chronic disease are in the risk group for depression. It is necessary to support the parents both socially and psychologically. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(5.000: 577-582

  9. Antigen Expression on Blast Cells and Hematological Parameters at Presentation in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, S.; Bukhari, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the expression of various antigens on the leukemic blasts and to determine the hematological parameters, in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) patients at presentation. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: King Edward Medical University, Lahore and Hameed Latif Hospital, Lahore, from February 2013 to March 2014. Methodology: A total of 50 newly diagnosed and untreated patients of ALL were selected from Mayo Hospital and Hameed Latif Hospital. These patients included both genders and all age groups. Hemoglobin, total leukocyte count and platelet count were determined on hematology analyser-Sysmex-Kx-2I. Blast cell percentage was estimated on Giemsa stained blood smears. Immuno phenotyping was done on bone marrow samples by 5 colour flow cytometery on Beckman Counter Navious Flow cytometer. An acute leukemia panel of 23 antibodies was used. The data was entered and analyzed in SPSS version 22. Results: Of the 50 ALL patients, 36 (72 percentage) were B-ALL and 14 (28 percentage) T-ALL. There were 18 (36 percentage) children and 32 (64 percentage) adults. T-ALL included 22 percentage of the childhood and 31 percentage of the adult cases. Immuno phenotypic analysis showed that CD19, CD79a and CD20 were B-lineage specific markers whereas cCD3, CD3 and CD5 were T-lineage specific. CD10 was the most sensitive marker for B-ALL and CD7 was the most sensitive marker of T-ALL. TdT was expressed in 92 percentage B-ALL and 71 percentage T-ALL cases, CD34 in 58 percentage and 43 percentage cases and CD45 in 83 percentage and 100 percentage respectively. High leukocyte count (> 50 x 109/L) was present in 58 percentage cases. Hemoglobin was < 10 g/dl in 74 percentage patients and platelet count was below 20 x 109/Lin 12 percentage patients. Leukocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet count and blast cell percentage did not show a significant difference in the two ALL immuno types. Conclusion: The frequency of T-ALL is higher in childhood

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics with Extended Dosing of CC-486 in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

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    Eric Laille

    Full Text Available CC-486 (oral azacitidine is an epigenetic modifier in development for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. In part 1 of this two-part study, a 7-day CC-486 dosing schedule showed clinical activity, was generally well tolerated, and reduced DNA methylation. Extending dosing of CC-486 beyond 7 days would increase duration of azacitidine exposure. We hypothesized that extended dosing would therefore provide more sustained epigenetic activity. Reported here are the pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD profiles of CC-486 extended dosing schedules in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML or acute myeloid leukemia (AML from part 2 of this study. PK and/or PD data were available for 59 patients who were sequentially assigned to 1 of 4 extended CC-486 dosing schedules: 300mg once-daily or 200mg twice-daily for 14 or 21 days per 28-day cycle. Both 300mg once-daily schedules and the 200mg twice-daily 21-day schedule significantly (all P < .05 reduced global DNA methylation in whole blood at all measured time points (days 15, 22, and 28 of the treatment cycle, with sustained hypomethylation at cycle end compared with baseline. CC-486 exposures and reduced DNA methylation were significantly correlated. Patients who had a hematologic response had significantly greater methylation reductions than non-responding patients. These data demonstrate that extended dosing of CC-486 sustains epigenetic effects through the treatment cycle.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00528983.

  11. Gene therapy imaging in patients for oncological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penuelas, Ivan; Haberkorn, Uwe; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2005-01-01

    Thus far, traditional methods for evaluating gene transfer and expression have been shown to be of limited value in the clinical arena. Consequently there is a real need to develop new methods that could be repeatedly and safely performed in patients for such purposes. Molecular imaging techniques for gene expression monitoring have been developed and successfully used in animal models, but their sensitivity and reproducibility need to be tested and validated in human studies. In this review, we present the current status of gene therapy-based anticancer strategies and show how molecular imaging, and more specifically radionuclide-based approaches, can be used in gene therapy procedures for oncological applications in humans. The basis of gene expression imaging is described and specific uses of these non-invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring illustrated. Molecular imaging of transgene expression in humans and evaluation of response to gene-based therapeutic procedures are considered. The advantages of molecular imaging for whole-body monitoring of transgene expression as a way to permit measurement of important parameters in both target and non-target organs are also analyzed. The relevance of this technology for evaluation of the necessary vector dose and how it can be used to improve vector design are also examined. Finally, the advantages of designing a gene therapy-based clinical trial with imaging fully integrated from the very beginning are discussed and future perspectives for the development of these applications outlined. (orig.)

  12. Agonist-induced platelet reactivity correlates with bleeding in haemato-oncological patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batman, B.; van Bladel, E. R.; van Hamersveld, M.; Pasker-De Jong, Pieternel C M; Korporaal, S. J.A.; Urbanus, R. T.; Roest, M.; Boven, Leonie A; Fijnheer, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Prophylactic platelet transfusions are administered to prevent bleeding in haemato-oncological patients. However, bleeding still occurs, despite these transfusions. This practice is costly and not without risk. Better predictors of bleeding are needed, and flow cytometric

  13. Hematologic emergencies

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    Daniele Vallisa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the surprising progress made in other areas of hematology (advances in the understanding of leukemogenesis, improved transplant techniques has been conspicuously absent in the management of hematologic emergencies. And yet, every step toward greater knowledge, every new treatment option will be of little value unless we are able to manage the acute complications of hematologic diseases. These complications are better defined as hematologic emergencies, and they are characterized by a high rate of mortality. This review is based on a search of the literature that was initially confined to articles published in the journal Hematology from 2000 to 2009. The search was then extended to the Cochrane Library and to Pub Med in February 2010 with the following Keywords emergencies; urgencies; hematology. The same key words were employed in a search of the archives of Blood and the New England Journal of Medicine from 2000 to 2010. The results confirm that hematologic emergencies can be caused by hematologic malignancies as well as by non-neoplastic hematologic diseases. Within the former category; this review examines the causes; manifestations; treatment and prevention of disseminated intravascular coagulation; superior vena caval syndrome; spinal cord compression; tumor lysis syndrome; hyperleukocytosis; and hypercalcemia. We also review emergency situations associated with non-neoplatic haematological diseases; such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; drug-induced hemolytic anemia; and acute sickle-cell crisis.

  14. [Fungemia due to Trichosporon asahii in a patient with hematological malignancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odero, Valle; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Agudo, Lidia; García-Tapia, Ana M; Guerrero-Lozano, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel A

    2015-01-01

    Trichosporonosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the genus Trichosporon. The majority of cases of invasive trichosporonosis occurs in immunocompromised individuals. We describe a case of disseminated infection by Trichosporon asahii in a hematology patient. A 52-year-old man diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed a febrile episode during the third cycle of the induction chemotherapy. The blood cultures were positive after 24h incubation, showing elongated structures compatible with fungal elements in the Gram stain. The identification of the fungus as Trichosporon asahii was carried out by the assimilation of compounds of carbon and the amplification and sequencing of the D1/D2 domain and the internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA. The fungus was also isolated from the pustular lesions that the patient had in the chest. After treatment with amphotericin B, the patient progressed satisfactorily. Trichosporon asahii is an emergent pathogen in immunosupressed patients and its presence should not be considered as colonization, as there is risk of invasive infection. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Infectious Complications of Radiologically Inserted Hickman Catheters in Patients with Hematologic Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, Jeannette; Overhagen, Hans van; Wielenga, Jenne; Marie, Siem de; Nouwen, Jan; Ridder, Marie A.J. de; Lameris, Johan S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of infections and its influence on the survival of radiologically inserted Hickman catheters (HCs) in patients with hematologic disorders and to determine factors associated with premature HC removal. Methods: Survival and complications of 175 HCs in 115 patients were studied retrospectively. To describe the data the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used, using the date of HC removal due to HC-related infection as endpoint. A stratified Cox regression model was used to determine explanatory factors. Results: Seventy (40%) HCs were removed prematurely because of proven or probable HC-related infections. The incidence of infection leading to HC removal was 4.78 per 1000 catheter-days for proven HC infections. Univariate analysis revealed that acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, or treatment for these diseases, gender, each subsequent catheter in the same patient and insertion site increased the risk of premature removal of the catheter due to infection. Conclusion: Infection is a major problem in patients with HCs. Unfortunately, the factors associated with increased infection rates that were found in this study cannot be influenced. Further studies are necessary to determine the role of environmental conditions in a radiology suite in relation to the risk of developing a catheter-related infection

  16. IMMUNE STATE IN PATIENTS WITH HEMATOLOGICAL MALIGNANCIES AT LATE TERMS AFTER AUTOLOGOUS HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

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    N. V. Minaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT is one of the most effective methods for treatment of patients with various forms of hemoblastoses, both in adults and children. However, high-dose chemotherapy protocols used in this procedure are characterized by pronounced myeloand immunotoxicity. Appropriate data concerning immune state at long terms after high-dose chemotherapy and auto-HSCT are sparse and controversial, and there is no consensus on time dynamics of immune system reconstitution. The aim of this study was a comprehensive evaluation of immunity in recipients of auto-HSCT at longer terms. Clinical and immunological testing was performed in ninety-eight patients with hematological malignancies before starting a high-dose chemotherapy, and at late post-transplant period. The state of cellular immunity was assessed as expression of surface CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocyte antigens. Humoral immunity was evaluated by serum IgG, IgA, and IgM levels. The studies have revealed disorders of cellular and humoral immunity, as well as nonspecific immune resistance factors in recipients of autologous hematopoietic stem cells at late terms post-transplant. Immune reconstitution in patients receiving highdose consolidation treatment followed by auto-HSCT takes longer time than in patients who did not receive autologous hematopoietic stem cells. Severity of these disturbances and immune reconstitution rates depend on the type of conditioning regimen, and the source of haematopoietic stem cells used for transplantation.

  17. Evaluation of a medication intensity screening tool used in malignant hematology and bone marrow transplant services to identify patients at risk for medication-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Mariana; Bondarenka, Carolyn; Luehrs-Hayes, Genevieve; Perez, Andy

    2018-06-01

    Background In 2014, a screening tool was implemented at Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) Health to identify patients who are at risk for medication-related events. Patients are classified as high-risk if they meet one of the following criteria: receiving anticoagulation therapy, taking more than 10 scheduled medications upon admission, or readmission within the past 30 days. The goal of this study was to determine risk criteria specific to the malignant hematology (MH) and bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients. Methods A retrospective chart review of 114 patients admitted and discharged from the MH/BMT services between 1 September 2015 and 31 October 2015 was performed. A pharmacist-conducted medication history was completed and documented, and all interventions at admission and throughout hospitalization were categorized by severity and by value of service. The primary objective was to evaluate if patients in the MH/BMT services have more medication-related interventions documented upon admission compared with patients who are not screened as high risk. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the different types and severities of interventions made by pharmacists during the entire hospital stay, and to determine if there are certain characteristics that can help identify hematology/oncology high-risk patients. Results More interventions documented upon admission in the high-risk group as a whole when compared with the not high-risk group (73 vs. 31), but when normalized per patients in each group, there was an equal number of interventions (1.0). The most common interventions were to modify regimen (36%) and discontinue therapy (16%). The patient characteristics associated with high-risk included neutropenia, lower average platelet counts on admission, and longer length of stay. Conclusion The screening tool does not further differentiate an already complex MH/BMT patient population. Pharmacists may be more useful at capturing errors or changes during

  18. Hematological evaluation of splenomegaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.; Anwar, M.; Ayyub, M.; Ejaz, A.; Nadeem, M.; Qureshi, A.H.; Qamar, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To find out the relative frequency of clinical conditions associated with splenomegaly that require hematological evaluation in our set up. Subjects and Methods: Patients of either gender or all age groups with palpable spleen was included. Patients with splenomegaly due to liver disease, malarial parasites on thick or thin blood film, positive Widal test, or positive blood cultures were excluded from study. Patients were initially evaluated with clinical history, microscopic examination of blood smear, and blood counts. Depending upon provisional diagnosis bone marrow examination or investigations for hemolytic anemia were performed. Results: One hundred patients were received. Seventy-eight patients were adults and 22 patients were of pediatric age group. In the adults, hematological malignancies were seen in 37%, malarial parasites in bone marrow in 20.5%, megaloblastic anemia in 13%, bacterial infections in 9%, hemolytic anemia in 9%, tropical splenomegaly in 5%, and positive bone marrow culture for salmonella in 6.5%. In children, hematological evaluation revealed hematological malignancies in 18%, beta thalassaemia in 55%, other hemolytic anemias in 13.5%, congenital sideroblastic anemia in 4.5%, and storage disorder in 9%. Conclusion: Hematological workup is informative in most of the cases. Bone marrow examination is the key investigation, hematological malignancies constituted 37% of the adult and 18% of pediatric age group patients. Hemolytic anemia constituted 68% of pediatric age group. (author)

  19. Effects of chemotherapy on changes of serum cytokines (TNF, IL-6, TGF-α) levels in patients with hematologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Liping; Ye Yixiu; Shi Bing; Liu Lihui; Liu Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum cytokines (TNF, IL-6, TGF-α) levels during chemotherapy in patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods: Serum TNF, IL-6 and TGF-α levels were measured with RIA in 92 patients with hematologic malignancies both before and after chemotherapy as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before chemotherapy, serum levels of TNF and IL-6 were significantly higher in all the patients than those in controls (P<0.01). After chemotherapy at remission, the values dropped considerably (vs before chemotherapy, P<0.01). The serum TGF-α levels before chemotherapy in these patients were also significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.01) with the exception of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (vs controls, not mach different) and patients with multiple myeloma (significantly lower than those in controls, P<0.01). The values were greatly corrected after chemotherapy in all these patients (vs before chemotherapy, P<0.01). In the patients relapsed (acute leukemia, n=4; chronic myelogenic leukemia, n=4; myelodysplastic syndrome, n=5), the cytokines levels rose abruptly to pre-chemotherapy levels or even higher. Conclusion: Serum TNF, IL-6 and TGF-α levels in patients with hematologic malignancies were closely related to the disease status and were of prognostic value. (authors)

  20. Atypical Presentation of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection Refractory to Treatment With Acyclovir in 2 Hematologic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Rodríguez, D; Sendagorta Cudós, E; Rueda Carnero, J M; Herranz Pinto, P

    2017-12-01

    Herpesvirus infections are not uncommon in hematologic patients. Our first patient, diagnosed with chronic lymphatic leukemia, presented extensive genital herpes infection refractory to treatment with acyclovir and with a partial response to foscarnet, which had to be withdrawn due to systemic adverse effects. The second patient, diagnosed with follicular Hodgkin lymphoma, presented hypertrophic herpes infection refractory to treatment with acyclovir but that responded to intralesional cidofovir and topical imiquimod. As in other immunodepressed patients, herpesvirus infection in hematologic patients can present atypical manifestations, as well as resistance to treatments that act via the viral thymidine kinase. A high level of clinical suspicion is therefore needed to make an early diagnosis, together with extensive knowledge of the different treatments available. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation Oncology and Online Patient Education Materials: Deviating From NIH and AMA Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Arpan V; Hansberry, David R; Agarwal, Nitin; Clump, David A; Heron, Dwight E

    2016-11-01

    Physicians encourage patients to be informed about their health care options, but much of the online health care-related resources can be beneficial only if patients are capable of comprehending it. This study's aim was to assess the readability level of online patient education resources for radiation oncology to conclude whether they meet the general public's health literacy needs as determined by the guidelines of the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association (AMA). Radiation oncology-related internet-based patient education materials were downloaded from 5 major professional websites (American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American Brachytherapy Society, RadiologyInfo.org, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group). Additional patient education documents were downloaded by searching for key radiation oncology phrases using Google. A total of 135 articles were downloaded and assessed for their readability level using 10 quantitative readability scales that are widely accepted in the medical literature. When all 10 assessment tools for readability were taken into account, the 135 online patient education articles were written at an average grade level of 13.7 ± 2.0. One hundred nine of the 135 articles (80.7%) required a high school graduate's comprehension level (12th-grade level or higher). Only 1 of the 135 articles (0.74%) met the AMA and NIH recommendations for patient education resources to be written between the third-grade and seventh-grade levels. Radiation oncology websites have patient education material written at an educational level above the NIH and AMA recommendations; as a result, average American patients may not be able to fully understand them. Rewriting radiation oncology patient education resources would likely contribute to the patients' understanding of their health and treatment options, making each physician-patient interaction more productive

  2. Seasonal clustering of sinopulmonary mucormycosis in patients with hematologic malignancies at a large comprehensive cancer center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobini Sivagnanam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive Mucorales infections (IMI lead to significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. The role of season and climatic conditions in case clustering of IMI remain poorly understood. Methods Following detection of a cluster of sinopulmonary IMIs in patients with hematologic malignancies, we reviewed center-based medical records of all patients with IMIs and other invasive fungal infections (IFIs between January of 2012 and August of 2015 to assess for case clustering in relation to seasonality. Results A cluster of 7 patients were identified with sinopulmonary IMIs (Rhizopus microsporus/azygosporus, 6; Rhizomucor pusillus, 1 during a 3 month period between June and August of 2014. All patients died or were discharged to hospice. The cluster was managed with institution of standardized posaconazole prophylaxis to high-risk patients and patient use of N-95 masks when outside of protected areas on the inpatient service. Review of an earlier study period identified 11 patients with IMIs of varying species over the preceding 29 months without evidence of clustering. There were 9 total IMIs in the later study period (12 month post-initial cluster with 5 additional cases in the summer months, again suggesting seasonal clustering. Extensive environmental sampling did not reveal a source of mold. Using local climatological data abstracted from National Centers for Environmental Information the clusters appeared to be associated with high temperatures and low precipitation. Conclusions Sinopulmonary Mucorales clusters at our center had a seasonal variation which appeared to be related to temperature and precipitation. Given the significant mortality associated with IMIs, local climatic conditions may need to be considered when considering center specific fungal prevention and prophylaxis strategies for high-risk patients.

  3. The need for psycho-oncological support for melanoma patients: Central role of patients' self-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Simone; Teufel, Martin; Schaeffeler, Norbert; Keim, Ulrike; Garbe, Claus; Eigentler, Thomas Kurt; Zipfel, Stephan; Forschner, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Despite an increasing number of promising treatment options, only a limited number of studies concerning melanoma patients' psycho-oncological distress have been carried out. However, multiple screening tools are in use to assess the need for psycho-oncological support. This study aimed first to identify parameters in melanoma patients that are associated with a higher risk for being psycho-oncologically distressed and second to compare patients' self-evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support with the results of established screening tools.We performed a cross-sectional study including 254 melanoma patients from the Center for Dermatooncology at the University of Tuebingen. The study was performed between June 2010 and February 2013. Several screening instruments were included: the Distress Thermometer (DT), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the patients' subjective evaluation concerning psycho-oncological support. Binary logistic regression was performed to identify factors that indicate the need for psycho-oncological support.Patients' subjective evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support, female gender, and psychotherapeutic or psychiatric treatment at present or in the past had the highest impact on values above threshold in the DT. The odds ratio of patients' self-evaluation (9.89) was even higher than somatic factors like female gender (1.85), duration of illness (0.99), or increasing age (0.97). Patients' self-evaluation concerning the need for psycho-oncological support indicated a moderate correlation with the results of the screening tools included.In addition to the results obtained by screening tools like the DT, we could demonstrate that patients' self-evaluation is an important instrument to identify patients who need psycho-oncological support.

  4. Feasibility of iFISH patterns in hematologic malignancies among Congolese patients at Kinshasa University clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille Solange Nganga Nkanga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the feasibility of detecting Ph1 in leukemia patients in the Kinshasa University Clinics in the Democratic Republic of Congo, at KU Leuven, Belgium. Methods: Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples with chronic myeloid leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia or acute leukocytes leukemia were obtained from 32 patients in Kinshasa University clinics in the Democratic Republic of Congo and transferred to KU Leuven in Belgium for iFISH feasibility. Ph1 was detected by using a remote analysis of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH. Results: Out of the 32 patients involved in this study, 65.6% (n = 21 of the cases were successfully tested, of which 52.4% (n = 11 were iFISH positives for the variant t(9;22 (presence of Ph1 in chronic myeloid leukemia samples and 47.6% (n = 10 negatives in all subtypes of hematological malignancies. However, there was a female predominance in chronic myeloid leukemia samples Ph1-positives by iFISH, whereas no sexual influence was observed on acute subtypes of leukemia. Conclusions: iFISH analysis is feasible on samples obtained from remote sites in the Democratic Republic of Congo. However, the optimization of the sample storage is necessary to further improve iFISH's performance. Keywords: iFISH, Ph1, Democratic Republic of Congo, Leukemia, Bone marrow, Blood

  5. Psycho-oncology: structure and profiles of European centers treating patients with gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenburg, Annette; Amant, Frederic; Aerts, Leen; Pascal, Astrid; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Kesic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    Psycho-oncological counseling should be an integrated part of modern cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the structures and interests of psycho-oncology services within European Society of Gynecological Oncology (ESGO) centers. In 2010, a survey, which consisted of 15 questions regarding organization of psycho-oncological services and interests in training and research, was sent to all ESGO-accredited centers (n = 41). The response rate was 65.8% (27 centers). 96.3% (n = 26) of the surveys came from universities, and 3.7% (n = 1) came from nonacademic institutions. Most of the institutions (92.6%, n = 25) offer psycho-oncological care, mainly by psychologists (64%, n = 16) or psycho-oncologists (48%, n = 12). Fifty-two percent of patients are evaluated for sexual dysfunction as sequelae of their disease or treatment-related adverse effects. Fifty-two percent (n = 14) of institutions offer psychological support for cancer care providers. Eighty-five percent (n = 23) of all centers are interested in psycho-oncological training, and the preferred teaching tools are educational workshops (87%). The main issues of interest are sexual problems in patients with cancer, communication and interpersonal skills, responses of patients and their families, anxiety and adjustment disorders, and palliative care. Eighty-five percent (n = 17) of the 20 institutions look for research in the field of psycho-oncology, and 55% (n = 11) of those are already involved in some kind of research. Although psycho-oncological care is provided in most of the consulted ESGO accredited centers, almost 50% of women lack information about sexual problems. The results of the survey show the need for and interest in psycho-oncology training and research, including sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, psychological support should be offered to all cancer care providers.

  6. Addressing changed sexual functioning in cancer patients: A cross-sectional survey among Dutch oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krouwel, E M; Nicolai, M P J; van Steijn-van Tol, A Q M J; Putter, H; Osanto, S; Pelger, R C M; Elzevier, H W

    2015-12-01

    In most types of cancer, the disease and its treatment can result in altered sexual function (SF). Oncology nurses are strategically placed to address SF since they have frequent patient interaction. Our aim was to establish their knowledge about and attitudes to SF in oncology care and identify their perceived barriers to addressing the subject. A 37-item questionnaire was administered during the 2012 Dutch Oncology Nursing Congress and mailed to 241 Dutch oncology nursing departments. The majority of 477 nurses (87.6%) agreed that discussing SF is their responsibility. Discussing SF routinely is performed by 33.4% of these nurses, consultations mainly consisted of mentioning treatment side-effects affecting SF (71.3%). There were significant differences depending on experience, knowledge, age, academic degree and department policy. Nurses ≤44 years old (p oncology experience (p = 0.001), insufficient knowledge (p oncology nurses consider counselling on sexual issues to be an important responsibility, in line with discussing other side-effects caused by the disease or its treatment. Nevertheless, cancer patients may not routinely be receiving a sexual health evaluation by oncology nurses. Results emphasize the potential benefit of providing knowledge, including practical training and a complete department protocol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Frequency of red cell, leukocytic and platelet alloantibodies in patients with hematological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available History of multiple transfusions in patients with hematological diseases increases the likelihood of immunization to donor blood cells antigensand immunological complications development. Incidence of alloantibodies development in this patients was assessed in this work. Alloantibodies detection was performed in patients with aplastic anemia, acute leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and autoimmune thrombocytopenia. 9696 patients were included in this study. Frequency of alloantibodies to red cell antigens was 3.8 %, with 0.9 % of the antibody belong to the immunoglobulin G, and 2.9 % of the cases – to immunoglobulin M. Most of the IgG antibodies had following specificity:monospecific anti-D antibody (21 cases, anti-DC and anti-DE antibodies (4 cases, anti-C (8 cases, anti-E (15, anti-c (13, and anti-K (11. Anti-e (1, anti-Fya (2, anti-Lea (4, anti-S (2, anti-s (2, anti-Jka (2 antibodies were less common. Granulocytes antibodies were found in 66.7 % of 384 patients, with results dependent on the detection method used. The presence of antiplatelet alloantibodies studied in 285 serum samples, of which antibodies were detected in 99 patients (34.7 %. Specificity of platelet antibodies was determined in three serum samples only: anti-2b, anti-1a, anti-1b. In other patients, probably present antibodies to several antigens simultaneously, and to identify them was not possible.

  8. Clinical and dosimetric predictors of acute hematologic toxicity in rectal cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya; Son, Christina H.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify clinical and dosimetric factors associated with hematologic toxicity (HT) during chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Materials and methods: We analyzed 120 rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant pelvic radiotherapy (PRT) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. The coxal (ilium, ischium, and pubis) bone marrow (BM), sacral BM, and femoral BM were contoured and dose-volume parameters were extracted. Associations between cell count trend and clinical predictors were tested using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Associations between clinical variables, Vx (percentage volume receiving x Gy), and cell count ratio at nadir were tested using linear regression models. Results: Nadirs for white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and platelets (PLT) occurred in the second week of PRT and the fifth week for hemoglobin and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC). Using cell count ratio, patients treated with 3DCRT had a lower WBC ratio trend during PRT compared to patients treated with IMRT (p = 0.04), and patients ⩾59 years of age had a lower hemoglobin ratio trend during PRT (p = 0.02). Using absolute cell count, patients treated with 3DCRT had lower ANC cell count trend (p = 0.03), and women had lower hemoglobin cell count trend compared to men (p = 0.03). On univariate analysis, use of 3DCRT was associated with a lower WBC ratio at nadir (p = 0.02). On multiple regression analysis using dosimetric variables, coxal BM V45 (p = 0.03) and sacral BM V45 (p = 0.03) were associated with a lower WBC and ANC ratio at nadir, respectively. Conclusions: HT trends during PRT revealed distinct patterns: WBC, ANC, and PLT cell counts reach nadirs early and recover, while hemoglobin and ALC decline steadily. Patients who were treated with 3DCRT and older patients experienced lower cell count ratio trend during PRT. Dosimetric constraints using coxal BM V45 and sacral BM V45 can be considered

  9. Preoperative computed tomography and scintigraphy to facilitate the detection of accessory spleen in patients with hematologic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Nobuhiro; Kanematsu, Takashi; Sugimachi, Keizo

    1988-01-01

    Accessory spleens of 1.5 cm in size were preoperatively identified by the combined use of computerized tomography and splenic scintigraphy in two patients with hematologic diseases. After the accessory spleen had been removed from the first patient, who had persistent hereditary spherocytosis and had undergone a splenectomy 15 months before, a postoperative decrease in hyperbilirubinemia was noted. In the other patient who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, a successful accessory splenectomy was done at the same time as her splenectomy, and was followed by 6 months' complete remission. These events indicate that preoperative investigations using computerized tomography and scintigraphy are indispensable for ruling out an accessory spleen in those patients for whom splenectomy needs to be done in order to alleviate hematologic disorders. (author)

  10. Clinical and Radiation Oncology. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurga, L.; Adam, Z.; Autrata, R.

    2010-01-01

    The work is two-volume set and has 1,658 pages. It is divided into 5 sections: I. Principles Clinical and radiation oncology. II. Hematological Malignant tumors. III. Solid tumors. IV. Treatment options metastatic Disease. V. Clinical practice in oncology. Second volume contains following sections a chapters: Section III: Solid nodes, it contains following chapters: (38) Central nervous system tumors; (39) Tumors of the eye, orbits and adnexas; (40) Head and neck carcinomas; (41) Lung carcinomas and pleural mesothelioma; (42) Mediastinal tumors; (43) Tumors of the esophagus; (44) Gastric carcinomas; (45) Carcinoma of the colon, rectum and anus; (46) Small intestinal cancer; (47) Liver and biliary tract carcinomas; (48) Tumors of the pancreas; (49) Tumors of the kidney and upper urinary tract; (50) Bladder tumors of the bladder, urinary tract and penis; (51) Prostate Carcinoma; (52) Testicular tumors; (53) Malignant neoplasm of the cervix, vulva and vagina; (54) Endometrial carcinoma; (55) Malignant ovarian tumors; (56) Gestational trophoblastic disease; (57) Breast carcinoma - based on a evidence-based approach; (58) Thyroid and parathyroid carcinomas; (59) Dental tumors of endocrine glands; (60) Tumors of the locomotory system; (61) Malignant melanoma; (62) Carcinomas of the skin and skin adnexa; (63) Malignant tumors in immunosuppressed patients; (64) Tumors of unknown primary localization; (65) Children's oncology; (66) Geriatric Oncology; (67) Principles of long-term survival of patients with medically and socially significant types of malignant tumors after treatment. Section IV: Options of metastic disease disease, it contains following chapters: (68) Metastases to the central nervous system; (69) Metastases in the lungs; (70) Metastases in the liver; (71) Metastases into the skeleton. Section V: Clinical practice in oncology, it contains following chapters: (72) Acute conditions in oncology; (73) Prevention and management of radiation and chemical toxicity

  11. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus infections in patients with hematologic malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Samantha E; Lamson, Daryl M; Soave, Rosemary; Guzman, Brigitte Huertas; Shore, Tsiporah B; Ritchie, Ellen K; Zappetti, Dana; Satlin, Michael J; Leonard, John P; van Besien, Koen; Schuetz, Audrey N; Jenkins, Stephen G; George, Kirsten St; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are common causes of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in hematologic malignancy (HM) patients. Predictors of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) including the impact of HRV species and types are poorly understood. This study aims to describe the clinical and molecular epidemiology of HRV infections among HM patients. From April 2012-March 2013, HRV-positive respiratory specimens from symptomatic HM patients were molecularly characterized by analysis of partial viral protein 1 (VP1) or VP4 gene sequence. HRV LRTI risk-factors and outcomes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. One hundred and ten HM patients presented with HRV URTI (n=78) and HRV LRTI (n=32). Hypoalbuminemia (OR 3.0; 95% CI, 1.0-9.2; p=0.05) was independently associated with LRTI, but other clinical and laboratory markers of host immunity did not differ between patients with URTI versus LRTI. Detection of bacterial co-pathogens was common in LRTI cases (25%). Among 92 typeable respiratory specimens, there were 58 (64%) HRV-As, 12 (13%) HRV-Bs, and 21 (23%) HRV-Cs, and one Enterovirus 68. LRTI rates among HRV-A (29%), HRV-B (17%), and HRV-C (29%) were similar. HRV-A infections occurred year-round while HRV-B and HRV-C infections clustered in the late fall and winter. HRVs are associated with LRTI in HM patients. Illness severity is not attributable to specific HRV species or types. The frequent detection of bacterial co-pathogens in HRV LRTIs further substantiates the hypothesis that HRVs predispose to bacterial superinfection of the lower airways, similar to that of other community-acquired respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) as Part of the Oncological Treatment: Survey about Patients? Attitude towards CAM in a University-Based Oncology Center in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Lettner, Sabrina; Kessel, Carmen; Bier, Henning; Biedermann, Tilo; Friess, Helmut; Herrschbach, Peter; Gschwend, J?rgen E.; Meyer, Bernhard; Peschel, Christian; Schmid, Roland; Schwaiger, Markus; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To understand if and which patients would be open-minded to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use parallel to their oncological treatment. Moreover, we sought to determine which methods are most accepted and which are the primary motivators to use CAM. Methods We developed and anonymously conducted a questionnaire for patients in the oncology center (TU Munich). Questions focus on different CAM methods, previous experiences, and willingness to apply or use CAM when off...

  13. Hematological follow-up studies on patients with thyroid neoplasms after 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chone, B.; Engelken, G.; Schenck, P.

    1978-01-01

    Based on 391 thyroid neoplasms diagnostic hematological follow-up studies were registered in 34 patients with an overall J-131-dose of more than 500 mCi including the following parameters: 1. Peripheral blood control. 2. Bone marrow aspiration. 3. Cell volume distribution size of leukocytes after preparative enrichment. If in doubt a bone marrow scintigraphy was added. The adjunctive diagnostic procedure was correlated with histological criteria of thyroid carcinoma and J-131 retention after therapeutic application of radioiodine. In particular, a case report is given regarding a patient of 66 years with follicular thyroid carcinoma receiving 990 mCi J-131 during a period of 11 years after having had total thyroidectomy twice. The development of acute leucemia followed by death happened 16 years later. The moment of bone marrow transformation was determined exactly. The value of blood parameters can be calculated as follows: 1. Peripheral blood controls are limited by lack of efficiency. 2. Biopsy of bone marrow can detect hypoplastic alteration being latent in circulating blood for some years, even of J-131 cumulation dose below 500 mCi. 3. The analysis of distribution size of leukocytes represents a functional aspect after radiation induced in injury of bone marrow. (author)

  14. Assessment of quality of care in an oncology institute using information on patients' satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brédart, A.; Razavi, D.; Robertson, C.; Didier, F.; Scaffidi, E.; Fonzo, D.; Autier, P.; de Haes, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility of conducting a patient satisfaction survey in the oncology hospital setting, using a multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire to be completed at home. METHODS: Socio-demographic and clinical data were collected for 133 consecutive patients. Patients

  15. Sci-Thur PM – Colourful Interactions: Highlights 05: Opal–the Oncology Patient Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Ackeem; Herrera, David; Kildea, John; Hijal, Tarek; Hendren, Laurie [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University Health Centre, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, School of Computer Science, McGill University (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    We describe Opal (Oncology portal and application), the mobile phone app and patient portal that we have developed and are deploying for Radiation Oncology patients at our cancer centre. Opal is a novel tool to empower patients with their own personal medical data, including appointment schedules, consultation notes, test results, radiotherapy treatment planning information and wait time management. Furthermore, due to its integration with our electronic medical record and treatment planning database, Opal will allow us to collect patient reported outcomes from consenting patients and link them directly with dose volume histograms and other treatment data.

  16. Sci-Thur PM – Colourful Interactions: Highlights 05: Opal–the Oncology Patient Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Ackeem; Herrera, David; Kildea, John; Hijal, Tarek; Hendren, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    We describe Opal (Oncology portal and application), the mobile phone app and patient portal that we have developed and are deploying for Radiation Oncology patients at our cancer centre. Opal is a novel tool to empower patients with their own personal medical data, including appointment schedules, consultation notes, test results, radiotherapy treatment planning information and wait time management. Furthermore, due to its integration with our electronic medical record and treatment planning database, Opal will allow us to collect patient reported outcomes from consenting patients and link them directly with dose volume histograms and other treatment data.

  17. Healing the mind/body split: bringing the patient back into oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Steven

    2003-03-01

    The effect on oncology of the doctrine of Cartesian dualism is examined. It is argued that (1) this doctrine continues to exert a baneful (though unacknowledged) influence on the practice of oncology, (2) Descartes's doctrine of a mind/body split is mistaken, and (3) mind and body (brain) are inextricably interwoven. A biopsychosocial model of disease is advocated. The role of psychooncology in healing the mind/body split by focusing research attention on the patient is outlined.

  18. Preliminary evaluations related to the ranges of hematological and biochemical variables in hospitalized patients with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Chitsaz

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Any considerable alter in patients′ biochemical and hematological figures (BS, Hgb, Plt and Lymph may necessitate further attention related to inter- and intra-individual variability in clinical supervision and drug′s assortment. Therefore, success in treatment could be achieved by the close management of clinical, biochemical, hematological, and pharmacological manifestation. To reduce disability, mortality, and morbidity in Iranian stroke population further clinical studies are needed to correlate drugs and laboratory markers to associated clinical events in order.

  19. Screening Patient Spirituality and Spiritual Needs in Oncology Nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, René; Schep-Akkerman, Annemiek; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To select 2 appropriate spiritual assessment tools and evaluate these by involving oncology nurses. Background. Spirituality is recognized as an important domain of cancer care. At admission, integration of spiritual assessment seems necessary. It is unclear what kind of spiritual assessment

  20. Screening patient spirituality and spiritual needs in oncology nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R. van; Schep-Akkerman, A.E.; Laarhoven, H.W.M. van

    2013-01-01

    AIM.: To select 2 appropriate spiritual assessment tools and evaluate these by involving oncology nurses. BACKGROUND.: Spirituality is recognized as an important domain of cancer care. At admission, integration of spiritual assessment seems necessary. It is unclear what kind of spiritual assessment

  1. Radiation Oncology and Online Patient Education Materials: Deviating From NIH and AMA Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Arpan V.; Hansberry, David R.; Agarwal, Nitin; Clump, David A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Physicians encourage patients to be informed about their health care options, but much of the online health care–related resources can be beneficial only if patients are capable of comprehending it. This study's aim was to assess the readability level of online patient education resources for radiation oncology to conclude whether they meet the general public's health literacy needs as determined by the guidelines of the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association (AMA). Methods: Radiation oncology–related internet-based patient education materials were downloaded from 5 major professional websites (American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American Brachytherapy Society, (RadiologyInfo.org), and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group). Additional patient education documents were downloaded by searching for key radiation oncology phrases using Google. A total of 135 articles were downloaded and assessed for their readability level using 10 quantitative readability scales that are widely accepted in the medical literature. Results: When all 10 assessment tools for readability were taken into account, the 135 online patient education articles were written at an average grade level of 13.7 ± 2.0. One hundred nine of the 135 articles (80.7%) required a high school graduate's comprehension level (12th-grade level or higher). Only 1 of the 135 articles (0.74%) met the AMA and NIH recommendations for patient education resources to be written between the third-grade and seventh-grade levels. Conclusion: Radiation oncology websites have patient education material written at an educational level above the NIH and AMA recommendations; as a result, average American patients may not be able to fully understand them. Rewriting radiation oncology patient education resources would likely contribute to the patients' understanding of their health and treatment options, making each

  2. Radiation Oncology and Online Patient Education Materials: Deviating From NIH and AMA Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, Arpan V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Hansberry, David R. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Agarwal, Nitin [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Physicians encourage patients to be informed about their health care options, but much of the online health care–related resources can be beneficial only if patients are capable of comprehending it. This study's aim was to assess the readability level of online patient education resources for radiation oncology to conclude whether they meet the general public's health literacy needs as determined by the guidelines of the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association (AMA). Methods: Radiation oncology–related internet-based patient education materials were downloaded from 5 major professional websites (American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American Brachytherapy Society, (RadiologyInfo.org), and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group). Additional patient education documents were downloaded by searching for key radiation oncology phrases using Google. A total of 135 articles were downloaded and assessed for their readability level using 10 quantitative readability scales that are widely accepted in the medical literature. Results: When all 10 assessment tools for readability were taken into account, the 135 online patient education articles were written at an average grade level of 13.7 ± 2.0. One hundred nine of the 135 articles (80.7%) required a high school graduate's comprehension level (12th-grade level or higher). Only 1 of the 135 articles (0.74%) met the AMA and NIH recommendations for patient education resources to be written between the third-grade and seventh-grade levels. Conclusion: Radiation oncology websites have patient education material written at an educational level above the NIH and AMA recommendations; as a result, average American patients may not be able to fully understand them. Rewriting radiation oncology patient education resources would likely contribute to the patients' understanding of their health and treatment

  3. From Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology to Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eBaldock

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are notoriously aggressive, malignant brain tumors that have variable response to treatment. These patients often have poor prognosis, informed primarily by histopathology. Mathematical neuro-oncology (MNO is a young and burgeoning field that leverages mathematical models to predict and quantify response to therapies. These mathematical models can form the basis of modern precision medicine approaches to tailor therapy in a patient-specific manner. Patient specific models (PSMs can be used to overcome imaging limitations, improve prognostic predictions, stratify patients and assess treatment response in silico. The information gleaned from such models can aid in the construction and efficacy of clinical trials and treatment protocols, accelerating the pace of clinical research in the war on cancer. This review focuses on the growing translation of PSM to clinical neuro-oncology. It will also provide a forward-looking view on a new era of patient-specific mathematical neuro-oncology.

  4. Actigraphy for measurements of sleep in relation to oncological treatment of patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chenxi; Gögenur, Ismail; Tvilling Madsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are a prevalent and disabling problem for patients with cancer. Sleep disturbances are present throughout the cancer trajectory, especially during oncological treatment. Previously sleep disturbances have primarily been quantified with subjective rating scales. Actigraphy is an...... are prevalent, and persistent in patients with cancer. The sleep disturbances seem to be aggravated by chemotherapy treatment and accumulate as the treatment continues. Sleep disturbances need further attention among clinicians working with patients with cancer.......Sleep disturbances are a prevalent and disabling problem for patients with cancer. Sleep disturbances are present throughout the cancer trajectory, especially during oncological treatment. Previously sleep disturbances have primarily been quantified with subjective rating scales. Actigraphy...... is an easy to use, non-invasive method for objective measurement of sleep. We systematically reviewed the literature for studies using actigraphy to measure sleeping habits of patients with cancer, undergoing oncological treatment. Our study furthermore reviewed studies with interventions designed to reduce...

  5. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  6. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  7. Adherence to, and outcomes of, a galactomannan screening protocol in high-risk hematology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harricharan, S; Biederman, K; Bombassaro, A M; Lazo-Langner, A; Elsayed, S; Fulford, A; Delport, J A; Xenocostas, A

    2018-04-01

    A twice-weekly galactomannan (gm) screening protocol was implemented in high-risk hematology inpatients. Study objectives were to determine adherence to the protocol, use of selected resources, and patient outcomes. This retrospective cohort study compared outcomes of interest before and after implementation of gm screening. Adults undergoing matched related allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia were eligible. Patients could be enrolled more than once and were evaluated as episodes. Adherence to the gm protocol was assessed in post-implementation episodes. Use of broad-spectrum antifungals (bsafs), consultations (infectious diseases, respirology), and diagnostic procedures (computed tomography imaging, bronchoalveolar lavage) were compared between phases, as were the patient outcomes of all-cause mortality and clinical success (alive and not taking a bsaf). Of 182 episodes consecutively screened, 70 per phase were enrolled. Clinical characteristics and duration of assessment were similar for the phases. Full or partial adherence to the protocol was observed in 61 post-implementation episodes (87%), with full adherence in 40 episodes (57%). More episodes in the pre-implementation phase than in the post-implementation phase involved receipt of bsafs, consultations, and diagnostics (27% vs. 7%, p = 0.02; 46% vs. 26%, p = 0.014; and 46% vs. 31%, p = 0.083 respectively). Although mortality was similar in the two phases, clinical success at the final assessment was observed in fewer pre-implementation than post-implementation episodes (79% vs. 98%, p < 0.001). Implementation of a gm screening protocol was feasible and associated with significantly fewer episodes involving receipt of bsafs and consultations, and with significantly more episodes showing clinical success.

  8. 64 multidetector CT findings of influenza A (H1N1) virus in patients with hematologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Badrawy, Adel; Zeidan, Amany; Ebrahim, Mohamed A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pandemic of swine-origin H1N1 influenza that began in early 2009 has provided evidence that radiology can assist in the early diagnosis of severe cases. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality. MDCT is superior to radiography in showing the distribution of the disease. Purpose. To review the 64 multidetector CT thoracic findings of novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus in patients with hematologic malignancies. Material and Methods. This study included 12 patients (3 women, 9 men; mean age, 32.2 years). All patients proved to be infected with influenza A (H1N1) virus. The hematologic malignancies were acute myeloid leukemia (n = 8), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 2), multiple myeloma (n = 1), and myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 1). All the patients underwent CT scanning using a 64 multidetector CT scanner. Chest CT scans were reviewed for ground-glass opacities (GGOs), consolidation, airway thickening/dilatation, nodules, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and pleural effusion. Results. More than one CT finding was detected in every patient. Pulmonary affection was bilateral, more on the left side. The affections were mainly peribronchial. Airway wall thickening and dilatation were detected in all 12 patients, GGO in 9/12 patients, nodules in 6/12 patients, consolidation in 6/12 patients, hilar lymphadenopathy in 3/12 patients, and pleural effusion in 2/12 patients. Conclusion. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common hematologic malignancy affected by influenza A (H1N1) virus. The left lung is affected more than the right one. The most common multidetector CT findings are unilateral or bilateral airway thickening and dilatation. Multidetector CT can be used for early and accurate assessment of pulmonary affection with influenza A H1N1 virus infection

  9. Comprehensive evaluation of nutritional status before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in 170 patients with hematological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Boshi; Yan, Xia; Cai, Jingjing; Wang, Yu

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the nutritional status of patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and explore optimal methods for assessing nutritional status in patients with hematological diseases. This cohort study enrolled 170 patients who were diagnosed with hematological diseases and underwent allogeneic HSCT in the Department of Hematology, Peking University People's Hospital between May 2011 and April 2013. We used fixed-point continuous sampling and four nutritional screening tools, Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and Malnutrition Universal Screening Tools (MUST), in combination with body measurements, to extensively screen and evaluate nutritional risks and status in patients receiving HSCT before entering and after leaving laminar air flow rooms. After HSCT, patients had significant reduction in weight, hip circumference, waist-hip ratio, calf circumference, mid-upper arm circumference, and suprailiac skinfold thickness compared with pre-HSCT measurements. Before HSCT, NRS-2002 identified that 21.2% of patients were at nutritional risks, compared with 100% after HSCT. MUST indicated that before HSCT, 11.77% of patients were at high nutritional risk, compared with 59.63% after HSCT. MNA assessed that 0.06% of patients were malnourished before HSCT, compared with 19.27% after HSCT. SGA identified that before HSCT, 1.76% of patients had mild to severe malnutrition, which increased to 83.3% after HSCT. There is a significant increase in the nutritional risk and malnutrition in patients who received HSCT. Before HSCT, some patients already had nutritional risk or nutritional deficiencies, and prompt and close nutritional screening or assessment should be performed. The nutritional status of patients after HSCT was generally deteriorated compared with that before transplantation. Body measurements should be taken more frequently during the subsequent treatment

  10. 64 multidetector CT findings of influenza A (H1N1) virus in patients with hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badrawy, Adel [Dept. of Radiology, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura (Egypt)], E-mail: adelelbadrawy@hotmail.com; Zeidan, Amany [Dept. of Thoracic Medicine, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura (Egypt); Ebrahim, Mohamed A. [Dept. of Medical Oncology, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The pandemic of swine-origin H1N1 influenza that began in early 2009 has provided evidence that radiology can assist in the early diagnosis of severe cases. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for morbidity and mortality. MDCT is superior to radiography in showing the distribution of the disease. Purpose. To review the 64 multidetector CT thoracic findings of novel swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus in patients with hematologic malignancies. Material and Methods. This study included 12 patients (3 women, 9 men; mean age, 32.2 years). All patients proved to be infected with influenza A (H1N1) virus. The hematologic malignancies were acute myeloid leukemia (n = 8), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 2), multiple myeloma (n = 1), and myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 1). All the patients underwent CT scanning using a 64 multidetector CT scanner. Chest CT scans were reviewed for ground-glass opacities (GGOs), consolidation, airway thickening/dilatation, nodules, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and pleural effusion. Results. More than one CT finding was detected in every patient. Pulmonary affection was bilateral, more on the left side. The affections were mainly peribronchial. Airway wall thickening and dilatation were detected in all 12 patients, GGO in 9/12 patients, nodules in 6/12 patients, consolidation in 6/12 patients, hilar lymphadenopathy in 3/12 patients, and pleural effusion in 2/12 patients. Conclusion. Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common hematologic malignancy affected by influenza A (H1N1) virus. The left lung is affected more than the right one. The most common multidetector CT findings are unilateral or bilateral airway thickening and dilatation. Multidetector CT can be used for early and accurate assessment of pulmonary affection with influenza A H1N1 virus infection.

  11. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of bleeding episodes in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: recommendations by the Hemostasis Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) and the Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Research (GTH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelmann, Iris; Kreher, Stephan; Parmentier, Stefani; Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Bisping, Guido; Kirschner, Martin; Bergmann, Frauke; Schilling, Kristina; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Petrides, Petro E; Tiede, Andreas; Matzdorff, Axel; Griesshammer, Martin; Riess, Hanno; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPN) comprise a heterogeneous group of chronic hematologic malignancies. The quality of life, morbidity, and mortality of patients with MPN are primarily affected by disease-related symptoms, thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications, and progression to myelofibrosis and acute leukemia. Major bleeding represents a common and important complication in MPN, and the incidence of such bleeding events will become even more relevant in the future due to the increasing disease prevalence and survival of MPN patients. This review discusses the causes, differential diagnoses, prevention, and management of bleeding episodes in patients with MPN, aiming at defining updated standards of care in these often challenging situations.

  12. [NEURO-ONCOLOGY A NEW FIELD IN DAVIDOFF CANCER CENTER AT RABIN MEDICAL CENTER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Abu-Shkara, Ramez; Siegal, Tali

    2017-08-01

    Neuro-oncology is a subspecialty attracting physicians from medical disciplines such as neurology, neurosurgery, pediatrics, oncology, and radiotherapy. It deals with diagnosis and management of primary brain tumors, as well as metastatic and non-metastatic neurological manifestations that frequently affect cancer patients including brain metastases, paraneoplastic syndromes and neurological complications of cancer treatment. A neuro-oncology unit was established in Davidoff Cancer Center at Rabin Medical Center. It provides a multidisciplinary team approach for management of brain tumors and services, such as expert outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations for the departments of oncology, hematology, bone marrow transplantation and other departments in the Rabin Medical Center. In addition, expert consultation is frequently provided to other hospitals that treat cancer patients with neurological manifestations. The medical disciplines that closely collaborate for the daily management of neuro-oncology patients include radiotherapy, hematology, oncology, neuro-surgery, neuro-radiology and neuro-pathology. The neuro-oncology center is also involved in clinical and laboratory research conducted in collaboration with researchers in Israel and abroad. The new service contributes substantially to the improved care of cancer patients and to the advance of research topics in the field of neuro-oncology.

  13. REPTILE HEMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejra Hadžimusić

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the number of circulating blood cells is of a great importance in clinical diagnosis. However, in some species, such as birds and reptiles, it is not possible to determine the number of individual blood cells using standard automated equipment, because of the specific morphological characteristics. For this reason, recognition of individual cell elements is crucial during hematological examination. Key words: Hematology, reptiles, blood cell morphology

  14. Immune-Mediated Neutropenia and Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Ulcerative Colitis: An Unusual Hematological Association with IBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-In Kim

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD are well described in the literature. However, the combination of immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia has only been reported once in association with IBD. A case is reported of immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in a patient with ulcerative colitis during a relapse. No obvious causes of these hematological abnormalities were found in the patient despite an exhaustive search. An immune-mediated process was confirmed by positive antineutrophil antibody and platelet-associated antibody in the patient’s serum, and the demonstration of binding of the patient’s immunoglobulin G to autologous neutrophils. The patient was treated with high-dose steroid, intravenous gamma-globulin and eventually splenectomy. The platelet count subsequently normalized; although the severe neutropenia recurred, it has subsequently improved without further treatment. Although a definitive cause-effect relationship cannot be established, the immune-mediated neutropenia and thrombocytopenia may be an unusual hematological manifestation associated with ulcerative colitis.

  15. Open Oncology Notes: A Qualitative Study of Oncology Patients' Experiences Reading Their Cancer Care Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayastha, Neha; Pollak, Kathryn I; LeBlanc, Thomas W

    2018-04-01

    Electronic medical records increasingly allow patients access to clinician notes. Although most believe that open notes benefits patients, some suggest negative consequences. Little is known about the experiences of patients with cancer reading their medical notes; thus we aimed to describe this qualitatively. We interviewed 20 adults with metastatic or incurable cancer receiving cancer treatment. The semistructured qualitative interviews included four segments: assessing their overall experience reading notes, discussing how notes affected their cancer care experiences, reading a real note with the interviewer, and making suggestions for improvement. We used a constant comparison approach to analyze these qualitative data. We found four themes. Patients reported that notes resulted in the following: (1) increased comprehension; (2) ameliorated uncertainty, relieved anxiety, and facilitated control; (3) increased trust; and (4) for a subset of patients, increased anxiety. Patients described increased comprehension because notes refreshed their memory and clarified their understanding of visits. This helped mitigate the unfamiliarity of cancer, addressing uncertainty and relieving anxiety. Notes facilitated control, empowering patients to ask clinicians more questions. The transparency of notes also increased trust in clinicians. For a subset of patients, however, notes were emotionally difficult to read and raised concerns. Patients identified medical jargon and repetition in notes as areas for improvement. Most patients thought that reading notes improved their care experiences. A small subset of patients experienced increased distress. As reading notes becomes a routine part of the patient experience, physicians might want to elicit and address concerns that arise from notes, thereby further engaging patients in their care.

  16. Breast cancer patients' presentation for oncological treatment: a single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinkuolie, Akinbolaji Andrew; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu Chiduziem; Olasehinde, Olalekan; Arowolo, Olukayode Adeolu; Babalola, Rereloluwa Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries' breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer patients from catchment area of an oncology service hospital in Nigeria between 2007 and 2013. Patients' demographics, breast cancer burden and health care giver presentation variables were analysed for causal factors of seeking medical help and what determines commencement of effective oncological treatment. Forty-six patients were enrolled, 19.6% of them presented primarily to oncologist while 80.4% presented secondarily for oncological treatment. There is a significant difference in presentation time for oncological treatment (t = -3.56, df = 42.90, p = 0.001) between primary (M =11.56 ± 5.21 weeks) and secondary presentation (M= 52.56 ± 10.27weeks). Tumor burden of those that presented secondarily were significantly more advanced (U = 78.5, p = 0.011) and, univariate analysis reveals that: patients' matrimonial setting, breast cancer awareness and mode of discovery of breast symptoms are patient related factors that determines their choice of health care providers and, determinant of effective oncological treatment is patient first contact health care provider. Patients' bio-characteristics that determine their choice of health care provider should be incorporated into community breast cancer sensitization drives. Additionally, there is a need for a government agency assign the task of accrediting and defining scope of enterprise of health care institutions and their health care providers in our pluralist health system.

  17. Patient and Oncology Nurse Preferences for the Treatment Options in Advanced Melanoma: A Discrete Choice Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Frank Xiaoqing; Witt, Edward A; Ebbinghaus, Scot; DiBonaventura Beyer, Grace; Basurto, Enrique; Joseph, Richard W

    2017-10-25

    Understanding the perceptions of patients and oncology nurses about the relative importance of benefits and risks associated with newer treatments of advanced melanoma can help to inform clinical decision-making. The aims of this study were to quantify and compare the views of patients and oncology nurses regarding the importance of attributes of treatments of advanced melanoma. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was conducted in US-based oncology nurses and patients diagnosed with advanced melanoma. Patients and nurses were enlisted through online panels. In a series of scenarios, respondents had to choose between 2 hypothetical treatments, each with 7 attributes: mode of administration (MoA), dosing schedule (DS), median duration of therapy (DoT), objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and grade 3 or 4 adverse events (AEs). Hierarchical Bayesian logistic regression models were used to estimate preference weights. A total of 200 patients with advanced melanoma and 150 oncology nurses participated. The relative importance estimates of attributes by patients and nurses, respectively, were as follows: OS, 33% and 28%; AEs, 29% and 26%; ORR, 25% and 27%; PFS, 12% and 15%; DS, 2% and 3%; DoT, 0% and 0%; and MoA, 0% and 0%. Both patients and oncology nurses valued OS, ORR, and AEs as the most important treatment attributes for advanced melanoma, followed by PFS, whereas DS, DoT, and MoA were given less value in their treatment decisions. Oncology nurses and patients have similar views on important treatment considerations for advanced melanoma, which can help build trust in shared decision-making.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  18. Oncology nurses' communication challenges with patients and families: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Smita C; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Shen, Megan Johnson; Pehrson, Cassandra; Zaider, Talia; Hammonds, Stacey; Krueger, Carol A; Parker, Patricia A; Bylund, Carma L

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of effective communication in an oncology setting are multifold and include the overall well-being of patients and health professionals, adherence to treatment regimens, psychological functioning, and improvements in quality of life. Nevertheless, there are substantial barriers and communication challenges reported by oncology nurses. This study was conducted to present a summary of communication challenges faced by oncology nurses. From November 2012 to March 2014, 121 inpatient nurses working in the oncology setting participated in an online pre-training qualitative survey that asked nurses to describe common communication challenges in communicating empathy and discussing death, dying, and end-of-life (EOL) goals of care. The results revealed six themes that describe the challenges in communicating empathically: dialectic tensions, burden of carrying bad news, lack of skills for providing empathy, perceived institutional barriers, challenging situations, and perceived dissimilarities between the nurse and the patient. The results for challenges in discussing death, dying and EOL goals of care revealed five themes: dialectic tensions, discussing specific topics related to EOL, lack of skills for providing empathy, patient/family characteristics, and perceived institutional barriers. This study emphasizes the need for institutions to provide communication skills training to their oncology nurses for navigating through challenging patient interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Results of emergency surgery in patients with Moschowitz's disease refractory to hematological treatment: is splenectomy always advisable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronna, R; Cardi, M; Meloni, G; Mangioni, S; Spera, G; Benedetti, M; Frantellizzi, V; Layek, D; Catinelli, S; Schiratti, M; Chirletti, P

    2005-01-01

    Patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), Moschowitz's disease, run a high risk of perioperative bleeding and need intensive hematologic support. In some patients, TTP is associated with cancer but the surgical role in these patients is still unclear. To illustrate the surgical problems and outcome we present the case histories of three patients with TTP observed in our emergency department. Two patients had TTP secondary to cancer and one patient with primary TTP (no evidence of neoplasia) had emergency operation for gastric hemorrhage, occlusion and TTP unresponsive to plasmapheresis. The first two patients who had not radical resection of cancer and no splenectomy, died for TTP complications. The third patient who underwent emergency splenectomy, had an uneventful postoperative course and TTP completely regressed. These case reports suggest that patients with TTP should be screened to rule out cancer. In patients with acute cancer-related complications emergency surgery should aim to resect the cancer. An associated splenectomy may increase the effectiveness of postoperative hematologic therapy.

  20. [Comparison of 1 mg/body and 3 mg/body of intravenous granisetron for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and adverse events in hematological malignancy patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Shinya; Hori, Katsuhito; Ono, Takaaki; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Kawakami, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Granisetron is a selective 5-hydroxy tryptamine3 receptor antagonist and widely used for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Recommended dose of intravenous granisetron in the USA and Europe has been set at 0.01 mg/kg (1 mg/body) in the antiemetic treatment guidelines established by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and National Comprehension Cancer Network. In contrast, the approved dose in Japan is 0.04 mg/kg (3 mg/body). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which compared 1 mg/body with 3 mg/body of intravenous granisetron for CINV had been reported in Japan. In these RCTs, however, hematological malignancy patients were excluded. We performed observational retrospective study to compare 1 mg/body with 3 mg/body of intravenous granisetron for the prevention of CINV and adverse events in hematological malignancy patients. Number of the patients and chemotherapy courses were 15 and 30 in the 1 mg/body group, and 15 and 27 in the 3 mg/body group, respectively. No nausea rates in the 1 and 3 mg/body group were 83% and 89% of courses, respectively. No vomiting rates in the 1 and 3 mg/body group were 97% and 100% of courses, respectively. The incidences of constipation in the 1 and 3 mg/body group were 34% and 45% of courses, respectively. Anaphylaxis and headache did not occur in both groups. Our findings suggested that 1 mg/body of intravenous granisetron can prevent from CINV in hematological malignancy patients, as well as 3 mg/body.

  1. 76 FR 61713 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ...] Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee. General... adult oncology indication, or in late stage development in pediatric patients with cancer. The...

  2. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: using online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Tates, K.; Dulmen, S. van; Hoogerbrugge, M.; Kamps, W.A.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated

  3. Oncologic Outcomes of Patients With Gleason Score 7 and Tertiary Gleason Pattern 5 After Radical Prostatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Yi-Hsueh; Lee, Won Jun; Yang, Seung Ok; Lee, Jeong Ki; Jung, Tae Young; Kim, Yun Beom

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated oncologic outcomes following radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with a Gleason score (GS) of 7 with tertiary Gleason pattern 5 (TGP5). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 310 patients who underwent RP from 2005 to 2010. Twenty-four patients who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant antiandrogen deprivation or radiation therapy were excluded. Just 239 (GS 6 to 8) of the remaining 286 patients were included in the study. Patients were cla...

  4. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology...... research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness...... of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology...

  5. Prophylactic and therapeutic management of oral complications related to chemotherapy and radiotherapy: role of dental oncology in cancer patient supportive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffarah, Henry Bittar

    2008-01-01

    Cancer patients under treatment of head and neck tumors as well as those under chemotherapy for hematologic cancers, such as lymphoma and leukemia, and those about to receive bone marrow grafts, do require preventive oral and dental care (prior to cancer treatment), as well as oral care during and after oncological treatment. Furthermore, chemo and radiotherapy-related adverse effects are also common in patients with other types of cancer, with an estimated frequency of 10 per cent in adjuvant chemotherapy (QT), 40 per cent in primary QT, 80 per cent in bone marrow transplantation, in which myeloablative regimens are introduced, and 100 per cent in head and neck radiotherapy, in which the targeted fields are those of the oral cavity. The dentist, specialized in dental oncology, works within the multidisciplinary team at the great centers of cancer treatment, contributing to improve the quality of life of these patients. The present review of literature and of the Guidelines for Management of Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head and Neck Radiation (US National Cancer Institute) aims to inform the clinical oncologist, the radio therapist, and other professionals about the resources available in Oral Supportive Therapy in both the prevention and managements of such complications. (author)

  6. European Society of Gynaecological Oncology Guidelines for the Management of Patients With Vulvar Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oonk, Maaike H M; Planchamp, François; Baldwin, Peter

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines as part of European Society of Gynaecological Oncology's mission to improve the quality of care for women with gynecologic cancers across Europe. METHODS: The European Society of Gynaecological...... Oncology Council nominated an international development group made of practicing clinicians who provide care to patients with vulvar cancer and have demonstrated leadership and interest in the management of patients with vulvar cancer (18 experts across Europe). To ensure that the statements are evidence...

  7. Outpatient dermatology consultation impacts the diagnosis and management of pediatric oncology patients: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hannah; Robinson, Sarah N; Huang, Jennifer T

    2017-11-01

    The impact of dermatology consultation on the care of children with oncologic conditions is unknown. To review outpatient dermatology visits and the resulting impact on diagnosis and management of pediatric oncology patients. Retrospective review of pediatric oncology patients with outpatient dermatology visits at a tertiary care center from 2008 to 2015. The most common dermatologic diagnoses in 516 patients were skin infections (21.3%) and nonmalignant skin eruptions (33.4%). A diagnosis of significant impact (ie, malignancy, adverse cutaneous drug reaction, graft-versus-host disease, varicella-zoster virus, or herpes simplex virus infection), was made at the dermatology clinic in 14.7% of visits. Consultation resulted in a change in diagnosis in 59.8% of patients, change in dermatologic management in 72.4% of patients, and change in management of noncutaneous issues in 12.4% of patients. The use of electronic medical records, the nongeneralizable study population, and the retrospective design represent potential limitations. Outpatient dermatology consultation can affect the care of pediatric oncology patients with respect to diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions and management of nondermatologic issues. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence and risk of hematologic toxicities in cancer patients treated with regorafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhao, Hong

    2017-11-07

    Regorafenib, an oral vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, has been approved for the treatment of several malignancies. As a non-traditional cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent, regorafenib is often associated with hematologic toxicities. Here we searched PubMed and Embase up to June 2017 for relevant clinical trials. Eligible studies include trials in which subjects treated with 160 mg of regorafenib daily during the first 21 days of each 28-day cycle, and adequate safety data profile reporting thrombocytopenia, anemia, neutropenia and leucopenia. Statistical analyses were conducted to calculate the overall incidences, relative risks (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 2,341 subjects from 16 trials were included in the present studies. The incidences of regorafenib associated all-grade and high-grade hematologic toxicities were: thrombocytopenia, 22% and 3%; anemia, 20% and 3%; neutropenia, 10% and 2%, and leucopenia, 13% and 2%, respectively. Regorafenib-treated subjects had a significant increased risk of all-grade (RR=6.35; 95% CI, 3.19-12.64) and high-grade (RR=6.27; 95% CI, 1.69-23.26) thrombocytopenia, all-grade (RR=2.76; 95% CI, 1.63-4.68) and high-grade (RR=5.38; 95% CI, 1.60-18.06) anemia. Our results suggested that regorafenib therapy was associated with significantly increased risks of hematological toxicities, and hematologic monitoring at regular intervals should be advised to clinician.

  9. Diagnostic impact of digital tomosynthesis in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaia, Emilio; Baratella, Elisa; Poillucci, Gabriele; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2016-08-01

    To assess the actual diagnostic impact of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography (CXR). A total of 237 patients (135 male, 102 female; age, 70.8 ± 10.4 years) with a known primary malignancy and suspected pulmonary lesion(s) on CXR and who underwent DTS were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists (experience, 10 and 15 years) analysed in consensus CXR and DTS images and proposed a diagnosis according to a confidence score: 1 or 2 = definitely or probably benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion, or pseudolesion; 3 = indeterminate; 4 or 5 = probably or definitely pulmonary lesion. DTS findings were proven by CT (n = 114 patients), CXR during follow-up (n = 105) or histology (n = 18). Final diagnoses included 77 pulmonary opacities, 26 pulmonary scars, 12 pleural lesions and 122 pulmonary pseudolesions. DTS vs CXR presented a higher (P chest radiography (CXR) in oncologic patients. • DTS improves confidence of CXR in oncologic patients. • DTS allowed avoidance of CT in about 50 % of oncologic patients.

  10. Reptile Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, John M; Klaphake, Eric

    2015-09-01

    The basic principles of hematology used in mammalian medicine can be applied to reptiles. The appearances of the blood cells are significantly different from those seen in most mammals, and vary with taxa and staining method used. Many causes for abnormalities of the reptilian hemogram are similar to those for mammals, although additional factors such as venipuncture site, season, hibernation status, captivity status, and environmental factors can also affect values, making interpretation of hematologic results challenging. Values in an individual should be compared with reference ranges specific to that species, gender, and environmental conditions when available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Understanding Effective Delivery of Patient and Family Education in Pediatric Oncology: A Systematic Review from the Children's Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Cheryl C.; Laing, Catherine M.; Herring, Ruth Anne; Tena, Nancy; Leonardelli, Adrianne; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna

    2016-01-01

    A diagnosis of childhood cancer is a life-changing event for the entire family. Parents must not only deal with the cancer diagnosis but also acquire new knowledge and skills to safely care for their child at home. Best practices for delivery of patient/family education after a new diagnosis of childhood cancer are currently unknown. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the existing body of evidence to determine the current state of knowledge regarding the delivery of education to newly diagnosed pediatric oncology patients and families. Eighty-three articles regarding educational methods, content, influencing factors, and interventions for newly diagnosed pediatric patients with cancer or other chronic illnesses were systematically identified, summarized, and appraised according to the GRADE criteria. Based on the evidence, ten recommendations for practice were identified. These recommendations address delivery methods, content, influencing factors, and educational interventions for parents and siblings. Transferring these recommendations into practice may enhance the quality of education delivered by healthcare providers, and received by patients and families following a new diagnosis of childhood cancer. PMID:27450361

  12. Increasing Incidence and Recurrence Rate of Venous Thromboembolism in Paediatric Oncology Patients in One Single Centre Over 25 Years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Irene L. M.; van Els, Anne L.; van de Wetering, Marianne D.; van Ommen, C. Heleen

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious complication in paediatric oncology patients. To identify the incidence, risk factors and recurrence rate of VTE in paediatric oncology patients, an observational, retrospective cohort study of all consecutive children (≤18 years) with malignancies, treated

  13. Targeted drugs and Psycho-oncological intervention for breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abramo, Flavio; Goerling, Ute; Guastadisegni, Cecilia

    2016-04-01

    Personalized medicine is a new field based on molecular biology and genomics in which targeted tumor therapies are administered to patients. Psycho-oncology is a complementary approach that considers social and psychological aspects of patients as part of the treatments for cancer patients. The aim of this mini-review is to weigh clinical benefits for breast cancer patients of both treatments and possibly enhance benefits by modulating the use of both interventions. We have compared and evaluated on the one hand the use of anti Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and, on the other hand, psycho-oncological interventions in metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients.Both treatments did not increase survival of metastatic breast cancer patients, while in a selected study psycho-oncological interventions extended lifespan of non-metastatic breast cancer patients and ameliorate psychological and social factors of metastatic breast cancer patients. Because the two approaches address completely different aspects of cancer patients, if the comparison is limited to the extension of survival, the value of these two treatments cannot be assessed and compared.It is likely that by comparing patients reported outcomes, possibly by using standardized Quality of Life questionnaires, both patients and health care providers can weigh the benefits of the two treatments. It is therefore important to evaluate the use of cancer patients' quality of life measures as a mean to improve their experiences about life and treatment, and possibly to extend their survival.

  14. Patient safety climate in a hospital specialized in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study’s objective was to assess the safety climate from the perspective of a health team from a hospital specialized in oncology. An observational sectional study, conducted with 66 health professionals, using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. For analysis, Student’s t test and Sperman’s correlation (α=0.05 were used. The instrument’s general score was 70.28. The domain with best score was satisfaction at work (86.74 and, the domains with lower scores were perception from management (64.99 and stress perception (61.74. There was no differences of means statistically significant between genders, but it was present between those who had gone through graduate school or not. There was no correlation between scores and career time in the specialty at the institution. The final assessment demonstrated fragilities in the perception of health professionals related to questions involving the institutional climate of safety.

  15. Clinical and Hematological Evaluation of Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia Before and After Four Years of Using Hydroxyurea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieda Maria Gonçalves Pacce Bispo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluating clinical and hematological-clinical parameters of patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA before and after four years of using hydroxyurea (HU.  Method: A retrospective cohort study implementing a quantitative, descriptive and analytical approach developed in two public teaching hospitals located in the Central-West region of Brazil, from November 2010 to October 2011. Data collection was performed through medical records of 32 patients with SCA to assess clinical and hematological parameters before and after HU treatment. The study was approved by the UFMS Ethics Committee under protocol number 1890/2010. Results: All of the 32 patients were homozygous with a mean age in the prescription of hydroxyurea of 19.72±7.58 years, an initial dose of 15.59±4.27 mg/kg/day, and 22.48±5.35 mg/kg/day in the fourth year of treatment. Regarding the use of HU, average values of some hematological parameters presented a significant difference in the fourth year compared to the mean values prior to HU use, such as fetal hemoglobin (14.49±7.52%, red blood cells (2.54±0.38x1012/L, hematocrit (25.30±4.03% and hemoglobin (9.22±3.34g/dL.  Conclusion: Treatment with hydroxyurea showed a significant increase in fetal hemoglobin levels, increased hemoglobin, hematocrit and average corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, with reduced episodes of pain, infection and acute chest syndrome in such a way as to reaffirm its efficiency in treating these patients. Keywords: Hemoglobin; Sickle Cell Anemia; Hydroxyurea.

  16. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  17. Radiation hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherbin, E.A.; Chukhlovin, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    State-of-the-Art ofl radiation hematology and review of the problems now facing this brauch of radiobiology and nuclear medicine are presented. Distortion of division and maturation of hemopoiesis parent cells is considered as main factor of radiopathology for hematopoetic system. Problems of radiation injury and functional variation of hematopoetic microenvironment cell populations are discussed. 176 figs.; 23 figs.; 18 tabs

  18. Invasive fungal sinusitis in patients with hematological malignancy: 15 years experience in a single university hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Shang-Yi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk factors and outcomes in hematological patients who acquire invasive fungal sinusitis (IFS are infrequently reported in the modern medical era. Method A retrospective study of hospitalized patients with hematological disease was conducted at National Taiwan University Hospital between January 1995 and December 2009. Results Clinical characteristics and outcomes with their associated radiographic and microbiological findings were analyzed. Forty-six patients with IFS and 64 patients with chronic non-invasive sinusitis were enrolled as comparsion. IFS developed more commonly in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML and with prolonged neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count less than 500/mm3 for more than 10 days (p Aspergillus flavus was the most common pathogen isolated (44%. Serum Aspergillus galactomannan antigen was elevated in seven of eleven patients (64% with IFS caused by aspergillosis but negative for all three patients with mucormycosis. Bony erosion and extra-sinus infiltration was found in 15 of 46 (33% patients on imaging. Overall, 19 of 46 patients (41.3% died within 6 weeks. Patients with disease subtype of AML (p = 0.044; Odds Ratio [OR], 5.84; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.02-30.56 and refractory leukemia status (p = 0.05; OR, 4.27; 95% CI, 1.003-18.15 had worse prognosis. Multivariate analysis identified surgical debridement as an independent good prognostic factor (p = 0.047 in patients with IFS. Conclusions Patients of AML with prolonged neutropenia (> 10 days had significantly higher risk of IFS. Early introduction of anti-fungal agent and aggressive surgical debridement potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in high risk patients with IFS.

  19. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  20. Clinical Pathways and the Patient Perspective in the Pursuit of Value-Based Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Jennifer L; Nadler, Eric; Freeman-Daily, Janet; Mazharuddin, Samir; Kim, Edward S

    2017-01-01

    The art of practicing oncology has evolved substantially in the past 5 years. As more and more diagnostic tests, biomarker-directed therapies, and immunotherapies make their way to the oncology marketplace, oncologists will find it increasingly difficult to keep up with the many therapeutic options. Additionally, the cost of cancer care seems to be increasing. Clinical pathways are a systematic way to organize and display detailed, evidence-based treatment options and assist the practitioner with best practice. When selecting which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway, considerations must include the efficacy and safety, as well as costs, of the therapy. Pathway treatment regimens must be continually assessed and modified to ensure that the most up-to-date, high-quality options are incorporated. Value-based models, such as the ASCO Value Framework, can assist providers in presenting economic evaluations of clinical pathway treatment options to patients, thus allowing the patient to decide the overall value of each treatment regimen. Although oncologists and pathway developers can decide which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway based on the efficacy of the treatment, assessment of the value of that treatment regimen ultimately lies with the patient. Patient definitions of value will be an important component to enhancing current value-based oncology care models and incorporating new, high-quality, value-based therapeutics into oncology clinical pathways.

  1. Effects of an intervention aimed at improving nurse-patient communication in an oncology outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Mette Trøllund; Jensen, Mette Lund; Andersen, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    skills training program in nursing cancer care. Twenty-four nurses in an oncology outpatient clinic participated and were randomly assigned to the intervention program or a control group. A total of 413 patients treated in the clinic during 2 recruitment periods (before and after the communication skills...

  2. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  3. Cancer patients' motives for psychosocial consultation-Oncology social workers' perceptions of 226 patient cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson, Joakim; Lilliehorn, Sara; Salander, Pär

    2018-04-01

    Although oncology social workers (OSWs) have emerged as a core profession in the provision of psychosocial services, there is a lack of empirical studies that describe their daily clinical work with patients. The overall aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' motives for consulting an OSW. From a nationwide survey, we used data from 226 patient cases that OSWs met face to face. The OSWs were asked to describe how the case was referred to them, the patient's characteristics, and what they perceived as the patient's motives for contacting them as well as additional motives that came up during the consultations. Patients have different motives for consulting an OSW, and these motives change over the course of consultations; while feelings associated with being diagnosed with cancer were often the initial motive, questions associated with moving on in life and dealing with relationships and the overall life situation were added over time. The results show that Swedish OSWs' function is multifaceted and that the initial motives among patients rarely predict the content in consultations over time. Based on the diversity of motives, it seems obvious that OSWs (at least in Sweden) need a broad education in the psychology of counselling. It also seems obvious that even if patients initially were referred by health care staff to the OSW due to psychological reactions to being ill, staff should also be attentive to the fact that relational and socio-economic/juridical issues are of great concern for the patients. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Intensive postoperative glucose control reduces the surgical site infection rates in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Niaimi, Ahmed N; Ahmed, Mostafa; Burish, Nikki; Chackmakchy, Saygin A; Seo, Songwon; Rose, Stephen; Hartenbach, Ellen; Kushner, David M; Safdar, Nasia; Rice, Laurel; Connor, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    SSI rates after gynecologic oncology surgery vary from 5% to 35%, but are up to 45% in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Strict postoperative glucose control by insulin infusion has been shown to lower morbidity, but not specifically SSI rates. Our project studied continuous postoperative insulin infusion for 24h for gynecologic oncology patients with DM and hyperglycemia with a target blood glucose of controlled with intermittent subcutaneous insulin injections. Group 2 was composed of patients with DM and postoperative hyperglycemia whose blood glucose was controlled by insulin infusion. Group 3 was composed of patients with neither DM nor hyperglycemia. We controlled for all relevant factors associated with SSI. We studied a total of 372 patients. Patients in Group 2 had an SSI rate of 26/135 (19%), similar to patients in Group 3 whose rate was 19/89 (21%). Both were significantly lower than the SSI rate (43/148, 29%) of patients in Group 1. This reduction of 35% is significant (p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed an odd ratio = 0.5 (0.28-0.91) in reducing SSI rates after instituting this protocol. Initiating intensive glycemic control for 24h after gynecologic oncology surgery in patients with DM and postoperative hyperglycemia lowers the SSI rate by 35% (OR = 0.5) compared to patients receiving intermittent sliding scale insulin and to a rate equivalent to non-diabetics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Association between PER3 length polymorphism and onco-hematological diseases and its influences on patients' functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Cerliani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clock gene PER3 and its length polymorphism may have a role in oncogenesis as clock genes act as key regulators of cell cycle and DNA repair pathways. The polymorphism may affect the condition of patients who show disrupted circadian rhythm due to tumor development. The aim was to assess the association between PER3 polymorphism and onco-hematological diseases, and analyze whether this variant has an impact on patient’s functionality. We conducted a case-control study on 125 patients with onco-hematological diseases and 310 control patients. PER3 allelic variants were detected by using polymerase chain reaction. Sociodemographic data and information on patient’s habits and functionality were obtained through questionnaire. Genotypes 4/5 + 5/5 showed an odd ratio (OR = 1.39, with no statistical significance. However, those genotypes were associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of acute/chronic lymphoblastic/myeloblastic leukemia, taken all together. The occurrence of “changes in humor during last two months” was significantly associated with onco-hematological diseases. “Fatigue on awakening” and “self-reported snore” were associated with cases carrying the 4/5 or 5/5 genotypes. The results suggested that PER3 polymorphism may have a role in the risk of leukemia, and might be a possible marker for individual differences in susceptibility to sleep disruption. This work provides insights for the identification of individuals at high risk of cancer, and those who are more susceptible to circadian disruption, which may decrease the physiological defenses against the tumor.

  6. 2014 President's plenary international psycho-oncology society: moving toward cancer care for the whole patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultz, Barry D; Travado, Luzia; Jacobsen, Paul B; Turner, Jane; Borras, Josep M; Ullrich, Andreas W H

    2015-12-01

    The International Psycho-oncology Society (IPOS) has just celebrated its 30th anniversary. The growth of psychosocial oncology has been exponential, and this relatively new field is becoming a core service that focuses on prevention, reducing the burden of cancer, and enhancing the quality of life from time of diagnosis, through treatment, survivorship, and palliative care. Looking back over the past 30 years, we see that cancer care globally has evolved to a new and higher standard. Today, 'cancer care for the whole patient' is being accomplished with an evidence-based model that addresses psychosocial needs and integrates psycho-oncology into the treatment and care of patients. The President's Plenary Session in Lisbon, Portugal, highlighted the IPOS Mission of promoting global excellence in psychosocial care of people affected by cancer through our research, public policy, advocacy, and education. The internationally endorsed IPOS Standard of Quality Cancer Care, for example, clearly states the necessity of integrating the psychosocial domain into routine care, and that distress should be measured as the sixth vital sign after temperature, blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, and pain. The plenary paper also discussed the global progress being made in Europe, North America, and Australia in providing quality cancer care for the whole patient. Collaborative partnerships between IPOS and organizations such as the European Partnership Action Against Cancer and the World Health Organization are essential in building capacity for the delivery of high-quality psycho-oncology services in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Striking hematological abnormalities in patients with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II): a potential role of pericentrin in hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Sule; Alanay, Yasemin; Cetin, Mualla; Boduroglu, Koray; Utine, Eda; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Huber, Celine; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Kilic, Esra; Simsek Kiper, Ozlem Pelin; Gumruk, Fatma

    2014-02-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is a rare primordial dwarfism that is similar to Seckel syndrome. Seckel syndrome is known to be associated with various hematological abnormalities; however, hematological findings in MOPD II patients have not been previously reported. The present study aimed to describe the hematological findings in a series of eight patients with MOPD II from a single center. The study included eight patients with MOPD II that were analyzed via molecular testing, and physical and laboratory examinations. Molecular testing showed that seven of the eight patients had pericentrin (PCNT) gene mutations. Hematological evaluation showed that 7 (87.5%) patients had thrombocytosis, 6 (75%) had leukocytosis, 5 (62.5%) had both leukocytosis and thrombocytosis, and 2 (25%) had anemia. We report leukocytosis and thrombocytosis as a common hematologic abnormality in patients with MOPD II. The present findings may improve our understanding of the potential function of the PCNT gene in hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamps Willem A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17, 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents.

  9. [Patient-centered care. Improvement of communication between university medical centers and general practitioners for patients in neuro-oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renovanz, M; Keric, N; Richter, C; Gutenberg, A; Giese, A

    2015-12-01

    Communication between university medical centers and general practitioners (GP) is becoming increasingly more important in supportive patient care. A survey among GPs was performed with the primary objective to assess their opinion on current workflow and communication between GPs and the university medical center. The GPs were asked to score (grades 1-6) their opinion on the current interdisciplinary workflow in the care of patients with brain tumors, thereby rating communication between a university medical center in general and the neuro-oncology outpatient center in particular. Questionnaires were sent to1000 GPs and the response rate was 15 %. The mean scored evaluation of the university medical center in general was 2.62 and of the neuro-oncological outpatient clinic 2.28 (range 1-6). The most often mentioned issues to be improved were easier/early telephone information (44 %) and a constantly available contact person (49 %). Interestingly, > 60 % of the GPs indicated they would support web-based tumor boards for interdisciplinary and palliative neuro-oncological care. As interdisciplinary care for neuro-oncology patients is an essential part of therapy, improvement of communication between GPs and university medical centers is indispensable. Integrating currently available electronic platforms under data protection aspects into neuro-oncological palliative care could be an interesting tool in order to establish healthcare networks and could find acceptance with GPs.

  10. Associations between dyadic coping and supportive care needs: findings from a study with hematologic cancer patients and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißflog, Gregor; Hönig, Klaus; Gündel, Harald; Lang, Dirk; Niederwieser, Dietger; Döhner, Hartmut; Vogelhuber, Martin; Mehnert, Anja; Ernst, Jochen

    2017-05-01

    The way couples mutually cope with hematologic cancer is likely to influence their levels of supportive care needs (SCN). Therefore, this study evaluated the levels of dyadic coping (DC) and SCN and the concurrent associations between both variables. Three hundred thirty patients with a hematologic malignancy (63% male) and their partners completed the dyadic coping inventory (DCI) and the supportive care needs survey (SCNS-SF-34-G). The levels of dyadic coping (DC) and supportive care needs (SCN) were compared with representative validation samples. Correlational analyses and actor-partner interdependence models (APIM) were calculated to estimate the association between DC and SCN. Partners' stress communication of cancer patients (as part of DC) was decreased in contrast to that of a non-cancer sample. The perception of partners' delegated DC was higher (both with a moderate effect size of g ≥ |0.50|). SCN of patients and partners were lower in the dimensions health system/information and physical problems/daily living in contrast to those of a cancer patients' validation sample (both with a small effect of g ≥ |0.20|). Higher perceptions of partners' negative DC were associated with higher SCN for both patients and partners. The same was true for patients' own stress communication and SCN, but only for the patients. Sociodemographic and illness-related factors were only partially related with the SCN of patients and partners. In order to diminish SCN of patients and partners, a possible way is to strengthen the quality of the dyadic relation. Due to its associations with elevated SCN, stress communication and negative dyadic coping behaviours may be useful targets for psychosocial interventions.

  11. A study of the hematological profile of human immunodeficiency virus positive patients in coastal South Indian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarshi Saha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In India, approximately 6 million populations are affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Anemia and leukopenia, especially thrombocytopenia is seen commonly in HIV infections. Low CD4+ count and increased viral load are some of the factors associated with increased risk of thrombocytopenia. We analyzed the hematological profile in a group of 150 HIV infected patients. Materials and Methods: A retrospective and prospective study of medical records of 150 HIV positive patients at Clinical Pathology laboratory at our institution was done between August 1 st and October 15 th, 2011 using nonrandom sampling. Hemoglobin (Hb, hematocrit, red cell indices, total leukocyte and differential count, CD4+ and platelet count were noted. Results: Of the 150 patients, 40 (26.67% were below age 10 and 98 (65.33% in 21-50 years age group. Eighty-six (57.33% were females. Hundred patients had anemia (Hb <12 g/dl of which 58% were microcytic hypochromic (MCHC. Eighteen patients had leukopenia along with anemia. Total number of patients with low CD4 count (<200/μL was 32 (21.33% and all had hematological abnormalities, mostly anemias with few leukopenia and thrombocytopenias. All patients with pancytopenia had low CD4+ counts. Total number of patients with thrombocytopenia (<1.5 lacs/dl was 20 (13.33%. Four patients (2.67% had pancytopenia. Conclusions: MCHC anemia is the most common morphological variant of anemia. Leukopenia was found to be consistently associated with anemia. Thus, anemia and to a greater extent leukopenia are bad prognostic indicators of disease. Pancytopenia may herald a low CD4+ count.

  12. Hematological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluery-Herard, A.

    1991-01-01

    The principles of hematological dosimetry after acute or protracted whole-body irradiation are reviewed. In both cases, over-exposure is never homogeneous and the clinical consequences, viz medullary aplasia, are directly associated with the mean absorbed dose and the seriousness and location of the overexposure. The main hematological data required to assess the seriousness of exposure are the following: repeated blood analysis, blood precursor cultures, as indicators of whole-body exposure; bone marrow puncture, medullary precursor cultures and medullary scintigraphy as indicators of the importance of a local over-exposure and capacity for spontaneous repair. These paraclinical investigations, which are essential for diagnosis and dosimetry, are also used for surveillance and for the main therapeutic issues [fr

  13. Correlation between high-resolution computed tomography and galactomannan antigenemia in adult hematologic patients at risk for invasive aspergillosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, A.; Parody, R.; Martino, R.; Sanchez, F.; Franquet, T.; Gimenez, A.; Blancas, C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse the predominant radiological pattern of pulmonary lesions in adult hematologic patients at risk for invasive aspergillosis (IA) together with the results of serial serum Aspergillus galactomannan antigen testing (GM). Material and methods: In a prospective study for patients at high risk of aspergillus pulmonary infection, serum GM were performed 2-3 times per week during the periods of high risk for IA and high-resolution CT (HRCT) was performed in case of abnormal chest X-ray (CXR) and/or persistent fever after 5 days of antibiotic treatment. Changes on HRCT scan were classified as airway IA and angioinvasive IA. IA was classified as proven or probable in accordance with the definitions stated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group (EORTC-MS). Positive GM testing was not considered as microbiological criterion. Results: 38 hematological patients were diagnosed of probable (n = 28) or proven (n = 10) IA. 55% patients had a neutrophil count less than 500 mm -3 (n = 21), and 37% patients ≥2 risk factors for IA. All probable IA were diagnosed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Proven IA was reached by positive histopathologic and culture results of samples obtained by autopsy (n = 4), percutaneous (n = 3) or transbronchial biopsy (n = 3). 18 patients had airway IA, and 60% had a GM level ≥1.5. 20 patients were diagnosed of angioinvasive IA from which 80% had a GM level ≥1.5. Conclusion: Serum GM levels may be lower in patients with airway IA than in those with an angioinvasive form. HRCT and serum GM are complementary tests in the diagnosis of IA.

  14. Cognitive compensatory processes of older, clinically fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy: A longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, Yves; Borghgraef, Cindy; Beguin, Yves; Delvaux, Nicole; Devos, Martine; Doyen, Chantal; Dubruille, Stéphanie; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Straetmans, Nicole; Van Den Neste, Eric; Bron, Dominique; Razavi, Darius

    2017-12-01

    Despite the well-known negative impacts of cancer and anticancer therapies on cognitive performance, little is known about the cognitive compensatory processes of older patients with cancer. This study was designed to investigate the cognitive compensatory processes of older, clinically fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy. We assessed 89 consecutive patients (age ≥ 65 y) without severe cognitive impairment and 89 age-, sex-, and education level-matched healthy controls. Cognitive compensatory processes were investigated by (1) comparing cognitive performance of patients and healthy controls in novel (first exposure to cognitive tasks) and non-novel (second exposure to the same cognitive tasks) contexts, and (2) assessing psychological factors that may facilitate or inhibit cognitive performance, such as motivation, psychological distress, and perceived cognitive performance. We assessed cognitive performance with the Trail-Making, Digit Span and FCSR-IR tests, psychological distress with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and perceived cognitive performance with the FACT-Cog questionnaire. In novel and non-novel contexts, average cognitive performances of healthy controls were higher than those of patients and were associated with motivation. Cognitive performance of patients was not associated with investigated psychological factors in the novel context but was associated with motivation and psychological distress in the non-novel context. Older, clinically fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy demonstrated lower cognitive compensatory processes compared to healthy controls. Reducing distress and increasing motivation may improve cognitive compensatory processes of patients in non-novel contexts. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Transthoracic ultrasonography for the immunocompromised patient. A pilot project that introduces transthoracic ultrasonography for the follow-up of hematological patients in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frinc, Ioana; Ilies, Petru; Zaharie, Florin; Dima, Delia; Tanase, Alina; Petrov, Ljubomir; Irimie, Alexandru; Berce, Cristian; Lisencu, Cosmin; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Bojan, Anca

    2017-06-01

    In the past decade, there has been significant progress in clinical hematology with the discovery of targeted molecules and thus the achievement of both hematologic and molecular responses. Nevertheless, chemotherapy remains the treatment of choice for many types of hematological malignancies. Aggressive chemotherapy leads to immunosuppression, accompanied by a high rate of infections and an increased rate of treatment-related mortality. Invasive fungal infections as well as more common bacterial and viral infections are frequent in immunocompromised patients as they are difficult to diagnose and treat. Pleuropulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients are diagnosed using clinical examination, imaging and laboratory tests. Many laboratory tests are run for several days before a final result is given and are expensive. Computer tomography is a reliable technique, but it is encumbered by high irradiation and high cost, and can assess lesions larger than 1 cm. Transthoracic ultrasound is a modern method, used in the diagnostic algorithm of pleuropulmonary pathology. It allows the diagnosis of small lesions, can be performed at the patients' bedside, with acceptable costs and no irradiation. A fast, informed and accurate medical decision is essential for a favorable outcome in immunosuppressed patients with an adjacent infection. In the current case series we present the implementation of a new protocol for the follow-up of immunocompromised patients using transthoracic ultrasonography, of great potential use in the clinic.

  16. Precision oncology in advanced cancer patients improves overall survival with lower weekly healthcare costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslem, Derrick S.; Chakravarty, Ingo; Fulde, Gail; Gilbert, Heather; Tudor, Brian P.; Lin, Karen; Ford, James M.; Nadauld, Lincoln D.

    2018-01-01

    The impact of precision oncology on guiding treatment decisions of late-stage cancer patients was previously studied in a retrospective analysis. However, the overall survival and costs were not previously evaluated. We report the overall survival and healthcare costs associated with precision oncology in these patients with advanced cancer. Building on a matched cohort study of 44 patients with metastatic cancer who received all of their care within a single institution, we evaluated the overall survival and healthcare costs for each patient. We analyzed the outcomes of 22 patients who received genomic testing and targeted therapy (precision oncology) between July 1, 2013 and January 31, 2015, and compared to 22 historically controlled patients (control) who received standard chemotherapy (N = 17) or best supportive care (N = 5). The median overall survival was 51.7 weeks for the targeted treatment group and 25.8 weeks for the control group (P = 0.008) when matching on age, gender, histological diagnosis and previous treatment lines. Average costs over the entire period were $2,720 per week for the targeted treatment group and $3,453 per week for the control group, (P = 0.036). A separate analysis of 1,814 patients with late-stage cancer diagnoses found that those who received a targeted cancer treatment (N = 93) had 6.9% lower costs in the last 3 months of life compared with those who did not. These findings suggest that precision oncology may improve overall survival for refractory cancer patients while lowering average per-week healthcare costs, resource utilization and end-of-life costs. PMID:29552312

  17. Impact of the lung oncology multidisciplinary team meetings on the management of patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Kim Ann; Campbell, Belinda A; Duplan, Danny; Ball, David; David, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are increasingly regarded as a component of multidisciplinary cancer care. We aimed to prospectively measure the impact of MDT meetings on clinicians' management plans for lung oncology patients, and the implementation rate of the meeting recommendations. Consecutive patient cases presented at the weekly lung oncology MDT meetings were prospectively enrolled. Investigators compared the clinicians' management plans pre-meeting with the consensus plans post-meeting. The meeting was considered to have an impact on management plans if ≥1 of the following changes were detected: tumor stage, histology, treatment intent or treatment modality, or if additional investigations were recommended. Investigators reviewed hospital patient records at 4 months to determine if the meeting recommendations were implemented. Reasons for non-implementation were also recorded. Of the 55 eligible cases, the MDT meeting changed management plans in 58% (CI 45-71%; P management plans for lung oncology patients. The majority of MDT recommendations (72%) were implemented into patient care. These findings provide further evidence to support the role of MDT meetings as an essential part of the decision-making process for the optimal multidisciplinary management of patients with cancer. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Use of inflammatory molecules to predict the occurrence of fever in onco-hematological patients with neutropenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, A.F. Tibúrcio; Nobre, V.; Neuenschwander, L.C. [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Teixeira, A.L. [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Xavier, S.G.; Paula, F.D.F. [Departamento de Propedêutica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Teixeira, M.M. [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Teixeira, J.C.A.; Bittencourt, H. [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-02-01

    Febrile neutropenia remains a frequent complication in onco-hematological patients, and changes in the circulating level of inflammatory molecules (IM) may precede the occurrence of fever. The present observational prospective study was carried out to evaluate the behavior of plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), soluble TNF-α I and II receptors (sTNFRI and sTNFRII), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1 or chemokine (c-c motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α or CCL3), eotaxin (CCL11), interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8), and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10) in 32 episodes of neutropenia in 26 onco-hematological patients. IM were tested on enrollment and 24-48 h before the onset of fever and within 24 h of the first occurrence of fever. Eight of 32 episodes of neutropenia did not present fever (control group) and the patients underwent IM tests on three different occasions. sTNFRI levels, measured a median of 11 h (1-15) before the onset of fever, were significantly higher in patients presenting fever during follow-up compared to controls (P = 0.02). Similar results were observed for sTNFRI and CCL2 levels (P = 0.04 for both) in non-transplanted patients. A cut-off of 1514 pg/mL for sTNFRI was able to discriminate between neutropenic patients with or without fever during follow-up, with 65% sensitivity, 87% specificity, and 93% positive predictive value. Measurement of the levels of plasma sTNFRI can be used to predict the occurrence of fever in neutropenic patients.

  19. Use of inflammatory molecules to predict the occurrence of fever in onco-hematological patients with neutropenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Tiburcio Ribeiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Febrile neutropenia remains a frequent complication in onco-hematological patients, and changes in the circulating level of inflammatory molecules (IM may precede the occurrence of fever. The present observational prospective study was carried out to evaluate the behavior of plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, soluble TNF-α I and II receptors (sTNFRI and sTNFRII, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1 or chemokine (c-c motif ligand 2 (CCL2], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α or CCL3, eotaxin (CCL11, interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8, and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10 in 32 episodes of neutropenia in 26 onco-hematological patients. IM were tested on enrollment and 24-48 h before the onset of fever and within 24 h of the first occurrence of fever. Eight of 32 episodes of neutropenia did not present fever (control group and the patients underwent IM tests on three different occasions. sTNFRI levels, measured a median of 11 h (1-15 before the onset of fever, were significantly higher in patients presenting fever during follow-up compared to controls (P = 0.02. Similar results were observed for sTNFRI and CCL2 levels (P = 0.04 for both in non-transplanted patients. A cut-off of 1514 pg/mL for sTNFRI was able to discriminate between neutropenic patients with or without fever during follow-up, with 65% sensitivity, 87% specificity, and 93% positive predictive value. Measurement of the levels of plasma sTNFRI can be used to predict the occurrence of fever in neutropenic patients.

  20. Analysis of the potential effect of ponatinib on the QTc interval in patients with refractory hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnichsen, Daryl; Dorer, David J; Cortes, Jorge; Talpaz, Moshe; Deininger, Michael W; Shah, Neil P; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Bixby, Dale; Mauro, Michael J; Flinn, Ian W; Litwin, Jeffrey; Turner, Christopher D; Haluska, Frank G

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac dysfunction, particularly QT interval prolongation, has been observed with tyrosine kinase inhibitors approved to treat chronic myeloid leukemia. This study examines the effects of ponatinib on cardiac repolarization in patients with refractory hematological malignancies enrolled in a phase 1 trial. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were collected at 3 dose levels (30, 45, and 60 mg) at 6 time points. Electrocardiographic parameters, including QTc interval, were measured, and 11 morphological analyses were conducted. Central tendency analyses of ECG parameters were performed using time-point and time-averaged approaches. All patients with at least 2 baseline ECGs and 1 on-treatment ECG were included in the analyses. Patients with paired ECGs and plasma samples were included in the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis to examine the relationship between ponatinib plasma concentration and change from baseline in QT intervals. Thirty-nine patients at the 30-, 45-, and 60-mg dose levels were included in the central tendency and morphological analyses. There was no significant effect on cardiac repolarization, as evidenced by non-clinically significant mean QTcF changes from baseline of -10.9, -3.6, and -5.0 ms for the 30-, 45-, and 60-mg dose levels, respectively. The morphological analysis revealed 2 patients with atrial fibrillation and 2 with T wave inversion. Seventy-five patients were included in the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis across all dose levels. The slope of the relationship for QTcF versus plasma ponatinib concentration was not positive (-0.0171), indicating no exposure-effect relationship. Ponatinib is associated with a low risk of QTc prolongation in patients with refractory hematological malignancies.

  1. Transthoracic ultrasonography for the immunocompromised patient. A pilot project that introduces transthoracic ultrasonography for the follow-up of hematological patients in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frinc Ioana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, there has been significant progress in clinical hematology with the discovery of targeted molecules and thus the achievement of both hematologic and molecular responses. Nevertheless, chemotherapy remains the treatment of choice for many types of hematological malignancies. Aggressive chemotherapy leads to immunosuppression, accompanied by a high rate of infections and an increased rate of treatment-related mortality. Invasive fungal infections as well as more common bacterial and viral infections are frequent in immunocompromised patients as they are difficult to diagnose and treat. Pleuropulmonary infections in immunocompromised patients are diagnosed using clinical examination, imaging and laboratory tests. Many laboratory tests are run for several days before a final result is given and are expensive. Computer tomography is a reliable technique, but it is encumbered by high irradiation and high cost, and can assess lesions larger than 1 cm. Transthoracic ultrasound is a modern method, used in the diagnostic algorithm of pleuropulmonary pathology. It allows the diagnosis of small lesions, can be performed at the patients’ bedside, with acceptable costs and no irradiation. A fast, informed and accurate medical decision is essential for a favorable outcome in immunosuppressed patients with an adjacent infection. In the current case series we present the implementation of a new protocol for the follow-up of immunocompromised patients using transthoracic ultrasonography, of great potential use in the clinic.

  2. The effect of weight-based chemotherapy dosing in a cohort of gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jean; Stephan, Jean-Marie; Freesmeier, Michele; Bender, David; Button, Anna; Goodheart, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Many clinicians limit chemotherapy doses based on a maximum body surface area (BSA) of 2m(2). We sought to determine how chemotherapy-related toxicities compared between groups of patients that varied with respect to BSA. We hypothesized that obese patients receiving weight-based (WB) dosing would not have significantly higher chemotherapy-related toxicities than control groups. We performed a retrospective review of patients with BSA≥2m(2) who received WB chemotherapy for a gynecologic cancer between January and August 2013. Subjects were matched with two controls: patients with BSAGynecologic cancer patients with BSA≥2m(2) treated with WB chemotherapy had no increase in hematologic or non-hematologic toxicities when compared to controls. Consideration should be given to using WB dosing in obese patients with gynecologic malignancies. Further investigation is required to determine the effect of WB dosing on progression-free and overall survival in obese gynecologic cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient-centered care in cancer treatment programs: the future of integrative oncology through psychoeducation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garchinski, Christina M; DiBiase, Ann-Marie; Wong, Raimond K; Sagar, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    The reciprocal relationship between the mind and body has been a neglected process for improving the psychosocial care of cancer patients. Emotions form an important link between the mind and body. They play a fundamental role in the cognitive functions of decision-making and symptom control. Recognizing this relationship is important for integrative oncology. We define psychoeducation as the teaching of self-evaluation and self-regulation of the mind-body process. A gap exists between research evidence and implementation into clinical practice. The patients' search for self-empowerment through the pursuit of complementary therapies may be a surrogate for inadequate psychoeducation. Integrative oncology programs should implement psychoeducation that helps patients to improve both emotional and cognitive intelligence, enabling them to better negotiate cancer treatment systems.

  4. Ethical leadership, professional caregivers' well-being, and patients' perceptions of quality of care in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Nicolas; Fouquereau, Evelyne; Coillot, Hélène; Bonnetain, Franck; Dupont, Sophie; Moret, Leïla; Anota, Amélie; Colombat, Philippe

    2018-04-01

    Although quality of care and caregivers' well-being are important issues in their own right, relatively few studies have examined both, especially in oncology. The present research thus investigated the relationship between job-related well-being and patients' perceptions of quality of care. More specifically, we examined the indirect effects of ethical leadership on patients' perceived quality of care through caregivers' well-being. A cross-sectional design was used. Professional caregivers (i.e., doctors, nurses, assistant nurses, and other members of the medical staff; n = 296) completed a self-report questionnaire to assess perceptions of ethical leadership and well-being, while patients (n = 333) competed a self-report questionnaire to assess their perceptions of quality of care. The study was conducted in 12 different oncology units located in France. Results revealed that ethical leadership was positively associated with professional caregivers' psychological well-being that in turn was positively associated with patients' perceptions of quality of care. Professional caregivers' well-being is a psychological mechanism through which ethical leadership relates to patients' perceptions of quality of care. Interventions to promote perceptions of ethical leadership behaviors and caregivers' mental health may thus be encouraged to ultimately enhance the quality of care in the oncology setting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucinous Histology Signifies Poor Oncologic Outcome in Young Patients With Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Basem G; Karagkounis, Georgios; Church, James M; Plesec, Thomas; Kalady, Matthew F

    2018-05-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer in the young (under age 40) is increasing, and this population has worse oncologic outcomes. Mucinous histology is a potential prognostic factor in colorectal cancer, but has not been evaluated specifically in young patients. The objective of the study was to determine factors associated with poor outcome in young patients with colorectal cancer (≤40 years) and to determine relationships between mucinous histology and oncologic outcomes in this population. This is a retrospective study. Patients from a single-institution tertiary care center were studied. A total of 224 patients with colorectal cancer under 40 years of age diagnosed between 1990 and 2010 were included (mean age, 34.7 years; 51.3% female). 34 patients (15.2%) had mucinous histology. There were no interventions. Oncologic outcomes were analyzed according to the presence of mucinous histology. The mucinous and nonmucin colorectal cancer study populations were statistically similar in age, sex, tumor location, pathological stage, differentiation, and adjuvant chemotherapy use. Five-year disease-free survival was 29.1% versus 71.3% (p colorectal cancers recurred earlier at a median time of 36.4 months versus 94.2 months for nonmucin colorectal cancers (p colorectal cancer. This is associated with early and high recurrence rates, despite use of standard neoadjuvant and adjuvant regimens. Physicians need to be aware of this association and potentially explore novel treatment options. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A575.

  6. Readability of Orthopaedic Oncology-related Patient Education Materials Available on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Akash K; Yi, Paul H; Stein, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    A person's health literacy is one of the most important indicators of a patient's health status. According to national recommendations, patient education materials should be written at no higher than the sixth- to eighth-grade reading level. The purpose of our study was to assess the readability of online patient education materials related to orthopaedic oncology on the websites of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), American Cancer Society (ACS), Bone and Cancer Foundation (BCF), and National Cancer Institute (NCI). We searched the online patient education libraries of the AAOS, ACS, BCF, and NCI for all articles related to orthopaedic oncology. The Flesch-Kincaid (FK) readability score was calculated for each article and compared between sources. A total of 227 articles were identified with an overall mean FK grade level of 9.8. Stratified by source, the mean FK grade levels were 10.1, 9.6, 11.1, and 9.5 for the AAOS, ACS, BCF, and NCI, respectively (P education materials related to orthopaedic oncology appear to be written at a level above the comprehension ability of the average patient. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  7. Alterações hematológicas em pacientes com dengue Hematological abnormalities in patients with dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éveny Cristine Luna de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue é uma doença negligenciada de alta morbidade e mortalidade em crianças e adultos, ocorrendo principalmente em regiões tropicais e subtropicais. O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar as alterações hematológicas de pacientes com quadro clínico de dengue. Foram estudados 543 prontuários de atendimentos referentes à epidemia pelo vírus tipo 3, ocorrida no ano de 2007, em Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul. Houve predomínio de casos de dengue clássico (90,2%, com quadro clínico leve sem complicações. As principais alterações hematológicas observadas foram a leucopenia (68,3%, plaquetopenia (66,5%, linfocitopenia (67,2% e presença de linfócitos atípicos (67%. A febre hemorrágica do dengue apresentou plaquetopenia mais prolongada e maior número de linfócitos atípicos, as demais alterações hematológicas apresentaram evolução diária semelhante às encontradas no dengue clássico. As alterações hematológicas observadas no dengue apresentaram-se de acordo com a evolução clínica e gravidade da doença.Dengue is a neglected disease with high morbidity and mortality among children and adults that occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical regions. The objective of this study was to evaluate hematological changes in patients with clinical manifestations of dengue. Medical records relating to 543 cases of dengue virus 3 that occurred during the 2007 epidemic in Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, were studied. Cases of classic dengue predominated (90.2%, with mild clinical manifestations lacking complications. The main hematological findings were leukopenia (68.3%, thrombocytopenia (66.5%, lymphocytopenia (67.2% and atypical lymphocytes (67%. In dengue hemorrhagic fever, thrombocytopenia was more prolonged and the number of atypical lymphocytes was higher, while the other hematological abnormalities presented daily evolution similar to those in classic dengue. The hematological changes observed in dengue present according

  8. An investigation into the spiritual needs of neuro-oncology patients from a nurse perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nixon Aline Victoria

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spiritual needs of cancer patients should be assessed and discussed by healthcare professionals. Neurosurgical nurses need to be able to assess and support neuro-oncology patients with their spiritual needs from diagnosis and throughout their hospital stay. Methods Data were collected through questionnaires using a Critical Incident Technique (CIT from neurosurgical nurses, findings were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Nurses reported some awareness of their patients’ spiritual needs during their stay on neurosurgical units although some used expressions approximating what could be described as spiritual needs. Patients’ spiritual needs were identified as: need to talk about spiritual concerns, showing sensitivity to patients’ emotions, responding to religious needs; and relatives’ spiritual needs included: supporting them with end of life decisions, supporting them when feeling being lost and unbalanced, encouraging exploration of meaning of life, and providing space, time and privacy to talk. Participants appeared largely to be in tune with their patients’ spiritual needs and reported that they recognised effective strategies to meet their patients’ and relatives’ spiritual needs. However, the findings also suggest that they don’t always feel prepared to offer spiritual support for neuro-oncology patients. Conclusions There is a need for healthcare professionals to provide spiritual care for neuro-oncology patients and their relatives. Although strategies were identified that nurses can use to support patients with spiritual needs further research is required to explore how effective nurses are at delivering spiritual care and if nurses are the most appropriate professionals to support neuro-oncology patients with spiritual care.

  9. Prospective evaluation through questionnaires of the emotional status of cancer patients in the waiting rooms of a department of oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Resega; Sheila Piva; Annalisa Bramati; Christian Lurati; Nicla La Verde; Marco Riva; Marina Chiara Garassino; Anna Moretti; Claudio Mencacci; Valter Torri; Gabriella Farina; Maria Chiara Dazzani

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to better identify the prevailing emotions and feelings of cancer patients during their stay in waiting rooms in a department of oncology. Methods: In July 2014, patients in the waiting rooms of our Department of Oncology were asked to fill out dedicated questionnaires. Patients had to choose sentences that best described their feelings, thoughts and experiences; this part was differentiated according to the waiting rooms (Consultation Rooms versus Day H...

  10. Focusing on cancer patients' intentions to use psycho-oncological support: a longitudinal, mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondorf, T; Grossert, A; Rothschild, S I; Koller, M T; Rochlitz, C; Kiss, A; Schaefert, R; Meinlschmidt, G; Hunziker, S; Zwahlen, D

    2018-04-15

    Distress screening programs aim to ensure appropriate psycho-oncological support for cancer patients, but many eligible patients do not use these services. To improve distress management, we need to better understand patients' supportive care needs. In this paper, we report the first key finding from a longitudinal study that focused on patients' intentions to use psycho-oncological support, and its association with distress and uptake of the psycho-oncology service. We conducted a prospective, observational study in an Oncology Outpatient Clinic and assessed distress, intention to use psycho-oncological support, and uptake of the psycho-oncology service using the Distress Thermometer (DT), a semi-structured interview, and hospital records. We analyzed data with a mixed-methods approach. Of 333 patients (mean age 61 years; 55% male; 54% DT≥5), 25% intended to use the psycho-oncology service (yes), 33% were ambivalent (maybe), and 42% reported no intention (no). Overall, 23% had attended the psycho-oncology service four months later. Ambivalent patients reported higher distress than patients with no intention (odds ratio (OR)=1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI)[1.06-1.32]) but showed significantly lower uptake behavior than patients with an intention (OR=14.04, 95%CI [6.74-29.24]). Qualitative analyses revealed that ambivalent patients (maybe) emphasized fears and uncertainties, while patients with clear intentions (yes/no) emphasized knowledge, attitudes, and coping concepts. We identified a vulnerable group of ambivalent patients with high distress levels and low uptake behavior. To optimize distress screening programs, we suggest addressing and discussing patients' supportive care needs in routine clinical practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-Term Shedding of Influenza Virus, Parainfluenza Virus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Nosocomial Epidemiology in Patients with Hematological Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Lehners

    Full Text Available Respiratory viruses are a cause of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI, but can be associated with severe lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI in immunocompromised patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic variability of influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and the duration of viral shedding in hematological patients. Nasopharyngeal swabs from hematological patients were screened for influenza, parainfluenza and RSV on admission as well as on development of respiratory symptoms. Consecutive swabs were collected until viral clearance. Out of 672 tested patients, a total of 111 patients (17% were infected with one of the investigated viral agents: 40 with influenza, 13 with parainfluenza and 64 with RSV; six patients had influenza/RSV or parainfluenza/RSV co-infections. The majority of infected patients (n = 75/111 underwent stem cell transplantation (42 autologous, 48 allogeneic, 15 autologous and allogeneic. LRTI was observed in 48 patients, of whom 15 patients developed severe LRTI, and 13 patients with respiratory tract infection died. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a variety of influenza A(H1N1pdm09, A(H3N2, influenza B, parainfluenza 3 and RSV A, B viruses. RSV A was detected in 54 patients, RSV B in ten patients. The newly emerging RSV A genotype ON1 predominated in the study cohort and was found in 48 (75% of 64 RSV-infected patients. Furthermore, two distinct clusters were detected for RSV A genotype ON1, identical RSV G gene sequences in these patients are consistent with nosocomial transmission. Long-term viral shedding for more than 30 days was significantly associated with prior allogeneic transplantation (p = 0.01 and was most pronounced in patients with RSV infection (n = 16 with a median duration of viral shedding for 80 days (range 35-334 days. Long-term shedding of respiratory viruses might be a catalyzer of nosocomial transmission and must be considered for

  12. The more, the less: age and chemotherapy load are predictive of poor stem cell mobilization in patients with hematologic malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shen-miao; CHEN Huan; CHEN Yu-hong; ZHU Hong-hu; ZHAO Ting; LIU Kai-yan

    2012-01-01

    Background Intensive treatment such as autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation is an important therapeutic strategy in many hematologic malignancies.A number of factors have been reported to impact PBSC mobilization,but the predictive factors varied from one study to another.This retrospective study assessed our current mobilization and collection protocols,and explored the factors predictive of PBSC mobilization in patients with hematologic malignancies.Methods Data of 64 consecutive patients with hematologic malignancies (multiple myeloma,n=22; acute leukemia,n=27; lymphoma,n=15) who underwent PBSC mobilization for over 1 year were analyzed.Four patients with response to treatment of near complete remission or better were administered granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize PBSCs.Sixty patients received G-CSF followed by chemotherapy mobilizing regimens.Poor mobilization (PM) was defined as when ≤2.0×106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight were collected within three leukapheresis procedures.Results The incidence of PM at the first mobilization attempt was 19% (12/64).The PM group was older than the non-PM group (median age,51 vs.40 years; P=0.013).In univariate analysis,there were no significant differences in gender,diagnosis,and body weight between the PM and non-PM groups.A combination of chemotherapy and G-CSF was more effective than G-CSF alone as a mobilizing regimen (P=0.019).Grade Ⅲ or Ⅳ hematopoietic toxicity of chemotherapy had no significant effect on the mobilization efficacy.Supportive care and the incidence of febrile neutropenia were not significantly different between the two groups.In multivariate analysis,age (odds ratio (OR),9.536;P=-0.002) and number of previous chemotherapy courses (OR 3.132; P=0.024) were two independent negative predictive factors for CD34+ cell yield.PM patients could be managed well by remobilization.Conclusion Older age and a heavy load of previous chemotherapy are the negative

  13. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided

  14. Fears, Uncertainties, and Hopes: Patient-Initiated Actions and Doctors’ Responses During Oncology Interviews*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Wayne A.; Dozier, David M.

    2015-01-01

    New cancer patients frequently raise concerns about fears, uncertainties, and hopes during oncology interviews. This study sought to understand when and how patients raise their concerns, how doctors responded to these patient-initiated actions, and implications for communication satisfaction. A sub-sampling of video recorded and transcribed encounters was investigated involving 44 new patients and 14 oncologists. Patients completed pre-post self-report measures about fears, uncertainties, and hopes as well as post-evaluations of interview satisfaction. Conversation Analysis (CA) was employed to initially identify pairs of patient-initiated and doctor-responsive actions. A coding scheme was subsequently developed, and two independent coding teams, comprised of two coders each, reliably identified patient-initiated and doctor-responsive social actions. Interactional findings reveal that new cancer patients initiate actions much more frequently than previous research had identified, concerns are usually raised indirectly, and with minimal emotion. Doctors tend to respond to these concerns immediately, but with even less affect, and rarely partner with patients. From pre-post results it was determined that the higher patients’ reported fears, the higher their post-visit fears and lower their satisfaction. Patients with high uncertainty were highly proactive (e.g., asked more questions), yet reported even greater uncertainties following encounters. Hopeful patients also exited interviews with high hopes. Overall, new patients were very satisfied: Oncology interviews significantly decreased patients’ fears and uncertainties, while increasing hopes. Discussion raises key issues for improving communication and managing quality cancer care. PMID:26134261

  15. Radiotherapy in pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas. A subgroup analysis within the prospective multicenter study HIT-LGG 1996 by the German Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology (GPOH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, K. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Gnekow, A.; Falkenstein, F. [General Hospital of Augsburg (Germany). Hospital for Children and Adolescents] [and others

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: We evaluated clinical outcomes in the subset of patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT) due to progressive pilocytic astrocytoma within the Multicenter Treatment Study for Children and Adolescents with a Low Grade Glioma HIT-LGG 1996. Patients and methods: Eligibility criteria were fulfilled by 117 patients. Most tumors (65 %) were located in the supratentorial midline, followed by the posterior fossa (26.5 %) and the cerebral hemispheres (8.5 %). Median age at the start of RT was 9.2 years (range 0.7-17.4 years). In 75 cases, external fractionated radiotherapy (EFRT) was administered either as first-line nonsurgical treatment (n = 58) or after progression following primary chemotherapy (n = 17). The median normalized total dose was 54 Gy. Stereotactic brachytherapy (SBT) was used in 42 selected cases. Results: During a median follow-up period of 8.4 years, 4 patients (3.4 %) died and 33 (27.4 %) experienced disease progression. The 10-year overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 97 and 70 %, respectively. No impact of the RT technique applied (EFRT versus SBT) on progression was observed. The 5-year PFS was 76 {+-} 5 % after EFRT and 65 {+-} 8 % after SBT. Disease progression after EFRT was not influenced by gender, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) status, tumor location (hemispheres versus supratentorial midline versus posterior fossa), age or prior chemotherapy. Normalized total EFRT doses of more than 50.4 Gy did not improve PFS rates. Conclusion: EFRT plays an integral role in the treatment of pediatric pilocytic astrocytoma and is characterized by excellent tumor control. A reduction of the normalized total dose from 54 to 50.4 Gy appears to be feasible without jeopardizing tumor control. SBT is an effective treatment alternative. (orig.)

  16. The patient-centered medical home in oncology: from concept to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ray D; Newcomer, Lee N; Sprandio, John D; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cost of providing quality cancer care has been subject to an epic escalation causing concerns on the verge of a health care crisis. Innovative patient-management models in oncology based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) principles, coupled with alternative payments to traditional fee for service (FFS), such as bundled and episodes payment are now showing evidence of effectiveness. These efforts have the potential to bend the cost curve while also improving quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, going forward with FFS alternatives, there are several performance-based payment options with an array of financial risks and rewards. Most novel payment options convey a greater financial risk and accountability on the provider. Therefore, the oncology medical home (OMH) can be a way to mitigate some financial risks by sharing savings with the payer through better global care of the patient, proactively preventing complications, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations. However, much of the medical home infrastructure that is required to reduced total costs of cancer care comes as an added expense to the provider. As best-of-practice quality standards are being elucidated and refined, we are now at a juncture where payers, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should work in concert to expand and implement the OMH framework into the variety of oncology practice environments to better equip them to assimilate into the new payment reform configurations of the future.

  17. Patients' and Parents' Needs, Attitudes, and Perceptions About Early Palliative Care Integration in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Deena R; Mandrell, Belinda N; Sykes, April; Pritchard, Michele; Gibson, Deborah; Symons, Heather J; Wendler, David; Baker, Justin N

    2017-09-01

    Early palliative care integration for cancer patients is now touted as the optimal care model, yet significant barriers often prevent its implementation. A perceived barrier, especially for pediatric oncology patients, is the notion that patients and their families may not need or want palliative care involvement early in the disease trajectory. To determine the perception of symptom burden early in treatment and assess attitudes toward early integration of palliative care in pediatric oncology patient-parent pairs. Novel but pretested survey tools were administered to 129 patient-parent dyads of hospital-based pediatric oncology ambulatory clinics and inpatient units between September 2011 and January 2015. All patient participants were aged between 10 and 17 years and were diagnosed as having an oncologic condition 1 month to 1 year before enrollment. Both the patient and the parent in the dyad spoke English, and all participating parents provided written informed consent. A convenience sample was used for selection, with participants screened when otherwise presenting at a participating site. A total of 280 eligible participants were approached for study inclusion, 258 of whom were enrolled in the study (92.1% positive response-rate). Degree of perceived suffering from early symptom-related causes, attitudes toward early palliative care integration, and patient-parent concordance. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, calculation of concordance, McNemar test results, and Cochran-Armitage trend test results. Of the 129 patients in the dyads, 68 were boys, and 61 girls; of the 129 parents, 15 were men, and 114 women. Patients reported the following symptoms in the first month of cancer therapy: nausea (n = 109; 84.5%), loss of appetite (n = 97; 75.2%), pain (n = 96; 74.4%), anxiety (n = 77; 59.7%), constipation (n = 69; 53.5%), depression (n = 64; 49.6%), and diarrhea (n = 52; 40.3%). A large proportion of those

  18. Regulatory barriers to clinical trial enrollment of adolescent and young adult oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgenhauer, Judy; Hooke, Mary C

    2014-06-01

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer may face unique challenges if they and their families wish to participate in clinical oncology trials. Regulatory guidelines and funding requirements put in place to protect patients may actually raise barriers to enrollment in clinical trials. Hospital age guidelines may need to be readdressed to better suit the needs of AYA patients. Finally, the creation of the National Clinical Trials Network will provide new opportunities for pediatric and medical oncologists to collaborate in the care of AYA patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Partnering with patients in translational oncology research: ethical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamzer, Marie-France; Duchange, Nathalie; Darquy, Sylviane; Marvanne, Patrice; Rambaud, Claude; Marsico, Giovanna; Cerisey, Catherine; Scotté, Florian; Burgun, Anita; Badoual, Cécile; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Hervé, Christian

    2017-04-08

    The research program CARPEM (cancer research and personalized medicine) brings together the expertise of researchers and hospital-based oncologists to develop translational research in the context of personalized or "precision" medicine for cancer. There is recognition that patient involvement can help to take into account their needs and priorities in the development of this emerging practice but there is currently no consensus about how this can be achieved. In this study, we developed an empirical ethical research action aiming to improve patient representatives' involvement in the development of the translational research program together with health professionals. The aim is to promote common understanding and sharing of knowledge between all parties and to establish a long-term partnership integrating patient's expectations. Two distinct committees were settled in CARPEM: an "Expert Committee", gathering healthcare and research professionals, and a "Patient Committee", gathering patients and patient representatives. A multidisciplinary team trained in medical ethics research ensured communication between the two committees as well as analysis of discussions, minutes and outputs from all stakeholders. The results highlight the efficiency of the transfer of knowledge between interested parties. Patient representatives and professionals were able to identify new ethical challenges and co-elaborate new procedures to gather information and consent forms for adapting to practices and recommendations developed during the process. Moreover, included patient representatives became full partners and participated in the transfer of knowledge to the public via conferences and publications. Empirical ethical research based on a patient-centered approach could help in establishing a fair model for coordination and support actions during cancer research, striking a balance between the regulatory framework, researcher needs and patient expectations. Our approach addresses

  20. For Our Patients, for Ourselves: The Value of Personal Reflection in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Lidia; Meisel, Jane Lowe; Srivastava, Ranjana

    2017-01-01

    Caring for patients with cancer is a great privilege as well as an emotionally and intellectually challenging task. Stress and burnout are prevalent among oncology clinicians, with serious repercussions for the care of patients. Professional societies must provide guidance for trainees and practicing physicians to mitigate the negative consequences of stress on their personal lives and medical practice. Reflection, reading, and writing about personal experiences provide outlets for fortifying personal reserves and promoting resilience to allow us to recognize the joy and meaning of our work and to forge connections with our peers. Herein, we present some of our own reflections on how and why one might take time to write, and about the power of the written word in oncology and medicine.

  1. Second medical opinions: the views of oncology patients and their physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Jennifer; Gold, Michelle; Schwarz, Max; Komesaroff, Paul

    2010-09-01

    Second medical opinions (SMOs) are common in oncology practice, but the nature of these consultations has received relatively little attention. This study examines the views of patients with advanced cancer and their physicians of SMOs. Parallel, concurrent surveys were developed for patients and physicians. The first was distributed to outpatients with advanced cancer-attending specialist clinics in an Australian quaternary hospital. The second survey, developed on the basis of results of exploratory interviews with medical oncologists, was distributed to medical oncologists in Australia. Seventeen of fifty two (33%) patients had sought a SMO, most commonly prompted by concerns around communication with their first doctor, the extreme and desperate nature of their medical condition and the need for reassurance. Most (94%) patients found the SMO helpful, with satisfaction related to improved communication and reassurance. Patients were concerned that seeking a second medical opinion may affect their relationship with their primary doctor. Most physicians (82%) reported seeing between one and five SMO per month, with patients being motivated by the need for additional information and reassurance. Physicians regarded SMO patients as having greater information needs (84%), greater psychosocial needs (58%) and requiring more of the physician's time and energy (77%) than other patients. SMOs are common in cancer care with most patients motivated by the need for improved communication, additional information and reassurance. Physicians identify patients who seek SMOs as having additional psychosocial needs compared with other oncology patients.

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy and risk of gastrointestinal, hematologic, and cardiac toxicities in elderly patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chung-Yuan; Chan, Wenyaw; Delclos, George P; Du, Xianglin L

    2012-06-01

    Randomized trials have established the effectiveness of 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III resectable colon cancer but the toxicity has not been well established outside the trial setting. The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of various toxicity-related endpoints among the elderly patients. Patients diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in 1991 to 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Chemotherapy use within 3 months after tumor resection was identified from submitted claims. We reported the 3-month cumulative incidence rate (CIR) for gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities. The risk of ischemic heart disease in relation to chemotherapy use and length was assessed using Cox regression models, stratified by age and comorbidity subgroups. Of the 12,099 patients, 63.9% (n=7740) received adjuvant chemotherapy. Common gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities among chemotherapy group include volume depletion disorder (CIR=9.1%), agranulocytosis (CIR=3.4%), diarrhea (CIR=2.4%), nausea and vomiting (CIR=2.3%). Chemotherapy use was significantly associated with the onset of these toxicities [hazard ratio (HR)=2.76; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=2.42-3.15]. The risk of ischemic heart disease was slightly associated with chemotherapy use (HR=1.08, 95% CI=0.96-1.22), but significant only among patients aged colon cancer. On account of the effects of these side effects on treatment discontinuation, rehospitalization, and overall health status, some close monitoring and preventive measures may be emphasized to maximize the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy.

  3. Cancerous patients and outbreak of Escherichia coli: an important issue in oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Joob, Beuy; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2014-01-01

    The widespread of the Escherichia coli outbreak in Europe becomes an important public concern at global level. The infection can be serious and might result in death. The retrospective literature review on this specific topic is performed. In this specific brief article, the author presented and discussed on the problem of Escherichia coli infection in the cancerous patients. This is an actual important issue in medical oncology for the scenario of Escherichia coli epidemic.

  4. Medical Cannabis: The Oncology Nurse's Role in Patient Education About the Effects of Marijuana on Cancer Palliation
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Carey S

    2018-02-01

    Cannabis, also known as marijuana, is legal either medicinally or recreationally in 29 states and the District of Columbia, with a majority of the U.S. adult population now living in states where cannabis is legal for medicinal use. As an advocate for patient autonomy and informed choice, the oncology nurse has an ethical responsibility to educate patients about and support their use of cannabis for palliation.
. This article aims to discuss the human endocannabinoid system as a basis for better understanding the palliative and curative nature of cannabis as a medicine, as well as review cannabis delivery methods and the emerging role of the oncology nurse in this realm.
. This article examines the literature and uses a theoretical-conceptual method to explore the oncology nurse's role in supporting the use of medicinal cannabis by patients with cancer. 
. The oncology nurse can play a pivotal role in supporting patients' use of cannabis for palliation.

  5. Internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Mills

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the arena of radiation oncology special procedures, medical physicists are often the focus professionals for implementation and administration of advanced and complex technologies. One of the most vexing and challenging aspects of managing complexity concerns the ongoing internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures. To demonstrate ongoing qualification, a physicist must a document initial training and successful completion of competencies to implement and perform this procedure, b demonstrate familiarity with all aspects of the commissioning and quality assurance process, c demonstrate continuing education respecting this procedure, d demonstrate the peer-reviewed completion of a minimum number of patient special procedures during a specified time span, and e demonstrate satisfactory overall progress toward maintenance of specialty board certification. In many respects, this information complement is similar to that required by an accredited residency program in therapy physics. In this investigation, we report on the design of a management tool to qualify staff radiation oncology physicists to deliver patient procedures.

  6. [Selected ethical problems of oncologic patients during the terminal period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaszczyszyn, J; Kwiecińska, A

    2001-01-01

    Patient suffering from terminal disease is depended on his environment more than any other one. He often suffers from nervous break down, anxiety and fear and he is usually unprotected from the environment. Fast development of medical science and its technicisation can lead towards dehumanization and lack of psychological and spiritual care, which should be based on clear ethical principles. Main lines of ethical principles of Health Service which are included in Deontological Code of Physicians and Collection of ethical principles for a qualified nurse are the main rules how to proceed as to fulfill the rule: "benefit of a patient is the superior law." According to its speciality Palliative Medicine introduces also four general ethical principles: 1. Patient will is a rule of treatment. 2. The principle of proportion--benefits from the treatment should be higher than losses and suffering from iatrogenic acting. 3. The principle of equality--stop taking a cure does not differ from not undertaking treatment. 4. The principle of relativity--life is not an absolute good, death is not an absolute evil. Holistic acts of Palliative Medicine determines also specific ethical attitudes, especially in the following: 1. Communication between a therapist and a patient and his family (interpersonal attitudes). 2. Procedures how to lessen suffering and its interpretation according to culture, tradition and religion ("nonsense and significance of suffering"). 3. Negation of euthanasia. 4. Spiritual, psychological and social care of patients.

  7. Patient engagement in the design and execution of urologic oncology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel J; Avulova, Svetlana; Conwill, Ralph; Barocas, Daniel A

    2017-09-01

    There have been significant effort and financial support to engage patients in the design and execution of medical research. However, little is known about the relative benefits or potential impact of involving patients in research, most efficient practices and systems to enhance their involvement, and potential barriers and challenges that are involved with engaging patients. In this review, we will discuss the value of patient centered research, review the challenges that many of these studies faced, and highlight potential future opportunities to enhance patient involvement in urologic research. An English-language literature search was performed in the electronic databases of Medline (PubMed), EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, the Cochrane Library, and on the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) website. Search items included "patient-centered research," "patient-reported outcomes" and "patient engagement" in various combinations. Although PCORI has funded almost 600 projects with $1.6 billion to improve patient centered research, the search revealed 3 studies of patient engagement in the development, management, and execution of urologic oncology research. Patient engagement in the design and execution of medical research can help align research topics to match patient priorities, improve survey and data collection tools, increase patient recruitment and participation in studies, and improve accessibility and dissemination of clinically relevant results from medical research. However, engagement patients in research requires significant investment of time, financial support, and energy from the patients, stakeholders, and researchers to provide mutual benefit. In the three studies in urologic oncology that involved patients, the patients provided a significant impact on the structure of the studies and helped improve the ability of patients to apply the results from the research studies. The benefits to involving patients in research to

  8. Fifteen-minute music intervention reduces pre-radiotherapy anxiety in oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee-Chen; Wang, Tze-Fang; Shih, Yi-Nuo; Wu, Le-Jung

    2013-08-01

    Oncology patients may respond to radiation treatment with anxiety expressed as stress, fear, depression, and frustration. This study aimed to investigate effects of music intervention on reducing pre-radiotherapy anxiety in oncology patients. Quasi-experimental study with purposeful sampling was conducted in the Department of Radiation Oncology, at Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Subjects were assigned into a music group (n = 100) receiving 15 min of music therapy prior to radiation and a control group (n = 100) receiving 15 min rest prior to radiation. Both groups were evaluated for pre- and post-test anxiety using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Physiological indicators of anxiety were measured pre- and post-test. Baseline State/Trait scores and vital signs were comparable between groups (P > 0.05). Mean change in pre- and post-test State/Trait scores showed significant decreases from baseline to post-test in both groups (all P music therapy and control groups in mean change of State anxiety scores (mean decreases 7.19 and 1.04, respectively; P music and control groups (-5.69 ± 0.41 mmHg vs. -0.67 ± 1.29 mmHg, respectively; P = 0.009). Music therapy decreased State anxiety levels, Trait anxiety levels and systolic blood pressure in oncology patients who received the intervention prior to radiotherapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nutrition screening by MUST on the oncological patient in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Paula Acevedo Souza dos; Cunha, Tamires Regina da Silva; Soares, Bruna Lucia de Mendonca; Maio, Regiane; Burgos, Maria Goretti Pessoa de Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiotherapy contributes to the reduction of food intake and increased weight loss due to the appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms, which consequently leads to malnutrition. Objective: Identify nutritional risk through the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), in patients submitted to radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Method: Cross-sectional study with outpatients at the radiotherapy service of the Cancer Hospital of Pernambuco, during October 2014 until May 2015. Socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle (smoking, alcohol use and physical activity), anthropometric variables (habitual weight, current weight and body mass index), comorbidities (hypertension and diabetes), tumor type, time since diagnosis and duration of treatment were evaluated. Nutritional risk was assessed using the MUST, which classifies patients as being at low, medium or high nutritional risk. Results: 150 patients were studied with an average age of 47.3 years, with a predominance of women (72%) and similar proportions of adults and elderly individuals. The sample mainly comprised individuals from in-state regions and inactive/retired individuals who received one to three times the minimum salary. Nutritional risk was significantly higher among elderly individuals (62.9%), among whom high risk predominated (45.7%), whereas most adults had no risk (61.2%). The most frequent tumors were gynecological (59.4%) with weight gain (33.3%), followed by tumors of the head and neck region with a high degree of weight loss (p = 0.007). Conclusion: The use of MUST led to the detection of nutritional risk in 50% of the studied patients, with a predominance of elderly individuals, the majority of whom were at high risk. Tumors of the head and neck led to weight loss, whereas gynecological tumors led to weight gain. Out-patient nutritional screening is important for the early establishment of specialized nutritional counseling. (author)

  10. The Limited English Proficiency Patient Family Advocate Role: Fostering Respectful and Effective Care Across Language and Culture in a Pediatric Oncology Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Stephanie; Hooke, Mary C; Niess, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Patients and families with limited English proficiency (LEP) face a multitude of barriers both inside and outside the hospital walls. These barriers can contribute to difficulty accessing care and understanding/adhering to treatment recommendations, ultimately placing them at higher risk for poorer outcomes than their English-speaking counterparts. The LEP Patient Family Advocate role was created with the aim of improving access, promoting effective communication, and equalizing care for children with cancer from families with LEP. The goal of this mixed methods study was to describe the level of satisfaction and experiences of parents and health care providers who used the LEP Patient Family Advocate while receiving or providing care. Twelve parents and 15 health care providers completed quantitative surveys and an open-ended question about their experiences. High levels of satisfaction were reported. Themes about the role from qualitative responses included its positive effect on communication, trust, and connectedness between parents and staff. Continuity of care and safety were improved, and parents thought the role helped decrease their stress. The LEP Patient Family Advocate has a positive influence on family-centered cultural care. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  11. Fasting abbreviation among patients submitted to oncologic surgery: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    PINTO, Andressa dos Santos; GRIGOLETTI, Shana Souza; MARCADENTI, Aline

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The abbreviation of perioperative fasting among candidates to elective surgery have been associated with shorter hospital stay and decreased postoperative complications. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review from randomized controlled trials to detect whether the abbreviation of fasting is beneficial to patients undergoing cancer surgery compared to traditional fasting protocols. METHOD: A literature search was performed in electronic databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), SciELO...

  12. Percutaneous placement of peritoneal port-catheter in oncologic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsi, Franco; Vigna, Paolo Della; Bonomo, Guido; Penco, Silvia; Lovati, Elena; Bellomi, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the technique of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided placement of a peritoneal port-catheter in an interventional radiological setting. Nineteen patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis were selected for intraperitoneal port-catheter placement in order to perform intracavitary receptor-immuno- or radio-immunotherapy with Ytrium-90. All the procedures were performed percutaneously under US and fluoro guidance; the insertion site for catheters was chosen according to abdominal conditions and US findings: all devices were implanted at the lower abdominal quadrants. All patients were followed up with CT and US according to the therapy protocol. The procedure was successfully completed in 15/19 patients, in 4 being contraindicated by peritoneal adhesions. No procedure-related complications and device occlusions during therapy were observed; one catheter displaced 7 months later the placement. In our experience, this procedure was feasible, reliable and easy to perform, allowing the correct administration of the planned intracavitary therapy. Peritoneal adhesions are the main limitation of peritoneal port placement. (orig.)

  13. Factors determining the style of adaptation to the disease in patients treated oncologically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Smoleń

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cancer diseases still have the strongest impact on the human psyche, leading to the overwhelming life crisis. Each person, depending on personality traits and well-developed defense mechanisms, reacts individually to the diagnosis of the disease. Attitude towards the disease affects the quality of life and the outcome of treatment. Aim. Determination of factors determining the style of adaptation to cancer in patients during oncological treatment. Materials and methods. The research was conducted in a group of 229 randomly selected patients in Fr.. B. Markiewicz Specialist Hospital of the Podkarpacki Oncological Center. in Brzozów. The method used was a diagnostic survey and a survey technique. Research tools were the author's questionnaire, „The scale of mental adaptation to cancer” - Mini-MAC (Mental Adjustment to Cancer in the adaptation of Z. Juczyński and the numerical scale of pain assessment NRS (Numeric Rating Scale. In the statistical analysis, the following tests were used: Kruskal Wallis and the symmetric measure V Kramer based on the chi-square test. The statistical significance level p≤0.05 was assumed. Results. The level of adaptation to the disease in the studied group of oncological patients was on an average level, which indicates good adaptation to cancer. The dominant style of struggling with cancer was the construction style with the intensity of a fighting spirit and positive re-evaluation. The destructive style had a low intensity in the studied group, especially for a low level strategy of helplessness / hopelessness. Better adaptation has been demonstrated in individuals who do not experience pain and assess their health well. Conclusions. Factors not related to the style of coping with cancer were sociodemographic variables. Feeling of pain, self-esteem of health and applied methods of treatment influenced the style of coping with cancer in oncologically treated patients. The constructive style

  14. Pleurodesis for effusions in pediatric oncology patients at end of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, Fredric A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Children' s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Department of Radiology, R-5438, Seattle, WA (United States); Hancock, Michael L.; Rai, Shesh N. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Hinds, Pamela S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Nursing Research, Memphis, TN (United States); Oigbokie, Nikita [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Rao, Bhaskar [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Pleurodesis for end-of-life care has been used in adults for decades, but little is known about the usefulness of this technique in improving the quality of care for pediatric patients. To assess whether intractable pleural effusions in pediatric oncology patients at end of life could be sufficiently relieved by pleurodesis. Eleven pleurodeses were performed with doxycycline in seven pediatric cancer patients (age 3-21 years) with intractable pleural effusions at the end of life. Five patients had unilateral pleurodeses and two had a unilateral followed by bilateral pleurodeses. Respiratory rates decreased in all seven patients (P = 0.016) and aeration improved significantly after chest tube placement (P = 0.033). The chest tubes were placed a median of 1 day before pleurodesis. Eight of nine chest tubes (89%) were removed before discharge at a median of 3 days after pleurodesis. Pain secondary to the pleurodesis lasted 1 day or less. Improvement in the respiratory rate remained after pleurodesis and chest tube removal (P = 0.031). Five of seven patients (70%) were able to leave the hospital to return home. The five patients discharged lived 10 to 49 days (median 19 days) after discharge. Pediatric oncology patients with intractable effusions at end of life can have respiratory benefit from pleurodeses and, as a result, are more likely to return home for terminal care. (orig.)

  15. Pleurodesis for effusions in pediatric oncology patients at end of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffer, Fredric A.; Hancock, Michael L.; Rai, Shesh N.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Oigbokie, Nikita; Rao, Bhaskar

    2007-01-01

    Pleurodesis for end-of-life care has been used in adults for decades, but little is known about the usefulness of this technique in improving the quality of care for pediatric patients. To assess whether intractable pleural effusions in pediatric oncology patients at end of life could be sufficiently relieved by pleurodesis. Eleven pleurodeses were performed with doxycycline in seven pediatric cancer patients (age 3-21 years) with intractable pleural effusions at the end of life. Five patients had unilateral pleurodeses and two had a unilateral followed by bilateral pleurodeses. Respiratory rates decreased in all seven patients (P = 0.016) and aeration improved significantly after chest tube placement (P = 0.033). The chest tubes were placed a median of 1 day before pleurodesis. Eight of nine chest tubes (89%) were removed before discharge at a median of 3 days after pleurodesis. Pain secondary to the pleurodesis lasted 1 day or less. Improvement in the respiratory rate remained after pleurodesis and chest tube removal (P = 0.031). Five of seven patients (70%) were able to leave the hospital to return home. The five patients discharged lived 10 to 49 days (median 19 days) after discharge. Pediatric oncology patients with intractable effusions at end of life can have respiratory benefit from pleurodeses and, as a result, are more likely to return home for terminal care. (orig.)

  16. A review of cost communication in oncology: Patient attitude, provider acceptance, and outcome assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Chien, Chun-Ru

    2017-05-15

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology released its first guidance statement on the cost of cancer care in August 2009, affirming that patient-physician cost communication is a critical component of high-quality care. This forward-thinking recommendation has grown increasingly important in oncology practice today as the high costs of cancer care impose tremendous financial burden to patients, their families, and the health care system. For the current review, a literature search was conducted using the PubMed and Web of Science databases to identify articles that covered 3 topics related to patient-physician cost communication: patient attitude, physician acceptance, and the associated outcomes; and 15 articles from 12 distinct studies were identified. Although most articles that addressed patient attitude suggested that cost communication is desired by >50% of patients in the respective study cohorts, only communication. When asked about whether cost communication actually took place in their practice, percentages reported by physicians varied widely from 60%. The data suggested that cost communication was associated with improved patient satisfaction, lower out-of-pocket expenses, and a higher likelihood of medication nonadherence; none of the studies established causality. Both patients and physicians expressed a strong need for accurate, accessible, and transparent information about the cost of cancer care. Cancer 2017;123:928-39. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  17. Significance of appendiceal thickening in association with typhlitis in pediatric oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, M.B.; Thompson, J.; Adelman, C.S.; Lee, M.O.; Li, C.; Alsammarae, D.; Rao, B.N.; May, M.V.; Jones, S.C.; Sandlund, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    Background: The management of pediatric oncology patients with imaging evidence of appendiceal thickening is complex because they are generally poor surgical candidates and often have confounding clinical findings. Objective: We sought to determine the significance of appendiceal thickening in pediatric oncology patients who also had typhlitis. Specifically, we evaluated the impact of this finding on the duration of typhlitis, its clinical management, and outcome. Materials and methods: From a previous review of the management of typhlitis in 90 children with cancer at our institution, we identified 4 with imaging evidence of appendiceal thickening. We compared colonic wall measurements, duration of typhlitis symptoms, management, and outcome of patients with appendiceal thickening and typhlitis to patients with typhlitis alone. Results: There was no significant difference in duration of typhlitis symptoms between patients with typhlitis only (15.6 ± 1.2 days) and those with typhlitis and appendiceal thickening (14.5 ± 5.8 days; P = 0.9). Two patients with appendiceal thickening required surgical treatment for ischemic bowel, and two were treated medically. Only one patient in the typhlitis without appendiceal thickening group required surgical intervention. There were no deaths in children with appendiceal thickening; two patients died of complications of typhlitis alone. (orig.)

  18. [Barriers and facilitators to implementing shared decision-making in oncology: Patient perceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Moreno, M; Padilla-Garrido, N; Huelva-López, L; Aguado-Correa, F; Bayo-Calero, J; Bayo-Lozano, E

    To determine, from the point of view of the oncological patient, who made the decision about their treatment, as well as the major barriers and facilitators that enabled Shared Decision Making to be implemented. A cross-sectional, descriptive, sand association study using a self-report questionnaire to selected cancer patients, with casual sampling in different oncology clinics and random time periods. A total of 108 patients provided analysable data. The information was collected on sociodemographic and clinical variables, who made the decision about treatment, and level of agreement or disagreement with various barriers and facilitators. More than one-third (38.1%) of patients claimed to have participated in shared decision making with their doctor. Barriers such as, time, the difficulty of understanding, the paternalism, lack of fluid communication, and having preliminary and often erroneous information influenced the involvement in decision-making. However, to have or not have sufficient tools to aid decision making or the patient's interest to participate had no effect. As regards facilitators, physician motivation, their perception of improvement, and the interest of the patient had a positive influence. The exception was the possibility of financial incentives to doctors. The little, or no participation perceived by cancer patients in decisions about their health makes it necessary to introduce improvements in the health care model to overcome barriers and promote a more participatory attitude in the patient. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Planning for patient privacy and hospitability: a must do in oncology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, James G

    2003-01-01

    The number one design challenge in the healthcare environment is the patient room. This space is one of the primary functional areas impacting hospital design and, quite often, the place of greatest controversy. This controversy is due to the length of time the patient spends in the room (compared to other areas), the amount of overall space required and the time dedicated to patient room utilization, maintenance, general arrangement and overall efficiency. In addition, there is a growing list of room types to be considered, many are of the ambulatory care, short stay and observation category. Other room types beyond the routine medical/surgical room include Intensive Care, Coronary Care, Surgical Intensive Care, Skilled Nursing, Rehabilitation and Oncology Care as well as more intensive Bone Marrow Transplantation, for example. Major features of the traditional acute care patient room require the space to be flexible, convertible, expandable and, most importantly, hospitable. For many, many years the patient room was considered a shared space with multiple beds and multiple users. The term semi-private has been used to describe the traditional two-bed and, sometimes 4-bed patient room. This article will address the programmatic elements of an inpatient area, the room and its functional components along with some examples for comparative purposes. For the oncology patient, the development of a family-focused, private room is mandatory. The private room is more flexible, less expensive to operate, safer and environmentally more appealing for the patient, family and staff.

  20. [Patients' satisfaction and waiting time in oncology day care centers in Champagne-Ardenne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debreuve-Theresette, A; Jovenin, N; Stona, A C; Kraïem-Leleu, M; Burde, F; Parent, D; Hettler, D; Rey, J B

    2015-12-01

    Quality of life of patients suffering from cancer may be influenced by the way healthcare is organized and by patient experiences. Nowadays, chemotherapy is often provided in day care centers. This study aimed to assess patient waiting time and satisfaction in oncology day care centers in Champagne-Ardenne, France. This cross-sectional survey involved all patients receiving ambulatory chemotherapy during a one-week period in day care centers of Champagne-Ardenne public and private healthcare institutions participating in the study. Sociodemographic, medical and outpatient data were collected. Patient satisfaction was measured using the Out-Patsat35 questionnaire. Eleven (out of 16) oncology day care centers and 441 patients participated in the study. Most of the patients were women (n=252, 57.1%) and the mean age was 61±12 years. The mean satisfaction score was 82±14 (out of 100) and the mean waiting time between the assigned appointment time and administration of chemotherapy was 97±60 min. This study has shown that waiting times are important. However, patients are satisfied with the healthcare organization, especially regarding nursing support. Early preparation of chemotherapy could improve these parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Interventions to improve quality of life in oncological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Steinger, Brunhilde; Koller, Michael; Lindberg, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    The assessment of quality of life is a central aspect in the current debate in support groups, certified cancer centres, benefit assessment, and also in palliative care. Accordingly, quality of life has become an essential part of clinical trials for more than two decades. But most of the time results are presented in a descriptive manner without any concrete therapeutic consequences for the improvement of quality of life. Likewise, there are no uniform recommendations for considering quality of life data in the decision-making process. Therefore, a guide with recommendations for the assessment of quality of life in trials has been developed. Its implementation is illustrated by a complex intervention for a targeted diagnosis and therapy of quality of life in patients with breast cancer or colorectal cancer. The basis is a standardised quality of life assessment and the presentation of results in an intelligible fashion as well as the close collaboration of all healthcare providers to create regional network structures for the targeted support of patients in both the inpatient and outpatient sector. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Main communication barriers in the process of delivering bad news to oncological patients - medical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Paulina; Jarosz, Magdalena; Kwiecińska, Agnieszka; Bętkowska-Korpała, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Delivering bad news is a major aspect of a doctor's work. The literature most often refers to patient's expectations or needs, and methods of delivering bad news, while medical perspective is often skipped. The purpose of this paper is to examine competencies (knowledge, skills and experience) in delivering bad news by medical specialists in the areas related to the causal and symptomatic treatment of oncological patients; identification of major communication problems and obstacles in this specific situation and evaluation of teaching needs for delivering bad news. The study was performed on a group of 61 medical specialists in the areas related to the causal and symptomatic treatment of oncological patients, using a self-generated questionnaire based on other studies in the literature. Topics that are considered most demanding are: delivering news on the termination of causal treatment and preparing the patient/ close ones for death. The most difficult aspect of such discussions for the respondents was associated with the emotions manifested by the patient. On the other hand, doctors were mostly distressed by the feeling of taking the patient's hope away. The study points to the need for education of doctors in the eld of techniques for delivering bad news, particularly in the area of dealing with the emotions manifested by the patient and giving them real hope. The results encourage to conduct studies on a larger group of doctors.

  3. Effect of Intraperitoneal Bupivacaine on Postoperative Pain in the Gynecologic Oncology Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Colleen; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Teoh, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate if the administration of intraperitoneal bupivacaine decreased postoperative pain in patients undergoing minimally invasive gynecologic and gynecologic cancer surgery. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). University-based gynecologic oncology practice operating at a tertiary medical center. All patients on the gynecologic oncology service undergoing minimally invasive surgery between September 2011 and June 2013. Starting August 2012, intraperitoneal administration of .25% bupivacaine was added to all minimally invasive surgeries. These patients were compared with historical control subjects who had surgery between September 2011 and July 2012 but did not receive intraperitoneal bupivacaine. One-hundred thirty patients were included in the study. The patients who received intraperitoneal bupivacaine had lower median narcotic use on the day of surgery and the first postoperative day compared with those who did not receive intraperitoneal bupivacaine (day 0: 7.0 mg morphine equivalents vs 11.0 mg, p = .007; day 1: .3 mg vs 1.7 mg, p = .0002). The median patient-reported pain scores were lower on the day of surgery in the intraperitoneal bupivacaine group (2.7 vs 3.2, p = .05) CONCLUSIONS: The administration of intraperitoneal bupivacaine was associated with improved postoperative pain control in patients undergoing minimally invasive gynecologic and gynecologic cancer surgery and should be further evaluated in a prospective study. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Helping patients to reduce tobacco consumption in oncology: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchiari, Claudio; Masiero, Marianna; Botturi, Andrea; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The present overview focuses on evidence of smoking cessation approaches in oncology settings with the aim to provide health personnel a critical perspective on how to help their patients. This narrative review is structured in two main sections: the first one describes the psycho-cognitive variables involved in the decision to continue smoking after a cancer diagnosis and during the treatment; the second section relates methods and tools may be recommended, being evidence-based, to support smoking cessation in oncology settings. Active smoking increases not only susceptibility to common cancers in the general population, but also increases disease severity and comorbidities in cancer patients. Nowadays, scientific evidence has identified many strategies to give up smoking, but a lack of knowledge exists for treatment of nicotine dependence in the cancer population. Health personnel is often ambiguous when approaching the problem, while their contribution is essential in guiding patients towards healthier choices. We argue that smoking treatments for cancer patients deserve more attention and that clinical features, individual characteristics and needs of the patient should be assessed in order to increase the attempts success rate. Health personnel that daily work and interact with cancer patients and their caregivers have a fundamental role in the promotion of the health changing. For this reason, it is important that they have adequate knowledge and resources in order to support cancer patients to stop tobacco cigarette smoking and promoting and healthier lifestyle.

  5. Robotic surgery in urological oncology: patient care or market share?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Deborah R; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Carter, H Ballentine; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2015-01-01

    Surgical robotic use has grown exponentially in spite of limited or uncertain benefits and large costs. In certain situations, adoption of robotic technology provides value to patients and society. In other cases, however, the robot provides little or no increase in surgical quality, with increased expense, and, therefore, does not add value to health care. The surgical robot is expensive to purchase, maintain and operate, and can contribute to increased consumerism in relation to surgical procedures, and increased reliance on the technology, thus driving future increases in health-care expenditure. Given the current need for budget constraints, the cost-effectiveness of specific procedures must be evaluated. The surgical robot should be used when cost-effective, but traditional open and laparoscopic techniques also need to be continually fostered.

  6. Quality of life of patients after oncological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilkova, L.

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. It is conditionally multidimensional and multi-factor conditional. Usually, in medicine we monitor the impact of the disease on the physical and mental state of the patient’s subjective point of view. The quality of life of cancer patients affects psychological and somatic symptoms, e. g. depression, anxiety, changes in the perception of their own body image and self-esteem, decreased libido, pain, anger, fear from the future and from relapse, gastrointestinal upset, lymphedema, stoma, fatigue, insomnia. Important role have also failures of cognitive functions arising as a result of treatment toxicity. (author)

  7. Patient-centered image and data management in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steil, Volker; Schneider, Frank; Kuepper, Beate; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Weisser, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Background: recent changes in the radiotherapy (RT) workflow through the introduction of complex treatment paradigms such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and, recently, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with their increase in data traffic for different data classes have mandated efforts to further integrate electronic data management for RT departments in a patient- and treatment-course-centered fashion. Methods: workflow in an RT department is multidimensional and multidirectional and consists of at least five different data classes (RT/machine data, patient-related documents such as reports and letters, progress notes, DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) image data, and non-DICOM image data). Data has to be handled in the framework of adaptive feedback loops with increasing frequency. This is in contrast to a radiology department where mainly DICOM image data and reports have to be widely accessible but are dealt with in a mainly unidirectional manner. When compared to a diagnostic Radiology Information System (RIS)/Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), additional legal requirements have to be conformed to when an integrated electronic RT data management system is installed. Among these are extended storage periods, documentation of treatment plan approval by physicians and physicist, documentation of informed consent, etc. Conclusion: since the transition to a paper- and filmless environment in medicine and especially m radiation ''neology is unavoidable this review discusses these issues and suggests a possible hardware and organizational architecture of an RT department information system under control of a Hospital Information System (HIS), based on combined features of genuine RT Record and Verify (R and V) Systems, PACS, and Electronic Medical Records (EMR). (orig.)

  8. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) as Part of the Oncological Treatment: Survey about Patients' Attitude towards CAM in a University-Based Oncology Center in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin A; Lettner, Sabrina; Kessel, Carmen; Bier, Henning; Biedermann, Tilo; Friess, Helmut; Herrschbach, Peter; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Meyer, Bernhard; Peschel, Christian; Schmid, Roland; Schwaiger, Markus; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-01-01

    To understand if and which patients would be open-minded to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use parallel to their oncological treatment. Moreover, we sought to determine which methods are most accepted and which are the primary motivators to use CAM. We developed and anonymously conducted a questionnaire for patients in the oncology center (TU Munich). Questions focus on different CAM methods, previous experiences, and willingness to apply or use CAM when offered in a university-based setting. A total of 171 of 376 patients (37.4% women, 62.0% men, 0.6% unknown) participated. This corresponds to a return rate of 45%. Median age was 64 years (17-87 years). Of all participants, 15.2% used CAM during their oncological therapy; 32.7% have used it in the past. The majority (81.9%) was not using CAM during therapy; 55.5% have not used CAM in the past respectively. The analysis revealed a significant correlation between education and CAM use during therapy (r = 0.18; p = 0.02), and CAM use in the past (r = 0.17; p = 0.04). Of all patients using CAM during therapy, favored methods were food supplements (42.3%), vitamins/minerals (42.3%), massage (34.6%). Motivations are especially the reduction of side effect and stress, the positive effect of certain CAM-treatments on the immune system and tumor therapy. Results showed no difference between women and men. Most patients not having had any experience with CAM complain about the deficiency of information by their treating oncologist (31.4%) as well as missing treatment possibilities (54.3%). Since many patients believe in study results demonstrating the efficacy of CAM, it stresses our task to develop innovative study protocols to investigate the outcomes of certain CAM on symptom reduction or other endpoints. Thus, prospective trials and innovative evidence-based treatment concepts to include CAM into high-end oncology is what patients demand and what a modern oncology center should offer.

  9. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM as Part of the Oncological Treatment: Survey about Patients' Attitude towards CAM in a University-Based Oncology Center in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin A Kessel

    Full Text Available To understand if and which patients would be open-minded to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use parallel to their oncological treatment. Moreover, we sought to determine which methods are most accepted and which are the primary motivators to use CAM.We developed and anonymously conducted a questionnaire for patients in the oncology center (TU Munich. Questions focus on different CAM methods, previous experiences, and willingness to apply or use CAM when offered in a university-based setting.A total of 171 of 376 patients (37.4% women, 62.0% men, 0.6% unknown participated. This corresponds to a return rate of 45%. Median age was 64 years (17-87 years. Of all participants, 15.2% used CAM during their oncological therapy; 32.7% have used it in the past. The majority (81.9% was not using CAM during therapy; 55.5% have not used CAM in the past respectively. The analysis revealed a significant correlation between education and CAM use during therapy (r = 0.18; p = 0.02, and CAM use in the past (r = 0.17; p = 0.04. Of all patients using CAM during therapy, favored methods were food supplements (42.3%, vitamins/minerals (42.3%, massage (34.6%. Motivations are especially the reduction of side effect and stress, the positive effect of certain CAM-treatments on the immune system and tumor therapy. Results showed no difference between women and men. Most patients not having had any experience with CAM complain about the deficiency of information by their treating oncologist (31.4% as well as missing treatment possibilities (54.3%.Since many patients believe in study results demonstrating the efficacy of CAM, it stresses our task to develop innovative study protocols to investigate the outcomes of certain CAM on symptom reduction or other endpoints. Thus, prospective trials and innovative evidence-based treatment concepts to include CAM into high-end oncology is what patients demand and what a modern oncology center should offer.

  10. Central line-associated bloodstream infections in adult hematology patients with febrile neutropenia: an evaluation of surveillance definitions using differential time to blood culture positivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Joshua T; Elinder-Camburn, Anna; McClymont, Catherine; Anderson, Deverick J; Bilkey, Mary; Williamson, Deborah A; Berkahn, Leanne; Roberts, Sally A

    2013-01-01

    We used differential time to positivity between central and peripheral blood cultures to evaluate the positive predictive value (PPV) of the National Healthcare Safety Network central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) surveillance definition among hematology patients with febrile neutropenia. The PPV was 27.7%, which suggests that, when the definition is applied to this population, CLABSI rates will be substantially overestimated.

  11. Tools for Communication: Novel infrastructure to address patient-perceived gaps in oncology care
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Suzanne; Szabo, Shelagh; Halbert, Ronald J; Lai, Catherine; Parikh, Aparna; Bunce, Mikele; Khoury, Raya; Small, Art; Masaquel, Anthony

    2017-04-01

    Healthcare providers (HCPs) and patient communication are integral to high-quality oncology care. The patient and HCP perspectives are needed to identify gaps in care and develop communication tools.
. This study aimed to understand patient- and HCP-perceived elements of and gaps in high-quality care to develop novel communication tools to improve care. 
. Qualitative interviews were conducted among 16 patients with cancer and 10 HCPs in the United States. Trained interviewers elicited patients' and HCPs' concerns, views, and perceived needs for communication tools. A thematic analysis was used to identify four quality of care domains, depicted in a conceptual model, and two draft communication tools were developed to address identified gaps.
. No patients reported previously using a communication tool, and gaps in communication regarding treatment aims and education were evident. Two tools were developed to assess patients' life and treatment goals and the importance of ongoing education.

  12. Increasing diversity in pediatric hematology/oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frugé, Ernest; Lakoski, Joan M; Luban, Naomi; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Poplack, David G; Hagey, Anne; Felgenhauer, Judy; Hilden, Joanne; Margolin, Judith; Vaiselbuh, Sarah R; Sakamoto, Kathleen M

    2011-07-15

    Diversity is necessary for the survival and success of both biological and social systems including societies. There is a lack of diversity, particularly the proportion of women and minorities in leadership positions, within medicine [Leadley. AAMC 2009. Steinecke and Terrell. Acad Med 2010;85:236-245]. In 2009 a group of ASPHO members recognized the need to support the career advancement of women and minority members. This article reports the results of a survey designed to characterize the comparative career pathway experience of women and minority ASPHO members. A group of ASPHO members modified a published Faculty Worklife survey [Pribbenow et al. High Educ Policy 2010;23:17-38] for use by Pediatric Hematologist-Oncologists (PHOs). A link to an online version of the survey was sent to all ASPHO members. Of 1,228 ASPHO members polled, 213 responded (17%). Women and minority PHOs reported less satisfaction than their counterparts on 70 of the 90 issues addressed in the survey including the hiring process, access to resources as well as integration and satisfaction with their organizations. Women also expressed greater dissatisfaction with issues of work-life balance, support for family obligations and personal health. The current literature suggests that there are significant disparities in career opportunities, compensation and satisfaction for women compared to men and minority compared to majority faculty in academic medicine [Nivet. J Vasc Surg 2010;51:53S-58S; Peterson et al. J Gen Intern Med 2004;19:259-265; DesRoches et al. Acad Med 2010;85:631-639; Castillo-Page. AAMC 2008]. Our data, derived from a survey of ASPHO members, suggests that this holds true for PHOs as well.

  13. Patient-Physician Communication in Oncology Care : The character of, barriers against, and ways to evaluate patient-physician communication, with focus on the psychosocial dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Fagerlind, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to characterize patient-physician communication in oncology care with focus on the content and quality of the consultations from the perspectives of patients, oncologists and observer. Further, the aim was to explore oncologists’ perceived barriers against psychosocial communication in out-patient consultations. Finally, the aim was to evaluate different methods for evaluating communication in this setting. Routine oncology out-patient consultations from two...

  14. [Social and esthetic care in oncology, a part of the patient's journey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Dominique; Reaux, Martine

    2013-10-01

    Socio-aesthetic care in oncology, a parenthesis in the patient's journey. Socio-aesthetics, which is an aspect of support care, is carried out within the hospital. The treatments given into the suggestion of paramedical teams or at the request of patients provide relief and well-being to women and men who are treated for cancer. Recourse to services of socio-esthetics at various stages of the cancer treatment helps avoid isolation, regain confidence in one's self image and prepare for life "after cancer".

  15. Is the clinical use of cannabis by oncology patients advisable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Avisar, Adva; Batash, Ron; Schaffer, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The use of the cannabis plant for various medical indications by cancer patients has been rising significantly in the past few years in several European countries, the US and Israel. The increase in use comes from public demand for the most part, and not due to a scientific basis. Cannabis chemistry is complex, and the isolation and extraction of the active ingredient remain difficult. The active agent in cannabis is unique among psychoactive plant materials, as it contains no nitrogen and, thus, is not an alkaloid. Alongside inconclusive evidence of increased risks of lung and head and neck cancers from prolonged smoking of the plant produce, laboratory evidence of the anti-cancer effects of plant components exists, but with no clinical research in this direction. The beneficial effects of treatment with the plant, or treatment with medicine produced from its components, are related to symptoms of the disease: pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight loss. The clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabis for these indications is only partial. However, recent scientific data from studies with THC and cannabidiol combinations report the first clinical indication of cancer-related pain relief. The difficulties of performing research into products that are not medicinal, such as cannabis, have not allowed a true study of the cannabis plant extract although, from the public point of view, such studies are greatly desirable.

  16. Supporting cancer patients with work-related problems through an oncological occupational physician: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, A C G N M; Bruinvels, D J; de Boer, A G E M; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of an oncological occupational physician (OOP) who is trained in oncological work-related problems, and in providing work-related support to cancer patients within the curative setting. We assessed facilitators and barriers that affect the activities of an OOP, and the satisfaction of the OOPs and patients with this new form of health care. Interviews were held with (1) OOPs (N = 13) to assess facilitators, barriers and their satisfaction with their ability to give supportive care and (2) cancer patients (N = 8) to assess their satisfaction concerning consulting an OOP. The main facilitators were positive feedback from health care providers and patients about the received care and support that the OOP had given, and the additional knowledge of the OOPs about cancer and work-related problems. Major barriers for being active as an OOP were lack of financial support for the OOP and the unfamiliarity of patients and health care providers with the specialised occupational physician. Both OOPs and the specialised knowledge and additional training of the OOPs facilitated providing support to cancer patients and survivors with work-related problems. Familiarity with the specialised occupational physician and financial support should be improved. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Delivering care to oncology patients in the community: an innovative integrated approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanan, Terry

    2014-08-01

    A community oncology nursing programme was developed in Ireland between the hospital and community health services for patients receiving systemic cancer therapy, in response to a service need. A robust evaluation of the pilot programme was undertaken, which found that defined clinical procedures traditionally undertaken in hospitals were safely undertaken in the patient\\'s home with no adverse effects. There was a dramatic decrease in hospital attendances for these defined clinical procedures, and hospital capacity was consequently freed up. Patients valued having aspects of their care delivered at home and reported that it improved their quality of life, including reduced hospital visits and travel time. Community nurses expanded their scope of practice and became partners with oncology day-ward nurses in caring for these patients. Community nurses developed the competence and confidence to safely deliver cancer care in the community. This initiative shows that defined elements of acute cancer care can be safely delivered in the community so long as the training and support are provided. The findings and recommendations of the evaluation resulted in university accreditation and approval for national roll-out of the programme. Integration of services between primary and secondary care is a key priority. This innovative programme is a good example of shared integrated care that benefits both patients and health-care providers.

  18. Agonist-induced platelet reactivity correlates with bleeding in haemato-oncological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, B; van Bladel, E R; van Hamersveld, M; Pasker-de Jong, P C M; Korporaal, S J A; Urbanus, R T; Roest, M; Boven, L A; Fijnheer, R

    2017-11-01

    Prophylactic platelet transfusions are administered to prevent bleeding in haemato-oncological patients. However, bleeding still occurs, despite these transfusions. This practice is costly and not without risk. Better predictors of bleeding are needed, and flow cytometric evaluation of platelet function might aid the clinician in identifying patients at risk of bleeding. This evaluation can be performed within the hour and is not hampered by low platelet count. Our objective was to assess a possible correlation between bleeding and platelet function in thrombocytopenic haemato-oncological patients. Inclusion was possible for admitted haemato-oncology patients aged 18 years and above. Furthermore, an expected need for platelet transfusions was necessary. Bleeding was graded according to the WHO bleeding scale. Platelet reactivity to stimulation by either adenosine diphosphate (ADP), cross-linked collagen-related peptide (CRP-xL), PAR1- or PAR4-activating peptide (AP) was measured using flow cytometry. A total of 114 evaluations were available from 21 consecutive patients. Platelet reactivity in response to stimulation by all four studied agonists was inversely correlated with significant bleeding. Odds ratios (OR) for bleeding were 0·28 for every unit increase in median fluorescence intensity (MFI) [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·11-0·73] for ADP; 0·59 [0·40-0·87] for CRP-xL; 0·59 [0·37-0·94] for PAR1-AP; and 0·43 [0·23-0·79] for PAR4-AP. The platelet count was not correlated with bleeding (OR 0·99 [0·96-1·02]). Agonist-induced platelet reactivity was significantly correlated to bleeding. Platelet function testing could provide a basis for a personalized transfusion regimen, in which platelet transfusions are limited to those at risk of bleeding. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  19. Integrative oncology for breast cancer patients: introduction of an expert-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, Gustav J; Voiss, Petra; Schwidde, Ilka; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Paul, Anna; Kirschbaum, Barbara; Saha, Felix J; Kuemmel, Sherko

    2012-01-01

    Malignant breast neoplasms are among the most frequent forms of cancer in the Western world. Conventional treatment of breast cancer may include surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiation and/or immunotherapy, all of which are often accompanied by severe side effects. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been shown to be effective in alleviating those symptoms. Furthermore, with patient survival rates increasing, oncologists, psychologists and other therapists have to become more sensitive to the needs of cancer survivors that go beyond than the mere alleviation of symptoms. Many CAM methods are geared to treat the patient in a holistic manner and thus are also concerned with the patient’s psychological and spiritual needs. The use of certain CAM methods may become problematic when, as frequently occurs, patients use them indiscriminately and without informing their oncologists. Herbal medicines and dietary supplements, especially, may interfere with primary cancer treatments or have other detrimental effects. Thus, expertise in this highly specialized field of integrative medicine should be available to patients so that they can be advised about the benefits and negative effects of such preparations and practices. Being a beneficial combination of conventional and CAM care, integrative oncology makes possible the holistic approach to cancer care. The concept of integrative oncology for breast cancer is jointly practiced by the Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Kliniken Essen-Mitte, academic teaching hospital of the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Breast Center at Kliniken Essen-Mitte in Germany. This model is introduced here; its scope is reviewed, and its possible implications for the practice of integrative medicine are discussed. Evidence-based integrative care is crucial to the field of oncology in establishing state-of-the-art care for breast cancer patients

  20. The impact of PET scanning on management of paediatric oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegner, E.A.; Barrington, S.F.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Kingston, J.E.; Robinson, R.O.; Ferner, R.E.; Taj, M.; Smith, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Limited information is available on the use of positron emission tomography (PET) in paediatric oncology. The aim of this study was to review the impact of PET on the management of paediatric patients scanned over a 10-year period. One hundred and sixty-five consecutive oncology patients aged 11 months to 17 years were included. Two hundred and thirty-seven scans were performed. Diagnoses included lymphoma (60 patients), central nervous system (CNS) tumour (59), sarcoma (19), plexiform neurofibroma with suspected malignant change (13) and other tumours (14). A questionnaire was sent to the referring clinician to determine whether the PET scan had altered management and whether overall the PET scan was thought to be helpful. One hundred and eighty-nine (80%) questionnaires for 126 patients were returned (63 relating to lymphoma, 62 to CNS tumours, 30 to sarcoma, 16 to plexiform neurofibroma and 18 to other tumours). PET changed disease management in 46 (24%) cases and was helpful in 141 (75%) cases. PET findings were verified by histology, clinical follow-up or other investigations in 141 cases (75%). The returned questionnaires indicated that PET had led to a management change in 20 (32%) lymphoma cases, nine (15%) CNS tumours, four (13%) sarcomas, nine (56%) plexiform neurofibromas and four (22%) cases of other tumours. PET was thought to be helpful in 47 (75%) lymphoma cases, 48 (77%) CNS tumours, 24 (80%) sarcomas, 11 (69%) neurofibromas and 11 (61%) cases of other tumours. PET findings were verified in 44 (70%) lymphoma cases, 53 (85%) CNS tumours, 21 (70%) sarcomas, 12 (75%) neurofibromas and 11 (61%) other tumour cases. PET imaging of children with cancer is accurate and practical. PET alters management and is deemed helpful (with or without management change) in a significant number of patients, and the results are comparable with the figures published for the adult oncology population. (orig.)

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chang, Kah Hoong

    2011-05-24

    Abstract Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts). Female gender (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.004), higher educational background (p < 0.001), higher annual household income (p = 0.001), private health insurance (p = 0.001) and non-Christian (p < 0.001) were factors associated with more likely CAM use. Multivariate analysis identified female gender (p < 0.001), non-Christian (p = 0.001) and private health insurance (p = 0.015) as independent predictors of CAM use. Most health care professionals thought they did not have adequate knowledge (58.8%) nor were up to date with the best evidence (79.2%) on CAM use in oncology. Health care professionals who used CAM were more likely to recommend it to patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of

  2. The Cardio-oncology Program: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Care of Cancer Patients With Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Sarah; Pituskin, Edith; Paterson, D Ian

    2016-07-01

    Improved cancer survivorship has resulted in a growing number of Canadians affected by cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a consequence, cardio-oncology programs are rapidly emerging to treat cancer patients with de novo and preexisting cardiovascular disease. The primary goal of a cardio-oncology program is to preserve cardiovascular health to allow the timely delivery of cancer therapy and achieve disease-free remission. Multidisciplinary programs in oncology and cardiology have been associated with enhanced patient well-being and improved clinical outcomes. Because of the complex needs of these multisystem patients, a similar model of care is gaining acceptance. The optimal composition of the cardio-oncology team will typically involve support from cardiology, oncology, and nursing. Depending on the clinical scenario, additional consultation from dietetics, pharmacy, and social services might be required. Timely access to consultation and testing is another prerequisite for cardio-oncology programs because delays in treating cardiac complications and nonadherence to prescribed cancer therapy are each associated with poor outcomes. Recommended reasons for referral to cardio-oncology programs include primary prevention for those at high risk for cardiotoxicity and the secondary treatment of new or worsening cardiovascular disease in cancer patients and survivors. Management is multifaceted and can involve lifestyle education, pharmacotherapy, enhanced cardiovascular surveillance, and support services, such as exercise training. The lack of evidence to guide clinical decisions and recommendations in cardio-oncology is a major challenge and opportunity for health care professionals. Large multicentre prospective registries are needed to adequately power risk model calculations and generate hypotheses for novel interventions. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Diffuse Spinal Bone Marrow Infiltration in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Yunfei; Li, Maojin [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Yang, Jianyong [the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2010-04-15

    To investigate the significance of the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters of diffuse spinal bone marrow infiltration in patients with hematological malignancies. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the lumbar spine was performed in 26 patients with histologically proven diffuse bone marrow infiltration, including multiple myeloma (n = 6), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 6), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5), chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 7), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2). Twenty subjects whose spinal MRI was normal, made up the control group. Peak enhancement percentage (E{sub max}), enhancement slope (ES), and time to peak (TTP) were determined from a time intensity curve (TIC) of lumbar vertebral bone marrow. A comparison between baseline and follow-up MR images and its histological correlation were evaluated in 10 patients. The infiltration grade of hematopoietic marrow with plasma cells was evaluated by a histological assessment of bone marrow. Differences in E{sub max}, ES, and TTP values between the control group and the patients with diffuse bone marrow infiltration were significant (t = -11.51, -9.81 and 3.91, respectively, p < 0.01). E{sub max}, ES, and TTP values were significantly different between bone marrow infiltration groups Grade 1 and Grade 2 (Z = -2.72, -2.24 and -2.89 respectively, p < 0.05). E{sub max}, ES and TTP values were not significantly different between bone marrow infiltration groups Grade 2 and Grade 3 (Z = -1.57, -1.82 and -1.58 respectively, p > 0.05). A positive correlation was found between E{sub max}, ES values and the histological grade of bone marrow infiltration (r = 0.86 and 0.84 respectively, p < 0.01). A negative correlation was found between the TTP values and bone marrow infiltration histological grade (r = -0.54, p < 0.01). A decrease in the E{sub max} and ES values was observed with increased TTP values after treatment in all of the 10 patients who responded to treatment (t

  4. Radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Radiation Oncology Division has had as its main objectives both to operate an academic training program and to carry out research on radiation therapy of cancer. Since fiscal year 1975, following a directive from ERDA, increased effort has been given to research. The research activities have been complemented by the training program, which has been oriented toward producing radiation oncologists, giving physicians short-term experience in radiation oncology, and teaching medical students about clinical cancer and its radiation therapy. The purpose of the research effort is to improve present modalities of radiation therapy of cancer. As in previous years, the Division has operated as the Radiation Oncology Program of the Department of Radiological Sciences of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. It has provided radiation oncology support to patients at the University Hospital and to academic programs of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus. The patients, in turn, have provided the clinical basis for the educational and research projects of the Division. Funding has been primarily from PRNC (approx. 40%) and from National Cancer Institute grants channeled through the School of Medicine (approx. 60%). Special inter-institutional relationships with the San Juan Veterans Administration Hospital and the Metropolitan Hospital in San Juan have permitted inclusion of patients from these institutions in the Division's research projects. Medical physics and radiotherapy consultations have been provided to the Radiotherapy Department of the VA Hospital

  5. Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmer, Julie R; Lacchetti, Christina; Schneider, Bryan J; Atkins, Michael B; Brassil, Kelly J; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chau, Ian; Ernstoff, Marc S; Gardner, Jennifer M; Ginex, Pamela; Hallmeyer, Sigrun; Holter Chakrabarty, Jennifer; Leighl, Natasha B; Mammen, Jennifer S; McDermott, David F; Naing, Aung; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Phillips, Tanyanika; Porter, Laura D; Puzanov, Igor; Reichner, Cristina A; Santomasso, Bianca D; Seigel, Carole; Spira, Alexander; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Wang, Yinghong; Weber, Jeffrey S; Wolchok, Jedd D; Thompson, John A

    2018-02-14

    Purpose To increase awareness, outline strategies, and offer guidance on the recommended management of immune-related adverse events in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICPi) therapy. Methods A multidisciplinary, multi-organizational panel of experts in medical oncology, dermatology, gastroenterology, rheumatology, pulmonology, endocrinology, urology, neurology, hematology, emergency medicine, nursing, trialist, and advocacy was convened to develop the clinical practice guideline. Guideline development involved a systematic review of the literature and an informal consensus process. The systematic review focused on guidelines, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, and case series published from 2000 through 2017. Results The systematic review identified 204 eligible publications. Much of the evidence consisted of systematic reviews of observational data, consensus guidelines, case series, and case reports. Due to the paucity of high-quality evidence on management of immune-related adverse events, recommendations are based on expert consensus. Recommendations Recommendations for specific organ system-based toxicity diagnosis and management are presented. While management varies according to organ system affected, in general, ICPi therapy should be continued with close monitoring for grade 1 toxicities, with the exception of some neurologic, hematologic, and cardiac toxicities. ICPi therapy may be suspended for most grade 2 toxicities, with consideration of resuming when symptoms revert to grade 1 or less. Corticosteroids may be administered. Grade 3 toxicities generally warrant suspension of ICPis and the initiation of high-dose corticosteroids (prednisone 1 to 2 mg/kg/d or methylprednisolone 1 to 2 mg/kg/d). Corticosteroids should be tapered over the course of at least 4 to 6 weeks. Some refractory cases may require infliximab or other immunosuppressive therapy. In general, permanent discontinuation of ICPis is

  6. [Economical evaluation of the treatment of invasive aspergillosis in pediatric oncology patients. Santiago. Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Claudia; del Valle, Gladys; Coria, Paulina

    2010-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a serious opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. Transplant recipients and patients with cancer represent the highest risk group. The antifungal treatment involves prolonged hospitalization and high economic resources. to estimate costs represented by IA as an intercurrent complication of oncologic treatment. Retrospective case-control study. Estimation of the cost of treatment in pediatric oncologic patients with IA in the Hospital Luis Calvo Mackenna during the years 2007-2008 was done. A control for each case of IA paired by sex, age, number of diagnosis and clinical department was selected. There were 13 patients during the observation period. The attributable cost of treatment of aspergillosis was US $23,600 and the cost for each indicator was: hospital days US $16,500; antifungal therapy US $7,000; and serum galactomannan US $100. In this study, the cost of treating IA is mainly due to hospitalization and antifungal medications. Three patients acquired IA in spite of staying in a protected environment.

  7. Appearance of febrile neutropenia episodes after cytostatic therapy on oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lami Casaus, Leonardo; Arbesu Michelena, Maria Antonieta; Sarmiento, Sofia Alsina; Brito Iglesia, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of oncology patient using cytotoxic drugs has the neutropenia and its infectious complications as the commonest dose-limiting toxicity. Its appearance provokes dose delays and reduction during post-chemotherapy cycles, as well as the quality of life deterioration of patients. Oncology Medicine Group including the Pharmacy Service carried out a study to analyze the appearance of febrile neutropenia after cytotoxic therapy administration, and the presence of other factors that may to increase the risk to these reactions. A total of 42 patients were studied admitted with febrile neutropenia after above therapy from February to August, 2007. Biomedical variables from included patient group were achieved and the previously applied cytostatic therapy. The prevalent age-group was those patients aged over 50 and predominance of male sex and advanced stages with associated affections. The more frequent tumor locations were in breast, lung, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The cytostatic agent more used in cases of febrile neutropenia was Adriamycin (71.4 %) followed by Cyclophosphamide (52.4 %). The factors more associated with febrile neutropenia appearance were: Anthracycline chemotherapy, age over 50, advanced stages, and presence of associated diseases

  8. [Crossed perceptions about malnutrition in patients and their doctors in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynard, Bruno; Hébuterne, Xavier; Goldwasser, François; Ait Hssain, Ali; Dubray Longeras, Pascale; Barthélémy, Philippe; Rosso, Edoardo; Phoutthasang, Valérie; Bories, Camille; Digue, Laurence; Laharie, David; Desport, Jean-Claude; Falkowski, Sabrina; Lacau Saint Guily, Jean; Gyan, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    Malnutrition is common in oncology. However, it is often detected too late and nutritional support is sub-optimal. The patient's opinion, although often sought in therapeutic decisions in oncology, does not appear to be frequently taken into account in dietetic management. In NutriCancer2012 study, we interviewed patients, relatives and doctors about their perceptions of the impact of malnutrition and its quality of care. Of the 2209 patients questioned, majority said they were concerned about nutrition with 75% considering it essential to take appropriate nutritional care but only 19% self-reported link between malnutrition and fatigue. Physicians underestimated impact of malnutrition on patient's "quality of life". Doctors referred to the lack of human resources and knowledge in nutrition, and more than 80% wished the creation of nutrition teams. Sensitization of the general public and patients (and relatives) as soon as the cancer diagnosis could lead to better malnutrition's screening. Better nutrition training for physicians and creation of nutrition team could optimize management and improve efficacy during cancer treatments. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Communication Challenges of Oncologists and Intensivists Caring for Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeniyi, Folasade; Nathanson, Pamela G; Schall, Theodore E; Walter, Jennifer K

    2017-12-01

    The families of oncology patients requiring intensive care often face increasing complexity in communication with their providers, particularly when patients are cared for by providers from different disciplines. The objective of this study was to describe experiences and challenges faced by pediatric oncologists and intensivists and how the oncologist-intensivist relationship impacts communication and initiation of goals of care discussions (GCDs). We conducted semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of 10 physicians, including pediatric oncology and intensive care attendings and fellows. We identified key themes (three barriers and four facilitators) to having GCDs with families of oncology patients who have received intensive care. Barriers included challenges to communication within teams because of hierarchy and between teams due to incomplete sharing of information and confusion about who should initiate GCDs; provider experiences of internal conflict about how to engage parents in decision-making and about the "right thing to do" for patients; and lack of education and training in communication. Facilitators included team preparation for family meetings; skills for partnering with families; the presence of palliative care specialists; and informal education in communication and willingness for further training in communication. Notably, the education theme was identified as both a barrier and resource. We identified barriers to communication with families both within and between teams and for individual physicians. Formal communication training and processes that standardize communication to ensure completeness and role delineation between clinical teams may improve oncologists' and intensivists' ability to initiate GCDs, thereby fulfilling their ethical obligations of decision support. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Seroprevalence of hepatitis and human immuno-deficiency virus in multitransfused patients from a pediatric hematology clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suar Çakı Kılıç

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Transfusion transmitted hepatitis has been a severe problem in Turkey in pediatric cancer patients and in chronic congenital anemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus infections in these patients in a University Hospital. METHODS: Multi-transfused 66 children (59 acute leukemia, 6 thalassemia major, 1 severe hereditary spherocytosis diagnosed and followed-up between May, 2000 and December, 2006 were evaluated. Screening of all the patients for HbsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBc, anti-HCV and anti-HIV was performed at presentation and during the last follow-up. Serologic studies of leukemic patients were also repeated at the end of the chemotherapy. Hepatitis B vaccination was administered to unvaccinated patients with anemia. All blood products were provided by Blood Bank of the Center. RESULTS: No patient was found HBsAg, anti-HCV or anti-HIV positive at diagnosis and at the end of the therapy. There was history of hepatitis B vaccination in only 42% of the patients at diagnosis due to administration of this vaccine to newborns since 1998. At the beginning of the study, 45 % (n=27 of the leukemic patients were immune for hepatitis B, but after completion of the intensive chemotherapy seropositivity persisted in only 28.8 % (n=17. CONCLUSION: Transmission of these viruses is no longer a real problem even in multitransfused immunosuppressed children in Pediatric Hematology Units as a result of the improvements in screening of voluntary blood donors, administration of disposable material in clinics and vaccination by hepatitis B.

  11. The Neurologic Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (NANO) Scale as an Assessment Tool for Survival in Patients With Primary Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Timothy H; Ney, Douglas E; Damek, Denise; Rusthoven, Chad G; Youssef, A Samy; Lillehei, Kevin O; Ormond, D Ryan

    2018-03-30

    The Neurologic Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (NANO) scale is a standardized objective metric designed to measure neurological function in neuro-oncology. Current neuroradiological evaluation guidelines fail to use specific clinical criteria for progression. To determine if the NANO scale was a reliable assessment tool in glioblastoma (GBM) patients and whether it correlated to survival. Our group performed a retrospective review of all patients with newly diagnosed GBM from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2012, at our institution. We applied the NANO scale, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) scale, Macdonald criteria, and the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria to patients at the time of diagnosis as well as at 3, 6, and 12 mo. Initial NANO score was correlated with overall survival at time of presentation. NANO progression was correlated with decreased survival in patients at 6 and 12 mo. A decrease in KPS was associated with survival at 3 and 6 mo, an increase in ECOG score was associated only at 3 mo, and radiological evaluation (RANO and Macdonald) was correlated at 3 and 6 mo. Only the NANO scale was associated with patient survival at 1 yr. NANO progression was the only metric that was linked to decreased overall survival when compared to RANO and Macdonald at 6 and 12 mo. The NANO scale is specific to neuro-oncology and can be used to assess patients with glioma. This retrospective analysis demonstrates the usefulness of the NANO scale in glioblastoma.

  12. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills

  13. CLINICAL AND HEMATOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH DENGUE FEVER AT A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL – AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Vishnu Tewari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Dengue is a major health issue with seasonal rise in dengue fever cases imposing an additional burden on hospitals, necessitating bolstering of services in the emergency department, laboratory with creation of additional dengue fever wards. Objectives: To study the clinical and hematological profile of dengue fever cases presenting to a hospital. Methods: Patients with fever and other signs of dengue with either positive NS1 antigen test or IgM or IgG antibody were included. Age, gender, clinical presentation, platelet count and hematocrit were noted and patients classified as dengue fever (DF, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF or dengue shock syndrome (DSS. Duration of hospitalization, bleeding manifestations, requirement for platelet component support and mortality were recorded. Results: There were 443 adults and 57 children between 6 months to 77 year age. NS1 was positive in 115 patients (23%. Fever (99.8% and severe bodyache (97.4% were the commonest presentation. DF was seen in 484 (96.8 %, DHF in 10 (2% and DSS in 6 cases (1.2%. OPD treatment was needed in 412 (82% and hospitalization in 88 (18%. Intravenous fluid resuscitation was needed in 16 (3.2% patients. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 335 (67% patients at presentation. Platelet transfusion was needed in 46 (9.2%. PRC transfusion was given in 3 patients with DF and 10 of DHF. Death occurred in 03 DSS and 2 DHF patients. Conclusions: Majority of DF cases can be managed on OPD basis. DHF and DSS carry high mortality. Hospitals can analyze annual data for resource allocation for capacity expansion.

  14. Usefulness of bone marrow magnetic resonance imaging and indium-111-chloride bone marrow scintigraphy in patients with various hematological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yutaka; Umekawa, Tsunekazu; Chikayama, Satoshi [Osaka General Hospital of West Japan Railway Compapy (Japan)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    This study investigated the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and indium-111 chloride (In-111) scintigraphy to assess bone marrow in various hematological lesions. The subjects were 7 with aplastic anemia (AA), 4 with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 3 with polycythemia (PC), 3 with essential thrombocythemia (ET), 2 with multiple myeloma (MM), 2 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 3 with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), one with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and one with secondary anemia due to chronic inflammation (SA). Bone marrow cellularity was assessed on MR images and both uptake and tissue distribution were assessed on In-111 scintigraphy. Hypo-cellularity was seen in all AA patients, but not seen in any other patient in each group. On the other hand, hyper-cellularity was seen in 3 MDS, one PC, all 3 ET, one ALL, and one SA patients. In the group of MM, the vertebral body was seen as heterogenous signal intensity on MR images. Bone marrow was seen as iso-intensity in one MDS, 2 PC, all 2 MGUS, and all 3 ITP patients. In-111 scintigraphy showed decrease or disappearance of tracer uptake and decreased tissue distribution in all 7 AA, one MDS, one PC, and one ALL patients. Increased tracer uptake and enlarged tissue distribution were seen in one MDS, one PC, and one SA patients. One MDS, one ET, all 2 MM, all 2 MGUS, all 3 ITP patients had tracer uptake and tissue distribution that were equal to those in the normal tissues. Since MR imaging and In-111 scintigraphy provided qualitatively different information, the combination of both modalities would contribute to the understanding of bone marrow condition in hematopoietic diseases. (N.K.).

  15. Colorectal cancer clinical epidemiological characteristics in patients attended at Oncology service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Area Abreu, Daniel; Borrego Pino, Luis; Borrego Diaz, Luis; Abreu Rivera, Pedro; Tillan Garrote; Aurora

    2009-01-01

    A study of series of cases from January 2006 to December 2007 was carried out in 195 patients with colorectal cancer. They were attended at Oncology Service at Lenin Hospital, and were diagnosed at different health areas of the province. 63% and 37% of them had tumors in rectum and colon respectively. The age group between 40 and 69 years old was the most affected one (81.0%) and 56.9% of them were males. The main risk factors were the family history of the illness, chronic constipation, bleeding polyps and vesicular lithiasis. The most frequent clinical manifestations were rectal hemorrhage and anemia. (author)

  16. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  17. Ongoing strategies and updates on pain management in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Kari E; Reynolds, R Kevin; Uppal, Shitanshu

    2018-05-01

    The opioid crisis in the United States has been declared a public health emergency. Various governmental agencies, cancer care organizations and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued guidelines in hopes of managing this crisis. Curbing over-prescription of opioids by medical professionals has been a central theme in many of these guidelines. Gynecologic oncologists encounter patients with a variety of pain sources, including acute pain secondary to the underlying malignancy or surgical procedures as well as chronic pain related to the malignancy and the sequelae of treatments rendered. In this review, we discuss the various etiologies of pain experienced by gynecologic oncology patients and discuss modalities frequently used to treat this pain. We highlight strategies to reduce the number of opioids prescribed and focus on incorporating non-opioid pain relief management principles in this review. We also discuss the mechanisms and etiology of various types of pain, with a focus on multimodal treatment strategies including preoperative counseling, strategies to identify individuals at risk of developing opioid dependence, and the role of symptom management and palliative care teams. Finally, we provide a blueprint for gynecologic oncology practices to develop their practice-specific pain management contracts to engage patients in a meaningful conversation around the addictive potential of opioids. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors associated with oncology patients' involvement in shared decision making during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Alexis; Halpern, Jodi; Paul, Steven; Micco, Guy; Lahiff, Maureen; Wright, Fay; Levine, Jon D; Mastick, Judy; Hammer, Marilyn J; Miaskowski, Christine; Dunn, Laura B

    2017-11-01

    Oncology patients are increasingly encouraged to play an active role in treatment decision making. While previous studies have evaluated relationships between demographic characteristics and decision-making roles, less is known about the association of symptoms and psychological adjustment characteristics (eg, coping styles and personality traits) and decision-making roles. As part of a larger study of symptom clusters, patients (n = 765) receiving chemotherapy for breast, gastrointestinal, gynecological, or lung cancer provided information on demographic, clinical, symptom, and psychological adjustment characteristics. Patient-reported treatment decision-making roles (ie, preferred role and role actually played) were assessed using the Control Preferences Scale. Differences among patients, who were classified as passive, collaborative, or active, were evaluated using χ 2 analyses and analyses of variance. Over half (56.3%) of the patients reported that they both preferred and actually played a collaborative role. Among those patients with concordant roles, those who were older, those with less education and lower income, and those who were less resilient were more likely to prefer a passive role. Several psychological adjustment characteristics were associated with decision-making role, including coping style, personality, and fatalism. Oncology patients' preferences for involvement in treatment decision making are associated with demographic characteristics as well as with symptoms and psychological adjustment characteristics, such as coping style and personality. These results reaffirm the complexities of predicting patients' preferences for involvement in decision making. Further study is needed to determine if role or coping style may be influenced by interventions designed to teach adaptive coping skills. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Accuracy of pre-contrast imaging in abdominal magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric oncology patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zaki, Faizah; Moineddin, Rahim; Grant, Ronald; Chavhan, Govind B.

    2016-01-01

    Safety concerns are increasingly raised regarding the use of gadolinium-based contrast media for MR imaging. To determine the accuracy of pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging for lesion detection and characterization in pediatric oncology patients. We included 120 children (37 boys and 83 girls; mean age 8.94 years) referred by oncology services. Twenty-five had MRI for the first time and 95 were follow-up scans. Two authors independently reviewed pre-contrast MR images to note the following information about the lesions: location, number, solid vs. cystic and likely nature. Pre- and post-contrast imaging reviewed together served as the reference standard. The overall sensitivity was 88% for the first reader and 90% for the second; specificity was 94% and 91%; positive predictive value was 96% and 94%; negative predictive value was 82% and 84%; accuracy of pre-contrast imaging for lesion detection as compared to the reference standard was 90% for both readers. The difference between mean number of lesions detected on pre-contrast imaging and reference standard was not significant for either reader (reader 1, P = 0.072; reader 2, P = 0.071). There was substantial agreement (kappa values of 0.76 and 0.72 for readers 1 and 2) between pre-contrast imaging and reference standard for determining solid vs. cystic lesion and likely nature of the lesion. The addition of post-contrast imaging increased confidence of both readers significantly (P < 0.0001), but the interobserver agreement for the change in confidence was poor (kappa 0.12). Pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging has high accuracy in lesion detection in pediatric oncology patients and shows substantial agreement with the reference standard for characterization of lesions. Gadolinium-based contrast media administration cannot be completely eliminated but can be avoided in many cases, with the decision made on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration location and type of tumor. (orig.)

  20. Accuracy of pre-contrast imaging in abdominal magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric oncology patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd Zaki, Faizah [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grant, Ronald [University of Toronto, Department of Hematology and Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chavhan, Govind B. [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children and Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    Safety concerns are increasingly raised regarding the use of gadolinium-based contrast media for MR imaging. To determine the accuracy of pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging for lesion detection and characterization in pediatric oncology patients. We included 120 children (37 boys and 83 girls; mean age 8.94 years) referred by oncology services. Twenty-five had MRI for the first time and 95 were follow-up scans. Two authors independently reviewed pre-contrast MR images to note the following information about the lesions: location, number, solid vs. cystic and likely nature. Pre- and post-contrast imaging reviewed together served as the reference standard. The overall sensitivity was 88% for the first reader and 90% for the second; specificity was 94% and 91%; positive predictive value was 96% and 94%; negative predictive value was 82% and 84%; accuracy of pre-contrast imaging for lesion detection as compared to the reference standard was 90% for both readers. The difference between mean number of lesions detected on pre-contrast imaging and reference standard was not significant for either reader (reader 1, P = 0.072; reader 2, P = 0.071). There was substantial agreement (kappa values of 0.76 and 0.72 for readers 1 and 2) between pre-contrast imaging and reference standard for determining solid vs. cystic lesion and likely nature of the lesion. The addition of post-contrast imaging increased confidence of both readers significantly (P < 0.0001), but the interobserver agreement for the change in confidence was poor (kappa 0.12). Pre-contrast abdominal MR imaging has high accuracy in lesion detection in pediatric oncology patients and shows substantial agreement with the reference standard for characterization of lesions. Gadolinium-based contrast media administration cannot be completely eliminated but can be avoided in many cases, with the decision made on a case-by-case basis, taking into consideration location and type of tumor. (orig.)

  1. Chromosomal differences between acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in patients with prior solid tumors and prior hematologic malignancies. A study of 14 cases with prior breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamuris, Z.; Dumont, J.; Dutrillaux, B.; Aurias, A.

    1989-01-01

    A cytogenetic study of 14 patients with secondary acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (S-ANLL) with prior treatment for breast cancer is reported. The chromosomes recurrently involved in numerical or structural anomalies are chromosomes 7, 5, 17, and 11, in decreasing order of frequency. The distribution of the anomalies detected in this sample of patients is similar to that observed in published cases with prior breast or other solid tumors, though anomalies of chromosome 11 were not pointed out, but it significantly differs from that of the S-ANLL with prior hematologic malignancies. This difference is principally due to a higher involvement of chromosome 7 in patients with prior hematologic malignancies and of chromosomes 11 and 17 in patients with prior solid tumors. A genetic determinism involving abnormal recessive alleles located on chromosomes 5, 7, 11, and 17 uncovered by deletions of the normal homologs may be a cause of S-ANLL. The difference between patients with prior hematologic malignancies or solid tumors may be explained by different constitutional mutations of recessive genes in the two groups of patients

  2. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Diffuse Spinal Bone Marrow Infiltration in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha, Yunfei; Li, Maojin; Yang, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the significance of the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters of diffuse spinal bone marrow infiltration in patients with hematological malignancies. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the lumbar spine was performed in 26 patients with histologically proven diffuse bone marrow infiltration, including multiple myeloma (n = 6), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 6), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5), chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 7), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2). Twenty subjects whose spinal MRI was normal, made up the control group. Peak enhancement percentage (E max ), enhancement slope (ES), and time to peak (TTP) were determined from a time intensity curve (TIC) of lumbar vertebral bone marrow. A comparison between baseline and follow-up MR images and its histological correlation were evaluated in 10 patients. The infiltration grade of hematopoietic marrow with plasma cells was evaluated by a histological assessment of bone marrow. Differences in E max , ES, and TTP values between the control group and the patients with diffuse bone marrow infiltration were significant (t = -11.51, -9.81 and 3.91, respectively, p max , ES, and TTP values were significantly different between bone marrow infiltration groups Grade 1 and Grade 2 (Z = -2.72, -2.24 and -2.89 respectively, p max , ES and TTP values were not significantly different between bone marrow infiltration groups Grade 2 and Grade 3 (Z = -1.57, -1.82 and -1.58 respectively, p > 0.05). A positive correlation was found between E max , ES values and the histological grade of bone marrow infiltration (r = 0.86 and 0.84 respectively, p max and ES values was observed with increased TTP values after treatment in all of the 10 patients who responded to treatment (t = -7.92, -4.55, and 5.12, respectively, p max , ES, and TTP can reflect the malignancies' histological grade

  3. Comparison of hematological toxicities between innovator and generic cisplatin formulations in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Sato, Hiro; Tamaki, Tomoaki; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Ando, Ken; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    To compare the incidence and degree of hematological toxicity between innovator and generic cisplatin formulations, decreases in white blood cell (WBC) count (leukopenia) and platelet counts (thrombocytopenia) were retrospectively examined, using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.0, in patients with uterine cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy using innovator (innovator group, n = 22) or generic (generic group, n = 22) cisplatin formulations. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics except in the technique of external irradiation; larger numbers of patients in the innovator and generic groups were irradiated using the parallel-opposed two-field technique and the four-field box technique, respectively (P = 0.00012), which is in line with the historical progress of external beam radiation therapy. The numbers of patients showing Grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 leukopenia were 1 (4.5%), 14 (64%), 7 (32%) and 0 (0.0%) in the innovator group, and 1 (4.5%), 6 (27%), 13 (59%) and 2 (9.0%) in the generic group, respectively. The number of patients showing Grade 3–4 leukopenia was significantly greater in the generic group than in the innovator group (P = 0.034). There was no significant relationship between the incidence of Grade 3–4 leukopenia and the technique of external irradiation. There were no significant differences in the incidence and degree of thrombocytopenia between the two groups. These results indicate the possibility that the generic cisplatin formulation may have a different toxicity profile compared to the innovator formulation in terms of the incidence of leukopenia

  4. Oncology Patient Perceptions of the Use of Ionizing Radiation in Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Jones, Aaron K; Clarke, Ryan K; Giordano, Sharon H; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2016-07-01

    To measure the knowledge of oncology patients regarding use and potential risks of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging. A 30-question survey was developed and e-mailed to 48,736 randomly selected patients who had undergone a diagnostic imaging study at a comprehensive cancer center between November 1, 2013 and January 31, 2014. The survey was designed to measure patients' knowledge about use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging and attitudes about radiation. Nonresponse bias was quantified by sending an abbreviated survey to patients who did not respond to the original survey. Of the 48,736 individuals who were sent the initial survey, 9,098 (18.7%) opened it, and 5,462 (11.2%) completed it. A total of 21.7% of respondents reported knowing the definition of ionizing radiation; 35.1% stated correctly that CT used ionizing radiation; and 29.4% stated incorrectly that MRI used ionizing radiation. Many respondents did not understand risks from exposure to diagnostic doses of ionizing radiation: Of 3,139 respondents who believed that an abdominopelvic CT scan carried risk, 1,283 (40.9%) believed sterility was a risk; 669 (21.3%) believed heritable mutations were a risk; 657 (20.9%) believed acute radiation sickness was a risk; and 135 (4.3%) believed cataracts were a risk. Most patients and caregivers do not possess basic knowledge regarding the use of ionizing radiation in oncologic diagnostic imaging. To ensure health literacy and high-quality patient decision making, efforts to educate patients and caregivers should be increased. Such education might begin with information about effects that are not risks of diagnostic imaging. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ENRICH: A promising oncology nurse training program to implement ASCO clinical practice guidelines on fertility for AYA cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Gwede, Clement K; Meade, Cathy; Kelvin, Joanne; Reich, Richard R; Reinecke, Joyce; Bowman, Meghan; Sehovic, Ivana; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-11-01

    We describe the impact of ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare), a web-based communication-skill-building curriculum for oncology nurses regarding AYA fertility and other reproductive health issues. Participants completed an 8-week course that incorporated didactic content, case studies, and interactive learning. Each learner completed a pre- and post-test assessing knowledge and a 6-month follow-up survey assessing learner behaviors and institutional changes. Out of 77 participants, the majority (72%) scored higher on the post-test. Fifty-four participants completed the follow-up survey: 41% reviewed current institutional practices, 20% formed a committee, and 37% gathered patient materials or financial resources (22%). Participants also reported new policies (30%), in-service education (37%), new patient education materials (26%), a patient navigator role (28%), and workplace collaborations with reproductive specialists (46%). ENRICH improved nurses' knowledge and involvement in activities addressing fertility needs of oncology patients. Our study provides a readily accessible model to prepare oncology nurses to integrate American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines and improve Quality Oncology Practice Initiative measures related to fertility. Nurses will be better prepared to discuss important survivorship issues related to fertility and reproductive health, leading to improved quality of life outcomes for AYAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Information Needs Expressed During Patient-Oriented Oncology Consultations: Quantity, Variation, and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Anesa; Wallner, Paul; Salenius, Sharon; Ross, Rudi; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2018-02-12

    High-quality oncology consultation includes patient-oriented communication tailored to patients' individualized needs. Common methods used in studies to increase question-asking are prompt lists and coaching pre-consultations. However, our patients were encouraged to ask questions by the physician during their visit. We aimed to estimate the quantity, nature, and variation of their questions when they were invited to ask by their oncologist. During radiotherapy consultations from 2012 to 2016, patient's questions were deliberately elicited and physician-transcribed. We derived mean and median number of questions per patient, variance by patient factors, and a taxonomy of subjects using thematic analysis. Three hundred ninety-six patients asked 2386 questions, median asked per patient = 6 (interquartile range = 4). We found significant variance with age (mean = 6.9 questions for  10% of patients and 40 topics were asked by < 10% of patients. With median of 6 questions, it is practicable to routinely elicit and address individualized information needs. Potential barriers may be older and underinsured patients. The wide variety of topics, often pertaining to individuals' case, suggests that cancer clinicians should take time-out during consultation to elicit patients' questions to accomplish best-practice communication.

  7. Improving patient safety in the radiation oncology setting through crew resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Srinath; Babbo, Angela E; Brown, John A; Doss, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how the communication patterns and protocol rigors of a methodology called crew resource management (CRM) can be adapted to a radiation oncology environment to create a culture of patient safety. CRM training was introduced to our comprehensive radiation oncology department in the autumn of 2009. With 34 full-time equivalent staff, we see 100-125 patients daily on 2 hospital campuses. We were assisted by a consulting group with considerable experience in helping hospitals incorporate CRM principles and practices. Implementation steps included developing change initiative skills for key leaders, providing training in teamwork and communications, creating site-specific tools for safety and efficiency, and collecting data to document results. Our goals were to improve patient safety, teamwork, communication, and efficiency through the use of tools we developed that emphasized teamwork and communication, cross-checking, and routinizing specific protocols. Our CRM plan relies on the following 4 pillars: patient identification methods; "pause for the cause"; enabling all staff to halt treatment and question decisions; and daily morning meetings. We discuss some of the hurdles to change we encountered. Our safety record has improved. Our near-miss rate before CRM implementation averaged 11 per month; our near-miss rate currently averages 1.2 per month. In the 5 years prior to CRM implementation, we experienced 1 treatment deviation per year, although none rose to the level of "mis-administration." Since implementing CRM, our current patient treatment setup and delivery process has eliminated all treatment deviations. Our practices have identified situations where ambiguity or conflicting documentation could have resulted in inappropriate treatment or treatment inefficiencies. Our staff members have developed an extraordinary sense of teamwork combined with a high degree of personal responsibility to assure patient safety and have spoken up when

  8. Understanding why cancer patients accept or turn down psycho-oncological support: a prospective observational study including patients' and clinicians' perspectives on communication about distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwahlen, Diana; Tondorf, Theresa; Rothschild, Sacha; Koller, Michael T; Rochlitz, Christoph; Kiss, Alexander

    2017-05-30

    International standards prioritize introducing routine emotional distress screening in cancer care to accurately identify patients who most need psycho-oncological treatment, and ensure that patients can access appropriate supportive care. However, only a moderate proportion of distressed patients accepts referrals to or uses psycho-oncological support services. Predictors and barriers to psycho-oncological support service utilization are under-studied. We know little about how patients and oncologists perceive the discussions when oncologists assess psychosocial distress with a screening instrument. We aim to 1) assess the barriers and predictors of uptake of in-house psycho-oncological support along the distress screening pathway in cancer patients treated at a University Oncology Outpatient Clinic and, 2) determine how patients and clinicians perceive communication about psychosocial distress after screening with the Distress Thermometer. This is a quantitative prospective observational study with qualitative aspects. We will examine medical and demographic variables, cancer patient self-reports of various psychological measures, and aspects of the patient-clinician communication as variables that potentially predict uptake of psycho-oncological support service. We will also assess the patients' reasons for accepting or refusing psycho-oncological support services. We assess at three points in time, based on paper-and-pencil questionnaires and two patient interviews during the study period. We will monitor outcomes (psycho-oncology service uptake) four months after study entry. The study will improve our understanding of characteristics of patients who accept or refuse psycho-oncological support, and help us understand how patients' and oncologists perceive communication about psychosocial distress, and referral to a psycho-oncologist. We believe this is the first study to focus on factors that affect uptake or rejection of psycho-oncological support services

  9. The Patient-Healthcare Professional Relationship and Communication in the Oncology Outpatient Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prip, Anne; Møller, Kirsten Alling; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet

    2017-01-01

    and communication with healthcare professionals during chemotherapy in the oncology outpatient setting. METHODS: The systematic literature review was carried out according to PRISMA guidelines and the PICO framework, and a systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, and Joanna Briggs...... on satisfaction of care, that hope and positivity are both a need and a strategy for patients with cancer and were facilitated by healthcare professionals, and that outpatient clinic visits framed and influenced communication and relationships. CONCLUSIONS: The relationship and communication between patients...... and healthcare professionals in the outpatient setting were important for the patients' ability to cope with cancer. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Healthcare professionals need to pay special attention to the relational aspects of communication in an outpatient clinic because encounters are often brief. More...

  10. Posttreatment follow-up of radiation oncology patients in a managed care environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, Michael L.; Rose, Christopher M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Health care delivery in the United States is in the midst of a structural revolution called managed care. Demands for cost control within the managed care environment force radiation oncologists to defend the need and obligation to follow their patients. Methods and Materials: We have analyzed this follow-up requirement from six potential justifications: patient care, medical-legal, quality assurance, outcome measurement, cost, and improvement of care. Results: Practical recommendations for discussing the need for follow-up with the medical directors and primary care physicians of managed care entities are given. Follow-up without valid documentation of benefit is hard to justify in this era of managed care. Conclusions: Collaborative follow-up between the referring physician, the treating radiation oncologist, and the other oncologic specialists will allow for outcome measurement and improvement in practice without driving up cost or exposing the patient to undue risk.

  11. Significances and meanings of the musical identity of patients and relatives receiving oncological palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Araujo de Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This phenomenological study was structured on Heidegger’s theoretical-philosophical framework, with the objective of unveiling the significances and meanings of the musical identity of patients and relatives under oncological palliative care. Individual interviews were performed with 12 clients (seven patients and five relatives staying at the support residence of the Maringa Female Network Against Cancer. A total of eight musical meetings were performed between January and February of 2011. I understood that the musical identity of the evidenced beings refers to the religious and country music styles, that their significances and meanings are connected to their spirituality and the significant events of their historicity, and that their mood and reflection intermediated by music can influence their musical choice. I gave evidence to the need to consider the music identity and empowerment in musical choices, which carries existential, social, cultural, spiritual and family aspects as qualifying elements of nursing in palliative care. Descriptors: Nursing Care; Oncology Nursing; Music; Music Therapy; Palliative Care.

  12. Readability of American online patient education materials in urologic oncology: a need for simple communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Amanda; Nielsen, Matthew E; Raynor, Mathew C; Woods, Michael E; Wallen, Eric M; Smith, Angela B

    2015-02-01

    To determine the readability levels of reputable cancer and urologic Web sites addressing bladder, prostate, kidney, and testicular cancers. Online patient education materials (PEMs) for bladder, prostate, kidney, and testicular malignancies were evaluated from the American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Urology Care Foundation, Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Kidney Cancer Association, and Testicular Cancer Resource Center. Grade level was determined using several readability indices, and analyses were performed on the basis of cancer type, Web site, and content area (general, causes, risk factors and prevention, diagnosis and staging, treatment, and post-treatment). Estimated grade level of online PEMs ranged from 9.2 to 14.2 with an overall mean of 11.7. Web sites for kidney cancer had the least difficult readability (11.3) and prostate cancer had the most difficult readability (12.1). Among specific Web sites, the most difficult readability levels were noted for the Urology Care Foundation Web site for bladder and prostate cancer and the Kidney Cancer Association and Testicular Cancer Resource Center for kidney and testes cancer. Readability levels within content areas varied on the basis of the disease and Web site. Online PEMs in urologic oncology are written at a level above the average American reader. Simplification of these resources is necessary to improve patient understanding of urologic malignancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine in radiation oncology. Survey of patients' attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettner, Sabrina; Kessel, Kerstin A.; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2017-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are gaining in importance, but objective data are mostly missing. However, in previous trials, methods such as acupuncture showed significant advantages compared to standard therapies. Thus, the aim was to evaluate most frequently used methods, their significance and the general acceptance amongst cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). A questionnaire of 18 questions based on the categorical classification released by the National Centre for Complementary and Integrative Health was developed. From April to September 2015, all patients undergoing RT at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Technical University of Munich, completed the survey. Changes in attitude towards CAM were evaluated using the questionnaire after RT during the first follow-up visit (n = 31). Of 634 patients, 333 answered the questionnaire (52.5%). Of all participants, 26.4% used CAM parallel to RT. Before RT, a total of 39.3% had already used complementary medicine. The most frequently applied methods during therapy were vitamins/minerals, food supplements, physiotherapy/manual medicine, and homeopathy. The majority (71.5%) did not use any complementary treatment, mostly stating that CAM was not offered to them (73.5%). The most common reasons for use were to improve the immune system (48%), to reduce side effects (43.8%), and to not miss an opportunity (37.8%). Treatment integrated into the individual therapy concept, e.g. regular acupuncture, would be used by 63.7% of RT patients. In comparison to other studies, usage of CAM parallel to RT in our department is considered to be low. Acceptance amongst patients is present, as treatment integrated into the individual oncology therapy would be used by about two-third of patients. (orig.) [de

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine in radiation oncology : Survey of patients' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettner, Sabrina; Kessel, Kerstin A; Combs, Stephanie E

    2017-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are gaining in importance, but objective data are mostly missing. However, in previous trials, methods such as acupuncture showed significant advantages compared to standard therapies. Thus, the aim was to evaluate most frequently used methods, their significance and the general acceptance amongst cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). A questionnaire of 18 questions based on the categorical classification released by the National Centre for Complementary and Integrative Health was developed. From April to September 2015, all patients undergoing RT at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Technical University of Munich, completed the survey. Changes in attitude towards CAM were evaluated using the questionnaire after RT during the first follow-up visit (n = 31). Of 634 patients, 333 answered the questionnaire (52.5%). Of all participants, 26.4% used CAM parallel to RT. Before RT, a total of 39.3% had already used complementary medicine. The most frequently applied methods during therapy were vitamins/minerals, food supplements, physiotherapy/manual medicine, and homeopathy. The majority (71.5%) did not use any complementary treatment, mostly stating that CAM was not offered to them (73.5%). The most common reasons for use were to improve the immune system (48%), to reduce side effects (43.8%), and to not miss an opportunity (37.8%). Treatment integrated into the individual therapy concept, e.g. regular acupuncture, would be used by 63.7% of RT patients. In comparison to other studies, usage of CAM parallel to RT in our department is considered to be low. Acceptance amongst patients is present, as treatment integrated into the individual oncology therapy would be used by about two-third of patients.

  15. Patients' satisfaction ratings and their desire for care improvement across oncology settings from France, Italy, Poland and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, A; Robertson, C; Razavi, D; Batel-Copel, L; Larsson, G; Lichosik, D; Meyza, J; Schraub, S; von Essen, L; de Haes, J C J M

    2003-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in patient satisfaction assessment across nations recently. This paper reports on a cross-cultural comparison of the comprehensive assessment of satisfaction with care (CASC) response scales. We investigated what proportion of patients wanted care improvement for the same level of satisfaction across samples from oncology settings in France, Italy, Poland and Sweden, and whether age, gender, education level and type of items affected the relationships found. The CASC addresses patient's satisfaction with the care received in oncology hospitals. Patients are invited to rate aspects of care and to mention for each of these aspects, whether they would want improvement.One hundred and forty, 395, 186 and 133 consecutive patients were approached in oncology settings from France, Italy, Poland and Sweden, respectively. Across country settings, an increasing percentage of patients wanted care improvement for decreasing levels of satisfaction. However, in France a higher percentage of patients wanted care improvement for high-satisfaction ratings whereas in Poland a lower percentage of patients wanted care improvement for low-satisfaction ratings. Age and education level had a similar effect across countries. Confronting levels of satisfaction with desire for care improvement appeared useful in comprehending the meaning of response choice labels for the CASC across oncology settings from different linguistic and cultural background. Linguistic or socio-cultural differences were suggested for explaining discrepancies between countries. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Osteosarcoma of the pelvis - oncological results of 40 patients registered by The Netherlands Committee on Bone Tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, SJ; Kroon, HM; Hoekstra, HJ; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    Aim and methods: We reviewed the oncological outcome in 40 consecutive patients with an osteosarcoma of the pelvic region, registered in the files of the Netherlands Committee on Bone Tumours (NCBT) between 1978 and 1995. Results: Six patients had distant metastases at initial presentation (Enneking

  17. Characterization of Specific Immune Responses to Different Aspergillus Antigens during the Course of Invasive Aspergillosis in Hematologic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauvais, Anne; Beau, Remi; Candoni, Anna; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Zanetti, Eleonora; Quadrelli, Chiara; Codeluppi, Mauro; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Pagano, Livio; Caira, Morena; Giovane, Cinzia Del; Maccaferri, Monica; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Tazzioli, Giovanni; Girardis, Massimo; Delia, Mario; Specchia, Giorgina; Longo, Giuseppe; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Merli, Francesco; Imovilli, Annalisa; Apolone, Giovanni; Carvalho, Agostinho; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Latgè, Jean Paul; Luppi, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in mouse model of invasive aspergillosis (IA) and in healthy donors have shown that different Aspergillus antigens may stimulate different adaptive immune responses. However, the occurrence of Aspergillus-specific T cells have not yet been reported in patients with the disease. In patients with IA, we have investigated during the infection: a) whether and how specific T-cell responses to different Aspergillus antigens occur and develop; b) which antigens elicit the highest frequencies of protective immune responses and, c) whether such protective T cells could be expanded ex-vivo. Forty hematologic patients have been studied, including 22 patients with IA and 18 controls. Specific T cells producing IL-10, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-17A have been characterized through enzyme linked immunospot and cytokine secretion assays on 88 peripheral blood (PB) samples, by using the following recombinant antigens: GEL1p, CRF1p, PEP1p, SOD1p, α1–3glucan, β1–3glucan, galactomannan. Specific T cells were expanded through short term culture. Aspergillus-specific T cells producing non-protective interleukin-10 (IL-10) and protective interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) have been detected to all the antigens only in IA patients. Lower numbers of specific T cells producing IL-4 and IL-17A have also been shown. Protective T cells targeted predominantly Aspergillus cell wall antigens, tended to increase during the IA course and to be associated with a better clinical outcome. Aspergillus-specific T cells could be successfully generated from the PB of 8 out of 8 patients with IA and included cytotoxic subsets able to lyse Aspergillus hyphae. Aspergillus specific T-cell responses contribute to the clearance of the pathogen in immunosuppressed patients with IA and Aspergillus cell wall antigens are those mainly targeted by protective immune responses. Cytotoxic specific T cells can be expanded from immunosuppressed patients even during the infection by using the above mentioned

  18. [Distribution of Pathogenic Bacteria and Its Influence on Expression of BCL-2 and BAX Protein after HSCT in the Patients with Hematological Malignancies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Gui-Ping; Dai, Yan; Huang, Lai-Quan; Jiang, Yi-Zhi; Geng, Liang-Quan; Ding, Kai-Yang; Huang, Dong-Ping

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the distribution of pathogenic bacteria in the patients with hematologic malignancies received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and its influence on the expression of BCL-2 and BAX proteins. The clinical data of 64 patients with malignant lymphoma (ML) received auto-HSCT from January 2011 to December 2015 in our hospital were analyzed. On basis of post-treansplant infection, the patients were divided into infection group (36 cases) and non-infection group (28 cases). The distribution of pathogenic bacteria in 2 groups was identified, the T lymphocyte subsets of peripheral blood, expression level of apoptotic proteins and C-reaction protein (CRP) in 2 group were detected. Thirty-six strains of pathogenic bacteria were isolated from 36 case of hematological malignancy after HSCT, including 24 strains of Gram-negative bacteria (66.67%) with predominamce of klebsiella pneumoniae (19.44%). The periperal blood CD4+ (t=2.637, Ppathogenic bacteria infecting ML patients after HSCT were mainly Gram-negative bacteria. The post-transplant infection can promote the expression up-regulation of related inflammatory factors and apoptotic proteins. The pathogens may be involved in cell apoptisis that provides a new strategy to treat the hematologic malignancies.

  19. Factors Influencing communication between the patients with cancer and their nurses in oncology wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the factors influencing nurse-patient communication in cancer care in Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in oncology wards of hospitals in Tabriz. Data was collected through purposive sampling by semi-structured deep interviews with nine patients, three family members and five nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: The main theme of the research emerged as "three-factor effects" that demonstrates all the factors related to the patient, nurse, and the organization and includes three categories of "Patient as the center of communication", "Nurse as a human factor", and "Organizational structures". The first category consists of two sub-categories of "Imposed changes by the disease" and "the patient′s particular characteristics". The second category includes sub-categories of "sense of vulnerability" and "perception of professional self: Pre-requisite of patient-centered communication". The third category consists of the sub-categories of "workload and time imbalance", "lack of supervision", and "impose duties in context of neglecting nurse and patient needs". Characteristics of the patients, nurses, and care environment seemed to be the influential factors on the communication. Conclusions: In order to communicate with cancer patients effectively, changes in philosophy and culture of the care environment are essential. Nurses must receive proper trainings which meet their needs and which focus on holistic and patient-centered approach.

  20. Implications of Patient Portal Transparency in Oncology: Qualitative Interview Study on the Experiences of Patients, Oncologists, and Medical Informaticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Jordan M; Morris, Bonny B; Thomson, Maria D; Matin, Khalid; Brown, Richard F

    2018-03-26

    Providing patients with unrestricted access to their electronic medical records through patient portals has impacted patient-provider communication and patients' personal health knowledge. However, little is known about how patient portals are used in oncology. The aim of this study was to understand attitudes of the portal's adoption for oncology and to identify the advantages and disadvantages of using the portal to communicate and view medical information. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 60 participants: 35 patients, 13 oncologists, and 12 medical informaticists. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed to identify critical incidents and general attitudes encountered by participants. Two primary themes were discovered: (1) implementation practices influence attitudes, in which the decision-making and execution process of introducing portals throughout the hospital did not include the input of oncologists. Lack of oncologists' involvement led to a lack of knowledge about portal functionality, such as not knowing the time period when test results would be disclosed to patients; (2) perceptions of portals as communication tools varies by user type, meaning that each participant group (patients, oncologists, and medical informaticists) had varied opinions about how the portal should be used to transmit and receive information. Oncologists and medical informaticists had difficulty understanding one another's culture and communication processes in their fields, while patients had preferences for how they would like to receive communication, but it largely depended upon the type of test being disclosed. The majority of patients (54%, 19/35) who participated in this study viewed lab results or scan reports via the portal before being contacted by a clinician. Most were relatively comfortable with this manner of disclosure but still preferred face-to-face or telephone communication. Findings from this study indicate that

  1. Merging Children's Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimei Li

    Full Text Available Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers.We merged the data from two Phase III Children's Oncology Group (COG trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS. We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031.Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1% patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7% matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2% and 150 (95.5% of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches.These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies.

  2. Validation of a Pediatric Early Warning Score in Hospitalized Pediatric Oncology and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulnik, Asya; Forbes, Peter W; Stenquist, Nicole; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Kleinman, Monica

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the correlation of a Pediatric Early Warning Score with unplanned transfer to the PICU in hospitalized oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. We performed a retrospective matched case-control study, comparing the highest documented Pediatric Early Warning Score within 24 hours prior to unplanned PICU transfers in hospitalized pediatric oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients between September 2011 and December 2013. Controls were patients who remained on the inpatient unit and were matched 2:1 using age, condition (oncology vs hematopoietic stem cell transplant), and length of hospital stay. Pediatric Early Warning Scores were documented by nursing staff at least every 4 hours as part of routine care. Need for transfer was determined by a PICU physician called to evaluate the patient. A large tertiary/quaternary free-standing academic children's hospital. One hundred ten hospitalized pediatric oncology patients (42 oncology, 68 hematopoietic stem cell transplant) requiring unplanned PICU transfer and 220 matched controls. None. Using the highest score in the 24 hours prior to transfer for cases and a matched time period for controls, the Pediatric Early Warning Score was highly correlated with the need for PICU transfer overall (area under the receiver operating characteristic = 0.96), and in the oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant groups individually (area under the receiver operating characteristic = 0.95 and 0.96, respectively). The difference in Pediatric Early Warning Score results between the cases and controls was noted as early as 24 hours prior to PICU admission. Seventeen patients died (15.4%). Patients with higher Pediatric Early Warning Scores prior to transfer had increased PICU mortality (p = 0.028) and length of stay (p = 0.004). We demonstrate that our institution's Pediatric Early Warning Score is highly correlated with the need for unplanned PICU transfer in hospitalized oncology and

  3. Balancing research interests and patient interests: a qualitative study into the intertwinement of care and research in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekking, Sara A S; van der Graaf, Rieke; Kars, Marijke C; Beishuizen, Auke; de Vries, Martine C; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, in ethical guidelines and in research ethics literature, care and research are clearly separated based on their different objectives. In contrast, in paediatric oncology, research and care are closely combined. Currently, it is unknown how relevant actors in paediatric oncology perceive this combination of research and care. We conducted a qualitative study into the experiences of those involved in Dutch paediatric oncology with the intertwinement of research and care and the dual role of paediatric oncologists as researchers and treating physicians. A qualitative study approach, using two focus groups and 19 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with paediatric oncologists, research coordinators, parents of children with cancer, and adolescents with cancer. Four themes characterize how actors experience the intertwinement of research and care in paediatric oncology. First, research is considered of major importance, and paediatric oncology professionals convey this message to patients and their parents. Second, there is ambiguity about categorization of studies into cancer therapy as either research or treatment. Third, role conflicts appear within the work of the paediatric oncologists. Finally, the various benefits of combining treatment with research are emphasized. Research is regarded as a fundamental and indispensable characteristic of paediatric oncology practice. Paediatric oncology professionals, parents, and patients have a very positive outlook on combining research and care, but they may not be sufficiently critical with respect to potential conflicts. Increased reflection on how to optimally combine research and care could serve as an important protection of the interests of children with cancer and their parents. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development and daily use of an electronic oncological patient record for the total management of cancer patients: 7 years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligioni, E; Berloffa, F; Caffo, O; Tonazzolli, G; Ambrosini, G; Valduga, F; Eccher, C; Ferro, A; Forti, S

    2009-02-01

    We describe our experience with an electronic oncological patient record (EOPR) for the total management of cancer patients. The web-based EOPR was developed on the basis of a user-centred design including user education and training, followed by continuous assistance; user acceptance was monitored by means of three questionnaires administered after 2 weeks, 6 months and 6 years. The EOPR has been used daily for all in-ward, day hospital and ambulatory clinical activities since July 2000. The most widely appreciated functions are its rapid multipoint access, the self-updated summary of the patients' clinical course, the management of the entire therapeutic programme synchronised with working agendas and oncological teleconsultation. Security and privacy are assured by means of the separate storage of clinical and demographic data, with access protected by login and a password. The questionnaires highlighted appreciation of rapid data retrieval and exchange and the perception of improved quality of care, but also revealed a sense of additional work and a negative impact on doctor-patient relationships. Our EOPR has proved to be effective in the total management of cancer patients. Its user-centred design and flexible web technology have been key factors in its successful implementation and daily use.

  5. Clinical and hematological response to hydroxyurea in a patient with Hb Lepore/beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigano, P; Manfré, L; La Galla, R; Renda, D; Renda, M C; Calabrese, A; Calzolari, R; Maggio, A

    1997-05-01

    The possibility of increasing Hb F in vivo using drugs like 5-azacytidine, hydroxyurea, and butyrate has been established. However, in many cases this does not entail an increase in total hemoglobin. We report on a patient with Hb Lepore/beta-thalassemia being treated with hydroxyurea (30 mg/Kg/day) because of the presence of erythroid extramedullary masses with severe neurological abnormalities. During therapy the patient showed a remarkable improvement in neurological signs due to the reduction in extra-medullary masses, a significant increase in both total hemoglobin (from 5.8 to 9.7 g/dl) and Hb F (from 4.9 g/dl to 9.1 g/dl). The marked improvement in hemoglobin level in our patient with Hb Lepore/beta-thalassemia suggests gamma-globin gene activation due to the DNA structure determined by the crossover event.

  6. Pain management in the pediatric oncological patient and factors influencing its perception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego Muñoz, Cristóbal; Martínez Bautista, María José; Romero Hernández, Irene; García Martín, Fátima; Manzano Martín, María Victoria; Guerrero Navarro, Nieves

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a subjective characteristic found in many patients during their hospital stay. Pediatric population presents physiological and psychological characteristics different from those of the adults. Added to this, if a cancer process is present, for which they are subjected to numerous painful experiences during their diagnosis and treatment, adequate pain management is vital. The objective of this paper was to review the main factors that influence the perception of cancer pain in the pediatric patient and both non-pharmacological and pharmacological measures that are necessary to take into account for proper pain management. To this end, a literature review was made in MEDLINE database, which covered the scientific publications of the last 25 years. It can be concluded that oncological pain perception has a multifactoral component. Furthermore, in addition to appropriate use of pharmacologic measures, non-pharmacological actions are very important for a comprehensive approach to pain. (author)

  7. The Impact of Alternative Payment Models on Oncology Innovation and Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Amy M; Omenn, Gilbert S; Kean, Marcia A

    2016-05-15

    Oncology care is in a time of major transformation. Scientific discovery is driving breakthroughs in prevention, diagnostics, and treatment, resulting in tremendous gains for patients as the number of cancer survivors continues to grow on an annual basis. At the same time, there is mounting pressure across the healthcare system to contain costs while improving the quality of cancer care. In response to this pressure, private and government payers are increasingly turning to tools such as alternative payment models (APM) and clinical pathways to improve the efficiency of care, inform coverage decisions, and support shared decision-making. As APMs, clinical pathways and other tools are utilized more broadly, it will be critical that these models support the evidence-based use of innovative biomedical advances, including personalized medicine, and deliver patient-centered, high-value care. Clin Cancer Res; 22(10); 2335-41. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. The current trend of administering a patient-generated index in the oncological setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jessica A; Oh, Taemin; Scheer, Justin K; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-03-17

    The patient-generated index (PGI) is a more novel approach to evaluating health-related quality of life (HRQOL) that allows patients to formulate their own responses in an open-ended format in order to measure HRQOL based on each patient's own stated goals and expectations. To date the use of PGI in the setting of patients diagnosed with cancer remains relatively less common compared to other health conditions. This systematic review primarily aims to identify current literature in which PGI has been used as a tool to assess quality of life in cancer patients. A systematic review using the MEDLINE database from January 1990 to July 2013 was performed with the following search terms to identify the implementation of PGI in oncology settings: (PGI OR patient generated index OR patient-generated OR patient-reported OR patient generated OR patient reported) AND (cancer OR oncology OR tumor OR neoplasm OR malignancy). Of the 2167 papers initially identified, 10 papers evaluated quality of life in oncology patients by collecting free-form responses from the patient, 4 of which actually used PGI. An overarching theme observed in these studies highlighted the concerns mentioned by patients that were not targeted or detected by standardized quality of life measures. While implementing the PGI may require slightly more investment of resources in the beginning, the potential implications of allowing patients to characterize their quality of life on their own terms are tremendous.

  9. Where is the difference between an epidemic and a high endemic level with respect to nosocomial infection control measures? An analysis based on the example of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in hematology and oncology departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich, Nikos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Some infection control recommendations distinguish epidemic and endemic levels for infection control. However, it is often difficult to separate long lasting outbreaks from high endemic levels and it remains open, if this distinction is really useful.Aim: To compare infection control measures in endemic and epidemic outbreaks.Methods: The example of vancomycin-resistant outbreaks in haematology or oncology departments was used to analyse differences in infection control measures between outbreaks and high endemic levels. The outbreak database and PubMed, including long lasting outbreaks, were used for this analysis. Two time limits were used for separation: 6 and 12 months. In addition, monoclonal and polyclonal outbreaks were distinguished. Findings: A total of 36 outbreaks were included. 13 outbreaks lasted 6 months or less, 9 outbreaks more than 6 months but at maximum 12 months and 9 more than 12 months. For the remaining outbreaks, no information about their duration was available. Altogether, 11 outbreaks were monoclonal and 20 polyclonal. ri infection control measures, there were almost no differences between the different groups compared. Patient screening was given up in 37.5% of long lasting outbreaks (>12 months and hand hygiene not reported in the majority of polyclonal outbreaks (77.8%.Conclusion: Despite many institutions trying to add further infection control measures in case of an outbreak, evidence based infection control measures should be implemented in endemic and epidemic situations. The crucial aspect is probably the degree of implementation and its control in both situations.

  10. The Value of Specialty Oncology Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dana P; Jena, Anupam B; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Malin, Jennifer L; Malkin, Jesse D; Sun, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate patients' elasticity of demand, willingness to pay, and consumer surplus for five high-cost specialty medications treating metastatic disease or hematologic malignancies. Data Source/Study Setting Claims data from 71 private health plans from 1997 to 2005. Study Design This is a revealed preference analysis of the demand for specialty drugs among cancer patients. We exploit differences in plan generosity to examine how utilization of specialty oncology drugs varies with patient out-of-pocket costs. Data Collection/Extraction Methods We extracted key variables from administrative health insurance claims records. Principal Findings A 25 percent reduction in out-of-pocket costs leads to a 5 percent increase in the probability that a patient initiates specialty cancer drug therapy. Among patients who initiate, a 25 percent reduction in out-of-pocket costs reduces the number of treatments (claims) by 1–3 percent, depending on the drug. On average, the value of these drugs to patients who use them is about four times the total cost paid by the patient and his or her insurer, although this ratio may be lower for oral specialty therapies. Conclusions The decision to initiate therapy with specialty oncology drugs is responsive to price, but not highly so. Among patients who initiate therapy, the amount of treatment is equally responsive. The drugs we examine are highly valued by patients in excess of their total costs, although oral agents warrant further scrutiny as copayments increase. PMID:19878344

  11. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in an Adult Oncology Department in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Alharbi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to evaluate patient safety culture across different healthcare professionals from different countries of origin working in an adult oncology department in a medical facility in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional survey of 130 healthcare staff (doctors, pharmacists, nurses was conducted in February 2017. We used the Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC to examine healthcare staff perceptions of safety culture. Results: A total of 127 questionnaires were returned, yielding a response rate of 97.7%. Eight out of 12 HSOPSC composites were considered areas for improvement (percent positivity < 50.0%. Significantly different mean scores were observed across the three professional groups in all 12 HSOPSC composites. Doctors tended to rate patient safety culture significantly more positively than nurses or pharmacists. Nurses scored significantly lower than pharmacists in the majority of HSOPSC composites. No significant differences in patient safety culture composite scores were observed between Saudi/Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC and non-Saudi/GCC groups. Regression analysis showed that the frequency of reported events is predicted by feedback and communication about errors, and teamwork across units. Perception of patient safety is associated with respondents’ profession and teamwork across units. Conclusions: This study brings to the fore the assumption that all healthcare professionals have a shared understanding of patient safety. We urge healthcare leaders and policy makers to look at patient safety culture at this granular level in their contexts and use this information to develop strategies and training to improve patient safety culture.

  12. [Pain management nursing in hospitalized patients with non-oncological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Sánchez, Juana María; Canca-Sánchez, José Carlos; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Martín-García, Mónica; Pérez-González, María Josefa; Timonet-Andreu, Eva María

    2016-01-01

    To assess pain management in patients hospitalized with a non-oncological disease and evaluate factors involved in pain assessment. A descriptive, cross-sectional study. We reviewed pain episodes documented in the medical records of 105 patients aged>18 years admitted to the medical units of a regional hospital between September and December 2014. Reports of pain episodes were evaluated by assessing 22 variables related to pain management quality criteria. A total of 184 reports were reviewed. Pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) in 70.1% of patients (n=129); pain was reassessed in 44.3% (n=54) of patients. Pain reassessment was significantly more frequent in patients agedPain was more frequently considered to be unrelated to the cause of admission in women as compared to men (50 vs. 25.7% p=0.027). Pain was identified in the patient care plan as a collaborative problem by the nurse for 21.1% of the patients. Some aspects of pain management should be improved, especially those regarding pain description and reassessment. The age and sex of patients significantly influence the approach of pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Narrative Medicine perspectives on patient identity and integrative care in neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Robert B; Howard, Tracy A; Villano, John L

    2017-09-01

    Narrative Medicine sessions can encourage patients to rediscover personal identity and meaning by telling or writing their stories. We explored this process to improve care and quality of life for brain cancer patients in an academic neuro-oncology program. Brain cancer and its treatments may threaten a patient's quality of life and sense of self in many ways, including impaired cognitive skills, loss of memory, reduced coordination, and limited capacity for self-expression. The impact of symptoms and side effects on quality of life must be evaluated in terms of each patient's identity and may be understood in terms of each patient's story. Insights from Narrative Medicine visits may also be helpful for the treatment team as they seek to assess patient needs, attitudes, and abilities. We provide case-based histories demonstrating applications of Narrative Medicine in the care of patients with brain tumors whose sense of self and quality of life are challenged. The cases include managing frontal lobe syndrome of loss of initiative and pervasive emotional apathy with his wife and young children, regaining a meaningful activity in a patient, re-establishing self-identity in a young woman with ependymoma, and improving spells with coexistent epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES).

  14. Improvement in quality of life of an oncological patient by laser phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Luana; Simões, Alyne; Sá, Pedro Henrique Rosário Nogueira; Eduardo, Carlos De Paula

    2009-04-01

    Common side effects of radiotherapy (RT) to the head and neck include oral mucositis, xerostomia, and severe pain. The aim of this study is to report improvement in the quality of life of an oncological patient by laser phototherapy (LPT). The patient, a 15-year-old girl diagnosed with mucoepidermoid carcinoma, underwent surgical excision of a tumor of the left palatomaxilla. After that, she was subjected to 35 sessions of RT (2 Gy/d). Clinical examination revealed the spread of severe ulcerations to the jugal mucosa, gums, lips, hard palate, and tongue (WHO mucositis score 3). She had difficulty in moving her tongue and she was unable to eat any solid food. Oral hygiene orientation and LPT were performed throughout all RT sessions. A continuous diode laser, 660 nm, 40 mW, 6 J/cm(2), 0.24 J per point in contact mode, with spot size of 0.04 cm(2) was used in the entire oral cavity. A high-power diode laser at 1 W, 10 sec per cm of mucositis, approximately 10 J/cm(2), was used in defocused mode only on ulcerative lesions. After the first laser irradiation session, decreases in pain and xerostomia were reported; however, a more significant improvement was seen after five sessions. At that point although the mucositis score was still 2, the patient reported that she was free of pain, and consequently a palatine plate could be made to rehabilitate the entire surgical area. Seventeen laser irradiation sessions were necessary to eliminate all oral mucositis lesions. Normal oral function and consequent improvements in the quality of life of this oncologic patient were observed with LPT.

  15. Continuous wound infiltration system for postoperative pain management in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Banghyun; Kim, Kidong; Ahn, Soyeon; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Suh, Dong Hoon; No, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong Beom

    2017-05-01

    Major open surgery for gynecologic cancer usually involves a long midline skin incision and induces severe postoperative surgical site pain (POSP) that may not be effectively controlled with the conventional management. We investigated whether combining a continuous wound infiltration system (CWIS, ON-Q PainBuster ® ) and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) effectively decreases POSP, compared with IV PCA alone, in gynecologic oncology patients. This retrospective study included 62 Korean patients who received a long midline skin incision during gynecologic cancer surgery. The combined therapy group (n = 31), which received CWIS (0.5% ropivacaine infused over 72 h) and IV PCA (fentanyl citrate), and the IV PCA only group (n = 31) were determined using 1:1 matching. POSP was assessed using resting numeric rating scale (NRS) scores measured for 96 h after surgery, which were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The slopes of the predicted NRS values from the linear mixed model were significantly different between the groups. Compared with the control group, the combined therapy group had lower predicted NRS scores for the first 72 h, but higher predicted scores between 72 and 96 h. Moreover, the mean NRS scores over the first 48 h postoperation were significantly lower in the combined therapy group than in the control group; the scores were similar in both groups during the remaining period. With the exception of a higher body mass index in the CWIS group, the other variables, such as the dosage and usage time of fentanyl citrate, use of additional painkillers, and side effects, including wound complications, did not differ between groups. Combined therapy using CWIS and IV PCA may be a useful strategy for POSP management in gynecologic oncology patients.

  16. Diagnosis of bacteremia in pediatric oncologic patients by in-house real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles, Milene Gonçalves; Menezes, Liana Carballo; Bauab, Karen de Castro; Gumpl, Elke Kreuscher; Rocchetti, Talita Trevizani; Palomo, Flavia Silva; Carlesse, Fabianne; Pignatari, Antonio Carlos Campos

    2015-07-23

    Infections are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in children with cancer. Gaining a favorable prognosis for these patients depends on selecting the appropriate therapy, which in turn depends on rapid and accurate microbiological diagnosis. This study employed real-time PCR (qPCR) to identify the main pathogens causing bloodstream infection (BSI) in patients treated at the Pediatric Oncology Institute IOP-GRAACC-UNIFESP-Brazil. Antimicrobial resistance genes were also investigated using this methodology. A total of 248 samples from BACTEC® blood culture bottles and 99 whole-blood samples collected in tubes containing EDTA K2 Gel were isolated from 137 patients. All samples were screened by specific Gram probes for multiplex qPCR. Seventeen sequences were evaluated using gender-specific TaqMan probes and the resistance genes bla SHV, bla TEM, bla CTX, bla KPC, bla IMP, bla SPM, bla VIM, vanA, vanB and mecA were detected using the SYBR Green method. Positive qPCR results were obtained in 112 of the blood culture bottles (112/124), and 90 % agreement was observed between phenotypic and molecular microbial detection methods. For bacterial and fungal identification, the performance test showed: sensitivity 87 %; specificity 91 %; NPV 90 %; PPV 89 % and accuracy of 89 % when compared with the phenotypic method. The mecA gene was detected in 37 samples, extended-spectrum β-lactamases were detected in six samples and metallo-β-lactamase coding genes in four samples, with 60 % concordance between the two methods. The qPCR on whole blood detected eight samples possessing the mecA gene and one sample harboring the vanB gene. The bla KPC, bla VIM, bla IMP and bla SHV genes were not detected in this study. Real-time PCR is a useful tool in the early identification of pathogens and antimicrobial resistance genes from bloodstream infections of pediatric oncologic patients.

  17. Emerging role of rasburicase in the management of increased plasma uric acid levels in patients with hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeAnne D Kennedy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available LeAnne D Kennedy1 Susannah Koontz2 Kamakshi Rao31Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, NC, USA; 2Koontz Oncology Consulting LLC, Houston, TX, USA; 3UNC Hospitals, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is defined as a group of metabolic derangements that result from the massive and abrupt release of cellular components into the bloodstream after rapid lysis of tumor cells. Breakdown of released materials leads to a number of electrolyte abnormalities, including elevated uric acid concentrations in the blood (hyperuricemia, which carries potentially serious consequences. The diagnosis, prevention, and management of TLS is complicated by variability in definitions, differences in risk factors based on patient- and tumor-specific characteristics, and practitioner preferences in terms of pharmaceutical management strategies. The best prevention and management option for a particular patient depends on the patient’s baseline risk for TLS development, the severity of symptoms in the event of TLS development, practical management considerations, and financial implications of treatment.Keywords: tumor lysis syndrome, uric acid, rasburicase

  18. Evaluation of hematologic toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy using protracted infusion of low-dose cisplatin and 5-FU and radiotherapy for malignant tumors in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Matsumoto, Akira; Asano, Akiko; Sasaoka, Masahiro; Ii, Noriko; Kimura, Yasuo

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between hematologic toxicity and the daily dose of CDDP or the field size of radiation in 26 patients with malignant tumors aged>70 years who underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy consisting of infusion of low-dose CDDP and 5-FU and radiotherapy. None of the 26 patients developed Gr4 toxicity. The incidence of Gr3 toxicity was 23.1% (6/26) for leukocytes, 7.7% (2/26) for platelets, and 3.8% (1/26) for hemoglobin, being high for leukocytes. When the patients were classified into those aged 70-74 years (younger group) and those aged>75 years (older group), the incidence of Gr3 leukocyte and platelet toxicity was low in the former but high in the latter. Concerning the relationship between hematologic toxicity and the field size of radiation, the incidence of Gr3 hemoglobin, leukocyte, and platelet toxicity with a radiation field size 2 was 44% (4/9) in the older group but 0% in the younger group. In the older group, the daily CDDP dose tended to be low, and the field size of radiation tended to be small, but the incidence of hematological toxicity was high. In the younger group, the incidence of Gr2 or Gr3 toxicity increased with the daily dose of CDDP and the field size of radiation. (author)

  19. Career opportunities in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, L

    Oncology nursing offers nurses a wide range of opportunities. Nurses need a wide range of skills in order to care for patients who may have acute oncological illnesses or require palliative care. The nature of the nurse/patient relationship can be intense. Nurses generally find this enhances job satisfaction. The pressures exerted on nurses working in oncology can be immense. Oncology nursing is rewarding but very demanding and therefore the nurse has to be resourceful. Early career planning is advisable to take advantage of the opportunities that are currently available.

  20. Acute oncological emergencies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabriel, J

    2012-01-01

    The number of people receiving systemic anti-cancer treatment and presenting at emergency departments with treatment-related problems is rising. Nurses will be the first point of contact for most patients and need to be able to recognise oncological emergencies to initiate urgent assessment of patients and referral to the acute oncology team so that the most appropriate care can be delivered promptly. This article discusses the role of acute oncology services, and provides an overview of the most common acute oncological emergencies.

  1. The current trend of administering a patient-generated index in the oncological setting: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Tang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The patient-generated index (PGI is a more novel approach to evaluating health-related quality of life (HRQOL that allows patients to formulate their own responses in an open-ended format in order to measure HRQOL based on each patient’s own stated goals and expectations. To date the use of PGI in the setting of patients diagnosed with cancer remains relatively less common compared to other health conditions. This systematic review primarily aims to identify current literature in which PGI has been used as a tool to assess quality of life in cancer patients. A systematic review using the MEDLINE database from January 1990 to July 2013 was performed with the following search terms to identify the implementation of PGI in oncology settings: (PGI OR patient generated index OR patient-generated OR patient-reported OR patient generated OR patient reported AND (cancer OR oncology OR tumor OR neoplasm OR malignancy. Of the 2167 papers initially identified, 10 papers evaluated quality of life in oncology patients by collecting free-form responses from the patient, 4 of which actually used PGI. An overarching theme observed in these studies highlighted the concerns mentioned by patients that were not targeted or detected by standardized quality of life measures. While implementing the PGI may require slightly more investment of resources in the beginning, the potential implications of allowing patients to characterize their quality of life on their own terms are tremendous.

  2. [Nutritional support and parenteral nutrition in the oncological patient: an expert group consensus report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camblor-Álvarez, Miguel; Ocón-Bretón, María Julia; Luengo-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Viruzuela, Juan Antonio; Sendrós-Maroño, María José; Cervera-Peris, Mercedes; Grande, Enrique; Álvarez-Hernández, Julia; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula

    2018-01-10

    Malnutrition is a frequent medical problem of cancer patients that negatively impacts their quality of life. To analyze and respond to different issues related to the nutritional management of cancer patients in the clinical setting. A multidisciplinary group of experts in Medical Oncology, Pharmacy, and Nutrition developed a list of topics related to the nutritional status of cancer patients, which were grouped into three blocks: Nutritional support; Parenteral nutrition (PN); and Home PN (HPN) in cancer patients. A literature search, which included articles published in Spanish, English, and French until February 2017, was carried out. The document was organized as a questionnaire with those questions that, according to the panel's criteria, could generate greater controversy or doubt. Of the 18 questions addressed, 9 focused on nutritional support: 5 were related to PN and 4 about HPN. Among the different recommendations, the panel emphasized that in the cancer patient, PN is indicated mainly when it is not possible to use the digestive tract and/or oral feeding and/or enteral nutrition is not sufficient or possible. Additionally, the objective of the HPN is to improve or maintain the nutritional status of a patient at home. This document seeks to lay down a set of recommendations and to identify key issues that may be useful for the nutritional management of cancer Patients.

  3. Monitoring of patients in the Oncology department of the Clinical Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Quiroz, J.

    2010-01-01

    An important number of patients that visit the Oncology department o the Clinicas Hospital lost sight at some stage of their evolution. Our objective was to quantify the proportion of patients who are lost and describe the time spent in the service and its relationship with variables such as age, sex, origin of the patient and progress of the disease, for which we performed a descriptive observational study with an analytical component of 435 stories clinics patients with confirmed diagnosis of cancer, treated from January 2001 to December 2004, in order to have a minimum of 5 years of follow-up potential. Data were processed with Excel 2003. Patients had between 15-85 years old with a mean and median of 52 ± 14 years DS. Two hundred Seventy women and 165 were men, 232 were from the metropolitan area. The time of length of service was 0-114 months with a median of 8 and an average DS 21 months ± 27 months. As of December 2009 31 117 patients had died 36 remained in control and 282 were lost from sight. We found no relationship between age (p = 0.1) nor the state of progress of the disease at diagnosis (p = 0.21) If there were significant differences with greater probability of loss tracking men (p = 0.009) and from sites outside the metropolitan area (p = 0.04). The number of patients who are lost is very large and we must develop strategies more effective monitoring

  4. Central venous device-related thrombosis as imaged with MDCT in oncologic patients: prevalence and findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, Orlando; Castelguidone, Elisabetta de Lutio di; Granata, Vincenza; D'Errico, Adolfo Gallipoli; Sandomenico, Claudia; Petrillo, Mario; Aprea, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    Background: Venous thrombosis is a common occurrence in cancer patients, developing spontaneously or in combination with indwelling central venous devices (CVD). Purpose: To analyze the multidetector CT (MDCT) prevalence, appearance, and significance of catheter related thoracic venous thrombosis in oncologic patients and to determine the percentage of thrombi identified in the original reports. Material and Methods: Five hundred consecutive patients were considered. Inclusion criteria were: presence of a CVD; availability of a contrast-enhanced MDCT; and cancer history. Exclusion criteria were: direct tumor compression/infiltration of the veins; poor image quality; device tip not in the scanned volume; and missing clinical data. Seventeen (3.5%) out of the final 481 patients had a diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Results: Factors showing the highest correlation with thrombosis included peripherally-inserted CVD, right brachiocephalic vein tip location, patient performance status 3, metastatic stage disease, ongoing chemotherapy, and longstanding CVD. The highest prevalence was in patients with lymphoma, lung carcinoma, melanoma, and gynecologic malignancies. Eleven out of 17 cases had not been identified in the original report. Conclusion: CVD-related thrombosis is not uncommon in cancer patients and can also be observed in outpatients with a good performance status and a non-metastatic disease. Thrombi can be very tiny. Radiologists should be aware of the possibility to identify (or overlook) small thrombi

  5. Clinician characteristics, communication, and patient outcome in oncology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, A M M; de Roten, Y; Meystre, C; Passchier, J; Despland, J-N; Stiefel, F

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature on clinician characteristics influencing patient-clinician communication or patient outcome in oncology. Studies investigating the association of clinician characteristics with quality of communication and with outcome for adult cancer patients were systematically searched in MEDLINE, PSYINFO, PUBMED, EMBASE, CINHAL, Web of Science and The Cochrane Library up to November 2012. We used the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement to guide our review. Articles were extracted independently by two of the authors using predefined criteria. Twenty seven articles met the inclusion criteria. Clinician characteristics included a variety of sociodemographic, relational, and personal characteristics. A positive impact on quality of communication and/or patient outcome was reported for communication skills training, an external locus of control, empathy, a socioemotional approach, shared decision-making style, higher anxiety, and defensiveness. A negative impact was reported for increased level of fatigue and burnout and expression of worry. Professional experience of clinicians was not related to communication and/or to patient outcome, and divergent results were reported for clinician gender, age, stress, posture, and confidence or self-efficacy. Various clinician characteristics have different effects on quality of communication and/or patient outcome. Research is needed to investigate the pathways leading to effective communication between clinicians and patients. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Hematologic Relapse after 2 Years on a Non-Authorized Copy Version of Imatinib in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoubir Chouffai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib (Gleevec®/Glivec® has demonstrated high and durable hematologic and cytogenetic response rates, favorable safety and toxicity profiles, and prolonged survival when used for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Imatinib copy drugs are currently available in some countries; however, the safety and efficacy of these compounds have not been widely assessed. We present a patient who received the copy drug imatinib-COPER, lost hematologic response while on therapy, and was subsequently treated with branded Glivec. This report, and other published cases, suggests that imatinib copy drugs may not be equivalent to branded Glivec in pharmacology, safety, and efficacy. The case was a 42-year-old Moroccan male with CML. Initial therapy with hydroxyurea alone followed by hydroxyurea in combination with interferon-α resulted in durable complete hematologic remission (CHR. Due to adverse effects, the patient was switched to imatinib-COPER at 400 mg/day. Despite compliance with therapy, he lost his CHR after 2 years and presented with aplasia requiring a blood transfusion. Administration of Glivec in combination with hydroxyurea resulted in re-achievement of complete hematologic remission that was stable at last follow-up. Data from large-scale trials demonstrating high and durable responses and favorable safety have resulted in Glivec being considered as standard frontline therapy for patients with CML. Such trials have not been conducted for imatinib copy drugs. In the absence of clinical trial data, information from individual cases is critical to assessing the utility of copy drugs. This report suggests that initial treatment with an imatinib copy drug may compromise efficacy.

  7. Mobile Health in Oncology: A Patient Survey About App-Assisted Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin Anne; Vogel, Marco Me; Kessel, Carmen; Bier, Henning; Biedermann, Tilo; Friess, Helmut; Herschbach, Peter; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Meyer, Bernhard; Kiechle, Marion; Keller, Ulrich; Peschel, Christian; Schmid, Roland M; Combs, Stephanie E

    2017-06-14

    In the last decade, the health care sector has been enriched by numerous innovations such as apps and connected devices that assist users in weight reduction and diabetes management. However, only a few native apps in the oncological context exist, which support patients during treatment and aftercare. The objective of this study was to analyze patients' acceptance regarding app use and to investigate the functions of an oncological app that are most required, and the primary reasons for patients to refuse app-assisted cancer care. We designed and conducted a survey with 23 questions, inquiring patients about their technical knowledge and equipment, as well as the possible advantages and disadvantages, data transfer, and general functionality of an app. A total of 375 patients participated; the participation rate was 60.7% (375/618). Gender distribution was about 3:4 (female:male) with a median age of 59 years (range 18-92 years). Whereas 69.6% (261/375) of patients used mobile devices, 16.3% (61/375) did not own one, and 9.1% (34/375) only used a personal computer (PC). About half of the patients rated their usability skills as very good and good (18.9% 71/375; 35.2% 132/375), 23.5% (88/375) described their skills as intermediate, and 14.4% (54/375) as bad. Of all patients, 182 (48.5%, 182/375) were willing to send data to their treating clinic via an app, that is, to a server (61.0% 111/182) or as email (33.5%, 61/182). About two-thirds (68.7%, 125/182) believed that additional and regularly sent data would be an ideal complement to the standard follow-up procedure. Additionally, 86.8% (158/182) wished to be contacted by a physician when entered data showed irregularities. Because of lack of skills (34.4%, 56/163), concerns about the use of data (35.0%, 57/163), lack of capable devices (25.8%, 42/163), and the wish for personal contact with the treating physician (47.2%, 77/163), a total of 163 (43.5%, 163/375) patients refused to use an app. Pearson correlation

  8. Safety and efficacy of cryopreserved autologous platelet concentrates in HLA-alloimmunized patients with hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Bernhard; Alberio, Lorenzo; Rochat, Sophie; Stenner, Frank; Manz, Markus G; Buser, Andy; Schanz, Urs; Stussi, Georg

    2016-10-01

    Curative chemotherapy approaches in patients with malignancies and platelet (PLT) transfusion refractoriness due to alloimmunization may be hampered by the lack of suitable PLT donors. For these patients, transfusion of cryopreserved autologous PLTs is an option, but is time- and resource-consuming. We aimed at further simplifying this process. A retrospective single-center analysis was conducted on the transfusion of cryopreserved autologous PLTs in nine female alloimmunized, PLT transfusion-refractory patients treated for acute leukemia (n = 8) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 1). No additional processing was used before transfusion, and most notably, washing and centrifugation steps were omitted. Clinical efficacy and safety, as well as a flow cytometric assessment of structural and functional PLT changes, were analyzed. A total of 40 autologous PLT concentrates were thawed at bedside and transfused a median of 32 (range, 9 to 994) days after cryopreservation. No major bleeds and no severe dimethyl sulfoxide toxicity were observed. The median PLT count increments did not differ 1 and 18 to 24 hours after transfusion and reached 6 × 10 9 /L (interquartile range [IQR], 3 × 10 9 -7.5 × 10 9 /L) and 6 × 10 9 /L (IQR, 2.5 × 10 9 -9.5 × 10 9 /L), respectively. Cryopreservation resulted in partial activation of one-third of the PLTs. In vitro stimulation with strong agonists induced additional full activation of cryopreserved PLTs: median, 55% (IQR, 42%-60%) after thrombin and 39% (IQR, 36%-39%) after convulxin. The transfusion of cryopreserved autologous PLTs is feasible and safe. Despite the cryopreservation process, PLT functionality is partially maintained. © 2016 AABB.

  9. Molecular characterization of hemoglobin D Punjab traits and clinical-hematological profile of the patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Hemoglobin (Hb D hemoglobinopathies are widespread diseases in northwestern India and usually present with mild hemolytic anemia and mild to moderate splenomegaly. The heterozygous form of Hb D is clinically silent, but coinheritance of Hb D with Hb S or beta-thalassemia produces clinically significant conditions like thalassemia intermedia of moderate severity. Under heterozygous conditions with coinheritance of alpha and beta-thalassemia, patients show a degree of clinical variability. Thus, our aim was to molecularly characterize the Hb D trait among individuals who were clinically symptomatic because of co-inheritance of alpha deletions or any beta-globin gene mutations. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in an autonomous tertiary-care hospital. METHODS: Complete blood count and red cell indices were measured using an automated cell analyzer. Quantitative assessment of hemoglobin Hb F, Hb A, Hb A2 and Hb D was performed by means of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. DNA extraction was done using the phenol-chloroform method. Molecular analyses on common alpha deletions and common beta mutations were done using the Gap polymerase chain reaction and Amplification Refractory Mutation System, respectively. RESULTS: We evaluated 30 patients and found clinical variation in the behavior of Hb D traits. In six patients, the Hb D traits were clinically symptomatic and behaved like those of thalassemia intermedia. Molecular characterization showed that three out of these six were IVS-1-5 positive. CONCLUSIONS: HPLC may not be the gold standard for diagnosing symptomatic Hb D Punjab traits. Hence, standard confirmation should include molecular studies.

  10. A Systematic Assessment of Google Search Queries and Readability of Online Gynecologic Oncology Patient Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexandra; Stewart, J Ryan; Gaskins, Jeremy; Medlin, Erin

    2018-01-20

    The Internet is a major source of health information for gynecologic cancer patients. In this study, we systematically explore common Google search terms related to gynecologic cancer and calculate readability of top resulting websites. We used Google AdWords Keyword Planner to generate a list of commonly searched keywords related to gynecologic oncology, which were sorted into five groups (cervical cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer) using five patient education websites from sgo.org . Each keyword was Google searched to create a list of top websites. The Python programming language (version 3.5.1) was used to describe frequencies of keywords, top-level domains (TLDs), domains, and readability of top websites using four validated formulae. Of the estimated 1,846,950 monthly searches resulting in 62,227 websites, the most common was cancer.org . The most common TLD was *.com. Most websites were above the eighth-grade reading level recommended by the American Medical Association (AMA) and the National Institute of Health (NIH). The SMOG Index was the most reliable formula. The mean grade level readability for all sites using SMOG was 9.4 ± 2.3, with 23.9% of sites falling at or below the eighth-grade reading level. The first ten results for each Google keyword were easiest to read with results beyond the first page of Google being consistently more difficult. Keywords related to gynecologic malignancies are Google-searched frequently. Most websites are difficult to read without a high school education. This knowledge may help gynecologic oncology providers adequately meet the needs of their patients.

  11. Progress of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines for patients with hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming; Hoffmann, Jean-Marc; Schmitt, Michael; Schmitt, Anita

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most professional antigen-presenting cells eliciting cellular and humoral immune responses against cancer cells by expressing these antigens on MHC class I/II complexes to T cells. Therefore, they have been employed in many clinical trials as cancer vaccines for patients with cancer. This review focuses on the use of DCs in leukemia patients expressing leukemia-associated antigens (LAAs). The contribution of both stimulating vs. tolerogenic DCs as well as of other factors to the milieu of anti-leukemia immune responses are discussed. Several DC vaccination strategies like leukemia lysate, proteins and peptides have been developed. Next generation DC vaccines comprise transduction of DCs with retroviral vectors encoding for LAAs, cytokines and costimulatory molecules as well as transfection of DCs with naked RNA encoding for LAAs. Published as well as ongoing clinical trials are reported and critically reviewed. Future results will demonstrate whether next-generation DCs are really superior to conventional pulsing with peptide, protein or tumor lysate. However, currently available methods based on nucleic acid transfection/transduction are tempting in terms of material production costs and time for clinical application according to good manufacturing practice (GMP).

  12. Parent, patient and health professional perspectives regarding enteral nutrition in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer; Wakefield, Claire E; Tapsell, Linda C; Walton, Karen; Cohn, Richard J

    2017-11-01

    Enteral tube feeding (ETF) is an important part of treatment for paediatric cancer patients. Without nutritional therapy, the prevalence of under-nutrition during treatment for childhood cancer may be as high as 50%. To ensure that the appropriate initiation of ETF is optimised, information on the views of key stakeholders regarding ETF is needed. In total, 48 interviews were conducted with parents of paediatric cancer patients (n = 20), patients (n = 10) and members of the paediatric oncology health-care team (n = 18). Semistructured interviews were used to elicit information from participants, and the data were analysed using a content analysis approach. The interviews focused on views regarding: (i) attitude toward, and impact of, ETF; (ii) information and support regarding ETF; and (iii) clinical management of ETF. There was agreement between stakeholders on the impact of ETF on patients, both positive (good nutrition, weight gain and decreased anxiety) and negative (physical appearance, invasive insertion procedure and comfort). There were discordant perceptions regarding the timing and type of information provided on the use of ETF, as well as the decision-making process used. By standardising the information given to parents and enhancing understanding of parent, patient and health-care worker perceptions about ETF, the initiation of tube feeding may be optimised. This may positively impact patient outcomes in the future. © 2017 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  13. [Music as an adjuvant treatment for anxiety in pediatric oncologic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Herrera-Zaragoza, Octavio René; Jaramillo-Villanueva, Leonel; Anaya-Segura, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Music has been used as adjuvant therapy for anxiety and it is based on scientific principles. Tone, rhythm, harmony and time are crucial for its efficacy. Chemotherapy treatment frequently produces important stress in pediatric patients. This may delay treatment occasionally. Our objective was to determine if adjuvant therapy with music reduces anxiety in pediatric oncologic patients under ambulatory chemotherapy. Time series design. We included patients from 8 to 16 years of age who received ambulatory intravenous chemotherapy at the Hospital de Pediatría, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. They received treatment as usual on the first day, and music therapy during the second day of chemotherapy. A visual scale was used to categorize the level of anxiety prior and after treatment on both days. We included 22 patients. All patients experienced both moderate and high levels of anxiety prior to chemotherapy treatment on both days. There was a statistically significant reduction of anxiety on both groups after chemotherapy, but with lower levels of anxiety in the intervention group. There is an additional benefit with the use of music therapy in the reduction of anxiety in pediatric patients who receive ambulatory chemotherapy.

  14. [A pilot study of antibiotic cycling for the treatment of febrile neutropenia patients with hematological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Kinoshita, Keiichi; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Tsutani, Hiroshi; Ueda, Takanori

    2004-03-01

    Two antibiotics recommended by the guideline of Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) were selected for treatment of febrile neutropenia, and these paired antibiotics were changed periodically three times. The clinical efficacy of each antibiotic was retrospectively evaluated at the end of the final period. There was no significant difference about efficacy rate between two kinds of antibiotics in the same sequential period. However, the efficacy rate has been rising and febrile duration has been shortening by degrees. Only a few drug resistant bacteria were recognized by the surveillance culture during antibiotic cycling. Recently, antibiotic cycling therapy has attracted attention especially in the ICU. However, a clinical study of treatment for febrile neutropenia has not been reported. Our trial suggests that cycling therapy may be useful for febrile neutropenia. However, Some deviation in the patients characteristics of each period may affect the result. It seems that further examination is necessary about usefullness of the cycling therapy for febrile neutropenia.

  15. Targeted Therapies in Hematology and Their Impact on Patient Care: Chronic and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Elias Jabbour Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the genetic and molecular characterizations of leukemias have enhanced our capabilities to develop targeted therapies. The most dramatic examples of targeted therapy in cancer to date are the use of targeted BCR-ABL protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) which has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Inhibition of the signaling activity of this kinase has proved to be a highly successful treatment target, transforming the prognosis of patients with CML. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disease with outcomes that vary widely according to subtype of the disease. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors are promising strategies to help improve the cure rates in AML. In this review, we will highlight the results of recent clinical trials in which outcomes of CML and AML have been influenced significantly. Also, novel approaches to sequencing and combining available therapies will be covered. PMID:24246694

  16. Self-Regulatory Fatigue, Quality of Life, Health Behaviors, and Coping in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Shawna L.; Patten, Christi A.; Gastineau, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-regulatory fatigue may play an important role in a complex medical illness. Purpose Examine associations between self-regulatory fatigue, quality of life, and health behaviors in patients pre- (N=213) and 1-year post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT; N=140). Associations between self-regulatory fatigue and coping strategies pre-HSCT were also examined. Method Pre- and 1-year post-HSCT data collection. Hierarchical linear regression modeling. Results Higher self-regulatory fatigue pre-HSCT associated with lower overall, physical, social, emotional, and functional quality of life pre- (p’sself-regulatory fatigue pre-HSCT relating to decreased quality of life and health behaviors, and predicting changes in these variables 1-year post-HSCT. PMID:24802991

  17. Prospective evaluation through questionnaires of the emotional status of cancer patients in the waiting rooms of a department of oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Resega

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to better identify the prevailing emotions and feelings of cancer patients during their stay in waiting rooms in a department of oncology. Methods: In July 2014, patients in the waiting rooms of our Department of Oncology were asked to fill out dedicated questionnaires. Patients had to choose sentences that best described their feelings, thoughts and experiences; this part was differentiated according to the waiting rooms (Consultation Rooms versus Day Hospital. In another section, patients were asked to choose their prevailing primary emotions: joy, fear, sadness, anger, disgust or surprise. Results: Two hundred eighty questionnaires were considered valid for statistical analysis. Regarding feelings, all patients in the Day Hospital and Consultation Rooms stated that they feel anxious (48% and 53%, respectively. By differentiating patients according to the setting, patients in the Day Hospital answered that they will face chemotherapy, thinking that it will be useful to defeat the disease (56%, and patients in Consultation Rooms answered that time in the waiting rooms goes more slowly (65%. Regarding the prevailing emotions experienced by patients, sadness was the most selected, followed by fear and surprise. Conclusions: A prevalent emotional and cognitive state while waiting is anxiety, followed by positive thoughts. Patients presented anxiety and fear independently from the setting of care. We believe that each oncologist should be aware of the degrees of fear and sadness that patients experience during an oncological examination because these emotions can have an impact on communication and understanding.

  18. Medical Decision-Making Incapacity among Newly Diagnosed Older Patients with Hematological Malignancy Receiving First Line Chemotherapy: A Cross-Sectional Study of Patients and Physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sugano

    Full Text Available Decision-making capacity to provide informed consent regarding treatment is essential among cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency of decision-making incapacity among newly diagnosed older patients with hematological malignancy receiving first-line chemotherapy, to examine factors associated with incapacity and assess physicians' perceptions of patients' decision-making incapacity.Consecutive patients aged 65 years or over with a primary diagnosis of malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma were recruited. Decision-making capacity was assessed using the Structured Interview for Competency and Incompetency Assessment Testing and Ranking Inventory-Revised (SICIATRI-R. Cognitive impairment, depressive condition and other possible associated factors were also evaluated.Among 139 eligible patients registered for this study, 114 completed the survey. Of these, 28 (25%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 17%-32% were judged as having some extent of decision-making incompetency according to SICIATRI-R. Higher levels of cognitive impairment and increasing age were significantly associated with decision-making incapacity. Physicians experienced difficulty performing competency assessment (Cohen's kappa -0.54.Decision-making incapacity was found to be a common and under-recognized problem in older patients with cancer. Age and assessment of cognitive impairment may provide the opportunity to find patients that are at a high risk of showing decision-making incapacity.

  19. Association between psychological distress and cancer type in patients referred to a psycho-oncology service

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lavelle, C

    2017-06-01

    Psychological distress is common in patients with cancer and psychological well-being is increasingly seen as an important component of cancer care. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cancer type and subjective distress. The following data were collected from a database of consecutive psycho-oncology referrals to the Liaison Psychiatry service in Cork University Hospital from 2006 to 2015: demographics, cancer diagnosis, Distress Thermometer (DT) score. 2102 out of 2384 referrals were assessed. Of those assessed, the most common cancer diagnoses were breast (23%, n=486) followed by haematological (21%, n=445). There were significant difference in DT score between the different cancer types, (χ2(13)=33.685, p=0.001, Kruskal–Wallis test). When adjusted for age, gender and whether or not the cancer was recently diagnosed, there was no significant association between cancer type and psychological distress. In conclusion, cancer type is not associated with level of distress in cancer.

  20. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Vapiwala, Neha; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients’ discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  1. A new ambulatory classification and funding model for radiation oncology: non-admitted patients in Victorian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antioch, K M; Walsh, M K; Anderson, D; Wilson, R; Chambers, C; Willmer, P

    1998-01-01

    The Victorian Department of Human Services has developed a classification and funding model for non-admitted radiation oncology patients. Agencies were previously funded on an historical cost input basis. For 1996-97, payments were made according to the new Non-admitted Radiation Oncology Classification System and include four key components. Fixed grants are based on Weighted Radiation Therapy Services targets for megavoltage courses, planning procedures (dosimetry and simulation) and consultations. The additional throughput pool covers additional Weighted Radiation Therapy Services once targets are reached, with access conditional on the utilisation of a minimum number of megavoltage fields by each hospital. Block grants cover specialised treatments, such as brachytherapy, allied health payments and other support services. Compensation grants were available to bring payments up to the level of the previous year. There is potential to provide incentives to promote best practice in Australia through linking appropriate practice to funding models. Key Australian and international developments should be monitored, including economic evaluation studies, classification and funding models, and the deliberations of the American College of Radiology, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group and the Council of Oncology Societies of Australia. National impact on clinical practice guidelines in Australia can be achieved through the Quality of Care and Health Outcomes Committee of the National Health and Medical Research Council.