WorldWideScience

Sample records for helsinki good news

  1. No news is good news?

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Schmid

    I'm retired and living back home in Austria. But I am still excited about ATLAS and I try to follow the progress of the project as closely as I can. The ATLAS e-news are an excellent source of information. Appearing now every month they provide a broad, solid view of what is going on. But I'm greedy; I'd love to be "on-line". When the first End-Cap Toroid moved from hall 180 to the pit I was frustrated. I knew that it was happening but I could only get first pictures and reports a few days later. In the meantime the ECT was lowered into the cavern; no information on this available nowhere up to the this issue of the e-news. Here is my dream: an "ATLAS news ticker", i.e. a web page with the news appearing on the day they happen; just one line of information, possibly with a reference to a picture, a person or a report. My idea isn't new. On the ATLAS web-site for the public we have a window "latest news". But I was disappointed when, until a week ago, the latest news dated from December 2006 !!! Can't we do...

  2. Nuclear waste: good news

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The author states that the problem of nuclear wastes is solved. He states that 90 per cent of radioactive wastes are now permanently managed and that technical solutions for deep geological storage and for transmutation will soon solve the problem for the remaining 10 pc. He states that geological storage will be funded (it is included in electricity price). He denounces why these facts which he consider as good news, do not prevail. He proposes several documents in appendix: a text explaining the nuclear fuel cycle in France, and an extract of a report made by the national inventory of radioactive materials and wastes

  3. Good Friends, Bad News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    . In this paper we explore the apparent paradox in a quantitative analysis of information diffusion on Twitter. Twitter is interesting in this context as it has been shown to present both the characteristics social and news media. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the probability of retweet. Twitter...... is different from email in that retweeting does not depend on pre-existing social relations, but often occur among strangers, thus in this respect Twitter may be more similar to traditional news media. We therefore hypothesize that negative news content is more likely to be retweeted, while for non-news tweets...

  4. Getting Out the Good News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciancia, David

    1995-01-01

    A majority of American schools are meeting the challenge of educating children. A New York State district gets out the good news by producing school newsletters and videos, by constant and close contact with the local news media, and by forming ties with local real estate agents. (MLF)

  5. Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, H.M.; Albæk, E.; van Dalen, A.; de Vreese, C.

    2017-01-01

    Negativity is a news ideology, and its negative effects on attitude formation are widely documented. Contrary to this view, the present study demonstrates that negative economic news can in fact be good news. Based on a two-wave national panel survey and a media content analysis, we show that individual exposure to negative economic news enhances internal economic efficacy, a sense of competence in and understanding of the economy. This is good news as internal economic efficacy may facilitat...

  6. The News Delivery Sequence: Bad News and Good News in Conversational Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas W.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the conditional nature of good and bad news while focusing on three topics: (1) the status of information as news according the participants in a conversation; (2) the valence of this information with regard to its perception as good or bad; and (3) the effect of news on individuals. Notes that good news is privileged over bad news in…

  7. Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, H.M.; Albæk, E.; van Dalen, A.; de Vreese, C.

    2017-01-01

    Negativity is a news ideology, and its negative effects on attitude formation are widely documented. Contrary to this view, the present study demonstrates that negative economic news can in fact be good news. Based on a two-wave national panel survey and a media content analysis, we show that

  8. Asymmetric News Effects on Volatility: Good vs. Bad News in Good vs. Bad Times

    OpenAIRE

    Laakkonen, Helinä; Lanne, Markku

    2008-01-01

    We study the impact of positive and negative macroeconomic US and European news announcements in different phases of the business cycle on the highfrequency volatility of the EUR/USD exchange rate. The results suggest that in general bad news increases volatility more than good news. The news effects also depend on the state of the economy: bad news increases volatility more in good times than in bad times, while there is no difference between the volatility effects of good news in bad and go...

  9. The Effects of Bad News and Good News on a Newspaper's Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Jack B.; Miller, M. Mark

    1984-01-01

    Concludes that whether a newspaper carries mostly good news or mostly bad news affects the image of the paper, with bad news having negative effects and good news having positive effects on readers' perceptions of the newspaper. (FL)

  10. Good news for coffee addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas H

    2009-06-01

    Whether it's a basic Mr. Coffee or a gadget that sports a snazzy device for grinding beans on demand, the office coffee machine offers a place for serendipitous encounters that can improve the social aspect of work and generate new ideas. What's more, a steaming cup of joe may be as good for your health as it is for the bottom line, says Lee, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the CEO of Partners Community HealthCare. Fears of coffee's carcinogenic effects now appear to be unfounded, and, in fact, the brew might even protect against some types of cancer. What's more, coffee may guard against Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia and somehow soften the blow of a heart attack. Of course, its role as a pick-me-up is well known. So there's no need to take your coffee with a dollop of guilt, especially if you ease up on the sugar, cream, double chocolate, and whipped-cream topping.

  11. Effects of "Good News" and "Bad News" on Newscast Image and Community Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galician, Mary-Lou; Vestre, Norris D.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates whether the relative amount of bad, neutral, and good news on television has corresponding effects on viewers' image of the community depicted and of the carrying newscast. Concludes that bad news creates a bad image for the community but that good news does not produce a more favorable image than neutral news. (MM)

  12. The good news about giving bad news to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Neil J; Urban, Susan Y; Collier, Virginia U; Weiner, Joan; Polite, Ronald G; Davis, Elizabeth B; Boyer, E Gil

    2002-12-01

    There are few data available on how physicians inform patients about bad news. We surveyed internists about how they convey this information. We surveyed internists about their activities in giving bad news to patients. One set of questions was about activities for the emotional support of the patient (11 items), and the other was about activities for creating a supportive environment for delivering bad news (9 items). The impact of demographic factors on the performance of emotionally supportive items, environmentally supportive items, and on the number of minutes reportedly spent delivering news was analyzed by analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis. More than half of the internists reported that they always or frequently performed 10 of the 11 emotionally supportive items and 6 of the 9 environmentally supportive items while giving bad news to patients. The average time reportedly spent in giving bad news was 27 minutes. Although training in giving bad news had a significant impact on the number of emotionally supportive items reported (P woman, unmarried, and having a history of major illness were also associated with reporting a greater number of emotionally supportive activities. Internists report that they inform patients of bad news appropriately. Some deficiencies exist, specifically in discussing prognosis and referral of patients to support groups. Physician educational efforts should include discussion of prognosis with patients as well as the availability of support groups.

  13. When good news leads to bad choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Margaret A; Dunn, Roger M; Spetch, Marcia L; Ludvig, Elliot A

    2016-01-01

    Pigeons and other animals sometimes deviate from optimal choice behavior when given informative signals for delayed outcomes. For example, when pigeons are given a choice between an alternative that always leads to food after a delay and an alternative that leads to food only half of the time after a delay, preference changes dramatically depending on whether the stimuli during the delays are correlated with (signal) the outcomes or not. With signaled outcomes, pigeons show a much greater preference for the suboptimal alternative than with unsignaled outcomes. Key variables and research findings related to this phenomenon are reviewed, including the effects of durations of the choice and delay periods, probability of reinforcement, and gaps in the signal. We interpret the available evidence as reflecting a preference induced by signals for good news in a context of uncertainty. Other explanations are briefly summarized and compared. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  14. The Stock Market's Reaction to Unemployment News: Why Bad News is Usually Good for Stocks

    OpenAIRE

    John H. Boyd; Ravi Jagannathan; Jian Hu

    2001-01-01

    We find that on average an announcement of rising unemployment is 'good news' for stocks during economic expansions and 'bad news' during economic contractions. Thus stock prices usually increase on news of rising unemployment, since the economy is usually in an expansion phase. We provide an explanation for this phenomenon. Unemployment news bundles two primitive types of information relevant for valuing stocks: information about future interest rates and future corporate earnings and divide...

  15. Good news is bad news: Leverage cycles and sudden stops

    OpenAIRE

    Akinci, Ozge; Chahrour, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We show that a model with imperfectly forecastable changes in future productivity and an occasionally binding collateral constraint can match a set of stylized facts about “sudden stop” events. “Good” news about future productivity raises leverage during times of expansion, increasing the probability that the constraint binds, and a sudden stop occurs, in future periods. The economy exhibits a boom period in the run-up to the sudden stop, with output, consumption, and investment all above tre...

  16. "I Have Good News and Bad News:" The Effects of Power Imbalances and Physical Distance on News-givers' Use of Blended News Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Legg, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    People dislike giving bad news, and one strategy they use to ease the process is to pair bad news with some good news, a phenomenon called blended news delivery. Often, blended news arrives from people in power positions such as physicians, managers, or teachers. But followers also find themselves needing to give bad news to those in higher power positions. Similarly, people can choose how they deliver bad news, such as in person or over email. The current study brings much needed empirical a...

  17. Politeness Strategies in Good-news Business Letters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕争; 李纳

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the presentation of politeness in good-news business letters at the lexical,syntactic,and discourse levels based on Leech's Politeness Principle and Brown and Levinson's Face-saving Theory.

  18. Does iris(in) bring bad news or good news?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Silvio; Corleo, Davide; Buscemi, Carola; Giordano, Carla

    2017-09-20

    Irisin, a novel myokine produced in response to physical activity, promotes white-to-brown fat transdifferentiation. The name irisin referred to the ancient Greek goddess Iris, the messenger who delivered (bad) news from the gods. In mice, it has been demonstrated that irisin plays a key role in metabolic regulation, energy expenditure and glucose homeostasis. New findings from various studies carried out in both animals and humans suggest that irisin might also have other favorable effects, such as increasing bone cortical mass, preventing hepatic lipid accumulation, and improving cognitive functions, thus mediating many exercise-induced health benefits. However, data on the role and function of irisin in humans have prompted controversy, due mostly to the only recent confirmation of the presence of irisin in humans. Another strong limitation to the understanding of irisin mechanisms of action is the lack of knowledge about its receptor, which until now remains unidentified in humans and in animals. This review presents an overall analysis of the history of irisin, its expression, and its involvement in health, especially in humans. Level of Evidence Level V, review.

  19. GOOD NEWS, BAD NEWS AND GARCH EFFECTS IN STOCK RETURN DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Craig A. Depken II

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the volume of trade can be decomposed into proportional proxies for stochastic flows of good news and bad news into the market. Positive (good) information flows are assumed to increase the price of a financial vehicle while negative (bad) information flows decrease the price. For the majority of a sample of ten split-stocks it is shown that the proposed decomposition explains more GARCH than volume itself. Using the proposed decomposition, the variance of returns for younger...

  20. For Video Games, Bad News Is Good News: News Reporting of Violent Video Game Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Allen; Mitrofan, Oana; Ferguson, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    News coverage of video game violence studies has been critiqued for focusing mainly on studies supporting negative effects and failing to report studies that did not find evidence for such effects. These concerns were tested in a sample of 68 published studies using child and adolescent samples. Contrary to our hypotheses, study effect size was not a predictor of either newspaper coverage or publication in journals with a high-impact factor. However, a relationship between poorer study quality and newspaper coverage approached significance. High-impact journals were not found to publish studies with higher quality. Poorer quality studies, which tended to highlight negative findings, also received more citations in scholarly sources. Our findings suggest that negative effects of violent video games exposure in children and adolescents, rather than large effect size or high methodological quality, increase the likelihood of a study being cited in other academic publications and subsequently receiving news media coverage.

  1. And now for the good news [nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1984-01-01

    When specialists get together to discuss their subject, they usually concentrate on their problems. This, if done constructively, can be useful, but it provides outsiders with an unbalanced view of the subject. The problems are then amplified by the media, which provide much better coverage of bad news than good news. For instance, in papers on global energy, economists have stressed the difficulties in raising capital, not only for new energy systems but for any worthwhile project. Restating the problem is no help; what is needed of economists are solutions. Fortunately, for the technical problems of energy supply, there are solutions, one of which is nuclear energy. Futhermore, some of the solutions are not just economically acceptable, they could be economically beneficial

  2. Do People Prefer to Pass Along Good or Bad News? Valence and Relevance of News as Predictors of Transmission Propensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath

    1996-11-01

    Anecdotal evidence seems to indicate that exaggeratedly bad news may propagate in the marketplace of ideas. Three studies investigate whether people prefer to pass along pieces of bad news or good news that are equated for "surprisingness." People typically prefer to pass along central rather than extreme information (i.e., news that is less surprising rather than more surprising). However, when confronted with extreme information, the results support a preference for congruence, that is, people prefer to pass along news that is congruent with the emotional valence of the domain in question. This means that in emotionally negative domains, contrary to some theoretical predictions, people are willing to pass along bad news even when it is exaggeratedly bad. At the same time, however, people transmit exaggeratedly good news in emotionally positive domains. The general discussion indicates how these results may inform research on word of mouth for consumer products and social relations in organizations.

  3. Understanding News Values: Secret to Good Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Rita Haugh

    1981-01-01

    Explains the news values that journalists use. Shows English teachers and administrators how they can apply this knowledge of news media to improve public relations between the school and the community. (RL)

  4. The asymetric recognition of good and bad news in France, Germany and the UK.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giner, B.; Rees, W.P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate whether accounting systems recognise bad news more promptly in earnings than good news, where news is proxied by changes in share price. The analysis is based on a sample of firm/years drawn from France, Germany, and the UK during 1990 to 1998. These three countries are the

  5. Special problems of getting good news published in the news media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimsley, M.

    1993-01-01

    Those of us who work in the nuclear industry face a special set of problems in getting our good news out to the public. Our biggest problem is the general public has a negative emotional reaction to the term open-quotes nuclear.close quotes I conduct tours at Wolf Creek generating station near Burlington, Kansas, in America's heartland. When visitors come to our plant, many of them are concerned with their own personal safety. They want to know how much radiation exposure they are receiving and tell me about friends who were supposed to accompany them on their tour but who were so concerned about their safety that they opted to stay at home. Once these people have completed their tour, their minds are eased. It is at that point that I ask them to do a simple word association test on themselves. I have them think of the word nuclear, then tell me the next word that comes to their minds. Generally, they will say words such as open-quotes bomb,close quotes open-quotes explosion,close quotes open-quotes radiation,close quotes and so forth. What is the best way to speak to people's fears about nuclear issues? One of the most effective, efficient ways is by asking the media to help spread the good word

  6. When good news is bad news: explicating the moderated mediation dynamic behind the reversed mobilization effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuck, A.R.T.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the mobilizing potential of positive news framing on opponents of a referendum proposal. On the basis of an experiment (N = 470), using bootstrapping as a method to assess conditional indirect effects, mediation analysis showed that positive news framing—endorsing a

  7. Good news for a change: Hope for a troubled planet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, D.; Dressel, H.

    2002-07-01

    wolves and coyotes, encourage wild grasses and wild flowers while growing better beef and lamb, and bringing marginal ranch land back to life. They describe forestry practices that provide lumber to support people and towns while conserving bear and cougar habitat. They are discovering farmers who use crop production methods that will feed the hungry indefinitely without the danger of destroying soil or water resources. They tell about new technologies that have the potential to reduce, control and even eliminate most forms of pollution and toxins, and banish the terror of leaks, spills and contamination. These developments, and many others discussed in the book, are good news indeed; the best news, however, is that more and more people everywhere are working tirelessly to change our cultural assumptions about what we humans want and need. The new precept for living that they are developing not only are increasing our chances for survival, but have the unexpected dividend of helping us to discover deep forms of satisfaction and joy.

  8. Good news for a change: Hope for a troubled planet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, D.; Dressel, H.

    2002-01-01

    , encourage wild grasses and wild flowers while growing better beef and lamb, and bringing marginal ranch land back to life. They describe forestry practices that provide lumber to support people and towns while conserving bear and cougar habitat. They are discovering farmers who use crop production methods that will feed the hungry indefinitely without the danger of destroying soil or water resources. They tell about new technologies that have the potential to reduce, control and even eliminate most forms of pollution and toxins, and banish the terror of leaks, spills and contamination. These developments, and many others discussed in the book, are good news indeed; the best news, however, is that more and more people everywhere are working tirelessly to change our cultural assumptions about what we humans want and need. The new precept for living that they are developing not only are increasing our chances for survival, but have the unexpected dividend of helping us to discover deep forms of satisfaction and joy

  9. Ideas and Inspirations: Good News about Diabetes Prevention and Management in Indian Country

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... selected presentation recordings. Good news: Reduction in Kidney Failure in AI/AN People Exit Disclaimer: You Are ... ihs.gov showing a dramatic decrease in kidney failure from diabetes among American Indians and Alaska Natives. ...

  10. Tumor Talk and Child Well-Being: Perceptions of "Good" and "Bad" News Among Parents of Children With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraco, Angela M; Dussel, Veronica; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy I; Geyer, J Russell; Rosenberg, Abby R; Feudtner, Chris; Wolfe, Joanne

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about how parents of children with advanced cancer classify news they receive about their child's medical condition. To develop concepts of "good news" and "bad news" in discussions of advanced childhood cancer from parent perspectives. Parents of children with advanced cancer cared for at three children's hospitals were asked to share details of conversations in the preceding three months that contained "good news" or "bad news" related to their child's medical condition. We used mixed methods to evaluate parent responses to both open-ended and fixed-response items. Of 104 enrolled parents, 86 (83%) completed the survey. Six (7%) parents reported discussing neither good nor bad news, 18 (21%) reported only bad news, 15 (17%) reported only good news, and 46 (54%) reported both good and bad news (one missing response). Seventy-six parents (88%) answered free-response items. Descriptions of both good and bad news discussions consisted predominantly of "tumor talk" or cancer control. Additional treatment options featured prominently, particularly in discussions of bad news (42%). Child well-being, an important good news theme, encompassed treatment tolerance, symptom reduction, and quality of life. A majority of parents of children with advanced cancer report discussing both good and bad news in the preceding three months. Although news related primarily to cancer control, parents also describe good news discussions related to their child's well-being. Understanding how parents of children with advanced cancer classify and describe the news they receive may enhance efforts to promote family-centered communication. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effects of Bad and Good News on Newspaper Image and Community Image. A Report from the Communications Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins , Jack B.

    A study tested the hypotheses that the relative amount of bad news and good news in a newspaper would have corresponding effects on perceptions of the newspaper's community of origin and of the newspaper itself. Five different versions of a realistic four-page newspaper were created, in which treatment of the news stories ranged from an…

  12. Tax decisions bring good and bad news for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, R S

    1980-12-01

    Three recent court decisions denying tax exemptions to shared hospital laundry service organizations should dispel the belief that tax exemptions will automatically be granted to shared service organizations. Two other decisions on the sale of goods and services to persons other than hospitals suggest that the IRS is moving toward a position that accepts certain services as indigenous to the exempt functions of a modern community hospital.

  13. Time perception: the bad news and the good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, William J; Meck, Warren H

    2014-01-01

    Time perception is fundamental and heavily researched, but the field faces a number of obstacles to theoretical progress. In this advanced review, we focus on three pieces of ‘bad news’ for time perception research: temporal perception is highly labile across changes in experimental context and task; there are pronounced individual differences not just in overall performance but in the use of different timing strategies and the effect of key variables; and laboratory studies typically bear little relation to timing in the ‘real world’. We describe recent examples of these issues and in each case offer some ‘good news’ by showing how new research is addressing these challenges to provide rich insights into the neural and information-processing bases of timing and time perception. PMID:25210578

  14. news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tkacheva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available XXIV World Congress of Architecture – UIA Tokyo 2011UIA NewsTuva Architects' SuccessRecollection of "Zodchestvo 2011""Children Are not People of Tomorrow, but Are People of Today with a Different Scale of Feelings and Experience"The 30th Anniversary of the Union of Architects of RussiaXX International Review Competition for the Best Graduation Architecturaland Design Projects (YerevanParticipation of the Design Department of National Research Irkutsk State Technical UniversityParticipation of Institute of Architecture and Construction of National Research Irkutsk State Technical UniversitySeven Years and Further on!Breathe Together!VI Special Meeting of the National Association of DesignersWhat is Good for a German… or a Russian-Style SRO2012. "Katastrofa" Festival. AdvertisementSummer Workshop of Les Ateliers of Urban Planning and Development (Cergy-Pontoise, France

  15. Ideas and Inspirations: Good News about Diabetes Prevention and Management in Indian Country

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... watch selected presentation recordings. Good news: Reduction in Kidney Failure in AI/AN People Exit Disclaimer: You Are ... www.ihs.gov showing a dramatic decrease in kidney failure from diabetes among American Indians and Alaska Natives. ...

  16. Good News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Peter Viggo; Møller, Karsten Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Danmark har udviklet sin egen særlige måde at føre krig på siden Murens fald. Undervejs er landet blevet en krigernation, som ser brugen af våbenmagt som et legitimt og nyttigt instrument med en central rolle i dansk udenrigspolitik i de sidste 20 år. På den baggrund kom Danmarks entusiastiske de...

  17. When it cannot get better or worse: The asymmetric impact of good and bad news on bond returns in expansions and recessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beber, A.; Brandt, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    We examine empirically the response of bond returns and their volatility to good and bad macroeconomic news during expansions and recessions. We find that macroeconomic announcements are most important when they contain bad news for bond returns in expansions and, to a lesser extent, good news in

  18. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    Italy’s Physics Olympiad creates greater interest and motivation House of Experiments: 'humour helps in the teaching of science' Science takes stage in Germany PPARC news: guide and awards Schools newspaper competition focuses on Venus Website offers practical advice SHAP workshop will sharpen up teachers' skills Students will soon use Faulkes Telescope North to see the stars Talk takes a tour of the universe ASE 2004 Welsh physicists share secrets Switch students on to physics Teachers Awards 2004 recognize quality of teaching AAPT spends winter in Miami sun Schools Physics Group meeting will take place at Rugby School

  19. News

    OpenAIRE

    News, Transfer

    2017-01-01

      NOTICIAS / NEWS (“transfer”, 2018)  1) LIBROS – CAPÍTULOS DE LIBRO  / BOOKS – BOOK CHAPTERS 1. Bandia, Paul F. (ed.). (2017). Orality and Translation.  London: Routledge.   2. Trends in Translation and Interpretin,  Institute of Translation & Interpreting 3. Schippel, Larisa & Cornelia Zwischenberger. (eds). (2017). Going East: Discovering New and Alternative Traditions in Translation Studies. Berlin: Frank & Timme. 4.  Godayol, Pilar. (2017). Tres escritoras censuradas: Simone de Beauvoir,...

  20. Underground space planning in Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilkka Vähäaho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives insight into the use of underground space in Helsinki, Finland. The city has an underground master plan (UMP for its whole municipal area, not only for certain parts of the city. Further, the decision-making history of the UMP is described step-by-step. Some examples of underground space use in other cities are also given. The focus of this paper is on the sustainability issues related to urban underground space use, including its contribution to an environmentally sustainable and aesthetically acceptable landscape, anticipated structural longevity and maintaining the opportunity for urban development by future generations. Underground planning enhances overall safety and economy efficiency. The need for underground space use in city areas has grown rapidly since the 21st century; at the same time, the necessity to control construction work has also increased. The UMP of Helsinki reserves designated space for public and private utilities in various underground areas of bedrock over the long term. The plan also provides the framework for managing and controlling the city's underground construction work and allows suitable locations to be allocated for underground facilities. Tampere, the third most populated city in Finland and the biggest inland city in the Nordic countries, is also a good example of a city that is taking steps to utilise underground resources. Oulu, the capital city of northern Finland, has also started to ‘go underground’. An example of the possibility to combine two cities by an 80-km subsea tunnel is also discussed. A new fixed link would generate huge potential for the capital areas of Finland and Estonia to become a real Helsinki-Tallinn twin city.

  1. Porous hydrophilic polymer: good and bad news in the orthopedic application of cruciate ligament substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R M; Marshall, J L

    1975-05-01

    In the configuration used, the Hydron sponge did not enhance the ingrowth of bone into the Dacron for prosthesis anchorage. In fact, the presence of the Hydron seemed to retard such ingrowth, even though there was bony incorporation of portions of the Hydron polymer. Fixation was more rigid when Dacron was implanted bare. Hydron sponge does not appear to remain intact within a joint. It would not seem suitable for intra-articular protection of a prosthesis or local delivery of antibiotics here. We did not search further for the polymer in the regional lymph nodes. Hydron sponge is capable of eleciting an unusual phenomenon of woven bone formation. This is "good news" for its potential, but realization of such potential will certainly require additional study. Double and triple interval fluorochrome labelling would be especially helpful in further studying the localization and rate of this bone formation.

  2. Behavioral determinants of healthy aging: good news for the baby boomer generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman-Stein, Paula E; Potkanowicz, Edward S

    2003-01-01

    The first of the Baby Boomer generation will officially enter the beginning of old age in 2011 by turning 65. Recent research findings suggest that if the members of this cohort group engage in certain healthy behaviors and thought patterns in their middle years, they will experience a vital, satisfying life in their 70s and beyond. This article reviews the existing literature, including the results of longitudinal studies showing variables that predicted successful aging. Focusing on a lifespan psychology perspective of aging, the authors provide behavioral recommendations for middle age individuals that are likely to prevent disease-related disability, cognitive impairment, and late life depression. These include regular physical exercise, engaging in cognitively stimulating activities, maintaining an optimistic mental outlook, and finding meaning in life. The good news for the Baby Boomers is that there is increasing evidence that their behavior at age 50 will impact how they feel at age 80.

  3. Good, Bad or Absent: Discourses of Parents with Disabilities in Australian News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Vikki; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2015-01-01

    Background: News media frames public perceptions. As such, news media becomes a useful source of analysis to understand the presence (or otherwise) of people with disabilities, particularly intellectual disabilities, within parenting discourses in Australia. Method: Using Critical Discourse Analysis, this article examines major Australian…

  4. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    11-14 Curriculum: Supporting Physics Teaching (11-14) Europe: Sci-tech couldn't be without it! Art-Science: Makrolab in Mountain Year Digital Curriculum: Should the BBC learn from the past? Scotland: Teachers get Rocket Science Malaysia: Controversy over the language medium for science teaching UK Science: Next stage of Science Year announced Special Educational Needs: Science for special needs students Folk Physics: Good vibrations Environment: IoM3 - a move towards sustainability? UK Primary Science: The threat of afternoon science

  5. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Meeting: Brecon hosts 'alternative-style' Education Group Conference Meeting: Schools' Physics Group meeting delivers valuable teaching update Saturn Mission: PPARC’s Saturn school resource goes online Funding: Grant scheme supports Einstein Year activities Meeting: Liverpool Teachers’ Conference revives enthusiasm for physics Loan Scheme: Moon samples loaned to schools Awards: Schoolnet rewards good use of ICT in learning Funding: PPARC provides cash for science projects Workshop: Experts in physics education research share knowledge at international event Bulgaria: Transit of Venus comes to town Conference: CERN weekend provides lessons in particle physics Summer School: Teachers receive the summer-school treatment

  6. When it cannot get better or worse: the asymmetric impact of good and bad news on bond returns in expansions versus recessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beber, A.; Brandt, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    We examine empirically the response of bond returns and their volatility to good and bad macroeconomic news in economic expansions and recessions. We find that the information content of macroeconomic announcements is most important when it contains bad news for bond returns in expansions and, to a

  7. A role for heme oxygenase-1 in the antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects of erythropoietin: the start of a good news/bad news story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Davis, Paul A; Piccoli, Antonio; Pessina, Achille C

    2006-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is the major regulator of erythropoiesis. EPO's actions have been shown to be antiapoptotic and dependent on JAK2 signaling and Akt phosphorylation. These effects serve as link between EPO and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 is an inducible enzyme with potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities which are regulated by Akt signaling. EPO's ability to alter cellular systems that involve apoptosis and oxidants suggests that EPO treatments are likely to have multiple and different effects which may start a good news/bad news story. Recombinant human EPO is the recognized treatment of choice to address anemia and to stimulate erythropoiesis in chronic renal failure patients, through its antiapoptotic action which likely involves HO-1. On the other hand, EPO treatment to address anemia in cancer patients, while providing significant improvements in cancer patients' quality of life, its effects on survival are equivocal, likely due to its linkage with HO-1. Two clinical trials of EPO in patients with solid tumors have, in fact, shown specific negative effects on survival. However, EPO's effect on tumor growth and survival is not uniformily pro growth and pro survival, as EPO may act synergistically with chemotherapy to induce apoptosis. Finally, compounds have been synthesized that do not trigger EPO receptor and thus may allow experimental distinction and, therefore, at least potentially affect at the clinical level the tissue-protective effects of EPO (e.g., antiapoptosis) without provoking its other potentially detrimental effects. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Animal encounters at the Helsinki zoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Ojalammi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The largest urban centre in Finland, the city of Helsinki, has a population of approximately 620,000 at the turn of the year 2016, and the whole metropolitan area has about 1,5 million human inhabitants. Helsinki is also a home to 46 wild mammal species (City of Helsinki 2016. Over 120 bird species nest in Helsinki (City of Helsinki 2016 and the city hosts a vibrant bird watcher community. Reptiles and frogs instead have declined (City of Helsinki 2016.

  9. 'Breaking Good News': Neurologists' experiences of discussing SUDEP with patients in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Tom; Turbull, Sue; Mulhern, Sharon; Razvi, Saif

    2017-05-01

    Since the findings of a Fatal Accident Inquiry (FAI) in 2010, clinicians working in Scotland have been advised to discuss the risk of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) with patients immediately or soon after a diagnosis of epilepsy is made. A thematic analysis was used to describe the experiences discussing SUDEP of 10 clinicians (six Consultant Neurologists and four Neurology Registrars) working in Scotland. Contrary to previous research, clinicians appear to be routinely discussing SUDEP in a standardized fashion with newly diagnosed patients and the FAI appears to have instigated this change in practice. Clinicians are ambivalent about the practice and whether this is a Breaking Bad News (BBN) experience. Clinicians appear to anticipate that patients will be anxious or distressed discussing SUDEP, despite their experiences that patients do not react this way. There are further concerns that the pressure to discuss SUDEP, as a result of the FAI, hinders effective communication of the SUDEP message. Implications for guideline development are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Years of research yield nothing, and that's good news for physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    Johnson, G

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Tevatron has so far not revealed the existence of supersymmetric particles. The results are good though because they establish a new lower limit for the mass of one of the hypothetical particles, a gluino (2 pages).

  11. Can Expanded Bacteriochlorins Act as Photosensitizers in Photodynamic Therapy? Good News from Density Functional Theory Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Mazzone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The main photophysical properties of a series of expanded bacteriochlorins, recently synthetized, have been investigated by means of DFT and TD-DFT methods. Absorption spectra computed with different exchange-correlation functionals, B3LYP, M06 and ωB97XD, have been compared with the experimental ones. In good agreement, all the considered systems show a maximum absorption wavelength that falls in the therapeutic window (600–800 nm. The obtained singlet-triplet energy gaps are large enough to ensure the production of cytotoxic singlet molecular oxygen. The computed spin-orbit matrix elements suggest a good probability of intersystem spin-crossing between singlet and triplet excited states, since they result to be higher than those computed for 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(m-hydroxyphenylchlorin (Foscan© already used in the photodynamic therapy (PDT protocol. Because of the investigated properties, these expanded bacteriochlorins can be proposed as PDT agents.

  12. Advertisement call and genetic structure conservatism: good news for an endangered Neotropical frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, Lucas R; Costa, William P; Martins, Lucas B; Nunes-de-Almeida, Carlos H L; Toledo, Luís Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Many amphibian species are negatively affected by habitat change due to anthropogenic activities. Populations distributed over modified landscapes may be subject to local extinction or may be relegated to the remaining-likely isolated and possibly degraded-patches of available habitat. Isolation without gene flow could lead to variability in phenotypic traits owing to differences in local selective pressures such as environmental structure, microclimate, or site-specific species assemblages. Here, we tested the microevolution hypothesis by evaluating the acoustic parameters of 349 advertisement calls from 15 males from six populations of the endangered amphibian species Proceratophrys moratoi. In addition, we analyzed the genetic distances among populations and the genetic diversity with a haplotype network analysis. We performed cluster analysis on acoustic data based on the Bray-Curtis index of similarity, using the UPGMA method. We correlated acoustic dissimilarities (calculated by Euclidean distance) with geographical and genetic distances among populations. Spectral traits of the advertisement call of P. moratoi presented lower coefficients of variation than did temporal traits, both within and among males. Cluster analyses placed individuals without congruence in population or geographical distance, but recovered the species topology in relation to sister species. The genetic distance among populations was low; it did not exceed 0.4% for the most distant populations, and was not correlated with acoustic distance. Both acoustic features and genetic sequences are highly conserved, suggesting that populations could be connected by recent migrations, and that they are subject to stabilizing selective forces. Although further studies are required, these findings add to a growing body of literature suggesting that this species would be a good candidate for a reintroduction program without negative effects on communication or genetic impact.

  13. Advertisement call and genetic structure conservatism: good news for an endangered Neotropical frog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R. Forti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many amphibian species are negatively affected by habitat change due to anthropogenic activities. Populations distributed over modified landscapes may be subject to local extinction or may be relegated to the remaining—likely isolated and possibly degraded—patches of available habitat. Isolation without gene flow could lead to variability in phenotypic traits owing to differences in local selective pressures such as environmental structure, microclimate, or site-specific species assemblages. Methods: Here, we tested the microevolution hypothesis by evaluating the acoustic parameters of 349 advertisement calls from 15 males from six populations of the endangered amphibian species Proceratophrys moratoi. In addition, we analyzed the genetic distances among populations and the genetic diversity with a haplotype network analysis. We performed cluster analysis on acoustic data based on the Bray-Curtis index of similarity, using the UPGMA method. We correlated acoustic dissimilarities (calculated by Euclidean distance with geographical and genetic distances among populations. Results: Spectral traits of the advertisement call of P. moratoi presented lower coefficients of variation than did temporal traits, both within and among males. Cluster analyses placed individuals without congruence in population or geographical distance, but recovered the species topology in relation to sister species. The genetic distance among populations was low; it did not exceed 0.4% for the most distant populations, and was not correlated with acoustic distance. Discussion: Both acoustic features and genetic sequences are highly conserved, suggesting that populations could be connected by recent migrations, and that they are subject to stabilizing selective forces. Although further studies are required, these findings add to a growing body of literature suggesting that this species would be a good candidate for a reintroduction program without negative

  14. DHC in Helsinki - The Ultimate Heating and Cooling Solution for a Large Urban Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirgentius, Niko; Riipinen, Marko

    2010-09-15

    Since the 1950s there has been successful district energy business in Helsinki. It has been the main factor for superior energy efficiency and low CO2 emissions both in heating and cooling as well as providing clean air for the metropolitan area. The system has been grown by commercial basis based on customers' own willingness to select district energy solution. It also provided a profitable energy business to local energy company, Helsinki Energy. Helsinki DHC system is a good example of ultimate urban energy solution that provides benefits for the customer, energy company, metropolitan area and for the whole society as well.

  15. Event seeking for sponsors: Case Helsinki Pride

    OpenAIRE

    Jaakkola, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was done for HeSeTa Ry (Helsingin seudun seksuaalinen tasavertaisuus ry) and the goal was to find out how Helsinki Pride could get sponsors more efficiently and how the co-operation could be made more long lasting with the current sponsors. Helsinki Pride is an event organized in Helsinki each year in June. It is also the biggest LGBT event organized in Finland. The biggest event of the week is the Gay Parade and the Party in the Park. In 2014 only these events had over 20 000 par...

  16. New business activities of Helsinki Energia; Helsinki Energian uusi liiketoiminta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuura, L.

    2001-07-01

    Helsinki Energia has started a new business activity - district cooling. The service is offered to cooling of large buildings, e.g. shopping centers, offices, etc. District cooling power is generated centrally at the power plant and the cooling power is transferred to the customer via separated distribution network. There are three main alternatives for production of district cooling power, mainly compressors, absorption devices and heat pumps. The operating energies required by them include electric power, district heat, steam, burning matter or some waste heat. The conditions for profitable district cooling are that the buildings to be cooled are built on a compact area at a reasonable distance from the district cool generation plant, that there enough need for district cool at the area, and that the district cool production plant is located at the seaside. Technically and economically reasonable construction of district cooling network requires that both the transmissions and distribution networks are as short as possible because the pipe dimensions are large, and because the streets are full of other infrastructure. Location near a sea ease the cooling of the district cool generation process, and especially, it is possible to use the coldness of the seawater directly via heat exchangers. The objective of district cool generation is to intensify the combined heat and power generation during warm seasons by reducing the electric power consumption and by increasing the utilization of surplus heat. It is also possible to reduce the use of harmful refrigerants. The district cooling activities of Helsinki Energia started in 1998 in Pitaejaenmaeki. Ruoholahti district cool system is the first larger area district cool project in Finland. The district cooling plant is constructed at the area of the Salmisaari power plant, hence the plant can utilize the present space and equipment of the power plant in generation of district cool. Energy needed for operation of the

  17. Doing good business and quality journalism? Entrepreneurial journalism and the debates on the future of news media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Carbasse

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As journalism finds itself in a process of accelerated transformations, Internet seems to be a place where both the reproduction of traditional models and a wide array of journalistic and business models experimentations happen at the same time. Here, at the intersection of changes in news models, job definitions and in career trajectories, the figure of the “entrepreneurial journalist” (BRIGGS, 2011 resurfaced and gradually gained in popularity over the last years in discourses celebrating innovation, flexibility and risk-taking. In this context, how can the figures of the journalist and the entrepreneur co-exist whereas commercial and journalistic activities have been historically strongly separated? How can business development be compatible with independent and objective news gathering when it is done by the same person? How do the notions of independent news writing and respect for the public interest – all strong elements of the journalistic ethics discourses – are negotiated by these actors? In this paper, we wish to explore these issues, first by contextualizing the rise of entrepreneurial journalism before presenting findings of an exploratory study about the ways the links between entrepreneurial and journalistic imperatives have been thought and presented in the existing journalistic literature in France and United States of America.

  18. Starting a Chinese Sauce Company in Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Bing; Shi, Jianan

    2017-01-01

    The thesis is about starting-up a Chinese sauce company in Helsinki. The introduction is about the history of Laoganma company and the missions of a branch company in Helsinki, as well as the aims of the project. The part about market research includes the current situation of Finnish sauce market and a SWOT analysis for a Finnish market entrance. Also, a successful case reflects the developed way for the company. Then, the price and location are defined in the thesis. Sales strategi...

  19. Good news, bad news on proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    While Argentina and Brazil now seem less likely to acquire nuclear weapons, Indian and Pakistani intentions remain uncertain. The Israeli nuclear program and recent allegations of black-marketing are even more disturbing. The author notes the positive developments in Latin America and some hopeful signs in South Asia, despite uncertainties over their final outcome. He finds Israel's program the most disturbing because of the deployment of Jericho II missiles and indications that Israel possesses a fully militarized nuclear force which was developed by illegal means. These activities could politicize the Non-Proliferation Treaty review conference. 14 references

  20. Good News and Bad News on Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Sociologists focus on the theory that parents spend less time with their kids than they used to. But fact-checking popular perceptions about the evolution of parenting indicates that fathers spend much more time with their children than they used to (from a weekly average of 3 hours of primary child care in 1965, to seven hours in 2000.). A more…

  1. [The Helsinki Declaration: relativism and vulnerability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, D; Corrêa, M

    2001-01-01

    The Helsinki Declaration is a crucial ethical landmark for clinical research involving human beings. Since the Declaration was issued, a series of revisions and modifications have been introduced into the original text, but they have not altered its humanist approach or its international force for regulating clinical research. A proposal for an extensive revision of the Declaration's underlying ethical principles has been debated for the past four years. If the proposal is approved, international clinical research involving human beings will be modified, further increasing the vulnerability of certain social groups. This article discusses the historical process involved in passing the Helsinki Declaration and the most recent debate on the new draft. The article analyzes the new text's social implications for underdeveloped countries, arguing for a political approach to the vulnerability concept.

  2. Research News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research News Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Research News Research News Quarterly Updates Research Call Archive ... Clinical Trials in MS Learn More Become a Research Champion An MS Research Revolution Support MS Research ...

  3. Iglesia Taivallahti, Helsinki – Finlandia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo y Tuomo Suomalainen, Arquitectos

    1973-11-01

    Full Text Available When this building was designed, an attempt was made to have the lot retain its open-space nature within the densely populated vicinity in which it is located. To achieve this end, an excavation was made to the street level in the rock mass more than 10 meters high which dominates the lot into which the main part of the church has been built. The rest of the dependencies, such as the vicarage, the technical stations, the control room and the club locations, were situated around the rock, adapting themselves as much as possible to its shape. Whenever possible, the rock itself was used as integral part in the construction of the temple, while the remaining walls, both inside and outside, were constructed using ordinary stone masonry. A dome, made up of a radial system of reinforced-concrete beams, covers the church. In its upper part, a skylight built with a metal frame and insulatingglass panels allows natural light to illuminate the interior space. The entire complex is characterized by its good adaptation to the landscape.Al proyectar este edificio se ha tratado de que el solar continuara manteniendo su carácter de espacio abierto, dentro del entorno densamente poblado en el que está enclavado. Para conseguirlo se realizó una excavación, hasta el nivel de la calle, en el macizo rocoso de más de 10 m de altura que domina la parcela, en el cual se ha incorporado la parte principal de la iglesia. El resto de las dependencias, tales como la vicaría, los locales técnicos, la sala de control y los locales del club, se situaron alrededor de la roca, adaptándose lo más fielmente posible a su forma. Siempre que fue posible se utilizó la propia roca como parte integrante en la construcción del templo, realizándose los muros restantes, tanto interiores como exteriores, con mampostería ordinaria. Una cúpula, constituida por un sistema radial de vigas de hormigón armado, cubre la iglesia. En su parte superior, un lucernario, construido con un

  4. Helsinki Metropolitan Area Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The Helsinki Metropolitan Area Climate Change Adaptation Strategy has been prepared in close cooperation with the four cities of the metropolitan area (Helsinki, Espoo, Vantaa and Kauniainen), the Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority HSY and other municipal, regional and state level organisations. In the strategy, strategic starting points and policies with which the metropolitan area prepares for the consequences of climate change, are compiled. The Helsinki Metropolitan Area adaptation strategy concentrates on the adaptation of the built and urban environment to the changing climate. The vision of the strategy is climate proof city - the future is built now. The strategy aims to (1) assess the impacts of climate change in the area, (2) prepare for the impacts of climate change and to extreme weather events and (3) to reduce the vulnerabilities of the area to climate variability and change. The target is to secure the well-being of the citizens and the functioning of the cities also in the changing climate conditions. The preparation of the adaptation strategy started in 2009 by producing the background studies. They include the regional climate and sea level scenarios, modelling of river floods in climate change conditions and a survey of climate change impacts in the region. Also, existing programmes, legislation, research and studies concerning adaptation were collected. The background studies are published in a report titled 'The Helsinki metropolitan area climate is changing - Adaptation strategy background studies' (in Finnish) (HSY 2010). HSY coordinated the strategy preparation. The work was carried out is close cooperation with the experts of the metropolitan area cities, regional emergency services, Ministry of the Environment, Helsinki Region Transport Authority and other regional organisations. The strategy work has had a steering group that consists of representatives of the cities and other central cooperation partners. The

  5. A shower of good news

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    It never rains but it pours. So the saying goes, and it was literally true in Brussels this week as well as figuratively, seen from a CERN perspective. I am in Brussels for the special meeting of the European Strategy Session of Council, which yesterday approved the updated European Strategy for Particle Physics. This is the first time that the Council has met in Brussels, and we used the opportunity to meet people whose opinions matter on science in Europe.   From a working lunch with MEPs in the European Parliament on Wednesday, we moved across town to the European Commission, our host for the Council meeting. The day was rounded off with a very stimulating panel discussion on the value of basic research, attended by many Brussels-based opinion leaders, as well as a number of European science research ministers, which brings me to the main reason for our being in Brussels this week. The timing of the CERN Council meeting was fixed to coincide with that of the European Competitiveness Coun...

  6. Good News About Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... includes: gene therapy, bone marrow transplant, chemotherapy, the biochemistry of normal and cancerous cells, radiation treatment, blood ... drugs that can be evaluated in clinical trials Projects designed to improve the health status of survivors ...

  7. Good news for young families

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    CERN and the commune of Meyrin have just signed an agreement under which the equivalent of 20 full-time places will be reserved for the children of CERN personnel in a new crèche being built in Meyrin.

  8. "And now for the good news..." the impact of negative and positive messages in self-management education for people with Type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study in an ethnically diverse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eborall, Helen C; Virdee, Satnam K; Patel, Naina; Redwood, Sabi; Greenfield, Sheila M; Stone, Margaret A

    2016-03-01

    To explore the impact of Diabetes Education and Self Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed (DESMOND) Foundation education, particularly from interviewees' narratives regarding recall of good and bad news messages and behaviour changes. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample (n=19) of people who had attended education sessions as part of a randomised controlled trial in two UK sites with ethnically diverse populations. Data collection and analysis were informed by the constant comparative approach and facilitated through charting. Findings were similar in people from different ethnic backgrounds. Exploration of levels of recall of the sessions suggested that this was variable and sometimes very limited, but that interviewees had all assimilated some relevant learning. Key themes emerged relating to the way in which interviewees recalled and had been influenced by positive (good news) and negative (bad news) messages within the education sessions, including biomedical explanations. Both types of message appeared to have an important role in terms of motivation to change behaviour, but a notable observation was that none of the interviewees recalled receiving bad news messages when diagnosed. Our findings have highlighted the importance of providing and combining both negative and positive messages within education designed to promote self-management behaviour change. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Initiatives towards Carbon Neutrality in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karna Dahal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon neutrality represents one climate strategy adopted by many cities, including the city of Helsinki and the Helsinki metropolitan area in Finland. This study examines initiatives adopted by the Helsinki metropolitan area aimed at reducing energy-related carbon emissions and achieving carbon neutrality through future actions. Various sectorial energy consumption rates per year and carbon emissions from various sectors within the city of Helsinki and the metropolitan area were extracted from an online database and re-calculated (in GWh, MWh/inhabitant and MtCO2e, KtCO2e/inhabitant. We employed a backcasting scenario method to explore the various carbon reduction measures in the Helsinki metropolitan area. About 96% of the emissions produced in the Helsinki metropolitan area are energy-based. District heating represents the primary source of emissions, followed by transportation and electricity consumption, respectively. We also found that accomplishing the carbon reduction strategies of the Helsinki metropolitan area by 2050 remains challenging. Technological advancement for clean and renewable energy sources, smart policies and raising awareness resulting in behavioral changes greatly affect carbon reduction actions. Thus, strong political commitments are also required to formulate and implement stringent climate actions.

  10. Waste prevention strategy for 2007 in Helsinki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahtala, R.M.; Blauberg, T.; Huu-htanen, S.R.S.; Kajaste, S.; Kemppainen, S.H.; Linsio, O.A.; Sten, S.T.E.

    2006-01-01

    In 2002, the Board of Directors of Helsinki Metropolitan Area Council (YTV) accepted the Waste Prevention Strategy. The target is to utilise advice and guidance, so as to motivate the residents, enterprises and the public sector to avoid waste production, so that less waste will be produced per resident and workplace in 2007 than in 2000. The main parts to include: 1) Waste prevention in companies, concentrating on co-operation networks to be formed for different sectors and on information acquired and distributed with them, on the use of the waste benchmarking system maintained by YTV. 2) The waste prevention in public administration covers offices, acquisitions and social and health care. The process stared by ecologising YTV's own operations, and proceeds towards waste reduction models to be prepared and introduced in co-operation with the municipalities other regions. 3) The information service and awareness education is directed towards households and schools. An awareness campaign has and will be arranged foe households in order to spread information on the reduction of waste. Education material and methods has produced so far for senior high school and will be produced for primary school and pre-school and vocational institutions together with the authorities in order to promote waste prevention [it

  11. The business plan of Izakaya restaurant in Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Peng

    2017-01-01

    The objective of thesis was to study the main areas of creating a business plan and to make research toward the current market environment of Asian fusion restaurant in the Helsinki area in order to make a realistic business plan of a Japanese Izakaya restaurant. The theoretical study is based on several business books, some suggestion from different types of restaurant owners in Helsinki, the business plan outline was finally made. For the empirical study, a survey of market analysis,...

  12. Declaração de Helsinki: relativismo e vulnerabilidade The Helsinki Declaration: relativism and vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Diniz

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A Declaração de Helsinki representou um marco fundamental para a pesquisa clínica envolvendo seres humanos. Desde a promulgação da Declaração, uma série de revisões e modificações foram feitas ao texto original, mas nenhuma delas modificou seu espírito humanista ou diminuiu sua força como instância reguladora da pesquisa clínica. Nos últimos quatro anos, no entanto, vem sendo debatida uma proposta de modificação dos princípios éticos da Declaração. No caso desta proposta ser aprovada, a pesquisa clínica internacional com seres humanos será radicalmente modificada, aumentando a vulnerabilidade de certos grupos sociais. Neste artigo, apresentamos o processo histórico de promulgação da Declaração de Helsinki e os mais recentes debates em torno da proposta de modificação. Trata-se de uma análise das implicações do novo texto para os países subdesenvolvidos e da defesa da necessidade de uma consideração política do conceito de vulnerabilidade.The Helsinki Declaration is a crucial ethical landmark for clinical research involving human beings. Since the Declaration was issued, a series of revisions and modifications have been introduced into the original text, but they have not altered its humanist approach or its international force for regulating clinical research. A proposal for an extensive revision of the Declaration's underlying ethical principles has been debated for the past four years. If the proposal is approved, international clinical research involving human beings will be modified, further increasing the vulnerability of certain social groups. This article discusses the historical process involved in passing the Helsinki Declaration and the most recent debate on the new draft. The article analyzes the new text's social implications for underdeveloped countries, arguing for a political approach to the vulnerability concept.

  13. NERSC News

    Science.gov (United States)

    NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Login Site Map | My NERSC search... Go Home About Scheduled Outages Login Node Status My NERSC Now Computing Highlights Timeline News & Publications News Coming to NERSC Login Page May 21, 2018 NERSC rolls out a redesigned login page on June 11. Read More Â

  14. NEWS: Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leeds. Physics at Work Exhibition: 12-14 September, University of Cambridge The year 2000 Exhibition will be the 16th organized by Brenda Jennison. The exhibition will be held at the Cavendish Laboratory and further details can be obtained from Brenda at the University (tel: 01223 332888, fax: 01223 332894 or e-mail: bmj10@cam.ac.uk). News on GNVQ science The Institute of Physics and the Royal Society of Chemistry are currently financing the compilation of a directory of resources to assist teachers in identifying and selecting suitable materials for teaching the new GNVQ science specifications. Work on the first part of the directory will soon be completed and it is hoped to publish the material in both print and electronic forms before the end of the summer term. This first part covers resources - all evaluated by practising GNVQ teachers - supporting the teaching of the compulsory units for Advanced GNVQ Science. A small team comprising a physics teacher, a chemistry teacher and a biology teacher, all involved with GNVQ programmes and led by Dr Ken Gadd, has carried out the work. They have established a network of teachers around the country to help with the evaluation of curriculum materials. The next part of the project will be to examine the feasibility of providing a similar listing for the optional units at this level. Future development, depending on the availability of funds, will extend the project to Intermediate level programmes in science, including the Part One, once its structure has been agreed at QCA. Further information about the Directory and the next phase of development will be available in the autumn. Activities Physics on Stage The future of science, technology and the ensuing wealth creation potential for Britain will depend on the quality of science education in schools today. Yet the numbers studying physics, which underpins science and engineering, are falling. This problem is currently

  15. Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Grunewald, Andreas; Kräkel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, social media and the Internet have amplified the possibility to spread false information, a.k.a. fake news, which has become a serious threat to the credibility of politicians, organizations, and other decision makers. This paper proposes a framework for investigating the incentives to strategically spread fake news under different institutional configurations and payoff structures. In particular, we show under what conditions institutions that foster transparency in the m...

  16. Marketing Plan for the Helsinki Cocktail Competition 2017

    OpenAIRE

    Järvinen, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    The Helsinki Cocktail Competition (HCC) is an event in search of a signature cocktail for the city of Helsinki. It was first organized in 2016 by the creative bartending agency the Son of a Punch. The objective is to organize the event on an annual basis. The HCC is a collaboration between the bars, bartenders and Finland’s major alcohol importers, that operate as the sponsors of the competition. The competition invites all the best cocktail bars of the capital to create a cocktail, that...

  17. Customer expectations and current offers from food trucks in Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, An

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine whether there is a gap between what customers expect and what the food trucks in Helsinki offers in term of diversity of products, price, time and location of service. Do the current offers match with what customers would like to have? The food truck concept has a long history and since 2008 became an international phenomenon. However, it is still relatively young in Helsinki. There are concerted efforts from different parties included the city’s au...

  18. Developing the service concept for CheapSleep Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Grönroos, Johnny; Väätäinen, Minja

    2013-01-01

    This report is a bachelor’s thesis, assigned by the company CheapSleep Helsinki. CheapSleep is a new hostel that is looking to expand its business in Helsinki, and therefore one of the aims for the thesis is to research if the hostel should expand in a new location in addition to the old one or not. If the results show that a new location is needed, the aim is to find out how it should be chosen and suggest some locations for it. In addition to this, the competition in the city will be explor...

  19. The aspect of mobility in the career paths of hotel managers of one hotel chain in Helsinki.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinigina, Nadezda

    2011-01-01

    The changes in the modern environment happen constantly. Individuals and organizations try to cope with the changes. The hotel industry has been showing good economical results globally and in Finland during the recent years, and therefore it is an attractive working environemnt. The purpose of this qualitative research was to understand the role of mobility in the career paths of the hotel managers in Helsinki. The hotel managers of only one company were interviewed, therefore the resul...

  20. 75 FR 75615 - Helsinki Human Rights Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ... Helsinki Human Rights Day, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation This year... states with respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms within states. With the signing of the Act... occasion also spurred courageous human rights activists in Eastern Europe to form citizens' groups to press...

  1. In defence of Helsinki and human rights | Plomer | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Declaration of Helsinki (DoH) is widely recognised as the leading authoritative source on ethical standards of medical research worldwide. Yet, in the past decade, different sources have questioned the authority of the DoH and its compliance with human rights, and argued for its replacement with UNESCO's Universal ...

  2. NEWS: Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    -March onwards include Guildford, Brighton, Gosport, Leeds, Loughborough, Oakham, Wolverhampton, Framlingham (Suffolk), Hatfield and London. Further details from Catherine Wilson (catherine.wilson@iop.org ). Courses and conferences Physics Update courses will be held in four locations this year. Details of the Malvern course (1 - 3 April) have already been circulated to schools and colleges. Details of the York course (8 - 10 July) will be circulated early next term. An Update course for teachers in Scotland will be held at Stirling University on 9 - 10 June and the final Update of the year will be held at Oxford University on 8 - 10 December. Further details are available from Leila Solomon (leila.solomon@iop.org ). Entitled `Hands on, minds on: raising standards by sharing good practice', the Education Group's Annual Conference 2000 will be held at the University of Durham on 7 - 8 July. Further details can be obtained from Jasmina Bolfek-Radovani (jasmina.bolfek-radovani@iop.org ) in the Institute's Conference Department. Other dates: * Schools Physics Group annual one-day meeting, 8 June 2000, Rugby School. * Scottish Branch one-day meeting for physics teachers, 8 June 2000, Stirling University. Posters A set of four full-colour A2 posters has recently been produced, with another set of four in preparation. The aim is to get across the message `Physics at the heart of everything' by means of eye-catching images - and to brighten up school and college labs and corridors in the process. Further explanations of the physics depicted are printed on the back of the posters. Sets of the first four posters are being circulated to all schools but additional copies will be available on request from schools.education@iop.org . And finally ... The Institute's Schools and Colleges Affiliation Scheme is to be relaunched later this year, as a free scheme for all schools and colleges which will provide low-cost items on a regular basis. There will also be a second, subscription tier giving

  3. people | News

    Science.gov (United States)

    of Communication Fermilab news Search Useful links Symmetry magazine Interactions Interact people , people, building, Wilson Hall, farm, planter A John Deere planter is ready for work. Josh Frieman takes the experiment for the next two years. Controlled burn at Pine Street entrance May 9, 2018 Ryan

  4. Fake News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    In a politically and digitally polarized environment, identifying and evaluating fake news is more difficult than ever before. Librarians who have been teaching information and media literacy skills for decades understand the role we can and must play in this environment.

  5. A Business Plan of Teahouse in Helsinki, Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zelu

    2013-01-01

    By studying what is a business plan, this paper introduces how to make a business plan with a real life case, starting a teashop business in Helsinki, Finland. It was started by studying how to make a business plan, which includes the structure of a business plan, such as operational planning, marketing planning and financial planning. It is the internal and external analysis that determines the corporate strategy, corporate strategy determines marketing strategy and operational strategy, ope...

  6. Competition in the health system: good news and bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R H

    1996-01-01

    Competition among health plans, hospitals, and physicians has taken place in fifteen health care markets primarily on the basis of price and secondarily on network breadth and style of care. In most markets, competition resulted in lower (or slowly growing) premium prices. Within a type of plan product, competition was leading to similar prices and networks and was reducing product differentiation among health plans. Competition was not taking place on the basis of measured and reported quality of care, which limited the capacity of employers and enrollees to make informed health plan choices. As a result, there was a substantial gap between competition as envisioned by the architects of the managed competition model and competition as it is evolving today.

  7. Brazil: good news for oil is bad news for alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    The impact of the doubling of oil prices and the devaluation of the Brazilian currency on the alcohol fuel programme is examined in this article, and the recent discovery by the Brazilian oil company, Petrobras, of a major new offshore oil field, the government's efforts to boost the consumption of alcohol fuel with subsidies and cheap loans, and the lower costs of running alcohol powered cars are discussed. Details of a major restructuring of the alcohol industry, the production of alcohol between 1994-1999, the boom in sugar exports, the glut of sugar cane, the falling confidence of motorists in alcohol powered cars, and the general move away from subsidies spearheaded by the World Trade Organisation are considered. (UK)

  8. Wisconsin EE Mandates: The Bad News and the Good News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jennie; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examines Wisconsin teachers' perceived competencies in, attitudes toward, and amount of class time devoted to teaching about the environment. Discusses the effects of Wisconsin environmental education mandates concerning preservice preparation in environmental education and K-12 environmental education curriculum plans. Identifies areas where the…

  9. Labour analgesia and the baby: good news is no news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2011-01-01

    When investigating different methods of maternal pain relief in labour, neonatal outcome has not always been at the forefront, or else maternal changes, such as haemodynamics, fever, length of labour, need for oxytocin or type of delivery, are taken as surrogates for neonatal outcome. It is essential to examine the actual baby and to appreciate that labour pain itself has adverse consequences for the baby. For systemic analgesia, pethidine has been most extensively studied and compared with neuraxial analgesia. It depresses fetal muscular activity, aortic blood flow, short-term heart rate variability and oxygen saturation. In the newborn it exacerbates acidosis, depresses Apgar scores, respiration, neurobehavioural score, muscle tone and suckling. Alternatives have few advantages, remifentanil being the most promising. Neuraxial analgesia is associated with better Apgar scores and variable neurobehavioural changes. Neonatal acid-base status is not only better with epidural than with systemic opioid analgesia, it is also better than with no analgesia. The effect on breast feeding has yet to be established, though it is certainly no worse than that of systemic opioid analgesia. Variations in neuraxial technique have little impact on the newborn. Widespread ignorance of the benefit to the newborn of neuraxial labour analgesia in the UK among non-anaesthetists needs to be combated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. News of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Margolis, Rick; Glick, Andrea; Milliot, Jim

    1999-01-01

    Includes the following reports: "'LJ' (Library Journal) News Report: Libraries Success at Funding Books and Bytes"; "'SLJ' (School Library Journal) News Report: We're in the Money!"; and "'PW' (Publishers Weekly) News Reports". (AEF)

  11. FAKE NEWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Vestergaard, Mads

    Politik og medier oversvømmes af fordrejninger, fortielser, forglemmelser og forvanskninger af sandheden. Vi invaderes af populistiske fortællinger, “alternative kendsgerninger” og “fake news”. Det er nu et faktum, at misinformation er noget man aktivt må forholde sig til som politiker, som...... for virkelige udfordringer, vi står over for. FAKE NEWS giver et første sammenhængende billede af hvordan opmærksomhedsøkonomien kan ende i det postfaktuelle demokrati: Eventyrlige fortællinger erstatter kendsgerninger som grundlag for politisk meningsdannelse, debat og lovgivning. Et monster, som de færreste...

  12. news-please

    OpenAIRE

    Hamborg, Felix; Meuschke, Norman; Breitinger, Corinna; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    The amount of news published and read online has increased tremendously in recent years, making news data an interesting resource for many research disciplines, such as the social sciences and linguistics. However, large scale collection of news data is cumbersome due to a lack of generic tools for crawling and extracting such data. We present news-please, a generic, multilanguage, open-source crawler and extractor for news that works out-of-thebox for a large variety of news websites. ...

  13. The Changing Landscape of Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordon, James

    2011-03-01

    Social media are revolutionizing the ways that people communicate and the ways they get their news. Traditional news outlets are in decline, and no subject area is declining faster than science news. Every day there are fewer professional science journalists working in traditional media. On the other hand, ever greater numbers of scientists, science enthusiasts, and online journalists are turning to blogs, podcasts, eBooks, twitter feeds, and social media sites like Facebook and Tumbler to spread news about science. I will present an overview of the state of science journalism and speculate on the likely directions it seems to be heading. I will also offer some general guidelines to help scientists understand what makes a good science news story, as well as suggesting ways that they can get their work in the news.

  14. Results of the Helsinki magnetic observatory 1844-1912

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nevanlinna

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic field declination (D and horizontal component (H were observed visually at the Helsinki magnetic observatory between 1844–1912. About 2.0 million single observations of the magnetic components are available. The observing equipment and observation methods were the same for almost 70 years. The Helsinki data series is thus rather homogeneous and suitable for magnetic field analysis of both internal and external origin for about five sunspot cycles (sunspot cycles 9–13. Due to disturbances from nearby electric tramway traffic, most of the observations after 1897 are very noisy and unreliable for magnetic activity studies. Observations of D (1844–1897 have been converted into an absolute scale but H refers to variation values only. Observations of D have been previously analyzed and published for the time interval 1844–1880. In this paper we present new results of D for 1881–1897 and H for 1844–1897. The annual rate of the secular variation of D has been rather stable between 1844–1909, showing a mean eastward increase of +0.11°/year, which is about twice as large as the mean secular variation rate for the past 50 years at the same latitude in Finland. Around 1875 there was a sudden change in the secular variation rate resembling the famous jerk of 1970. Magnetic activity indices (K, Ak for 1844–1897 were calculated from hourly values of D- and D-series separately using the IAGA K-index algorithm (the FMI-method. Comparisons with other relevant activity series from other sources (aa, u, RI, C9, auroral occurrence rate show that the Helsinki index series gives an important contribution to the index family. By extending the Mayaud's aa-index series with Helsinki Ak-values (1844–1868, it is possible to reconstruct a (pseudo aa-series that covers almost 160 years. Magnetic activity (space weather was appreciably greater during the first three cycles (9–11 than during the two last ones (12–13. The largest magnetic

  15. Ethics of orthodontic clinical research based on Helsinki declaration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Erwansyah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Declaration of Helsinki code of ethics on human experimentation, states that the desin and peformance of experimental procedures involving human should be clearly formulated in an experimental protocol, Todeterminewhetheraninvestigationin accordancewiththe code of conductin a researchthen letusconsider the contentofthe declarationhelsinkiasour referencein conductingaclinicalstudyusinghuman subjects. In journals, authors are expected to report if the study was carried out in accordance with international and national ethical guidelines and inform readers if approval from ethics committee was obtained and if written informed consent was taken from the participant or legal guardian.

  16. Radon in an underground excavation site in Helsinki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venelampi, E.

    2004-01-01

    The paper reports on radon measurements and actions taken in a large underground excavation site in Helsinki, where a coal store was excavated underneath an existing power plant. The measurements were carried out by taking grab samples using Lucas type scintillation cells. Large variations in radon concentrations were observed during the three-year study. The reasons for variations are discussed and recommendations are given for radon monitoring procedures in underground excavation sites. The importance of ventilation to reduce the radon level is stressed. (P.A.)

  17. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Helge H. Wehmeier, President and Chief Executive Office of Bayer Corporation, is the recipient of the 2001 Leadership in Education Award from the Keystone Center. Wehmeier was cited for his support in spearheading ongoing education and volunteer efforts such as Bayer's Making Science Make Sense program, which, in partnership with NSF, advances science literacy through hands-on, inquiry-based science learning. You are invited to send contributions to the News & Announcements column. They should be sent to Elizabeth A. Moore, Associate Editor, by email or by mail at Journal of Chemical Education, 209 N. Brooks St., Madison, WI 53715-1116. Contributions should be concise, to the point, and appropriate for the Journal's audience. They may be edited for clarity, timeliness, appropriateness, or length.

  18. Cheap oil. Good news - for most

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorié, J.

    2014-01-01

    - The oil price has fallen by 40% in recent months, as a result of increasing oil supply, and is expected to be in the range of USD 70 - 80 per barrel in 2015. - The global economy is set to benefit, as are oil importing regions such as Europe and Asia. - Oil exporting countries like Brazil, Russia

  19. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include: Total Pages Served 361,115 Total Visits 138,377 Total Unique Visitors 51,744 Total Repeat Visitors 11,536 Average Visit Length 03:05 Average Requests/Visit 10.8 Average Pages/Visit 2.6 Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include: ·JCE Index to all 76 years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds. ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers

  20. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  1. Beta : The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Joost; van Zundert, J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper decomposes aggregate and individual stock returns into cash flow news, interest rate news, and risk premium news. We then extend the “good beta, bad beta” approach of Campbell and Vuolteenaho (2004) by allowing for a third beta: exposure to interest rate news. Using various stock

  2. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    News from Journal House Journal Ambassadors, 1999 What do the people listed below have in common? A search of our records indicates that each has been a participant in our Journal Ambassador program during 1999. Guy Anderson Jim Becvar Jerry Bell Jim Birk Diane Bunce Ann Cartwright Thomas Clark Jane Crosby Maria Dean Art Ellis Donald Elswick Tommy Franklin Babu George Paul Heath Angela Hoffman Lynn Hogue J. J. Lagowski Frank Lambert Dorothy Lehmkuhl George Lelevre Scott Luaders Jane McMullen Marci Merritt Carl Minnier Richard Narske Ron Perkins Gabriel Pinto Dick Potts Herb Retcofsky Jerry Sarquis Elke Schoffers Sara Selfe Uni Susskind J. Mark Tolman John Varine Dawn Wakeley Marla White Those who are a part of this program take materials about the Journal to workshops, outreach programs, seminars, regional meetings, award nights, short courses, and other events at home and abroad, places where people who are interested in chemical education gather. Given about three weeks notice, we can outfit you with a variety of materials that will help others get tuned in to the good things that are happening in chemical education. We can send you an assortment of Journal issues, subscription forms, our Publications/Software Catalog, reprints from the Viewpoints series, copies of Classroom Activities, or JCE Gift Award Certificates, assuming that supplies are available. Of course we can arrange for the group to have temporary access to JCE Online. We can send you a brochure about the Ambassador program or answer any questions - just ask: email to jce@chem.wisc.edu; phone 1-800-991-5534 (U.S.) or 608-262-5153 (non-U.S.); fax 608-265-8094. If by chance you were a Journal Ambassador in 1999 but your name was not included, just let us know so that you can be recognized in a future column. Gift Subscription Awards As spring, the season of awards, approaches, we remind you of our handy Gift Certificates (a replica is shown on page 142). A gift of the Journal is not only affordable

  3. Physics News

    CERN Multimedia

    Gianotti, F.

    In spite of the fact that real data will only come in the year 2006, this is a very busy and interesting time for Physics-related activities. A very short overview of these activities is given in this issue of the ATLAS News Letter, while the various topics will be described in more detail in the next issues. The Physics and Combined Performance groups are working in four main areas: 1) Assess the ATLAS potential for physics, with emphasis on new channels and ideas. Recent examples are Extra-dimensions, invisible Higgs decays, heavy ion physics, the expected potential of a "Super-LHC" running at a luminosity of 10^35, etc.. 2) Improve the understanding of the detector performance and optimise the reconstruction algorithms. Examples of issues in the pipeline are: can we tag charm-jet ? What can we gain in the jet energy resolution by combining the calorimeter and tracker information to reconstruct the jet energy ? 3) Follow detector changes and detector-related issues and monitor the impact on the perform...

  4. Novae news

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    As announced in the previous Bulletin, Novae has opened a new snack bar on the Flagstaff car park, just a few metres from CERN's reception area (Building 33).   Just a few metres from the CERN Reception, the new Novae snack point welcomes visitors and CERNois. Opening hours Currently: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. From September: Monday to Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The snack bar selection includes breakfast, starting at 2.70 CHF, cold dishes from 5 CHF, and hot dishes from 6 CHF.   Novae has also installed a 24-hour-a-day food vending machine in the CERN hostel (Building 39) and in Building 13. You can buy pasta and cooked dishes for 6.50 CHF to 8 CHF. In addition, a groceries vending machine has been installed in the main building, just across from the news kiosk. Nearly 60 different items are available around the clock. Finally, Novae has introduced a new payment system in several buildings on the Meyrin site. It accepts credit ca...

  5. Results of the Helsinki magnetic observatory 1844-1912

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nevanlinna

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The geomagnetic field declination (D and horizontal component (H were observed visually at the Helsinki magnetic observatory between 1844–1912. About 2.0 million single observations of the magnetic components are available. The observing equipment and observation methods were the same for almost 70 years. The Helsinki data series is thus rather homogeneous and suitable for magnetic field analysis of both internal and external origin for about five sunspot cycles (sunspot cycles 9–13. Due to disturbances from nearby electric tramway traffic, most of the observations after 1897 are very noisy and unreliable for magnetic activity studies. Observations of D (1844–1897 have been converted into an absolute scale but H refers to variation values only. Observations of D have been previously analyzed and published for the time interval 1844–1880. In this paper we present new results of D for 1881–1897 and H for 1844–1897. The annual rate of the secular variation of D has been rather stable between 1844–1909, showing a mean eastward increase of +0.11°/year, which is about twice as large as the mean secular variation rate for the past 50 years at the same latitude in Finland. Around 1875 there was a sudden change in the secular variation rate resembling the famous jerk of 1970. Magnetic activity indices (K, Ak for 1844–1897 were calculated from hourly values of D- and D-series separately using the IAGA K-index algorithm (the FMI-method. Comparisons with other relevant activity series from other sources (aa, u, RI, C9, auroral occurrence rate show that the Helsinki index series gives an important contribution to the index family. By extending the Mayaud's aa-index series with Helsinki Ak-values (1844–1868, it is possible to reconstruct a (pseudo aa-series that covers almost 160 years. Magnetic activity (space weather was

  6. Cities in Sustainability Transitions: Comparing Helsinki and Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kuokkanen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sustainability transitions are manifested as the needed scope to meet sustainability challenges at the local and global scales. While sustainability transitions are ubiquitous, each transition is nested in a specific spatial context. Especially, due to accelerating urbanization, cities are increasingly important agents, but they are also understudied geographical loci of change. Urban transitions are interesting because they operate at both the national and global scales, concentrating people, wealth, and resources. They have both regime and niche elements, as they act as an incubation space for novel experiments, ideas, and alternative social movements. Thus, this paper aims to improve understanding of the geographical context and spatial scales from a multilevel perspective and develop a framework for analytic comparison. Furthermore, the paper draws insights from two empirical cases, namely the cities of Helsinki and Istanbul. Consequently, opportunities and challenges for instigating context-specific sustainability transitions can be identified.

  7. Declaration of Helsinki, 2008: Implications for stakeholders in research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Declaration of Helsinki (DoH was adopted by the World Medical Association (WMA in 1964, as a statement of ethical principles, to provide guidance to physicians and other participants in medical research involving human subjects. Having undergone several amendments, the most recent version was approved on 18 October 2008, by the WMA General Assembly at Seoul, South Korea, replacing all previous versions. This version highlights issues such as, participant safety, the need to include participants from otherwise underrepresented groups, clinical trial registration, post-study access, usage of data and human tissues, compensating participants with research-related injury, and usage of placebo. In this article, we discuss the major aspects of the 2008 version, including the impact of this version on all stakeholders in research, including, investigators, ethics committee members, sponsors, authors, editors, and reviewers.

  8. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House National Chemistry Week (NCW) Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles). Awards Announced Passer Award Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are: George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist; there is an honorarium of 1500 plus expenses. Welch Award Roger D. Kornberg, a professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, received the 2001 Welch Award for his discovery of the nucleosome

  9. "Who Is Helsinki" Sex Workers Advise Improving Communication for Good Participatory Practice in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditmore, Melissa Hope; Allman, Dan

    2011-01-01

    After premature closures in 2004 of biomedical human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention trials involving sex workers in Africa and Asia, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and Global Advocacy for HIV Prevention (AVAC) undertook consultations to establish better participatory guidelines for such trials in order to address…

  10. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  11. Market News Price Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Real-time price data collected by the Boston Market News Reporter. The NOAA Fisheries' "Fishery Market News" began operations in New York City on February 14, 1938....

  12. Have we lost the ability to listen to bad news?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oorschot, Kim.E.; van Wassenhove, Luk; Sengupta, Kishore; Akkermans, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Research shows that project managers continuously prioritised good vibes (positive, but subjective signals) over bad news (negative, but objective signals), which resulted in decisions of poor quality. Without understanding the root causes that generate the bad news and the good vibes, managers

  13. Customer Service and Customer Satisfaction Level of CheapSleep Hostels, Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hoa

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis was commissioned by CheapSleep hostels, Helsinki. CheapSleep is a young budget hostel having operated for 3,5 years located in Vallila, Helsinki. CheapSleep has recently considered opening a new business in Helsinki, as well as the metropolitan area. The aim of this dissertation is to examine the service concept and identify the customer satisfaction level by conducting a customer satisfaction survey while the author was working at the reception in CheapSleep hostels. ...

  14. News Media Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    radio news departments will operate on many technological platforms at the same time ( Papper , 2006, p.3). News radio stations will likely broadcast...Retrieved March 25, 2007, from http://firstlook.nytimes.com/index.php?cat=4 Papper , Bob. RTNDF’s 2006 Future of the News Survey, 25 Mar. 2006. 10 Mar

  15. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  16. The municipal continuum: Research on maritime water pollution in Helsinki in the 20th century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurila, S. K. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Social History; Laakkonen, S. J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Social Policy

    2004-07-01

    In general, the history of environmental research is not known very well. Our study contributes to filling this gap by focusing on the history of the methods that were used during the 20th century to study the state of the urban sea area in Helsinki, Finland. From the beginning of the past century, the methodological basis of municipal water pollution studies in Helsinki was broad, involving the use of physical, chemical, hygienic and biological methods. Since 1904, municipal laboratories have overseen and conducted most physico-chemical and bacteriological studies of pollution of urban watercourses, and they have done regular annual sampling since 1947. In the 1920s and 1930s, the municipal laboratories cooperated with the University of Helsinki and, secondarily, with the Helsinki University of Technology in order to develop the skills and manpower that were required in order to conduct pollution studies. Statutory monitoring was initiated in the mid-1960s, and it continues today. (orig.)

  17. An explorative study of municipal developer competitions in Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Östman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the central features of so-called ‘site allocation competitions’, as organized by the City of Helsinki Real Estate Department (Kiinteistövirasto in Finnish. Site allocation competitions are developer competitions where the municipality sells or leases plots of land to developers or contractors, but where the ‘bidding’ is based on competing on the basis of architectural and urban quality factors. The focus in this paper is on the Finnish context, but as its legal framework is constituted by European competition law. In these competitions the proprietor expects the contractor or developer to create a design team and in turn the proprietor receives multiple proposals for a site without really paying for them. It seems important to examine this rather new type of architectural competition, as it is often an integral part of important large projects in terms of both financial investments and architectural design. It also constitutes a new tool in the practices of urban planning. The present study is explorative, based mainly on a close study and analysis of written material, such as reports, as well as three interviews with experienced organizers. The aim of the paper is to clarify the concept of developer competition, and discuss its possible benefits and problems. The core issue in the study is how architectural quality is produced within the legal framework, as well as to discuss the relation of the developer competition to the aims of urban planning and professional agents.

  18. Data Envelopment Analysis of Helsinki-Tallinn Transportation Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olli-Pekka Hilmola

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Baltic Sea shipping is at a crossroads as sulphur regulation will lead to excessive cost increases from the year 2015 onwards and CO2 emission trading is planned to be implemented for the entire shipping sector within the EU area. Therefore, shipping is going to be minimized and hinterland transportation (road and rail will act as substitute. This research analyzes the situation on one of the highest volume general cargo transportation routes of Finland (operating between Helsinki, Finland and Tallinn, Estonia, including loading and unloading at seaports and short sea shipping activity in between. Based on the efficiency evaluation results, it seems that containers should be favoured over semi-trailers – containers could be carried efficiently either in container ships or even at currently favoured RoRo or RoPax ships. Our research illustrates that pure container shipping with larger container ships within the analyzed route is not entirely out of question, but lead time and hinterland operations should receive more attention. Alternatively, RoRo and RoPax ships can also do something to increase their competitiveness in environmental harm caused and diesel consumption – higher cargo loads and utilization levels are short-term key for continued dominance.

  19. Do the services for children offered in Helsinki hotels meet the preferences of family travellers?

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the needs of family travellers by catering to the children is a way for hotels to attract these profitable guests. The objective of this thesis is to analyse the services offered for children in four Helsinki hotels and evaluate whether they meet the needs and preferences of current domestic and international travellers. The preliminary hypothesis is that the hotels chosen to represent the hotel market in Helsinki offer similar services; that do not meet current traveller preferences....

  20. Multicultural Human Resources Management in Hilton Helsinki Hotels – case Food & Beverage departments

    OpenAIRE

    Jarva, Arla; Mäkinen, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a research on the managing multicultural workforce in the restaurant field. The research has been conducted in a case company Hilton Hotels & Resorts with highly multicultural staff in the Helsinki metropolitan area on three different properties: Airport, Kalastajatorppa and Strand. The managers interviewed were from all three Hilton properties and the employee interviewees were from Hilton Helsinki Airport. The research focuses on determining the problems the managers and staf...

  1. A Comparison of Taste of Helsinki and Tallinn Restaurant Week : Possible Cooperation & Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Harnova, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this Bachelor’s Thesis is to analyse restaurant events happening in Helsinki and Tallinn, compare them and create a new event that joins both cities in cooperation. Two events were chosen, Taste of Helsinki and Tallinn Restaurant Week, as they have a common purpose and target market. The theoretical framework studies the strategies of event organising, the factors of consumer buying behaviour and the consumer buying decision process. The Twin-Capital project is examined...

  2. Customers’ purchasing behaviour between Airbnb and hostels when travelling to Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Dao, Ngoc Lien; Vu, Anh

    2016-01-01

    Short-term accommodation for visitors is becoming increasingly expensive in many popular cities in the world and Helsinki is one such city. Helsinki is famous for its living standard and has become a favourite destination for tourists since the past few years. The emergence of reputable online portals such as Airbnb has made it possible for homeowners to list their space online and make some money from providing a place to stay for someone who is seeking it during travelling time. Apparently,...

  3. Helsinki market entry opportunity for a Vegan & Raw Danish restaurant chain 42˚RAW

    OpenAIRE

    Yablokova, Anna

    2015-01-01

    For those who follow and are interested in the vegan lifestyle, the scarce number of restaurants which offer suchlike products in Helsinki is evident. Comparing the local market with cities around the globe this impression can be proven with statistical data. Despite the world growing trend of healthy eating and living, Finland is still far behind even the neighbouring Nordic countries on the level of niche vegan industry. The purpose of this thesis was to research the Helsinki market and fin...

  4. EPRI News

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that from instant sensation to virtual pariah, cold fusion has had a stormy history since two University of Utah researchers first announced its discovery in March 1989. Research into this mysterious phenomenon has been plagued both by technical difficulties in replicating experimental results and by sometimes bitter controversy over scientific standards and personal credibility. Now, in a somewhat calmer atmosphere, significant progress is being made through experiments that are reproducible over long periods of time and under a variety of conditions. These experiments indicate that nuclear reactions may indeed occur at room temperature in a crystal lattice in ways not understood before. It's time we stopped calling these reactions cold fusion, says David Worledge, EPRI coordinator of research in this area. There is now good evidence that cold nuclear reaction of some sort are taking place, but also growing indications that they aren't conventional deuterium-deuterium fusion, as first assumed. Also, the cold nuclear reactions inferred from the neutrons that have been detected are not numerous enough to be responsible for the excess heat production still being reported in some experiments. In their original work, University of Utah scientist Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons used a simple laboratory apparatus consisting of a palladium rod surrounded by a platinum coil and immersed in heavy water. They reported that when a small electric current was applied to the cells, deuterium nuclei from the heavy water were driven into the palladium rod, where they were held in the metal lattice and apparently fused, producing 4 watts of heat for each watt of electric power supplied

  5. Hot News Recommendation System from Heterogeneous Websites Based on Bayesian Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyou Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs. In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  6. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  7. Who Makes The News?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørndrup, Hanne; Bentsen, Martine

    As newsroom staff around the world went about their day on 25 March 2015, hundreds of volunteers located in over 100 countries gathered to monitor their news media as part of the Fifth Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP). The Global Media Monitoring Project (GMMP) is the world’s longest......-running and most extensive research on gender in the news media. It began in 1995 when volunteers in 71 countries around the world monitored women’s presence in their national radio, television and print news. The research revealed that only 17% of news subjects – the people who are interviewed or whom the news...... is about – were women. It found that gender parity was ‘a distant prospect in any region of the world. News [was] more often being presented by women but it [was] still rarely about women. Denmark participates in GMMP for the second time and both times we can recognize the global inequality in the Danish...

  8. News | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    to give second life to EV batteries Yemen News National Lab Licensing Hydrogen Refueling Method Could Computing Center Centers, Institutes, and Programs RISCRisk and Infrastructure Science Center Other

  9. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    provided as a part of the telephone order; when the new account is active, the account information will be emailed. Remember to Provide Your Email Address Knowing your email address has become important for Journal communication. In addition to account information, we will send an order confirmation to each subscriber who provides an email address. For those who want it, we intend, in the near future, to send an email message announcing when each month's issue goes online. We do not sell or give email addresses to anyone else. Keeping Up to Date with JCE Online JCE Online will continue to change and expand, as the technology around us changes and as new features and columns are added. The best way to keep abreast of new developments is to look for the JCE Online column in both print and online. Jon Holmes, editor of JCE Online, uses this column to keep readers in touch with the latest happenings: JCE Online FAQs (March 1999, p 446) JCE Online 99 (April 1999, p 584) JCE Feature Columns (May 1999, p 718) Molecular Modeling (June 1999, p 871) JCE: A Good Deal That Keeps Getting Better If you carry copies of JCE around in hopes of finding time to read them, you may think they are getting heavierand they are. Your Journal was more than a third bigger in 1998 than it was in 1995! We have printed more pages every year since 1996 (see graph for the past 25 years). We estimate that you will receive more than 2000 pages this year and even more next year. This is more pages than at any time in the Journal 's history, excepting the four years 1929-1932, when the pages were smaller. We are printing more pages because we need to. We have many good manuscripts that have been peer reviewed and accepted and now are awaiting publication in print. The time between acceptance of a manuscript and its publication is already too long. Unless we print more pages, it will grow longer. For the past three years we have been slowly but steadily reducing this publication lag, and we don't want to stop

  10. Thrilling News Revisited: The Role of Suspense for the Enjoyment of News Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Zimmermann, Daniel; Wilbers, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 ( n = 263) successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 ( n = 255) and 3 ( n = 599) challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics and news evaluation were relatively stable. In particular, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story's personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large absence of

  11. Education of radiochemistry in the University of Helsinki, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, J.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory of Radiochemistry is one of the seven laboratories in the Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki. In the department there are altogether 220 employees of which 25 work in the Laboratory of Radiochemistry. Laboratory of Radiochemistry is the only radiochemical institute within Finnish universities. It gives teaching in a wide range of topics including most areas of radiochemistry. Teaching in radiochemistry is given at the master's level. Prior to taking radiochemistry as their major students have studied two to three years of chemistry and other fields of sciences. Compulsory courses in radiochemistry are: (1) Principles of radioactivity and radiochemistry (8 credit units), includes two weeks' laboratory course. (2) Radiation safety (2 cu), includes one day laboratory work. (3) Detection and measurement of radiation (5 cu), includes two weeks' laboratory course. (4) Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides (5 cu), includes two weeks' laboratory course. There are several optional courses of which students have to take at least three: (1) Chemistry of the nuclear fuel cycle (3 cu), students write an essay. (2) Environmental radioactivity (3 cu), students write an essay and give a seminar lecture. (3) Radiopharmaceutical chemistry (3 cu), includes one week laboratory course. (4) Radioactive tracer techniques (3 cu), includes one week laboratory course. (5) Radiation chemistry (3 cu), includes one week laboratory course. (6) Chemistry of uranium series in the environment (3 cu). (7) Atmospheric radioactivity (3 cu), students write an essay. After finalising the required radiochemistry courses, and other studies (40 cu), students make their project work and write a master's thesis (together 40 cu). Project work and master's thesis are done in one of the research projects of the laboratory. The research projects are working in the following fields: 1) migration and retention of radionuclides in the geo sphere, 2) selective separation of radionuclides

  12. Education of radiochemistry in the University of Helsinki, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, J.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory of Radiochemistry is one of the seven laboratories in the Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki. In the department there are altogether 220 employees of which 25 work in the Laboratory of Radiochemistry. Laboratory of Radiochemistry is the only radiochemical institute within Finnish universities. It gives teaching in a wide range of topics including most areas of radiochemistry. Teaching in radiochemistry is given at the master's level. Prior to taking radiochemistry as their major students have studied two to three years of chemistry and other fields of sciences. Compulsory courses in radiochemistry are: Principles of radioactivity and radiochemistry (8 credit units), includes two weeks' laboratory course. Radiation safety (2 cu), includes one day laboratory work. Detection and measurement of radiation (5 cu), includes two weeks' laboratory course. Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides (5 cu), includes two weeks' laboratory course There are several optional courses of which students have to take at least three: Chemistry of the nuclear fuel cycle (3 cu), students write an essay. Environmental radioactivity (3 cu), students write an essay and give a seminar lecture. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry (3 cu), includes one week laboratory course. Radioactive tracer techniques (3 cu), includes one week laboratory course. Radiation chemistry (3 cu), includes one week laboratory course. Chemistry of uranium series in the environment (3 cu). Atmospheric radioactivity (3 cu), students write an essay. After finalising the required radiochemistry courses, and other studies (40 cu), students make their project work and write a master's thesis (together 40 cu). Project work and master's thesis are done in one of the research projects of the laboratory. The research projects are working in the following fields: 1) migration and retention of radionuclides in the geo sphere, 2) selective separation of radionuclides from nuclear waste effluents, 3

  13. Googling the news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Search engines provide a window into the changing association between websites and keywords across cultures and countries and over time. As such, they offer journalism and news researchers an opportunity to study how search engines, in this case Google, mediate news events and stories online...

  14. BRAZILIAN NEWS PORTALS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza G. Herckovitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A content analysis of four Brazilian news media portals found that economic news dominated the top headlines with little attention paid to education, the environment and welfare. Other trends included a focus on local events and national news sources, reliance on few sources, mostly official ones, and a low percentage of news that fitted the concept of newsworthiness (a combination of both social significance and deviance concepts. Other findings of a study of 432 top news stories published by UOL, Estadão, iG and Terra during a 15-day period between February and March 2008 indicate that the top portions of the portals’ front pages carry news that lacks story depth, editorial branding, and multimedia applications. The results suggest that online news portals are in their infancy although Brazil has the largest online population of Latin America. This study hopes to shed light on the gatekeeping process in Brazilian news portals. Brazilian media portals have yet to become a significant editorial force able to provide knowledge about social issues and public affairs in a socially responsible fashione.

  15. Evaluation of high-resolution forecasts with the non-hydrostaticnumerical weather prediction model Lokalmodell for urban air pollutionepisodes in Helsinki, Oslo and Valencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Fay

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The operational numerical weather prediction model Lokalmodell LM with 7,km horizontal resolution was evaluated for forecasting meteorological conditions during observed urban air pollution episodes. The resolution was increased to experimental 2.8 km and 1.1 km resolution by one-way interactive nesting without introducing urbanisation of physiographic parameters or parameterisations. The episodes examined are two severe winter inversion-induced episodes in Helsinki in December 1995 and Oslo in January 2003, three suspended dust episodes in spring and autumn in Helsinki and Oslo, and a late-summer photochemical episode in the Valencia area. The evaluation was basically performed against observations and radiosoundings and focused on the LM skill at forecasting the key meteorological parameters characteristic for the specific episodes. These included temperature inversions, atmospheric stability and low wind speeds for the Scandinavian episodes and the development of mesoscale recirculations in the Valencia area. LM forecasts often improved due to higher model resolution especially in mountainous areas like Oslo and Valencia where features depending on topography like temperature, wind fields and mesoscale valley circulations were better described. At coastal stations especially in Helsinki, forecast gains were due to the improved physiographic parameters (land fraction, soil type, or roughness length. The Helsinki and Oslo winter inversions with extreme nocturnal inversion strengths of 18°C were not sufficiently predicted with all LM resolutions. In Helsinki, overprediction of surface temperatures and low-level wind speeds basically led to underpredicted inversion strength. In the Oslo episode, the situation was more complex involving erroneous temperature advection and mountain-induced effects for the higher resolutions. Possible explanations include the influence of the LM treatment of snow cover, sea ice and stability-dependence of transfer

  16. Routinizing Breaking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re-theorizat......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”......This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re...

  17. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  18. News from EUPHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EUPHA 17th European Conference on Public Health

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is very good news for Italian participation at this year’s EUPHA meeting, which will be held in Lodz (Poland. From 25 to 28 November the joint annual conference EUPHA-ASPHER will see a peaceful “invasion” from Italy. Out of the 63 Italian abstracts submitted to the conference organisers, only 5 (7.9% were rejected. Overall, 11.6% of all of the accepted abstracts are Italian, 9.8% of the oral presentations and 13% of the poster presentations. These results pay testimony to the high quality of European public health research and practice reached in several fields and settings (academic, public health regional agencies, and local health units. Highlights from Italy include the ongoing work in the field of infectious disease control, Stefania Bruno (Catholic University will present the Roman experience of Tubercolosis surveillance in the homeless. Maria De Giusti (Sapienza University presents “Knowledge, attitudes and behaviour towards Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections and S. aureus nasal colonisation”; while Chiara de Waure (Catholic University will present “Rapid screening tests for MRSA carriage at hospital admission: a systematic review”.

  19. Biomonitoring the effects of air pollution on forest ecosystems in an urban area, Helsinki, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekinen, A.; Pihlstroem, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Systematics

    1995-12-31

    Single bioindicators have been used for a long time in air pollution monitoring in the Helsinki area (e.g. lichen studies since 1933). In the mid-eighties local authorities became aware of the need for regular integrated monitoring. Important objectives were: (a) to collect timeseries for the evaluation of natural variation e.g. weather in different parameters (b) to detect small, gradual, changes resulting from pollution control measures. The intensive monitoring of coniferous forests in the metropolitan area of Helsinki started in 1988. (author)

  20. Customer Satisfaction at the Hospitality Industry: Holiday Inn Helsinki-Vantaa Airport

    OpenAIRE

    Eld, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this Bachelor’s Degree thesis was to examine and observe the customer service and especially customer satisfaction in a hotel industry, and Holiday Inn Helsinki-Vantaa Airport was selected to be an example for this survey. This survey and thesis is carried out by the author in collaboration with Holiday Inn Helsinki-Vantaa Airport, which was the commissioner of this Bachelor’s Degree thesis. This hotel was chosen since the author of this thesis did her second internship there...

  1. Biomonitoring the effects of air pollution on forest ecosystems in an urban area, Helsinki, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekinen, A; Pihlstroem, M [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Systematics

    1996-12-31

    Single bioindicators have been used for a long time in air pollution monitoring in the Helsinki area (e.g. lichen studies since 1933). In the mid-eighties local authorities became aware of the need for regular integrated monitoring. Important objectives were: (a) to collect timeseries for the evaluation of natural variation e.g. weather in different parameters (b) to detect small, gradual, changes resulting from pollution control measures. The intensive monitoring of coniferous forests in the metropolitan area of Helsinki started in 1988. (author)

  2. Thrilling news revisited: The role of suspense for the enjoyment of news stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kaspar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 (n = 263 successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 (n = 255 and 3 (n = 599 challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics were relatively stable. In particular, a higher liking of the protagonist and a higher perceived likelihood of a good versus bad ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and it contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants’ liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story’s personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large

  3. Tweeting News Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Toledo Bastos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the impact of social media readership to the editorial profile of newspapers. We analyze tweets containing links to news articles from eight of the largest national newspapers in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil, and Germany. The data collection follows the first two weeks of October 2012 and includes 2,842,699 tweets with links to news articles. Twitter-shortened links were resolved using a three-pass routine and assigned to 1 of the 21 newspaper sections. We found the concentration of links to news articles posted by top users to be lower than reported in the literature and the strategy of relaying headlines on Twitter via automatic news aggregators (feeds to be inefficient. The results of this investigation show which sections of a newspaper are the most and least read by readers in different parts of the world, with German readers placing greater emphasis on Politics and Economy; Brazilians on Sports and Arts; Spaniards on Local and National news; Britons and Americans on Opinion and World news. We also found that German and Spanish readers are more likely to read multiple national newspapers, while British readers more often resort to foreign sources of news. The results confirm that feedback to news items from a large user base is pivotal for the replication of content and that newspapers and news items can be clustered according to the editorial profile and principles of newsworthiness inherited from legacy media. The results of this investigation shed light onto the networked architecture of journalism that increasingly depends on readership agency.

  4. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...

  5. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...... by the media, with harmful effects on democracy....

  6. The news Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ralf

    for ideas etc. Reporters have limitedpossibilities for making own stories and less time for research - each live reportercovers 5-7 stories during a day. People : In a survey, most reporters replied that the new workflow was afundamental change of their work and had major impact on their identity......The News Engine How a new experiment in newsrooms can change process, product and people.   By Ralf Andersson   In fall 2012, the news department of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation,decided to implement a new workflow called ”The News Engine” - in order to workfaster, more freely, flexible...... and with fewer resources. This was done to raisethe productivity. The fundamental principle was that all stories should fit all platforms(content sharing) - and that no one did their own story anymore. DR News introduced 8-10 mobile live teams who are responsible for doinginterviews, record pictures and sound...

  7. Zimbabwe Science News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -disciplinary and semi-popular. The Zimbabwe Science News has ceased publication. ... An overview of solar and solar-related technologies in Zimbabwe · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  8. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... in a media environment where immediacy rules (Domingo 2008a). Following this research the primary focus of this paper is the category breaking news and Tuchmans developing news, but as they are all connected the analysis will also draw upon the other categories in Tuchmans typology. The theoretical framework...

  9. The News Media Industry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bartlett, Charlie

    2003-01-01

    American news media has two fundamental roles in our democracy: that of eyewitness, giving citizens critical information, and also as the watchdog, providing another arm of "checks and balances" within our governmental system...

  10. Evaluation of the external costs of energy production in the Helsinki metropolitan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otterstroem, T.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the research is to evaluate the external costs of energy production at Helsinki metropolitan area (Helsinki, Espoo, Vantaa). The previously developed valorization method for effects on population centres is adjusted. All the main health, material and environmental effects will be taken into account in the research. The effects of emissions of the energy production of the Helsinki metropolitan area on concentrations of the impurities in the air and through them on human and environment will be evaluated. The estimates will be based on the relativistic fuels consumption and the emission data of Helsinki metropolitan area. Life-cycle reasoning will be applied so that the emissions of the main components of the fuels used in the metropolitan area will be included in the estimation. The cost-effectiveness of the investments will be estimated by comparing the environmental investments of energy boards with the external costs. The methods of this work can be applied to estimation of the profitability of energy production plants from the point of view of national economy also elsewhere in the country

  11. School Performance, School Segregation, and Stress-Related Symptoms: Comparing Helsinki and Stockholm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modin, Bitte; Karvonen, Sakari; Rahkonen, Ossi; Östberg, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates cross-cultural differences in the interrelation between school performance, school segregation, and stress-related health among 9th-grade students in the greater Stockholm and Helsinki areas. Contrary to the Swedish case, it has been proposed that school performance in Finland is largely independent of the specific school…

  12. Adaptive Learning in Smart Cities--The Cases of Catania and Helsinki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Ilpo; Piazza, Roberta; Stenvall, Jari

    2017-01-01

    Our research is a comparative qualitative study. The material has been gathered from the cities of Helsinki and Catania. The target cities showcase varied successes and models of smart cities. In the cities, key people involved in the smart city concept--with different kinds of professional backgrounds--were interviewed, both individually and in…

  13. The News Media Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-05

    into “infotainment,” with an emphasis on trivia and news of the lives of celebrities. As a result, the American public is, as media critic Mark...presented by multiple outlets is often recycled . For example, a reader of Newsweek may see a similar, if not identical, story in its sibling...teleprompter. News and entertainment have morphed into “infotainment,” with an emphasis on trivia and the lives of celebrities. Unfortunately

  14. Good Health Is a Global Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... live longer and adopt a more western life style? Dr. Glass: The good news is that—with ... through Fogarty's programs have gone on to assume leadership positions in their home countries. Our vision is ...

  15. News values on social media: News organizations’ Facebook use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations’ ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process. PMID:29278253

  16. News values on social media: News organizations' Facebook use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations' ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process.

  17. Networks in the news media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Peter

    more formal types of social networks, but also complement or even substitute social networking elsewhere, and as such this particular type of social network offers people both inside and outside the news room new potentials - and problems. This article describe the basic vision of networks in the news......When news reporters connect people in a single news story or in a series of coherent news stories they essentially construct networks in the news media. Networks through which social actors are aligned symbolically in written, visible or audible form. These socio-symbolic networks not only copy...

  18. 新聞論述中的「去體罰」與「好老師」― 1952∼2005年聯合新聞資料庫內的規訓意象 Elimination of Corporal Punishment and Good Teacher in News Discourse: The Image of Discipline in UDN News Database Between 1952-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    鄧宗聖 Tzong-Sheng Deng

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available 本研究的主要目的,在於反思「體罰」如何在社會文化中逐漸成為問題,並以此對教師角色(主體)進行塑造。透過Foucault的理論觀點, 本研究利用聯合新聞資料庫, 回溯1952~2005年相關「體罰」的新聞事件,透過文本論述的比較,辨析出三種不連續的體罰論述,包括1950~1960年間維護民主國家形象的體罰論述、1960~1990年間追求理性的體罰論述、1990~2005年間追求合法懲戒的體罰論述。透過新聞事件的再現,其論述對「體罰」意義的想像,同時也是型塑紀律行動者(好老師)的自我認同。不過,「去體罰」不等於「去懲罰」,學校內的管束與規範手段逐漸轉向細緻,而大眾媒體在社會角色之規訓上,則成為中介的監控機構。 This study aims at introspecting how corporal punishment gradually becomes a problem in our society, and further shaping the role of teachers, that is, the subject, by means of the results of the introspection. Through Foucault’s theoretical viewpoints, this investigation used UDN news database to recall the news events relevant to corporal punishment between 1952-2005. By reviewing and comparing texts, I found three types of discourse on corporal punishment: the discourse maintaining the image of a democratic country between 1950-1960, the one pursuing rationality between 1960-1990, and the one seeking legitimate punishment between 1990-2005. Through the representation of press, the discourses not only implement the imagination toward the meaning of corporal punishment but also shape the self-identity of the actor, that is, teacher. However, the elimination of corporal punishment is not equivalent to the elimination of punishment. The means of control and standardization in the school progressively become detailed, and the mass media become intermediary monitoring organizations in terms of social role discipline.

  19. Misinformation with fake news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. BOTEI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The last presidential elections in the United States of America (2016 have brought to the international public opinion’ s attention the phenomenon of “fake news”. Though it isn’t a new phenomenon, the spread of fake information for manipulating and misinforming the masses has existed in all historical periods. This time the phenomenon was noticed because of the number of fake news and, especially because of their impact, starting the discussion whether the victory of Donald Trump happened because of fake news and raising the question whether this phenomenon is a danger to democracy. An important reaction came also from the part of technology companies, of tech giants, Google and Facebook especially, which want the implementation of the phenomenon. Misinformation with public speech under the form of fake news brings to discussion the responsibility in the online space, but also the protection of people against this phenomenon.

  20. News from Council - September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    I would like to inform you of the main news from the Council this week. First of all, the Council congratulated CERN and the Collaborations on the superb performance of the accelerator complex and experiments. It has been a great year so far, with important physics results across the whole spectrum of the CERN research programme.   Looking forward, one of the main accomplishments from this week’s meetings is that the Council has approved the opening of a credit facility with the European Investment Bank (EIB) to cover the cash shortage during the peak years of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) construction. This is very good news since it will allow us to carry out the work necessary for the HL-LHC without compromising the rest of the Laboratory’s scientific programme. Turning to the scientific and geographical enlargement, the Council approved the admission of India as an Associate Member State, and I very much hope that the agreement can be signed in the near future so that Indi...

  1. Science News of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Highlights important 1983 news stories reported in Science News. Stories are categorized under: anthropology/paleontology; behavior; biology; chemistry; earth sciences; energy; environment; medicine; physics; science and society; space sciences and astronomy; and technology and computers. (JN)

  2. Automatic Detection of Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rosas, Verónica; Kleinberg, Bennett; Lefevre, Alexandra; Mihalcea, Rada

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of misleading information in everyday access media outlets such as social media feeds, news blogs, and online newspapers have made it challenging to identify trustworthy news sources, thus increasing the need for computational tools able to provide insights into the reliability of online content. In this paper, we focus on the automatic identification of fake content in online news. Our contribution is twofold. First, we introduce two novel datasets for the task of fake news...

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING (O. BRUNING / CERN-SL, S. TAPPROGGE / Helsinki Univ. of Physics, E. TSESMELIS / Helsinki Univ. of Physics , CERN-EST)

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    21, 22, 23 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC Machine/Experiment Interface by O. BRUNING / CERN-SL, S. TAPPROGGE / Helsinki Univ. of Physics, E. TSESMELIS / Helsinki Univ. of Physics, CERN-EST     This series of three lectures will provide an overview of issues arising at the interface between the LHC machine and the experiments, which are required for guiding the interaction between the collider and the experiments when operation of the LHC commences. A basic description of the LHC Collider and its operating parameters, such as its energy, currents, bunch structure and luminosity, as well as variations on these parameters, will be given. Furthermore, the optics foreseen for the experimental insertions, the sources and intensities of beam losses and the running-in scenarios for the various phases of operation will be discussed. A second module will cover the specific requirements and expectations of each experiment in terms of the layout of experiment...

  4. Bad news transmission as a function of the definitiveness of consequences and the relationship between communicator and recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weenig, M W; Groenenboom, A C; Wilke, H A

    2001-03-01

    There is ample evidence suggesting (e.g., A. Tesser & S. Rosen, 1975) that people are reluctant to transmit bad news. Research on rumors, on the other hand, suggests that people sometimes are less reluctant to transmit bad news. It is argued that differences between the 2 lines of research include the definitiveness of the consequences of the news and the relationship between communicator and recipient. The influence of these 2 factors on news transmission was investigated in 3 experiments. Results showed that bad news with indefinite consequences was transmitted more often than bad news with definite consequences and that both kinds of bad news were transmitted more often if the recipient was a friend rather than a stranger. Differences in feelings of moral responsibility to transmit the news largely accounted for both effects. The 2 factors did not affect the likelihood of good news transmission.

  5. Political News and Political Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertges, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with mass media in modern democratic societies, using the example of Israeli news reports in German television (TV) news. Central to this interest are processes of mediating politics: political socialisation and education; that is to say, empowering citizens via TV news to participate in democratic processes. The article…

  6. How Can Asian Snack FuLoi Plan Successful Entering to Greater Helsinki Area? : Market research

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Loc

    2014-01-01

    This thesis introduces the significant factors of market research and its importance when considering doing international business. Furthermore, it could be useful for investors who have same favour to enter Finnish market. The case company is Asian Snack FuLoi- a German food industry company looking for new market. The goal of this study was to investigate the possibility for a company to enter Finland in general and Greater Helsinki in particular. The thesis was structured with theor...

  7. Security issues affecting occupational safety of receptionists in Helsinki city centre hotels

    OpenAIRE

    Hämäläinen, Ann-Mari

    2013-01-01

    Safety in tourism is more and more under discussion as restlessness has increased worldwide. Hotel as a working environment is exceptionally challenging as it needs to be accessible 24 hours a day. The aim of this thesis is to identify the main factors and threats affecting hotel receptionists’ employee safety. Improvement suggestions to improve safety are drawn based on the results of the research. The research was limited to Helsinki city centre hotels. The research data was collect...

  8. Public health response to radiation emergencies and the role of the Helsinki Project Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baverstock, Keith F.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on the public health element of nuclear emergency preparedness, defined as the mitigation of the long-term effects of radiation on exposed populations, as opposed to dealing with the health consequences of an exposure in an individual (termed medical aspects). The paper also approaches to the role of the Helsinki Project Office which is concerned with the protection of public health through effective response to nuclear emergencies, and falling into two categories, namely contingency planning or preparedness, and response

  9. Difference in place attachment between students in Helsinki and in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radusinović Dubravka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Place attachment refers to the process of human-place bonding; the bonding process includes both physical and social ties formed within an environment. In the last two decades, place attachment has been the subject of many studies, but there have not been many cross-cultural studies. The aim of this study was to determine differences in global attachment to house, neighbourhood and city among young people in Belgrade and Helsinki, with consideration of social and physical dimensions of place attachment. Additionally, the effects of gender on all types of place attachments were tested. Data were collected using the Place Attachment Scale (Hidalgo & Hernandez, 2001 and the Questionnaire on residential and socio-demographic characteristics of the sample. The instrument was translated into Serbian and Finnish, respecting the translation procedure for cross-cultural studies (Brislin, 1986 and administered to subjects in their native language. The study was conducted on the sample of two hundred students of psychology, comprising: 100 inhabitants of Belgrade, and 100 of Helsinki, balanced by gender (60% female, 40% male and age (average 24.4 years. The following results can be pointed out: 1 young people living in Belgrade show greater degree of global attachment to their city than young people living in Helsinki to their city, 2 young people from Belgrade also show greater social ties within their city and house, in relation to peers from Helsinki, 3 physical attachment to house and city is also significantly higher in young inhabitants of Belgrade. An interesting finding is 4 the existence of significant differences between men and women in the degree of global, social and physical attachment to house and physical attachment to city in the Serbian sample, and non-existence of differences in place attachment between men and women in the Finnish sample. The findings are interpreted within the Hofstede's five Cultural Dimensions.

  10. Difference in place attachment between students in Helsinki and in Belgrade

    OpenAIRE

    Radusinović Dubravka; Vukčević Maša; Čizmić Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Place attachment refers to the process of human-place bonding; the bonding process includes both physical and social ties formed within an environment. In the last two decades, place attachment has been the subject of many studies, but there have not been many cross-cultural studies. The aim of this study was to determine differences in global attachment to house, neighbourhood and city among young people in Belgrade and Helsinki, with consideration of social and physical dimensions of place ...

  11. Proceedings of Task Force Meeting "Human Factors in Innovation Management". Helsinki, 9-14 October, 1983

    OpenAIRE

    Vasko, T.; Goncharov, V.

    1984-01-01

    These proceedings from the IIASA Task Force Meeting held in Helsinki from 9-14 October, 1983 reflect the wide spectrum of interests and experiences of the participants. The main topic -- Human Factors in Innovation Management -- was singled out as a potential focus early in the life of the Innovation Management Project. Preliminary meetings had already indicated how internally structured this topic could be. Intentionally, no attempts were made to limit the scope of the meeting, as the object...

  12. Leadership strategies for a multicultural work environment in hotels in Helsinki

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on determining what kind of leadership strategies are used in hotels in Helsinki for managing a multicultural work environment. Do the hotels have multicultural leadership strategies on the management level or can some kind of overall strategy be found only at the corporate level? Also, this thesis examines how the strategies are implemented in the everyday work. Furthermore, do the managers think there is need for a more precise multicultural management strategy in orde...

  13. Post-trial obligations in the Declaration of Helsinki 2013: classification, reconstruction and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroleo, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    The general aim of this article is to give a critical interpretation of post-trial obligations towards individual research participants in the Declaration of Helsinki 2013. Transitioning research participants to the appropriate health care when a research study ends is a global problem. The publication of a new version of the Declaration of Helsinki is a great opportunity to discuss it. In my view, the Declaration of Helsinki 2013 identifies at least two clearly different types of post-trial obligations, specifically, access to care after research and access to information after research. The agents entitled to receive post-trial access are the individual participants in research studies. The Declaration identifies the sponsors, researchers and host country governments as the main agents responsible for complying with the post-trial obligations mentioned above. To justify this interpretation of post-trial obligations, I first introduce a classification of post-trial obligations and illustrate its application with examples from post-trial ethics literature. I then make a brief reconstruction of the formulations of post-trial obligations of the Declaration of Helsinki from 2000 to 2008 to correlate the changes with some of the most salient ethical arguments. Finally I advance a critical interpretation of the latest formulation of post-trial obligations. I defend the view that paragraph 34 of 'Post-trial provisions' is an improved formulation by comparison with earlier versions, especially for identifying responsible agents and abandoning ambiguous 'fair benefit' language. However, I criticize the disappearance of 'access to other appropriate care' present in the Declaration since 2004 and the narrow scope given to obligations of access to information after research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Outsourcing Housekeeping: An insight into two cleaning companies, SOL and N-Clean, in Helsinki, Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Samra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the author was to find to get an insight into the cleaning companies, in Helsin-ki, Finland, which the hotel industry is using as an external supplier for their housekeeping de-partment. The author has looked into the cleaning companies training process for the cleaning staff, employee demographics, quality control and process of handling complaints. The ad-vantages and disadvantages of outsourcing housekeeping in the hotel sector are also investi-gated. The research method...

  15. Dental care and treatments provided under general anaesthesia in the Helsinki Public Dental Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savanheimo Nora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental general anaesthesia (DGA is a very efficient treatment modality, but is considered only in the last resort because of the risks posed by general anaesthesia to patients’ overall health. Health services and their treatment policies regarding DGA vary from country to country. The aims of this work were to determine the reasons for DGA in the Helsinki Public Dental Service (PDS and to assess the role of patient characteristics in the variation in reasons and in the treatments given with special focus on preventive care. Methods The data covered all DGA patients treated in the PDS in Helsinki in 2010. The data were collected from patient documents and included personal background: age ( Results The DGA patients (n=349 were aged 2.3 to 67.2 years. Immigrants predominated in the youngest age group (p Conclusions Extreme non-cooperation, dental fear and an excessive need for treatment were the main reasons for the use of comprehensive, conservative DGA in the Helsinki PDS. The reasons for the use of DGA and the treatments provided varied according to personal and medical background, and immigration status with no gender-differences. Preventive measures formed only a minor part of the dental care given under DGA.

  16. OH reactivity of the urban air in Helsinki, Finland, during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pfannerstill, Eva Y.; Williams, Jonathan; Hellén, Heidi

    2017-11-01

    A new instrument to measure total OH reactivity in ambient air based on the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) has been built and characterized at the Finnish Meteorological Institute in Helsinki, Finland. The system is based on the detection of pyrrole by a gas chromatograph with a photoionization detector and designed for long term studies. It was tested in a container close to the SMEAR III semi-urban station in Helsinki during the winter in February 2016. The sampling location next to the delivery area of the institute was influenced by local vehicle emissions and cannot be considered representative of background conditions in Helsinki. However, effects of nitrogen oxides on the measurements could be investigated there. During this campaign, 56 compounds were measured individually by 1) an in-situ gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and by 2) off-line sampling in canisters and on adsorbent filled cartridges taken at the container and subsequently analysed by GC-FID and liquid chromatography, respectively. In addition, nitrogen oxides were measured at the same location, while ozone, carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide concentrations have been retrieved from the SMEAR III mast data. The comparison between the total OH reactivity measured and the OH reactivity derived from individual compound measurements are in better agreement for lower reactivity levels. Possible explanations for the differences are discussed in detail.

  17. CERN television news

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN events brought right to your desktop by the new video bulletin.   CERN now has its very own news broadcast , or rather 'webcast', with a host of special reports and even a star presenter. From today onwards, just go to the Bulletin's web page, click on the 'video news' link and sit back and enjoy the latest news about CERN, presented in images by Wendy Korda. The ten-minute newscast in both French and English, the Organization's two official languages, presents interviews, pictures of experiments and computer-generated graphics, bringing you right up to date with some of the Laboratory's latest stories. The show concludes with a selection of the best snapshots taken by the CERN Photo Lab. So every one or two months CERN's Audio-Video Service (ETT/DH) will be putting together a video news report that you can watch on your own desktop computer. Daniel Boileau, Patrick Gilbert de Vautibault and Jacques Fichet, the Service's three technicians, came up with the idea of producing this regular feat...

  18. Global news production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    Events around the world are broadcast by giant media players such as CNN, BBC and NHK amongst others. Consumers of news media receive the final message without knowing the processes that the images, the text and the sound have gone through. The media players can be considered as professional gene......), and it shows how events are "domesticated" for the target audience....

  19. Multimodal news framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual

  20. Inexpensive News Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Ellen D.; Wall, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Describes consumer or business-oriented online services that provide access to current news information and offers a less expensive alternative to standard online databases. Online clipping services are discussed, their costs are examined, and profiles of five services are compared: CompuServe, CompuServe as a gateway to IQuest, DELPHI, DIALCOM,…

  1. VULTURE NEWS 55.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-18

    Jun 18, 2006 ... near San Lucas, but the marksmen didn't use non-lead ammunition. Condors eat only carrion – dead carcasses – and are highly susceptible to lead poisoning if they ingest lead bullet ... came in and started eating everything,”. Petersen said. News of the ... And yet the state refuses to act.” Earlier this.

  2. COBE video news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    This videotape was produced for hand-out to both local and national broadcast media as a prelude to the launch of the Cosmic Background Explorer. The tape consists of short clips with multi-channel sound to facilitate news media editing.

  3. Antarctic news clips, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Published stories are presented that sample a year's news coverage of Antarctica. The intent is to provide the U.S. Antarctic Program participants with a digest of current issues as presented by a variety of writers and popular publications. The subject areas covered include the following: earth science; ice studies; stratospheric ozone; astrophysics; life science; operations; education; antarctic treaty issues; and tourism

  4. BBC VERSUS EURO NEWS: DISCOURSE AND IDEOLOGY IN NEWS TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini, F.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare discursive strategies employed by two international news agencies including Euro News and BBC. Van Dijk’s (2004 model of CDA was adopted. Thirty pieces of news about internal affairs of Iran together with their Persian translations were downloaded from the corresponding website, i.e. 30 pieces of English news and their corresponding Persian translations from the Euro News website and 30 pieces of English news with their corresponding translations from the BBC website. The frequency of lexical items was observed to not differ significantly. Two sets of translations were compared to their source texts based on four discursive strategies of hyperbole, polarization, vagueness and euphemism. An independent-samples t-test was conducted to compare the frequency of strategies applied by the two news agencies. Results revealed no significant difference between the two agencies except for the discursive strategy of vagueness.

  5. Further steps in the modeling of behavioural crowd dynamics, good news for safe handling. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopoff, Damián A.

    2016-09-01

    The recent review paper [4] constitutes a valuable contribution on the understanding, modeling and simulation of crowd dynamics in extreme situations. It provides a very comprehensive revision about the complexity features of the system under consideration, scaling and the consequent justification of the used methods. In particular, macro and microscopic models have so far been used to model crowd dynamics [9] and authors appropriately explain that working at the mesoscale is a good choice to deal with the heterogeneous behaviour of walkers as well as with the difficulty of their deterministic identification. In this way, methods based on the kinetic theory and statistical dynamics are employed, more precisely the so-called kinetic theory for active particles [7]. This approach has successfully been applied in the modeling of several complex dynamics, with recent applications to learning [2,8] that constitutes the key to understand communication and is of great importance in social dynamics and behavioral sciences.

  6. Sensing the News: User Experiences when Reading Locative News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Vaage Øie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on user experiences on reading location-aware news on the mobile platform and aims to explore what experiences this kind of locative journalism generates and how such experiences change the users’ social interaction with news. We produced a specially designed mobile application and tailored news stories specific to this project called LocaNews in order to explore participants’ relation to the content in this journalistic format. The result is generated through a field study and a questionnaire of 32 people to find out how they experience the news presented in this format. The user participants’ responses are analyzed based on their news experiences, contextualizing places and their social interaction with the news within this form of journalism. Results showed that the local, semi-local and non-local user approaches the locative news in a different manner, but that the average user found this kind of news more interesting and more informative than ordinary news. The participants also have a problem identifying this as journalism, rather than an information service.

  7. A website for astronomical news in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.

    2008-06-01

    Noticias del Cosmos is a collection of web pages within the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Valencia's website where we publish short daily summaries of astronomical press releases. Most, if not all of, the releases are originally written in English, and often Spanish readers may find them difficult to understand because not many people are familiar with the scientific language employed in these releases. Noticias del Cosmos has two principal aims. First, we want to communicate the latest astronomical news on a daily basis to a wide Spanish-speaking public who would otherwise not be able to read them because of the language barrier. Second, daily news can be used as a tool to introduce the astronomical topics of the school curriculum in a more immediate and relevant way. Most of the students at school have not yet reached a good enough level in their knowledge of English to fully understand a press release, and Noticias del Cosmos offers them and their teachers this news in their mother tongue. During the regular programme of school visits at the Observatory we use the news as a means of showing that there is still a lot to be discovered. So far the visits to the website have been growing steadily. Between June 2003 and June 2007 we had more than 30,000 visits (excluding 2006). More than 50% of the visits come from Spain, followed by visitors from South and Central America. The feedback we have received from teachers so far has been very positive, showing the usefulness of news items in the classroom when teaching astronomy.

  8. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  9. AN EVALUATION OF TIMELINE VISUALIZATION AND TREE VIEWER IN CRIME NEWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAZLENA MOHAMAD ALI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Finding good and relevant information in crime news is one of the most challenging tasks faced by users. An increase in the amount of information from news media has caused difficulties for users in obtaining relevant information. Hence, visualization is one of the important aspects to enhance user’s understanding when browsing or searching for news. Crime news requires a proper approach to visualize a variety of important information such as suspect, victim, location, time and evidence. Visual navigation is more interactive than linear. This has motivated us to develop a prototype called Crime News Visualization (CNV, which mplements a timeline and tree viewer to assist users when browsing crime news chronologically. The prototype follows several phases of development starting with design concept, implementation and evaluation. News corpus used in this study is from the Bernama Library & Infolink Service (BLIS resource, with a sample of 247 crime news documents from year 1997 to 2012. A user experiment was conducted with 20 undergraduate students from the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia in order to evaluate the acceptance and perception of interactive browsing of crime news using news portal (baseline and CNV (experimental. Findings revealed that more than 90% of the respondents indicated that the use of timeline visualization and tree viewer was helpful and had potential to improve the way users browse for crime news content.

  10. News media old and new

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and discusses three different approaches to the exploration of the cross-media challenges facing news audiences, as they seek access to, navigate in and make sense of the multitude of news sources across print, broadcasting, online and mobile media platforms. From a modernized...... uses and gratifications perspective, based on the notion of “worthwhileness” as the determinant of people's everyday selections from the “supermarket of news”, the article first reports from a longitudinal survey study in Denmark in which the author's foundational mapping of cross-media news...... consumption in pre-mobile 2008 is compared with replicating mappings carried out in 2011 and 2012, in a collaborative project between academics and news publishers. The analytical interest here focuses on the fluctuations between traditional news media and the surging digital news outlets of the internet...

  11. Dental care and treatments provided under general anaesthesia in the Helsinki Public Dental Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental general anaesthesia (DGA) is a very efficient treatment modality, but is considered only in the last resort because of the risks posed by general anaesthesia to patients’ overall health. Health services and their treatment policies regarding DGA vary from country to country. The aims of this work were to determine the reasons for DGA in the Helsinki Public Dental Service (PDS) and to assess the role of patient characteristics in the variation in reasons and in the treatments given with special focus on preventive care. Methods The data covered all DGA patients treated in the PDS in Helsinki in 2010. The data were collected from patient documents and included personal background: age (periodontics, surgical procedures and miscellaneous. The reasons for DGA and the treatments provided varied according to age, immigration, previous sedation and DGA and medical background. The logistic regression model showed that previous sedation (OR 2.3; 95%CI 1.3-4.1; p=0.005) and extreme non-cooperation (OR 1.7; 95%CI 0.9-3.2; p=0.103) were most indicative of preventive measures given. Conclusions Extreme non-cooperation, dental fear and an excessive need for treatment were the main reasons for the use of comprehensive, conservative DGA in the Helsinki PDS. The reasons for the use of DGA and the treatments provided varied according to personal and medical background, and immigration status with no gender-differences. Preventive measures formed only a minor part of the dental care given under DGA. PMID:23102205

  12. When Self-Organization intersects with Urban Planning: Two Cases from Helsinki

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horelli, Liisa; Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Wallin, Sirkku

    2015-01-01

    Participation as self-organization has emerged as a new form of citizen activism, often supported by digital technology. A comparative qualitative analysis of two case studies in Helsinki indicates that the self-organization of citizens expands the practice of urban planning. Together, they enable...... the mobilization of different groups around issues related to urban space. The consequences have become visible in temporary uses of places, event making and community development through bottom-up cultures. However, the lacking links to decision-making constrains new solutions and creative actions....

  13. Minibaaritoiminnan kehittäminen Holiday Inn Helsinki-Vantaa Airportissa

    OpenAIRE

    Raunio, Reijo

    2009-01-01

    Tämä tutkimustyyppinen opinnäytetyö käsittelee Restel Oy:n operoiman Holiday Inn Helsinki-Vantaa Airportin minibaaritoiminnan kehittämistä. Työn on tarkoitus toimia hotellin johdon apuvälineenä pohdittaessa toimenpiteitä, joilla voitaisiin tehostaa minibaaritoiminnan tuottoja ja parantaa sen kannattavuutta. Koska kannattavuuden käsitteen avaamiselle syntyy näin ollen olennainen tarve, se saa pääroolin viitekehyksessä. Kannattavuuden osalta käsitellään paitsi sen yleistä määrittelyä myös ...

  14. How Television News Programs Use Video News Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Mark D.; White, Candace

    2001-01-01

    Examines actual use in television news broadcasts of video news releases (VNRs). Finds that all sizes of markets were likely to use VNRs. Finds that the most common use was as a voice-over story in an early evening newscast, and that VNRs associated with children and their safety or health got the greatest number of uses. (SR)

  15. Reestablishing microglia function : Good news for Alzheimer's therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, Knut

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related neurodegenerative disease resulting in dementia. The current notion is that AD is based on a pathological plaque-forming accumulation of amyloid- (A) peptides that originate from a disturbed balance between production and removal of A

  16. Is the shuttle delay good news for the AMS?

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The delay of two months (or longer) for the Atlantis STS-122 mission, carrying the European laboratory module Columbus to the International Space Station (ISS), is going to have repercussions that will impact the space program for years to come.

  17. Good Friends, Bad News - Affect and Virality in Twitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    2011-01-01

    The link between affect, defined as the capacity for sentimental arousal on the part of a message, and virality, defined as the probability that it be sent along, is of significant theoretical and practical importance, e.g. for viral marketing. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the prob......The link between affect, defined as the capacity for sentimental arousal on the part of a message, and virality, defined as the probability that it be sent along, is of significant theoretical and practical importance, e.g. for viral marketing. The basic measure of virality in Twitter...

  18. Barefoot running and hip kinematics: good news for the knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Colm; Fleming, Neil; Donne, Bernard; Blanksby, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Patellofemoral pain and iliotibial band syndromes are common running injuries. Excessive hip adduction (HADD), hip internal rotation (HIR), and contralateral pelvic drop (CLPD) during running have been suggested as causes of injury in female runners. This study compared these kinematic variables during barefoot and shod running. Three-dimensional gait analyses of 23 habitually shod, uninjured female recreational athletes running at 3.33 m·s while shod and barefoot were studied. Spatiotemporal and kinematic data at initial contact (IC), 10% of stance (corresponding to the vertical impact peak), and peak angles were collected from each participant for HADD, HIR, and CLPD, and differences were compared across footwear conditions. Step rates when running barefoot were 178 ± 13 versus 172 ± 11 steps per minute when shod (P strike patterns changed from a group mean heel-toe latency indicating a rear-foot strike (20.8 ms) when shod, to one indicating a forefoot strike (-1.1 ms) when barefoot (P knee injuries in female runners, barefoot running could have potential for injury prevention or treatment in this cohort.

  19. News from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    News from the world in relation with nuclear power and fuel cycle are given: Dismantling of the research reactor of the Pasteur Institute, Areva gets the contract to replace the vessel caps for the nuclear power plant of Diablo Canyon, the United Kingdom chooses the renewal of the nuclear park and an increase in the use of renewable energy sources, The united states launches a call to projects for the building of new generation nuclear power plants, in Argentina the government develops its nuclear industry, the Russian federation proposes the creation of an international center for the fuel cycle are the principal points that are developed in this issue. (N.C.)

  20. News from the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinecke Hansen, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a corpus linguistic analysis of the development in future-oriented political journalism in four Danish newspapers in the period 1997–2013 (N = 2954 full articles = 1,553,038 word tokens). Keyword analysis and concordance analysis are applied within a framework of grammatical......-semantic theory of tense and modal verbs and semantic-pragmatic theory of time meaning, modality and speech acts. The results suggest, unexpectedly, that the newspapers – and news reports in particular – seem to have become less future-oriented in the period. At the same time, however, the articles...

  1. CERN Video News

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    From Monday you can see on the web the new edition of CERN's Video News. Thanks to a collaboration between the audiovisual teams at CERN and Fermilab, you can see a report made by the American laboratory. The clip concerns the LHC magnets that are being constructed at Fermilab. Also in the programme: the spectacular rotation of one of the ATLAS coils, the arrival at CERN of the first American magnet made at Brookhaven, the story of the discovery 20 years ago of the W and Z bosons at CERN. http://www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page.

  2. Pushed news: when the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet which state that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  3. PUSHED NEWS: When the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet whichstate that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  4. City of Helsinki and the evaluation of the Baltic Sea Challenge-actions; Helsingin kaupungin Itaemerihaaste-toimenpiteiden toteutumisen arviointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harju, I.

    2010-06-15

    The Baltic Sea Challenge initiative was made in June 2007 by the mayors of the cities of Helsinki and Turku in order to improve the state of the Baltic Sea. Its objective is to influence the status of the water, both locally and throughout the Baltic Sea. In addition to the concrete water protection measures, the cities of Helsinki and Turku are also committed to increase international co-operation on the environment, investigation of water protection and to provide general information and assistance. The challenge for improving the state of the Baltic Sea has already been sent to approximately 750 actors. In December 2009 about 165 positive responses have been received, of which 60 are cities, municipalities and joint local authorities in Finland, whereas 12 of them are cities in other Baltic Sea countries The actions of the city of Helsinki for saving the Baltic Sea are reducing the amount of point source loading and diffuse source loading (agriculture and scattered settlements), dredging of contaminated sediments, reducing discharges from shipping and boating, international environment cooperation, research projects and establishment of a professorship, and increasing awareness about the state of the Baltic Sea. Administrative branches of the city carry out the Baltic Sea Challenge. The administrative branches of the city of Helsinki are Port of Helsinki, Helsinki Water, Real Estate Department, Sports Department, City Planning Department, Public Works Department, Administration Centres department in the international operations and Environment centre. In addition, also other entities were summoned to participate in the voluntary improvement of the Baltic Sea. These were government agencies and research institutions, NGOs (nongovernmental organization) and associations, companies, schools and other organisations. The aim of this research was to examine the city of Helsinki's own Baltic Sea Challenge-actions from 2007 to 2009. The study dealt with all seven

  5. Correction of errors in scale values for magnetic elements for Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Svalgaard

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using several lines of evidence we show that the scale values of the geomagnetic variometers operating in Helsinki in the 19th century were not constant throughout the years of operation 1844–1897. Specifically, the adopted scale value of the horizontal force variometer appears to be too low by ~ 30% during the years 1866–1874.5 and the adopted scale value of the declination variometer appears to be too low by a factor of ~ 2 during the interval 1885.8–1887.5. Reconstructing the heliospheric magnetic field strength from geomagnetic data has reached a stage where a reliable reconstruction is possible using even just a single geomagnetic data set of hourly or daily values. Before such reconstructions can be accepted as reliable, the underlying data must be calibrated correctly. It is thus mandatory that the Helsinki data be corrected. Such correction has been satisfactorily carried out and the HMF strength is now well constrained back to 1845.

  6. Is macroeconomic announcement news priced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, Peter; Hu, Jiehui; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    We test whether news contained in macroeconomic announcements (MEAs) is priced in the cross-section of stock returns. When including news on a set of widely followed individual macroeconomic fundamentals in the cross-section of stock returns, estimates of their prices of risk are consistent with the

  7. What Turns Events into News?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukachinsky, Riva

    2013-01-01

    "The New York Times" is known for its slogan ''All the News That's Fit to Print.'' But how do gatekeepers decide which events meet this criterion? Although some individuals might believe that the news constitutes an undistorted reflection of the social reality, students in communication courses have the…

  8. School Violence and the News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and teens have many sources of information about school shootings or other tragic events. They might see or hear news stories or graphic images on TV, radio, or online, over and over. ... of a news story about school violence can make some kids feel that might ...

  9. CERN Video News on line

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The latest CERN video news is on line. In this issue : an interview with the Director General and reports on the new home for the DELPHI barrel and the CERN firemen's spectacular training programme. There's also a vintage video news clip from 1954. See: www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page

  10. Human development of the ability to learn from bad news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutsiana, Christina; Garrett, Neil; Clarke, Richard C.; Lotto, R. Beau; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne; Sharot, Tali

    2013-01-01

    Humans show a natural tendency to discount bad news while incorporating good news into beliefs (the “good news–bad news effect”), an effect that may help explain seemingly irrational risk taking. Understanding how this bias develops with age is important because adolescents are prone to engage in risky behavior; thus, educating them about danger is crucial. We reveal a striking valence-dependent asymmetry in how belief updating develops with age. In the ages tested (9–26 y), younger age was associated with inaccurate updating of beliefs in response to undesirable information regarding vulnerability. In contrast, the ability to update beliefs accurately in response to desirable information remained relatively stable with age. This asymmetry was mediated by adequate computational use of positive but not negative estimation errors to alter beliefs. The results are important for understanding how belief formation develops and might help explain why adolescents do not respond adequately to warnings. PMID:24019466

  11. Climate News Across Media Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2015-01-01

    In a changing media landscape marked by technological, institutional and cultural convergence, comparative and cross-media content analysis represents a valuable analytical tool in mapping the diverse channels of climate change communication. This paper presents a comparative study of climate...... quantitative and qualitative content analysis the paper documents and explores the extent and character of climate change news across different media platforms. The study aims at contributing to the on-going assessment of how news media are addressing climate change at a time when old and new media...... change news on five different media platforms: newspapers, television, radio, web-news and mobile news. It investigates the themes and actors represented in public climate change communication as well as the diverse possibilities of participating in public debates and information sharing. By combining...

  12. Assessing News Contagion in Finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cerchiello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of news in the financial context has gained a prominent interest in the last years. This is because of the possible predictive power of such content especially in terms of associated sentiment/mood. In this paper, we focus on a specific aspect of financial news analysis: how the covered topics modify according to space and time dimensions. To this purpose, we employ a modified version of topic model LDA, the so-called Structural Topic Model (STM, that takes into account covariates as well. Our aim is to study the possible evolution of topics extracted from two well known news archive—Reuters and Bloomberg—and to investigate a causal effect in the diffusion of the news by means of a Granger causality test. Our results show that both the temporal dynamics and the spatial differentiation matter in the news contagion.

  13. Good leadership for good quality

    OpenAIRE

    Franzon, Vilma Maria

    2016-01-01

    Good leadership is important if you like to have high quality in the results. My experience in the production of the television industry is that conditions for good leadership is insufficient. Therefore, I have tried to get answers for those two questions in my exam report: What are the characteristics of good leadership? What are the prerequisites for good leadership out of production? The method I used is a literature study and observation. I have read a number of books and research studies...

  14. Investigating people’s news diets: how online news users use offline news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D.; Schoenbach, K.

    2015-01-01

    The question how offline media use is related to online media use has been heavily debated in the last decades. If they are functionally equivalent, then advantages like low costs, rapid publication cycles, and easy access to online news could lead to them displacing offline news. Data from a

  15. Drug Use, Dependence, and Addiction at a British Columbia University: Good News and Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Bruce K.

    1985-01-01

    Two studies of perceived and actual drug use at Simon Fraser University found students estimating greater drug use among friends than for themselves, but 31 percent reported dependence and 5 percent reported current addiction, especially to caffeine and nicotine. An approach to drug abuse focusing on familiar substances is recommended. (MSE)

  16. Good news – bad news: the Yin and Yang of immune privilege in the eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Vincent Forrester

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The eye and the brain are prototypical tissues manifesting immune privilege (IP in which immune responses to foreign antigens, particularly alloantigens are suppressed, and even completely inhibited. Explanations for this phenomenon are numerous and mostly reflect our evolving understanding of the molecular and cellular processes underpinning immunological responses generally. IP is now viewed as a property of many tissues and the level of expression of IP varies not only with the tissue but with the nature of the foreign antigen and changes in the limited conditions under which privilege can operate as a mechanism of immunological tolerance. As a result, IP functions normally as a homeostatic mechanism preserving normal function in tissues, particularly those with highly specialised function and limited capacity for renewal such as the eye and brain. However, IP is relatively easily bypassed in the face of a sufficiently strong immunological response, and the privileged tissues may be at greater risk of collateral damage because of its natural defences are more easily breached than in a fully immunocompetent tissue which rapidly rejects foreign antigen and can restores integrity. This two-edged sword cuts its swathe through the eye: under most circumstances, IP mechanisms such as blood ocular barriers, intraocular immune modulators, induction of T regulatory cells, lack of lymphatics and other properties maintain tissue integrity; however, when these are breached, various degrees of tissue damage occur from severe tissue destruction in retinal viral infections and other forms of uveoretinal inflammation, to less severe inflammatory responses in conditions such as macular degeneration. Conversely, ocular IP and tumour-related IP can combine to permit extensive tumour growth and increased risk of metastasis thus threatening the survival of the host.

  17. Good news-bad news: the Yin and Yang of immune privilege in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, John V; Xu, Heping

    2012-01-01

    The eye and the brain are prototypical tissues manifesting immune privilege (IP) in which immune responses to foreign antigens, particularly alloantigens are suppressed, and even completely inhibited. Explanations for this phenomenon are numerous and mostly reflect our evolving understanding of the molecular and cellular processes underpinning immunological responses generally. IP is now viewed as a property of many tissues and the level of expression of IP varies not only with the tissue but with the nature of the foreign antigen and changes in the limited conditions under which privilege can operate as a mechanism of immunological tolerance. As a result, IP functions normally as a homeostatic mechanism preserving normal function in tissues, particularly those with highly specialized function and limited capacity for renewal such as the eye and brain. However, IP is relatively easily bypassed in the face of a sufficiently strong immunological response, and the privileged tissues may be at greater risk of collateral damage because its natural defenses are more easily breached than in a fully immunocompetent tissue which rapidly rejects foreign antigen and restores integrity. This two-edged sword cuts its swathe through the eye: under most circumstances, IP mechanisms such as blood-ocular barriers, intraocular immune modulators, induction of T regulatory cells, lack of lymphatics, and other properties maintain tissue integrity; however, when these are breached, various degrees of tissue damage occur from severe tissue destruction in retinal viral infections and other forms of uveoretinal inflammation, to less severe inflammatory responses in conditions such as macular degeneration. Conversely, ocular IP and tumor-related IP can combine to permit extensive tumor growth and increased risk of metastasis thus threatening the survival of the host.

  18. The 1996 High Schools That Work Assessment: Good News, Bad News and Hope. Research Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Gene

    Implementation of the High Schools That Work (HSTW) key practices improved achievement for career-bound students in these four ways: (1) HSTW sites showed significant improvement in average reading and math scores; (2) the percentage of career- bound students meeting HSTW performance goals in 1994 and 1996 increased from 33% to 43% in reading and…

  19. Health and low-level radiation: turning good news into bad news

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, B.; Wallis, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper has a dual purpose. On the one hand, congratulations are in order; the 25th Hanford Life Sciences Symposium celebrates four decades of important research at Hanford. This research has helped provide a better understanding of ionizing radiation effects on man and his environment. Researchers at Hanford and those at other locations can take pride in the fact that today we know more about the major characteristics and potential health effects of ionizing radiation than we do for any other biological hazard. Ionizing radiation's present mysteries, important as they are, involve subtleties that are difficult to explore in detail because the effects are so small relative to other health effects. It will also be a pleasure to add our tribute, along with many others, to Herb Parker, a friend, colleague, and pioneer in the radiation protection field. Building on the work of early pioneers such as Herb and those who have and will follow in their footsteps, we will develop an even broader understanding--an understanding that will clarify the effects of low-level radiation exposure, an area of knowledge about which sound explanations and predictions elude us today. The second purpose of this paper is to remind those in the radiation protection field that they have been less than successful in one of their most important tasks--that of effective communication. The task is not an easy one because the content of the message depends upon the dose. At high doses, above 1 Sv, where the deleterious effects of radiation are predictable, there is agreement on the message that must be delivered to the public: avoid it. There is no confusion in the public sector about this message. At the much lower doses resulting from beneficial activities, the message we must convey to the public is different

  20. Work-Based Learning: Good News, Bad News and Hope. Research Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Gene; Presson, Alice

    The effects of work-based learning on student achievement were examined by analyzing data from the 1996 High Schools That Work (HSTW) assessment. The comparison focused on the experiences of 12th-graders in structured work-based learning programs and 12th-graders with after-school jobs. A larger percentage of students earning school credit for…

  1. Health and low-level radiation: turning good news into bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, B; Wallis, L R

    1988-08-01

    This paper has a dual purpose. On the one hand, congratulations are in order; the 25th Hanford Life Sciences Symposium celebrates four decades of important research at Hanford. This research has helped provide a better understanding of ionizing radiation effects on man and his environment. Researchers at Hanford and those at other locations can take pride in the fact that today we know more about the major characteristics and potential health effects of ionizing radiation than we do for any other biological hazard. Ionizing radiation's present mysteries, important as they are, involve subtleties that are difficult to explore in detail because the effects are so small relative to other health effects. It will also be a pleasure to add our tribute, along with many others, to Herb Parker, a friend, colleague, and pioneer in the radiation protection field. Building on the work of early pioneers such as Herb and those who have and will follow in their footsteps, we will develop an even broader understanding--an understanding that will clarify the effects of low-level radiation exposure, an area of knowledge about which sound explanations and predictions elude us today. The second purpose of this paper is to remind those in the radiation protection field that they have been less than successful in one of their most important tasks--that of effective communication. The task is not an easy one because the content of the message depends upon the dose. At high doses, above 1 Sv, where the deleterious effects of radiation are predictable, there is agreement on the message that must be delivered to the public: avoid it. There is no confusion in the public sector about this message. At the much lower doses resulting from beneficial activities, the message we must convey to the public is different. Unfortunately, the only message about radiation that the public seems to remember is "avoid it." We know the proper message is not being received when the medical profession resorts to using the term "magnetic resonance" in place of "nuclear magnetic resonance" because of public fear of the word "nuclear." We know there's a problem when the public cringes because of a lead story in the press detailing an incident where people were exposed to a few microgray and when the linear hypothesis is used to predict hundreds of thousands of cancers from Chernobyl-related doses well below 0.01 Sv.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  2. International News Flows in the Post-Cold War World: Mapping the News and the News Producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreberny-Mohammadi, Annabelle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the global political environment, major global news providers, and technologies of global news production. Argues for a multinational comparative mapping of international news representation in the 1990s. Outlines a major international venture to update and elaborate the 1979 UNESCO/IAMCR study of foreign news in the media of 29 countries,…

  3. News from Afar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Peter

    in Denmark immediately following the Allied invasion of Sicily in 1943, and a second wave erupted in the summer of 1944 after the Normandy landings. In other words, knowledge of the war at large was an important aspect of life in German-controlled Europe in the 1940s, but remains somewhat understudied......News filtering through about the changing fortunes of the Axis had a direct impact on public opinion in occupied Europe during the war years, not only affecting morale but also at times triggering mass popular action. For example, a wave of protests against the German occupation broke out...... theater of war by writers of diaries in Denmark. It can be tentatively concluded that while reporting on the Pacific was relatively neutral in tone and did not, to a systematic extent, exaggerate Japanese victories, the Danish public especially paid attention to that theater of war in 1941 and 1942...

  4. NetWorking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    For many years cooperative design was primarily concerned with the development of IT supported systems for professional users. However, the cooperative design approach can embrace other social practices such as children’s everyday life. At a methodological level there is no difference in designing...... the Networking News workshop, offers an opportunity to make first hand studies of children’s IT supported social activities in an informal classroom setting....... with adults or children. However there is a need for new methods to support communication and collaboration between designers and children. This article proposes a new method for understandings children’s appropriation of new technology in an interactive workshop setting. The method, which we call...

  5. News from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    This document gathers a series of brief news concerning nuclear industry throughout the world. Russia and Venezuela have signed an agreement for the construction of the first nuclear power plant in Venezuela. Russia and Ukraine have signed an agreement for the construction of a nuclear fuel plant in Ukraine, this plant will produce fuel assemblies for VVER reactors. The Italian authorities have stated that the come back of nuclear energy will allow Italy to comply with the Kyoto protocol. The French consortium Novarka is constructing the new sarcophagus for the Chernobyl reactor whose cost will reach 870.10 6 euros. The Socatri company has been discharged on the count of environment pollution in the accident that occurred in July 2008 on the Tricastin plant but the company was fined for not reporting in due delay the accident. (A.C.)

  6. Senior expert symposium on electricity and the environment, Helsinki, Finland, 13-17 May 1991. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This document summarizes the key issues of the Senior Expert Symposium on Electricity and the Environment held in Helsinki, Finland in May 1991, and highlights the main findings. It is hoped that this summary will contribute to rational and objective discussion of different options and strategies aimed at ensuring the provision of adequate and economical electricity services while protecting health and the environment

  7. Cultural Knowledge in News Comprehension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main lines of the design and the findings of a reception study on news comprehension. This empirical study is a comparison of the comprehension processes of Danes and French Canadians over a set of news texts from both countries. Comprehension is explored from a cultural...... perspective, through the lens of cognition and pragmatics, revealing the role played by cultural knowledge in comprehension and the underlying relationship between a text and its intended audience. It is argued that recipients ‘problematise’ the news texts, a process by which the texts answer questions...

  8. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers of...

  9. Diverse artikelen in Gay Amsterdam News

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekma, G.

    2002-01-01

    Vernedering, in: Gay Amsterdam News 125 (jan 2002), pp. 20-21; Webseks, zaad, zweetseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 126 (feb 2002), pp. 30-31; Wurgseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 127 (mrt 2002), pp. 30-31; Wijnandus Johannes Sengers (1927-2002), in: Gay Amsterdam News 133 (sept 2002), pp. 49.

  10. Scientific Computers at the Helsinki University of Technology during the Post Pioneering Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykänen, Panu; Andersin, Hans

    The paper describes the process leading from the pioneering phase when the university was free to develop and build its own computers through the period when the university was dependent on cooperation with the local computer companies to the stage when a bureaucratic state organization took over the power to decide on acquiring computing equipment to the universities. This stage ended in the late 1970s when computing power gradually became a commodity that the individual laboratories and research projects could acquire just like any resource. This development paralleled the situation in many other countries and universities as well. We have chosen the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) as a case to illustrate this development process, which for the researchers was very annoying and frustrating when it happened.

  11. Spatial clustering of knowledge-based industries in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Eduardo Chica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The central locations of metropolitan areas have some specific attributes, leading to an accumulation of large knowledge exchanges and extensive knowledge externalities, which encourage the concentration of various economic activities, especially knowledge-based industries (KBI. Other agglomeration economies found in metropolitan areas – such as telecommunications and transport infrastructures connected to global productive circuits and complementary labour markets – are key factors for KBI employment growth. This paper explores the Helsinki Metropolitan Area’s (HMA spatial clustering of KBI at the sub-district level, and the role played by agglomeration economies (both specialization and diversity economies in fostering this process. The results reveal that KBI employment shows patterns of concentration in the core and adjacent areas. The specialization and diversity economies found in the metropolitan core and the specialization economies found in others areas lead to KBI spatial clustering in the HMA. Public policies regarding the promotion of science parks have also played a decisive role.

  12. Sedimentation and lithostratigraphy of the Vuosaari multiple till sequence in Helsinki, southern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirvas, H.

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available A multiple till sequence interbedded with sorted sediments has been investigated at Vuosaari, Helsinki, Finland. The investigation was carried out using standard sedimentological procedures combined with microfossil analysis in order to determine the genesis of the exposed sediments. This evidence is used to correlate lithostratigraphically the sequence with adjacent multiple till sequences in other parts of southern Finland (south of the Salpausselkä zone. It is concluded that all three till beds at Vuosaari are of basal origin that were laid down by separate ice flow phases. In contrast two rhythmite beds between the tills are thought to have been deposited in open water. The sediments at Vuosaari may have been laid down during the Weichselian glaciation although it is also possible that the lowermost till bed represents Saalian till.

  13. Changing environments or shifting paradigms? Strategic decision making toward water protection in Helsinki, 1850-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakkonen, Simo; Laurila, Sari

    2007-04-01

    The study examines the history of strategic decision-making concerning water protection in Helsinki, 1850-2000. We identified five major strategic decisions that occurred during the study period. The results indicate that strategic decision-making evolves in long-term policy cycles that last on average 20-30 years. New policy cycles are caused by paradigm shifts. Paradigms are shared and predominant ways of understanding reality that help when groups must act to solve common and complex environmental problems. However the internal structure and external dynamics of paradigms are contradictory. Although paradigms serve initially as means to redefine problems and find creative solutions, as time goes by each paradigm seems to become also a barrier that restricts the introduction of new ways of thinking and acting. The power of paradigms lies in the fact that they can be defined as scientific but also social, political, or cultural agreements depending on the context.

  14. Dense downtown living more carbon intense due to higher consumption: a case study of Helsinki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, Jukka; Kyroe, Riikka; Junnila, Seppo, E-mail: jukka.heinonen@aalto.fi, E-mail: riikka.kyro@aalto.fi, E-mail: seppo.junnila@aalto.fi [School of Engineering, Department of Surveying, Aalto University, PO Box 11200, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2011-07-15

    Hindering urban sprawl is one of the main goals for contemporary urban planning. Urban density is considered crucial in climate change mitigation since it reduces automobile dependence and decreases unit sizes, for example. This letter analyzes the effect of density in a city context. In the study the Finnish capital Helsinki is divided into two areas of different urban densities: the high density downtown area and the more scarcely populated suburbs. The study is a continuation of a recently published study on the implications of urban structure on carbon emissions, and analyzes further the main finding of the first study-that higher urban density might have negligible or even reverse effect on the per capita carbon emissions. Similarly to the previous study, a consumption based tiered hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) approach is employed in order to produce a comprehensive assessment, free of territorial boundaries and system cutoffs typical of traditional LCAs. Based on the findings of the previous study, it is hypothesized that when assessing city level carbon dioxide emissions from a wider, consumer oriented LCA perspective, increased urban density may not necessarily reduce carbon emissions. Surprisingly, the study finds that carbon dioxide equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions are substantially higher in the dense downtown area than in the surrounding suburbs, which is suggested to imply that the increased consumption due to the higher standard of living increases emissions more than the higher density is able to reduce them. The results demonstrate that, while increasing urban density can be justified from a number of ecological, social and economic viewpoints, density is not necessarily a key parameter in the particular case of climate change. In cities like Helsinki, where wealth is concentrated in the downtown area, climate policies should give higher priority to the energy consumption of buildings, to alternative energy production and distribution modes

  15. Smoking in context – a multilevel approach to smoking among females in Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahkonen Ossi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking is associated with disadvantage. As people with lower social status reside in less privileged areas, the extent of contextual influences for smoking remains unclear. The aims were to examine the spatial patterning of daily smoking within the city of Helsinki, to analyse whether contextual variation can be observed and which spatial factors associate with current daily smoking in the employed female population. Methods Data from a cross-sectional questionnaire were collected for municipal employees of Helsinki (aged 40–60 years. The response rate was 69%. As almost 4/5 of the employees are females, the analyses were restricted to women (n = 5028. Measures included smoking status, individual level socio-demographic characteristics (age, occupational social class, education, family type and statistical data describing areas in terms of social structure (unemployment rate, proportion of manual workers and social cohesion (proportions of single parents and single households. Logistic multilevel analysis was used to analyse data. Results After adjusting for the individual-level composition, smoking was significantly more prevalent according to all social structural and social cohesion indicators apart from the proportion of manual workers. For example, high unemployment in the area of domicile increased the risk of smoking by almost a half. The largest observed area difference in smoking – 8 percentage points – was found according to the proportion of single households. Conclusion The large variation in smoking rates between areas appears mainly to result from variation in the characteristics of residents within areas. Yet, living in an area with a high level of unemployment appears to be an additional risk for smoking that cannot be fully accounted for by individual level characteristics even in a cohort of female municipal employees.

  16. Understanding developmental language disorder - the Helsinki longitudinal SLI study (HelSLI): a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laasonen, Marja; Smolander, Sini; Lahti-Nuuttila, Pekka; Leminen, Miika; Lajunen, Hanna-Reetta; Heinonen, Kati; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Bailey, Todd M; Pothos, Emmanuel M; Kujala, Teija; Leppänen, Paavo H T; Bartlett, Christopher W; Geneid, Ahmed; Lauronen, Leena; Service, Elisabet; Kunnari, Sari; Arkkila, Eva

    2018-05-21

    Developmental language disorder (DLD, also called specific language impairment, SLI) is a common developmental disorder comprising the largest disability group in pre-school-aged children. Approximately 7% of the population is expected to have developmental language difficulties. However, the specific etiological factors leading to DLD are not yet known and even the typical linguistic features appear to vary by language. We present here a project that investigates DLD at multiple levels of analysis and aims to make the reliable prediction and early identification of the difficulties possible. Following the multiple deficit model of developmental disorders, we investigate the DLD phenomenon at the etiological, neural, cognitive, behavioral, and psychosocial levels, in a longitudinal study of preschool children. In January 2013, we launched the Helsinki Longitudinal SLI study (HelSLI) at the Helsinki University Hospital ( http://tiny.cc/HelSLI ). We will study 227 children aged 3-6 years with suspected DLD and their 160 typically developing peers. Five subprojects will determine how the child's psychological characteristics and environment correlate with DLD and how the child's well-being relates to DLD, the characteristics of DLD in monolingual versus bilingual children, nonlinguistic cognitive correlates of DLD, electrophysiological underpinnings of DLD, and the role of genetic risk factors. Methods include saliva samples, EEG, computerized cognitive tasks, neuropsychological and speech and language assessments, video-observations, and questionnaires. The project aims to increase our understanding of the multiple interactive risk and protective factors that affect the developing heterogeneous cognitive and behavioral profile of DLD, including factors affecting literacy development. This accumulated knowledge will form a heuristic basis for the development of new interventions targeting linguistic and non-linguistic aspects of DLD.

  17. Dense downtown living more carbon intense due to higher consumption: a case study of Helsinki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, Jukka; Kyroe, Riikka; Junnila, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    Hindering urban sprawl is one of the main goals for contemporary urban planning. Urban density is considered crucial in climate change mitigation since it reduces automobile dependence and decreases unit sizes, for example. This letter analyzes the effect of density in a city context. In the study the Finnish capital Helsinki is divided into two areas of different urban densities: the high density downtown area and the more scarcely populated suburbs. The study is a continuation of a recently published study on the implications of urban structure on carbon emissions, and analyzes further the main finding of the first study-that higher urban density might have negligible or even reverse effect on the per capita carbon emissions. Similarly to the previous study, a consumption based tiered hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) approach is employed in order to produce a comprehensive assessment, free of territorial boundaries and system cutoffs typical of traditional LCAs. Based on the findings of the previous study, it is hypothesized that when assessing city level carbon dioxide emissions from a wider, consumer oriented LCA perspective, increased urban density may not necessarily reduce carbon emissions. Surprisingly, the study finds that carbon dioxide equivalent (CO 2 e) emissions are substantially higher in the dense downtown area than in the surrounding suburbs, which is suggested to imply that the increased consumption due to the higher standard of living increases emissions more than the higher density is able to reduce them. The results demonstrate that, while increasing urban density can be justified from a number of ecological, social and economic viewpoints, density is not necessarily a key parameter in the particular case of climate change. In cities like Helsinki, where wealth is concentrated in the downtown area, climate policies should give higher priority to the energy consumption of buildings, to alternative energy production and distribution modes, as

  18. Simultaneous bilateral cataract surgery: economic analysis; Helsinki Simultaneous Bilateral Cataract Surgery Study Report 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivo, Tiina; Sarikkola, Anna-Ulrika; Uusitalo, Risto J; Hellstedt, Timo; Ess, Sirje-Linda; Kivelä, Tero

    2011-06-01

    To present an economic-analysis comparison of simultaneous and sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Helsinki University Eye Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Economic analysis. Effects were estimated from data in a study in which patients were randomized to have bilateral cataract surgery on the same day (study group) or sequentially (control group). The main clinical outcomes were corrected distance visual acuity, refraction, complications, Visual Function Index-7 (VF-7) scores, and patient-rated satisfaction with vision. Health-care costs of surgeries and preoperative and postoperative visits were estimated, including the cost of staff, equipment, material, floor space, overhead, and complications. The data were obtained from staff measurements, questionnaires, internal hospital records, and accountancy. Non-health-care costs of travel, home care, and time were estimated based on questionnaires from a random subset of patients. The main economic outcome measures were cost per VF-7 score unit change and cost per patient in simultaneous versus sequential surgery. The study comprised 520 patients (241 patients included non-health-care and time cost analyses). Surgical outcomes and patient satisfaction were similar in both groups. Simultaneous cataract surgery saved 449 Euros (€) per patient in health-care costs and €739 when travel and paid home-care costs were included. The savings added up to €849 per patient when the cost of lost working time was included. Compared with sequential bilateral cataract surgery, simultaneous bilateral cataract surgery provided comparable clinical outcomes with substantial savings in health-care and non-health-care-related costs. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.) A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970 The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator Discovery of Lawrencium How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms The Discovery of Element 106-Finally The Naming of Element 106 The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements What Good Is a Heavy Element? To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall

  20. Does emotional intelligence predict breaking bad news skills in pediatric interns? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Suzanne; Kassis, Karyn; Nagel, Rollin; Verbeck, Nicole; Mahan, John D; Shell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    While both patients and physicians identify communication of bad news as an area of great challenge, the factors underlying this often complex task remain largely unknown. Emotional intelligence (EI) has been positively correlated with good general communication skills and successful leadership, but there is no literature relating EI to the delivery of bad news. Our objectives were to determine: 1) performance of first-year pediatric residents in the delivery of bad news in a standardized patient (SP) setting; and 2) the role of EI in these assessments. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trainees with higher EI would demonstrate more advanced skills in this communication task. Forty first-year residents participated. Skill in bad news delivery was assessed via SP encounters using a previously published assessment tool (GRIEV_ING Death Notification Protocol). Residents completed the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI) as a measure of EI. Residents scored poorly on bad news delivery skills but scored well on EI. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated moderate to substantial inter-rater reliability among raters using the delivering bad news assessment tool. However, no correlation was found between bad news delivery performance and EI. We concluded that first-year pediatric residents have inadequate skills in the delivery of bad news. In addition, our data suggest that higher EI alone is not sufficient to effectively deliver death news and more robust skill training is necessary for residents to gain competence and acquire mastery in this important communication domain.

  1. Does emotional intelligence predict breaking bad news skills in pediatric interns? A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Reed

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: While both patients and physicians identify communication of bad news as an area of great challenge, the factors underlying this often complex task remain largely unknown. Emotional intelligence (EI has been positively correlated with good general communication skills and successful leadership, but there is no literature relating EI to the delivery of bad news. Purpose: Our objectives were to determine: 1 performance of first-year pediatric residents in the delivery of bad news in a standardized patient (SP setting; and 2 the role of EI in these assessments. Our hypothesis was that pediatric trainees with higher EI would demonstrate more advanced skills in this communication task. Methods: Forty first- year residents participated. Skill in bad news delivery was assessed via SP encounters using a previously published assessment tool (GRIEV_ING Death Notification Protocol. Residents completed the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory (ESCI as a measure of EI. Results: Residents scored poorly on bad news delivery skills but scored well on EI. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated moderate to substantial inter-rater reliability among raters using the delivering bad news assessment tool. However, no correlation was found between bad news delivery performance and EI. Conclusions: We concluded that first-year pediatric residents have inadequate skills in the delivery of bad news. In addition, our data suggest that higher EI alone is not sufficient to effectively deliver death news and more robust skill training is necessary for residents to gain competence and acquire mastery in this important communication domain.

  2. Creative Cycling of News Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Gynnild, PhD.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The theory of creative cycling emerged from my PhD study of news professionals in Norway. The study was carried out according to classic grounded theory principles (Glaser and Strauss 1967, Glaser 1978, 1998, 2001, 2005, and the area of interest was the performance of news journalism in the multimedia age. The theory runs counter to widespread tendencies of industrial age thinking in news media. It emphasizes news professionals’ search for meaning in their daily work, and suggests that their main concern is self-fulfillment through original contribution. The dilemma and resolution, creative cycling, is a basic social process continuously going within inner and outer framings. It consists of three interrelated dimensions: productive processing, breaks and shifts and inspirational looping.

  3. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  4. Automated negotiation and bundling of information goods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somefun, D.J.A.; Gerding, E.H.; Bohté, S.M.; Poutré, la J.A.; Faratin, P.; Parkes, D.; Rodriquez-Aguilar, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel system for selling bundles of news items. Through the system, customers bargain with the seller over the price and quality of the delivered goods. The advantage of the developed system is that it allows for a high degree of flexibility in the price, quality, and

  5. Subprime Loans and Fake News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella

    2017-01-01

    Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?......Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?...

  6. News, Documentary and Advocacy Journalism

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Mathew

    2013-01-01

    This chapter examines how alternative models of journalism are emerging to counter the news values associated with the so-called mainstream media - news values, which are increasingly criticised for serving only the interests of the political and economic elite. In particular, this chapter looks at advocacy journalism, which focuses on a shift away from objectivity towards the arguably more ethical practice of attachment. The neutral and detached reporter, who remains outside of events and re...

  7. Figuring Out Health News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they do — like diet and exercise — have a good or bad effect on their health. For new drugs or treatments, ... they may report a dramatic or scary side effect of a medication that is really ... more can help you ask good questions about your own health when you see ...

  8. News of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers short pieces of news from nuclear industry throughout the world. The most relevant are the following. A micro-crack has been detected in the bottom head instrumentation penetration during the ten-yearly inspection of the unit 1 of the Gravelines nuclear power station. Poland is expected before the end of 2012 to launch a bid of tender for the construction of 2 nuclear power plants of 3000 MW each. The cost of this program is estimated to near 23 billions euros. The Spanish government has allowed the 2 reactors of the Asco plant to operate 10 years more. The Russian company 'Atomstroyexport' will supply the 2 nuclear islands of the 2 new reactors at the Tianwan nuclear power plant (China). Russia is going to build the first nuclear power plant in Bangladesh. Areva has recently discovered 12300 tonnes of uranium in central Jordan. The IAEA experts recommend the Japanese Authorities to decontaminate first the inhabited areas contaminated by the Fukushima accident. It is more important to focus on the real radiation dose received by the population than on the contamination levels of the environment. (A.C.)

  9. News from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    This document gathers pieces of information from around the world concerning the nuclear sector. Among which were the following. Saudi-Arabia projects to build 16 nuclear reactors till 2020. In Pakistan the third reactor has entered into service, this reactor (Chashma-2, 330 MW) is a PWR-type reactor designed by CNNC (China National Nuclear Corporation). Areva Newport News LLC has postponed to a later date the construction of a plant dedicated to manufacturing big components like reactor vessels or vessel heads. Areva and Rhodia have signed an agreement for a better valorization of deposits involving uranium and rare earth elements. Bulgaria has inaugurated a new storage center for nuclear wastes. Areva has launched the construction of a plant dedicated to the production of Pb-212, an isotope used in the treatment of some cancers. A worker died of a fall on the building site of Flamanville-3. According to COMARE (Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment) there is no relationship between the child leukemia and the presence of nuclear power plants in U.K. Siemens has been condemned to pay 0.648 billion euros to Areva as a compensation for the breach of the shareholder pact. Rosatom has created Rosatom Overseas that will be in charge of financing, building, operating and even owning nuclear power plants on foreign soil. 'Electricite de France' has presented its trends for the next decade. (A.C.)

  10. Antarctic news clips - 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The newspaper and magazine stories selected for this book present only a sampling of one year's (July 1991 to July 1992) news coverage of Antarctica. The only requirement for inclusion in this publication is that the article's subject matter pertains or refers to Antarctica in some way - whether it is focused on the science done there, or on the people who play such a large part in the work accomplished, or on the issues related to it. No attempt has been made to correlate the number of articles, or their length, with the importance of the subjects treated. Clippings are provided to the Foundation by a service that searches for items containing the phrase 'National Science Foundation'. Identical versions of many stories, especially those written and distributed by wire services such as the Associated Press and United Press International, and by syndicated columnists, are published in numerous papers across the United States. Other articles are submitted from a variety of sources, including interested readers across the United States and in New Zealand.

  11. New Bulletin: Latest News

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The paper version of the CERN Bulletin will be published twice a month with effect from 18 April 2005. The electronic version will be updated weekly. This year will see many changes in the Bulletin, designed to make it more economical, more compact and more attractive. From 18 April the paper version of the Bulletin will be published twice monthly, so we shall have to stop calling it the "Weekly". The purpose of this change in publication frequency is to redistribute the resources of the Publications Section of the Communications Group so that it can produce new brochures for the general public. However, so as not to compromise on topicality and communication of information, the Official News and General Information sections, the Pension Fund and training announcements and the seminar schedule will continue to be updated weekly. If you have signed up to be informed of the updates, you will continue to receive a weekly e-mail reminding you that the electronic version of the Bulletin has been updated. Offici...

  12. Accidental goodness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Anne

    In postmodern capitalist market economies, management of the single organisation is bound to be guided by several rationales, which are in conflict with each other. For some writers this perception leads to the argument, that conceptions of management should strive towards goals beyond the present...... society. For others, the handling of plural perspectives is just a management discipline. However these positions seem to share a focus on organization as a the arena for the organization of the good. The contribution looks at the management of occupational accidents as an example of striving for good...

  13. Tumor Talk and Child Well-Being: Perceptions of “good” and “bad” news among parents of children with advanced cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraco, Angela M.; Dussel, Veronica; Orellana, Liliana; Kang, Tammy I.; Geyer, J. Russell; Rosenberg, Abby R.; Feudtner, Chris; Wolfe, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Context Little is known about how parents of children with advanced cancer classify news they receive about their child’s medical condition. Objective To develop concepts of “good news” and “bad news” in discussions of advanced childhood cancer from parent perspectives. Methods Parents of children with advanced cancer cared for at three children’s hospitals were asked to share details of conversations in the preceding 3 months that contained “good news” or “bad news” related to their child’s medical condition. We used mixed methods to evaluate parent responses to both open-ended and fixed response items. Results Of 104 enrolled parents, 86 (83%) completed the survey. Six (7%) parents reported discussing neither good nor bad news, 18 (21%) reported only bad news, 15 (17%) reported only good news, and 46 (54%) reported both good and bad news (1 missing response). Seventy-six parents (88%) answered free response items. Descriptions of both good and bad news discussions consisted predominantly of “tumor talk” or cancer control. Additional treatment options featured prominently, particularly in discussions of bad news (42%). Child well-being, an important good news theme, encompassed treatment tolerance, symptom reduction, and quality of life. Conclusion A majority of parents of children with advanced cancer report discussing both good and bad news in the preceding 3 months. While news related primarily to cancer control, parents also describe good news discussions related to their child’s well-being. Understanding how parents of children with advanced cancer classify and describe the news they receive may enhance efforts to promote family-centered communication. PMID:28062345

  14. Early acts and spaces for peer support : development evaluation of early intervention and family support in Family Centres of Helsinki City Social Services Department

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    Endast sammandrag. Inbundna avhandlingar kan sökas i Helka-databasen (http://www.helsinki.fi/helka). Elektroniska kopior av avhandlingar finns antingen öppet på nätet eller endast tillgängliga i bibliotekets avhandlingsterminaler. Only abstract. Paper copies of master’s theses are listed in the Helka database (http://www.helsinki.fi/helka). Electronic copies of master’s theses are either available as open access or only on thesis terminals in the Helsinki University Library. Vain tiivi...

  15. Good Faith

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomcenco, Alex

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines the current state of law in Canada in respect to good faith in contratial relations. The topic is highly relevant due to expected growth in the numbers of contracts concluded between European and Canadian enterprises in the wake of adoption of the Comprehensive Economic...

  16. News of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    This document gathers pieces of news from the nuclear industry around the world. The most relevant are the following. EDF has inaugurated a logistic hub for the supply of spare parts for its 58 operating reactors. Russia has opened a new site to store spent fuels from RBMK reactors. This site is located at Zheleznogorsk near Krasnoiarsk in Siberia. The capacity of the La Hague fuel reprocessing plant is 1700 tonnes a year but the plant processes only between 800 and 1000 tones because most of its foreign contracts have come to an end and have not been renewed. In 2012 the plant is expected to process 1003 tonnes for EDF and 12 tonnes for The Netherlands. AREVA has delivered to the CNNC Chinese company 700 fuel assemblies and 800 control rod clusters. The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) said that there was neither health nor environmental hazards on French soil due to the Fukushima accident. The French Academy of Sciences has highlighted the least sanitary impact of nuclear power compared to other energies. The American Nuclear Safety Association has stated that the American nuclear power plants are safe and that the probability of a severe accident is very low. A new study shows an excess of cases of leukemia near nuclear power stations in France. This study rests on very few statistical cases. An opinion survey in the United Kingdom shows that the construction of nuclear power stations is considered as the best investment in infrastructures. EDF has planned to recruit in 2012 about 6000 people essentially in the nuclear sector. The Netherlands government has given its consent for the construction of the high flux reactor Pallas on the Petten site, this reactor will replace the HFR whose lifetime is over 50 years. (A.C.)

  17. Indonesian News Harvester and Recommender System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Wibowo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To provide convenience for the user that frequently read the news, a system to gather, classify, and provide news from several news websites in one place was needed. This system utilized a recommender system to provide only relevant news to the user. This research proposed a system architecture that used vector space model, and Rocchio relevance feedback to provide specific news recommendation to user’s feedback. The results are that the proposed system architecture can achieve the goal by using five levels of feedback from the user. However, the time needed to gather news is increasing exponentially in line with the number of terms gathered from articles.

  18. LA DECLARACIÓN DE HELSINKI VI: UNA REVISIÓN NECESARIA, PERO ¿SUFICIENTE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. de Abajo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available La quinta modificación de la Declaración de Helsinki (Edimburgo, 2000 ha supuesto un cambio fundamental en la historia de este documento, tras años de debate dentro y fuera de la Asociación Médica Mundial. La Declaración se adoptó en el año 1964 en un intento de demostrar la capacidad autorreguladora de los médicos en el control ético de la investigación con seres humanos. Diversos hechos desgraciados, como el estudio de la sífilis de Tuskegee, confirmaron que dicha autorregulación no era suficiente y que se hacía necesaria una regulación externa, un control público. Paradójicamente, esto no supuso un menoscabo de la importancia de la Declaración, en la medida en que muchas legislaciones la incorporaron como una referencia en su articulado, dotándola, por tanto, de carácter legal. Pero una nueva paradoja se vino a sumar a la anterior: a pesar de su importancia formal, la Declaración había tenido más bien un escaso impacto en el mundo real, si se juzga por el número nada despreciable de ensayos clínicos que la incumplían. Esto se debía fundamentalmente a que la Declaración de Helsinki se basaba en una lógica de la investigación clínica arcaica, a espaldas de todo el desarrollo metodológico moderno. La revisión parecía, pues, inaplazable. En el presente trabajo se analizan estas contradicciones de la Declaración y se evalúa si la revisión de Edimburgo ha permitido superarlas y en qué medida.

  19. Early life origins cognitive decline: findings in elderly men in the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Raikkonen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine whether the adverse effects of slow prenatal and postnatal growth on cognitive function persist to old age and predict age related cognitive decline. DESIGN AND SETTING: A longitudinal birth cohort study of men born in Helsinki, Finland 1934-44. PARTICIPANTS: Nine-hundred-thirty-one men of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study, with detailed data on growth from birth to adulthood, aged 20.1 (SD = 1.4 at the first and 67.9 (SD = 2.5 years at the second cognitive testing. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The Finnish Defense Forces Basic Intellectual Ability Test assessed twice over nearly five decades apart. RESULTS: Lower weight, length and head circumference at birth were associated with lower cognitive ability at 67.9 years (1.04-1.55 points lower ability per each standard deviation [SD] unit decrease in body size, 95% Confidence Interval [95%CI]: 0.05 to 2.72 and with cognitive decline after 20.1 years (0.07-0.11 SD decline over time per each SD decrease in body size, 95%CI:0.00 to 0.19. Men who were born larger were more likely to perform better in the cognitive ability test over time (1.22-1.43 increase in odds to remain in the top relative to the lower two thirds in ability over time per each SD increase in body size, 95%CI:1.04 to 1.79 and were more resilient to cognitive decline after 20.1 years (0.69 to 0.76 decrease in odds to decline from than remain in the top third of ability over time per each SD increase in body size, 95%CI:0.49 to 0.99. Slower growth between birth and two years in weight, height and body mass index was associated with lower cognitive ability at 67.9 years, but not with cognitive decline. CONCLUSIONS: Poorer lifetime cognitive ability is predicted by slower growth before and after birth. In predicting resilience to age related cognitive decline, the period before birth seems to be more critical.

  20. Music Export from Helsinki to Berlin and vice versa. Case study: Face of God and Ill Kommodity

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This is a product - oriented thesis. The aim is to conclude a guidebook about music export for young bands that are interested in playing a show abroad. The project: Music export from Helsinki to Berlin and vice versa. Case study: Face of God and Ill Kommodity, was used to learn from the praxis. The thesis describes the responsibilities of the project manager and brings project management and event planning together. The music export history of Finland and Germany is taken in considerat...

  1. News on pediatric urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Masnata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric urology is a pediatric speciality dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of congenital and acquired genitourinary tract diseases. It is a speciality that is rapidly changing, thanks to the technological development that has been emerging in recent years. There have been important diagnostic and therapeutic news.Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT include various entities of structural malformations that result from defects in their morphogenesis. Clinical research and genetic studies on the origins of CAKUT are quickly evolving, with significant growth of high-quality research.Management goals of CAKUT include prevention of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs in newborns and toddles and renal injury, while minimizing the morbidity of treatment and follow-up. Treatment options include observation with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and surgical correction. Now, randomized controlled studies show that children with normal urinary tracts or low-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis.All children with known mechanical or functional obstructions of the urinary tract are considered to have UTI. Functional obstruction often results from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD of either neurogenic or non-neurogenic origin and dilating VUR.The role of bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD in children with UTI and the long-term risk of renal scarring have shed new light on treatment strategies. Often it is BBD, rather than reflux, that causes UTI in children older than 2 years.Pediatric urology has evolved in recent years, with a greater focus on bladder and renal function, minimally invasive treatment, evidence-based interventions, and guideline adherence. Other topics in pediatric urology include urinary incontinence in children with special needs and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS in children, with advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery

  2. The effects of a three-year smoking prevention programme in secondary schools in Helsinki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Erkki; Pennanen, Marjaana; Haukkala, Ari; Dijk, Froukje; Lehtovuori, Riku; De Vries, Hein

    2007-06-01

    This study evaluates the effects of a 3-year smoking prevention programme in secondary schools in Helsinki. The study is part of the European Smoking prevention Framework Approach (ESFA), in which Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the UK participated. A total of 27 secondary schools in Finland participated in the programme (n = 1821). Schools were randomised into experimental (13) and control groups (14). The programme included 14 information lessons about smoking and refusal skills training. The 3-year smoking prevention programme was also integrated into the standard curriculum. The community-element of the programme included parents, parish confirmation camps and dentists. The schools in the experimental group received the prevention programme and the schools in the control group received the standard health education curriculum. Among baseline never smokers (60.8%), the programme had a significant effect on the onset of weekly smoking in the experimental group [OR = 0.63 (0.45-0.90) P = 0.009] when compared with the control group. Being female, doing poorly at school, having parents and best friends who smoke and more pocket money to spend compared with others were associated with an increased likelihood of daily and weekly smoking onset. These predictors did not have an interaction effect with the experimental condition. This study shows that a school- and community-based smoking prevention programme can prevent smoking onset among adolescents.

  3. Lead, cadmium, and mercury contents of fungi in the Helsinki area and in unpolluted control areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuusi, T.; Liukkonen-Lilja, H.; Piepponen, S.; Laaksovirta, K.; Lodenius, M.

    1981-10-01

    More than 40 species of wild-growing fungi in Finland have been investigated with regard to their contents of lead, cadmium and mercury. A total of 326 samples was studied, 242 being from the urban area of Helsinki and 84 from unpolluted rural areas. The lead content ranged from < 0.5 to 78 mg/kg of dry matter. In the control areas the mean contents for the different species ranged from < 0.5 to 13 mg/kg, and in the urban area from 0.5 to 16.8 mg/kg. The cadmium content ranged from < 0.2 to 101 mg/kg of dry matter. In the control areas the mean contents for the different species ranged from < 0.2 to 16.8 mg/kg, and in the urban area from < 0.2 to 17.3 mg/kg. The mercury content ranged from < 0.01 to 95 mg/kg of dry matter. In the rural areas the mean contents for the diferent species ranged from 0.03 to 4.2 mg/kg, and in the urban area from 0.02 to 14.1 mg/kg. In conclusion, consumption of those fungi that grow in unpolluted rural areas carries no risk, particularly when they belong to mycorrhizal species. In urban areas the risk is somewhat greater. The Agaricus species show the highest contents of the metals studied and their use as food requires caution.

  4. Multilevel climate policy: the case of the European Union, Finland and Helsinki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monni, S.; Raes, F.

    2008-01-01

    Mitigation of climate change requires action at all the different levels, from the international to the national and the local levels. This contribution presents a case study of the city of Helsinki in Finland. An ex-post approach is used to follow the implementation of the EU directives to the national and further to the city level and to identify the relevant voluntary action taken in the city. We find that the coherence of national and city level policies is the highest in regulated areas, such as waste management and building regulation. Voluntary action is easily taken at local level in areas where co-benefits can be expected: e.g. energy conservation and biofuels for transportation. These voluntary actions can show the feasibility of certain measures which can later on be implemented at national or supranational level. We observe a clear contradiction between the EU and national renewable electricity targets and the nonaction at the city level: local conditions and private interests pose barriers to the implementation of a climate policy. We conclude that the coherence between policies at different levels develops over time and international requirements as well as local conditions can be drivers for it. Cities in particular play a role in mitigating climate change through removing barriers for the implementation of national and EU policies, and through moving forward with and promoting innovative voluntary measures, e.g. through international city networks

  5. Personal carbon monoxide exposures of preschool children in Helsinki, Finland: levels and determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, S.; Mukala, K.; Jantunen, M. J.

    Personal CO exposures of 194 preschool children were measured with personal exposure monitors during a 24 week sampling period from fall 1990 to spring 1991 in Helsinki, Finland. Arithmetic mean of the maximum 1 and 8 h exposure levels were 6.0 and 3.3 mg m -3. The then Finnish ambient air quality guideline values for 1/8 h maximum CO level (30/10 mg m -3) were exceeded in 2/4% of the children's daily maximum 1/8 h exposure levels. Gas stove at home, parents, especially mother, smoking in the home, and living in high rise buildings — reflecting higher local population and traffic density — increased the children's CO exposures. The presence of a fireplace in the home was associated with decreased CO exposures. Father's high education reduced the children's CO exposure while mother's education level had no significant effect. The peak (15 min) exposure levels of the children commuting to day care center by car or bus were higher than those of the children who walked or came by bike.

  6. The role of SSDL-Helsinki for dosimetry and quality audit in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, P [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-08-01

    Quality and dosimetry audit in radiotherapy has in Finland been implemented through inspections carried out by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). In connection with the Radiation Metrology Laboratory of the Centre, the SSDL-Helsinki, there is a section for radiotherapy supervision. The inspection by STUK is an independent review of the quality and dosimetry control system which can be called quality and dosimetry audit by site visits. STUK is the responsible authority for the supervision of all use of radiation in Finland and that is why it also can set up requirements on the basis of results of the review. The disagreement of the measuring results between STUK and the radiotherapy department, of more than a given action level, will always lead to a thorough investigation of the reason and to a discussion of the most reliable results to be used for the treatments. The inspections include dose calibration for conventional X-ray therapy equipment and dose comparison, including field size dependence, for high energy equipment. For afterloading equipment the reference air kerma rate is checked. Additionally, the inspections by STUK include checks of the performance characteristics of the equipment and the accomplishment and the results of quality control procedures. Further, methods are currently being developed to supplement the direct measurements by TL-measurements in special phantoms in order to include the whole treatment chain (e.g. the treatment planning system) in the audit. (author). 7 refs, 1 tab.

  7. [Registration of observational studies: it is time to comply with the Declaration of Helsinki requirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Delgado, Miguel; Bolumar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Publication bias is a serious deficiency in the current system of disseminating the results of human research studies. Clinical investigators know that, from an ethical standpoint, they should prospectively register clinical trials in a public registry before starting them. In addition, it is believed that this approach will help to reduce publication bias. However, most studies conducted in humans are observational rather than experimental. It is estimated that less than 2% out of 2 million concluded or ongoing observational studies have been registered. The 2013 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki requires registration of any type of research study involving humans or identifiable samples or data. It is proposed that funding agencies, such as the Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias, as well as private companies, require preregistration of observational studies before providing funding. It is also proposed that Research Ethics Committees which, following Spanish regulation, have been using the Declaration as the framework for assessing the ethics of clinical trials with medicines since 1990, should follow the same provisions for the assessment of health-related observational studies: therefore, they should require prospective registration of studies before granting their final approval. This would allow observational study investigators to be educated in complying with an ethical requirement recently introduced in the most important ethical code for research involving humans. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Knotworking in Academic Libraries: Two Case Studies from the University of Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yrjö Engeström

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Librarians in academic libraries are facing major changes in their work due to, e.g., the internet, digitization, and increasing use of new channels for information retrieval by their most important clients, namely researchers. This creates challenges for librarians: both to deepen their own expertise and to develop innovative service models for their clients. In this paper we present a development project entitled ‘Knotworking in the Library’ from the Helsinki University Library. The project made use of the Change Laboratory method, which is an intensive developmental effort which facilitates improvements in the activities of organizations and changes in the organizational culture. The process started in Viikki Campus Library in 2009–2010 and continued in the City Centre Campus Library in 2010–2011. The aim was to create new kinds of partnership between libraries and research groups in the form of knotworking. By knotworking we mean a boundary-crossing, collective problem-solving way of organizing work. The knotworking model presented in this paper generated practical tools to assist selected research groups in dealing with data management related-issues.

  9. Transfusion practice in Helsinki University Central Hospital: an analysis of diagnosis-related groups (DRG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrjälä, M T; Kytöniemi, I; Mikkolainen, K; Ranimo, J; Lauharanta, J

    2001-12-01

    Transfusion data combined with data automatically recorded in hospital databases provides an outstanding tool for blood utilization reporting. When the reporting is performed with an online analytical processing (OLAP) tool, real time reporting can be provided to blood subscribers. When this data is combined with a common patient classification system, Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG), it is possible to produce statistical results, that are similar in different institutions and may provide a means for international transfusion bench-marking and cost comparison. We use a DRG classification to describe the transfusion practice in Helsinki University Central Hospital. The key indicators include the percentage of transfused patients, the number of transfused units and costs in different DRG groups, as well as transfusion rates per DRG weighted treatment episodes. Ninety-three per cent of all transfusions could be classified into different DRGs. The largest blood-using DRG group was acute adult leukaemia (DRG 473), which accounted for 10.4% of all transfusion costs. The 13 largest blood consuming DRGs accounted for half the total costs in 1998. Currently, there is a lack of an internationally accepted standardized way to report institutional or national transfusion practices. DRG-based transfusion reporting might serve as a means for transfusion benchmarking and thus aid studies of variations in transfusion practice.

  10. Personal carbon monoxide exposures of preschool children in Helsinki, Finland - comparison to ambient air concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, S.; Mukala, K.; Tittanen, P.; Jantunen, M.J. [KTL National Public Health Institute, Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Health

    2001-07-01

    The associations of personal carbon monoxide (CO) exposures with ambient air CO concentrations measured at fixed monitoring sites, were studied among 194 children aged 3-6yr in four downtown and four suburban day-care centers in Helsinki, Finland. Each child carried a personal CO exposure monitor between 1 and 4 times for a time period of between 20 and 24h. CO concentrations at two fixed monitoring sites were measured simultaneously. The CO concentrations measured at the fixed monitoring sites were usually lower (mean maximum 8-h concentration: 0.9 and 2.6mgm{sup -3}) than the personal CO exposure concentrations (mean maximum 8-h concentration: 3.3mgm{sup -3}).The fixed site CO concentrations were poor predictors of the personal CO exposure concentrations. However, the correlations between the personal CO exposure and the fixed monitoring site CO concentrations increased (-0.03 -- -0.12 to 0.13-0.16) with increasing averaging times from 1 to 8h. Also, the fixed monitoring site CO concentrations explained the mean daily or weekly personal CO exposures of a group of simultaneously measured children better than individual exposure CO concentrations. This study suggests that the short-term CO personal exposure of children cannot be meaningfully assessed using fixed monitoring sites. (author)

  11. Just News 20 Final

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    and accounting for almost 80% of export earnings. However, as Bangladesh increasingly shifts to non-farm employment, a new generation faces challenges finding good jobs in this country of more than 165 million people. While changes in the employment landscape have brought many benefits, most. Bangladeshis still ...

  12. Report of the ninth meeting of the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission - Helsinki Commission (HELCOM). Convention on the Protection of the Marine Environment of the Baltic Sea Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-07-01

    This document is the report of the ninth meeting of the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission - the Helsinki Commission - held in Helsinki 15-19 February 1988. The Commission is composed of the representatives of Denmark, Finland, Federal Republic of Germany, Poland, Sweden and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics as well as national, regional and international organizations. The Meeting made a number of proposals and recommendations on the protection of the marine environment.

  13. Report of the ninth meeting of the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission - Helsinki Commission (HELCOM). Convention on the Protection of the Marine Environment of the Baltic Sea Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This document is the report of the ninth meeting of the Baltic Marine Environment Protection Commission - the Helsinki Commission - held in Helsinki 15-19 February 1988. The Commission is composed of the representatives of Denmark, Finland, Federal Republic of Germany, Poland, Sweden and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics as well as national, regional and international organizations. The Meeting made a number of proposals and recommendations on the protection of the marine environment

  14. "Good mothering" or "good citizenship"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Maree; Kerridge, Ian H; Jordens, Christopher F C

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood banking is one of many biomedical innovations that confront pregnant women with new choices about what they should do to secure their own and their child's best interests. Many mothers can now choose to donate their baby's umbilical cord blood (UCB) to a public cord blood bank or pay to store it in a private cord blood bank. Donation to a public bank is widely regarded as an altruistic act of civic responsibility. Paying to store UCB may be regarded as a "unique opportunity" to provide "insurance" for the child's future. This paper reports findings from a survey of Australian women that investigated the decision to either donate or store UCB. We conclude that mothers are faced with competing discourses that force them to choose between being a "good mother" and fulfilling their role as a "good citizen." We discuss this finding with reference to the concept of value pluralism.

  15. Exploiting Tri-Relationship for Fake News Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Wang, Suhang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming popular nowadays. The low cost, easy access and rapid information dissemination of social media bring benefits for people to seek out news timely. However, it also causes the widespread of fake news, i.e., low-quality news pieces that are intentionally fabricated. The fake news brings about several negative effects on individual consumers, news ecosystem, and even society trust. Previous fake news detection methods mainly focus on news contents fo...

  16. News Consumption and Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Xiang; Miklos Sarvary

    2007-01-01

    Bias in the market for news is well-documented. Recent research in economics explains the phenomenon by assuming that consumers want to read (watch) news that is consistent with their tastes or prior beliefs rather than the truth. The present paper builds on this idea but recognizes that (i) besides “biased” consumers, there are also “conscientious” consumers whose sole interest is in discovering the truth, and (ii) consistent with reality, media bias is constrained by the truth. These two fa...

  17. Assessing News Contagion in Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Cerchiello; Giancarlo Nicola

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of news in the financial context has gained a prominent interest in the last years. This is because of the possible predictive power of such content especially in terms of associated sentiment/mood. In this paper, we focus on a specific aspect of financial news analysis: how the covered topics modify according to space and time dimensions. To this purpose, we employ a modified version of topic model LDA, the so-called Structural Topic Model (STM), that takes into account covariat...

  18. How to Spot Fake News?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çev.: Fatih Canata

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is a key skill in media and information literacy, and the mission of libraries is to educate and advocate its importance. Discussions about fake news has led to a new focus on media literacy more broadly, and the role of libraries and other education institutions in providing this. When Oxford Dictionaries announce post-truth is Word of the Year 2016, as librarians realise action is needed to educate and advocate for critical thinking – a crucial skill when navigating the information society, an infographic with eight simple steps have been prepared by IFLA to discover the verifiability of a given news-piece in front of you.

  19. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: an exploration of competitive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.; Beentjes, J.; Nuijten, K.; Peeters, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  20. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: An exploration of competitive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Beentjes, J.W.J.; Nuijten, C.M.; Peeters, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  1. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Xin; Liang Yu; Cao Sanxing; Gu Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  2. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  3. Emotional Mining: Tagging Emoticons to Online News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Vinothini; Mustapha, Aida; Zhi Yong, Lee; Aida Zamnah, Z. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an emotion mining system, which assigns emoticons to newspaper articles into a pre-defined emotion category based on the underlying emotion in the news. Next, the system makes recommendation to the reader by tagging the news headline with the respective emoticons. Users are then able to decide whether to read the news based on the emoticons provided. The system also provides a filter for the users to choose the category of news to read following the emoticons.

  4. Move! Eat better: news

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Are you curious to know whether you’re doing enough daily exercise…? Test yourself with a pedometer!   Through the Move! Eat better campaign, launched in May 2012, the CERN medical service is aiming to improve the health of members of the personnel by encouraging them to prioritise physical activity in conjunction with a balanced diet. Various successful activities have already taken place: relay race/Nordic walk, Bike2work, Zumba and fitness workshops, two conferences (“Physical activity for health” and “Good nutrition every day”), events in the restaurants, as well as posters and a website. Although everyone has got the message from our various communications that physical activity is good for your health, there is still a relevant question being asked: “What is the minimum amount of exercise recommended?” 10,000 steps per day is the ideal figure, which has been demonstrated as beneficial by scientific studies ...

  5. Visualizing news: obstacles, challenges, and solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Piet Bakker; Gerard Smit; Yael de Haan; Laura Buijs

    2013-01-01

    Depicting news graphically is considered an apt way to deal with challenges of modern journalism: to disclose big data, and present news attractively, visually, and fast to grasp. This study delves into reported obstacles and challenges for the production of news visualizations. It focuses on the

  6. Perceptions of Advertising Influence on Broadcast News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hubert W.; Barnes, Beth E.

    2001-01-01

    Finds that while students (studying broadcast journalism or advertising) and practitioners (station news directors and agency media directors) were in agreement on the majority of opinion statements discussing advertising's influence on broadcast news content, except students were less bothered by advertising's influence on news content than were…

  7. The News Media as a Political Institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Allern, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    : what new roles, if any, are news organizations and journalists playing in the political system? What are the characteristics of these new roles, and how do news organizations use their newfound political power? We address these questions in the context of an institutional approach to the news coupled...... with Hallin and Mancini's analysis of media systems....

  8. Linking online news and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; de Rijke, M.; Weerkamp, W.

    2011-01-01

    Much of what is discussed in social media is inspired by events in the news and, vice versa, social media provide us with a handle on the impact of news events. We address the following linking task: given a news article, find social media utterances that implicitly reference it. We follow a

  9. Product Differentiation in Local Television News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Tony

    A study was conducted to investigate the extent to which local television stations exhibited diversity in newscast content within three midwest broadcast markets. A second objective was to describe the nature of the news content characteristic of local news stories that were broadcast by only one station within a market (or unique news stories). A…

  10. Making the News: Jobs in TV Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorny, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    What do TV news workers do each day? For many of them, contributing to daily news broadcasts has changed greatly over the years. This evolution will likely continue for years to come. And more changes to news production are expected, according to Tom Weir, an associate professor at the University of South Carolina's School of Journalism and Mass…

  11. News Resources on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notess, Greg R.

    1996-01-01

    Describes up-to-date news sources that are presently available on the Internet and World Wide Web. Highlights include electronic newspapers; AP (Associated Press) sources and Reuters; sports news; stock market information; New York Times; multimedia capabilities, including CNN Interactive; and local and regional news. (LRW)

  12. Semantic Analysis of FBI News Reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our work on semantic analysis of FBI News reports. In the paper we have considered the News which are of the immense significance for the analyst who want to analyze the News of specific area. With this definite analysis we are able to extract critical events or concepts...

  13. Detecting Terrorism Incidence Type from News Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the experiments to detect terrorism incidence type from news summary data. We have applied classification techniques on news summary data to analyze the incidence and detect the type of incidence. A number of experiments are conducted using various classification algorithms...... and results show that a simple decision tree classifier can learn incidence type with satisfactory results from news data....

  14. Daily Market News Sentiment and Stock Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the influx of news related to traded assets in international financial markets. This financial news is now available via print media but also through real-time online sources such as internet news and social media sources. The

  15. Possible Courses for News and Public Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Richard C.

    1978-01-01

    Live programming, regular daily news programs, and documentary series, which are suggested as solutions to the limited scope of news and public affairs air time, would enable PBS to increase its coverage of news and public affairs. Some suggestions are also made for restructuring the functions of stations within the system to facilitate this…

  16. NEWS: Eclipse matters (still)!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This collection of snippets has as its theme the 1999 Solar Eclipse, and covers items that might be of interest to eclipse watchers and their associates. Much information can be obtained from the national web site at http://www.eclipse.org.uk. Set up by the CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, on behalf of the UK Eclipse Group, the site is intended to keep viewers abreast of developments during the countdown to the eclipse. The list of contents includes: about eclipses; eclipse pictures; eclipse science; safety advice; latest news; and local information. There is also a wealth of images and video footage, so the site has been organized with the visitor having a small PC and modem in mind, so that the key information can be accessed as quickly as possible. Free colour leaflets containing useful details for eclipse watchers can be obtained from the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council. `The Sun - our local star' and `Neutrinos' are additions to PPARC's series introducing key areas of its science. They answer such questions as what the Sun is, what eclipses are, why the Sun is important and where neutrinos come from. They support the National Curriculum Key Stages 3 and 4 plus A-level physics. The A5 leaflets open out into an A2 sized double-sided wall chart and bulk quantitites are available for class sets, visitor centres, exhibitions, open days etc. A full list of PPARC materials can be found at the website http://www.pparc.ac.uk or by order from Mark Wells, PPARC, Polaris House, North Star Avenue, Swindon SN2 1SZ (fax: 01793 442002). A message has been received from George Care, Head of Physics in the Science Department at Mounts Bay School, Penzance, which we now pass on to our readers. During his application for electronic access to Physics Education via the Institute of Physics Affiliated Schools and Colleges scheme, George notes that his school is on the track of the eclipse this summer and he has invited us to pass on the details to anyone who

  17. Fake news propagate differently from real news even at early stages of spreading

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zilong; Zhao, Jichang; Sano, Yukie; Levy, Orr; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2018-01-01

    Social media can be a double-edged sword for modern communications, either a convenient channel exchanging ideas or an unexpected conduit circulating fake news through a large population. Existing studies of fake news focus on efforts on theoretical modelling of propagation or identification methods based on black-box machine learning, neglecting the possibility of identifying fake news using only structural features of propagation of fake news compared to those of real news and in particular...

  18. The Dutch and the news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemarie Wennekers; Jos de Haan

    2017-01-01

    Original title: Nederlanders en nieuws For a long time, the television and newspapers were the most prominent news sources in the Netherlands, but digitalisation and the rise of new media have caused major shifts in the media landscape. Based on a time use survey focusing on media (Media:Tijd

  19. Journalism and Explaining News Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albæk, E.; Skovsgaard, M.; de Vreese, C.H.; Nussbaum, J.F.

    Three models are presented to explain variation in news content. In the first model the explanation is based on the individual journalist, in the second model on the professional journalist, and in the third model on the organized journalist. The individual journalist model focuses on how the

  20. Myth, Method and International News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lule, Jack

    Defining myth as a cultural narrative in symbolic form that articulates a world view and offers consensus with that view, this paper uses a brief "New York Times" report on the Soviet shooting down of South Korean airline flight 007 as the basis for comparison of international news and myth. Following a review of the literature on myth…

  1. How to Tell Bad News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  2. Customized News in Your Mailbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudich, Joe

    1996-01-01

    Customized Internet services deliver news and selected research via e-mail, fax, Web browser, or their own software. Some are clipping services while others are full-fledged online newspapers. Most charge a monthly subscription fee, but a few are free to registered users. Provides the addresses, cost, scope, and evaluation of eight services. (PEN)

  3. Done good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, A L

    2015-01-01

    How did bioethics manage to grow, flourish and ultimately do so well from a very unpromising birth in the 1970s? Many explanations have been advanced. Some ascribe the field's growth to a puzzling, voluntary abnegation of moral authority by medicine to non-physicians. Some think bioethics survived by selling out to the biomedical establishment-public and private. This transaction involved bestowing moral approbation on all manner of biomedicine's doings for a seat at a well-stocked funding table. Some see a sort of clever intellectual bamboozlement at work wherein bioethicists pitched a moral elixir of objective expertise that the morally needy but unsophisticated in medicine and the biological sciences were eager to swallow. While each of these reasons has its defenders, I think the main reason that bioethics did well was that it did good. By using the media to move into the public arena, the field engaged the public imagination, provoked dialogue and debate, and contributed to policy changes that benefitted patients and healthcare providers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Planeteria: news from France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, J.; Acker, A.; Delfosse, X.

    2011-10-01

    France has a good network of planetaria. They are linked through a network called Association of the French Speaking Planetaria. In this talk, I will present this organization and its different activities. I will also report on the making of a Art and Science museum in Grenoble which will include a planetarium. The grand opening is foreseen in 2014. Finally, I will present an astronomical show which has been adapted for planetaria and demonstrate how this benefits both to the show and the planetarium.

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of turbulent vertical fluxes in Helsinki, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvi, L.; Nordbo, A.; Haapanala, S.; Moilanen, J.; Vesala, T.

    2012-04-01

    The eddy-covariance technique has been widely used above vegetated surfaces to measure the turbulent exchange of momentum, heat and gases between the surface and the atmosphere. Above an urban surface, however, observations are scarce and complex measurement surroundings bring challenges to the measurements and the representativeness of the fluxes in a city scale. The fluxes of sensible (QH) and latent heat (QE), and CO2 (Fc) have been measured at three sites in Helsinki, Finland. At the SMEAR III station the measurements have been ongoing since December 2005 and the site is located next to a busy road about 4 km from downtown Helsinki. Two of the sites, Erottaja Fire Station (EFS) and Hotel Torni (HT), are located in downtown within a distance of 400 meters from each other. In EFS, the measurements have been carried out in June 2010 - January 2011, while in HT, the measurements have been ongoing since September 2010. The present dataset allows the studying of the inter-site variability of the exchange processes. Simultaneous measurements from all three sites cover four months in autumn/winter time. The high-latitude location allows a detailed examination of the effect of seasonal variation to the exchange processes. QH tends to be higher in city centre than in SMEAR III and a difference of 50 W m-2 is observed in winter. During the simultaneous measurements, stable atmospheric stratification is observed half of the time at SMEAR III whereas the occurrence in the city centre is less than 5%. This is a result of the urban heat island effect which is stronger in downtown than in the outside region. On the other hand, higher QE is measured in SMEAR III than in downtown particularly during spring and summer months when a difference of 100 W m-2 is observed. In downtown the low fraction of green areas limits the evaporation. Despite the short distance there are also differences between the two downtown sites. Both the median QH and QE are 7 W m-2 smaller in EFS than in

  6. Abstracts of the 4th International MELODI Workshop 12 -14 September 2012, Helsinki, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulonen, N.

    2012-08-01

    The Fourth International MELODI Workshop is organized by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Helsinki, Finland, on 12-14 September 2012. The workshop offers an update of recent low-dose research issues, and an opportunity to participate in the MELODI Low Dose Research Platform, a major step in the long term goals that the European Low-Dose Risk research intends to achieve. The main goal of MELODI is to develop and maintain a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) in the field of low-dose radiation research, and to actively promote its implementation. DoReMi Network of Excellence funded by the European Commission is supporting the setting up of the Platform and addressing some of its research needs. In line with one of the main SRA goals, a major aim of the workshop was to set all topics in an interdisciplinary context. The Workshop abstracts cover plenary lectures as well as poster presentations related to topical discussions in breakout sessions. The theme of the first day 'Low dose risk research - state of the art' provides an introduction to the MELODI activities and the SRA and an update on recent epidemiological studies and dosimetric aspects of low dose studies. Potential implications of cardiovascular disease risk for radiation protection are also addressed. Discussion on the state-of-the art of MELODI SRA took place in three break-out groups addressing epidemiological approaches, cancer mechanisms and models and infrastructures and knowledge management. The second day 'Emerging scientific challenges' features the development of science and novel technologies, covering topics such as epigenetics, systems biology, stem cells as well as biomarkers that could be potentially used in molecular epidemiological studies. The associated breakout sessions explore the roadmap for future research, covering themes on biomarkers and biobanks, non-cancer effects, as well as low dose dosimetry and dose concept. The third day 'Integrating the research' provides

  7. Modelling and measurements of urban aerosol processes on the neighborhood scale in Rotterdam, Oslo and Helsinki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, M.; Kukkonen, J.; Keuken, M. P.; Lützenkirchen, S.; Pirjola, L.; Hussein, T.

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluates the influence of aerosol processes on the particle number (PN) concentrations in three major European cities on the temporal scale of one hour, i.e. on the neighborhood and city scales. We have used selected measured data of particle size distributions from previous campaigns in the cities of Helsinki, Oslo and Rotterdam. The aerosol transformation processes were evaluated using an aerosol dynamics model MAFOR, combined with a simplified treatment of roadside and urban atmospheric dispersion. We have compared the model predictions of particle number size distributions with the measured data, and conducted sensitivity analyses regarding the influence of various model input variables. We also present a simplified parameterization for aerosol processes, which is based on the more complex aerosol process computations; this simple model can easily be implemented to both Gaussian and Eulerian urban dispersion models. Aerosol processes considered in this study were (i) the coagulation of particles, (ii) the condensation and evaporation of n-alkanes, and (iii) dry deposition. The chemical transformation of gas-phase compounds was not taken into account. It was not necessary to model the nucleation of gas-phase vapors, as the computations were started with roadside conditions. Dry deposition and coagulation of particles were identified to be the most important aerosol dynamic processes that control the evolution and removal of particles. The effect of condensation and evaporation of organic vapors emitted by vehicles on particle numbers and on particle size distributions was examined. Under inefficient dispersion conditions, condensational growth contributed significantly to the evolution of PN from roadside to the neighborhood scale. The simplified parameterization of aerosol processes can predict particle number concentrations between roadside and the urban background with an inaccuracy of ∼ 10 %, compared to the fully size-resolved MAFOR model.

  8. Educational differences in sickness absence trends among young employees from 2002 to 2013 in Helsinki, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanen, Hilla; Lahelma, Eero; Lahti, Jouni; Pietiläinen, Olli; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2016-05-06

    Socioeconomic differences in sickness absence (SA) are well established among older employees but poorly understood among the young. Our aim was to examine 12-year trends in educational differences in SA among young female and male employees, and to assess the magnitude of the differences. We examined annual SA spells. The data were obtained from the employer's registers and linked to Statistics Finland's register data on completed education and qualifications. Education was classified into four hierarchical groups. Joinpoint regression models were used to identify turning points in SA trends. The magnitude of the relative educational differences was estimated in accordance with the relative index of inequality for 2002, 2008 and 2013. Employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, in 2002-2013. The analyses covered female and male employees aged 25-34 years: employees aged 35-54 years were used as a reference group. SA spells. An educational gradient emerged among younger and older women and men. SA spells increased in the early 2000s, and downward turning points were located in 2007-2010 in all educational groups among women and in most groups among men. The magnitude of the differences remained broadly stable among younger women from 2002 to 2013, and decreased slightly among older women and more strongly among younger and older men. The educational differences were greater among men than women in the early 2000s, but similar among both at the end of the study period. The changes in SA spells may reflect the economic downturn started in 2008 and resulting job insecurity. Early preventive measures aimed at reducing educational differences in SA should be focused at an early stage on those with low levels of education in particular. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Joint associations of sleep duration and insomnia symptoms with subsequent sickness absence: the Helsinki Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, Tea; Haaramo, Peija; Rahkonen, Ossi; Sivertsen, Børge

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to examine the joint associations of sleep duration and insomnia symptoms with subsequent sickness absence of various lengths while considering several covariates. Baseline surveys among 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, (N = 6535) were prospectively linked with employer's personnel register data comprising short self-certified (1-3 days), medically-certified intermediate (4-14 days) and long (15 days or more) sickness absence spells. Average follow-up time was 4.1 years. Sleep duration, insomnia symptoms, sociodemographics, working conditions, health behaviours and health were self-reported in the surveys. Poisson regression analysis was used. Insomnia symptoms were associated with sickness absence at all levels of sleep duration. Adjusting for gender and age, U-shaped associations regarding sleep hours were found. Thus, those reporting short or long sleep and reporting insomnia symptoms had a higher risk for medically-certified intermediate and long sickness absence as compared to those reporting 7 hours of sleep without insomnia symptoms. Also, those reporting 6, 7, and 8 hours of sleep had a higher risk for such sickness absence, if they reported insomnia. Weak associations were also found for self-certified sickness absence, and for those reporting short and long sleep without insomnia. Adjustments attenuated the associations, but they mainly remained. These results suggest primacy of the effects of insomnia symptoms over sleep duration on sickness absence. Although insomnia dominated the joint association, U-shaped associations suggest that both sleep duration and insomnia symptoms need to be considered to promote work ability.

  10. The shifting cross-media news landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Steeg Larsen, Bent

    2010-01-01

    and lifestyles. Theoretically the study is anchored in Habermas’s notion of the public sphere, and its recent reconceptualizations in theories of ‘cultural citizenship’, 'civic agency' and 'public connection'. The project operationalizes these theories through the concept of users' perceived “worthwhileness......The article offers new insights for democracy and for news producers by mapping the use and users of today’s cross-media news landscape, as the everyday consumption of news across the range of available news media and formats is shifting as a result of transformations of technology, culture......” of news media, a user-anchored concept which incorporates the different functionalities of the situational cross-media use of news by citizen/consumers in everyday life. Empirically the article presents the findings of a large-scale survey that traces the imminent challenges facing players in the news...

  11. Navigating cross-media news use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    distinctive cross-media repertoires, and what makes these compositions meaningful. This article analyzes the value of different platforms, genres and practices in everyday life by mapping patterns of cross-media news use. Combining Q methodology with think-aloud protocols and day-in-the-life-interviews, five...... distinct news media repertoires are identified: 1) regionally-oriented 2) background-oriented 3) digital 4) laid-back and 5) nationally-oriented news use. Our findings indicate that users do not always use what they prefer, nor do they prefer what they use. Moreover, the boundaries they draw between news......The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble...

  12. Exploring Digital News Publishing Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindskow, Kasper

    News publishers in the industrialized world are experiencing a fundamental challenge to their business models because of the changing modes of consumption, competition, and production of their offerings that are associated with the emergence of the networked information society. The erosion...... of the traditional business models poses an existential threat to news publishing and has given rise to a continuing struggle among news publishers to design digital business models that will be sustainable in the future. This dissertation argues that a central and underresearched aspect of digital news publishing...... business models concerns the production networks that support the co-production of digital news offerings. To fill this knowledge gap, this dissertation explores the strategic design of the digital news publishing production networks that are associated with HTML-based news offerings on the open Web...

  13. News from the Library

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2010-01-01

    Discover more literature and be aware of the most popular articles! For years particle physicists have  enjoyed monitoring the most cited articles thanks to the Spires system. This is obviously an important feature that is also carried forward by Inspire, a system currently available in its beta version. For colleagues based at CERN working in closely related disciplines or in technological areas, no system has been available to monitor the most cited articles within the various specific topics. As a result of the rapid changes in the information landscape, the Library is currently streamlining the set of databases CERN subscribes to. In this context the Library is now making  different services available for site-wide evaluation. Thomson Web of Knowledge is a platform that integrates over 100 years of scientific literature and citations, covering more than 256 disciplines. This tool offers various interesting features, including the citation report, which can be a good sourc...

  14. Research and Practice of the News Map Compilation Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Liu, W.; Ma, W.

    2018-04-01

    Based on the needs of the news media on the map, this paper researches on the news map compilation service, conducts demand research on the service of compiling news maps, designs and compiles the public authority base map suitable for media publication, and constructs the news base map material library. It studies the compilation of domestic and international news maps with timeliness and strong pertinence and cross-regional characteristics, constructs the hot news thematic gallery and news map customization services, conducts research on types of news maps, establish closer liaison and cooperation methods with news media, and guides news media to use correct maps. Through the practice of the news map compilation service, this paper lists two cases of news map preparation services used by different media, compares and analyses cases, summarizes the research situation of news map compilation service, and at the same time puts forward outstanding problems and development suggestions in the service of news map compilation service.

  15. The Dynamic Cross-Correlations between Mass Media News, New Media News, and Stock Returns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuochao Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic cross-correlations between mass media news, new media news, and stock returns for the SSE 50 Index in Chinese stock market by employing the MF-DCCA method. The empirical results show that (1 there exist power-law cross-correlations between two types of news as well as between news and its corresponding SSE 50 Index return; (2 the cross-correlations between mass media news and SSE 50 Index returns show larger multifractality and more complicated structures; (3 mass media news and new media news have both complementary and competitive relationships; (4 with the rolling window analysis, we further find that there is a general increasing trend for the cross-correlations between the two types of news as well as the cross-correlations between news and returns and this trend becomes more persistent over time.

  16. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  17. Fake news in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An article in the National Review by Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry points out that there is considerable waste in healthcare spending (1. He blames much of this on two entitlements-Medicare and employer-sponsored health insurance. He also lays much of the blame on doctors. “Doctors are the biggest villains in American health care. ... As with public-school teachers, we should be able to recognize that a profession as a whole can be pathological even as many individual members are perfectly good actors, and even if many of them are heroes. And just like public-school teachers, the medical profession as a whole puts its own interests ahead of those of the citizens it claims to be dedicated to serve.” Who is Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry and how could he say something so nasty about teachers and my profession? A quick internet search revealed that Mr. Gobry is a fellow at the Ethics & Public Policy Center …

  18. Comparison of OMI NO2 Observations and Their Seasonal and Weekly Cycles with Ground-Based Measurements in Helsinki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ialongo, Iolanda; Herman, Jay; Krotkov, Nick; Lamsal, Lok; Boersma, Folkert; Hovila, Jari; Tamminen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    We present the comparison of satellite-based OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) NO2 products with ground-based observations in Helsinki. OMI NO2 total columns, available from standard product (SP) and DOMINO algorithm, are compared with the measurements performed by the Pandora spectrometer in Helsinki in 2012. The relative difference between Pandora 21 and OMI SP retrievals is 4 and 6 for clear sky and all sky conditions, respectively. DOMINO NO2 retrievals showed slightly lower total columns with median differences about 5 and 14 for clear sky and all sky conditions, respectively. Large differences often correspond to cloudy autumn-winter days with solar zenith angles above 65. Nevertheless, the differences remain within the retrieval uncertainties. Furthermore, the weekly and seasonal cycles from OMI, Pandora and NO2 surface concentrations are compared. Both satellite- and ground-based data show a similar weekly cycle, with lower NO2 levels during the weekend compared to the weekdays as result of reduced emissions from traffic and industrial activities. Also the seasonal cycle shows a similar behavior, even though the results are affected by the fact that most of the data are available during spring-summer because of cloud cover in other seasons. This is one of few works in which OMI NO2 retrievals are evaluated in an urban site at high latitudes (60N). Despite the city of Helsinki having relatively small pollution sources, OMI retrievals have proved to be able to describe air quality features and variability similar to surface observations. This adds confidence in using satellite observations for air quality monitoring also at high latitudes.

  19. Delivering bad news in emergency care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas W

    2017-01-01

    Forecasting is a strategy for delivering bad news and is compared to two other strategies, stalling and being blunt. Forecasting provides some warning that bad news is forthcoming without keeping the recipient in a state of indefinite suspense (stalling) or conveying the news abruptly (being blunt). Forecasting appears to be more effective than stalling or being blunt in helping a recipient to "realize" the bad news because it involves the deliverer and recipient in a particular social relation. The deliverer of bad news initiates the telling by giving an advance indication of the bad news to come; this allows the recipient to calculate the news in advance of its final presentation, when the deliverer confirms what the recipient has been led to anticipate. Thus, realization of bad news emerges from intimate collaboration, whereas stalling and being blunt require recipients to apprehend the news in a social vacuum. Exacerbating disruption to recipients' everyday world, stalling and being blunt increase the probability of misapprehension (denying, blaming, taking the situation as a joke, etc.) and thereby inhibit rather than facilitate realization. Particular attention is paid to the "perspective display sequence", a particular forecasting strategy that enables both confirming the recipient's perspective and using that perspective to affirm the clinical news. An example from acute or emergency medicine is examined at the close of the paper.

  20. News clippings for introductory astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew

    1999-09-01

    Most students entering our introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors arrive not merely lacking scientific facts-they also have misconceptions about the nature of science, and many have a handicapping ``science anxiety'' (in addition to math anxiety). So I have added a ``current science'' requirement to our introductory course. Each student must compile a file of five astronomy news articles taken from readily available sources.

  1. Accuracy and Coverage of Diagnosis and Procedural Coding of Severely Injured Patients in the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register: Comparison to Patient Files and the Helsinki Trauma Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinänen, M; Brinck, T; Handolin, L; Mattila, V M; Söderlund, T

    2017-09-01

    The Finnish Hospital Discharge Register data are frequently used for research purposes. The Finnish Hospital Discharge Register has shown excellent validity in single injuries or disease groups, but no studies have assessed patients with multiple trauma diagnoses. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy and coverage of the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register but at the same time validate the data of the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit. We assessed the accuracy and coverage of the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register data by comparing them to the original patient files and trauma registry files from the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit. We identified a baseline cohort of patients with severe thorax injury from the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit of 2013 (sample of 107 patients). We hypothesized that the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register would lack valuable information about these patients. Using patient files, we identified 965 trauma diagnoses in these 107 patients. From the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register, we identified 632 (65.5%) diagnoses and from the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit, 924 (95.8%) diagnoses. A total of 170 (17.6%) trauma diagnoses were missing from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register data and 41 (4.2%) from the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit data. The coverage and accuracy of diagnoses in the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register were 65.5% (95% confidence interval: 62.5%-68.5%) and 73.8% (95% confidence interval: 70.4%-77.2%), respectively, and for the trauma registry of the Helsinki University Hospital's Trauma Unit, 95.8% (95% confidence interval: 94.5%-97.0%) and 97.6% (95% confidence interval: 96.7%-98.6%), respectively. According to patient records, these patients were subjects in 249 operations. We identified 40 (16.1%) missing operation codes from the Finnish Hospital

  2. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

  3. Second meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Helsinki, 6-9 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The Second Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) was held in Helsinki, Finland, from 6-9 June 1988. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes since the first meeting of IWGATWR in May 1987 in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers presented at the meeting. Figs and tabs

  4. Senior expert symposium on electricity and the environment, Helsinki, Finland, 13-17 May 1991. Key issues papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This volume contains the four Key Issues Papers prepared as background papers by international expert groups for the Senior Expert Symposium on Electricity and the Environment held in Helsinki, Finland in May 1991. The papers are on topics selected as the central themes of the symposium: energy and electricity supply and demand - implications for the global environment; energy sources and technologies for electricity generation; comparative environmental and health effects of different energy systems for electricity generation; and the incorporation of environmental and health impacts into policy, planning and decision making for the electricity sector. The four papers have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Hotels as a target for terrorism: a study of the Helsinki area hotels’ preparedness for an attack

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalevskiy, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    The threat of terrorism is an issue that is not to be taken lightly in the world of today. The year 2015 has sadly been marked with an unsettlingly high number of acts of terror across the globe that claimed a multitude of civilian lives. The hospitality industry and hotels in particular are especially vulnerable to a potential terrorist attack, and this fact attracted the author’s attention to the issue of the prevention of such attacks and the measures (if any) that the Helsinki hotels are ...

  6. Physical and chemical characterization of urban winter-time aerosols by mobile measurements in Helsinki, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, Liisa; Niemi, Jarkko V.; Saarikoski, Sanna; Aurela, Minna; Enroth, Joonas; Carbone, Samara; Saarnio, Karri; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Kousa, Anu; Rönkkö, Topi; Hillamo, Risto

    2017-06-01

    A two-week measurement campaign by a mobile laboratory van was performed in urban environments in the Helsinki metropolitan area, Finland, in winter 2012, to obtain a comprehensive view on aerosol properties and sources. The abundances and physico-chemical properties of particles varied strongly in time and space, depending on the main sources of aerosols. Four major types of winter aerosol were recognized: 1) clean background aerosol with low particle number (Ntot) and lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentrations due to marine air flows from the Atlantic Ocean; 2) long-range transported (LRT) pollution aerosol due to air flows from eastern Europe where the particles were characterized by the high contribution of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) and inorganic species, particularly sulphate, but low BC contribution, and their size distribution possessed an additional accumulation mode; 3) fresh smoke plumes from residential wood combustion in suburban small houses, these particles were characterized by high biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) and black carbon (BC) concentrations; and 4) fresh emissions from traffic while driving on busy streets in the city centre and on the highways during morning rush hours. This aerosol was characterized by high concentration of Ntot, LDSA, small particles in the nucleation mode, as well as high hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and BC concentrations. In general, secondary components (OOA, NO3, NH4, and SO4) dominated the PM1 chemical composition during the LRT episode accounting for 70-80% of the PM1 mass, whereas fresh primary emissions (BC, HOA and BBOA) dominated the local traffic and wood burning emissions. The major individual particle types observed with electron microscopy analysis (TEM/EDX) were mainly related to residential wood combustion (K/S/C-rich, soot, other C-rich particles), traffic (soot, Si/Al-rich, Fe-rich), heavy fuel oil combustion in heat plants or ships (S with V-Ni-Fe), LRT pollutants (S

  7. Modeling and measurements of urban aerosol processes on the neighborhood scale in Rotterdam, Oslo and Helsinki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Keuken, Menno P.; Lützenkirchen, Susanne; Pirjola, Liisa; Hussein, Tareq

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the influence of aerosol processes on the particle number (PN) concentrations in three major European cities on the temporal scale of 1 h, i.e., on the neighborhood and city scales. We have used selected measured data of particle size distributions from previous campaigns in the cities of Helsinki, Oslo and Rotterdam. The aerosol transformation processes were evaluated using the aerosol dynamics model MAFOR, combined with a simplified treatment of roadside and urban atmospheric dispersion. We have compared the model predictions of particle number size distributions with the measured data, and conducted sensitivity analyses regarding the influence of various model input variables. We also present a simplified parameterization for aerosol processes, which is based on the more complex aerosol process computations; this simple model can easily be implemented to both Gaussian and Eulerian urban dispersion models. Aerosol processes considered in this study were (i) the coagulation of particles, (ii) the condensation and evaporation of two organic vapors, and (iii) dry deposition. The chemical transformation of gas-phase compounds was not taken into account. By choosing concentrations and particle size distributions at roadside as starting point of the computations, nucleation of gas-phase vapors from the exhaust has been regarded as post tail-pipe emission, avoiding the need to include nucleation in the process analysis. Dry deposition and coagulation of particles were identified to be the most important aerosol dynamic processes that control the evolution and removal of particles. The error of the contribution from dry deposition to PN losses due to the uncertainty of measured deposition velocities ranges from -76 to +64 %. The removal of nanoparticles by coagulation enhanced considerably when considering the fractal nature of soot aggregates and the combined effect of van der Waals and viscous interactions. The effect of condensation and

  8. Abstracts of the 4th International MELODI Workshop 12 -14 September 2012, Helsinki, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulonen, N. (ed.)

    2012-08-15

    The Fourth International MELODI Workshop is organized by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Helsinki, Finland, on 12-14 September 2012. The workshop offers an update of recent low-dose research issues, and an opportunity to participate in the MELODI Low Dose Research Platform, a major step in the long term goals that the European Low-Dose Risk research intends to achieve. The main goal of MELODI is to develop and maintain a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) in the field of low-dose radiation research, and to actively promote its implementation. DoReMi Network of Excellence funded by the European Commission is supporting the setting up of the Platform and addressing some of its research needs. In line with one of the main SRA goals, a major aim of the workshop was to set all topics in an interdisciplinary context. The Workshop abstracts cover plenary lectures as well as poster presentations related to topical discussions in breakout sessions. The theme of the first day 'Low dose risk research - state of the art' provides an introduction to the MELODI activities and the SRA and an update on recent epidemiological studies and dosimetric aspects of low dose studies. Potential implications of cardiovascular disease risk for radiation protection are also addressed. Discussion on the state-of-the art of MELODI SRA took place in three break-out groups addressing epidemiological approaches, cancer mechanisms and models and infrastructures and knowledge management. The second day 'Emerging scientific challenges' features the development of science and novel technologies, covering topics such as epigenetics, systems biology, stem cells as well as biomarkers that could be potentially used in molecular epidemiological studies. The associated breakout sessions explore the roadmap for future research, covering themes on biomarkers and biobanks, non-cancer effects, as well as low dose dosimetry and dose concept. The third day 'Integrating the

  9. Modeling and measurements of urban aerosol processes on the neighborhood scale in Rotterdam, Oslo and Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the influence of aerosol processes on the particle number (PN concentrations in three major European cities on the temporal scale of 1 h, i.e., on the neighborhood and city scales. We have used selected measured data of particle size distributions from previous campaigns in the cities of Helsinki, Oslo and Rotterdam. The aerosol transformation processes were evaluated using the aerosol dynamics model MAFOR, combined with a simplified treatment of roadside and urban atmospheric dispersion. We have compared the model predictions of particle number size distributions with the measured data, and conducted sensitivity analyses regarding the influence of various model input variables. We also present a simplified parameterization for aerosol processes, which is based on the more complex aerosol process computations; this simple model can easily be implemented to both Gaussian and Eulerian urban dispersion models. Aerosol processes considered in this study were (i the coagulation of particles, (ii the condensation and evaporation of two organic vapors, and (iii dry deposition. The chemical transformation of gas-phase compounds was not taken into account. By choosing concentrations and particle size distributions at roadside as starting point of the computations, nucleation of gas-phase vapors from the exhaust has been regarded as post tail-pipe emission, avoiding the need to include nucleation in the process analysis. Dry deposition and coagulation of particles were identified to be the most important aerosol dynamic processes that control the evolution and removal of particles. The error of the contribution from dry deposition to PN losses due to the uncertainty of measured deposition velocities ranges from −76 to +64 %. The removal of nanoparticles by coagulation enhanced considerably when considering the fractal nature of soot aggregates and the combined effect of van der Waals and viscous interactions. The effect of

  10. Peace Journalism and the news production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Bläsi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years various models of „peace journalism“ or „constructive conflict coverage“ have been proposed. These models suggest alternative ways of conflict reporting in order to contribute to processes of de-escalation, peacebuilding and reconciliation instead of escalating, exaggerating or neglecting conflicts. However, these models will remain irrelevant for the practical work of journalists unless they are connected to the reality of today’s media. Therefore it is of great importance to also direct our attention to the news production process. At the same time, studying the factors that influence the production of journalistic reporting in times of conflict and war means learning about the actual preconditions for any effort of constructive conflict coverage. Based on qualitative expert interviews with German journalists, this paper presents a model of the production process of conflict coverage. According to this model, the production process can be described as a complex interaction of six factors: (1 structural aspects of the media, (2 conflict situation on-site, (3 personal features of the individual journalist, (4 the political climate, (5 lobbies, (6 the audience. After presenting the general model and the discussion of its limitations and possible benefits, the influence of the „political climate“ factor is explored in more detail and illustrated with the experience of German journalists in the aftermath of 9/11. The author argues that peace journalism can only attract the critical number of journalists needed for a noticeable change in conflict coverage, if there are realizable suggestions for how to meet the obstacles journalists face in their daily work. The model of influencing factors affecting conflict coverage could be a good starting point for this undertaking, as it enables us, on the one hand, to systematize and specify attempts to implement peace journalism and, on the other hand, to develop a more

  11. NEWS: GIREP in Barcelona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Ken

    2000-11-01

    designing a new curriculum in Physics. His main argument perhaps was that a physics course should be designed as a set of narratives, with beginning, middle, end and a point, rather than as a set of concepts whose meaning was of more significance to the teacher or curriculum designer than to the students. He was followed by Ed Redish of the University of Maryland, another entertaining speaker who addressed the global problem of the decline in the number of students willing to study physics when given a free choice not to do so. His talk was wide ranging, but centred on the apparent fact that physics teaching was essentially unsuccessful - for a variety of reasons. He proposed that this was a problem that could and should be tackled scientifically, with a loop of research-instruction-design. Science is good at solving problems, but so far physics hasn't seen physics teaching and learning as problematic. Maybe physics lecturers are so good at physics that difficulty in learning it is taken to be a student problem (inattention, sheer stupidity) rather than a systemic one. I look forward to hearing more about this. What I did get from one or two lectures about research into the way teachers failed tended to raise my blood pressure to dangerous levels. In both cases considerable skill and effort had been put into finding out that curriculum innovations or new teaching techniques had been badly handled by teachers, who had still kept to their old ways - like using ray boxes in optics work, or failing to make best use of Real Time laboratory systems (i.e. data logging). These new approaches were described as expert-designed innovations. I am afraid that it occurred to me that if experts had been employed to produce a new production system in a factory failure of the workforce to implement it would have resulted in some high-level expert redundancies. Certainly not `more research' as was advocated here. But it wasn't all grief: many talks and lectures were inspiring and showed how

  12. NEWS: Post-16 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter

    2000-07-01

    post16.gif As a teacher of physics it is very easy to become preoccupied with particulars of courses, or topics or even single concepts. Concerned with imminent student audiences and desired learning outcomes, the daily challenge is to summon satisfactory teaching approaches and resources for the job at hand. For the conscientious teacher, assessment outcomes may too often seem a judgment on our own efforts rather than those of our students. From time to time we may step back and think bigger, for example while planning a recruitment event, or while away from work on holiday. We may be successful locally. But why, at a time when books and television documentaries popularizing science have a large following, has physics education been facing declining numbers? Many recognize that physics has an essential contribution to make to the training of science or engineering specialists, but we know that it is also important for the skilled worker, the informed citizen and, in fact, for anyone trying to make sense of the world. So what are the best ways forward for post-16 physics? To make any impact on the bigger picture requires organization, thinking and meeting time among people in diverse roles: teachers and curriculum managers; university lecturers; employers and professional bodies; unitary awarding bodies; regulatory and funding agencies; and even Government. For the past few years, the Institute of Physics post-16 Initiative has created an unrivalled opportunity to address the wider issues. Its Shaping the Future booklets series was designed to stimulate informed discussion and debate, by providing background information and analysis. Taken together, the booklets should help all those concerned with physics education to understand where we are now, and why. Literally dozens of people have contributed to a review and analysis of physics education. Each booklet is a 48-page smorgasbord in A4 landscape format, containing many examples of good practice, basic but

  13. "Crashing the gates" - selection criteria for television news reporting of traffic crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ceunynck, Tim; De Smedt, Julie; Daniels, Stijn; Wouters, Ruud; Baets, Michèle

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates which crash characteristics influence the probability that the crash is reported in the television news. To this purpose, all news items from the period 2006-2012 about traffic crashes from the prime time news of two Belgian television channels are linked to the official injury crash database. Logistic regression models are built for the database of all injury crashes and for the subset of fatal crashes to identify crash characteristics that correlate with a lower or higher probability of being reported in the news. A number of significant biases in terms of crash severity, time, place, types of involved road users and victims' personal characteristics are found in the media reporting of crashes. More severe crashes are reported in the media more easily than less severe crashes. Significant fluctuations in media reporting probability through time are found in terms of the year and month in which the crash took place. Crashes during week days are generally less reported in the news. The geographical area (province) in which the crash takes place also has a significant impact on the probability of being reported in the news. Crashes on motorways are significantly more represented in the news. Regarding the age of the involved victims, a clear trend of higher media reporting rates of crashes involving young victims or young fatalities is observed. Crashes involving female fatalities are also more frequently reported in the news. Furthermore, crashes involving a bus have a significantly higher probability of being reported in the news, while crashes involving a motorcycle have a significantly lower probability. Some models also indicate a lower reporting rate of crashes involving a moped, and a higher reporting rate of crashes involving heavy goods vehicles. These biases in media reporting can create skewed perceptions in the general public about the prevalence of traffic crashes and eventually may influence people's behaviour. Copyright © 2015

  14. News/High speed oil defense boat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    An oil defense boat that can travel at 30 knots to the scene of a spill and surround the polluted area or protect a nearby beach or harbor, with a 200 m floating plastic barrier within 20 minutes, has been developed by Vator Oy of Helsinki in association with the Finnish Board of Navigation. The Vator 18T boat, which can carry a crew of three or four, has a trimaran glass reinforced plastic hull. The floating plastic barrier (Nokia SUP Spillbooms) is produced by the Oy Nokia A.B., Cable Works Division of Helsinki and is made of a PVC-coated fabric enclosing floats of polyethylene foam and either chain ballast or iron sinkers.

  15. Giving bad news: a qualitative research exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aein, Fereshteh; Delaram, Masoumeh

    2014-06-01

    The manner in which healthcare professionals deliver bad news affects the way it is received, interpreted, understood, and dealt with. Despite the fact that clinicians are responsible for breaking bad news, it has been shown that they lack skills necessary to perform this task. The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian mothers' experiences to receive bad news about their children cancer and to summarize suggestions for improving delivering bad news by healthcare providers. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 mothers from two pediatric hospitals in Iran. Five major categories emerged from the data analysis, including dumping information, shock and upset, emotional work, burden of delivering bad news to the family members, and a room for multidisciplinary approach. Effective communication of healthcare team with mothers is required during breaking bad news. Using multidisciplinary approaches to prevent harmful reactions and providing appropriate support are recommended.

  16. How to Write News for Broadcast and Print Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dary, David

    This book is a primer on the techniques of news writing and the application of those principles to print and broadcast journalism. Chapters include: "The News Media," which presents a brief history of journalism and the foundations on which it is based; "What Is News?"; "Gathering News," which discusses news beats, reporters' qualifications, and…

  17. NEWS: Post-16 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    (post16) Making physics connect Doesn't Melvyn Bragg do a wonderful job, engaging both scientists and artists in sensitive discussion on Radio 4 about their methods and their purposes? But every week teachers have the chance to show their students that physics is a way of seeing the world that is well-connected with other aspects of knowledge and culture. The stakes are high: students who fail to appreciate this generally choose not to study the subject beyond GCSE. Most students find our preoccupation with technical detail off-putting. Accepting that we have a syllabus to cover, it's still a question of balance. In our teaching we should aim for variety in order to find ways to connect with every student's interests. Also, we can show that we (the nearest embodiment of a physicist some students will experience) are multidimensional and so fully human. Most important, teachers need flexibility to both encourage and respond to student comment and questions. The first booklet in the discussion series Shaping the Future takes up these themes. Rich in ideas for both immediate use and the longer term, it aims to stimulate debate and improve teaching. Copies cost £5.50 including postage and are available from Ingrid Ebeyer, Post-16 Initiative, Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH. How far is it? This question is asked in many family cars and school minibuses at the start of a journey, and answered by most in terms of hours and minutes rather than miles. What a good idea for introducing a social and historical perspective to a lesson on distance, velocity and time. How far can you actually get in a day? What is the range of human activity? Walking for eight hours will get many people about 25 miles. A pack horse will progress at much the same rate, but fast riding or a coach and team of horses will get further. Motorway driving (when the cones are on holiday) would take you nearly 500 miles. The 05.15 am train from Penzance arrives in Inverness at 7

  18. News with an attitude: assessing the mechanisms underlying the effects of opinionated news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, M.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Moorman, M.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Opinionated news targets communities of likeminded viewers, relies on dramaturgical storytelling techniques, and shares characteristics with political satire. Accordingly, opinionated news should be understood as a specific form of political entertainment. We have investigated the mechanisms

  19. Linking Financial Market Dynamics and the Impact of News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacher, J. C.; Ochiai, T.

    2011-09-01

    In financial markets, he behavior of investors determines the prices of financial products. However, these investors can also be influenced by good and bad news. Here, we present a mathematical model to reproduce the price dynamics in real financial markets affected by news. The model has both positive and negative feed-back mechanisms. Furthermore, the behavior of the model is examined by considering two different types of noise. Our results show that the dynamic balance of positive and negative feed-back mechanisms with the noise effect determines the asset price movement. For comparison with real market, we have used the Forex data corresponding to the time period of the recent Tohoku-Kanto earthquake in Japan.

  20. The Cognitive Information Effect of Televised News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lăzăroiu, George; Pera, Aurel; Ştefănescu-Mihăilă, Ramona O; Bratu, Sofia; Mircică, Nela

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the key findings which prove that the biased perceptions of viewers may provide an inaccurate image of the informational validity of televised news. The news may generate distorted recollections of what occurred in particular reported events if displayed routines influence viewers not to pay attention to the essential features of a narrative. Elaborating on Fiske and Hartley (2010), Zelizer (2010), and Gunter (2015), we indicate that the character of the news setting has altered and individuals' news consumption routines have changed in adapting to media advancements. The news may be undergone at various psychological stages by news publics. Televised news may transmit information undeviatingly to publics that may (not) be committed successfully to memory. Our paper shows that individuals' skills to handle information that is displayed in a linguistic configuration are influenced by their abilities in the utilization of certain symbol systems that are employed to represent notions and meanings. Televised news may shape what individuals grasp, influence their perceptions, convictions, and views regarding prevailing events and matters, and transmit knowledge and interpretation. If news stories can be jotted down in a linguistic style that sidesteps making needless processing demands and captivate news users by facilitating them to make connections with former knowledge, they may be more worthy of note and more edifying. We conclude that news narratives present a cognitive demanding task to individuals, displaying novel information regarding evolving events in a multifarious format. Broadcast news exhibits intricate contents, displaying configurations that employ excessively the cognitive abilities for information processing of viewers.

  1. The Cognitive Information Effect of Televised News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Lăzăroiu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the key findings which prove that the biased perceptions of viewers may provide an inaccurate image of the informational validity of televised news. The news may generate distorted recollections of what occurred in particular reported events if displayed routines influence viewers not to pay attention to the essential features of a narrative. Elaborating on Fiske and Hartley (2010, Zelizer (2010, and Gunter (2015, we indicate that the character of the news setting has altered and individuals’ news consumption routines have changed in adapting to media advancements. The news may be undergone at various psychological stages by news publics. Televised news may transmit information undeviatingly to publics that may (not be committed successfully to memory. Our paper shows that individuals’ skills to handle information that is displayed in a linguistic configuration are influenced by their abilities in the utilization of certain symbol systems that are employed to represent notions and meanings. Televised news may shape what individuals grasp, influence their perceptions, convictions, and views regarding prevailing events and matters, and transmit knowledge and interpretation. If news stories can be jotted down in a linguistic style that sidesteps making needless processing demands and captivate news users by facilitating them to make connections with former knowledge, they may be more worthy of note and more edifying. We conclude that news narratives present a cognitive demanding task to individuals, displaying novel information regarding evolving events in a multifarious format. Broadcast news exhibits intricate contents, displaying configurations that employ excessively the cognitive abilities for information processing of viewers.

  2. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  3. The lifelong socioeconomic disadvantage of single-mother background - the Helsinki Birth Cohort study 1934-1944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, H Maiju; Salonen, Minna K; Häkkinen, Antti; Olkkola, Maarit; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Räikkönen, Katri; Osmond, Clive; Eriksson, Johan G; Kajantie, Eero

    2016-08-18

    Growing up with one parent is associated with economic hardship and health disadvantages, but there is limited evidence of its lifetime consequences. We examined whether being born to an unmarried mother is associated with socioeconomic position and marital history over the lifespan. We analysed data from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study including birth, child welfare clinic and school healthcare records from people born in Helsinki, Finland, between 1934 and 1944. Using a unique personal identification number, we linked these data to information on adult socioeconomic position from census data at 5-year intervals between 1970 and 2000, obtained from Statistics Finland. Compared to children of married mothers, children of unmarried mothers were more likely to have lower educational attainment and occupational status (odds ratio for basic vs. tertiary education 3.40; 95 % confidence interval 2.17 to 5.20; for lowest vs. highest occupational category 2.75; 1.92 to 3.95). They were also less likely to reach the highest income third in adulthood and more likely to stay unmarried themselves. The associations were also present when adjusted for childhood socioeconomic position. Being born to an unmarried mother, in a society where marriage is the norm, is associated with socioeconomic disadvantage throughout life, over and above the disadvantage associated with childhood family occupational status. This disadvantage may in part mediate the association between low childhood socioeconomic position and health in later life.

  4. The lifelong socioeconomic disadvantage of single-mother background - the Helsinki Birth Cohort study 1934–1944

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Maiju Mikkonen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing up with one parent is associated with economic hardship and health disadvantages, but there is limited evidence of its lifetime consequences. We examined whether being born to an unmarried mother is associated with socioeconomic position and marital history over the lifespan. Methods We analysed data from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study including birth, child welfare clinic and school healthcare records from people born in Helsinki, Finland, between 1934 and 1944. Using a unique personal identification number, we linked these data to information on adult socioeconomic position from census data at 5-year intervals between 1970 and 2000, obtained from Statistics Finland. Results Compared to children of married mothers, children of unmarried mothers were more likely to have lower educational attainment and occupational status (odds ratio for basic vs. tertiary education 3.40; 95 % confidence interval 2.17 to 5.20; for lowest vs. highest occupational category 2.75; 1.92 to 3.95. They were also less likely to reach the highest income third in adulthood and more likely to stay unmarried themselves. The associations were also present when adjusted for childhood socioeconomic position. Conclusion Being born to an unmarried mother, in a society where marriage is the norm, is associated with socioeconomic disadvantage throughout life, over and above the disadvantage associated with childhood family occupational status. This disadvantage may in part mediate the association between low childhood socioeconomic position and health in later life.

  5. How to write a good scientific paper

    CERN Document Server

    Mack, Chris A

    2018-01-01

    Many scientists and engineers consider themselves poor writers or find the writing process difficult. The good news is that you do not have to be a talented writer to produce a good scientific paper, but you do have to be a careful writer. In particular, writing for a peer-reviewed scientific or engineering journal requires learning and executing a specific formula for presenting scientific work. This book is all about teaching the style and conventions of writing for a peer-reviewed scientific journal. From structure to style, titles to tables, abstracts to author lists, this book gives practical advice about the process of writing a paper and getting it published.

  6. Tailor-Made News: Meeting the demands of news users on mobile and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Costera Meijer, I.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological possibilities for portable, personalized, and participatory news use, the public has not turned en masse from passive receivers who consume news on the producers' terms, into active users who tailor news to fit their personal preferences and practices. Unmistakably, some

  7. The Usefulness of a News Media Literacy Measure in Evaluating a News Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie; Ashley, Seth; Miller, Dean

    2017-01-01

    A survey of college students showed those who had taken a news literacy course had significantly higher levels of news media literacy, greater knowledge of current events, and higher motivation to consume news, compared with students who had not taken the course. The effect of taking the course did not diminish over time. Results validate the News…

  8. Young people’s news orientations and uses of traditional and new media for news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cauwenberge, A.; d'Haenens, L.; Beentjes, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on Flemish college students’ news orientations and their uses of traditional and new media for news within a public service media environment. We used five homogeneous focus groups that covered variation in news media use. The analysis of the focus groups revealed major

  9. Navigating Cross-Media News Use : Media repertoires and the value of news in everyday life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Joelle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble

  10. Coinheritance of High Oxygen Affinity Hb Helsinki [HBB: c.248A>T; β82(EF6)Lys→Met] with Hb H Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shir-Ying; Goh, Jia-Hui; Tan, Karen M L; Liu, Te-Chih

    2017-05-01

    Hb Helsinki [HBB: c.248A>T; β82(EF6)Lys→Met] is a high oxygen affinity hemoglobin (Hb) causing polycythemia, whereas Hb H (β4) disease causes mild to severe chronic hemolytic anemia. The clinical characteristics, gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and molecular genotyping of a case of Hb Helsinki coinherited with Hb H disease in an ethnic Malay is described, illustrating the interaction between the β-globin variant and coinheritance of three α gene deletions. The proband was asymptomatic, exhibited microcytosis and a normal with Hb value.

  11. Physiological and psychological effects of delivering medical news using a simulated physician-patient scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lorenzo; Baile, Walter F; Henninger, Evelyn; Agarwal, Sandeep K; Kudelka, Andrzej P; Lenzi, Renato; Sterner, Janet; Marshall, Gailen D

    2003-10-01

    We examined the acute stress response associated with having to deliver either bad or good medical news using a simulated physician-patient scenario. Twenty-five healthy medical students were randomly assigned to a bad medical news (BN), a good medical news (GN), or a control group that read magazines during the session. Self-report measures were obtained before and after the task. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured throughout the task period. Four blood samples were obtained across the task period. The BN and GN tasks produced significant increases in self-reported distress and cardiovascular responses compared with the control group. There was also a significant increase in natural killer cell function 10 min into the task in the BN group compared with the control group. The BN task was also somewhat more stressful than the GN task, as shown by the self-report and cardiovascular data. These findings suggest that a simulated physician-patient scenario produces an acute stress response in the "physician," with the delivery of bad medical news more stressful than the delivery of good medical news.

  12. News and Features Updates from USA.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — Stay on top of important government news and information with the USA.gov Updates: News and Features RSS feed. We'll update this feed when we add news and featured...

  13. Terra News: sensationalism and fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  14. TERRA NEWS: Sensationalism and Fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  15. Outsourcing the news? An empirical assessment of the role of sources and news agencies in the contemporary news landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Journalists are increasingly accused of uncritically recycling subsidized material in the form of press releases and news agency copy. This practice has been labeled churnalism and is believed to compromise journalism’s autonomy and threaten news quality. While the context - rampant competition,

  16. Turning Science Results into News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2006-09-01

    Do you want to get into the New York Times? Aside from writing an angry letter or robbing a bank, getting into the news (with your science result) requires a well-crafted press release. Reaching out to reporters is very different from reaching out to fellow scientists. Scientific significance is not the same as newsworthiness, but many science results can be molded into interesting stories that reporters can relate to their audience. This presentation will present examples of science stories that made it big and some that flopped. We will also examine what makes a story attractive to newspaper and magazine editors.

  17. Miscellaneous news from the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Different news from the world, Ukraine hopes to build 11 new nuclear reactors up to 2030, Armenia allows the construction of a for radioactive waste storage (in operation in 50 years), Poland has announced the opening of a nuclear power plant for 2020, Sweden closed the second reactor of the Barsebaeck nuclear power plant on the 31 of may (2005), the energy situation in the Baltic sea region, on February 2005 six governments(Canada, France, Japan, United States, United kingdom, Switzerland) have signed a framework agreement for international collaboration on research and development of generation four nuclear energy systems. Finland does the choice of E.P.R.. (N.C.)

  18. Boundary Spanners, Network Capital and the Rise of Edu-Businesses: The Case of News Corporation and Its Emerging Education Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a critical analysis of News Corporation and argues that through the acquisition of high profile policy actor, Joel Klein, News Corporation has been able to assemble significant "network capital" to position itself as an entity apparently responsible for the public good and with a role to play in public policymaking.…

  19. Preferences and attitudes of the Saudi population toward receiving medical bad news: A primary study from Riyadh city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrukban, Mohammed O; Albadr, Badr O; Almansour, Mohammed; Sami, Waqas; Alshuil, Mussab; Aldebaib, Abulrahman; Algannam, Tamim; Alhafaf, Faisal; Almohanna, Abdulaziz; Alfifi, Tariq; Alshehri, Abdullah; Alshahrani, Muhannad

    2014-05-01

    Breaking bad news is one of the most stressful and difficult things a physician has to do. Good communication skills are required in order to ensure that bad news is delivered in a humane but effective way. This study was designed to explore the preferences and attitude of the Saudi population toward receiving bad news. Second, it was to identify the associations between preferences, attitudes, and sociodemographic characteristics. This was a cross-sectional study conducted during the month of April 2009 in Riyadh. Data were collected from 1013 adult Saudis. Stratified random sampling technique was used through a self-administered questionnaire. In this study, 474 (46.8%) were males and 539 (53.2%) were females. Almost two-third of the participants preferred to be the first to receive the bad news. A majority of the participants 695 (68.6%) preferred to be told the bad news at a private place, whereas, 441 (43.5%) preferred to be told by the head of the medical team. Moreover, almost half of the participants would like the one who breaks the bad news to remain with them to give them some more information about the disease. Significant associations were observed between participants' perception and attitude with age, marital status, gender, and education (P bad news is received. Understanding what is important in the process of breaking bad news may help in determining how best to perform this challenging task.

  20. Preferences and attitudes of the Saudi population toward receiving medical bad news: A primary study from Riyadh city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrukban, Mohammed O.; Albadr, Badr O.; Almansour, Mohammed; Sami, Waqas; Alshuil, Mussab; Aldebaib, Abulrahman; Algannam, Tamim; Alhafaf, Faisal; Almohanna, Abdulaziz; Alfifi, Tariq; Alshehri, Abdullah; Alshahrani, Muhannad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Breaking bad news is one of the most stressful and difficult things a physician has to do. Good communication skills are required in order to ensure that bad news is delivered in a humane but effective way. Objectives: This study was designed to explore the preferences and attitude of the Saudi population toward receiving bad news. Second, it was to identify the associations between preferences, attitudes, and sociodemographic characteristics. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted during the month of April 2009 in Riyadh. Data were collected from 1013 adult Saudis. Stratified random sampling technique was used through a self-administered questionnaire. Results: In this study, 474 (46.8%) were males and 539 (53.2%) were females. Almost two-third of the participants preferred to be the first to receive the bad news. A majority of the participants 695 (68.6%) preferred to be told the bad news at a private place, whereas, 441 (43.5%) preferred to be told by the head of the medical team. Moreover, almost half of the participants would like the one who breaks the bad news to remain with them to give them some more information about the disease. Significant associations were observed between participants' perception and attitude with age, marital status, gender, and education (P bad news is received. Understanding what is important in the process of breaking bad news may help in determining how best to perform this challenging task. PMID:24987276

  1. Press problem related to nuclear energy news reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Since the event of Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in 2007 and the subsequent press reports on damage of nuclear power station after it, a stance of media is being questioned. In order to clear this problem, basic organizational structure of the press related to nuclear energy news was analyzed. Local news department, social news department, science news department and economical news department involve in nuclear energy news the accordance with their own situations and concerns. This structure makes problem of nuclear energy news reporting complicated. Changing this system is required but very difficult. It is concluded that the press problem around nuclear energy news is strange. (author)

  2. Power structure in Chilean news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde, Jorge; Bollen, Johan; Elejalde, Erick; Ferres, Leo; Poblete, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Even democracies endowed with the most active free press struggle to maintain diversity of news coverage. Consolidation and market forces may cause only a few dominant players to control the news cycle. Editorial policies may be biased by corporate ownership relations, narrowing news coverage and focus. To an increasing degree this problem also applies to social media news distribution, since it is subject to the same socio-economic drivers. To study the effects of consolidation and ownership on news diversity, we model the diversity of Chilean coverage on the basis of ownership records and social media data. We create similarity networks of news outlets on the basis of their ownership and the topics they cover. We then examine the relationships between the topology of ownership networks and content similarity to characterize how ownership affects news coverage. A network analysis reveals that Chilean media is highly concentrated both in terms of ownership as well as in terms of topics covered. Our method can be used to determine which groups of outlets and ownership exert the greatest influence on news coverage.

  3. News Values and the Vividness of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennamer, J. David

    Most journalism textbooks begin with lists of what have been called "news values." These are criteria to be used to judge the newsworthiness of issues, events, and persons. The list of news values that most journalists have memorized can be replaced with a single concept--vividness. Vividness is a characteristic of the information…

  4. The Places and Spaces of News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Historically, or so we would like to believe, the story of everyday life for many people included regular, definitive moments of news consumption. Journalism, in fact, was distributed around these routines: papers were delivered before breakfast, the evening news on TV buttressed the transition...

  5. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic…

  6. News Analytics for Financial Decision Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Milea (Viorel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual

  7. Television news and fear; A child survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walma van der Molen, J.H.; Valkenburg, P.M.; Peeters, A.L.

    2002-01-01

    Using telephone interviews among a random sample of 537 Dutch children aged 7–12 years old, we investigated (a) the prevalence of fear reactions to television news among younger and older children and among boys and girls, (b) what types of news items children in different age and gender groups

  8. Predicting User Views in Online News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardt, Daniel; Rambow, Owen

    2017-01-01

    We analyze user viewing behavior on anonline news site. We collect data from64,000 news articles, and use text featuresto predict frequency of user views.We compare predictiveness of the headlineand “teaser” (viewed before clicking) andthe body (viewed after clicking). Both arepredictive of click...

  9. News analytics for financial decision support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milea, D.V.

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual messages, by

  10. Corporate actors in Western European television news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, P.

    2009-01-01

    News about corporations can be understood as an interdependent relationship among the public relations function, organizational logic and the logic of the media. This research addresses the visibility and role of corporate actors in Western European public television news. A quantitative content

  11. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

  12. Space Shuttle Status News Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Richard Gilbech, External Tank "Tiger Team" Lead, begins this space shuttle news conference with detailing the two major objectives of the team. The objectives include: 1) Finding the root cause of the foam loss on STS-114; and 2) Near and long term improvements for the external tank. Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Manager, presents a chart to explain the external tank foam loss during STS-114. He gives a possible launch date for STS-121 after there has been a repair to the foam on the External Tank. He further discusses the changes that need to be made to the surrounding areas of the plant in New Orleans, due to Hurricane Katrina. Bill Gerstemaier, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations, elaborates on the testing of the external tank foam loss. The discussion ends with questions from the news media about a fix for the foam, replacement of the tiles, foam loss avoidance, the root cause of foam loss and a possible date for a new external tank to be shipped to NASA Kennedy Space Center.

  13. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  14. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  15. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Microscopy: Schools to gain remote access to Oxford University-based SEM Canada: Perimeter Institute calls international applicants to its 2005 summer school ASE: ASE 2005 refreshes the teaching parts that other conferences cannot reach Scotland: Glasgow hosts Kelvin exhibition Climate Analysis: Met Office sets up project to predict climate change Wales: Welsh teachers meet at Christ College, Brecon ESERA: ESERA 2005 unveils its conference programme Higher Education: Educators address school-university transition Christmas Lecture Series: Royal Institution supports Christmas Lecture series with interactive CD-ROM Events: UK’s Science Week kicks off in March Grants: PPARC and IOP to provide grants worth up to £400 Camera Competition: Congratulations go to camera winners Teachers’ TV: Teachers’ channel hits the small screen Physics and Music: Foster and Liebeck presentation combines physics and music Science on Stage: SOS gears up for Geneva festival Nanoworld: Hirsch lecture at Oxford focuses on the nanoworld GIREP: GIREP conference aims to raise physics’ profile Course: STELAR offers free radio-communication course

  16. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    industry to discuss utilizing artificial intelligence and quantum science throughout the Air Force Air Force leaders met with scientists and industry members May 17 at the Artificial Intelligence and quantum Fallen Airman Profiles 2015 Air Force Events Cybersecurity Government Shutdown 2015 ISR Medal of Honor

  17. News

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    <正> A high rank officer of Tianjin Toyota said recently that Toyota NBC V car, which represents the latest technology of Toyata specially designed for catering to Chinese market will be produced in Tianjin Toyota in 2002. The new model will be equipped with 1.3-litre or 1.5-litre VVT-I engine whose performance is much better than that of 8A engine installed in Xiali 2000 car. Both manual transmission and automatic transmission are available at user’s option. Now the working shops for NBC V car are

  18. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    IRELAND New courses for high-tech Ireland; SCIENCE YEAR Science Year launched with a jump; THE NETHERLANDS School science teachers face uncertainty; KOREA Embedding physics in a cultural context; TEACHING RESOURCES Teacher, get your hook; ICT RESOURCES Stock-take of ICT progress; INTERNET Teachers to test-drive new physics gateway; NEW ZEALAND Physics is valued in New Zealand; JAPAN Advancing Physics in Japan; HIGHER EDUCATION Networking works in Cologne; INSTITUTE MATTERS IoP demands a better deal for physics teachers; AUSTRALIA Physics numbers decline: educators blame the low impact curriculum; SCIENCE FOR THE PUBLIC More than sixty seconds in Glasgow; INTERNET A gift selection of papers from IoP; TEACHING STYLES I know what you did last summer;

  19. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Physics on Stage: Physics on the political stage Women in Physics: Allez les girls! Curriculum: Students want ethics debate in school science Physics on Stage: Buzzing around the tulips Events: GIREP 2002 Competition: Schumacher in the shower! Higher Education: Universities consider conceptual physics courses Resources: Evaluation of Advancing Physics Research Frontiers: Physics Teachers @ CERN 2002 UK Curriculum: Preparing useful citizens China: Changing the approach NSTA Annual Convention: Innovations and simplicity Europe: European Community Science and Society Action Plan Citizenship: ASE-Wellcome Trust citizenship education initiative

  20. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    Resources: First Faulkes Telescope on its way! Events: Everything under the Sun - GIREP 2002 Experiments: The most beautiful experiment, your favourite demonstration Science year: Planet Science takes off Resources: New CD packages Lecture: Fantastic Plastic Summer workshop: The Wright Stuff Resources: Amazing Space 14-16 curriculum: 21st century science ASE conference: ASE 2003 South Africa: Sasol SciFest Earth sciences: JESEI: the answer to all your Earthly problems

  1. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Energy: Increasing global energy needs require drastic policy changes Germany: Science teachers talk tactics in Bavaria Physics Day: NPL hosts A-level physics day Engineering: ICE members consider the past and the future of engineering IOP Awards: Superb teachers receive awards for their contribution to physics New Zealand: Unlikely location serves up stimulating conference Astronomy: Teaching ideas abound at EAAE event in Spain Mexico: Sharing knowledge about better physics teaching

  2. Role, perspective and knowledge of Iranian critical care nurses about breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanipour, Masoomeh; Karim, Zahra; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-05-01

    Given the issue of caring critically ill patients, nurses are involved in the process of breaking bad news in critical care units, while little research has been conducted on this challenging issue. The purpose of this study was to determine the role, perspective and knowledge of Iranian critical care nurses regarding breaking bad news. This descriptive study was conducted on a sample of 160 nurses working in critical care units of hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Stratified and quota sampling methods were used. The data collection tool was a four-part questionnaire with validity and reliability confirmed via content validity and test-retest, respectively. The study showed that most critical care nurses were involved in breaking bad news, with different roles. The majority of participants (91.2%) had a positive attitude towards involvement of nurses in breaking bad news. In this study, 78.8% of nurses had moderate knowledge about how to break bad news, and only a few had good level of knowledge (16.2%). According to the findings, while critical care nurses took different roles in the process of breaking bad news and they had positive attitude towards participation in this process, yet their knowledge about this process was inadequate. Thus, designing educational programmes to enhance critical care nurses' knowledge and skills in this area seems necessary. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A study on the asymmetry of the news aspect of the stock market: Evidence from three institutional investors in the Taiwan stock market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tzu-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses daily data to investigate the behavior of institutional investors in Taiwan’s stock market. We adopted TGARCH and EGARCH models to test various news. We found that, for the entire sample, a significant clustering phenomenon exists in the investment behavior of three institutional investors, and the impact due to a change of news content shows significant asymmetry and leverage effects. That is, the impact of bad news from the market is stronger than that of good news. In addition, an asymmetric phenomenon can also be seen for the international news aspect as responded to by foreign institutional investors. This phenomenon is more significant than those of the dealers and institutional trust investors. Moreover, the asymmetric phenomenon as responded to by the dealers for domestic news is more significant than those of foreign investors and institutional trust investors.

  4. Data Exchanges in Mobile News Apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Aske; Wallberg, Filip

    This paper maps the flows of data to and from third-party actors when users access content in mobile news apps. This way, it analyzes the strategic networks of collaboration and data exchange that news organizations engage in in the digital economy, expanding the traditional two-sided model...... of media economics (centered around sales to audiences and advertisers) to also account for what happens “behind the curtain”. Research already shows that the trade with data constitutes a central component of web-based business models (Evens & Van Damme, 2016; Gerlitz & Helmond, 2013; Lindskow, 2016......), but no systematic scrutiny of the same phenomenon exists with regards to mobile news use even though the use of mobile platforms for news accessing increases these years (Newman, Levy, & Nielsen, 2015). This study measures all calls made by the news apps upon accessing content, mapping which third-party actors get...

  5. News from Online: Industrial Chemicals and Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-02-01

    of the American Chemical Society Divisions of Polymer Chemistry and Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering and General Electric Corporation. The POLYED site, http:/ /chemdept.uwsp.edu/polyed/index.htm, is hosted by the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. This National Center for Polymer Education is another good place to go for information. More education is available at the Ziegler Research Group Home Page at http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/index.html . Go to Metallocene as Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: An Introduction ( http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/met_intro.html ) for historical accounts of metallocene and Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Movies are available here too. This Canadian site is well-documented and educational. Back at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, The Why Files site at http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu helps bring important chemical and technology news to the public. Go to the archived files of October 1997 ( http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu/shorties/catalyst.html ) to find information about the importance of low-temperature metallocene catalysts. The Why Files received funding from the National Science Foundation. Go here for science information in an easy-to-read format. One of the driving forces toward better catalysis is the attempt to reach 100% product, combining efficiency with lowered pollution. Companies can look to the Environmental Protection Agency for information: Environsense at http://es.epa.gov/ is pledged to offer "Common Sense Solutions to Environmental Problems". So where can we get these polymers? The American Chemical Society can help. Go to Chemcylopedia at http://pubs.acs.org/chemcy99/ for great information. Both purchasers and users of chemicals can benefit from this site. Searches can be made on the chemical or on the supplier. Information provided includes CAS Registry Numbers and special shipping requirements as well as potential applications. Do you remember that we started with paper? Let

  6. Promoting biogas production and using it as transport fuel in the Helsinki region; Suunnitelma liikennebiokaasun tuotannon ja kaeytoen edistaemiseksi Helsingin seudulla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasi, S.; Havukainen, J.; Uusitalo, V.; Andersson, R.; Manninen, K.; Aro-Heinilae, E.; Rintala, J.

    2012-11-01

    The main objective of the project was to promote biogas production and its use as transport fuel. The aims in the four Finnish and two Estonian case areas were to reduce the amount and improve the sustainable use of waste and sludge, to promote biogas production, to start biogas use as transport fuel and to provide tools for implementing the aims. The total biomethane potential in the Helsinki region corresponds to approximately 450 GWh/a. The most potential user for biomethane is public transport. The total amount of biomethane would suffice for 80% of the busses operating in the Helsinki region. Using biogas as a transport fuel instead of energy production in the Helsinki region would result in emission reductions (13 000 t{sub CO2,eq}/a). However if the fuel replacing biogas in energy production would be renewable, the emission reductions would be significantly greater. The economical assessment indicates that the production of biogas is economically feasible if all the produced gas can be sold. Biogas produced near the natural gas grid can also be transported to the Helsinki region where there are better possibilities to find uses for it. In this way, for example, gas that is produced in Kymenlaakso but is not consumed there can be transported via the natural gas grid, assuming that the production plant is reasonably close to the grid. (orig.)

  7. COX-2 Gene Promoter Polymorphism and Coronary Artery Disease in Middle-Aged Men: The Helsinki Sudden Death Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati H. Huuskonen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase (COX catalyzes formation of prostaglandins that contribute to the inflammation in atherosclerosis. Our objective was to study whether the functional C variant of the −765G→C polymorphism in the human COX-2 gene associates with the severity of coronary atherosclerosis measured at the coronary artery level. The Helsinki sudden death study autopsy material (n = 300 comprised of Finnish men who died suddenly. The area of atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries was quantitated, and coronary narrowing was measured. The occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI was assessed. Genotyping was by restriction endonuclease analysis. Men carrying the minor C allele had larger areas of complicated lesions (P = .024 and a higher number of coronary arteries that had over 50% stenosis (P = .036 compared to men representing the common GG genotype. The COX-2 polymorphism was not associated with MI. Our data suggest that COX-2 may be involved in plaque growth.

  8. Journalists' and Public Relations Practitioners' News Values: Perceptions and Cross-Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallot, Lynne M.; Steinfatt, Thomas M.; Salwen, Michael B.

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to research on the relationship between journalism and public relations by surveying journalists and public relations practitioners. Shows that the two groups share generally similar news values, but that journalists were largely unaware of this similarity. Finds that practitioners, expecting contributions of social good by public…

  9. Breaking bad news in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantis, Apostolos; Exiara, Triada

    2015-01-01

    In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59%) had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90%) were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66%) had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61%) delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83%) ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83%) used simple words and 54 (91.53%) checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97%) allowed relatives to determine patient's knowledge about the disease. There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician's speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  10. Breaking bad news in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Konstantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. Materials and Methods: 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Results: Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59% had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90% were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66% had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61% delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83% ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83% used simple words and 54 (91.53% checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97% allowed relatives to determine patient′s knowledge about the disease. Conclusions: There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician′s speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  11. The news machine hacking, the untold story

    CERN Document Server

    Hanning, James

    2014-01-01

    There is one mystery figure at the heart of ?Hackergate' ? Glenn Mulcaire, the News of the World's top private investigator. The former AFC Wimbledon footballer has never spoken publicly or in court about his work investigating and backing up front-page news stories (such as the News of the World's award-winning David Beckham scoop). Mulcaire's arrest in 2006 for intercepting royal-household phone messages barely registered at the time. Yet his work has continued to generate headlines and embarrassment for the establishment ? with a Prime Minister on the back foot after his former aide Andy

  12. News search, blogs and feeds a toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Vage, Lars

    2010-01-01

    This book is about news search and monitoring. Aimed at professionals with a strategic need of monitoring the surrounding world, users with a need to find the best news sources, monitoring services and news search strategies and techniques will benefit from reading this book. The main purpose is to present a practical handbook with an analysis of readily available tools, blending with passages of a theoretical nature. It is also useful for students at LIS programmes and related information programmes and for librarians and information professionals. The authors aim to aid the reader in reachin

  13. The Role of Audiovisual Mass Media News in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2011-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the role of audio/visual mass media news in language learning. In this regard, the two important issues regarding the selection and preparation of TV news for language learning are the content of the news and the linguistic difficulty. Content is described as whether the news is specialized or universal. Universal…

  14. Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

  15. Hypertext in online news stories: More control, more appreciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerwerf, L.; Verheij, D.

    2014-01-01

    News websites struggle tailoring news stories to divergent needs of online news users. We examined a way to bridge these needs by representing sources in hypertext. News items were designed to be short and concise, with hyperlinks citing sources. Readers could either ignore hyperlinks or explore

  16. Predicting the volume of comments on online news stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.; Cheung, D.; Song, I.-Y.; Chu, W.; Hu, X.; Lin, J.; Li, J.; Peng, Z.

    2009-01-01

    On-line news agents provide commenting facilities for readers to express their views with regard to news stories. The number of user supplied comments on a news article may be indicative of its importance or impact. We report on exploratory work that predicts the comment volume of news articles

  17. Healthy depictions? Depicting adoption and adoption news events on broadcast news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Susan L; Chatterjee, Karishma; Karel, Amanda I

    2009-01-01

    Given that the public uses the media to learn about adoption as a family form, this study analyzes U.S. television news coverage of adoption between 2001 and 2005 (N = 309 stories), to identify the types of news events covered about adoption. A majority of news stories covered fraud, crime, legal disputes, and negative international adoption cases. Adoptees as defective or unhealthy were depicted more in negative news event stories, birth parents appeared less overall, and adoptive parents were most likely to have healthy depictions in positively oriented adoption experience, big family, and reunion stories. Although three quarters of the stories used primary adoption participants as news sources, one-third of the negative event stories did not contain healthy depictions of adoption participants. The authors discuss ways journalists and researchers might improve adoption news coverage.

  18. CEBAF: Accelerating cavities look good

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-09-15

    The first assembled pairs of superconducting accelerating cavities from German supplier Interatom for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, have exceeded performance specifications.

  19. CEBAF: Accelerating cavities look good

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The first assembled pairs of superconducting accelerating cavities from German supplier Interatom for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, have exceeded performance specifications

  20. A content-based news video retrieval system: NVRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huayong; He, Tingting

    2009-10-01

    This paper focus on TV news programs and design a content-based news video browsing and retrieval system, NVRS, which is convenient for users to fast browsing and retrieving news video by different categories such as political, finance, amusement, etc. Combining audiovisual features and caption text information, the system automatically segments a complete news program into separate news stories. NVRS supports keyword-based news story retrieval, category-based news story browsing and generates key-frame-based video abstract for each story. Experiments show that the method of story segmentation is effective and the retrieval is also efficient.

  1. Neighborhood walkability scale (News - Brazil: Back translation and Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Both

    2007-12-01

    this study demonstrated that the α value of the questionnaire (0.8042 could be considered as a good reliability coefficient. The dimensions evaluated by this instrument presented a strong correlation (R = 0.98 -1.00 and good credibility (0.655 < α < 0.904. The indicators exhibited moderate to strong values for reliability (0.55 < rs < 0.99, and a strong correlation (0.98< R <1.00. According to these results, the Brazilian NEWS questionnaire had acceptable linguistic validity and reliability. Therefore, the Brazilian NEWS questionnaire can be used as an instrument to evaluate the relationship between environmental barriers and physical activity in communities.

  2. The U.S. Online News Coverage of Mammography Based on a Google News Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Lin, Leng Leng; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-12-01

    To characterize online news coverage relating to mammography, including articles' stance toward screening mammography. Google News was used to search U.S. news sites over a 9-year period (2006-2015) based on the search terms "mammography" and "mammogram." The top 100 search results were recorded. Identified articles were manually reviewed. The top 100 news articles were from the following sources: local news outlet (50%), national news outlet (24%), nonimaging medical source (13%), entertainment or culture news outlet (6%), business news outlet (4%), peer-reviewed journal (1%), and radiology news outlet (1%). Most common major themes were the screening mammography controversy (29%), description of a new breast imaging technology (23%), dense breasts (11%), and promotion of a public screening initiative (11%). For the most recent year, article stance toward screening mammography was 59%, favorable; 16%, unfavorable; and 25%, neutral. After 2010, there was an abrupt shift in articles' stances from neutral to both favorable and unfavorable. A wide range of online news sources addressed a range of issues related to mammography. National, rather than local, news sites were more likely to focus on the screening controversy and more likely to take an unfavorable view. The controversial United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines may have influenced articles to take a stance on screening mammography. As such online news may impact public perception of the topic and thus potentially impact guideline adherence, radiologists are encouraged to maintain awareness of this online coverage and to support the online dissemination of reliable and accurate information. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A test of rivaling approaches to explain news effects: A multi-wave panel study of agenda setting, social and economic conditions, the tone of the news, and horse race news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, J.; van Hoof, A.M.J.; Oegema, D.; de Ridder, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Different "paradigmatic" approaches to explain news effects on voting may supplement each other, because their starting points are based on different news types in political campaign news: news on issue positions of parties, news on real-world developments, news on support or criticism for parties,

  4. Incorporating popularity in a personalized news recommender system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Jonnalagedda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Online news reading has become a widely popular way to read news articles from news sources around the globe. With the enormous amount of news articles available, users are easily overwhelmed by information of little interest to them. News recommender systems help users manage this flood by recommending articles based on user interests rather than presenting articles in order of their occurrence. We present our research on developing personalized news recommendation system with the help of a popular micro-blogging service, “Twitter.” News articles are ranked based on the popularity of the article identified from Twitter’s public timeline. In addition, users construct profiles based on their interests and news articles are also ranked based on their match to the user profile. By integrating these two approaches, we present a hybrid news recommendation model that recommends interesting news articles to the user based on their popularity as well as their relevance to the user profile.

  5. Good news or bad news: Conducting sentiment analysis on Dutch texts to distinguish between positive and negative relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Atteveldt, W.H.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.; Ruigrok, N.; Schlobach, S.

    2008-01-01

    Many research questions in political communication can be answered by representing text as a network of positive or negative relations between actors and issues such as conducted by semantic network analysis. This article presents a system for automatically determining the polarity

  6. Good news and bad news: depressive symptoms decline and undertreatment increases with age in home care and institutional settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerbińska, Katarzyna; Hirdes, John P; Zyczkowska, Jolanta

    2012-12-01

    Examination of prevalence of depressive symptoms among older persons in home care (HC) and complex continuing care (CCC) hospitals/units, factors associated with depressive symptoms in those settings, and rate of antidepressant use among older persons with depressive symptoms. Observational study using data from interRAI assessments used in normal clinical practice. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with depressive symptoms in the frail elderly and treatment approaches were described. Fourteen HC agencies and 134 CCC hospitals/units in Ontario, Canada. Older persons (N = 191,9871) aged 65 years and older, including 114,497 persons from HC and 77,490 persons from CCC. Data were collected using Resident Assessment Instrument 2.0 (RAI 2.0) (1996-2004) in CCC and Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC) (2003-2004) in HC. Prevalence of depressive symptoms among older HC enrollees was lower (12.0%) than in CCC (23.6%). It decreased significantly with age in HC (to about 6% in those older than 95 years) but there were not substantial age differences in CCC. Common factors associated with depressive symptoms in both types of care were cognitive impairment, instability of health, daily pain, disability in activities of daily living; however, advanced age lost its protective effect in CCC. Less than half of the persons in HC and CCC with depressive symptoms were treated with antidepressants and their use decreased with age. Undertreatment of depressive symptoms among older persons remains a serious problem. Learning more about factors associated with depressive symptoms among the oldest old might improve detection and treatment of depression.

  7. News coverage of climate change in Nature News and ScienceNOW during 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt; Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    of appreciating climate change, its severe consequences, and its anthropogenic causes. During that year the two journals’ online news services Nature News and ScienceNOW framed climate change to fit particular agendas resulting in markedly different narratives. This article demonstrates that Nature News reported...... more critically on political decisions, scientific results, and social matters of climate change compared to ScienceNOW. Operating under different institutional constraints ScienceNOW generally took a more cautious line. The evidence drawn from both textual and visual analyses shows that news sections...

  8. Large-scale Comparative Sentiment Analysis of News Articles

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Franz; Rohrdantz, Christian; Mansmann, Florian; Stoffel, Andreas; Oelke, Daniela; Krstajic, Milos; Keim, Daniel; Luo, Dongning; Yang, Jing; Atkinson, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Online media offers great possibilities to retrieve more news items than ever. In contrast to these technical developments, human capabilities to read all these news items have not increased likewise. To bridge this gap, this poster presents a visual analytics tool for conducting semi-automatic sentiment analysis of large news feeds. The tool retrieves and analyzes the news of two categories (Terrorist Attack and Natural Disasters) and news which belong to both categories of the Europe Media ...

  9. Studying Fake News via Network Analysis: Detection and Mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Bernard, H. Russell; Liu, Huan

    2018-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming increasingly popular due to its easy access, fast dissemination, and low cost. However, social media also enable the wide propagation of "fake news", i.e., news with intentionally false information. Fake news on social media poses significant negative societal effects, and also presents unique challenges. To tackle the challenges, many existing works exploit various features, from a network perspective, to detect and mitigate fake news. In essence...

  10. Nuclear Malaysia in The News 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  11. Alternative Fuel News, Volume 4, Number 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficker, C.

    2000-11-14

    This issue of Alternative Fuel News focuses on transit buses and refuse haulers. Many transit agencies and waste management companies are investigating alternatives to traditional diesel buses and refuse haulers.

  12. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  13. Uncovering the skewness news impact curve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anatolyev, Stanislav; Petukhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2016), s. 746-771 ISSN 1479-8409 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : conditional skewness * news impact curve * stock returns Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.800, year: 2016

  14. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  15. Uncovering the skewness news impact curve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anatolyev, Stanislav; Petukhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2016), s. 746-771 ISSN 1479-8409 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : conditional skewness * news impact curve * stock returns Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.800, year: 2016

  16. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 3 No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-23

    This special issue of Alternative Fuel News highlights the Fifth National Clean Cities Conference held in Louisville, Kentucky. The momentum for the program is stronger than ever and the coalitions are working to propel the alternative fuel industry forward.

  17. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstands by public as a terrifying term. The nuclear activities around Malaysia was disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency for nuclear for peace were collecting that news and compiled them to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy to develop our country. All the news about nuclear were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  18. Automatic Amharic text news classification: Aneural networks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School of Computing and Electrical Engineering, Institute of Technology, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar ... The study is on classification of Amharic news automatically using neural networks approach. Learning Vector ... INTRODUCTION.

  19. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  20. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Digital News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    of changing the socially-situated affordances of news use. Having sketched these contours, the chapter then highlights analytical challenges for understanding and conceptualizing the new interrelations between digital news content, production, and consumption, grounding this analysis with theoretical insights...... that emphasize the significance of spatiotemporal dynamics. The emphasis here is on the interrelations and mobilities of digital news audiences, based on a recognition of the productive impacts of media use while being careful to note the limitations of a paradigm shift that points solely to the possibilities...... generated by the ubiquitous presence of media in our everyday lives. Aspects of interaction and personalization beget by new media technologies certainly shape the possibilities, practices and power audiences have to choose news wherever, whenever, and however they want. However, this simultaneously...

  1. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  2. News Agencies and Global Communication: Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    News Agencies and Global Communication: Development Implications for Third World Nations. ... It argues that most of these roles have some consequences undesirable to the Third World Nations. ... village”, cultural imperialism, ethnocentrism, media imperialism, media dependency, global ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  3. Nuclear Malaysia in the news 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear was a term that always misunderstood by public as a terrifying term. Nuclear activities around Malaysia were disseminated in newspaper and Malaysian Nuclear Agency as a responsible agency were collecting that news and compiled them. The purpose for this compilation were to make the public aware the benefits of nuclear energy and all the activities regarding nuclear surround them. All the news about nuclear technology were collected using various type of newspaper published in Malaysia such as Utusan Malaysia, Berita Harian, Daily Express, News Straits Time, The Star, Borneo Post and others. This news was compiled according to their main topics such as energy, nuclear in agriculture, education and others. Each year one edition of this report will publish and disseminate it to the other libraries, government agencies, school and others to make the public aware the existence of nuclear activities around their countries.

  4. News Media Framing of Negative Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2014-01-01

    that news coverage of negative campaigning does apply the strategic game frame to a significantly larger degree than articles covering positive campaigning. This finding has significant implications for campaigning politicians and for scholars studying campaign and media effects.......News media coverage of election campaigns is often characterized by use of the strategic game frame and a focus on politicians’ use of negative campaigning. However, the exact relationship between these two characteristics of news coverage is largely unexplored. This article theorizes that consumer...... demand and norms of journalistic independence might induce the news media outlets to cover negative campaigning with a strategic game frame. A comprehensive content analysis based on several newspaper types, several election campaigns, and several different measurements of media framing confirms...

  5. The Electronic Archiving of Arab News Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Ayub Gigawy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This Research aims to present the electronic archives of Arab news agency websites and their methods of searching for and retrieving information. Also, its aim is to examine all their methods in order to find out which are the best and most practically useful ones. The research refers to the news agencies and the Internet, through the methods that users encounter in these inquires and links which present information. It concentrates on practical ways of searching for news items in both texts and pictures. The research contains tables showing the results. It presents a brief summery for each of Arab news agencies.The research comes to the conclusion that there are many things which need to be considered, and also some suggestions as to how the search for and retrieval of information might be improved

  6. The shifting temporalities of online news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik; Brügger, Niels

    2018-01-01

    websites (as well as other characteristics of online archives), the construction of the empirical base stands in a complex relation to the analytical framework applied. As much as the article is a historical analysis of the temporality of online news, it, thus, also offers a range of methodological......As much as news websites news can be characterised by speed and immediacy, they are also recognisable online periodicals, which accumulate preceding news items. This is, as with the constitution of time in general, linked to relations between change and continuity. This article aims to understand...... consequently employs a framework for webpage analysis that primarily focuses on the syntactical level where temporalities emerge as relations between textual elements that change at very different intervals. This framework is applied to examples from the different stages of The Guardian’s webpage from 1996...

  7. Engaging and Disengaging with Political News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob; Linaa Jensen, Jakob

    (most notably by Prior, 2007; Stromback, Djerf-Pierre, & Shehata, 2012) that this development also can lead to an increase in the number of people who utilize this enhanced media choice to skip news altogether. One area that merits special attention in this context is political news. Critical engagement......, 1992) and 'performance of identity' (Madianou, 2009) that take place throughout people's everyday life. To further understand these processes it is important to attend to how users engage – or disengage – with political news. To do this we present a typology of news users based on an exploratory...... and conversing face-to-face) that users engage in for political discussion, and compare these across demographics as well as relevant media use patterns. The findings from the survey will be supplemented by results from a series of qualitative interviews that shed light on the motivations users have for engaging...

  8. CSIR eNews: Laser technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR e-NewsLaserT1_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1889 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name CSIR e-NewsLaserT1_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Laser...

  9. Broadcast news gisting using lexical cohesion analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, Nicola; Newman, Eamonn; Carthy, Joe; Smeaton, Alan F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe an extractive method of creating very short summaries or gists that capture the essence of a news story using a linguistic technique called lexical chaining. The recent interest in robust gisting and title generation techniques originates from a need to improve the indexing and browsing capabilities of interactive digital multimedia systems. More specifically these systems deal with streams of continuous data, like a news programme, that require further annotation be...

  10. Cinema and the communication of bad news

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Isabel GÓMEZ CORDOBA; Haroldo ESTRADA

    2016-01-01

    Breaking Bad News requires medical professionals possess a range of skills to ensure that the patient has the information required for decision?making, this process occurs without further damage and even has a therapeutic effect, and another, that the doctor is not exposed to legal risk or stress associated with the inability to cope with the feelings of the patient, their families or themselves. This article discusses the aspects of communication of bad news in the field of doctor?patient re...

  11. News Impact Curve for Stochastic Volatility Models

    OpenAIRE

    Makoto Takahashi; Yasuhiro Omori; Toshiaki Watanabe

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to compute the news impact curve for stochastic volatility (SV) models. The new method incorporates the joint movement of return and volatility, which has been ignored by the extant literature, by simply adding a couple of steps to the Bayesian MCMC estimation procedures for SV models. This simple procedure is versatile and applicable to various SV type models. Contrary to the monotonic news impact functions in the extant literature, the new method gives a U-s...

  12. Mudanças na Declaração de Helsinki: fundamentalismo econômico, imperialismo ético e controle social Changes in the Declaration of Helsinki: economic fundamentalism, ethical imperialism and social control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volnei Garrafa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho consiste em uma reflexão crítica sobre as tentativas de alterações na Declaração de Helsinki, entendida como um dos documentos que representam as teses democráticas vencedoras da segunda metade do século passado, portanto, patrimônio da humanidade, pelo seu valor de referência como diretrizes éticas a serem observadas em pesquisas envolvendo seres humanos. Assim, o controle sobre tal documento deve ser coletivo, mundial, societário, e qualquer mudança suscita amplo debate, participação e discussão, visando-se evitar algum retrocesso humanitário. Este estudo analisa alguns fatos atuais relacionados com pesquisas com sujeitos humanos, desenvolvidas em países chamados "periféricos" ou "em desenvolvimento". E, também, faz uma interpretação sócio-política da questão, em que se evidencia que o fundamentalismo econômico por parte dos países ricos resulta em um inevitável imperialismo ético, expondo ainda mais as comunidades dos países pobres à vulnerabilidade, discriminação e exclusão social.This study is a critical reflection on attempts to alter the Declaration of Helsinki, a key document of the democratic theses achieved in the latter half of the 20th century and thus a legacy for humanity because of its ethical guidelines for research involving human beings. Therefore, there must be worldwide social control over such a document, and any change in it demands ample debate with international participation to avoid any reversal in its humanitarian thrust. The study analyzes current aspects of research with human subjects in so-called "outlying" or "developing" countries. It also brings a social and political focus to the matter, highlighting that the economic fundamentalism exercised by wealthy countries inevitably leads to an ethical imperialism, exposing communities of poor countries to even greater vulnerability, discrimination, and social exclusion.

  13. Qualification of contemporary French TV news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie LELEU-MERVIEL

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The News is one of the main programs on TV. In this regard, many investigations are concerned with TV News tackling the problem of the specificity of the audiovisual media. So, descriptive methods were designed to investigate conception and writing processes. Today, the emerging forms (non-stop news TV channels, no comment images TV, revitalize the information processing at television.Carrying on with the analyses of (Compte & Mouchon, 1990, this paper develops a method to examine the news productions in a relevant way. To do so, this article advocates the use of MCR, Méthode générale de Conceptualisation Relativisée based upon knowledge weaving theory (Mugur-Schächter, 2006. This study analysed a few TV news programs by using MCR tools. The method was applied to a corpus of news programs which were broadcasted the same day by two French channels. The study revealed the specificities of the present TV innovations.

  14. 'BREAKS' Protocol for Breaking Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vijayakumar; Bista, Bibek; Koshy, Cheriyan

    2010-05-01

    Information that drastically alters the life world of the patient is termed as bad news. Conveying bad news is a skilled communication, and not at all easy. The amount of truth to be disclosed is subjective. A properly structured and well-orchestrated communication has a positive therapeutic effect. This is a process of negotiation between patient and physician, but physicians often find it difficult due to many reasons. They feel incompetent and are afraid of unleashing a negative reaction from the patient or their relatives. The physician is reminded of his or her own vulnerability to terminal illness, and find themselves powerless over emotional distress. Lack of sufficient training in breaking bad news is a handicap to most physicians and health care workers. Adherence to the principles of client-centered counseling is helpful in attaining this skill. Fundamental insight of the patient is exploited and the bad news is delivered in a structured manner, because the patient is the one who knows what is hurting him most and he is the one who knows how to move forward. Six-step SPIKES protocol is widely used for breaking bad news. In this paper, we put forward another six-step protocol, the BREAKS protocol as a systematic and easy communication strategy for breaking bad news. Development of competence in dealing with difficult situations has positive therapeutic outcome and is a professionally satisfying one.

  15. The New News Media: Democratic implications of undergraduate education and news consumption over social and traditional media

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Communication students at Simon Fraser University were surveyed and interviewed to deduce perceptions and behaviour of news consumption over social and traditional media. Both social media and traditional media are used to consume news with traditional media acting as the primary news source and as more accessible and reliable than social media. News stories considered important or having various perspectives were verified the most, especially world news. Extent of accessibility of sources an...

  16. News from the gas world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadonneix, P.; Bergmann, B.; Chabrelie, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    Mr Pierre Gadonneix, President of Gaz de France, presented 'The Gaz de France Group in the new European context: opportunities and strategy of a major gas operator' during the 21. world gas congress, which was held in Nice from 6. to 9. June 2000. A few weeks from the liberalization of the gas market in Europe. It seems interesting to publish this article, which very pertinently presents the point of view of the leading French gas operator. We also considered it right to publish the presentation of Mr Burckhard Bergmann, President of Eurogas, who presented the European vision. To complete this panorama of the gas situation, we are also publishing news about the international gas situation in 1999, written by Marie-Francoise Chabrelie of Cedigaz which is summarized here under: in a changing environment, characterized by privatisation, the deregulation and the opening up of markets (Europe, Australia), natural gas has progressively gained ground in the world energy market. This trend was confirmed in 1999. Major discoveries open the way to new projects for local use and export. In spite of the uncertainties regarding the situation in countries of the ex-Soviet Union, several favourable factors, including economic recovery in Asia faster than forecast, indicate a growth hypothesis ranging from 2.5% for this year. (authors)

  17. Top medical news stories 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Here is our list of the top seven medical news stories for 2015 with special emphasis on the Southwest. 7. Wearable health devices: A wave of wearable computing devices such as Fitbit and UP wristbands have people keeping track of how much they sit, stand, walk, climb stairs and calories they consume (1. These fitness-tracking devices herald a series of devices that will detect and monitor serious diseases. However, these so-called medical-grade wearables require approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a regulatory hurdle avoided by the fitness-tracking devices which will likely slow their introduction. 6. Caitlyn Jenner: Caitlyn Jenner became the most famous transgender woman in the world following an interview published in Vanity Fair (2. The Vanity Fair website saw 11.6 million visits curious about the former Olympic athlete. Though Jenner publicly shared her gender identity, many transgender Americans do not-12% of gender non-conforming adults said they ...

  18. A Blind Angle? News Sources, Gender and Ethnicity in Danish TV News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    The paper will present and discuss a framework for grasping some of the democratic consequences of biased TV news programs. In line with Jürgen Habermas, one can ask what consequences it has for a democratic public sphere that the national TV news landscape is biased in term of source diversity (...

  19. Children's Recall of the News: TV News Stories Compared with Three Print Versions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Juliette H. Walma; van der Voort, Tom H. A.

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 144 fourth and sixth graders was presented with five children's news stories, in television form or in one of three print versions. Results indicated that children who watched news on television remembered the stories better than children who read one of the three print versions, regardless of their level of reading proficiency.…

  20. News Sources, Gender and Majority-Minority in Danish TV News Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    In this paper, I am going to identify some central methodological challenges in relation to a project on TV-news and news sources in a perspective of intersectionality and to sketch a research design. In what follows, I will present some methodological issues and research designs of previous...

  1. News reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-01-10

    The document reproduces a letter dated 27 December 1993 from the Alternate Resident Representative of Iraq to the IAEA including in an annex the news reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency concerning the detection of nuclear radiations in Iraqi military equipment left behind by the Iraqi army during the war for Kuwait liberation.

  2. News reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The document reproduces a letter dated 27 December 1993 from the Alternate Resident Representative of Iraq to the IAEA including in an annex the news reported on 30 November 1993 by the Middle East News Agency concerning the detection of nuclear radiations in Iraqi military equipment left behind by the Iraqi army during the war for Kuwait liberation

  3. Television news coverage of obesity in China, 1982-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhe; Xu, Rui Qing; Zhao, Kun; Li, Ke Ji

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how obesity was covered in television news in China, including the trends over time and the characteristics of obesity-related news. The frame analysis was adopted to assess the content of obesity-related news broadcasted in China Central Television (CCTV) from 1982 to 2009. To investigate the characteristics of the news, the obesity-related news was divided into subgroups according to populations concerned, as well as the period in which the news was broadcasted. The differences between subgroups were examined. A total of 1 599 pieces of news reported obesity, in which 1 278 pieces (79.92%) aired in "wealthy" period (2006-2009). More news was concerned with adults (1 134, 70.92%). "Individual behavior" dominated most of the cause frames (389, 24.33%), solution frames (522, 32.65%), and responsibility frames (860, 53.78%). There was more news mentioning individual factors in news aired in "wealthy" period and news concerning children. The coverage of social-structure causes was higher in news concerning children, while the coverage of social-structure solutions was higher in news concerning children and news aired in "wealthy" period. Although the coverage of obesity was modest, it showed an incremental trend as the economy grew. Obesity was mostly depicted as an individual problem in terms of responsibility, causes and solutions. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. RESEARCH AND PRACTICE OF THE NEWS MAP COMPILATION SERVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the needs of the news media on the map, this paper researches on the news map compilation service, conducts demand research on the service of compiling news maps, designs and compiles the public authority base map suitable for media publication, and constructs the news base map material library. It studies the compilation of domestic and international news maps with timeliness and strong pertinence and cross-regional characteristics, constructs the hot news thematic gallery and news map customization services, conducts research on types of news maps, establish closer liaison and cooperation methods with news media, and guides news media to use correct maps. Through the practice of the news map compilation service, this paper lists two cases of news map preparation services used by different media, compares and analyses cases, summarizes the research situation of news map compilation service, and at the same time puts forward outstanding problems and development suggestions in the service of news map compilation service.

  5. Local television news reporting of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffery, Jonathan B; Jacobson, Lynn M; Goldstein, Kenneth M; Pribble, James M

    2006-12-01

    Local television is the primary news source for the majority of Americans. This study aims to describe how local news reports on kidney disease. Using our searchable database of health-related late local news segments from 2002, we identified stories with the key words kidney, hypertension, blood pressure, or diabetes. This database is a representative sample of the late local news on 122 stations in the 50 largest US media markets, comprising 60% of the population. The content of each identified story was reviewed to determine whether it mentioned: (1) chronic kidney disease (CKD), (2) screening for kidney disease, or (3) kidney disease as a potential complication (for blood pressure- or diabetes-related stories). Only 2 of 1,799 database news stories (0.11%) included "kidney" as a summary key word; neither referred to CKD, screening, or complications of other diseases. Of 19 stories about hypertension or blood pressure (1.06% of all stories) and the 14 stories about diabetes (0.78% of all stories), none mentioned these criteria. Despite efforts to increase public awareness of and screening for CKD, local television news (the most important news source for a majority of Americans) did little to help achieve these goals. Further work will be needed to confirm whether this paucity of coverage varies over time and determine why so little attention is given to CKD. Educating physicians and public relations personnel who advocate for kidney disease about journalists' needs may be an important step to help advance public awareness of CKD.

  6. News Authorship and News Sources: Impacts on Environmental Coverage in The Nigerian Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogadimma C. Emenyeonu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impacts of news authorship and news sources on environmental coverage in the Nigerian press to shed light on the roles they play in news construction. The study finds that journalists in conjunction with policy makers are the catalyst for environmental information, whereas citizens who are pivotal in creating relevant public opinion on environmental issues are left behind. The study reveals that investigative reporting lacks in environmental coverage because most coverage are events driven which explains why environmental news is reported as straight news and as such journalists rely heavily on official sources rather than subsidiary sources. The study opines that for proper environmental coverage, journalists must choose sources from both main and subsidiary actors and revert to proactive, investigative and interpretive reporting so as to make environmental stories relatable to the intended audiences.

  7. Meta-analysis of the Alpha/Beta Ratio for Prostate Cancer in the Presence of an Overall Time Factor: Bad News, Good News, or No News?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method for meta-analysis of the fractionation sensitivity of tumors as applied to prostate cancer in the presence of an overall time factor. Methods and Materials: A systematic search for radiation dose-fractionation trials in prostate cancer was performed using PubMed and by manual search. Published trials comparing standard fractionated external beam radiation therapy with alternative fractionation were eligible. For each trial the α/β ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were extracted, and the data were synthesized with each study weighted by the inverse variance. An overall time factor was included in the analysis, and its influence on α/β was investigated. Results: Five studies involving 1965 patients were included in the meta-analysis of α/β. The synthesized α/β assuming no effect of overall treatment time was −0.07 Gy (95% CI −0.73-0.59), which was increased to 0.47 Gy (95% CI −0.55-1.50) if a single highly weighted study was excluded. In a separate analysis, 2 studies based on 10,808 patients in total allowed extraction of a synthesized estimate of a time factor of 0.31 Gy/d (95% CI 0.20-0.42). The time factor increased the α/β estimate to 0.58 Gy (95% CI −0.53-1.69)/1.93 Gy (95% CI −0.27-4.14) with/without the heavily weighted study. An analysis of the uncertainty of the α/β estimate showed a loss of information when the hypofractionated arm was underdosed compared with the normo-fractionated arm. Conclusions: The current external beam fractionation studies are consistent with a very low α/β ratio for prostate cancer, although the CIs include α/β ratios up to 4.14 Gy in the presence of a time factor. Details of the dose fractionation in the 2 trial arms have critical influence on the information that can be extracted from a study. Studies with unfortunate designs will supply little or no information about α/β regardless of the number of subjects enrolled.

  8. Meta-analysis of the alpha/beta ratio for prostate cancer in the presence of an overall time factor: bad news, good news, or no news?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Bentzen, Søren M

    2013-01-01

    To present a novel method for meta-analysis of the fractionation sensitivity of tumors as applied to prostate cancer in the presence of an overall time factor. A systematic search for radiation dose-fractionation trials in prostate cancer was performed using PubMed and by manual search. Published trials comparing standard fractionated external beam radiation therapy with alternative fractionation were eligible. For each trial the α/β ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were extracted, and the data were synthesized with each study weighted by the inverse variance. An overall time factor was included in the analysis, and its influence on α/β was investigated. Five studies involving 1965 patients were included in the meta-analysis of α/β. The synthesized α/β assuming no effect of overall treatment time was -0.07 Gy (95% CI -0.73-0.59), which was increased to 0.47 Gy (95% CI -0.55-1.50) if a single highly weighted study was excluded. In a separate analysis, 2 studies based on 10,808 patients in total allowed extraction of a synthesized estimate of a time factor of 0.31 Gy/d (95% CI 0.20-0.42). The time factor increased the α/β estimate to 0.58 Gy (95% CI -0.53-1.69)/1.93 Gy (95% CI -0.27-4.14) with/without the heavily weighted study. An analysis of the uncertainty of the α/β estimate showed a loss of information when the hypofractionated arm was underdosed compared with the normo-fractionated arm. The current external beam fractionation studies are consistent with a very low α/β ratio for prostate cancer, although the CIs include α/β ratios up to 4.14 Gy in the presence of a time factor. Details of the dose fractionation in the 2 trial arms have critical influence on the information that can be extracted from a study. Studies with unfortunate designs will supply little or no information about α/β regardless of the number of subjects enrolled. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Entrepreneurial motivation factors: : A case study of students at the Universities of Applied Sciences in the Helsinki Metropolitan region with respect to place of origin

    OpenAIRE

    Asfaw, Gezahegn Dawit

    2011-01-01

    According to research conducted in Finland concerning entrepreneurship, the involvement of students is minimal compared to people without educational background, and furthermore the significant number of businesses are only established by certain ethnic groups. Based on this argument, this thesis aims to identify primarily the motivational factors that inspire students to be entrepreneurs, focusing mainly on students studying in the Helsinki metropolitan region at Universities of Applied Scie...

  10. [Influence of the news media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena Luna, R

    1991-01-01

    Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

  11. Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarnio, K.; Saarikoski, S. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Niemi, J.V. [HSY Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of ambient particles under the influence of biomass burning emissions was studied in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA) in selected periods during 2005-2009. Monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs; levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan), commonly known biomass burning tracers, were used to estimate the wood combustion contribution to local particulate matter (PM) concentration levels at three urban background sites close to the city centre, and at three suburban sites influenced by local small-scale wood combustion. In the cold season (October-March), the mean MAs concentrations were 115-225 ng m{sup -3} and 83-98 ng m{sup -} {sup 3}at the suburban and urban sites, respectively. In the warm season, the mean MAs concentrations were low (19-78 ng m{sup -3}), excluding open land fire smoke episodes (222-378 ng m{sup -}3{sup )}. Regionally distributed wood combustion particles raised the levels over the whole HMA while particles from local wood combustion sources raised the level at suburban sites only. The estimated average contribution of wood combustion to fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) ranged from 18% to 29% at the urban sites and from 31% to 66% at the suburban sites in the cold season. The PM measurements from ambient air and combustion experiments showed that the proportions of the three MAs can be utilised to separate the wildfire particles from residential wood combustion particles. (orig.)

  12. A healthy Nordic diet and physical performance in old age: findings from the longitudinal Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perälä, Mia-Maria; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela; Männistö, Satu; Salonen, Minna K; Simonen, Mika; Kanerva, Noora; Pohjolainen, Pertti; Kajantie, Eero; Rantanen, Taina; Eriksson, Johan G

    2016-03-14

    Epidemiological studies have shown that a number of nutrients are associated with better physical performance. However, little is still known about the role of the whole diet, particularly a healthy Nordic diet, in relation to physical performance. Therefore, we examined whether a healthy Nordic diet was associated with measures of physical performance 10 years later. We studied 1072 participants from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. Participants' diet was assessed using a validated 128-item FFQ at the mean age of 61 years, and a priori-defined Nordic diet score (NDS) was calculated. The score included Nordic fruits and berries, vegetables, cereals, PUFA:SFA and trans-fatty acids ratio, low-fat milk, fish, red and processed meat, total fat and alcohol. At the mean age of 71 years, participants' physical performance was measured using the Senior Fitness Test (SFT), and an overall SFT score was calculated. Women in the highest fourth of the NDS had on average 5 points higher SFT score compared with those in the lowest fourth (P for trend 0·005). No such association was observed in men. Women with the highest score had 17% better result in the 6-min walk test, 16% better arm curl and 20% better chair stand results compared with those with the lowest score (all P valueshealthy Nordic diet was associated with better overall physical performance among women and might help decrease the risk of disability in old age.

  13. Mental health functioning (SF-36) and intentions to retire early among ageing municipal employees: the Helsinki Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkonmäki, Karoliina; Lahelma, Eero; Martikainen, Pekka; Rahkonen, Ossi; Silventoinen, Karri

    2006-01-01

    To examine the associations of mental health functioning with intentions to retire early among ageing municipal employees. Cross-sectional survey data (n = 7,765) from the Helsinki Health Study in 2000, 2001, and 2002 were used. Intentions to retire early were sought with a question: "Have you considered retiring before normal retirement age?" The dependent variable was divided into three categories: 1 = no intentions to retire early; 2 = weak intentions; 3 = strong intentions. Mental health functioning was measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) mental component summary (MCS). Other variables included age, sex, physical health functioning (SF-36), limiting longstanding illness, socioeconomic status, and spouse's employment status. Multinomial regression analysis was used to examine the association of mental health functioning with intentions to retire early. Employees with the poorest mental health functioning were much more likely to report strong intentions to retire early (OR 6.09, 95% CI 4.97-7.47) than those with the best mental health functioning. Adjustments for physical health, socioeconomic status, and spouse's employment status did not substantially affect this association. The findings highlight the importance of mental health for intentions to retire early. Strategies aimed at keeping people at work for longer should emphasize the importance of mental well-being and the prevention of poor mental health. More evidence is needed on why mental problems among ageing baby-boomer employees are giving rise to increasing social consequences, although the overall prevalence of mental problems has not increased.

  14. Anomalously high concentrations of uranium, radium and radon in water from drilled wells in the Helsinki region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asikainen, M.; Kahlos, H.

    1979-01-01

    The concentrations of uranium, 226 Ra and 222 Rn were determined in 308 drilled and 58 dug wells in the Helsinki region. The study area was about 400 km 2 and geologically highly variable, with granites, amphibolites and migmatites the dominant rocks. The radioactivity of water in the dug wells was on a 'normal' level, but in numerous drilled wells it was anomalously high. In 14 drilled wells the concentration of uranium exceeded 1000 μg/l, the highest concentration being 14,870 μg/l. For 222 Rn the maximum concentration was 880,000 pCi/l. The 226 Ra/ 228 Ra and 230 Th/ 232 Th activity ratios showed the isotopes of the uranium series to be dominant in the study area. A state of disequilibrium between 238 U and 234 U was very common in the samples. The 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios varied in the range 1.0 to 4.0 regardless of the amount of uranium in the water. The conclusion can be drawn from the isotopic data that the high radioactivity of water is in some cases caused by primary uranium mineralizations, but mostly by uranium deposited in fissures of the bedrock. The paper includes a summary of the results of two studies carried out between 1967 and 1977. (author)

  15. Estimating efficacy in the presence of non-ignorable non-trial interventions in the Helsinki Psychotherapy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkänen, Tommi; Arjas, Elja; Laaksonen, Maarit A; Lindfors, Olavi; Haukka, Jari; Knekt, Paul

    2016-04-01

    In a randomised clinical trial with a longitudinal outcome, analyses of the efficacy of the study treatments may be complicated by both non-trial interventions, which have not been administered by the researcher, and sparsely measured outcome values. The delay between the change in outcome and the starting of the non-trial intervention may be much shorter than the time intervals between the actual measurements. We propose a model that accounts for the possible dynamic interdependence between the longitudinal outcome and time-to-event data. The model is based on discretising time into short intervals. This results in a missing data problem, which we tackle using Bayesian inference and data augmentation. The method is based on the assumption that decisions to initiate non-trial interventions are not confounded by unobservable factors. The Helsinki Psychotherapy Study data are used as an illustration. Different psychotherapies were compared, and possible episodes of psychotropic medication were viewed as non-trial interventions. Simulation studies suggest that our method provides reasonable estimates of the effects of both the study treatment and the non-trial intervention also showing some robustness against possible latent background factors. An application of marginal structural modelling, however, appeared to underestimate the differences between the treatments. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. Fake News Detection on Social Media: A Data Mining Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Sliva, Amy; Wang, Suhang; Tang, Jiliang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, its low cost, easy access, and rapid dissemination of information lead people to seek out and consume news from social media. On the other hand, it enables the wide spread of "fake news", i.e., low quality news with intentionally false information. The extensive spread of fake news has the potential for extremely negative impacts on individuals and society. Therefore, fake news detection on social media has recently b...

  17. The Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology: a way forward with the European Board and the European Society of Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, F; Solca, M; De Robertis, E; Peduto, V A; Pasetto, A; Conti, G; Antonelli, M; Pelosi, P

    2010-11-01

    Anesthesiology, which includes anaesthesia, perioperative care, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy, is acknowledged as the leading medical specialty in addressing issues of patient safety, but there is still a long way to go. Several factors pose hazards in Anesthesiology, like increasingly older and sicker patients, more complex surgical interventions, more pressure on throughput, as well as new drugs and devices. To better design educational and research strategies to improve patient safety, the European Board of Anesthesiology (EBA) and the European Society of Anesthesiology (ESA) have produced a blueprint for patient safety in Anesthesiology. This document, to be known as the Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology, was endorsed together with the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists (WFSA), and the European Patients' Federation (EPF) at the Euroanaesthesia meeting in Helsinki in June 2010. It was signed by several Presidents of National Anesthesiology Societies as well as other stakeholders. The Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology represents a shared European view of what is necessary to improve patient safety, recommending practical steps that all anesthesiologists can include in their own clinical practice. The Italian Society of Anaesthesia, Analgesia, Reanimation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI) is looking forward to continuing work on "patient safety" issues in Europe, and to cooperating with the ESA in the best interest of European patients.

  18. Personal exposures to NO2 in the EXPOLIS-study: relation to residential indoor, outdoor and workplace concentrations in Basel, Helsinki and Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousa, A.; Rotko, T.; Alm, S.; Monn, C.

    2001-01-01

    Personal exposures, residential indoor, outdoor and workplace levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) were measured for 262 urban adult (25-55 years) participants in three EXPOLIS centres (Basel, Switzerland; Helsinki, Finland; and Prague, Czech Republic) using passive samplers for 48-h sampling periods during 1996-1997. The average residential outdoor and indoor NO 2 levels were lowest in Helsinki (24 ± 12 and 18 ± 11 μgm -3 , respectively), highest in Prague (61 ± 20 and 43 ± 23μgm -3 ), with Basel in between (36 ± 13 and 27± 13μgm -3 ). Average workplace NO 2 levels, however, were highest in Basel (36 ± 24μgm -3 ), lowest in Helsinki (27 ± 15μgm -3 ), with Prague in between (30 ± 18μgm -3 ). A time-weighted microenvironmental exposure model explained 74% of the personal exposure variation in all centre and in average 88% of the exposures. Log-linear regression models, using residential outdoor measurements (fixed site monitoring) combined with residential and work characteristics (i.e. work location, using gas appliances and keeping windows open), explained 48% (37%) of the personal NO 2 exposure variation. Regression models based on ambient fixed site concentrations alone explained only 11-19% of personal NO 2 exposure variation. Thus, ambient fixed site monitoring alone was a poor predictor for personal NO 2 exposure variation, but adding personal questionnaire information can significantly improve the predicting power. (Author)

  19. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  20. Modeling news dissemination on nuclear issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Menezes, Mario O., E-mail: jsbrj@ime.usp.b, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b, E-mail: mario@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Using a modified epidemiological model, the dissemination of news by media agents after the occurrence of large scale disasters was studied. A modified compartmented model was developed in a previous paper presented at INAC 2007. There it used to study to the Chernobyl's nuclear accident (1986) and the Concorde airplane crash (2000). Now the model has been applied to a larger and more diverse group of events - nuclear, non-nuclear and naturally caused disasters. To be comprehensive, old and recent events from various regions of the world were selected. A more robust news repository was used, and improved search techniques were developed to ensure that the scripts would not count false positive news. The same model was used but with improved non-linear embedded simulation optimization algorithms to generate the parameters of interest for our model. Individual parameters and some specific combination of them allow some interesting perceptions on how the nature of the accident / disaster gives rise to different profiles of growth and decay of the news. In our studies events involving nuclear causes generate news repercussion with more explosive / robust surge profiles and longer decaying tails than those of other natures. As a consequence of these differences, public opinion and policy makers are also much more sensitive to some issues than to others. The model, through its epidemiological parameters, shows in quantitative manner how 'nervous' the media content generators are with respect to nuclear installations and how resilient this negative feelings about nuclear is. (author)

  1. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H; Sibley, Chris G; Osborne, Danny; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media's role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950's, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world's most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand). In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice.

  2. Modeling news dissemination on nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Menezes, Mario O.

    2011-01-01

    Using a modified epidemiological model, the dissemination of news by media agents after the occurrence of large scale disasters was studied. A modified compartmented model was developed in a previous paper presented at INAC 2007. There it used to study to the Chernobyl's nuclear accident (1986) and the Concorde airplane crash (2000). Now the model has been applied to a larger and more diverse group of events - nuclear, non-nuclear and naturally caused disasters. To be comprehensive, old and recent events from various regions of the world were selected. A more robust news repository was used, and improved search techniques were developed to ensure that the scripts would not count false positive news. The same model was used but with improved non-linear embedded simulation optimization algorithms to generate the parameters of interest for our model. Individual parameters and some specific combination of them allow some interesting perceptions on how the nature of the accident / disaster gives rise to different profiles of growth and decay of the news. In our studies events involving nuclear causes generate news repercussion with more explosive / robust surge profiles and longer decaying tails than those of other natures. As a consequence of these differences, public opinion and policy makers are also much more sensitive to some issues than to others. The model, through its epidemiological parameters, shows in quantitative manner how 'nervous' the media content generators are with respect to nuclear installations and how resilient this negative feelings about nuclear is. (author)

  3. THE REPRESENTATION OF EGYPTIAN PEOPLE’S VOICE IN THE JAKARTA GLOBE NEWS PHOTOGRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fini Fitriani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: As a product of mass media, news photograph is an image which provides the viewers with a valuable source of information and news story. All events captured in photographs turn into a news photo. Besides covering the news with fact, news photographs do not only have surface meanings, but also deeper meanings to be interpreted by each viewer. The phenomenon of demonstration, particularly the massive demonstration in Egypt in 2011, offers a good chance to discover how visual messages have been presented to guide interpretation of foreign news events. Principally, demonstration is an expression of the people’s voices, and thus, their voices are related closely with their demands, grievances and wishes related to the new government. Here, the photographs are able to portray and reflect the people’s voices through the compositions and contents (meanings involved in the photos. This study is aimed at discovering the portrayal of the voice of the people (the protesters in the news photographs of the Indonesian online newspaper, The Jakarta Globe. The data consist of 15 news photographs taken from The Jakarta Globe online newspaper published in January – October 2011. The study employs qualitative method framed with semiotic analysis using Roland Barthes’ theory of orders of signification and photographic message. The results of the study show that The Jakarta Globe visually constructs this event (demonstration by focusing on the human action (the protesters. Thus, the voice of the people is portrayed in the photo subjects (the protesters and the included objects of the photo. Meanwhile, the technical aspects of the photos play a meaningful role in emerging the portrayal of the people’s voice. There are four voices revealed by the people in the 15 photographs, namely the voice of freedom, the voice of peace, the voice of justice and the voice of human rights. The photo text including headlines and captions also interact with

  4. HOW GOOD IS GOODS AND SERVICES TAX

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Sreemoyee Guha Roy

    2016-01-01

    Goods and Services Tax is a broad based and a single comprehensive tax levied on goods and services consumed in an economy. GST is levied at every stage of the production-distribution chain with applicable set offs in respect of the tax remitted at previous stages. It is basically a tax on final consumption. The Goods and Services Tax (GST) is a value added tax to be implemented in India, the decision on which is pending. GST is the only indirect tax that directly affects all sectors and sect...

  5. The interaction of financial news between mass media and new media: Evidence from news on Chinese stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Zuochao; Liu, Lanbiao; Shen, Dehua

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate both the contemporaneous and the lead-lag relationships between the mass media news and the new media news of the financial news on the constitute stocks of the CSI 300. The empirical results show that: (1) there exists a strong correlation between these two types of news; (2) the granger causality direction from new media news to mass media news is increasingly obvious, while the reverse direction has a downward trend; (3) new media is playing a increasingly important role in the stock market and exhibits a trend to substitutes the mass media.

  6. Exploring the New Narrative of Internet News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that digital tools provide opportunities for new storytelling techniques. To take full advantage of the new media resources and to establish an innovative news narrative structure, the existing research limit and the relationship between narrative and the media were examined. This paper progresses from a discussion on the narrative structure to how the plot of a story is influenced by its discourse, and then to how different media characteristics can change the structure and voice of the involved narrative. A new narrative structure that can be used to explore the hypertext and interactivity of Internet news is described. Finally, this paper discusses the cultivation of news storytelling in the digital age.

  7. [Breaking bad news in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Andrea; Ríos, Matías; Manríquez, José Manuel; Rojas, Gonzalo

    2014-10-01

    Breaking bad news is a complex task that requires multiple communication skills from health professionals. Clinical practice demands to communicate all type of bad news, from a diagnosis of cancer to adverse effects of a treatment. On the other hand, since the beginning of the health reform in 2003, the need to improve the quality of services was proposed, among which the concern about the rights and duties of patients stands out. Therefore, the health care provider-patient relationship becomes again the subject of discussion and study, and a topic of great importance for clinical work. We revise the consequences of breaking bad news for the patient and for the health care provider, as well as the current protocols available for this purpose. The importance of developing communication skills both for future health professionals as for those who currently work in the area is emphasized.

  8. Swisster – a news website for Anglophones

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Employees of CERN can now sign up for a free account at Swisster.ch, an English language website devoted to Swiss news and current affairs. « prev next » The website, which is aimed at English speakers in Switzerland, normally requires an annual subscription of 300 CHF, but has teamed up with sponsors to offer a free subscription for CERN employees. The service provides a daily newsletter containing the main news and other information sent to subscribers every working day. The Swisster website also offers a variety of services such as health, education and food forums called "corners", as well as weather & snow forecasts, blogs and even a TV guide for Anglophones. The editorial team of English-speaking journalists is based in Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich and Neuchatel and covers news for expatriates and English speakers living and working in Switzerland. Swisster.ch also has a Saturday morning radio show from 08:30 to 09:30, on Radio Cit�...

  9. Water and environment news. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This news bulletin will brief the reader on news related to isotope applications in the water and environment sector. It will bring the reader up to date on what is going on in the various projects constituting the IAEA sub programme entitled D evelopment and Management of Water Resources , and will highlight new results and achievements made in implementing the programme activities, including those jointly carried out with other organizations and institutes. Furthermore, the news bulletin will serve as an international open forum for the exchange of information in isotope hydrology and related fields. The first issue will make readers acquainted with general aspects of the Agency's sub-programme mentioned above, give an overview on past activities and achievements, and highlight current ones. The Agency's staff involved in all these activities is briefly introduced

  10. The Spin Doctors of news sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Antonio Schmitz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a historical context, with reference to concrete cases, the phenomenon of spin doctors. What is it? How does it act? What is its purpose? Where does it operate? And what are its consequences? These questions are raised in order to help identify the actions and strategies benefitting news sources, as well as the impact on journalism: the accommodation of journalists, the reduction or elimination of investigative journalism, the transference of the news to digital social networks, and the expansion of media sources. The article draws on a survey conducted with 163 news sources and journalists, on the premise that spin doctors are professional communicators, who are able to forge public opinion using processes, procedures, journalist’s co-optation, and knowledge of journalism and public relations, in order to be successful in the media, or directly with the target audience.

  11. THE SPIN DOCTORS OF NEWS SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Antonio Schmitz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a historical context, with reference to concrete cases, the phenomenon of spin doctors. What is it? How does it act? What is its purpose? Where does it operate? And what are its consequences? These questions are raised in order to help identify the actions and strategies benefitting news sources, as well as the impact on journalism: the accommodation of journalists, the reduction or elimination of investigative journalism, the transference of the news to digital social networks, and the expansion of media sources. The article draws on a survey conducted with 163 news sources and journalists, on the premise that spin doctors are professional communicators, who are able to forge public opinion using processes, procedures, journalist’s co-optation, and knowledge of journalism and public relations, in order to be successful in the media, or directly with the target audience.

  12. Bioenergy good practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birse, J.; Chambers, K.

    2000-07-01

    This report gives details of a project to make the Good Practice Guidelines, which were developed to help the UK Bioenergy industry, the national and local governments, and the public, more widely available. Details concerning the designing of a Good Practice Programme, and the proposed codes of Good Practice programme are given, and general relevant good practice guidance documents are discussed. The stakeholder survey and workshop, and the proposed codes of a Good Practice Programme are presented in Annexes. (UK)

  13. Bad news: The influence of news coverage and Google searches on Gardasil adverse event reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faasse, Kate; Porsius, Jarry T; Faasse, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie R

    2017-12-14

    Human papilloma virus vaccines are a safe and effective tool for reducing HPV infections that can cause cervical cancer. However, uptake of these vaccines has been suboptimal, with many people holding negative beliefs and misconceptions. Such beliefs have been linked with the experience of unpleasant side effects following medical treatment, and media coverage may heighten such concerns. The present study sought to assess the influence of news coverage (number of news articles per month) on adverse event reporting in response to Gardasil vaccination in New Zealand over a 7.5-year period, and whether the influence of news coverage was mediated by internet search activity (Google search volumes). Multiple linear regression analyses and simple mediation analyses were used, controlling for year and number of vaccinations delivered. News coverage in the previous month, and Google search volumes in the same month, were significant predictors of adverse event reporting, after accounting for vaccination rates and year. Concurrent Google search volumes partially mediated the effect of prior news coverage. The results suggest that some of the adverse events reported were not related to the vaccination itself, but to news coverage and internet search volumes, which may have contributed to public concerns about potentially unpleasant or harmful outcomes. These findings have implications for the importance of psychological and social factors in adverse event reporting, and the role of the news media in disseminating health information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. When Sound Bites Become the News: a Case Study on Manufacturing News in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tena Perišin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Media environment is rapidly changing and facing a widespread crisis in journalism. It is followed by the decline of audience trust and increasing market pressures. The main goal is to win the audience’s attention, very often by creating drama and producing ‘conflict’. The news is not based on something that really happened and that is relevant, but it is more often manufactured or artificially produced. In this case study we explore the curious life cycle of a sound bite from a passing remark by the then Croatian Prime Minister Zoran Milanović’s to the headlines, discussions and extensive reports which developed over the course of several days. This example shows how news could be manufactured and content blurred when it is built around a fragment without providing the context, in this case a political quote. For several days, politicians, experts, war veterans, but also ordinary citizens were involved in the manufactured news story without making a reference to the context. Consequently, the democratic debate was avoided. Drawing on a discussion of news fragmentation as isolation from context, we show that in this case, news values (what news is are increasingly blurred, preventing the news from becoming the source of information and discussion of the country’s key issues.

  15. Microneurosurgical Management of Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm: A Contemporary Series from Helsinki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiarawat, Peeraphong; Jahromi, Behnam Rezai; Kozyrev, Danil A; Intarakhao, Patcharin; Teo, Mario K; Choque-Velasquez, Joham; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyze microsurgical techniques and to determine correlations between microsurgical techniques and the radiographic findings in the microneurosurgical treatment of posterior communicating artery aneurysms (PCoAAs). We retrospectively analyzed radiographic findings and videos of surgeries in 64 patients with PCoAAs who underwent microsurgical clipping by the senior author from August 2010 to 2014. From 64 aneurysms, 30 (47%) had acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that necessitated lamina terminalis fenestration (odds ratio [OR], 67.67; P < 0.001) and Liliequist membrane fenestration (OR, 19.62; P < 0.001). The low-lying aneurysms significantly necessitated the coagulation of the dura covering the anterior clinoid process (ACP) (OR, 7.43; P = 0.003) or anterior clinoidectomy (OR, 91.0; P < 0.001). We preferred straight clips in 45 (83%) of 54 posterolateral projecting aneurysms (OR, 45.0; P < 0.001), but preferred curved clips for posteromedial projecting aneurysms (OR, 6.39; P = 0.008). The mean operative time from the brain retraction to the final clipping was 17 minutes and 43 seconds. Postoperative computed tomography angiography revealed complete occlusion of 60 (94%) aneurysms. Three (4.6%) patients with acute SAH suffered postoperative lacunar infarction. For ruptured aneurysms, lamina terminalis and Liliequist membrane fenestration are useful for additional cerebrospinal fluid drainage. For low-lying aneurysms, coagulation of the dura covering the ACP or tailored anterior clinoidectomy might be necessary for exposing the proximal aneurysm neck. Type of clips depends on the direction of projection. The microsurgical clipping of the PCoAAs can achieve good immediate complete occlusion rate with low postoperative stroke rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Rhetorical Illusions of News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    ; and so on and so forth. In sum: the conditioned reaction on questions about ‘what journalism is good for’ tends to lead back toward familiar rhetorics and rationales. Journalism’s normative claims rely heavily upon these established modernist discourses which serve to affirm its essential role within...

  17. TUBERCULOSIS IN AFRICA - ANY NEWS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERWERF, TS

    1994-01-01

    The tuberculosis situation in Africa in the AIDS era has become bleak. The tuberculosis incidence has increased in most sub-Saharan African countries, diagnosis has become more difficult, response to treatment, though initially good, is eventually less effective, and patient compliance, which has

  18. Breaking bad news among cancer physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ayed Alshammary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breaking bad news to patients with cancer diagnosis is not an easy task for physicians. The diagnosis must be explicitly stated and understood, and prognosis must be well-discussed in the most gentle and comfortable manner. It is important that the disclosure is performed in a way that patients will not lose all hope and get very depressed, leading them to undergo an abrupt change of their outlook in life. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the physicians' perceptions and perspectives of breaking bad news to cancer patients. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of all comprehensive cancer centre physicians currently working in a university teaching hospital in the Middle East was conducted from August to September 2016. Results: Sixty-eight percent responded to the survey. Eighty-four percent were comfortable with breaking bad news, and 70% had training in breaking bad news. Eighty-six percent of responders stated that patients should be told about their cancer. Almost 30% of the respondents stated that they would still disclose the diagnosis to patients even if it would be against the preference of the relatives. Nearly 61% said that they would only tell the details to the patients if asked while 67% of them disagreed that patients should be told about the diagnoses only if the relatives consent. About 51% of physicians wanted to discuss the bad news with the family members and patient together, whereas 24% stated that the patient alone should be involved in the discussion. Conclusion: Physicians face a dilemma when families do not wish the patient to know the cancer diagnosis and this highlights the necessity of taking into consideration the social circumstances in healthcare. When taking these into considerations, curriculum in the medical school must, therefore, be updated and must integrate the acquisition of skills in breaking bad news early in training.

  19. Tipping news in information accumulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J. K.

    2010-05-01

    As a continuous opinion dynamics model, the information accumulation system (IAS) includes three basic mechanisms of the news, the inheritance and the diffusion as contributing to the information accumulation process of a system. A system is composed of agents who diffuse information through internal interaction, while each of them has incomplete memory or inheritance rate. The news comes from external sources of information, such as mass media. Previously the model IAS was studied only for the small news problems. In this study, a tipping news problem is considered. A key question of the problem is: what is the minimum strength of advertisement that can tip the minority opinion to a majority one? Dynamics of the IAS is briefly revisited with a special interest on nonlinear behavior of the model. In particular, it is shown that a discrete map of the IAS for a single color problem can be transformed into a logistic map, from which the dynamics of the IAS can be better understood. To show the applicability of the IAS model, the result is applied to explain the concept of the critical population size, which claims that there is a minimum population size for a social knowledge system to be continuously inherited without being lost. And critical size of the tipping news is found analytically in terms of IAS parameters. Some of the key results from the present study are compared in detail with the results from the Brownian particle model, which is believed to be the most similar model to the IAS. The concept of tipping news is used to show that a traditional society can tip at an exceptionally low inter-community exposure. Finally, the result was applied to the language competition problem.

  20. Television News Uses: A Cross-National Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mark R.

    1978-01-01

    Reports that a classification of television news uses and gratifications based on research in Leeds, England, did not adequately encompass the functions of television news for a United States audience. (GW)

  1. Volume, Volatility and Public News Announcements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Jia; Xue, Yuan

    We provide new empirical evidence for the way in which financial markets process information. Our results are based on high-frequency intraday data along with new econometric techniques for making inference on the relationship between trading intensity and spot volatility around public news...... announcements. Consistent with the predictions derived from a theoretical model in which investors agree to disagree, our estimates for the intraday volume-volatility elasticity around the most important news announcements are systematically below unity. Our elasticity estimates also decrease significantly...

  2. Welcome to the Era of Fake News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Albright

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For the news industry, information is used to tell stories, which have traditionally been organized around “facts”. A growing problem, however, is that fact-based evidence is not relevant to a growing segment of the populace. Journalists need facts to tell stories, but they need data to understand how to engage audiences with this accurate information. The implementation of data is part of the solution to countering the erosion of trust and the decay of social discourse across networked spaces. Rather than following “trends”, news organizations should establish the groundwork to make facts “matter” by shaping the narrative instead of following deceptive statements.

  3. Personalized News Recommendation: A Review and an Experimental Investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Li; Ding-Ding Wang; Shun-Zhi Zhu; Tao Li

    2011-01-01

    Online news articles,as a new format of press releases,have sprung up on the Internet.With its convenience and recency,more and more people prefer to read news online instead of reading the paper-format press releases.However,a gigantic amount of news events might be released at a rate of hundreds,even thousands per hour.A challenging problem is how to efficiently select specific news articles from a large corpus of newly-published press releases to recommend to individual readers,where the selected news items should match the reader's reading preference as much as possible.This issue refers to personalized news recommendation.Recently,personalized news recommendation has become a promising research direction as the Internet provides fast access to real-time information from multiple sources around the world.Existing personalized news recommendation systems strive to adapt their services to individual users by virtue of both user and news content information.A variety of techniques have been proposed to tackle personalized news recommendation,including content-based,collaborative filtering systems and hybrid versions of these two.In this paper,we provide a comprehensive investigation of existing personalized news recommenders.We discuss several essential issues underlying the problem of personalized news recommendation,and explore possible solutions for performance improvement.Further,we provide an empirical study on a collection of news articles obtained from various news websites,and evaluate the effect of different factors for personalized news recommendation.We hope our discussion and exploration would provide insights for researchers who are interested in personalized news recommendation.

  4. Decoding youth DNA: The relationship between social engagement and news interest, news media use and news preferences of Dutch millennials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drok, N.; Hermans, E.A.H.M.; Kats, K.

    2018-01-01

    There is a growing concern in Western democracies about the decline in young people's use of news media. Some scholars see it as a result of a diminishing interest in social issues and even of a more general deterioration in civic culture. Others claim that young people still feel socially engaged

  5. Software licenses: Good fences make good neighbors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreary, J.G.; Woodyard, A.

    1995-01-01

    The basis for a good contract is that it is beneficial to both parties. A good foundation will cement the responsibilities and obligations of the parties after areas of agreement have been negotiated. Unfortunately, software licenses do not always reflect what is best for all. Some clauses are definitely for the benefit of the vendor, while others are required by a prudent client. The resulting contract is then a matter of reasonable compromise to achieve a good business relationship. Major issues of warranty, liability, training, support, and payment may be in conflict. Such topics as maintenance, testing, patents, extent of use, and return of software are often overlooked or addressed unevenly. This paper addresses these subjects and provides guidelines for software licenses. An understanding of legal phrases is of value. A better understanding of the viewpoints of both the vendor and the client results in a better working relationship

  6. VOC source identification from personal and residential indoor, outdoor and workplace microenvironment samples in EXPOLIS-Helsinki, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Rufus D. [KTL-Finnish National Inst. of Public Health, Dept. of Environmental Hygiene, Kuopio (Finland); California Univ., School of Public Health, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jurvelin, J. [KTL-Finnish National Inst. of Public Health, Dept. of Environmental Hygiene, Kuopio (Finland); Jyvaeskylae Polytechnic, School of Engineering and Technology, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Koistinen, K. [KTL-Finnish National Inst. of Public Health, Dept. of Environmental Hygiene, Kuopio (Finland); Saarela, K. [VTT, Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Jantunen, M. [EC JRC, Inst. of the Environment, Ispra (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    Principal component analyses (varimax rotation) were used to identify common sources of 30 target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential outdoor, residential indoor and workplace microenvironment and personal 48-h exposure samples, as a component of the EXPOLIS-Helsinki study. Variability in VOC concentrations in residential outdoor microenvironments was dominated by compounds associated with long-range transport of pollutants, followed by traffic emissions, emissions from trees and product emissions. Variability in VOC concentrations in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) free residential indoor environments was dominated by compounds associated with indoor cleaning products, followed by compounds associated with traffic emissions, long-range transport of pollutants and product emissions. Median indoor/outdoor ratios for compounds typically associated with traffic emissions and long-range transport of pollutants exceeded 1, in some cases quite considerably, indicating substantial indoor source contributions. Changes in the median indoor/outdoor ratios during different seasons reflected different seasonal ventilation patterns as increased ventilation led to dilution of those VOC compounds in the indoor environment that had indoor sources. Variability in workplace VOC concentrations was dominated by compounds associated with traffic emissions followed by product emissions, long-range transport and air fresheners. Variability in VOC concentrations in ETS free personal exposure samples was dominated by compounds associated with traffic emissions, followed by long-range transport, cleaning products and product emissions. VOC sources in personal exposure samples reflected the times spent in different microenvironments, and personal exposure samples were not adequately represented by any one microenvironment, demonstrating the need for personal exposure sampling. (Author)

  7. Analyses of Helsinki 2012 European Athletics Championships injury and illness surveillance to discuss elite athletes risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edouard, Pascal; Depiesse, Frédéric; Branco, Pedro; Alonso, Juan-Manuel

    2014-09-01

    To further analyze newly incurred injuries and illnesses (I&Is) during Athletics International Championships to discuss risk factors. Prospective recording of newly occurred injuries and illnesses. The 2012 European Athletics (EA) Championships in Helsinki, Finland. National team and local organizing committee physicians and physiotherapists and 1342 registered athletes. Incidence and characteristics of new injuries and illnesses. Ninety-three percent of athletes were covered by medical teams, with a response rate of 91%. One hundred thirty-three injuries were reported (incidence of 98.4 injuries per 1000 registered athletes). Sixty-two injuries (47%) resulted in time loss from sport. The most common diagnosis was hamstring strain (11.4% of injuries and 21% of time-loss injuries). Injury risk was higher in males and increased with age. The highest incidences of injuries were found in combined events and middle- and long-distance events. Twenty-seven illnesses were reported (4.0 illnesses per 1000 athlete days). The most common diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (33.3%) and gastroenteritis/diarrhea (25.9%). During outdoor EA Championships, injury and illness incidences were slightly lower and injury characteristics were comparable with those during outdoor World Athletics Championships. During elite athletics Championships, gender (male), age (older than 30 years), finals, and some events (combined events and middle- and long-distance races) seem to be injury risk factors. Illness risk factors remain unclear. As in previous recommendations, preventive interventions should focus on overuse injuries, hamstring strains, and adequate rehabilitation of previous injuries, decreasing risk of infectious diseases transmission, appropriate event scheduling, sports clothes, and heat acclimatization.

  8. Early life origins of all-cause and cause-specific disability pension: findings from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaela B von Bondorff

    Full Text Available There is some evidence linking sub-optimal prenatal development to an increased risk of disability pension (DP. Our aim was to investigate whether body size at birth was associated with transitioning into all-cause and cause-specific DP during the adult work career.10 682 people born in 1934-44 belonging to the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study had data on birth weight extracted from birth records, and on time, type and reason of retirement between 1971 and 2011 extracted from the Finnish Centre for Pensions.Altogether 21.3% transitioned into DP during the 40-year follow-up, mainly due to mental disorders, musculoskeletal disorders and cardiovascular disease. Average age of transitioning into DP was 51.3 (SD 8.4 for men and 52.2 (SD 7.6 for women. Cohort members who did not transition into DP retired 10 years later on average. Among men, higher birth weight was associated with a lower hazard of transitioning into DP, adjusted hazard ratio (HR being 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88-0.99 for 1 SD increase in birth weight. For DP due to mental disorders the adjusted HR was 0.90, 95% CI 0.81, 0.99. A similar but non-significant trend was found for DP due to cardiovascular disease. Among women there were no associations between body size at birth and all-cause DP (p for interaction gender*birth weight on DP p = 0.007.Among men disability pension, particularly due to mental disorders, may have its origins in prenatal development. Given that those who retire due to mental health problems are relatively young, the loss to the workforce is substantial.

  9. Temporal differences in gamma-hydroxybutyrate overdoses involving injecting drug users versus recreational drug users in Helsinki: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd James J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL have been profiled as 'party drugs' used mainly at dance parties and in nightclubs on weekend nights. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of injecting drug use among GHB/GBL overdose patients and whether there are temporal differences in the occurrence of GHB/GBL overdoses of injecting drug and recreational drug users. Methods In this retrospective study, the ambulance and hospital records of suspected GHB- and GBL overdose patients treated by the Helsinki Emergency Medical Service from January 1st 2006 to December 31st 2007 were reviewed. According to the temporal occurrence of the overdose, patients were divided in two groups. In group A, the overdose occurred on a Friday-Saturday or Saturday-Sunday night between 11 pm-6 am. Group B consisted of overdoses occurring on outside this time frame. Results Group A consisted of 39 patient contacts and the remaining 61 patient contacts were in group B. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in (group A vs. B, respectively: history of injecting drug abuse (33% vs. 59%, p = 0.012, reported polydrug and ethanol use (80% vs. 62%, p = 0.028, the location where the patients were encountered (private or public indoors or outdoors, 10%, 41%, 41% vs. 25%, 18%, 53%, p = 0.019 and how the knowledge of GHB/GBL use was obtained (reported by patient/bystanders or clinical suspicion, 72%, 28% vs. 85%, 10%, p = 0.023. Practically all (99% patients were transported to emergency department after prehospital care. Conclusion There appears to be at least two distinct groups of GHB/GBL users. Injecting drug users represent the majority of GHB/GBL overdose patients outside weekend nights.

  10. Chemical and physical characterization of traffic particles in four different highway environments in the Helsinki metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Enroth

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Traffic-related pollution is a major concern in urban areas due to its deleterious effects on human health. The characteristics of the traffic emissions on four highway environments in the Helsinki metropolitan area were measured with a mobile laboratory, equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation. Concentration gradients were observed for all traffic-related pollutants, particle number (CN, particulate mass (PM1, black carbon (BC, organics, and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2. Flow dynamics in different environments appeared to be an important factor for the dilution of the pollutants. For example, the half-decay distances for the traffic-related CN concentrations varied from 8 to 83 m at different sites. The PM1 emissions from traffic mostly consisted of organics and BC. At the most open site, the ratio of organics to BC increased with distance to the highway, indicating condensation of volatile and semi-volatile organics on BC particles. These condensed organics were shown to be hydrocarbons as the fraction of hydrocarbon fragments in organics increased. Regarding the CN size distributions, particle growth during the dilution was not observed; however the mass size distributions measured with a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS, showed a visible shift of the mode, detected at  ∼  100 nm at the roadside, to a larger size when the distance to the roadside increased. The fleet average emission factors appeared to be lower for the CN and higher for the NO2 than ten years ago. The reason is likely to be the increased fraction of light-duty (LD diesel vehicles in the past ten years. The fraction of heavy-duty (HD traffic, although constituting less than 10 % of the total traffic flow, was found to have a large impact on the emissions.

  11. College Students' News Gratifications, Media Use, and Current Events Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Richard C.; Basil, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Results of testing uses and gratifications theory with college students show students' media use and surveillance needs increase college year. Demographic differences and gratifications sought drive news media use. Surveillance needs result in increased use of all news media, whereas entertainment needs result in television news and CNN viewing.…

  12. Are news media substitutes? Gratifications, contents, and uses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wurff, R.

    2011-01-01

    Internet is generally expected to have one of two effects on traditional news media: It displaces them, or it forces them into distinct market niches. A shared assumption underlying both expectations is that news media displacement, or substitution, is a function of the degree to which news media

  13. A Predictive Framework for Determining How Journalists Determine News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudino, James L.

    To determine how to articulate a concrete definition of the substance of the journalist's occupation, this paper offers a propositional framework of news value based on Kurt Lewin's gatekeeper model. First, the paper follows the established suggestion that news decisions are best studied from a gatekeeping perspective or that "news is…

  14. Comprehending News Videotexts: The Influence of the Visual Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Informed by dual coding theory, this study explores the role of the visual content in L2 listeners' comprehension of news videotexts. L1 research into the visual characteristics and comprehension of news videotexts is outlined, subsequently informing the quantitative analysis of audiovisual correspondence in the news videotexts used. In each of…

  15. News and corporate reputation: Empirical findings from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.M.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the influence of business news on corporate reputation. A panel survey was used to measure the reputations of six companies and two professional sectors. Media coverage was analyzed by focusing on the tone of two different types of news. News about the successes of the

  16. The Determinants of International News Flow: A Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungmo; Barnett, George A.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the structure of international news flow and its determinants. Reveals inequality of international news flow between core and periphery, with Western industrialized countries at the center. Finds that the news flow network is structured into eight geographic-linguistic groups. Indicates flow is influenced by a country's economic…

  17. Top News Events of 1973 Ranked for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdin, Joel L.

    This document presents a listing of those news events for 1973 that are thought by the author to have the most immediate or potential significance for educators. It is noted that the selections were made primarily from the "Washington Post,""Washington Star-News,""New York Times," and weekly news magazines. The events, ranked in order of present…

  18. News, volatility and jumps: the case of Natural Gas futures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borovkova, S.A.; Mahakena, D.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of news sentiment on the price dynamics of natural gas futures. We propose a Local News Sentiment Level model, based on the Local Level model of Durbin and Koopman [Time Series Analysis by State Space Methods, 2001], to construct a running series of news sentiment from

  19. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... media attempts to influence any Agency employee on a substantial interest matter. ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a...

  20. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500... for news or advertising. Photographs for news purposes may be taken at the USNA without prior permission. Photographs for advertising and other commercial purposes may be taken, but only with the prior...