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Sample records for helping doctors counsel

  1. Does a self-referral counselling program reach doctors in need of help? A comparison with the general Norwegian doctor workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gude Tore

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doctors have a relatively high degree of emotional distress, but seek help to a lesser degree and at a later stage than other academic groups. This can be deleterious for themselves and for their patients. Prevention programs have therefore been developed but it is unclear to what extent they reach doctors in need of help. This study describes doctors who participated in a self-referrral, easily accessible, stress relieving, counselling program in Norway, and compares them with a nationwide sample of Norwegian doctors. Methods Two hundred and twenty seven (94% of the doctors, 117 women and 110 men, who came to the resort centre Villa Sana, Modum, Norway, between August 2003 and July 2005, agreed to participate in the study. Socio-demographic data, reasons for and ways of help-seeking, sick-leave, symptoms of depression and anxiety, job stress and burnout were assessed by self-reporting questionnaires. Results Forty-nine percent of the Sana doctors were emotionally exhausted (Maslach compared with 25% of all Norwegian doctors. However, they did not differ on empathy and working capacity, the other two dimensions in Maslach's burnout inventory. Seventy-three percent of the Sana doctors could be in need of treatment for depression or anxiety based on their symptom distress scores, compared with 14% of men and 18% of women doctors in Norway. Twenty-one percent of the Sana doctors had a history of suicidal thoughts, including how to commit the act, as compared to 10% of Norwegian doctors in general. Conclusion Sana doctors displayed a higher degree of emotional exhaustion, symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as job related stress, compared with all Norwegian doctors. This may indicate that the program at Villa Sana to a large extent reaches doctors in need of help. The counselling intervention can help doctors to evaluate their professional and private situation, and, when necessary, enhance motivation for seeking adequate

  2. Teaching doctors to treat doctors: medical student peer counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, J H; Roenneburg, M; Maly, B J

    1980-01-01

    Physicians' emotional problems need to be recognized and treated. Intervention and prevention in this problem area have been attempted at the Medical College of Wisconsin through a programme of peer counselling designed to teach student physicians how to recognize and treat emotional difficulties faced by their peers. During the 18 months that the programme has been in operation, 20 peer counsellors reported a total 1,185 hours spent in counselling their peers, lending credence to the speculation that doctors will turn to their peers for help if, in medical school, there is acceptance of fallibility and responsiveness on the part of peers.

  3. Online Counseling: Prioritizing Psychoeducation, Self-Help, and Mutual Help for Counseling Psychology Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This reaction article extends the research and practice recommendations for online counseling from the Major Contribution to the November 2005 issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" by prioritizing research and practice in online psychoeducation, self-help, and mutual help. Research suggests that tens of millions of Americans use the Internet for…

  4. Doctor of Professional Counseling: The Next Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Stephen; Cade, Rochelle; Locke, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    Professional doctorates have been established in the allied health professions by clinicians seeking the highest levels of independent practice. Allied health professional doctorates include nursing practice (DNP), occupational therapy (OTD), psychology (PsyD), social work (DSW), and marriage and family therapy (DMFT). Lessons learned from the…

  5. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Trainees' Satisfaction with Clinical Methods Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Kristen Ann

    2015-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral trainees' satisfaction with their clinical methods training is an important predictor of their self-efficacy as counselors, persistence in graduate programs, and probability of practicing psychotherapy in their careers (Fernando & Hulse-Killacky, 2005; Hadjipavlou & Ogrodniczuk, 2007; Morton & Worthley,…

  6. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students' Training Experiences in Primary Care Psychology

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    Cox, Jared

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on counseling psychology doctoral students' perspectives regarding their practicum training experience in primary care psychology. The four participants included three females and one male. Semi-structured individual and focus group interviews were used to explore participants' experiences. The participants described…

  7. Counselling for burnout in Norwegian doctors: one year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rø, Karin E Isaksson; Gude, Tore; Tyssen, Reidar; Aasland, Olaf G

    2008-11-11

    To investigate levels and predictors of change in dimensions of burnout after an intervention for stressed doctors. Cohort study followed by self reported assessment at one year. Norwegian resource centre. 227 doctors participating in counselling intervention, 2003-5. Counselling (lasting one day (individual) or one week (group based)) aimed at motivating reflection on and acknowledgement of the doctors' situation and personal needs. Levels of burnout (Maslach burnout inventory) and predictors of reduction in emotional exhaustion investigated by linear regression. 185 doctors (81%, 88 men, 97 women) completed one year follow-up. The mean level of emotional exhaustion (scale 1-5) was significantly reduced from 3.00 (SD 0.94) to 2.53 (SD 0.76) (t=6.76, Ppsychotherapy, from 20% (36/182) to 53% (97/182). In the whole cohort, reduction in emotional exhaustion was independently associated with reduced number of work hours/week (beta=0.17, P=0.03), adjusted for sex, age, and personality dimensions. Among men "satisfaction with the intervention" (beta=0.25, P=0.04) independently predicted reduction in emotional exhaustion. A short term counselling intervention could contribute to reduction in emotional exhaustion in doctors. This was associated with reduced working hours for the whole cohort and, in men, was predicted by satisfaction with the intervention.

  8. Counseling Health Psychology: Assessing Health Psychology Training within Counseling Psychology Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L.; Torrey, Carrie L.; Lewis, Brian L.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    Training directors of American Psychological Association-approved counseling psychology doctoral programs completed a questionnaire assessing (a) student and faculty involvement in health-related research, practice, and teaching; (b) health-related research conducted by students and faculty; and (c) programs' expectations and ability to…

  9. Financial Stress and Financial Counseling: Helping College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Sonya L.; Canale, Anthony; Fernatt, Fred; Stutz, Kristen; Tibbetts, Racquel

    2015-01-01

    This study had two distinct purposes. First, to determine the predictors of financial stress among college students who sought free peer-based financial counseling from a large Midwestern university (N = 675). Secondly, to determine the effectiveness of the particular financial counseling center from a subsample of those who sought help (N = 97).…

  10. Avoidance of Counseling: Psychological Factors that Inhibit Seeking Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, David L.; Wester, Stephen R.; Larson, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    How do counselors reach out to individuals who are reluctant to seek counseling services? To answer this question, the authors examined the research on the psychological help-seeking barriers from counseling, clinical and social psychology, as well as social work and psychiatry. Specific avoidance factors that have been identified in the mental…

  11. An Approach to Supervision for Doctoral and Entry-Level Group Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Robyn; Bambacus, Elizabeth; Gibson, Donna

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a supervision approach to experiential groups that replaces professors with doctoral students in the chain of supervision, enlists a faculty member to provide supervision of supervision to the doctoral students, and translates supervision theory to meet the unique needs of group counseling supervision.…

  12. Teaching Statistics in APA-Accredited Doctoral Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology: A Syllabi Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Anna S.; Ripley, Jennifer S.; Hook, Joshua; Erspamer, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Although statistical methods and research design are crucial areas of competency for psychologists, few studies explore how statistics are taught across doctoral programs in psychology in the United States. The present study examined 153 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology and aimed…

  13. An educational model for improving diet counselling in primary care. A case study of the creative use of doctors' own diet, their attitudes to it and to nutritional counselling of their patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Palmvig, Birthe; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire......Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire...

  14. Peer counselling for doctors in Norway: A qualitative study of the relationship between support and surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson Rø, Karin; Veggeland, Frode; Aasland, Olaf G

    2016-08-01

    Peer support can entail collegial responsibility for counselling and support as well as reactions to academic or ethical failure. These considerations can be complementary, but also conflicting. This article focuses on how the peer support programme in Norway addresses these considerations. Focus group interviews held with Norwegian peer counsellors from August 2011 to June 2012 were analysed by a stepwise deductive-inductive method. Based on organisational theory, two "ideal types" of counsellors were identified from the data, and these were then used to reanalyse the text. We found that the organisational framework is associated with the peer counsellors' role conception and thereby the relationship between the counsellor and the help-seeking doctor. The relationship between informal frameworks like collegiality, confidence and discretion, and more formalized incentive-driven frameworks, appear to influence the accessibility to peer support, the mandate to provide relevant help and the understanding of what peer support represents. The study showed the need for a continuous awareness of a balance between the informal and the more formalized elements in the framework for peer support. This is of importance for how the service can contribute to better health among doctors and to secure quality and safety in the treatment of patients. The analysis can also be used to demonstrate the consequences of how the peer support program is designed - such as the degree of formalisation and the balance between "hard" and "soft" ways to regulate the interaction between peer counsellors and doctors - for the ability to achieve the stated objectives of the service. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. New mobile App to help doctors evaluate cancer in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawerth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing cancer care for women is the aim of a new mobile app designed to help doctors evaluate more quickly and accurately the extent of cancer in female reproductive organs and select the most appropriate treatment. The app also includes investigation and management strategies based on best practices as endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). The FIGO Gyn Cancer Management app is available for use on iOS and Android devices. The new app is useful for a range of medical specialists, including gynaecologists, oncologists, pathologists and surgeons. Cancer management is an important strand of the IAEA’s work worldwide. It contributes to helping countries achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and, in particular, the target of reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, by one third by 2030.

  16. New mobile App to help doctors evaluate cancer in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawerth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing cancer care for women is the aim of a new mobile app designed to help doctors evaluate more quickly and accurately the extent of cancer in female reproductive organs and select the most appropriate treatment. The app also includes investigation and management strategies based on best practices as endorsed by the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). The FIGO Gyn Cancer Management app is available for use on iOS and Android devices. The new app is useful for a range of medical specialists, including gynaecologists, oncologists, pathologists and surgeons. Cancer management is an important strand of the IAEA’s work worldwide. It contributes to helping countries achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and, in particular, the target of reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases, such as cancer, by one third by 2030

  17. Social Justice and Counseling Psychology: Listening to the Voices of Doctoral Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Hofsess, Christy D.; Boyer, Elizabeth M.; Kwong, Agnes; Lau, Allison S. M.; McLain, Melissa; Haggins, Kristee L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand counseling psychology doctoral trainees' perceptions of social justice training in their academic programs. Participants (N = 66) completed an online social justice survey with open-ended questions. Researchers identified major themes of participants' responses (e.g., promotion of social…

  18. Latino Doctoral Students in Counseling Programs: Navigating Professional Identity within a Predominantly White American Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Anna Flores

    2017-01-01

    Using a basic qualitative research design, this author interviewed eight Latino doctoral students in counseling programs about their professional identity development experiences. The author analyzed the data from a Latino Critical Race theoretical perspective to explore the ways in which power and privilege played a role in the participants'…

  19. [The Web: a help or a labyrinth for doctors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor-Goldschmidt, C; Massard, C

    2010-10-01

    Internet, unknown there fifteen years, has become commonly used today to communicate and exchange all types of information. Concerning medical points, this network is full of data and has become indispensable to physicians. The biomedical knowledge base is changing so fast that it is impossible for a doctor to know everything about everything. Specialists are increasingly specialized but must keep aware of developments in medical knowledge and above all must be able to search quickly and effectively in a given time. To stay informed, they have several means of which the most common are reading the press, Continuing Medical Education and now Internet. Unfortunately, the richness of the Web is also its main fault so we must have the knowledges for searching, analyzing, among the flood of documents available if we do not want to be caught by the screen. Internet usage is done by two approaches: the pull: dynamic approach to information retrieval and the push: passive process of receiving documents. Most doctors have not been trained to use this tool although it became their main source of knowledge and research. This article aims to outline the main ways to learn about a specific topic by giving some tips for saving time.

  20. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, K.; Faber, M.J.; Arah, O.A.; Elwyn, G.; Lombarts, K.M.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy-makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  1. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, Karlijn; Faber, Marjan J.; Arah, Onvebuchi A.; Elwyn, Glyn; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Wollersheim, Hub C.; Grol, Richard P. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  2. Counseling and the Bystander-Equity Model of Supervisory Helping Behavior: Directions for EAP Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Bayer, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses contribution of Bystander-Equity Model of Supervisory Helping Behavior to pursuit of employee assistance program (EAP) research based on traditions of field of counseling. Offers structure for pursuing empirical and applied activities in EAP settings. Encourages counseling researchers and practitioners to respond to challenge of working…

  3. Therapy and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... system of rewards and reinforcement of positive behavior. Psychoanalysis. This type of treatment encourages you to think ... work, marriage and family therapy, rehabilitation counseling, and psychoanalysis. Your family doctor can help you choose the ...

  4. Revisiting a Meta-Analysis of Helpful Aspects of Therapy in a Community Counselling Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Emma L; Dowd, Claire; Spong, Sheila

    2018-01-01

    This small scale mixed methods study examines helpful events in a community counselling setting, categorising impacts of events according to Timulak's [(2007). Identifying core categories of client-identified impact of helpful events in psychotherapy: A qualitative meta-analysis. "Psychotherapy Research," 17, 305-314] meta-synthesis of…

  5. UK military doctors; stigma, mental health and help-seeking: a comparative cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Norman; Whybrow, D; Coetzee, R

    2018-03-09

    Studies suggest that medical doctors can suffer from substantial levels of mental ill-health. Little is known about military doctors' mental health and well-being; we therefore assessed attitudes to mental health, self-stigma, psychological distress and help-seeking among UK Armed Forces doctors. Six hundred and seventy-eight military doctors (response rate 59%) completed an anonymous online survey. Comparisons were made with serving and ex-military personnel (n=1448, response rate 84.5%) participating in a mental health-related help-seeking survey. Basic sociodemographic data were gathered, and participants completed measures of mental health-related stigmatisation, perceived barriers to care and the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire. All participants were asked if in the last three years they had experienced stress, emotional, mental health, alcohol, family or relationship problems, and whether they had sought help from formal sources. Military doctors reported fewer mental disorder symptoms than the comparison groups. They endorsed higher levels of stigmatising beliefs, negative attitudes to mental healthcare, desire to self-manage and self-stigmatisation than each of the comparison groups. They were most concerned about potential negative effects of and peer perceptions about receiving a mental disorder diagnosis. Military doctors reporting historical and current relationship, and alcohol or mental health problems were significantly and substantially less likely to seek help than the comparison groups. Although there are a number of study limitations, outcomes suggest that UK military doctors report lower levels of mental disorder symptoms, higher levels of stigmatising beliefs and a lower propensity to seek formal support than other military reference groups. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Development of informational-communicative system, created to improve medical help for family medicine doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiianov, Vladyslav A; Dryha, Natalia O; Smiianova, Olha I; Obodyak, Victor K; Zudina, Tatyana O

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Today mobile health`s protection service has no concrete meaning. As an research object it was called mHealth and named by Global observatory of electronic health`s protection as "Doctor and social health practice that can be supported by any mobile units (mobile phones or smartphones), units for patient`s health control, personal computers and other units of non-wired communication". An active usage of SMS in programs for patients` cure regimen keeping was quiet predictable. Mobile and electronic units only begin their development in medical sphere. Thus, to solve all health`s protection system reformation problems a special memorandum about cooperation in creating E-Health system in Ukraine was signed. The aim: Development of ICS for monitoring and non-infection ill patients` informing system optimization as a first level of medical help. Materials and methods: During research, we used systematical approach, meta-analysis, informational-analytical systems` schemes projection, expositive modeling. Developing the backend (server part of the site), we used next technologies: 1) the Apache web server; 2) programming language PHP; 3) Yii 2 PHP Framework. In the frontend developing were used the following technologies (client part of the site): 1) Bootstrap 3; 2) Vue JS Framework. Results and conclusions: Created duo-channel system "doctor-patient" and "patient-doctor" will allow usual doctors of family medicine (DFM) take the interactive dispensary cure and avoid uncontrolled illness progress. Doctor will monitor basic physical data of patient`s health and curing process. The main goal is to create automatic system to allow doctor regularly write periodical or non-periodical notifications, get patients` questioning answers and spread information between doctor and patient; that will optimize work of DFMs.

  7. Report on an Investigation into an Entry Level Clinical Doctorate for the Genetic Counseling Profession and a Survey of the Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Catherine; LeRoy, Bonnie; Grubs, Robin; Walton, Carol

    2015-10-01

    The master's degree is the required entry-level degree for the genetic counseling profession in the US and Canada. In 2012 the Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors (AGCPD) passed resolutions supporting retention of the master's as the entry-level and terminal degree and opposing introduction of an entry-level clinical doctorate (CD) degree. An AGCPD workgroup surveyed directors of all 34 accredited training programs with the objective of providing the Genetic Counseling Advanced Degrees Task Force (GCADTF) with information regarding potential challenges if master's programs were required to transition to an entry-level CD. Program demographics, projected ability to transition to an entry-level CD, factors influencing ability to transition, and potential effects of transition on programs, students and the genetic counseling workforce were characterized. Two programs would definitely be able to transition, four programs would close, thirteen programs would be at risk to close and fourteen programs would probably be able to transition with varying degrees of difficulty. The most frequently cited limiting factors were economic, stress on clinical sites, and administrative approval of a new degree/program. Student enrollment under an entry-level CD model was projected to decrease by 26.2 %, negatively impacting the workforce pipeline. The results further illuminate and justify AGCPD's position to maintain the master's as the entry-level degree.

  8. Pharyngalgia: self-treatment or the qualified help of the family doctor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podpletnia O.A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-treatment by pharmaceuticals is an actual problem of health care, patients more and more often address to the pharmacist, not visiting the family doctor for various reasons. In this case, the role of the pharmacist is not limited to the release of non-prescription drugs "at the request or insistence of the patient." This situation requires from the pharmacist not only specialist knowledge of the pharmacology of drugs, but also a professional approach to the diagnosis and treatment of symptoms and syndromes. Pharmacoepidemiologic research of the department of General and Clinical Pharmacy showed that about 93% of population of Dnepropetrovsk use pharmaceuticals without preliminary consultation with the doctor. The pharmacist in time having recognized the leading symptoms, having provided symptomatic treatment with OTC-medicines and having convinced the patient to ask for the qualified help of the doctor is a link between the patient and the family doctor. In the article by the example of one of the most common symptoms – pharyngalgia – difficulties of diagnostics which is impossible without a deep knowledge of clinical medicine are shown and the need of administering prescription drugs in most cases is confirmed, which in turn is possible only after consultation of the family doctor in most cases.

  9. Perfectionism and Marital Satisfaction among Graduate Students: A Multigroup Invariance Analysis by Counseling Help-seeking Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foo Fatt Mee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to measure the latent mean difference in perfectionism and marital satisfaction by counseling help-seeking attitudes. The respondents were 327 married graduate students from a research university in Malaysia. An online self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The respondents completed the Almost Perfect Scale- Revised, Dyadic Almost Perfect Scale, Marital Satisfaction Scale, and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychology Help Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examined the instruments and the results indicated that construct validity were achieved. The latent mean difference in perfectionism and marital satisfaction by counseling help-seeking attitudes were tested using multigroup invariance analysis. The respondents with negative attitudes toward counseling help-seeking (n = 159 reported a higher latent mean in perfectionism but a lower latent mean in marital satisfaction compared to those with positive attitudes toward counseling help-seeking (n = 168. The implications of these findings for counseling services are discussed.

  10. Doctors and the Web. Help your patients surf the Net safely.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandinetti, D A

    2000-03-06

    The Internet promises to touch every aspect of a physician's professional life, from patient relations to access to clinical studies, from billing to patient records, from marketing to e-mail. To help you make sense of what may be the most profound force in medical practice today, we're kicking off a new series with this article on helping patients navigate the Internet. Future installments, which will run in our first issue of every month, will look at such topics as online patient charts; Web-based electronic medical records; services that electronically connect doctors with health plans, hospitals, and other providers; and online supply purchasing.

  11. How Different Insights from a Variety of Theories Might Help Ethical Decision-Making in Educational Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveit, Anne Dorthe; Sunde, Annikken Louise

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how different insights from a variety of theories might help ethical decision making in educational counselling and highlight the need for reflection. A framework for ethical decision making based on basic features of counselling, namely the interlocutors' practice or "acts", is proposed. There are…

  12. Education and counselling group intervention for women treated for gynaecological cancer: does it help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekse, Ragnhild Johanne Tveit; Blaaka, Gunnhild; Buestad, Ingjerd; Tengesdal, Ellen; Paulsen, Anita; Vika, Margrethe

    2014-03-01

    Women who have been through gynaecological cancer, experience challenges on many levels after diagnosis and treatment. Studies show that, in order to help women in their rehabilitation process, there is a need for holistic care and follow-up. The aim of this qualitative study is to provide insight into women's own lived experiences of participating in an education and counselling group intervention after curative treatment for gynaecological cancer. A qualitative study based on data from three focus groups with 17 women who had participated in a nurse-led education and counselling group intervention after treatment for gynaecological cancer. The main findings show that participation in the rehabilitation group was described as a special community of mutual understanding and belonging. Education and the sharing of knowledge provided a clearer vocabulary for, and understanding of, the women's own lived experiences. The presence of dedicated and professional care workers was reported to be essential for the outcome of the group intervention. Attending a nurse-led education and counselling group intervention had a positive impact on various aspects of the women's lived experiences. The programme also provided professionals with important insights into the patients' views and feelings regarding cancer treatment, trajectories and rehabilitation. This knowledge has already proven itself useful in clinical practice for improving staff communication skills and psycho-social support related to gynaecological cancer care. © 2013 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  13. Physical activity of Estonian family doctors and their counselling for a healthy lifestyle: a cross-sectional study

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    Rätsep Anneli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity offers major health benefits and counselling for it should be integrated into the medical consultation. Based on the literature, the personal health behaviour of the physician (including physical activity is associated with his/her approach to counselling patients. Our hypothesis is that family doctors (FD in Estonia are physically active and their recommendation to counsel patients with chronic diseases to use physical activity is high. The study was also interested in how FDs value physical activity among other important determinants of a healthy lifestyle, e.g. nutrition, non-consumption of alcohol, and non-smoking. Methods Physicians on the electronic list were contacted by e-mail and sent a questionnaire. The first part assessed physical activity by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ short form. Self-reported physical activity during one week was calculated as total physical activity in minutes per week (MET min/week. The second part of the questionnaire included questions about the counselling of patients with chronic disease concerning their physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. The study focused on female FDs because 95% of the FDs in Estonia are women and to avoid bias related to gender. Results 198 female FDs completed the questionnaire. 92% reported that they exercised over the past 7 days to a moderate or high level of physical activity. Analysis revealed no statistically significant relationship between the level of physical activity and general characteristics (age, living area, body mass index [BMI], time spent sitting. FDs reported that patients with heart problems, diabetes, and obesity seek their advice on physical activity more often than patients with depression. Over 94% of the FDs claimed that they counsel their patients with chronic diseases about exercising. According to the FDs' reports, the most important topic in counselling patients for a healthy

  14. Interactive "Video Doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings.

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    Paul Gilbert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide "prevention with positives" in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors.We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003-September 2006 at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476 were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a "Video Doctor" via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months. Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (-2.3 vs. -1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and -2.7 vs. -0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months.The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual-level reductions in days of ongoing drug use and number of casual sex partners compared with the

  15. Help-Seeking and Counseling within a Traditional Male Gender Role: An Examination from a Multicultural Perspective

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    McCarthy, John; Holliday, Ebony L.

    2004-01-01

    A traditional male gender role reflects an affirmation of masculine identity associated with such qualities as success and self-reliance. This gender role is examined from a diversity perspective in counseling, because it may affect many men's help-seeking attitudes and behaviors. Suggestions from the literature are reviewed from the standpoint of…

  16. Men's Help Seeking for Depression: The Efficacy of a Male-Sensitive Brochure about Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Joseph H.; Vogel, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Although depression among men is becoming better understood, men still underuse counseling services. Hence, there is an important need for improved ways to reach out to depressed men. This study examined the efficacy of a male-sensitive brochure aimed toward improving attitudes about seeking counseling and reducing the self-stigma of seeking…

  17. Customized nutrition intervention and personalized counseling helps achieve nutrition targets in perioperative liver transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daphnee, D K; John, Sheila; Rajalakshmi, P; Vaidya, Anil; Khakhar, Anand; Bhuvaneshwari, S; Ramamurthy, Anand

    2018-02-01

    Nutritional therapy is an integral part of care in all phases of liver transplantation (LTx). However, there are several factors that make it a challenge to manage malnutrition in these patients including, but not limited to, loss of appetite, dietary restrictions and dietary habits. Dietary habits are guided by personal choice, social, cultural and regional background with diversity ranging from veganism to vegetarianism with the latter predominant in Indian population. Therefore, it is difficult to improve nutritional intake of patients with standard dietary recommendations. We evaluated the effects of implementing personalized dietary counseling and a customized nutrition plan on its ability to enhance oral intake and, thereby improve nutritional status of patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) being evaluated for LTx. We compared the outcomes with a matched group of patients who were prescribed standard dietary recommendations from a historic database. Primary outcome was measured by number of patients achieving ≥75% of recommended energy and protein requirements during hospitalization for LTx. Secondary outcomes included mean energy and protein intake, hours of ventilation, length of stay in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and hospital, mortality and readmission rate in the acute phase (3months) after LTx. This was a prospective observational study, performed at a single LTx centre. All patients >18years who enrolled for LTx and consented for the study were included. The study was conducted after obtaining institutional ethics committee approval. A protocol based nutrition planning was implemented from April'14. According to this protocol, all patients being evaluated for LTx underwent a detailed nutritional assessment by a qualified Clinical Dietitian (CD) and regularly followed up with until LTx. Nutritional intervention, including a customized nutrition care plan and personalized dietary counseling, was provided based on the severity of malnutrition. To

  18. Counselling by primary care physicians may help patients with heartburn-predominant uninvestigated dyspepsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Pierre; Math, Joanna Lee M; Hawes, Ian A

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether strategies to counsel and empower patients with heartburn-predominant dyspepsia could improve health-related quality of life. METHODS: Using a cluster randomized, parallel group, multicentre design, nine centres were assigned to provide either basic or comprehensive counselling to patients (age range 18 to 50 years) presenting with heartburn-predominant upper gastrointestinal symptoms, who would be considered for drug therapy without further investigation. Patients were treated for four weeks with esomeprazole 40 mg once daily, followed by six months of treatment that was at the physician’s discretion. The primary end point was the baseline change in Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire score. RESULTS: A total of 135 patients from nine centres were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There was a statistically significant baseline improvement in all domains of the QOLRAD questionnaire in both study arms at four and seven months (Pheartburn-predominant uninvestigated dyspepsia. Further investigation is needed to confirm the potential benefits of providing patients with comprehensive counselling regarding disease management. PMID:20352148

  19. [Successful patient-activated help call for a doctor during in-hospital stay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mette Mejlby; Hasselkvist, Birgith; Thordal, Sofie; Riiskjær, Erik; Kelsen, Jens

    2014-09-29

    Department of Medicine, Randers Regional Hospital, conducted a study of patient-activated help call, involving 1,050 patients with nearly 3,700 days in-hospital stay. Patients were encou-raged to bypass traditional clinical hierarchy of communication when they felt, that their concern was not met by the staff. Three help calls were related to the management of pain. In two cases it resulted in a surgical procedure. A survey including 104 patients revealed that one third reported that patient safety was improved by the initiative and nearly three quarters re-ported that they would be willing to activate the call.

  20. Interactive "Video doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, P; Ciccarone, D; Gansky, SA; Bangsberg, DR; Clanon, K; McPhee, SJ; Calderón, SH; Bogetz, A; Gerbert, B

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide “prevention with positives” in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based...

  1. What supervisors and universities can do to enhance doctoral student experience (and how they can help themselves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Dawn C; Denicolo, Pam M

    2017-05-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a flurry of government papers and policy reports worldwide calling for increased number and diversity of doctoral researchers and a broadening of the curriculum to meet the developing needs of respective national 'knowledge-driven' economies. This has been followed by position papers and best practice examples of employability skills development in boundary-crossing doctoral programmes, especially in response to these initiatives. However, there is a disassociation between this ample literature expounding the new doctorate with its broader remit, inclusivity and production of 'industry-ready' graduates and the comparatively sparse literature on the doctoral candidates' experiences of their programmes and career readiness. Within this review, we briefly outline international government initiatives and examples of the responses by Life Science and Biomedical doctoral programmes to address these various challenges. Furthermore, we explore the recent literature on the lived experience of doctoral researchers by examining their perception of the recent changes to the research context to make recommendations for universities and supervisors on how to better support an ever more diverse doctoral population for a wide range of career opportunities. Examples of how doctoral researchers themselves can make the best of currently available opportunities are also provided. © FEMS 2017.

  2. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth / For Parents / Prenatal Genetic Counseling What's in ... can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating family ...

  3. A Decade of Counseling Services in One College of Veterinary Medicine: Veterinary Medical Students' Psychological Distress and Help-Seeking Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Adryanna A S; Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R

    Much has been discussed about the high prevalence of psychological distress among veterinary medical students. Studies investigating general samples of veterinary medical students indicate that, on average, depression and anxiety symptoms are present at higher rates than in comparison samples. However, little is known about veterinary medical students who seek counseling. This study intends to expand the literature on veterinary student well-being, as the first to examine a sample of veterinary medical students seeking counseling services. It offers an overview of student distress and help-seeking trends from a decade of counseling services provided in one College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) in the US. The sample includes data from 279 participants. Results indicate a steady increase in students seeking counseling over the last decade. First-year students sought services at higher rates but second-year students experienced the greatest distress when compared to other cohorts. Students seeking counseling services experienced levels of overall distress, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and social role concerns that were, on average, above cut-off scores. Physical health was significantly associated with student distress, suggesting opportunities for intervention.

  4. Mentoring from Different Social Spheres: How Can Multiple Mentors Help in Doctoral Student Success in Ed.D Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Tarae; Ghosh, Rajashi

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students leave their programs early due to lack of mentoring relationships needed to support degree completion and success. However, how mentoring contributes to Ed.D degree completion is not widely studied. In this qualitative narrative study, we sought to explore how multiple mentoring relationships reduced attrition in an Ed.D program.…

  5. Is training effective? A study of counseling psychology doctoral trainees in a psychodynamic/interpersonal training clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E; Baumann, Ellen; Shafran, Naama; Gupta, Shudarshana; Morrison, Ashley; Rojas, Andrés E Pérez; Spangler, Patricia T; Griffin, Shauna; Pappa, Laura; Gelso, Charles J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated changes over 12 to 42 months in 23 predoctoral trainees during their externship training in a psychodynamic/interpersonal psychotherapy clinic. Over time, trainees increased in client-rated working alliance and real relationship, therapist-rated working alliance, client-rated interpersonal functioning, ability to use helping skills (e.g., challenges, immediacy), higher-order functioning (e.g., conceptualization ability, countertransference management), feelings about themselves as therapists (e.g., more authentic, more self-aware), and understanding about being a therapist (e.g., theoretical orientation, curiosity about client dynamics). In contrast, trainees did not change in engaging clients (return after intake or for at least 8 sessions), judge-rated psychodynamic techniques in third and ninth sessions across clients (although trainees used more cognitive-behavioral techniques over time in third but not ninth sessions), or changes in client-rated symptomatology. Trainees primarily attributed changes to graduate training, individual and group supervision, research participation, and working with clients. Implications for training and research are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Getting Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents & Students Home > Special Features > Getting Help Getting Help Resources from NIAAA Treatment for Alcohol Problems: Finding ... and find ways to make a change. Professional help Your doctor. Primary care and mental health practitioners ...

  7. Do "trainee-centered ward rounds" help overcome barriers to learning and improve the learning satisfaction of junior doctors in the workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Vikas; Reyahi, Amir; Amis, Samuel M; Mansour, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Ward rounds are widely considered an underutilized resource with regard to medical education, and therefore, a project was undertaken to assess if the initiation of "trainee-centered ward rounds" would help improve the confidence, knowledge acquisition, and workplace satisfaction of junior doctors in the clinical environment. Data were collated from junior doctors, registrar grade doctors, and consultants working in the delivery suite at Luton and Dunstable University Hospital in Luton over a 4-week period in March-April 2013. A review of the relevant literature was also undertaken. This pilot study found that despite the reservations around time constraints held by both junior and senior clinicians alike, feedback following the intervention was largely positive. The junior doctors enjoyed having a defined role and responsibility during the ward round and felt they benefited from their senior colleagues' feedback. Both seniors and junior colleagues agreed that discussing learning objectives prior to commencing the round was beneficial and made the round more learner-orientated; this enabled maximal learner-focused outcomes to be addressed and met. The juniors were generally encouraged to participate more during the round and the consultants endeavored to narrate their decision-making, both were measures that led to greater satisfaction of both parties. This was in keeping with the concept of "Legitimate peripheral participation" as described by Lave and Wenger. Overall, trainee-centered ward rounds did appear to be effective in overcoming some of the traditional barriers to teaching in the ward environment, although further work to formalize and quantify these findings, as well as using greater sample sizes from different hospital departments and the inclusion of a control group, is needed.

  8. Help-Seeking Behaviour and Attitudes towards Counselling: A Qualitative Study among Hong Kong Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busiol, Diego

    2016-01-01

    This study examined Hong Kong university students' perception of general help-seeking and seeking of professional help. Thirty-two students, aged from 25 to 46 years were interviewed. A grounded theory approach was adopted. The results indicated four domains to categorise culture-influenced factors: attitudes towards speaking, relational concern,…

  9. A stories-based interactive DVD intended to help people with hypertension achieve blood pressure control through improved communication with their doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Carol M; Houston, Thomas K; Williams, Jessica Hillman; Larkin, Damien; Trobaugh, John; Crenshaw, Katie; Wray, Nelda P

    2010-05-01

    Our goal was to develop an interactive DVD to help African American and Caucasian American adults with hypertension learn how to become better communicators during medical interactions. Material was to be presented in several formats, including patients' narratives (stories). To develop the narratives we recruited members of the target audience and elicited stories and story units in focus groups, interviews, and seminars. Story units were ranked-ordered based on conformance with the theory of planned behavior and narrative qualities and then melded into cohesive stories. The stories were recounted by actors on the DVD. 55 adults (84% women; 93% African American) participated in a focus group, interview, or seminar; transcripts yielded 120 story units. The most highly rated units were woven into 11 stories. The six highest rated stories/actor-storytellers were selected for presentation on the DVD. We achieved our goal of developing an easy-to-use, story-driven product that may teach adults how to talk effectively with their doctors about hypertension. The DVD's effectiveness should be tested in a randomized trial. Behavioral interventions aimed at improving patients' ability to communicate during doctor visits may be useful adjuncts in the achievement of BP goals. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Do “trainee-centered ward rounds” help overcome barriers to learning and improve the learning satisfaction of junior doctors in the workplace?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya V

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vikas Acharya,1Amir Reyahi,2 Samuel M Amis,3 Sami Mansour2 1Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, Coventry, 2Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton, 3Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Abstract: Ward rounds are widely considered an underutilized resource with regard to medical education, and therefore, a project was undertaken to assess if the initiation of “trainee-centered ward rounds” would help improve the confidence, knowledge acquisition, and workplace satisfaction of junior doctors in the clinical environment. Data were collated from junior doctors, registrar grade doctors, and consultants working in the delivery suite at Luton and Dunstable University Hospital in Luton over a 4-week period in March–April 2013. A review of the relevant literature was also undertaken. This pilot study found that despite the reservations around time constraints held by both junior and senior clinicians alike, feedback following the intervention was largely positive. The junior doctors enjoyed having a defined role and responsibility during the ward round and felt they benefited from their senior colleagues’ feedback. Both seniors and junior colleagues agreed that discussing learning objectives prior to commencing the round was beneficial and made the round more learner-orientated; this enabled maximal learner-focused outcomes to be addressed and met. The juniors were generally encouraged to participate more during the round and the consultants endeavored to narrate their decision-making, both were measures that led to greater satisfaction of both parties. This was in keeping with the concept of “Legitimate peripheral participation” as described by Lave and Wenger. Overall, trainee-centered ward rounds did appear to be effective in overcoming some of the traditional barriers to teaching in the ward environment, although further work to formalize and quantify these findings

  11. Effects of Support, Counselling and Therapy Before and After the Loss: Can we Really Help Bereaved People?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Schut

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Can other persons, personally or professionally, help bereaved individuals deal with the loss of a loved one? An increasing number of empirical studies, as well as qualitative and quantitative reviews, have addressed this question. Here, the main findings are summarised and implications for researchers and practitioners considered. First, provision of help from the informal social network and volunteers/professionals in the post-loss period is examined. Second, and uniquely in this research area, examination is extended to the efficacy of intervention for family members prior to their bereavement (i.e., in the context of palliative/end-of-life care. To what extent do the pre-loss patterns mirror those for post-bereavement intervention efficacy? A main conclusion is that intervention is not effective for bereaved persons in general, either when this is provided before or after the actual loss. It is important to identify and target high-risk persons. Further scientific and clinical implications of the patterns of results are discussed.

  12. Effectiveness of individually tailored smoking cessation advice letters as an adjunct to telephone counselling and generic self-help materials: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Stephen; Gilbert, Hazel

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of individually tailored smoking cessation advice letters as an adjunct to telephone counselling and generic self-help materials. Randomized controlled trial. The UK Quitline. A total of 1508 current smokers and recent ex-smokers. The control group received usual care (telephone counselling and an information pack sent through the post). The intervention group received in addition a computer-generated individually tailored advice letter. All outcomes were assessed at 6-month follow-up. The primary outcome measure was self-reported prolonged abstinence for at least 3 months. Secondary outcomes were self-reported prolonged abstinence for at least 1 month and 7-day and 24-hour point-prevalence abstinence. For the sample as a whole, quit rates did not differ significantly between the two conditions. However, among the majority (n = 1164) who were smokers at baseline, quit rates were consistently higher in the intervention group: prolonged abstinence for 3 months, 12.2% versus 9.0% [odds ratio (OR) = 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.96-2.04, P = 0.080); prolonged abstinence for 1 month, 16.4% versus 11.3% (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.09-2.15, P = 0.013); 7-day point-prevalence abstinence, 18.9% versus 12.7% (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.15-2.19, P = 0.004); 24-hour point-prevalence abstinence, 20.9% versus 15.4% (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.07-1.96, P = 0.015). The results for the smokers are encouraging in showing a small but useful effect of the tailored letter on quit rate. Versions of the tailoring program could be used on the web and in general practices, pharmacies and primary care trusts.

  13. Cultural competence in working with the Arab Australian community: a conceptual review and the experience of the Arab Council Australia (ACA gambling help counselling service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Mazbouh-Moussa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although Culturally And Linguistically Diverse (CALD communities participate less in gambling than the general population, those who gamble are more likely to show signs of disordered gambling (Moore and Ohtsuka International Gambling Studies, 1, 87–101, 2001; Raylu and Oei Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1087–1114, 2004; Yamine and Thomas The impact of gaming on specific cultural groups, Victorian Casino and Gaming Authority, Melbourne, 2000. Research data on gambling problems and interventions in the Arab Australian community are extremely scarce. Therefore, this article will present an overview of the Arab Australian community and cultural issues regarding gambling within the Arab Australian community. Identifying these issues is important to work effectively with Arab Australians clients and those from other CALD backgrounds. The article also presents a conceptual review of peer-reviewed research articles on cultural competence in working with the Arab clients, the overview of Arab migration history to Australia and a summary of recent events that suggest a tension between Arab and non-Arab Australian communities. Observations and experiences that were encountered during the gambling counselling service operating in the Australian Arab community in New South Wales are also discussed. The research data to validate the effectiveness and positive impact of cultural competence are still in its early stages. However, a small number of community education resources have been available for working with the Arab community. From the data in annual reviews on the Arab Council Australia gambling counselling service, it was identified that cultural beliefs and expectations influence risk-taking decisions, identification of gambling issues, and preference of help seeking within the client’s social network. Further, culturally-specific sensitive issues related to political and global security events, which in turn influenced openness and

  14. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... honest communication between you and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your health. ... recovery. Here are a few tips that can help you talk to your doctor and make the ...

  15. Intimate partner violence victims' acceptance and refusal of on-site counseling in emergency departments: Predictors of help-seeking behavior explored through a 5-year medical chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Anna Wai-Man; Wong, Janet Yuen-Ha; Lo, Ruby Tsz-Fung; Chan, Pik-Ying; Wong, John Kit-Shing; Lau, Chu-Leung; Kam, Chak-Wah

    2018-03-01

    Healthcare services constitute the first formal support that many intimate partner violence (IPV) victims receive and a link to formal welfare and psychological support. The help-seeking behavior for psychosocial support, e.g., Accident and Emergency Departments (AED) onsite counseling, is key to developing effective support for IPV victims. This study aimed to strengthen the health-welfare support link to aid IPV prevention in AEDs by investigating the acceptance and refusal of on-site counseling by IPV victims. A retrospective cohort study retrieved and reviewed all records of IPV victims presenting at the AEDs of two Hong Kong hospitals between 2010 and 2014. A total of 157 male and 823 female IPV victims were identified, 295 of whom refused on-site counseling. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the association between help-seeking and demographic and violent injury-related factors. The odds of help-seeking via on-site counseling were significantly lower for victims with mental illness (aOR=0.49; 95% CI=0.27, 0.88). After controlling for all demographic characteristics, mental illness, and drug abuse information, sex remained an independent predictor of help-seeking (aOR=2.62; 95% CI=1.45, 4.74); victims who had experienced >2 abuse incidents were more likely to seek help than those who had experienced ≤2 abuse incidents (aOR=1.90; 95% CI=1.11, 3.26). The factors associated with help-seeking from on-site services by IPV victims reflect the need for multidisciplinary collaborative work aimed at IPV prevention. Healthcare professionals require training on how to promote help-seeking behavior targeted specifically for male and female IPV victims according to their needs and preferences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The doctoral learning penumbra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Robinson, Gill; Wisker, Gina

    This paper presents our cross-national research into what we term the ‘doctoral learning penumbra’, which covers the diverse, unnoticed, and often unrecognised forms of help and support that doctoral students draw from during their PhD, and which are vital for completion. Our aim is to better...

  17. Genetic Counseling and Evaluation for BRCA1/2 Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Options Talking to Family Family Stories Diseases Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Recommend on ... mutation, your doctor may refer you for genetic counseling. Understanding and dealing with a strong family health ...

  18. Voluntary Counseling and Testing and Prevalence of HIV Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Voluntary Counseling and Testing and Prevalence of HIV Infection Amongst Patients Booked for Surgical Operations. ... The effectiveness (yield) of lay counseling in HIV testing by resident doctors who have not ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  19. Counseling in teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Dorthe Busk

    Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant-orientated pilotp......Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant......-orientated pilotproject about counseling in teacher education. The aim was to acquire knowledge about how students perceive counseling. This knowledge could help uncover potential areas of development for counselingpractice. In the pilotproject it is tested if the chosen method is suitable for bigger qualitative study....... The study is a qualitative questionnaire survey. The “lifeworld” is central, therefore a phenomenological and hermeneutical approach was chosen, where the student’s perception of the counseling is studied. Central themes: Setting of the counseling and progress of the counselingcourse, content and shape...

  20. 249 Marriage Counselling in Multicultural Society, Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... The researcher sees Multicultural Counselling as a helping relationship, which involves two or more ... pastors and elders in the counselling profession. Some recommendations were made as ... Multicultural counselling is a helping relationship which involves two or more persons with different culture, ...

  1. Helping doctors in training to STEP-UP: A leadership and quality improvement programme in the Belfast Health and Social Care Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Grainne; McKeever, Kris; Flanagan, Catherine; O'Kane, Donal; McQuillan, Bernie; Cash, Johnny; Jack, Cathy; Lundy, Claire

    2018-05-01

    Medical engagement in healthcare organisations can improve service development and patient experience. Doctors in training have limited opportunities to engage in service improvement work and develop leadership skills. We describe the Specialist Trainees Engaged in Leadership Programme (STEP) , a programme developed to introduce concepts of medical leadership and quality improvement skills in the Belfast Trust. STEP started in 2013 and over 140 trainees have now participated in the programme. Over 42 quality improvement projects have been completed with the support of the programme. Evaluation of STEP has demonstrated an improvement across all domains explored throughout the duration of the programme, with benefits for the individual trainee and the wider organisation. We describe the programme in detail. The STEP curriculum can easily be adapted to meet the needs of NHS trainees, allowing them to understand the objectives and strategy of their employers and improve their ability to plan and deliver safe, effective, patient-centred care.

  2. CDC Vital Signs: Alcohol Screening and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... service without a co-payment. Top of Page Problem Doctors, nurses, and other health professionals should screen all adult patients and counsel ... often than it does. Yet, people report a doctor, nurse, or other health ... first step for addressing problems with drinking too much: Only 1 in 6 ...

  3. State Level Review of Doctoral Programs in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Nil

    Review of doctoral degree programs in Texas public colleges and universities is discussed. Attention is directed to review procedures and strengths and weaknesses in the state's doctoral programs in educational psychology, counseling and guidance, and student personnel services. Doctoral programs were reviewed because of their high cost and a…

  4. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Jan 19,2018 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  5. Adlerian Counseling for Parent Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Fred P.

    The helping professions must aid parents in understanding their children and in providing parents with methods to improve family relationships. Adlerian counseling is presented as one potentially useful method of reaching this goal. The basic principles and democratic philosophy of Adlerian counseling are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the…

  6. Choose your doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Jeremy

    2007-02-01

    The development of education options for nurses has been inexorable and it is increasingly the case that senior nurses are considering a doctorate as the logical next step in their educational career. Such individuals need to make important decisions as to whether they should embark on a taught doctorate, professional doctorate or a traditional PhD. Each of these options will necessitate a considerable investment in time and money as well as the sacrifice of quality time and spare time over a significant number of years. A doctorate is not for everyone. Those still reading this text may be asking 'could this possibly be for me'? This paper will try to help the reader decide which if any option to take. It is suggested that nurses will now turn to the doctoral degree as their next adventure in academic study. It is argued that this development is not being controlled by management forces and indeed cannot be controlled by them. This last is chiefly because the move towards doctoral education is led by individuals who choose to study for a doctorate simply because they can. The paper considers what choices are available to nurses who wish to pursue a doctoral programme of study. In particular, this paper considers what new developments in doctoral courses are becoming available and what advantage there may be in studying for one of the newer professional doctorates rather than a traditional PhD. The material here is the result of a review of the literature on recent developments in doctoral education for nurses. The existing provision by UK and other universities was also reviewed, the data being collected by an informal review of universities' advertising material. It is inevitable that some nurses who are already qualified to degree and masters degree will take advantage of the doctoral degree opportunities which now newly present themselves. For nurses in practice, the advantages of the professional doctorate is that it is more structured, enables more peer and

  7. Doctors Today

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-03-01

    Doctors’ relationship with patients and their role in society is changing. Until the 1960s doctors concentrated on the welfare of patients with less emphasis placed on patients’ rights1. Over recent decades there has been increasing empowerment of the individual across all facets of society including health care. Doctors continue to be perceived as having expertise and authority over medical science. Patients, however, now hold sway over questions of values or preferences. We all must be aware of this change in the doctor- patient interaction. We need to be more aware of the outcomes that patients view as important. The concept of shared decision-making with the patient is now widely appreciated. The process involves a change in mind set particularly for doctors who trained in an earlier era.

  8. Spin doctoring

    OpenAIRE

    Vozková, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    1 ABSTRACT The aim of this text is to provide an analysis of the phenomenon of spin doctoring in the Euro-Atlantic area. Spin doctors are educated people in the fields of semiotics, cultural studies, public relations, political communication and especially familiar with the infrastructure and the functioning of the media industry. Critical reflection of manipulative communication techniques puts spin phenomenon in historical perspective and traces its practical use in today's social communica...

  9. The counselees' self-reported request for psychological help in genetic counseling for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer : not only psychopathology matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Joel; van Asperen, Christi J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Menko, Fred H.; Collee, Margriet J.; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Tibben, Aad

    Background Several studies have shown that counselees do not experience psychopathological levels of distress after DNA test result disclosure. However, it has not systematically been studied whether the absence of psychopathology also means that counselees do not want to receive help. Their

  10. The counselees' self-reported request for psychological help in genetic counseling for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer: Not only psychopathology matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vos (Joël); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); F. Menko (Fred); J.M. Collée (Margriet); E.B.G. Garcia; A. Tibben (Arend)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground Several studies have shown that counselees do not experience psychopathological levels of distress after DNA test result disclosure. However, it has not systematically been studied whether the absence of psychopathology also means that counselees do not want to receive help.

  11. Marriage Counselling in Multicultural Society, Nigerian Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses marriage counselling in Multicultural society: Nigerian experience. The researcher sees Multicultural Counselling as a helping relationship, which involves two or more persons with different culture, beliefs and environment. The paper discusses how multicultural counselling can be applied in marriage ...

  12. Psychological counselling and indigenous African knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological counselling relates to basic humanity and universal values such as the regard for human dignity, healthy socialisation, and emotional health. Counselling individuals who experience emotional or relational problems is a function of the helping and health care professions. Effective counselling should provide ...

  13. Infusing Counseling Skills in Test Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Melanie E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents an instructional model based on Neurolinguistic Programming that links counseling student course work in measurement and test interpretation with counseling techniques and theory. A process incorporating Neurolinguistic Programming patterns is outlined for teaching graduate students the counseling skills helpful in test interpretation.…

  14. The importance of legal counsel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Fisher

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available At each stage of the resettlement process, the presence of counsel – legal advocates – can help refugees to present their complete cases efficiently and avoid unnecessary rejections. This provides benefits to decision makers as well.

  15. Doctor's Orders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VALERIE SARTOR

    2010-01-01

    @@ "To become a doctor is like becoming a bomb expert:It takes a long time to learn this skill; you must use care and intuition; and you must understand that your work has grave consequences for those around you,"said Amgalan Gamazhapov,an advanced medical student who studies traditional Chinese and Mongolian medicine at the Inner Mongolia Medical University.

  16. Doctor Down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nagornaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biographical data of John Langdon Down, his invaluable contribution to the development of rehabilitation programs for children with Down syndrome. The basis of these programs was the socialization of people with intellectual disabilities. In doctor Down’s rehabilitation center there were used methods, including health care, education, physical education, the formation of correct behavior.

  17. An investigation into the individual experience of seeking help for bulimia nervosa, and the process of integrating and searching for identity following recovery from bulimia.

    OpenAIRE

    Turek, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    This research dossier was developed as an integral part of the practitioner doctorate degree in counselling psychology, and has evolved over the last three years. It contains three pieces of research: one literature review and two empirical studies. The literature review particularly focuses on the available help for bulimia nervosa and the process of seeking help for this type of human distress. By exploring the current trends in the eating disorders field and implications for individuals wh...

  18. Teaching Genetic Counseling Skills: Incorporating a Genetic Counseling Adaptation Continuum Model to Address Psychosocial Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugar, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Genetic counselors are trained health care professionals who effectively integrate both psychosocial counseling and information-giving into their practice. Preparing genetic counseling students for clinical practice is a challenging task, particularly when helping them develop effective and active counseling skills. Resistance to incorporating these skills may stem from decreased confidence, fear of causing harm or a lack of clarity of psycho-social goals. The author reflects on the personal challenges experienced in teaching genetic counselling students to work with psychological and social complexity, and proposes a Genetic Counseling Adaptation Continuum model and methodology to guide students in the use of advanced counseling skills.

  19. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  20. Counseling through Images: Using Photography to Guide the Counseling Process and Achieve Treatment Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginicola, Misty M.; Smith, Cheri; Trzaska, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Creative approaches to counseling help counselors to meet the needs of diverse populations. The utility of photography in counseling has been demonstrated through several case studies; however, clear implications of how photography relates to the counseling process have not been well delineated. The existing literature on phototherapy is reviewed…

  1. Help with Hives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Help With Hives KidsHealth / For Kids / Help With Hives What's in this article? What Are ... about what happened. The doctor can try to help figure out what might be causing your hives, ...

  2. Agency doctorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Staff members of the Agency working at the Seibersdorf laboratory are continuing to achieve high academic distinction. Two more - both Austrian - have now been awarded the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. Joachim Kramer, who is 26, graduated from the Hochschule fur Bodenkultur in 1967 with the degree of Diplom-Ingenieur and then started work in the plant breeding and genetics section of the laboratory under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen. The results of the research work he carried out were accepted as the subject of a thesis for which he has now been granted his doctorate. The doctoral promotion took place on 30 June, at a ceremony attended by Dr. Andre Finkelstein, Deputy Director General for Research and Isotopes. The subject of Dr. Kramer's thesis was a comprehensive study of the mutagenic effects of fast neutrons and gamma rays, and the influence of various modifying factors such as water content, oxygen and metabolic state of seeds at the time of irradiation. This work has contributed significantly to the understanding of the mechanisms by which these two types of ionizing radiation produce mutations in seeds. The knowledge gained will be of great importance in the efficient use of ionizing radiation in practical plant breeding. Paul Wassermann, who is 33 years old, joined the Agency in 1965. He, too, graduated from the Hochschule fur Bodenkultur as Diplom-Ingenieur in agriculture, having graduated with honours previously from the agricultural secondary school at Raumberg, Austria, in 1958. Dr. Wassermann's own words may be used to explain how he came to gain his doctorate. 'In October, 1966, I completed my studies at the Hochschule,' he writes. 'I was employed at the Agency laboratories in Seibersdorf, working in the plant and soils group. Encouraged by the interesting research which was performed there, a thesis entitled 'the Fate of Nitrogen in Submerged Rice Soils' was started, which finally led to the doctor's degree in Agriculture in June this year

  3. Nondirective counseling interventions with schizophrenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwood, J B

    1993-12-01

    Counseling interventions with paranoid schizophrenics can be daunting. While chemical, directive, and behavioral controls often are considered important, nondirective counseling techniques used by the therapeutic staff may help schizophrenic patients explore their thoughts and feelings. Several nondirective concepts pioneered by Carl Rogers are examined. These methods, which represent basic concepts of the person-centered approach, are empathy, unconditional positive regard, and congruence. A brief illustration of an interaction with a patient diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic is presented to suggest the effectiveness of Rogerian counseling.

  4. Agency doctorates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1970-07-01

    Mr. Wen-chuan Li of China has become the first student to obtain a doctor's degree as a result of research work carried out in the Agency. Mr. Li, who is 33, graduated as a Bachelor of Agriculture at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University in 1960 and in 1966 was granted a fellowship to study mutations in plant breeding at the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory near Vienna, under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen, a professor of the University of Bergen. The Hochschule fur Bodenkultur of Vienna accepted the research as being suitable for a thesis and have now granted the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. The subject of the thesis was modifying factors influencing the mutagenic effects of alkylating agents as compared with ionizing radiations in barley. Alkylating agents are involved in the use of chemicals as a means of changing the characteristics of seeds to bring about changes aimed at improving the quality of crops. Mr. Li's work is regarded as a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanics by which mutations are induced, to the efficient use of chemicals and ionizing radiations in practical applications, and to the efforts of the Agency in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization to benefit food supplies. Mr. Li has now completed his fellowship with the Agency and has been appointed an Assistant Professor in Plant Breeding at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University. The photograph, taken in the plastic hot house at Seibersdorf, shows him studying rice plants grown from seeds subjected to irradiation. Another noteworthy achievement is that of Mr. Karl-Franz Lacina, a security guard at the Agency's headquarters. At the age of 50 he has been accorded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Vienna University, the result of six years' work in his leisure time. The major subject was Arabic, with French and philosophy as supporting subject. (author)

  5. Agency doctorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Mr. Wen-chuan Li of China has become the first student to obtain a doctor's degree as a result of research work carried out in the Agency. Mr. Li, who is 33, graduated as a Bachelor of Agriculture at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University in 1960 and in 1966 was granted a fellowship to study mutations in plant breeding at the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory near Vienna, under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen, a professor of the University of Bergen. The Hochschule fur Bodenkultur of Vienna accepted the research as being suitable for a thesis and have now granted the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. The subject of the thesis was modifying factors influencing the mutagenic effects of alkylating agents as compared with ionizing radiations in barley. Alkylating agents are involved in the use of chemicals as a means of changing the characteristics of seeds to bring about changes aimed at improving the quality of crops. Mr. Li's work is regarded as a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanics by which mutations are induced, to the efficient use of chemicals and ionizing radiations in practical applications, and to the efforts of the Agency in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization to benefit food supplies. Mr. Li has now completed his fellowship with the Agency and has been appointed an Assistant Professor in Plant Breeding at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University. The photograph, taken in the plastic hot house at Seibersdorf, shows him studying rice plants grown from seeds subjected to irradiation. Another noteworthy achievement is that of Mr. Karl-Franz Lacina, a security guard at the Agency's headquarters. At the age of 50 he has been accorded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Vienna University, the result of six years' work in his leisure time. The major subject was Arabic, with French and philosophy as supporting subject. (author)

  6. The Practice of Self-Care among Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Mary G.; Devries, Sabina R.; Wardle, Elizabeth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Self-care behavior is recognized as an important component for the helping professional who practices in the field of counseling or who is training to become a helping professional. Occupational stress and burnout in the field of counseling is of great concern. This study examined the practice of self-care among master level counseling students to…

  7. Characteristics of clients accessing HIV counseling and testing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characteristics of clients accessing HIV counseling and testing services in a tertiary hospital in ... Introduction: Client-initiated HIV testing and counseling has helped millions of people learn their HIV status. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  8. Mass Counseling: Effective Tool to Improve Knowledge, Attitude and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mass Counseling: Effective Tool to Improve Knowledge, Attitude and Behavior Regarding Blood Donation. ... PY Kulkarni, AD Kulkarni ... Establishment of mobile counseling units by blood banks may help to create a voluntary blood donor.

  9. Counseling the pregnant adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibiasi, V; Sturgis, S H

    1980-07-01

    Approaches employed in counseling pregnant adolescents at the Crittenton Clinic in Boston are described. Concentrating on concrete issues of management of the pregnancy -- supplying information and exploring the pros and cons of various alternatives are advocated; probing into the psychological and emotional background of the pregnant adolescent is discouraged. Counseling about contraceptives and taking into account each individual situation are considered essential. Case studies are reviewed and figures representing the attitudes and contraceptive use of patients 1 year after abortion are presented. It is considered important to establish a trusting relationship with the adolescent, which will increase the likelihood that she will return for follow-up and additional help if she needs it.

  10. Exercise: When to Check with Your Doctor First

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... check with your doctor before you start to exercise. By Mayo Clinic Staff Regular exercise can help you control your weight, reduce your ... talk to your doctor before starting a new exercise routine. Although moderate physical activity such as brisk ...

  11. Lonely Days and Lonely Nights: Completing the Doctoral Dissertation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germeroth, Darla

    1991-01-01

    Surveys holders of doctorates in speech communication to discover the greatest barriers to dissertation completion and the forms of emotional support perceived as most useful. Offers advice to help doctoral candidates succeed in completing a dissertation. (SR)

  12. Artificial Intelligence, Counseling, and Cognitive Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Greg; And Others

    With the exception of a few key writers, counselors largely ignore the benefits that Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Cognitive Psychology (CP) can bring to counseling. It is demonstrated that AI and CP can be integrated into the counseling literature. How AI and CP can offer new perspectives on information processing, cognition, and helping is…

  13. [Influence of patients' attitude on doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; Qiu, Ze-qi; Zhang, Tuo-hong

    2009-04-18

    To describe the doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship and find out the influencing factors of the patients, gathering evidence to improve the doctor-patient relationship. This study was a cross-sectional study, in which doctors and nurses in 10 hospitals of Beijing, Shandong and Chongqing were surveyed with structured questionnaires and in-depth interviews. The mean score of the doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship was 59.97, which was much lower than the patients'. The patients' socio-demographic characteristics, social economic status (SES) and behavior characteristics influence the interaction of the doctors and the patients. The doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship was influenced by the patients' trust. The doctors' perspective is helpful to define the tension and the cause of the doctor-patient relationship. The patients' characteristics have important influence on the doctor-patient relationship. It's necessary to take action on the patients to improve the doctor-patient relationship.

  14. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  15. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine P. Dabney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  16. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Katherine P.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-06-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  17. Counseling Adolescents with Problem Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marecek, Jeanne

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the psychosocial context of unintended teenage pregnancies, including emotional and cognitive development during adolescence, family and peer relations, and norms for gender-appropriate sexual expression. The main goal in counseling is helping clients reach and implement an informed and fulled integrated decision about the pregnancy.…

  18. Alcohol Screening and Counseling PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the January 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Millions of Americans drink too much, a dangerous behavior that can lead to serious health problems. Alcohol screening and counseling can help.

  19. A Controlled Study of Variables Related to Counseling Center Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmajian, C. Perry, Jr.; Mattson, Robert E.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated the utility of several variables in discriminating between students who seek counseling and those who do not. Interaction between personal adjustment and help-seeking status was also examined. Alternate sources of help, counseling usefulness, and perceived severity of help-seeker pathology descriminated seekers from nonseekers.…

  20. The experience of seeking help for postnatal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Debbi

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore women's experiences of support and treatment for postnatal depression. In-depth interviews from seven women were analysed using the phenomenological method described by Creswell (1998). Findings indicate that partners provided women the most support. The women did not know where to seek professional help, often being identified and helped by the maternal health nurse who monitors and guides the progress of their babies' development. Hospital programs were criticised for not informing and involving family. The women were dissatisfied with hospital doctors and their GPs claiming they had limited time for counselling, preferring to prescribe medication that alleviated symptoms but reinforced feelings of inadequacy. Recommendations are made to involve families and to use the unique position of the maternal health nurse in assessing new mothers.

  1. Marriage Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You might have homework. Your counselor might suggest communication exercises at home to help you practice what you've learned during your session. For example, talking face-to-face to with your partner for a few minutes ...

  2. [Teenager counselling in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Teresa; Morera, Iván; Vargas, Nelson A

    2007-04-01

    Teenager counseling to recognize risks and reinforce strengths is carried out in a primary care outpatient clinic since 2003. To describe the epidemiology and causes for consultation in this teenage counseling program. Retrospective review of the records of 116 teenagers (median age 13 years, 67% females) that received teenager counseling. Seventy percent of women and 50% of men came from nuclear families. More than two thirds were primogenital. Most adolescents were accompanied by their mother, that were the main adult raw model. Fifty percent had dysfunctional families. All were attending school regularly and 21% of women and 29% of men had repeated a school level. Sixty eight percent of women and 62% of men declared to have a life project. Twenty percent were worried about their physical appearance. Seventy seven percent of women and 62% of men considered themselves as happy. Thirty six percent of women and 14% of men smoked. The figures for alcohol consumption were 21% and 14%, respectively. The causes for consultation were obesity, overweight, unspecific symptoms, behavioral problems, bad school achievement, communication problems or pregnancy. Reasons for counseling were family dysfunction, low self esteem, bad school achievement and information about sexuality. The information obtained could help to improve the interdisciplinary work and to coordinate counseling with the family and schools.

  3. Counseling Blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vontress, Clemmont E.

    1970-01-01

    Blacks have developed unique environmental perceptions, values, and attitudes, making it difficult for counselors to establish and maintain positive rapport. This article examines attitudinal ingredients posited by Carl Rogers for relevance to this problem, and suggests in-service training to help counselors and other professionals relate…

  4. Building doctoral ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    heavily from the support from informal and extra-curricular researcher communities and non-formal support systems even beyond the institution in the private and societal lifeworlds. The chapter describes and analyses such forms of organizational and existential darkness within doctoral education...... and professionalization of doctoral education, with Graduate schools increasing in size and organizational complexity. Paradoxically, we see in contemporary research into doctoral students’ learning experiences that the students do not favour the formalized support systems and supervision, but on the contrary draw most......, and discusses how institutions and doctoral programmes could use such sprawling spaces for learning to build doctoral ecologies and to strengthening existentially based pedagogies within doctoral education....

  5. Cost incentives for doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schottmüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    If doctors take the costs of treatment into account when prescribing medication, their objectives differ from their patients' objectives because the patients are insured. This misalignment of interests hampers communication between patient and doctor. Giving cost incentives to doctors increases...... welfare if (i) the doctor's examination technology is sufficiently good or (ii) (marginal) costs of treatment are high enough. If the planner can costlessly choose the extent to which doctors take costs into account, he will opt for less than 100%. Optimal health care systems should implement different...... degrees of cost incentives depending on type of disease and/or doctor....

  6. Doctoral Women: Managing Emotions, Managing Doctoral Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Claire; Mowbray, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of women doctoral students and the role of emotion during doctoral candidature. The paper draws on the concept of emotional labour to examine the two sites of emotional investment students experienced and managed during their studies: writing and family relationships. Emotion is perceived by many dominant…

  7. Suicide in doctors and wives of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakinofsky, I

    1980-06-01

    This paper re-examines the widespread belief that doctors have a proneness for suicide greater than the general population. The Standardized Mortality Ratio for male physicians is 335 and for single women doctors 257. Doctors' wives have an even greater risk: their SMR is 458. These rates for doctors are higher than for most other professional groups (except pharmacists) and the rate for doctors' wives far exceeds that for wives of other professionals. The intrinsic causes of the physician's high occupational mortality include his knowledge of toxicology and ready access to lethal drugs, so that impulsive suicide is more often successful. Professional stress and overwork, particularly the unrelenting responsibility for decisions upon which the lives of others may depend, have been inculpated. These stresses interact with the decline in the doctors' self-respect and with a personality that is prestige-oriented and independent. Some physicians turn in their frustration to alcohol/and or drugs, accelerating the process of deterioration. The high suicide rate in doctors' wives appears to be the result of unrequited needs for caring and dependency which the doctors' career demands and personality deny them.

  8. Considerations and Strategies for Teaching Online Counseling Skills: Establishing Relationships in Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepal, Heather; Haberstroh, Shane; Duffey, Thelma; Evans, Marcheta

    2007-01-01

    As technology advances and the use of online counseling becomes more routine, attention must be paid to instruction regarding online counseling skills. The authors present considerations for teaching basic online counseling skills to master's-level counseling students. Recommendations are made for helping students to establish and maintain…

  9. The Online and Face-to-Face Counseling Attitudes Scales: A Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlen, Aaron B.; Beretvas, S. Natasha; Zack, Jason S.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on the development of measures of attitudes toward online and face-to-face counseling. Overall, participants expressed more favorable evaluations of face-to-face counseling than of online counseling. Significant correlations were found between online and face-to-face counseling with traditional help-seeking attitudes, comfort…

  10. Arab doctors, evolving society and corruption: a medical student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2015-01-01

    Doctors, especially junior doctors, face immense pressure in their day-to-day work. As a result, the rates of depression and anxiety are particularly high in this demanding profession. The pressure, which is compounded by constantly being under societal scrutiny, can unfortunately drive the doctor to breaking point. However, we can help doctors deal with these pressures in a more meaningful way if we make them aware of their wider environment (within a social paradigm) and the implications of their actions.

  11. Psychiatric Prescribers' Experiences With Doctor Shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Johnson, Mary; Karnik, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Doctor shopping is a primary method of prescription medication diversion. After opioids, benzodiazepines and stimulants are the next most common prescription medications used nonmedically. Studies have shown that patients who engage in doctor shopping find it fun, exciting, and easy to do. There is a lack of research on the prescriber's perspective on the phenomenon of doctor shopping. This study investigates the experiences of prescribers in psychiatry with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Fifteen prescribers including psychiatrists and psychiatric nurse practitioners working in outpatient psychiatry were interviewed to elicit detailed information about their experiences with patients who engage in doctor shopping. Themes found throughout the interview were that psychiatric prescribers' experience with patients who engage in doctor shopping includes (a) detecting red flags, (b) negative emotional responding, (c) addressing the patient and the problem, and (d) inconsistently implementing precautions. When red flags were detected when prescribing controlled drugs, prescribers in psychiatry experienced both their own negative emotional responses such as disappointment and resentment as well as the negative emotions of the patients such as anger and other extreme emotional responses. Psychiatric prescribers responded to patient's doctor shopping in a variety of ways such as changing their practice, discharging the patients or taking steps to not accept certain patients identified as being at risk for doctor shopping, as well as by talking to the patient and trying to offer them help. Despite experiencing doctor shopping, the prescribers inconsistently implemented precautionary measures such as checking prescription drug monitoring programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. INTRODUCING OVER THE COUNTER COUNSELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Bakić-Mirić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A pharmacist in today’s world has a great responsibility – to help and educate patients about diverse ways for effective self-treatment. Whereas self-care is becoming increasingly popular among patients today the availability of over-the-counter medications makes it possible for patients to treat numerous conditions on their own but still under the supervision of a healthcare provider. During the pharmacist-patient encounter, the pharmacist’s obligation is to evaluate the patient’s medical condition, provide proper advice and counsel the patient on the proper course of treatment to be taken. Also by employing effective over the counter (OTC counseling as the most proper means in a pharmacist/patient communication process and, accordingly, rapport building in the OTC area, the pharmacist needs to demonstrate high energy, enthusiasm, respect, empathy, know-how of sensitive intercultural issues alongside personal appearance, body language, eye contact that all together make his/her personal “signature”. Accordingly, apart from patient education, the primary objective of OTC counseling becomes to educate pharmacists on basic principles used in assisting patients in the selection of over-the-counter (OTC products, provide examples of proper communication techniques for effective patient counseling concerning the OTC products (i.e. dosage, administration technique, storage, food and beverage interaction, monitoring etc where the pharmacist plays the key role in helping patients maximize their pharmaceutical care.

  13. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » ... can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ...

  14. Finding the Right Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... certified hospital Communicating with Healthcare Professionals for Caregivers Consumer Health Care • Home • Health Insurance Information • Your Healthcare Team Introduction Finding the Right Doctor Talking to Your Doctor Getting a Second ...

  15. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Impact of NIH Research Science, Health, and Public Trust You are here Home » Institutes at NIH » NIH ... Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, and Public Trust Talking to Your Doctor Part I: Preparing for ...

  16. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Communications & Public Liaison » Clear Communication Clear Communication Clear Communication Health Literacy Clear & Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, and Public Trust Talking to Your Doctor ...

  17. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for the doctor’s contact information and their preferred method of communication. Remember that nurses and pharmacists are also good sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , NIH ...

  18. [Topics on Which Relatives of Persons with Dementia Seek Counseling Over Telephone or Email: Current Results of a Nationwide Counseling Service of the German Alzheimer Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Anna; Weiß, Saskia; Gräßel, Elmar

    2018-04-19

    Since 15 years, the Alzheimer 's Telephone of the German Alzheimer Society (Deutsche Alzheimer Gesellschaft e.V.; DAlzG), a nationwide psychosocial counseling service, has been offering support for people with dementia (PwD) and their families. The aim of this study was to evaluate: a) why informal PwD caregivers seek telephone counseling, b) whether these telephone calls are one-time counseling or long-term support, and c) whether the telephone inquiries differ from the email-based inquiries with regard to the addressed issues. The data are based on the inquiries of 3,744 informal caregivers, which consulted the DAlzG in 2015. Sociodemographic data on the informal caregivers and the PwD, the characteristics of the telephone call, and the topics addressed in the email inquiries were collected. 70.3% of the callers were female. Most of them (59.9%) were the children (in-law) of and half of them (49.7%) lived with PwD. More than two-thirds of the callers (70%) were seeking help in dealing with the person with dementia (e. g. challenging behavior) and 36.5% of the relatives needed recommendations for further local help and assistance. In the third place, the calls were related to financial and legal topics (23.5%). 92.2% of the calls were one-time consultations. The addressed issues in the email inquiries did not significantly differ from the topics discussed over the telephone. On many topics there is a need for further "on site" consultation. Doctors and other health professionals should therefore be actively involved in counseling relatives of PwD. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) Español Aging Planning Your Doctor Visit , NIHSeniorHealth.gov Videos: Talking ... A Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your Doctor Presentation Toolkit , National ...

  20. Edo Journal of Counselling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edo Journal of Counselling, the official publication of Edo Chapter of Counselling ... The Mediating Impact of Personality and Socio-Economic Status in the ... Fostering Adolescents' Interpersonal Behaviour: An Empirical Assessment of ...

  1. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper. PMID:27417625

  2. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper.

  3. Mexican American Women Pursuing Counselor Education Doctorates: A Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Tamara J.; Carney, JoLynn V.

    2016-01-01

    The authors used narrative inquiry and Anzaldúa's (1999) bordlerlands theory to understand the cultural experiences of 5 Mexican American women in doctoral programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. Results indicated that participants navigated multiple cultural spheres and that the…

  4. Contraceptive counseling for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Julia; Santelli, John S

    2015-11-01

    The majority of adolescents become sexually active during their teenage years, making contraceptive counseling an important aspect of routine adolescent healthcare. However, many healthcare providers express discomfort when it comes to counseling adolescents about contraceptive options. This Special Report highlights the evidence supporting age-appropriate contraceptive counseling for adolescents and focuses on best practices for addressing adolescents' questions and concerns about contraceptive methods.

  5. Do doctors attending sexual-offence victims have to notify sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-03

    Dec 3, 2017 ... the Sexual Offences Act);[1] and (iii) the ethical rules and guidelines ... and the duty on doctors to treat their patients with the skill and care ... duty on the doctor to counsel the patient to warn such partner and to ... persons may suffer injury as a result of interactions with their patients, and that this applies to.

  6. Doctors in Balzac's work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Balzac wrote his novels during a time of great literary and scientific change. Romanticism gave way to the school of realism, of which Balzac could be considered the founder. It was via realism, where both the positive and negative aspects of life were depicted, that doctors naturally gained a much more active role in novels. In conjunction with this was the development of science and medicine, which fascinated Balzac, also leading to the significant and prevalent role of doctors in his works. His fascination with the sciences led to him to gain many acquaintances and much knowledge in the medical domain, especially in neuropsychiatry and physiology. His fictional doctors, such as Desplein and Bianchon, thus demonstrate considerable knowledge of pathology, physiology, and neuropsychiatry. The doctors in Balzac's novels can be grouped into four categories: provincial doctors, Parisian doctors, country doctors, and military doctors. They were most often fictitious representations of real individuals (e.g. Guillaume Dupuytren), and often symbolize schools of thought which were in vogue at the time. In addition to the accurate scientific depiction of doctors, it must be noted that his doctors not only played an active role in clinically assessing their patients, but also had a sociological role in assessing society; it is through his doctors that Balzac gave his opinion of the world in which he lived. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Doctors and pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Roy G

    2009-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is seen as seducing doctors by providing expensive gifts, subsidising travel and underwriting practice expenses in return for those doctors prescribing products that otherwise they would not use. This paints doctors in a very negative light; suggests doctors are available to the highest bidder; implies doctors do not adequately act as independent agents; and that doctors are driven more by self-interest than by patient needs. Similar practices, in other industries, are accepted as normal business behaviour but it is automatically assumed to be improper if the pharmaceutical industry supports doctors. Should the pharmaceutical industry withdraw educational grants then there would be: fewer scientific meetings; reduced attendance at conferences; limited post graduate education; and a depreciated level of maintenance of professional standards. To suggest that doctors prescribe inappropriately in return for largesse maligns their integrity but where there is no scientific reason to choose between different treatments then there can be little argument against selecting the product manufactured by a company that has invested in the doctor and the question arises as to whether this represents bad medicine? This paper will examine what constitutes non-professional conduct in response to inducements by the pharmaceutical industry. It will review: conflict of interest; relationships between doctors and pharma and the consequences for patients; and the need for critical appraisal before automatically decrying this relationship while accepting that there remain those who do not practice ethical medicine.

  8. The role of doctors in provision of support for primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice ... Twelve clinics reported that doctors spent time teaching staff during the visit. ... During focus group discussions, both doctors and nurses stated that doctors' visits were generally helpful, but both groups felt strongly that the time spent in the clinic during visits was too short, and that the doctor ...

  9. Practise what you preach: health behaviours and stress among non-consultant hospital doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, Sinéad

    2016-02-01

    High rates of psychological distress, depression and suicide have been reported among doctors. Furthermore, many doctors do not access healthcare by conventional means. This study aimed to increase understanding regarding non-consultant hospital doctors\\' (NCHDs\\') response to stress and barriers to accessing supports, and identify possible solutions. Medical manpower departments in 58 hospitals distributed a 25-item questionnaire to 4,074 NCHDs; we received 707 responses (response rate, 17.4%). 60% of NCHDs were unable to take time off work when unwell; \\'letting teammates down\\' (90.8%) and \\'difficulty covering call\\' (85.9%) were the leading reasons. \\'Being too busy\\' (85%), \\'self-prescription\\' (66.6%) and \\'self-management\\' (53.1%) were ranked highest in deterring NCHDs from visiting a general practitioner (GP). 22.9% of NCHDs would not attend a GP with anxiety or depression until they began to feel hopeless, helpless or suicidal. 12.2% would not seek help at all. 55% of respondents (n = 330) had to move away from partners or dependants due to work, negatively affecting the social supports of 82.9%. Possible practical solutions were explored. NCHDS are a vulnerable population and have a particularly challenging lifestyle. Key recommendations include improved GP and counselling access for NCHDs, and addressing the culture of self-treatment and poor health behaviours through undergraduate and postgraduate education.

  10. Predicting Burnout and Career Choice Satisfaction in Counseling Psychology Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Murdock, Nancy L.; Koetting, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral students (N = 284) from 53 training programs throughout the United States anonymously completed online measures of burnout, career choice satisfaction, global stress, role conflict, social support (from family/friends, advisors, other students) and psychological sense of community (SOC) in the doctoral program. Two…

  11. Systematic Approach to Research Training: Benefits for Counseling Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughead, Teri A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Synthesizes developments concerning research training in graduate counselor education and presents a systematic approach for training master's and doctoral students in mental health counseling to assimilate, use, and perform research. Suggests diversity of research training strategies for implementation in counselor preparation programs.…

  12. Biblical counselling regarding inner change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Campbell-Lane

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of inner change is not only the ultimate goal of counselling; it is also a central concept of the gospel. Biblical counselling entails a Scriptural understanding of the nature of change and aims at helping the counsellee change his/her inner life under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Change is the essence of the process of sanctification, entailing “putting off” (laying off sinful ways of life, renewing the mind, and ”putting on” (“clothing” oneself with godly ways of life (Eph. 4:22 ff.; Col. 3:8 ff.; Rom. 12:1-2. Although believers have a new identity in Christ, they still suffer from the effect of sin and have to grow in sanctification. Often the believer has not been instructed about changing previous irrational and unbiblical beliefs, behaviour, and habits, and he/she thus still integrates these negative results of sin into his/her new life. Unless old patterns are replaced with new ones, the counsellee can revert to sinful habits, unbiblical beliefs and behavioural patterns. A pastoral counsellor thus needs to teach the counsellee that God has made provision for him/her to change. A worldly anthropology-psychology is entirely opposed to the Biblical doctrines of sin and sanctification. Effective Biblical counselling depends on a Biblical anthropology and world view. A Biblical counsellor should promote holiness and a lifestyle in accordance with Biblical guidelines, thus shaping the counsellee to the likeness of Jesus Christ. When a Biblical counsellor ministers the Word of God in a life-transforming way, then God himself changes the counsellee from the inside out. A counsellor may not ignore sin and its effect as it will limit the effectiveness of counselling in facilitating lasting change in the life of a counsellee. It is important that a Biblical counseller understands the nature of change and is equipped with knowledge about, and the character of change.

  13. Promoting Counseling Competence using Silf-Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alis Norliza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-Reflection (SR has received a high degree of attention in extant Counseling Competence (CC. The present study sought to determine the relation of SR subscale; self awareness, and managing strategies with the three general areas in CC; performing helping skill, managing the counseling process, and handling challenging counseling situations. A total of 100 counselor trainees completed The Self-awareness and Management Strategies (SAMS Scale to measured the SR, and the Counselor Activity Self-Efficacy Scales (CASES to measured the CC. Result of the Pearson Product Moment Coefficient indicated there is a significant relationship between SR; Self-awareness with CC;handling challenging counselling, and SR;management strategies with all the three general areas in CC. A disscussion of the findings are presented and several implications and recommendations for further development of CC a proposed.

  14. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Website NIH Employee Intranet Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines ... Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health Español Talking to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) ...

  15. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Discovery Into Health ® Impact of NIH Research Science, Health, and Public Trust You are here Home » Institutes at NIH » ... Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, and Public Trust Talking to Your Doctor Part I: Preparing ...

  16. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation...... impact the supervisor – student relationship in a positive way....

  17. Predicting Factors of Drop Out Counseling Process in University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer OZER

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predicting factors the drop out the counseling process. Methods: The study group consists of 555 college students admitted to a Counseling and Guidance Center (CGC and participated in at least one session of counseling after the first view in the 2013-2014 academic year. As a data collection tool, an “Application Form” on the demographic information and the “Brief Symptom Inventory” was applied to the students; and independent samples t-test and binary logistic regression techniques were used in the analysis of the collected data. Results: According to the analysis results, the age of the students attending the counseling process was found to be higher than those who drop out, but no significant difference was found in their psychometric properties in terms of continuation of the counseling process. Only the age of clients and their previous psychiatric help history was found to predict the dropping out counseling process early. Conclusion: Drop outs are less frequently observed in clients having a previous psychiatric help experience. In addition, it was determined that older clients less frequently drop out the counseling process

  18. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  19. The 'reformation' of counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Lotter

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the Reformation took place some four hundred years ago, one area in which reformation is really needed today is the counselling of people. Since Wilhelm Wundt started the “study of the mind” in 1879, William James and Sigmund Freud followed and secular psychology gradually has developed to take the “front seat”; hence moving Biblical counselling, which has been practised since the times of the New Testament, to the “back burner”. This development had been going on for the greater part of the 20th century, up to the publication of Competent to Counsel by Jay E. Adams in 1970. In the model for counselling suggested by Adams, the principles of the Reformation of the sixteenth century, Soli Deo Gloria, Soli Scriptura, Soli Fidei, Sola Gratia, etc. were again implemented in assisting and counselling people with personal and interpersonal problems. The epistomological and anthropological approach of secular psychology differs radically from that of Biblical principles, thus necessitating a new “reformation” of counselling. Within this new form counselling, inter alia, implies the following: the Word of God has its rightful place, sin has to be taken seriously and the work of the Holy Spirit should be recognised. In this article it is proposed that the “reformation” of counselling was started by scholars with a Biblical Reformational approach and that this method of counselling followed the parameters of the Reformation of the sixteenth century. This “reformation” developed into a new direction in counselling and still continues today with fascinating new frontiers opening up for Biblical counselling.

  20. Counselling women considering or seeking sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T

    1980-12-01

    The view of counseling as assessment and advice-giving places unrealistic and unnecessary stresses on both counselor and client. The counselor-doctor feels responsible for client's subsequent happiness in life and feels guilty if his advice leads to future unhappiness for her. The client feels powerless in the decision-making process and has less incentive to take full responsibility for the direction of her life. A review of studies of emotional adjustment to sterilization revealed a lack of clearly defined goals for preoperative counseling and the failure to test in any way the effect of different models of counseling on client outcome. Issues which might be raised with a woman considering sterilization may be grouped into 4: 1) the woman's life situation; 2) her reasons for considering sterilization; 3) timing; and 4) ambivalence. Counselors should be prepared for and comfortable with the expression of emotion in counseling sessions. Counselors who themselves are unable to cope with expression of intense emotion will send conflicting messages to clients, both giving permission for and disapproving of exploration of certain levels of feeling. The concept of 'regret' as an outcome measure should be refined.

  1. The Profile and Empathy Level of Helping Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Lulu L. Loyola

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study looked into the demographic profile and empathy level of helping professionals enrolled at West Visayas State University, College of Education, Graduate School taking up Master of Education (M.Ed. major in Guidance and Counseling and Doctor of Philosophy in Education (Ph.D. in Ed. major in Psychology and Guidance. Results showed that the participants taking graduate education in the field of teacher education, psychology, guidance and counseling were generally female, younger and are actively teaching. Majority were beginners in the Ph.D. program. Except for the category on sex where females had significantly higher empathy level than males, all the participants had an average level of empathy. However, looking at their individual mean scores, it appeared that the older respondents, married, are teaching and are finishing their degrees had higher mean. These results seem to imply that the females, those with more experience, married, in the field of teaching, and have more training had higher levels of empathy.

  2. Working with doctors and nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with doctors and nurses Working with doctors and nurses Answering questions, filling out papers, getting poked and ... to pay? What questions will the doctor or nurse ask? top It’s a good idea to know ...

  3. The Use of Clinical Hypnosis in a College Counseling Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Herbert A.

    This report describes the use of hypnosis at the Hiram College Counseling Center, a counseling technique that has been especially helpful in academic, athletic, and personal improvement areas. The induction techniques of hypnosis are described as well as the use of hyperempiria. The use of hypnosis in improving study habits and alleviating test…

  4. Brief Counseling Scenarios from Fictional Characters for Counselors in Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Katrina

    2018-01-01

    To develop confidence and competence, student counselors need opportunities to practice applying their counseling skills. However, practicing on actual clients before counseling students are developmentally prepared not only can provoke anxiety within students but is also unethical. Counselor educators must find ways to help students practice…

  5. Factors affecting guidance and counseling programme in primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to establish the factors that affect guidance and counseling in primary schools. Guidance and counseling seems not to be adequately helping pupils with physical and psychological problems in Nairobi province of Kenya. Many primary schools are faced with indiscipline and poor performance ...

  6. Coping More Effectively Through Rational Self-Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, George W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Rational Self-Counseling, a variation of rational-emotive therapy, is a self-help therapeutic technique in which students are encouraged to be responsible for their own behavior and emotions. The primary function of self-counseling is to evaluate whether thoughts are rational. A list of questions which students might ask themselves is presented.…

  7. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  8. Narrative Dietary Counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard Jakobsen, Nina; Kaufmann, Lisbeth; Hennesser, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Using cases and empirical data from a research and development project at a Danish prevention center, this study explores whether and how the use of narrative dietary counseling can strengthen dietitians' relationships and collaboration with clients who are chronically ill. The results of the study...... dietary counseling empowered clients and improved relationship building and collaboration between client and dietitian....

  9. Beyond spaces of counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Mads; Nissen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The article articulates experiments with spatial constructions in two Danish social work agencies, basing on (a) a sketchy genealogical reconstruction of conceptualisations and uses of space in social work and counselling, (b) a search for theoretical resources to articulate new spaces, and (c...... spaces are forms of spatialisations which might be taken as prototypical in attempts to develop social work and counselling...

  10. Crisis Counseling: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Jonathan; Scott, Amy Nicole; Padilla, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Psychologists working in schools are often the first contacts for children experiencing a potentially traumatizing event or change in status. This article reviews basic concepts in crisis counseling and describes the components of psychological first aid. This form of counseling must be developmentally and culturally appropriate as well as…

  11. Counseling in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Soo Yin; Neihart, Maureen F.

    2012-01-01

    Singapore, a tiny island nation, rose from 3rd- to 1st-world status in just 3 decades. Unlike in most developed countries, counseling in Singapore has a short history with faith-based beginnings and currently faces challenges to remain culturally relevant. The authors trace the development of Singapore's counseling services, provide an update…

  12. Islamic approach in counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin Hamjah, Salasiah; Mat Akhir, Noor Shakirah

    2014-02-01

    A religious approach is one of the matters emphasized in counseling today. Many researchers find that there is a need to apply the religious element in counseling because religion is important in a client's life. The purpose of this research is to identify aspects of the Islamic approach applied in counseling clients by counselors at Pusat Kaunseling Majlis Agama Islam Negeri Sembilan (PKMAINS). In addition, this research also analyses the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS with reference to al-Quran and al-Sunnah. This is a qualitative research in the form of case study at PKMAINS. The main method used in this research is interview. The research instrument used is interview protocol. The respondents in this study include 9 counselors who serve in one of the counseling centers in Malaysia. This study also uses questionnaire as an additional instrument, distributed to 36 clients who receive counseling service at the center. The findings of the study show that the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS may be categorized into three main aspects: aqidah (faith), ibadah (worship/ultimate devotion and love for God) and akhlaq (moral conduct). Findings also show that the counseling in these aspects is in line with Islamic teachings as contained in al-Quran and al-Sunnah.

  13. Counseling Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Richard B.

    1995-01-01

    Explores how the understanding of graduate students' special needs and circumstances enhances counseling of this population. Looks at stress factors, educational preparation, delayed gratification, achieving autonomy, intellectual development, and the counseling process. Emphasizes the importance of establishing trust in the therapeutic dialog so…

  14. Counseling for Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Ellen Hawley

    Counseling for empowerment is a complex and multifaceted process that requires, for some, a radical departure from the traditional conceptualization of the helper's role. The process of empowerment demands that professional helpers and their clients take an active, collaborative approach to identifying problems and goals. Drawing from counseling,…

  15. Malpractice in Counseling Neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1992-01-01

    Responds to earlier four articles on integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology by noting that neuropsychology occurs in settings with high risk of legal complaints. Contends that aspiration to press counseling psychology toward clinical neuropsychology should be filtered through consideration for legal risk. Explores legal…

  16. How Doctors View and Use Social Media: A National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, James; Ryan, Christopher; Harris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background Doctors are uncertain of their ethical and legal obligations when communicating with patients online. Professional guidelines for patient-doctor interaction online have been written with limited quantitative data about doctors’ current usage and attitudes toward the medium. Further research into these trends will help to inform more focused policy and guidelines for doctors communicating with patients online. Objective The intent of the study was to provide the first national profi...

  17. [Career counselling and choice of speciality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillevang, G.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences. The cou......Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences....... The counsellor must be aware that the trainees' subjective opinions about the specialties may not be in line with the actual conditions. Hence, career counselling should provide factual knowledge about the specialties including information on the working conditions and defining characteristics of the specialties...

  18. Follow-up effects of a tailored pre-counseling website with question prompt in breast cancer genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, Akke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Ausems, Margreet G E M

    Objective: Pre-counseling education helps counselees to prepare for breast cancer genetic counseling and might subsequently result in more positive experiences, improved cognitive outcomes and more experienced control. This study assessed the effects of a website with tailored information and a

  19. Follow-up effects of a tailored pre-counseling website with question prompt in breast cancer genetic counseling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pre-counseling education helps counselees to prepare for breast cancer genetic counseling and might subsequently result in more positive experiences, improved cognitive outcomes and more experienced control. This study assessed the effects of a website with tailored information and a

  20. Help wanted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Anthony McGrath , Senior Lecturer at Middle-sex University, is undertaking a doctorate to examine 'To what extent does masters degree education affect clinical prac-tice'. He would like to hear from anyone who has undertaken such a degree programme and remains in clinical practice to discuss their perceptions of the value of the educational and clinical benefits of their masters degree education.

  1. Surgical patient selection and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegelmann, Matt; Köhler, Tobias S; Bailey, George C; Miest, Tanner; Alom, Manaf; Trost, Landon

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of patient selection and counseling are ultimately to enhance successful outcomes. However, the definition for success is often narrowly defined in published literature (ability to complete surgery, complications, satisfaction) and fails to account for patient desires and expectations, temporal changes, natural history of underlying diseases, or independent validation. Factors associated with satisfaction and dissatisfaction are often surgery-specific, although correlation with pre-operative expectations, revisions, and complications are common with most procedures. The process of appropriate patient selection is determined by the integration of patient and surgeon factors, including psychological capacity to handle unsatisfactory results, baseline expectations, complexity of case, and surgeon volume and experience. Using this model, a high-risk scenario includes one in which a low-volume surgeon performs a complex case in a patient with limited psychological capacity and high expectations. In contrast, a high-volume surgeon performing a routine case in a male with low expectations and abundant psychiatric reserve is more likely to achieve a successful outcome. To further help identify patients who are at high risk for dissatisfaction, a previously published mnemonic is recommended: CURSED Patient (compulsive/obsessive, unrealistic, revision, surgeon shopping, entitled, denial, and psychiatric). Appropriate patient counseling includes setting appropriate expectations, reviewing the potential and anticipated risks of surgery, post-operative instruction to limit complications, and long-term follow-up. As thorough counseling is often a time-consuming endeavor, busy practices may elect to utilize various resources including educational materials, advanced practice providers, or group visits, among others. The consequences for poor patient selection and counseling may range from poor surgical outcomes and patient dissatisfaction to lawsuits, loss of

  2. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science ... More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives ...

  3. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. Learn how ...

  4. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Health Literacy Clear & Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain ... Health Care Providers About Complementary Health Approaches , National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) Diabetes Questions ...

  5. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH ...

  6. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus ...

  7. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... concerns before your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. ...

  8. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  9. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Science, Health, ... to take notes for you. Learn how to access your medical records, so you can keep track ...

  10. Talking to Your Doctor

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  11. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ... Institute on Aging (NIA) Cancer Communication in Cancer Care , National Cancer Institute (NCI) Español Complementary and Integrative ...

  12. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ... Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  13. The Doctor and Society*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the pressure of his own discipline he should be an edu- cated person in the ... found and multiform influence on social norms and human .destiny. The paths of ... This broad approach is fundamental to a sound doctor- patient relationship.

  14. Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manager Book Appointments Getting Care When on Active Duty Getting Care When Traveling What's Covered Health Care Dental Care ... Manager Book Appointments Getting Care When on Active Duty Getting Care When Traveling Bread Crumbs Home Find a Doctor ...

  15. Alcohol Screening and Counseling PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-01-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the January 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Millions of Americans drink too much, a dangerous behavior that can lead to serious health problems. Alcohol screening and counseling can help.  Created: 1/7/2014 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/7/2014.

  16. Developmental Issues in Counseling With Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Linda; Deutsch, Marjorie B.

    Marriages, just like the individuals in them, go through stages of development. Understanding these relatively predictable stages can be helpful to couples, by allaying apprehension, promoting preparation for change, and putting fluctuations into perspective. Research on marital stages and experiences in counseling couples suggest that marriages…

  17. Counseling View of Abortion in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwokhademhe, M. C.; Sowho, Paulina O.

    2015-01-01

    Guidance and counseling are twin words that help people adjust to their psychological, emotional, social and psychosocial problems which tend to occur in human life. Abortion, which is a prevalent problem in Nigeria mostly among the teenage girls, has drawn the attentions of the counselors, teachers, guardians, administrators, researchers and the…

  18. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine P. Dabney; Robert H. Tai

    2013-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female...

  19. Personal Study Planning in Doctoral Education in Industrial Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahenius, K.; Martinsuo, M.

    2010-01-01

    The duration of doctoral studies has increased in Europe. Personal study planning has been considered as one possible solution to help students in achieving shorter study times. This study investigates how doctoral students experience and use personal study plans in one university department of industrial engineering. The research material…

  20. Differential growth in doctor-patient communications skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M van Es, Judith; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet; Visser, Mechteld R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Although doctor-patient communication is considered a core competency for medical doctors, the effect of training has not been unequivocally established. Moreover, knowledge about the variance in the growth of different skills and whether certain patterns in growth can be detected could help us to

  1. Counseling a Student Presenting Borderline Personality Disorder in the Small College Context: Case Study and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Matthew R.; Faulkner, Ginger E.

    2009-01-01

    This case study examines the dynamics and challenges associated with counseling a client experiencing borderline personality disorder in the small college institutional context. The work of counseling centers at small private institutions has been relatively unexplored in the extant college counseling literature. To help fill this gap, the current…

  2. Indigenous counseling: A needed area in school counseling in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous counselling has not been given attention in Nigeria's school counselling programme. This counselling gap was created by European colonialism, which succeeded in developing in the minds of the African that anything indigenous is local, unscientific and unorthodox. Indigenous counselling is one of the ...

  3. University strategy for doctoral training: the Ghent University Doctoral Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, N; Moens, L

    2010-01-01

    The Doctoral Schools at Ghent University have a three-fold mission: (1) to provide support to doctoral students during their doctoral research, (2) to foster a quality culture in (doctoral) research, (3) to promote the international and social stature and prestige of the doctorate vis-a-vis potential researchers and the potential labour market. The Doctoral Schools offer top-level specialized courses and transferable skills training to doctoral students as part of their doctoral training programme. They establish mechanisms of quality assurance in doctoral research. The Doctoral Schools initialize and support initiatives of internationalization. They also organize information sessions, promotional events and interaction with the labour market, and as such keep a finger on the pulse of external stakeholders.

  4. Doctors with dyslexia: strategies and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Alexander, Gail; Mann, Richard; Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha

    2017-10-01

    Looking beyond dyslexia as an individual doctor's issue requires adjusting a working environment to better serve the needs of doctors with dyslexia. With an increasing number of doctors disclosing dyslexia at medical school, how can educators best provide this support? Our research looks at the impact of dyslexia on clinical practice and the coping strategies used by doctors to minimise the effect. Qualitative data were collected from 14 doctors with dyslexia using semi-structured interviews and by survey. 'In situ' demonstration interviews were conducted in order to understand how dyslexia is managed in the workplace from first-hand experience. Employers and educators who have responsibility for meeting the needs of this group were also consulted. Even in cases of doctors who had a diagnosis, they often did not disclose their dyslexia to their employer. Study participants reported having developed individual ways of coping and devised useful 'workarounds'. Support from employers comes in the form of 'reasonable adjustments', although from our data we cannot be sure that such adjustments contribute to an 'enabling' work environment. Supportive characteristics included the opportunity to shadow others and the time and space to complete paperwork on a busy ward. How can educators best provide support [for doctors with dyslexia]? Doctors with dyslexia need to be helped to feel comfortable enough to disclose. Educators need to challenge any negative assumptions that exist as well as promote understanding about the elements that contribute to a positive working environment. As a result of the research there is now practice available for educators to identify evidence-based strategies and resources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  5. Helping While Learning: A Skilled Group Helper Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaby, Marlowe H.; Tamminen, Armas W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a developmental group training workshop for training experienced counselors to do group counseling. Discusses stages of training including exploration, understanding, and action, which can help counselors learn helping skills for counseling that can often transfer to their own interpersonal lives and interactions with others. (JAC)

  6. Reaching In--Reaching Out: Counseling an Autistic Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystul, Michael S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a humanistic counseling approach that can be used with autistic children. A case study illustrates how the approach can be implemented. Gains are shown in academics, classroom behavior, and self-help skills. (Author/ABB)

  7. Vital Signs – Alcohol Screening and Counseling?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is based on the January 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Millions of Americans drink too much, a dangerous behavior that can lead to serious health problems. Alcohol screening and counseling can help.

  8. Is my daughter still a virgin? Can you, please, check it, doctor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rigon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender-based violence is a pervasive public health problem, let alone a violation of human rights. The World Health Organization (WHO has estimated that, overall, 35% of women worldwide have experienced physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or nonpartner sexual violence. In 2016, the author had the privilege to work with an outstanding group of people that helps sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV survivors in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The clinic, run by an international nongovernmental organizations, open walk-in to anyone in need, is functioning to the present day. In its 1st year along, the clinic helped almost 1000 survivors, mainly underaged girls. At the clinic, a highly qualified staff of local doctors and nurses, psychologists, and social workers is available, free of charge, 24 h a day, 7 days a week, and accessible to SGBV survivors in absolute confidentiality. Survivors are offered all the support they might need as per the WHO guidelines, from medical assistance (treating of physical injuries, testing and preventing sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV or hepatitis B, and also gynecological and obstetric care to psychological counseling, as well as specific referrals to shelters, legal aid, or secondary care as needed. Virginity still is highly valued in Haiti, and the father, mother, the beau-mare, or aunt of the survivor will often approach the doctor and anxiously whisper the question: “Is my daughter (goddaughter, niece still a virgin?”, “Can you, please, check it, Doctor?” This article presents the perspective of SGBV survivors clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

  9. Is my daughter still a virgin? Can you, please, check it, doctor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigon, Sara

    2018-01-01

    Gender-based violence is a pervasive public health problem, let alone a violation of human rights. The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that, overall, 35% of women worldwide have experienced physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or nonpartner sexual violence. In 2016, the author had the privilege to work with an outstanding group of people that helps sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) survivors in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The clinic, run by an international nongovernmental organizations, open walk-in to anyone in need, is functioning to the present day. In its 1 st year along, the clinic helped almost 1000 survivors, mainly underaged girls. At the clinic, a highly qualified staff of local doctors and nurses, psychologists, and social workers is available, free of charge, 24 h a day, 7 days a week, and accessible to SGBV survivors in absolute confidentiality. Survivors are offered all the support they might need as per the WHO guidelines, from medical assistance (treating of physical injuries, testing and preventing sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV or hepatitis B, and also gynecological and obstetric care) to psychological counseling, as well as specific referrals to shelters, legal aid, or secondary care as needed. Virginity still is highly valued in Haiti, and the father, mother, the beau-mare, or aunt of the survivor will often approach the doctor and anxiously whisper the question: "Is my daughter (goddaughter, niece) still a virgin?", "Can you, please, check it, Doctor?" This article presents the perspective of SGBV survivors clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

  10. HIV counselling in prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, L; McHugh, M; Nooney, K

    1989-01-01

    HIV presents particular problem in penal establishments: the nature of the population; conditions in prison; media attention and misinformation; the possibility of transmission within and beyond the prison population; the extra issues that apply to female prisoners. These are discussed in the context of prison policy regarding HIV and the broad strategic approach which is being adopted to manage the problem of HIV within penal institutions. Counselling has a key role in the overall strategy. Pre- and post-test counselling with prisoners is described and the particular problems presented by inmates are discussed and illustrated by reference to case histories. Developments in counselling provision for inmates are outlined.

  11. Trial Counsel and Defense Counsel Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-01

    for? If so, what kind? (Get sample) NA _Are you taking tranquillzers, pills or medicine * of any kind? NA Last doee? NA Do you have...coffee table) Bag, about four by five inches, brown paper construction, approximately half full, containing suspected marihuana , marked on bag and...Crime Prevention (Policeman, sheriff, detective, etc.) Medicine (Doctor, Nurse, Pharmacist, etc.) Mental Health (Psychiatrist, Psychologist, etc

  12. Wanted--doctors who care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovdal, L T; Pearson, R

    1989-03-01

    A study was conducted to determine what consumers value in doctors' behavior. Results indicate that consumers in the sample population studied prefer doctors who are friendly and caring as well as those who are technically competent. However, these respondents reported less favorable opinions about doctors' friendliness (i.e., affective behavior) than they did about doctors' competence (i.e., instrumental behavior).

  13. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  14. Controlling Depersonalized Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Outlines Gestalt therapy techniques to increase active listening and counselor/client involvement in career counseling. Discusses awareness through dialog, role playing or "presentizing," and experiential "presentizing." Presents a sample dialog as illustration. (RC)

  15. [Murder of the doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorettu, Liliana; Falchi, Lorenzo; Nivoli, Fabrizia L; Milia, Paolo; Nivoli, Giancarlo; Nivoli, Alessandra M

    2015-01-01

    To examine possible risk factors for the doctor to be killed by the patient in the clinical practice by examining a series of murders that involved physicians. This aim has been achieved through a retrospective review on clinical cases of doctors killed by patients within the period between 1988 and 2013, in Italy. In this period 18 Italian doctors have been killed in the workplace, with a rate of 0.3/100,000. In 7 cases, the murder resulted in the context of doctor-dissatisfaction; in 7 cases the murder was committed by a psychiatric patient; 1 case in the context of a stalking; 3 cases occurred in a workplace which was not safe enough. Four categories of at-risk contexts have been identified. One category includes a murder in the context of a doctor-dissatisfaction, perceived by patient. The second category concerns murders committed by patients suffering from mental illness. A third category includes homicides in a workplace which is not safe. The last category comprises the murder in the context of stalking. These categories identify specific dangerous situations for physicians, in which are highlighted elements that have played a crucial role in the murder and for which special precautions are suggested preventive.

  16. [Group counselling for the second trimester ultrasound: can group counselling be an alternative for individual counselling?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lau, Hinke; Depmann, Martine; Laeven, Yvo J M; Stoutenbeek, Philip H; Pistorius, Lou R; van Beek, Erik; Schuitemaker, Nico W E

    2013-01-01

    To compare group counselling to individual counselling with respect to the second trimester ultrasound. A prospective cohort study at two hospitals. At one hospital, 100 pregnant women were counselled on the risks and benefits of the second trimester ultrasound in groups of up to 15 patients. Shortly before the ultrasound they were asked to fill out a questionnaire. Results were compared to 100 women who were counselled individually at another hospital. The primary outcome was the level of informed choice whether or not to undergo the ultrasound, defined as sufficient knowledge and a value-consistent decision. The secondary outcome measures were level of understanding of the second trimester ultrasound and the degree of satisfaction with the counselling. The resulting level of informed choice was 87.0% after group counselling compared to 79.4% after individual counselling (p = 0.47). The mean knowledge score was 8.8 for the women who attended group counselling; women who were individually counselled had a mean score of 7.4 (p counselling was 7.0 for group counselling and 6.2 for individual counselling (p group counselling was associated with higher post-counselling knowledge and satisfaction scores. Group counselling should therefore be considered as an alternative counselling method.

  17. Contextualising eating problems in individual diet counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Tange; Køster, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Health professionals consider diet to be a vital component in managing weight, chronic diseases and the overall promotion of health. This article takes the position that the complexity and contextual nature of individual eating problems needs to be addressed in a more systematic and nuanced way...... than is usually the case in diet counselling, motivational interviewing and health coaching. We suggest the use of narrative practice as a critical and context-sensitive counselling approach to eating problems. Principles of externalisation and co-researching are combined within a counselling framework...... sessions, exploration of the complex structures of food and eating with the client can provide agency by helping them navigate within the context of the problem. We also exemplify why a reflexive and critical approach to the way health is perceived by clients should be an integrated part of diet...

  18. Parents' knowledge and attitude regarding their child's cancer and effectiveness of initial disease counseling in pediatric oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine parent's knowledge, attitude and psychosocial response regarding their child's cancer and treatment after initial disease counseling by doctor. Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaire based study of 43 mothers of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients undergoing treatment in pediatric oncology division. Mothers received initial counseling regarding their child's cancer and treatment from the doctor. Questionnaire was administered 2-6 months after initial counseling and mothers self-reported their responses. Results: 83% mothers had school level education only and 84% belonged to lower and middle socio-economic status. More than 80% mothers knew the name of their child's cancer, type of treatment received by child and approximate duration of treatment. 93% knew regarding painful procedures and 84% mothers reported knowledge about chemotherapy side effects. Hope of cure and satisfaction with treatment were reported by 90% mothers. 81% mothers reported high levels of anxiety and 66% worried regarding painful procedures. As high as 60% of parents were afraid to send their child outside to play and 40% were afraid to send their child to school. 40% mothers wanted more information regarding child's higher education, married life & fertility. On statistical analysis, mother's age, educational status or family background did not influence their knowledge and attitude. Conclusion: Relevant information about child's cancer and treatment can be imparted effectively even to mothers with school level education. This knowledge helps to instill hopeful attitude, confidence and satisfaction in parents. Anxiety and fear related to cancer persists in mothers even after the initial stress period is over. Pain related to injections and procedures is a major concern in parents. Involvement of counselor in the treating team is desirable to overcome these problems.

  19. Surviving the Doctoral Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This article probes the implications of neo-conservative public education policies for the future of the academic profession through a detailed examination of critical issues shaping contemporary doctoral education in U.S. and Canadian universities. Institutional and social factors such as financial retrenchment, declining support for affirmative action, downward economic mobility, a weak academic labor market for tenure-track faculty, professional ethics in graduate education, and backlash against women's progress form the backdrop for analysis of the author's survey of current doctoral students' opinions about funding, support, the job market, and quality of learning experiences.

  20. Conceptualising Doctoral Writing as an Affective-political Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Burford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This article offers a conceptual summary and critique of existing literature on doctoral writing and emotion. The article seeks to intervene in current debates about doctoral writing by re-positioning it as an affective-political practice Background: Over recent decades public interest in the doctorate has expanded as it has become re-framed as a key component of national success in the global knowledge economy. It is within this context that the practice of doctoral writing has crystallised as an object of interest. While researchers have examined the increased regulation, surveillance, and intensification of doctoral writing, often this work is motivated to develop pedagogies that support students to meet these new expectations. At this point, there has been limited attention to what broad changes to the meanings and practices of doctoral writing feel like for students. Methodology: The paper offers a conceptual review that examines the ways in which doctoral writing tends to be understood. A review of literature in the areas of doctoral writing, doctoral emotion, and critical studies of academic labour was undertaken in order to produce a more comprehensive understanding of the political and emotional dynamics of doctoral writing. Contribution: It is intended that this conceptual research paper help researchers attend to the emotional context of doctoral writing in the current university context. Critical studies of academic work and life are identified as a possible platform for the development of future doctoral education research, and the conceptual tool of “affective-politics” is advanced as a novel frame for approaching doctoral writing research.

  1. Contextualising eating problems in individual diet counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Søren T; Køster, Allan

    2014-05-01

    Health professionals consider diet to be a vital component in managing weight, chronic diseases and the overall promotion of health. This article takes the position that the complexity and contextual nature of individual eating problems needs to be addressed in a more systematic and nuanced way than is usually the case in diet counselling, motivational interviewing and health coaching. We suggest the use of narrative practice as a critical and context-sensitive counselling approach to eating problems. Principles of externalisation and co-researching are combined within a counselling framework that employs logistic, social and discursive eating problems as analytic categories. Using cases from a health clinic situated at the Metropolitan University College in Copenhagen, we show that even if the structural conditions associated with eating problems may not be solvable through individual counselling sessions, exploration of the complex structures of food and eating with the client can provide agency by helping them navigate within the context of the problem. We also exemplify why a reflexive and critical approach to the way health is perceived by clients should be an integrated part of diet counselling.

  2. 38 CFR 21.3100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.3100.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3100 Counseling. (a) Purpose of counseling. The purpose of counseling is to...)) (b) Availability of counseling. Counseling assistance is available for— (1) Identifying and removing...

  3. A survey on doctors' knowledge and attitude of treating chronic pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic non-cancer pain (CP) is one of the most common complaints that bring patients to the hospital. When pain persists, people move from doctor-to-doctor seeking for help, thus the burden of CP is huge. This study, therefore was aimed at assessing attitude and knowledge of doctors in three teaching ...

  4. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  5. Talking to Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or risks? Will I need more tests later? Understanding your doctor's responses is essential to good communication. Here are a few more tips: If you ... is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and ... and Human Services | The National Institutes of Health | USA.gov ...

  6. Choosing a Family Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age or sex. This includes care for your physical, mental, and emotional health. Family doctors get to know their patients. They ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food ...

  7. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ...

  8. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Repayment More » Search the NIH Guide Quick Links RePORT eRA Commons NIH Common Fund NIH and the ... if you feel embarrassed or shy. Have an open dialogue with your doctor — ask questions to make ...

  9. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science ... Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation and Guidance More » Quick Links ...

  10. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in ...

  11. The Effects of an Equine Assisted Learning Supervision Intervention on Counselors'-in-Training Performance Anxiety, Counseling Self-Efficacy, and Supervisory Working Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Cheryl C.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the counseling process, counselors-in-training often experience performance anxiety when entering the counseling profession. Research shows that higher counseling self-efficacy (the belief in oneself to perform counseling skills successfully) helps decrease performance anxiety. Further, a strong supervisory working…

  12. Search Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance and search help resource listing examples of common queries that can be used in the Google Search Appliance search request, including examples of special characters, or query term seperators that Google Search Appliance recognizes.

  13. One Message, Many Voices: Mobile Audio Counselling in Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Mbvundula, Francis

    2018-01-01

    Health workers' use of counselling information on their mobile phones for health education is a central but little understood phenomenon in numerous mobile health (mHealth) projects in Sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on empirical data from an interpretive case study in the setting of the Millennium Villages Project in rural Malawi, this research investigates the ways in which community health workers (CHWs) perceive that audio-counselling messages support their health education practice. Three main themes emerged from the analysis: phone-aided audio counselling (1) legitimises the CHWs' use of mobile phones during household visits; (2) helps CHWs to deliver a comprehensive counselling message; (3) supports CHWs in persuading communities to change their health practices. The findings show the complexity and interplay of the multi-faceted, sociocultural, political, and socioemotional meanings associated with audio-counselling use. Practical implications and the demand for further research are discussed.

  14. Reinventing The Doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a seismic shift in the lives of people because of technology. People are far better informed than they were in the 1980s and 1990s. Much of this information is available through the media but even more is available and archived on the internet. The forces pushing the internet into health and health care are strong and unstoppable, ensuring that the internet and the choices it offers must be part of the design of our future health care system. We are no longer content to wait in queues as we live at a faster pace than earlier generations — we don’t not have time to wait for appointments months, weeks or even days in advance. The internet offers the prospect of online consultations in the comfort of your own home. The physical examination will change as new devices are developed to allow the necessary sounds and signals emitted by our malfunctioning bodies to be recorded, interpreted and captured at a remote location. Meanwhile, for those who prefer to see a health care practitioner in person the options to consult practitioners other than doctors who can advise on our health is expanding. The reality is we can’t afford to train or pay for all the doctors we need under the current “doctor-knows-best” system of health care. Patients no longer believe the rhetoric and are already voting with their feet. Pharmacists, nurses and other allied health professionals are beginning to play a much greater role in offering relief from symptoms and monitoring of chronic diseases. Of course, the doctor of the future will still need to offer face-to-face consultations to some people most of the time or most people some of the time. The social role doctors play will continue to be important as humans will always need other humans to personally respond to their distress. As doctors reinvent themselves, the internet and the value of time with patients will be the driving forces that move us into a more sustainable future in health care.

  15. Online Counseling: Reviewing the Literature from a Counseling Psychology Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.; Rochlen, Aaron B.; Day, Susan X.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the online-counseling literature with an emphasis on current applications and considerations for future research. It focuses on primary themes of counseling psychology including the history of process-outcome research and multiculturalism. It explores current gaps in the literature from a counseling psychology framework,…

  16. Introduction to the Major Contribution: Counseling Psychology and Online Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article introduces the Major Contribution, which focuses on online counseling. Several acronyms and terms are presented to familiarize the reader with distance-communication technology, including a definition of online counseling. The authors show how counseling psychology provides a framework for specific questions related to the theory,…

  17. The Ghosts of Counseling Psychology: Is Counseling Research Really Dead?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Scheel et al. offer an interesting analysis on the publication rate of counseling-related research articles in counseling psychology's two major journals. In this reaction to their work, the author considers various aspects of their results and contemplates possible explanations for the decline of counseling-related publications. The author…

  18. Working as a doctor when chronically ill or disabled: comments made by doctors responding to UK surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J; Lambert, Trevor W

    2016-07-01

    To report a qualitative study of themes doctors raised spontaneously, in a large-scale prospective cohort study covering many aspects of their medical careers, when referring to their own chronic illness or disability. Questionnaire survey. UK. Questionnaires were sent one, five and 10 years after graduation to 44,539 doctors who qualified between 1993 and 2012 in the UK: 38,613 questionnaires were returned and 11,859 respondents provided comments made by doctors about their training or work. The comments of 123 doctors about their own chronic illness or disability. Main themes raised included poor support for doctors with chronic illness or disability, delays in and changes to careers (either planned ahead or imposed), the impact of pressure at work, difficulties returning to work after illness, limitations on career choices and inadequate careers advice for doctors with chronic illness or disabilities. More needs to be done to ensure that doctors with chronic illness or disability receive appropriate support. Occupational health guidance should be monitored closely, with more support for ill doctors including adjustments to the job, help if needed with morale and mental health, and advice on career options. Further studies should establish the prevalence of long-term health conditions among doctors.

  19. Counseling Centers Lack Resources to Help Troubled Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2008-01-01

    The fatal shootings at Northern Illinois University this month were shocking yet familiar. For the second time in 10 months, a student with a record of mental-health problems went on a killing spree at a large public university. Ever since a disturbed student fatally shot 32 students and professors at Virginia Tech last April, college…

  20. Kierkegaard's Philosophy: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopson, Lorraine; Gade, Eldon

    1981-01-01

    Discusses how the philosophy of Soren Kierkegaard can provide useful guidelines for the study of the counseling process. Compares Kierkegaard's philosophy with selected contributions of Freud, Skinner, Rogers, and May and with four common themes of counseling and psychotherapy. (Author)

  1. A Thirteen-Year Comparison in Patterns of Attitudes toward Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Warren R.; Gandy, Gerald L.

    1994-01-01

    Administered survey of attitudes toward counseling to college students in 1976 and 1989, rating likelihood of seeking counseling, likelihood of seeking help from professional and nonprofessional helpers, likelihood of seeking help for differing problems, degree of responsibility professional should assume, and preferences for five counseling…

  2. Empathy and the wounded healer: a mixed-method study of patients and doctors views on empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, C; Bambury, R M; O'Reilly, S

    2015-04-01

    Empathy is increasingly being recognized as a crucial component for an effective doctor-patient relationship. Using a mixed method approach, we surveyed 125 patients and 361 medical practitioners (doctors and medical students) views of the doctor-patient relationship. We qualitatively assessed patients' views of what constituted a good doctor and qualitatively measured empathy using a validated scale in medical practitioners. Patients desire a doctor that is both clinically proficient 66 (55%) and caring 32 (27%). Doctors who have a personal experience of illness have a statistically higher empathy score. These doctors may be well placed to help develop and foster empathy in our profession.

  3. Sexual Dysfunction and Help Seeking Behaviors in Newly Married Men in Sari City: a Descriptive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakineh Mohammad-Alizadeh Charandabi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for people's general health. The aim of this study was to determine the status of sexual function and help-seeking behaviors in newly married men. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 363 newly married men. Simple random sampling was used according to premarital counseling offices in the health center of Sari city. Data collection instruments included personal and social characteristics, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX, and help-seeking behaviors questionnaires. In order to determine the relationship between characteristics and sexual function, general linear model and also between socio-demographic characteristics and receiving or lack of receiving help, multivariate logistic regression test were used. Results: The mean of sexual function score was 21.3 (2.7 out of possible 5-30, and 26% of men suffered sexual dysfunction. The highest prevalence (27.2% of dysfunction was in the dimension of sexual stimulation, and the lowest (15.7% in maintaining erection. For the treatment of sexual dysfunction, only 32% men had sought help, and 40% of them had visited specialists. The most frequent reasons for not seeking help were feeling uncomfortable with doctor, and their belief that doctor is not able to do much. 65% of men desired to be treated. Conclusion: The results demonstrated relatively high prevalence of sexual dysfunction among men, and unfortunately, most of them did not seek help for their sexual problem. Since Sexual dysfunction can leave damaging effects on the quality of life and marital relationship, interventions to deal with these challenges and screening to identify such problems appear necessary.

  4. Paediatrician knowledge, attitudes, and counselling patterns on teen driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jeffrey C; O'Neil, Joseph; Shope, Jean T; O'Connor, Karen G; Levin, Rebecca A

    2012-02-01

    Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are the leading cause of death among teenagers. Little is known about the content of US paediatrician counselling about teen driving. To examine US paediatrician knowledge, attitudes, and counselling patterns regarding teen driving. A random sample questionnaire was mailed to American Academy of Pediatrics members in 2009 (n=1606; response=875 (55%)). Analysis was limited to 596 paediatricians who provide adolescent checkups. Questions addressed counselling and attitudes towards roles in promoting safe driving. Logistic regression assessed the relationship between counselling topics and practice characteristics. Most (89%) respondents provide some counselling about driving. Two topics commonly discussed by paediatricians were seatbelts (87%) and alcohol use (82%). Less frequently discussed were: cell phones (47%), speeding (43%), and dangers of transporting teen passengers (41%). Topics rarely discussed were: night driving (21%), graduated driver licensing laws (13%), safe cars (9%), driver education (9%), fatigue (25%), and parental limit setting (23%). Only 10% ever recommend a parent-teen driver agreement. Paediatricians who had a patient injured or killed in an MVC were more likely to discuss night driving (OR=2.86). Physicians caring for a high proportion of adolescents (OR=1.83) or patients with private insurance (OR=1.85) counsel more about the risks of driving with teen passengers. Paediatricians in the USA support counselling on teen driving during routine office visits, but omit many important risk factors. Few recommend parent-teen driver agreements. Methods that help clinicians efficiently and effectively counsel families about teen driving should be developed.

  5. Family Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levant, Ronald F., ed.

    1983-01-01

    Describes programs for family counseling which use psychological-educational and skills training methods to remediate individual and family problems or enhance family life. The six articles discuss client-centered skills training, behavioral approaches, cognitive behavioral marital therapy, Adlerian parent education, and couple communication. (JAC)

  6. First Cycle Counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darska, Anna

    1981-01-01

    Investigations are described that were carried out by the Centre d'Information de Documentation et d'Orientation of the Rene Descartes University to find an answer to the counseling problems arising from student admission, through coursework, and upon leaving the university to start a career. (Author/MLW)

  7. Counseling and Transcendental Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donceel, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    An acquaintance with the different philosophies of human nature is an invaluable asset for counseling. The author presents a modern Christian concept of man with emphasis on contributions of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas and elements from modern philosophy. Its two main concerns are man's spirit and man's knowledge and will. (Author/CG)

  8. A Maslovian Counseling Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. Stephen

    1979-01-01

    With Maslow's hierarchy as a basis, the model provides structure for setting goals in counseling cases and overall programs. Different kinds of client concerns are identified, and suggestions are made for using these 14 categories. The article includes specific suggestions for using the model in diagnosis, evaluation, counselor education, and…

  9. Counseling Third Culture Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Carolyn Fox

    Third Culture Kids (TCKs) represent a group of youth who have lived overseas with their families for business, service, or missionary work. The implications of living in multiple cultures, especially during the developmental and formative years of youth, warrant investigation. This study informs the US counseling community about the…

  10. Life Satisfaction and Frequency of Doctor Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S.; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K.; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information is available about the association between life satisfaction and health care use. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Methods Participants were 6,379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50. Participants were tracked for four years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Results Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a six-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits—after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86 to 0.93). The most satisfied respondents (N=1,121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than the least satisfied (N=182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93 to 0.99). Conclusions Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs. PMID:24336427

  11. Life satisfaction and frequency of doctor visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high-quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information about the association between life satisfaction and health care use is available. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Participants were 6379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults older than 50 years. Participants were tracked for 4 years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a 6-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits--after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (relative risk = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.86-0.93). The most satisfied respondents (n = 1121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than did the least satisfied (n = 182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (relative risk = 0.96, 95% confidence interval = 0.93-0.99). Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs.

  12. Radon house doctor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitschke, I.A.; Brennan, T.; Wadach, J.B.; O'Neil, R.

    1986-01-01

    The term house doctor may be generalized to include persons skilled in the use of instruments and procedures necessary to identify, diagnose, and correct indoor air quality problems as well as energy, infiltration, and structural problems in houses. A radon house doctor would then be a specialist in radon house problems. Valuable experience in the skills necessary to be developed by radon house doctors has recently been gained in an extensive radon monitoring and mitigation program in upstate New York sponsored by Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. These skills, to be described in detail in this paper, include: (i) the use of appropriate instruments, (ii) the evaluation of the symptoms of a radon-sick house, (iii) the diagnostic procedures required to characterize radon sources in houses, (iv) the prescription procedures needed to specify treatment of the problem, (v) the supervision of the implementation of the treatment program, (vi) the check-up procedures required to insure the house cured of radon problems. 31 references, 3 tables

  13. Do Counseling and Marketing Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by discussing concerns about two of Wittman's purposes for use of marketing: improved services in consumers and economic survival of counseling profession. Agrees that counseling profession needs to understand basic marketing principles used by business and health care industry;…

  14. Abraham Maslow's Legacy for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the life of Abraham Maslow, a key founder of the humanistic approach to counseling, and his contributions to the counseling field. Maintains that Maslow's innovative work was often misinterpreted by both his admirers and his critics, yet remains highly relevant to current concerns in counseling. (Author/PVV)

  15. Role Induction in Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Chen, Yung-Lung; Novakovic, Alexandra; Guillen, Amy; Priester, Paul E.; Henry, Caroline; Terry, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Many vocational psychologists advocate addressing career as well as personal concerns in career counseling. However, some clients may have inappropriate expectations toward career counseling and may not be prepared or want to discuss personal issues. This study examined whether perceptions of the career counseling process could be modified with…

  16. Epicureanism as a Foundation for Philosophical Counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Fatić, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses the manner and extent to which Epicurean ethics can serve as a general philosophy of life, capable of supporting philosophical practice in the form of philosophical counseling. Unlike the modern age academic philosophy, the philosophical practice movement portrays the philosopher as a personal or corporate advisor, one who helps people make sense of their experiences and find optimum solutions within the context of their values and general preferences. Philosophical counse...

  17. Impact of Pharmacist Counselling on Clozapine Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciara Ní Dhubhlaing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine is the only antipsychotic with evidence for efficacy in treatment of resistant schizophrenia but it carries a high side effect burden. Patient information is provided but may be poorly retained. This study aims to examine the impact of pharmacist counselling upon patient knowledge of clozapine. Outpatients, aged 18 years and over, attending St. Patrick’s University Hospital, Dublin, participated in this study between June and August 2015. The intervention consisted of pharmacist counselling on two occasions one month apart. Knowledge was assessed using a 28-point checklist devised from the currently available clozapine patient information sources, at baseline and after each counselling session. Ethics approval was obtained. Twenty-five participants (40% female; mean age 45.1 years, SD 9.82; 64% unemployed, 28% smokers showed an improvement in knowledge scores of clozapine from baseline to postcounselling on each occasion with an overall improvement in knowledge score, from baseline to postcounselling at one month, of 39.43%; p<0.001. This study adds to the evidence that interventions involving pharmacist counselling can improve patient knowledge, whilst the specific knowledge gained relating to recognition of side effects may help patients towards more empowerment regarding their treatment.

  18. [Nurse-doctor relationships, reflection of our society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothier Bautzer, Eliane

    Relations between nurses and doctors are a paradigmatic example of the tensions produced by the process of empowerment over the course of the 20th century. The techniques, health policies, organisation of care and the place of the patient within the health system together contribute to the reconfiguration of the partnership relationship between nurses and doctors. These relationships help to define those that these professionals establish with their patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparing for Graduate-Level Training in Professional Psychology: Comparisons across Clinical PhD, Counseling PhD, and Clinical PsyD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Smith, Lena

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, faculty who teach in clinical and counseling doctor of philosophy (PhD) or doctor of psychology (PsyD) programs completed surveys regarding preferences for prospective student preparations to graduate programs. Faculty expectations of minimum and ideal undergraduate training were highest for scientific methods, though…

  20. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education.

  1. [Dietary counseling in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Nathalie; Haslebacher, Yvonne; Teuscher-Sick, Patricia; Fischer, Beatrice

    2013-02-01

    Information on weight management and a healthy eating is accessible to anyone. However, recommendations are inconsistent. This often leads to confusion rather than to real changes in eating behavior. The principle of a long-term weight reduction is based on the idea of achieving negative energy balance with a healthy, balanced and slightly hypocaloric diet. The regimen is neither supposed to be rigid nor should it ban any food products or food products. Changes in eating patterns come about step by step and the counseling approach should be based on the patient's habits and capabilities. The basic requirement to successfully treat obese patients is their own motivation Therefore, the timing of launching the therapy needs to be well chosen. Apart from goals directly concerning weight loss, goals related to well-being, general health and exercise should be set and pursued. However, the main focus should be on changes of dietary behavior. Dietary counseling is preferably embedded in a multidisciplinary treatment concept.

  2. Doctors on display: the evolution of television's doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Tapper, Elliot B.

    2010-01-01

    Doctors have been portrayed on television for over 50 years. In that time, their character has undergone significant changes, evolving from caring but infallible supermen with smoldering good looks and impeccable bedside manners to drug-addicted, sex-obsessed antiheroes. This article summarizes the major programs of the genre and explains the pattern of the TV doctors' character changes. Articulated over time in the many permutations of the doctor character is a complex, constant conversation...

  3. Of Course: Prerequisite Courses for Admission into APA-Accredited Clinical and Counseling Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.; Stratigis, Katerina Y.; Zimmerman, Barrett E.

    2014-01-01

    Students often inquire about which psychology courses to complete in preparation for graduate school. This study provides data that enable students and their advisors to make research-informed decisions. We surveyed the directors of the 304 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology (97%…

  4. Risk Assessment, Genetic Counseling, and Genetic Testing for BRCA-Related Cancer in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their family history of cancer. Depending on a woman’s family history, the doctor or nurse may then use a ... against routine genetic counseling or BRCA testing of women whose family history is not associated with an increased risk for ...

  5. Doctors' experience with handheld computers in clinical practice: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Schweikhart, Sharon B; Medow, Mitchell A

    2004-05-15

    To examine doctors' perspectives about their experiences with handheld computers in clinical practice. Qualitative study of eight focus groups consisting of doctors with diverse training and practice patterns. Six practice settings across the United States and two additional focus group sessions held at a national meeting of general internists. 54 doctors who did or did not use handheld computers. Doctors who used handheld computers in clinical practice seemed generally satisfied with them and reported diverse patterns of use. Users perceived that the devices helped them increase productivity and improve patient care. Barriers to use concerned the device itself and personal and perceptual constraints, with perceptual factors such as comfort with technology, preference for paper, and the impression that the devices are not easy to use somewhat difficult to overcome. Participants suggested that organisations can help promote handheld computers by providing advice on purchase, usage, training, and user support. Participants expressed concern about reliability and security of the device but were particularly concerned about dependency on the device and over-reliance as a substitute for clinical thinking. Doctors expect handheld computers to become more useful, and most seem interested in leveraging (getting the most value from) their use. Key opportunities with handheld computers included their use as a stepping stone to build doctors' comfort with other information technology and ehealth initiatives and providing point of care support that helps improve patient care.

  6. Doctors on display: the evolution of television's doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Elliot B

    2010-10-01

    Doctors have been portrayed on television for over 50 years. In that time, their character has undergone significant changes, evolving from caring but infallible supermen with smoldering good looks and impeccable bedside manners to drug-addicted, sex-obsessed antiheroes. This article summarizes the major programs of the genre and explains the pattern of the TV doctors' character changes. Articulated over time in the many permutations of the doctor character is a complex, constant conversation between viewer and viewed representing public attitudes towards doctors, medicine, and science.

  7. The Business of Doctoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The core business of medicine is the consultation. During the consultation one human being responds to another in distress. Most doctors spend more time talking with people than performing surgery, prescribing pills or ordering tests. The extent to which the doctor succeeds as a communicator may even govern the ‘success’ of any procedure performed, if we define success as relief from the condition causing distress. As human beings our ability to benefit from what is offered to alleviate our symptoms is limited by the extent to which we feel that we have been heard and supported with empathy. It has been demonstrated that the human body has the capacity to heal and that healers are limited by their capacity to facilitate that process. That is not to say that ‘talking’ can spare us the need for other interventions. In this review the author examines the factors that impact on the medical consultation with particular emphasis on the scope for harm when the consultation is interrupted.

  8. [Health behaviour of doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Anikó

    2016-07-01

    Health behaviour involves maintaining, improving and restoration of health. The aim of the author was to assess correlations of health behaviour with age, gender, job type and overtime. A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted using an online questionnaire (N = 186). Data were analyzed with chi-square, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Doctors working in in-patient care drink more coffee (p = 0.034) and energy drinks (p = 0.018); they eat undisturbed only on weekends at home (p = 0.032). Men consume more alcohol (p = 0.003), red meats (pmeals (p = 0.018) and their daily fluid consumption exceeds 2 litres (p = 0.005); their body mass index values are higher compared to women (peat more hot meals (p = 0.005), and those under the age of 30 consume more crisps, fast food (p = 0.001) and energy drinks (p = 0.005), while they are more active (p = 0.010). Dietary habits of doctors are not ideal and their physical activity is diminished compared to international trends. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(30), 1198-1206.

  9. [Doctors in love].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    To investigate how often doctors fall in love or are in a relationship with a colleague. Descriptive questionnaire. Doctors and medical students completed an online questionnaire during the summer of 2012. The questions concerned baseline characteristics as well as their feelings of happiness. In addition, we asked them whether they were in love or had ever been with a colleague and whether this had resulted in a steady relationship. A total of 401 individuals participated, of which 41% were male and 59% female. Their mean age was 40 years. Altogether, 40% of the participants indicated to be or have been in love with a colleague. This occurred more often in women than men. In 82% the relationship was of an equivalent nature; it was hierarchical in the remainder. In only 23% of cases, the relationship was steady; this was independent of age. Dermatologists appeared to be the least apt to fall in love with a colleague, while obstetricians had the highest rate. Although love between colleagues is a frequently occurring phenomenon, this is associated with a steady relationship in only about 25% of cases. There is wide variation among specialists in their proneness to intercollegial love.

  10. Got Anxiety? Get Help: Tips for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems, secondary conditions such as substance abuse or depression, and —in extreme cases —suicide. Early treatment can help prevent these problems. Visit your campus health or counseling center to ...

  11. The Embedded Counseling Model: An Application to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David Francis

    2017-01-01

    Prior research has suggested that dental students experience high rates of stress, anxiety, and mood concerns, which have been linked to poor academic performance, health concerns, and substance abuse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an embedded counseling office at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics in its first three academic semesters. Data were gathered from students attending appointments, and two inventories were used to monitor students' counseling progress and gather psychological outcomes data: the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34 (CCAPS-34) and the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). In the three semesters, 55 students attended 251 counseling appointments, with an average of 4.5 appointments per student. Their presenting psychological concerns included academic concerns, time management, test anxiety, study skills, low self-esteem, self-care, interpersonal conflicts, anxiety, depression, stress management, sexual concerns, substance abuse, eating/body image concerns, work-life balance, and financial issues. The CCAPS-34 data showed that, at initial clinical assessment, students experienced moderate levels of depression, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, academic distress, and overall psychological distress; 45 (82%) showed clinically significant symptoms on at least one CCAPS-34 subscale. The ORS data further showed that the students entered counseling experiencing high levels of psychological distress. A positive relationship was found between number of counseling appointments and increased overall functioning. These results suggest that an embedded counseling office can help dental schools meet the needs of their students.

  12. [Patients, doctors and the internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannot, Jean Gabriel; Bischoff, Thomas

    2015-05-13

    The majority of the Swiss population uses the internet to seek information about health. The objective is to be better informed, before or after the consultation. Doctors can advise their information-seeking patients about high quality websites, be it medical portals or websites dedicated to a specific pathology. Doctors should not see the internet as a threat but rather as an opportunity to strengthen the doctor-patient relationship.

  13. Counseling Services for Women in Marriage Age

    OpenAIRE

    Frischa Meivilona Yendi; Zadrian Ardi; Ifdil Ifdil

    2015-01-01

    Marriage is a bond between the outer and inner man as a husband who has not aged 25 years and women 21 years old wife is not with the purpose of achieving happiness. Marriage and family counseling is a profession that will be developed in Indonesia. Counseling emphasizes on changes contained in the family system. Stages counseling, theory and dynamics as well as the use of counseling skills in marriage and family counseling has similarities with individual counseling and group counseling.

  14. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  15. The Spin Doctors of news sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Antonio Schmitz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a historical context, with reference to concrete cases, the phenomenon of spin doctors. What is it? How does it act? What is its purpose? Where does it operate? And what are its consequences? These questions are raised in order to help identify the actions and strategies benefitting news sources, as well as the impact on journalism: the accommodation of journalists, the reduction or elimination of investigative journalism, the transference of the news to digital social networks, and the expansion of media sources. The article draws on a survey conducted with 163 news sources and journalists, on the premise that spin doctors are professional communicators, who are able to forge public opinion using processes, procedures, journalist’s co-optation, and knowledge of journalism and public relations, in order to be successful in the media, or directly with the target audience.

  16. THE SPIN DOCTORS OF NEWS SOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Antonio Schmitz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines in a historical context, with reference to concrete cases, the phenomenon of spin doctors. What is it? How does it act? What is its purpose? Where does it operate? And what are its consequences? These questions are raised in order to help identify the actions and strategies benefitting news sources, as well as the impact on journalism: the accommodation of journalists, the reduction or elimination of investigative journalism, the transference of the news to digital social networks, and the expansion of media sources. The article draws on a survey conducted with 163 news sources and journalists, on the premise that spin doctors are professional communicators, who are able to forge public opinion using processes, procedures, journalist’s co-optation, and knowledge of journalism and public relations, in order to be successful in the media, or directly with the target audience.

  17. Encouraging formative assessments of leadership for foundation doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Lindsay; Black, David; Welch, Jan; Reynolds, Peter; Penlington, Clare

    2015-08-01

    Clinical leadership is considered essential for maintaining and improving patient care and safety in the UK, and is incorporated in the curriculum for all trainee doctors. Despite the growing focus on the importance of leadership, and the introduction of the Medical Leadership Competency Framework (MLCF) in the UK, leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. Assessment is focused on clinical skills, and trainee doctors receive very little formal feedback on their leadership competencies. In this article we describe the approach taken by Health Education Kent, Sussex and Surrey (HEKSS) to raise the profile of leadership amongst doctors in training in the South Thames Foundation School (STFS). An annual structured formative assessment in leadership for each trainee has been introduced, supported by leadership education for both trainees and their supervisors in HEKSS trusts. We analysed over 500 of these assessments from the academic year 2012/13 for foundation doctors in HEKSS trusts, in order to assess the quality of the feedback. From the analysis, potential indicators of more effective formative assessments were identified. These may be helpful in improving the leadership education programme for future years. There is a wealth of evidence to highlight the importance and value of formative assessments; however, particularly for foundation doctors, these have typically been focused on assessing clinical capabilities. This HEKSS initiative encourages doctors to recognise leadership opportunities at the beginning of their careers, seeks to help them understand the importance of acquiring leadership skills and provides structured feedback to help them improve. Leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Re-Imagining Doctoral Education: Professional Doctorates and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alison; Brennan, Marie; Green, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Portents of the demise of the Professional Doctorate have emerged in some recent policy and institutional circles in Australia, raising questions about the meaning and relevance of the Professional Doctorate in an era of "league tables" and research assessment in Australia. This article argues that such portents, based largely on narrow…

  19. Perceived Helpfulness of Teachers in Clinical Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moate, Randall M.; Holm, Jessica M.; West, Erin M.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical courses are important in the development of students pursuing a master's degree in clinical mental health counseling (CMHC). Despite the importance of clinical courses, little is known about what CMHC students perceive as being helpful about their teachers of clinical courses. To investigate this, we sought the viewpoints of beginning…

  20. Cultural Intentionality: The Core of Effective Helping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Allen E.

    1987-01-01

    Responds to Lloyd by cautioning counselors regarding the centrality of multicultural awareness in counseling curricula. Maintains the primacy of culture cannot be denied as the first dimension in our thinking as professional helpers. Cultural intentionality is proposed as a metagoal of the helping process--the integration of cultural awareness…

  1. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  2. Response to A Different Vantage Point Commentary: Psychotherapeutic Genetic Counseling, Is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, Barbara; Austin, Jehannine; Caleshu, Colleen

    2017-04-01

    Whether genetic counseling is a form of psychotherapy is open for debate. Early practicioners in genetic counseling described it as such, and this claim has been replicated in recent publications. This commentary is a rebuttal to the claim that genetic counseling is distinct from psychotherapty. We argue that it is a a form of psychoterapy that aims to help clients manage a health threat that affects their psychological wellbeing, paralleling the goals of psychotherapy.

  3. Response to A Different Vantage Point Commentary: Psychotherapeutic Genetic Counseling, Is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jehannine; Caleshu, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Whether genetic counseling is a form of psychotherapy is open for debate. Early practicioners in genetic counseling described it as such, and this claim has been replicated in recent publications. This commentary is a rebuttal to the claim that genetic counseling is distinct from psychotherapty. We argue that it is a a form of psychoterapy that aims to help clients manage a health threat that affects their psychological wellbeing, paralleling the goals of psychotherapy. PMID:27804046

  4. White racial identity, color-blind racial attitudes, and multicultural counseling competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alex; Jackson Williams, Dahra

    2015-07-01

    Multicultural counseling competence (awareness, knowledge, and skills) is necessary to provide effective psychotherapy to an increasingly diverse client population (Sue, 2001). Previous research on predictors of competency among White clinicians finds that above having multicultural training, exposure to racially diverse clients, and social desirability, that White racial identity stages predict multicultural counseling competence (Ottavi et al., 1994). Research also suggests that higher color-blind racial attitudes (denying or minimizing racism in society) correlates with less advanced White racial identity stages (Gushue & Constantine, 2007). However, no studies have examined these variables together as they relate to and possibly predict multicultural counseling competence. The current study aims to add to this literature by investigating the effects of these variables together as potential predictors of multicultural counseling competence among (N = 487) White doctoral students studying clinical, counseling, and school psychology. Results of 3 hierarchical multiple regressions found above the effects of social desirability, demographic variables, and multicultural training, that colorblind racial attitudes and White racial identity stages added significant incremental variance in predicting multicultural counseling knowledge, awareness, and skills. These results add to the literature by finding different predictors for each domain of multicultural competence. Implications of the findings for future research and the clinical training of White doctoral trainees are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. The industrial doctor and radiation hygiene at ECN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpaij, W.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The organisation of the health service department of the Netherlands Energy Research Centre where a nuclear reactor is maintained in operation, is divided in three working groups: (1) the occupational health service, (2) the radiation inspection service, and (3) the safety control service. Next to these, there are three groups which also render services to outsiders, viz. the analytical, the instrumentation, and the biological control services. The task and place of each of these is elucidated. The industrial doctor's main task is the supervision of the medical surveillance of all personnel members, counseling of the radiological workers, and treatment of radiation accidents. (Auth.)

  6. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Collaboration on Effective Professional Practice. This register is kept up to date by searching the following databases for reports of relevant research: DHSS-DATA; EMBASE; MEDLINE; SIGLE; Resource Database in Continuing Medical Education (1975-1994), along with bibliographies of related topics, hand searching......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... of key journals and personal contact with content area experts. Randomised controlled trials and non-equivalent group designs with pre- and post-intervention measures were included. Outcome measures were those used by the study authors. For each study we determined whether these were positive, negative...

  7. Doctor's dilemma: Medical decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    How a doctor arrives at a decision is of interest to both the developed and the developing countries. The developed and the developing want to walk on the same road but from different directions: one wants to develop a little more and the other wants to develop a little less for cost containment. To justify nuclear medicine in a developing country we have to see nuclear medicine in a new role. It is not for putting the diagnostic labels, not for differential diagnosis as we have been conditioned to think so far. In a developing country it should be for differential management, How does it alter the management decision in respect to a particular patient? If management outcomes are restricted, there is no need for an investigation which does not help in any way the management of the patient. If there is no bypass surgery, what use is the thallium perfusion? Although primarily a diagnostic discipline for its justification and survival in the developing country it should lead to a sensible differential management

  8. Trends in nutrition and exercise counseling among adolescents in the health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Tasha; Crawford, Patricia B

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a serious health threat, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities and those who are uninsured, yet little is known about the implementation of nutrition or exercise counseling or the combination of both among these groups. Trends in counseling by race/ethnicity and types of insurance were examined. Trend analyses were conducted with the California Health Interview Surveys among those ages 12-17 for the period 2003-2009. Race/Ethnicity: Receipt of both counseling methods declined from 2003-2009 for all racial/ethnic groups, except Hispanics and Whites, for whom increases in counseling began after 2007. Hispanics and African Americans generally reported higher levels of nutrition than exercise counseling, while Whites generally reported higher levels of exercise than nutrition counseling for the study period. INSURANCE TYPE: Receipt of both counseling methods appeared to decline from 2003-2009 among all insurance types, although after 2007, a slight increase was observed for the low-cost/free insurance group. Those with private health insurance generally received more exercise counseling than nutrition counseling over the study period. Counseling among all racial/ethnic groups and insurance types is warranted, but particularly needed for African Americans, American Indian/Alaska Natives, and the uninsured as they are at highest risk for developing obesity. Institutional and policy changes in the health care environment will be beneficial in helping to promote obesity-related counseling.

  9. Trends in Nutrition and Exercise Counseling among Adolescents in the Health Care Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasha Peart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Obesity is a serious health threat, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities and those who are uninsured, yet little is known about the implementation of nutrition or exercise counseling or the combination of both among these groups. Trends in counseling by race/ethnicity and types of insurance were examined. Methods. Trend analyses were conducted with the California Health Interview Surveys among those ages 12–17 for the period 2003–2009. Results. Race/Ethnicity: Receipt of both counseling methods declined from 2003–2009 for all racial/ethnic groups, except Hispanics and Whites, for whom increases in counseling began after 2007. Hispanics and African Americans generally reported higher levels of nutrition than exercise counseling, while Whites generally reported higher levels of exercise than nutrition counseling for the study period. Insurance Type: Receipt of both counseling methods appeared to decline from 2003–2009 among all insurance types, although after 2007, a slight increase was observed for the low-cost/free insurance group. Those with private health insurance generally received more exercise counseling than nutrition counseling over the study period. Conclusions. Counseling among all racial/ethnic groups and insurance types is warranted, but particularly needed for African Americans, American Indian/Alaska Natives, and the uninsured as they are at highest risk for developing obesity. Institutional and policy changes in the health care environment will be beneficial in helping to promote obesity-related counseling.

  10. 38 CFR 21.3102 - Required counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required counseling. 21.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3102 Required counseling. (a) Child. The VA counseling psychologist will provide counseling and assist in preparing the educational plan only if the eligible child or his or her...

  11. 38 CFR 21.7100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7100... Bill-Active Duty) Counseling § 21.7100 Counseling. A veteran or servicemember may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is (1) To...

  12. The hospital doctor of today - still continuously on duty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Tuva Kolstad; Skirbekk, Helge; Tyssen, Reidar; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw; Rø, Karin Isaksson

    2016-10-01

    Norwegian hospital doctors emphasise the value of working hard and efficiently and of a high degree of attendance in the workplace. This helps establish social norms that guide behaviour within the professional culture. It is important to examine what consequences these values may entail when the doctor also needs to cater to his or her own needs. We conducted eight focus-group interviews and three individual interviews among a total of 48 senior consultants and specialty registrars working in the areas of surgery, psychiatry and internal medicine. Total N = 48; 56  % women. The interviews were analysed with the aid of systematic text condensation. When Norwegian hospital doctors wish to appear as good doctors, they see that this entails consequences for the interrelationships with colleagues, the management and the work-life balance. Conflicts of interest arose between senior consultants and specialty registrars. Management initiatives to deal with absence, adaptation of the job to the life stage of each individual doctor and increased management involvement among doctors were among the measures proposed. Better mutual knowledge between doctors and management with regard to each other’s values and responsibilities could constitute key premises for structural changes, for example in terms of better planning of leaves of absence and opportunities for adaptation of work schedules to the life stage of the persons concerned.

  13. Towards “Operating Within” the Field: Doctoral Students’ Views of Supervisors’ Discipline Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gube

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This paper considers the role of supervisors’ discipline expertise in doctoral learning from a student perspective. Background:\tDoctoral students need to develop expertise in a particular field of study. In this context, developing expertise requires doctoral students to master disciplinary knowledge, conventions and scholarship under the guidance of supervisors. Methodology\t: The study draws on a mixed-method approach, using an online survey and semi-structured interviews conducted with doctoral students. Contribution: The paper brings to the fore the role of supervisors’ discipline expertise on doctoral students’ research progress. Findings: The survey data suggest that doctoral students nominate their supervisors on the basis of their discipline expertise. They also view supervisors’ expertise as key to the development of ‘insider’ knowledge of their doctoral research. Recommendations for Practitioners: Supervisors play a pivotal role in helping doctoral students overcome intellectual barriers by imparting their discipline knowledge as well as balancing satisfactory doctoral completion rate and high quality student experience. Impact on Society\t: Doctoral supervision equips doctoral students with the right arsenal to be able to competently operate within their field and prepares them for their future research or professional career that demands a high level of discipline expertise. Future Research:\tThe scope of the findings leaves open a discussion about the experiences of doctoral students matched with non-discipline expert supervisory teams; for example, the extent of the mismatch and its ramifications.

  14. A marketing clinical doctorate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Isaac D; Kimball, Olive M

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, clinical doctorate programs in health disciplines have proliferated amid both support and controversy among educators, professional organizations, practitioners, administrators, and third-party payers. Supporters argue that the explosion of new knowledge and increasing sophistication of technology have created a need for advanced practice models to enhance patient care and safety and to reduce costs. Critics argue that necessary technological advances can be incorporated into existing programs and believe that clinical doctorates will increase health care costs, not reduce them. Despite the controversy, many health disciplines have advanced the clinical doctorate (the most recent is the doctor of nursing practice in 2004), with some professions mandating the doctorate as the entry-level degree (i.e., psychology, pharmacy, audiology, and so on). One aspect of the introduction of clinical doctoral degrees has been largely overlooked, and that is the marketing aspect. Because of marketing considerations, some clinical doctorates have been more successfully implemented and accepted than others. Marketing is composed of variables commonly known as "the four P's of marketing": product, price, promotion, and place. This report explores these four P's within the context of clinical doctorates in the health disciplines.

  15. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  16. Women, Men and the Doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centra, John A; Kuykendall, Nancy M.

    This study describes the current status and professional development of a sample of women doctorates and compares them to a sample of men who have attained the same educational status. Chapters cover the sample and procedures used; employment patterns; doctorates in academe; publications, income, and job satisfaction; marriage and family life;…

  17. Doctorate Program Trains Industrial Chemists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The University of Texas (Dallas) has initiated a new Ph.D. program specifically to train chemists for doctoral level work in industry (Doctor of Chemistry). Participants will complete three research practica (at an industrial site and in two laboratory settings) instead of the traditional dissertation, emphasizing breadth and flexibility in…

  18. Exploration of Support Behavior in Counseling Groups with Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Yoni; Shechtman, Zipora; Cutrona, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    The study explores the types of support expressed in counseling groups attended by trainee counselors. Support is a crucial factor in human life in general, and in groups in particular, yet little is known about the type of support presented in counseling groups. Type of support was categorized by means of the Social Support Behavior Code (SSBC;…

  19. Addiction Counseling Accreditation: CACREP's Role in Solidifying the Counseling Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Culbreth, Jack R.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs' (CACREP) role in furthering the specialty of addiction counseling. After sharing a brief history and the role of counselor certification and licensure, the authors share the process whereby CACREP developed the first set of…

  20. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment (3:57) More Resources from NIH You can play an active role in your health care ... and honest communication between you and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your ...

  1. 45 CFR 618.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 618.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance of...

  2. 34 CFR 106.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or...

  3. 45 CFR 2555.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 2555.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance of...

  4. 32 CFR 196.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 196.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or...

  5. Intolerance and Violence Against Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meharban

    2017-10-01

    Intolerance and grouse against doctors is a global phenomenon but India seems to lead the world in violence against doctors. According to World Health Organization, about 8-38% healthcare workers suffer physical violence at some point in their careers. Many more are verbally abused or threatened. Public is almost behaving like health sector terrorists. The spate of increasing attacks on doctors by damaging their property and causing physical injury is not acceptable by any civilized society. The public is becoming increasingly intolerant to a large number of social issues because of poor governance and vote bank politics. There is a need to arrest the development of further distrust between doctors and their patients/relatives, otherwise it will compromise all achievements of medical science and adversely affect healing capabilities of doctors. Rude and aggressive behavior of the patients or their family members, and arrogant and lackadaisical approach of the doctor, adversely affects the doctor-patient relationship and the outcome of the patient. The doctors, hospital administration and government must exercise "zero tolerance" with respect to acts of violence against healthcare professionals. It is possible to reduce the incidence of intolerance against doctors but difficult to eliminate it completely. The healthcare providers should demonstrate greater compassion and empathy with improved communication skills. The hospitals must have adequate infrastructure, facilities and staff to handle emergencies without delay and with due confidence and skills. The security of healthcare providers, especially in sensitive areas, should be improved by having adequate number of security guards, frisking facilities, extensive CCTV network and availability of "Quick response team" to handle unruly mob. In case of any grievances for alleged mismanagement, the public should handle the situation in a civilized manner and seek redressal through Medical Protection Act and legal

  6. The Relationships between Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Supervision and Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Cornér

    2017-06-01

    students develop networks both nationally and internationally. Recommendation for Researchers: A recommendation emanating from this research is to put greater emphasis on further investigation of the role of other predictors in burnout in order to enhance doctoral students’ well-being. Impact on Society: A better understanding of factors that promote lower attrition rates and enhance well-being for doctoral students is likely to lead to more efficient use of finacial and intellectual resources in academia and society more broadly. Future Research: Given the results of this study, qualitative interviews might be helpful in mapping out the dynamics that lead to attrition and to identify the mechanisms in the researcher community that support the doctoral students and enhance well-being in their doctoral journey.

  7. Radiographers as doctors: A profile of UK doctoral achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snaith, B.; Harris, M.A.; Harris, R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiography aspires to be a research active profession, but there is limited information regarding the number of individuals with, or studying for, a doctoral award. This study aims to profile UK doctoral radiographers; including their chosen award, approach and employment status. Method: This was a prospective cohort study utilising an electronic survey. No formal database of doctoral radiographers existed therefore a snowball sampling method was adopted. The study sample was radiographers (diagnostic and therapeutic) based in the UK who were registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and who held, or were studying for, a doctoral award. Results: A total of 90 unique responses were received within the timescale. The respondents comprised 58 females (64.4%) and the majority were diagnostic radiographers (n = 71/90; 78.9%). The traditional PhD was the most common award, although increasing numbers were pursuing Education or Professional Doctorates. An overall increase in doctoral studies is observed over time, but was greatest amongst those working in academic institutions, with 63.3% of respondents (n = 57/90) working solely within a university, and a further 10% employed in a clinical–academic role (n = 9/90). Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that radiography is emerging as a research active profession, with increasing numbers of radiographers engaged in study at a doctoral level. This should provide a platform for the future development of academic and clinical research. - Highlights: • 90 radiographers were identified as holding, or studying for, a doctoral award. • The PhD is the most common award. • EdD and professional doctorates are increasing in popularity. • Academic staff were more likely to pursue such research training.

  8. When technological affordances meet interactional norms: the value of pre-screening in online chat counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stommel, Wyke; te Molder, Hedwig Frederica Maria

    2016-01-01

    We present a conversation analysis of openings sequences of online text-based chat counseling. Particular about this chat counseling is that the clients made available their help question through pre-screening. The data consisted of 40 chat sessions with pre-screening and 34 sessions without

  9. Enrichment Programs and Counselling at the Budapest Centre for the Gifted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, Maria

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the development of gifted education in Hungary and the special counseling services for gifted children available at the Centre for the Gifted in Budapest. The Centre provides professional help from psychologists, counseling for choosing an appropriate school and/or supplementary programs for gifted children (ages 3-14), and…

  10. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology. ... paediatric and ethical aspects of the applied field of clinical and counselling psychology. The journal publishes contributions of research, clinical, counselling and theoretical interest.

  11. Counseling in Turkey: An Evolving Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Guneri, Oya Yerin

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of counseling and addresses the current issues and future trends of counseling in Turkey. Special emphasis is placed on the factors that impede the development of school counseling as a discipline.

  12. How doctors view and use social media: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James; Ryan, Christopher; Harris, Anthony

    2014-12-02

    Doctors are uncertain of their ethical and legal obligations when communicating with patients online. Professional guidelines for patient-doctor interaction online have been written with limited quantitative data about doctors' current usage and attitudes toward the medium. Further research into these trends will help to inform more focused policy and guidelines for doctors communicating with patients online. The intent of the study was to provide the first national profile of Australian doctors' attitudes toward and use of online social media. The study involved a quantitative, cross-sectional online survey of Australian doctors using a random sample from a large representative database. Of the 1500 doctors approached, 187 participated (12.47%). Most participants used social media privately, with only one-quarter not using any social media websites at all (48/187, 25.7%). One in five participants (30/155, 19.4%) had received a "friend request" from a patient. There was limited use of online communication in clinical practice: only 30.5% (57/187) had communicated with a patient through email and fewer than half (89/185, 48.1%) could offer their patients electronic forms of information if that were the patients' preference. Three in five participants (110/181, 60.8%) reported not being uncomfortable about interacting with patients who had accessed personal information about them online, prior to the consultation. Most of the participants (119/181, 65.8%) were hesitant to immerse themselves more fully in social media and online communication due to worries about public access and legal concerns. Doctors have different practices and views regarding whether or how to communicate appropriately with patients on the Internet, despite online and social media becoming an increasingly common feature of clinical practice. Additional training would assist doctors in protecting their personal information online, integrating online communication in patient care, and guidance on

  13. Sociolinguistics and the Counselling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conville, Richard L.; Ivey, Allen E.

    1975-01-01

    Sociolinguistics is the study of language as part of culture and society. Counselling, basically a linguistic-communicative process, has too often failed to consider systematic knowledge from related fields. This article discusses basic concepts of sociolinguistics and considers their relation to the counselling process. (Author)

  14. Exercise as a Counseling Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonski, Verna O.

    2003-01-01

    The focus of wellness counseling is to guide individuals to live a healthy life in which body, mind, and spirit are integrated in order to experience fulfillment and happiness. The purpose of this article is to provide counselors steps to follow when using exercise as a counseling intervention and to provide techniques that will encourage exercise…

  15. Physical Attractiveness and Counseling Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Alice M.; Borkowski, John G.

    1982-01-01

    Searched for interaction between quality of counseling skills (presence or absence of empathy, genuineness, and positive regard) and physical attractiveness as determinants of counseling effectiveness. Attractiveness influenced perceived effectiveness of counselor's skill. Analyses of expectancy data revealed that only with good skills did…

  16. Oedipal Issues in Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth R.

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes current status of counseling psychology from perspective of Freudian, drive-structure theory. Argues that counseling psychology has committed classical response to oedipal conflict in its treatment of counselor education by identifying with aggressor (psychiatry and clinical psychology). Recommends more unified relationship between…

  17. Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 6 of 6 ... Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling. Journal Home > Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 6 of 6 Items. 2011 ...

  18. School Counseling in China Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Timothy C.; Qiong, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the development of psychological thinking in China and social influences on the practice of school counseling today. Common problems of students are described, including anxiety due to pressure to perform well on exams, loneliness and social discomfort, and video game addiction. Counseling approaches used…

  19. Group Counseling for Navy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchum, Nancy Taylor

    1991-01-01

    Conducted six-session group counseling program for Navy children (n=22) enrolled in public schools whose fathers were on deployment. Pretest and posttest scores on the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory suggest that participation in the group counseling unit positively affected self-esteem of Navy children whose fathers were on deployment. Found…

  20. Turning Doctors Into Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Much of the contentious debate surrounding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare” concerned its financing and its attempt to guarantee (near universal access to healthcare through the private insurance market.  Aside from sensationalist stories of “death panels,” much less attention went to implications of the bill for the actual provision of healthcare. Methodology: This paper examines the "patient-centered medical home" (PCMH model which has been widely promoted as a means of reviving and improving primary care (i.e. general internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics. Argument: The PCMH and many of its components (e.g pay-for-performance, electronic medical records were interventions that were implemented on a massive basis without any evidence of benefit. Recent research has not generally supported clinical benefits with the PCMH model. Instead it seems to designed to de-professionalize (make proletarians of health care workers and enforce corporate models of health. The core values of professional work are undermined while the PCMH does nothing to address the structural marginalization of primary care within US health care. Conclusions: The development of alternative models will require political changes. Both doctors and teachers are in a position of advocate for more progressive systems of care and education.

  1. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  2. Interventions for improving patients' trust in doctors and groups of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Alix; Cash-Gibson, Lucinda; Car, Josip; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2014-03-04

    the studies.  Interventions were of three main types; three employed additional physician training, four were education for patients and three provided additional information about doctors in terms of financial incentives or consulting style. Additionally, several different measures of trust were employed.The studies gave conflicting results. Trials showing a small but statistically-significant increase in trust included: a trial of physician disclosure of financial incentives; a trial of providing choice of physician based on concordance between patient and physician beliefs about care; a trial of group visits for new inductees into a Health Maintenance Organisation; a trial of training oncologists in communication skills; and a trial of group visits for diabetic patients. However, trust was not affected in a subsequent larger trial of group visits for uninsured people with diabetes, nor with a decision aid for helping choose statins, another trial of disclosure of financial incentives or specifically training doctors to increase trust or cultural competence. There was no evidence of harm from any of the studies. Overall, there remains insufficient evidence to conclude that any intervention may increase or decrease trust in doctors. This may be due in part to the sensitivity of trust instruments, and a ceiling effect, as trust in doctors is generally high. It may be that current measures of trust are insufficiently sensitive. Further trials are required to explore the impact of doctors' specific training or the use of a patient-centred or decision-sharing approach on patients' trust, especially in the areas of healthcare provider choice, and induction into healthcare organisation. International trials would be of particular benefit. The review was constrained by the lack of consistency between trust measurements, timeframes and populations.

  3. Masculinity in the doctor's office: Masculinity, gendered doctor preference and doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, Mary S; Sanchez, Diana T

    2016-03-01

    Mortality and morbidity data suggest that men have shorter life expectancies than women and outrank women on several leading causes of death. These gendered disparities may be influenced by psychosocial factors like masculinity. Three studies (Total N=546) examined the role of masculinity in men's doctor choices and doctor-patient interactions. In Studies 1 and 2, men completed measures of masculinity, gender bias, and doctor preference. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the direct relationship between masculinity and male doctor preference and the indirect relationship of masculinity on male doctor preference through an association with gendered competence stereotypes. Participants in Study 3 disclosed symptoms in private followed by disclosure to a male or female interviewer in a clinical setting. Using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), we examined the interaction among symptom reporting, masculinity and doctor gender, controlling for participant comfort. In Study 1, results suggested that masculinity encouraged choice of a male doctor directly and indirectly via beliefs that men make more competent doctors than women; Study 2 directly replicated the results of Study 1. In Study 3, independent of participant comfort, an interaction between interviewer gender and masculinity emerged such that men scoring higher on masculinity reported symptoms less consistently to male interviewers (relative to higher scoring men reporting to female interviewers); the reverse was found for men scoring low on masculinity. Taken together these studies suggest that masculinity may affect men's health by encouraging choice of a male doctor with whom doctor-patient communication may be impaired. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Digital Native and Digital Immigrant Use of Scholarly Network for Doctoral Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald Berman; Deliesha Hassell

    2014-01-01

    The Doctoral Community Network (DC) is a learner driven, scholarly community designed to help online doctoral learners successfully complete their dissertation and program of study. While digital natives grew up in an environment immersed in technology, digital immigrants adapted to this environment through their ability to learn and adjust to new technologies. With several thousand Doctoral Community Network users, it was not known to what extent digital immigrants had embraced the technolog...

  5. Counselling young cannabis users by text message

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Ditte

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study of two SMS services aimed at providing young people with information on cannabis and helping them to reduce their consumption of the drug. The attitude of the 12 participants in the study towards the SMS services is generally positive, but they prefer...... factual information to advice and counselling. The messages prompt reflection and awareness among the recipients, and their repetitive, serial nature plays a significant part in the process of change. This is especially true of the young people whose use of cannabis is recreational. For them, the SMS...

  6. How Computer Games Help Children Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, David Williamson

    2008-01-01

    This book looks at how particular video and computer games--such as "Digital Zoo", "The Pandora Project", "SodaConstructor", and more--can help teach children and students to think like doctors, lawyers, engineers, urban planners, journalists, and other professionals. In the process, new "smart games" will give them the knowledge and skills they…

  7. Training Pediatric Residents to Provide Smoking Cessation Counseling to Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Collins

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess the effectiveness of a smoking cessation educational program on pediatric residents' counseling. Residents were randomly selected to receive the intervention. Residents who were trained were compared to untrained residents. Self-reported surveys and patient chart reviews were used. Measures included changes in self-reported knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of residents, and differences in chart documentation and caretaker-reported physician counseling behaviors. The intervention was multidimensional including a didactic presentation, a problem-solving session, clinic reminders, and provision of patient education materials. Results showed that residents who were trained were more likely to ask about tobacco use in their patients' households. They were also more likely to advise caretakers to cut down on or to quit smoking, to help set a quit date, and to follow up on the advice given at a subsequent visit. Trained residents were more likely to record a history of passive tobacco exposure in the medical record. These residents also reported improved confidence in their counseling skills and documented that they had done such counseling more often than did untrained residents. Caretakers of pediatric patients who smoke seen by intervention residents were more likely to report that they had received tobacco counseling. Following this intervention, pediatric residents significantly improved their behaviors, attitudes, and confidence in providing smoking cessation counseling to parents of their pediatric patients.

  8. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your health. It’s important to be ... Flickr More Social Media from NIH Footer NIH Home En Español Site Map Visitor Information Frequently Asked ...

  9. TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Hernández Esteve

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations María Soledad Campos Lucena: El control de las arcas municipales a través de la rendición de cuentas. La transformación del proceso del Antiguo al Nuevo régimen y la consolidación del modelo liberal: 1745-1914 The control of municipal coffers by means of account rendering. The change from Ancien Régime to the New Regime and the consolidation of liberalism: 1745-1914 Candelaria Castro Pérez: La institución parroquial a través de los registros contables del Señorío episcopal de la Villa de Agüimes. (1500-1860 The parochial institution seen through the account books of the Episcopal domain of the city of Aguimes (1500-1860 José Julián Hernández Borreguero: El Cabildo Catedral de Sevilla: organización y sistema contable. (1625-1650 Administrative and accounting organization of the Seville Cathedral. (1625-1650 Juan Lanero Fernández: El esplendor de la teneduría de libros: la partida doble en los tratados contables ingleses de la dinastia Tudor (1543-1588 Bookkeeping splendor: double-entry in the English accounting treatises at the time of the Tudor dynasty (1543-1588 María Llompart Bibiloni: Un análisis histórico-contable de la Procuración del Real Patrimonio en el Reino de Mallorca, período 1310-1330 An accounting historical análisis of the Royal Exchequer of the Kingdom of Mallorca (1310-1330

  10. Doctors do cry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Sonal; Goel, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Physicians have tried to understand whether crying for a patient is a raw emotion that demonstrates their lack of control over themselves and the situation, or whether it is a sign of humanity and concern for one's fellow beings. Studies on medical students and doctors'narrations of times when they have shed tears over a patient's suffering or death have established beyond doubt that medical students and physicians are not immune to their patients'suffering and may cry when overwhelmed by stress and emotions. Even though humanity is the cornerstone of medicine, depersonalisation has somehow crept into the physician-patient relationship and crying is considered incompatible with the image of a good physician, who is supposed to be strong, confident and fully in charge. Thus, crying has been equated to weakness and at times, incompetence. This could be attributed to the fact that our medical curriculum has ingrained in us the belief that emotion clouds rationality and prevents us from being objective while making decisions regarding a patient's clinical progress. Our curriculum fails to teach us how to handle emotional situations, witness the dying process, communicate bad news, interact with the bereaved during the period of grief immediately following death, and reduce the professional stress involved in working with newly bereaved persons. Our training focuses on cure, amelioration of disease and the restoration of good health, with little emphasis on death, which is an absolute reality. It is crucial that medical educators take note of these lacunae in the curriculum. Physicians and teachers must recognise and accept the emotions that medical students experience in these situations, and teach them to offer their patients a sound blend of rationality and compassion with an attitude of humility.

  11. Does Extended Telephone Callback Counselling Prevent Smoking Relapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segan, C. J.; Borland, R.

    2011-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial tested whether extended callback counselling that proactively engaged ex-smokers with the task of embracing a smoke-free lifestyle (four to six calls delivered 1-3 months after quitting, i.e. when craving levels and perceived need for help had declined) could reduce relapse compared with a revised version of…

  12. Vital Signs – Alcohol Screening and Counseling?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-01-07

    This podcast is based on the January 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Millions of Americans drink too much, a dangerous behavior that can lead to serious health problems. Alcohol screening and counseling can help.  Created: 1/7/2014 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/7/2014.

  13. African American College Students, the Black Church, and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avent Harris, Janeé R.; Wong, Christine D.

    2018-01-01

    African American undergraduate students face numerous challenges during college; however, they are less likely to seek help from college counseling services. Often, African Americans seek support from spiritual resources. In the current phenomenological study, participants shared in a focus group interview. Overall, participants seemed to value…

  14. Career counseling research-practice disparities: What we know and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CICPSI, Faculty of Psychology, University of Lisbon [Universidade de Lisboa], Lisbon, ... emanates from our understanding of the experience of everyday life. ..... planning, cognitive factors, or rational calculations. .... helps in the construction of a coherent, connected, .... in mind, counselling cannot be viewed outside of a.

  15. Counselling at primary health facilities and level of knowledge of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Education and employment were associated with good knowledge on ... counseling on PMTCT in the PHFs will bridge the identified knowledge gap and help in ... income countries, MTCT rates of less than 2% have ... behavioural changes but seems to have little impact ..... the United Kingdom and Ireland, 2000-2006. AIDS.

  16. Increasing Positive Perceptions of Counseling: The Importance of Repeated Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Scott A.; Vogel, David L.; Gentile, Douglas A.; Wade, Nathaniel G.

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the effectiveness of repeated exposures to a video intervention based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model. The video was designed to increase help-seeking attitudes and perceptions of peer norms and to decrease the stigma associated with seeking counseling. Participants were 290 undergraduates who were randomly assigned to a…

  17. Black Undergraduate Students Attitude toward Counseling and Counselor Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Lonnie E.; Johnson, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A help seeking survey and measures of socioeconomic status, cultural mistrust, and African Self-consciousness were administered to 315 Black college students to study attitudes toward counseling and counselor preference. Multiple Regression analysis indicated that gender, cultural mistrust, and socioeconomic status were statistically significant…

  18. Feasible utopias in doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elliot, Dely; Guccione, Kay; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    -Martek, Chen & McAlpine, 2011). PGRs’ motivation, creativity, resilience and momentum during their long and intense doctoral journey are often strongly sustained by unseen informal structures, social support systems and extra-curricular activities tacitly providing emotional, social, pastoral and academic......Part 1 Abstract Ongoing educational and psycho-social challenges in doctoral education (e.g. psychological distress, attrition and delay in completion) warrant a more comprehensive understanding of the expanded doctoral education context and how the different facets of doctoral support mechanisms......, 2016b; Bengtsen & Barnett, 2017; Bryan & Guccione, 2018; Elliot et al., 2016b, 2016c; Wisker et al., 2017). Yet, there remains a somewhat limited understanding not only of these multifaceted components but how they interact with already existing formal and informal support mechanisms offered...

  19. Penumbra: Doctoral support as drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gill; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    Much international doctoral learning research focuses on personal, institutional and learning support provided by supervisors, managed relationships,‘nudging’ robust, conceptual, critical, creative work. Other work focuses on stresses experienced in supervisor-student relationships and doctoral...... journeys. Some considers formal and informal learning communities supporting students on research journeys, and roles played by families, friends and others, sometimes o ering encouragement and sometimes added stress. However, little has been explored concerning often uno cial, largely unrecognised...... sanctioned (‘lightside’), and less well recognised often unsanctioned (‘darkside’) on doctoral research and writing learning journey, instigating questions about doctoral student needs, and the range of support provided, both legitimate, well known, less legitimate. This work concentrates on the ‘darkside’....

  20. Creating pedagogical spaces for developing doctor professional identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandinin, D Jean; Cave, Marie-Therese

    2008-08-01

    Working with doctors to develop their identities as technically skilled as well as caring, compassionate and ethical practitioners is a challenge in medical education. One way of resolving this derives from a narrative reflective practice approach to working with residents. We examine the use of such an approach. This paper draws on a 2006 study carried out with four family medicine residents into the potential of writing, sharing and inquiring into parallel charts in order to help develop doctor identity. Each resident wrote 10 parallel charts over 10 weeks. All residents met bi-weekly as a group with two researchers to narratively inquire into the stories told in their charts. One parallel chart and the ensuing group inquiry about the chart are described. In the narrative reflective practice process, one resident tells of working with a patient and, through writing, sharing and inquiry, integrates her practice and how she learned to be a doctor in one cultural setting into another cultural setting; another resident affirms her relational way of practising medicine, and a third resident begins to see the complexity of attending to patients' experiences. The process shows the importance of creating pedagogical spaces to allow doctors to tell and retell, through narrative inquiry, their stories of their experiences. This pedagogical approach creates spaces for doctors to individually develop their own stories by which to live as doctors through narrative reflection on their interwoven personal, professional and cultural stories as they are shaped by, and enacted within, their professional contexts.

  1. Learning needs in clinical biochemistry for doctors in foundation years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khromova, Victoria; Gray, Trevor A

    2008-01-01

    Most medical school curricula have reduced the amount of time available for teaching in pathology despite the fact that junior staff in the early stages of their training were responsible for requesting the majority of pathology tests on acutely ill hospital patients. So, the lack of specific training in this area means that test requesting may be poorly performed and the results ill understood by these staff. This paper describes a questionnaire, which was designed to assist laboratory staff providing targeted teaching in this area. Doctors in Foundation year 1 (F1) and Foundation year 2 (F2) in Sheffield teaching hospitals were given a questionnaire to ascertain how confident they were in requesting and interpreting the results of clinical biochemistry tests. The doctors were also asked about which areas of laboratory medicine they would like to be taught. Responses were received from 82 doctors, about half those in F1 and F2. The survey revealed areas where juniors are less confident in requesting tests and interpreting results. Despite lack of confidence in interpreting the result, 18% were confident about requesting tests. Doctors were also unsure of the effects of common problems like haemolysis on the interpretation of results. More than 70% of the doctors requested specific teaching in these areas. Foundation doctors have learning needs in clinical biochemistry, addressing which would assist them in patient care. While better training in medical school may help in future, there are specific needs for those on the wards now that require targeted teaching.

  2. Doctoral Conceptual Thresholds in Cellular and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldon, David F.; Rates, Christopher; Sun, Chongning

    2017-01-01

    In the biological sciences, very little is known about the mechanisms by which doctoral students acquire the skills they need to become independent scientists. In the postsecondary biology education literature, identification of specific skills and effective methods for helping students to acquire them are limited to undergraduate education. To…

  3. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL STUDENTS, CLINICIANS AND SPORTS SCIENTISTS TOWARDS EXERCISE COUNSELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbyrhamy Gnanendran

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We compared the amount of exercise undertaken by medical students, clinicians, and sport scientists with the National Australian Physical Activity (NAPA Guidelines. A second aim was to compare attitudes to exercise counselling as preventive medicine between university- and clinic-based professionals. The research setting was a university medical school and a sports science sports medicine centre. A 20-item questionnaire was completed by 216 individuals (131 medical students, 43 clinicians and 37 sports scientists. Self-reported physical activity habits, exercise counselling practices and attitudes towards preventive medicine were assessed. The physical activity undertaken by most respondents (70% met NAPA Guidelines. General practitioners had significantly lower compliance rates with NAPA Guidelines than other professionals. More than half of clinicians and medical students (54% were less active now compared with levels of activity undertaken prior to graduate training. Most physicians (68% reported they sometimes discuss physical activity with patients. In contrast, the majority of non-medically qualified respondents (60% said they never discuss physical activity with their doctor. Most respondents (70% had positive attitudes to exercise counselling. Sports scientists and respondents who were highly active in childhood had more positive attitudes to exercise counselling than others. Health professionals in this study were more active than the general population, however healthy exercise habits tend to deteriorate after the commencement of medical training. Despite the important role of doctors in health promotion, the degree of exercise counselling to patients is low

  4. Smart strategies for doctors and doctors-in-training: heuristics in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwarth, Odette; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2009-08-01

    How do doctors make sound decisions when confronted with probabilistic data, time pressures and a heavy workload? One theory that has been embraced by many researchers is based on optimisation, which emphasises the need to integrate all information in order to arrive at sound decisions. This notion makes heuristics, which use less than complete information, appear as second-best strategies. In this article, we challenge this pessimistic view of heuristics. We introduce two medical problems that involve decision making to the reader: one concerns coronary care issues and the other macrolide prescriptions. In both settings, decision-making tools grounded in the principles of optimisation and heuristics, respectively, have been developed to assist doctors in making decisions. We explain the structure of each of these tools and compare their performance in terms of their facilitation of correct predictions. For decisions concerning both the coronary care unit and the prescribing of macrolides, we demonstrate that sacrificing information does not necessarily imply a forfeiting of predictive accuracy, but can sometimes even lead to better decisions. Subsequently, we discuss common misconceptions about heuristics and explain when and why ignoring parts of the available information can lead to the making of more robust predictions. Heuristics are neither good nor bad per se, but, if applied in situations to which they have been adapted, can be helpful companions for doctors and doctors-in-training. This, however, requires that heuristics in medicine be openly discussed, criticised, refined and then taught to doctors-in-training rather than being simply dismissed as harmful or irrelevant. A more uniform use of explicit and accepted heuristics has the potential to reduce variations in diagnoses and to improve medical care for patients.

  5. Digital Native and Digital Immigrant Use of Scholarly Network for Doctoral Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Ronald; Hassell, Deliesha

    2014-01-01

    The Doctoral Community Network (DC) is a learner driven, scholarly community designed to help online doctoral learners successfully complete their dissertation and program of study. While digital natives grew up in an environment immersed in technology, digital immigrants adapted to this environment through their ability to learn and adjust to…

  6. Boundary Management in Doctoral Supervision: How Supervisors Negotiate Roles and Role Transitions throughout the Supervisory Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmore, Anne

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, boundary management illuminates understanding of the doctoral supervisory relationship. Boundary management is presented as a theoretical vehicle that helps to define and explain roles that supervisors employ at different junctures along the doctoral journey and how transitions between these are negotiated. The paper draws on the…

  7. Closing the Loop: The Pay-Off on Your State's Investment. Doctoral Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Ansley

    2014-01-01

    States are investing in their futures through the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) Doctoral Scholars Program, which helps minority Ph.D. students become faculty members. The return on investment? Candidates complete their doctorates faster and serve as role models for the increasingly diverse college students they teach as faculty members.…

  8. Some Thoughts on Counseling Parents of the Mentally Retarded. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, William R.

    Discussed are techniques in counseling parents of retarded children. Suggested are ways to structure the interview as well as methods to help the parents deal with such problems as overprotection and initial reactions to the diagnosis of retardation. (CL)

  9. Healthy Doctors – Sick Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Gjerløw Aasland

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are among the healthiest segments of the population in western countries. Nevertheless, they complain strongly of stress and burnout. Their own explanation is deprofessionalisation: The honourable art of doctoring has been replaced by standardised interventions and production lines; professional autonomy has withered. This view is shared by many medical sociologists who have identified a “golden age of medicine,” or “golden age of doctoring,” starting after World War II and declining around 1970. This article looks at some of the central sociological literature on deprofessionalisation, particularly in a perspective of countervailing powers. It also looks into another rise-and-fall model, proposed by the medical profession itself, where the fall in professional power was generated by the notion that there are no more white spots to explore on the map of medicine. Contemporary doctoring is a case of cognitive dissonance, where the traditional doctor role seems incompatible with modern health care.Keywords: deprofessionalisation, professional autonomy, cognitive dissonance, golden age of doctoring

  10. Professionalism for future humanistic doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear editor Clinical environments encounter is an important part of studying medicine (1. Patient contact as an integral part of medical education occurs in various formats in the clinical settings (2, 3. During clinical training, medical students may experience high levels of stress, and some may not deal with it well. The abruptness of students’ transition to the clinical setting generated positive and negative emotions. Due to being a novice, they did not receive adequate training on how to get emotionally prepared for meeting seriously ill people. In such circumstances, the shortage of training will have predictably crucial consequences. Early clinical contact has been suggested to reduce these stresses and help the students adapt effectively to changes in the hospital climate (2. Patient contact creates an environment where each student appreciates cultural diversity and reinforces the development of clinical professional interpersonal skills through social, emotional and cognitive experiences (4, 5. It encourages validating of the relationship between patients and doctors and allows students to experience a more personal relationship with patients and nurture the ability to empathize with them, providing considerable benefits for trainees and patients. In this way, the social emotions that students experience when empathizing with a patient represent a uniquely human achievement. By internalizing their subjective interpretations of patient’s beliefs and feelings, the student’s body, brain and mind come together to produce cognition and emotion . They construct culturally relevant knowledge and make decisions about how to act and think about the patient’s problems as if they were their own. On the other hand, patient interaction in undergraduate education offers students a valuable early insight into the day-to-day role of a doctor and the patients’ perspective on specific conditions. Early experience provides a greater knowledge

  11. Guidelines for cognitive behavioral training within doctoral psychology programs in the United States: report of the Inter-organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K; Ronan, George F; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D; Belar, Cynthia D; Berry, Sharon L; Christofff, Karen A; Craighead, Linda W; Dougher, Michael J; Dowd, E Thomas; Herbert, James D; McFarr, Lynn M; Rizvi, Shireen L; Sauer, Eric M; Strauman, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a year-long series of conferences, and developed a consensus on optimal doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology. The recommendations assume solid foundational training that is typical within applied psychology areas such as clinical and counseling psychology programs located in the United States. This article details the background, assumptions, and resulting recommendations specific to doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology, including competencies expected in the areas of ethics, research, and practice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Pending appendicectomy: a personal experience and review of a doctor's own illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Ahmad; Hay, Alexandra Naomi

    2016-05-12

    Doctors will inevitably 1 day become patients. Whether as an acute emergency or as part of routine screening, doctors often find it difficult to recognise and act on their own healthcare needs. This article aims to provide a personal account and reflections from the point of view of a doctor in denial about his acute appendicitis, and a friend and fellow colleague's attempts to convince him to seek help. We review the challenges, learning points and literature about why doctors ignore their health needs, both physical and psychological, and suggest potential changes to tackle this issue based on the current literature, support networks and personal experiences. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Review of School Counseling Outcome Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiston, Susan C.; Quinby, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    This article is somewhat unique in this special issue as it focuses on the effectiveness of an array of school counseling interventions and not solely on individual and group counseling. In summarizing the school counseling outcome literature, the authors found that students who participated in school counseling interventions tended to score on…

  14. 34 CFR 685.304 - Counseling borrowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling borrowers. 685.304 Section 685.304 Education... Direct Loan Program Schools § 685.304 Counseling borrowers. (a) Entrance counseling. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(8) of this section, a school must ensure that entrance counseling is conducted...

  15. 38 CFR 21.9580 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.9580...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9580 Counseling. An individual may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. VA will apply the provisions of...

  16. 38 CFR 21.100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.100... Counseling § 21.100 Counseling. (a) General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under Chapter 31 shall be provided professional counseling services by Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR...

  17. 38 CFR 21.6100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.6100... Recipients Counseling § 21.6100 Counseling. General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under this temporary program shall be provided professional counseling services by the Vocational...

  18. 38 CFR 21.7600 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7600...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance for Members of the Selected Reserve Counseling § 21.7600 Counseling. A reservist may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during...

  19. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43 Drug counseling. (a) Drug counseling shall be provided to sentenced inmates in contract community treatment...

  20. 38 CFR 21.8100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.8100... Vietnam Veterans-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects Counseling § 21.8100 Counseling. An eligible child requesting or receiving services and assistance under this subpart will receive professional counseling by VR...

  1. Online Counseling: New Entity, New Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jeffrey E.

    2005-01-01

    Mallen, Vogel, and colleagues explore the developing field of online counseling from the unique perspective of counseling psychology. They examine the body of available research and relevant clinical, ethical, legal, and practical issues and make recommendations for counseling psychologists who desire to participate in online counseling. This…

  2. Marriage Counselling in Australia: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcott, Ilene; Glezer, Helen

    A study was conducted of the effectiveness of marriage counseling with respect to marital status and the long-term stability of relationships. Data were gathered from clients of approved Australian marriage counseling agencies (n=540) who took a pre-counseling survey during a 4-week period in October-November 1987 and a post-counseling survey 8…

  3. Courtland Lee: A Global Advocate for Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    2011-01-01

    Courtland Lee is exemplary in his accomplishments nationally and internationally. His academic achievements are notable in multicultural counseling and social justice. His leadership in counseling has been outstanding with his having served as president of the American Counseling Association, the Association for Multicultural Counseling and…

  4. [Prevalence of smoking among doctors and paramedical staff in Hospital University Center Mohammed VI, Marrakech].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Farid; Sajiai, Hafsa; Amro, Lamyae

    2017-01-01

    Smoking is a major public health problem. Doctors and paramedical staff are not excluded from this plague. Smoking ban in hospitals originated from government effort to reduce passive smoking. The objectives were to evaluate smoking habits among doctors and paramedical staff in order to implement tobacco control strategy in this study population and to refer them to the smoking-cessation counselling. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study of the entire staff of the Hospital University Center Mohammed VI, Marrakech based on the distribution of anonymous questionnaires. A total of 530 questionnaires were distributed, and 380 were returned, a response rate of 71.7%. The study population consisted of 58.2% women (n=221) and 41.8% men (n=159). Doctors (n=220) were the most represented occupational category (57.9%) followed by nurses (31.8%). Smokers (n=62) accounted for 16.3% of our study population; the ex-smokers (n=31) accounted for 8.1% and the non-smokers (n=287) 75.5%. The average age of smokers was 31.1 years, ranging from 22 to 56 years. The prevalence of smoking was 16.3% (n=62) of study population, of whom 32.7% (n=52) among men compared to 4.5% (n=10) among women. The average age of smoking onset was 19 years with a range from 11 to 29 years and with a mean consumption of 9 cigarettes/day. 13% (n=50) of people even smoked narguilé, 9% (n=34) consumed alcohol, and 3% (n=21) cannabis. 67.7% of smokers (n=42) were planning to quit, of whom 30.9% (n=13) in the next 3 months, 52.4% (n=22) in the next 6 months and 16, 7% (n=16) were planning to quit in the year. Several activities encouraged smoking, including night shift, coffee breaks and meals in 90.3% (n=56), 64.3% (n=40) and 61.3% (n=38) of cases respectively. This survey highlights the need to carry out awareness-raising actions to strengthen people motivation to quit smoking and help them during their withdrawal.

  5. Between coaching and social counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Vrana

    2012-03-01

    The basic difference between coaching and social counselling lies in a different interpretation of the client' starting situation. Social counselling understands the client' starting situation as problematic and attempts to normalize it, while coaching understands it as normal and attempts to develop it. The key similarity of the two approaches is encour- agement of the clients' own initiative. Coaching needs to be investigated within the field of developmental conceptions, since its focus on results supports, unintentionally, the dominant developmental paradigm. Focusing on solutions in coaching is questionable also within an organization, where its interests may channel the course of clients' search for their own solutions. The counselling doctrine of coaching can gain valuable insights by a reassessment of the concepts of development and normality, a domain in which it is likely to encounter social counselling.

  6. Counselling Psychology in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country’s socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country’s mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country’s health care and education systems. PMID:27867261

  7. HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD sponsors housing counseling agencies throughout the country that can provide advice on buying a home, renting, defaults, foreclosures, and credit issues. This...

  8. VOCATIONAL INTEREST, COUNSELLING, SOCIO- ECONOMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between vocational ... Modified Bakare Vocational interest inventory, the instrument on counselling, .... family influences the vocational preference of youths. .... Theories of Personality.

  9. FEATURES OF STUDENT PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dorina PASCA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Student psychological counseling is one of the means to acknowledge student identity by employing counseling tools that allow the psychologist to make use of a set of skills essential in achieving envisaged outcomes. To act as counseling psychologist for students is to guide actions by the five wh- questions: who (the client is, why (the counselor is approached, who (the counselor talks to, what (problem the student has to tackle, how (the problem can be solved. Some of the most important features that contribute to solving student problems are the counselor’s deontology, trustworthiness and attitude that are to be relied on without impeding the client’s personality traits. Thus, developing awareness of the features underlying student psychological counseling and acting accordingly is the real test for any professional in the field. Therefore, the real challenge is not being in the lion’s den, but living with it.

  10. Counselling Psychology in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country's socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country's mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country's health care and education systems.

  11. A thirteen-year comparison in patterns of attitudes toward counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, W R; Gandy, G L

    1994-01-01

    Two comparable samples of college students were administered the same survey of attitudes toward counseling in 1976 and 1989. Ratings were obtained for (1) likelihood of seeking counseling, (2) likelihood of seeking help from professional and nonprofessional helpers, (3) likelihood of seeking help for differing types of problems, (4) degree of responsibility the professional should assume, and (5) preferences for five of the major counseling approaches (Adlerian, Behavioral, Gestalt, Person-Centered, Rational-Emotive). Consistencies and changing patterns were noted within each year and between years. Findings are discussed in relation to existing research as well as to possible gender and societal determinants.

  12. Counseling Services for Women in Marriage Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frischa Meivilona Yendi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is a bond between the outer and inner man as a husband who has not aged 25 years and women 21 years old wife is not with the purpose of achieving happiness. Marriage and family counseling is a profession that will be developed in Indonesia. Counseling emphasizes on changes contained in the family system. Stages counseling, theory and dynamics as well as the use of counseling skills in marriage and family counseling has similarities with individual counseling and group counseling.

  13. Between coaching and social counselling

    OpenAIRE

    Toni Vrana

    2012-01-01

    Coaching appears to be another modern counselling approach, practiced initially in the business world. It can to be analyzed through a comparison with social counselling. The roots of coaching go back to Ancient Greece.. Plato used to propagate the art of aksing questions by recording the Socratic dialogue. Today coaching is in substance related to mentoring, tutoring and coaching in sport. The core of the activity - according to different coaching definitions - is discovering the hidden pote...

  14. 24 CFR 3.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 3.425 Section 3.425 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department... Activities Prohibited § 3.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  15. 29 CFR 36.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 36... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 36.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of...

  16. 31 CFR 28.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 28.425 Section 28.425 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the....425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not...

  17. 10 CFR 1042.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials... on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  18. 14 CFR 1253.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1253.425 Section 1253.425 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... § 1253.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall...

  19. 38 CFR 23.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 23.425 Section 23.425 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Activities Prohibited § 23.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  20. 13 CFR 113.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 113.425 Section 113.425 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS... Activities Prohibited § 113.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  1. 22 CFR 146.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  2. 7 CFR 15a.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Education Programs and Activities Prohibited § 15a.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the...

  3. 22 CFR 229.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  4. 49 CFR 25.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  5. 45 CFR 86.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  6. 6 CFR 17.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  7. 18 CFR 1317.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1317.425 Section 1317.425 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... Activities Prohibited § 1317.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  8. 10 CFR 5.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the...

  9. The "doctor-customer" relationship: Hippocrates in the modern marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhall, Kevin J; Ahmed, Aftab; Masterson, Eric

    2002-01-01

    We performed a consecutive survey of 100 people presenting to a hospital injury clinic to ascertain their attitude to terminology currently used to describe them in our own institution and in the international literature. The results of this demonstrated that the subjects significantly preferred the traditional assignation "patient" rather than terms such as client or customer. This finding reflects the need to remember peoples' attitudes and expectations from their consultation with their doctor. Although business models undoubtedly help in the provision of an efficient health care service, remaining at the centre of this encounter is a doctor-patient relationship that involves a more complex interaction than simply a market transaction.

  10. Work of female rural doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Jo

    2004-04-01

    To identify the impact of family life on the ways women practice rural medicine and the changes needed to attract women to rural practice. Census of women rural doctors in Victoria in 2000, using a self-completed postal survey. General and specialist practice. Two hundred and seventy-one female general practitioners and 31 female specialists practising in Rural, Remote and Metropolitan Area Classifications 3-7. General practitioners are those doctors with a primary medical degree and without additional specialist qualifications. Interaction of hours and type of work with family responsibilities. Generalist and specialist women rural doctors carry the main responsibility for family care. This is reflected in the number of hours they work in clinical and non-clinical professional practice, availability for on-call and hospital work, and preference for the responsibilities of practice partnership or the flexibility of salaried positions. Most of the doctors had established a satisfactory balance between work and family responsibilities, although a substantial number were overworked in order to provide an income for their families or meet the needs of their communities. Thirty-six percent of female rural general practitioners and 56% of female rural specialists preferred to work fewer hours. Female general practitioners with responsibility for children were more than twice as likely as female general practitioners without children to be in a salaried position and less likely to be a practice partner. The changes needed to attract and retain women in rural practice include a place for everyone in the doctor's family, flexible practice structures, mentoring by women doctors and financial and personal recognition. Women make up less than a quarter of the rural general practice workforce and an even smaller percentage of the specialist rural medical workforce. As a result their experiences are not well articulated in research on rural medical practice and their needs are

  11. [The cult of Asklepios and the doctors in Greek epigraphical evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Cécile

    2007-01-01

    Greek inscriptions afford several examples of the relationship between Asklepios, the god of medicine, and human doctors in Graeco-Roman Antiquity. Many dedications of steles, statues, altars and even sanctuaries were consecrated to Asklepios by physicians. Other physicians have undertaken the offices of zacorate or priesthood in the worship of Asklepios. In some cities, notably at Athens and Ephesos, the doctors sacrificed collectively to the physician-god. The aim of this paper is to explain these cult relations between Asklepios and the doctors. After the Asklepiads, doctors at Kos and Knidos, who were believed to be the descendants of Asklepios, all the ancient doctors were connected with Asklepios by their techne; the physician-god was the divine patron of the physicians. Furthermore although the doctors rejected the divine origin of the diseases, they acknowledged the healing power of the gods, especially Asklepios, and could seek his help.

  12. The impact of HIV/AIDS on doctors - a report on 2 years experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Minutes for the Patient – Interactions in General Practice ... interaction, thus helping the presenting doctor to relate ..... tic. This was further compounded by the close link between HIV-AIDS and ... challenge to the political, social, educa- tional ...

  13. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGAD 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European EmergencyCall 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors will...

  14. Predictors of the Change in Self-Stigma Following a Single Session of Group Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nathaniel G.; Post, Brian C.; Cornish, Marilyn A.; Vogel, David L.; Tucker, Jeritt R.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to seeking psychological help is the stigma associated with counseling and therapy. Self-stigma, the fear of losing self-respect or self-esteem as a result of seeking help, is an important factor in the help-seeking process. In the present study, college students meeting a clinical cutoff for psychological symptoms…

  15. Preferred prenatal counselling at the limits of viability: a survey among Dutch perinatal professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurtzen, R; Van Heijst, Arno; Hermens, Rosella; Scheepers, Hubertina; Woiski, Mallory; Draaisma, Jos; Hogeveen, Marije

    2018-01-03

    Since 2010, intensive care can be offered in the Netherlands at 24 +0  weeks gestation (with parental consent) but the Dutch guideline lacks recommendations on organization, content and preferred decision-making of the counselling. Our aim is to explore preferred prenatal counselling at the limits of viability by Dutch perinatal professionals and compare this to current care. Online nationwide survey as part of the PreCo study (2013) amongst obstetricians and neonatologists in all Dutch level III perinatal care centers (n = 205).The survey regarded prenatal counselling at the limits of viability and focused on the domains of organization, content and decision-making in both current and preferred practice. One hundred twenty-two surveys were returned out of 205 eligible professionals (response rate 60%). Organization-wise: more than 80% of all professionals preferred (but currently missed) having protocols for several aspects of counselling, joint counselling by both neonatologist and obstetrician, and the use of supportive materials. Most professionals preferred using national or local data (70%) on outcome statistics for the counselling content, in contrast to the international statistics currently used (74%). Current decisions on initiation care were mostly made together (in 99% parents and doctor). This shared decision model was preferred by 95% of the professionals. Dutch perinatal professionals would prefer more protocolized counselling, joint counselling, supportive material and local outcome statistics. Further studies on both barriers to perform adequate counselling, as well as on Dutch outcome statistics and parents' opinions are needed in order to develop a national framework. Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02782650 , retrospectively registered May 2016.

  16. [Life conditions of Togolese doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffi-Tessio, Annick Viwalé; Oniankitan, Owonayo; Mijiyawa, Moustafa

    2010-09-01

    A study has been carried out by Togolese medical doctors in order to determine the perceived and the real life of their profession. The study, which was transversal, has taken in account a sample of 52 medical doctors made on the basis of a cautious choice. Most of these medical doctors (15 general practitioners, 23 specialists and 14 hospitalo-universitaires) work in the medical cares centres of Lomé. A sheet of survey has permitted the collection of demographic data and data relating to the medical studies and career. The 52 medical doctors included in the study (7 women, 45 men) were between 25 and 59 years old; their age of getting their A-level was between 16 and 23 years old, and that of getting the doctorate diploma between 24 and 37. The length of professional experience stands between 8 months and 27 years. The marital status was specified by 47 of the 52 medical doctors: 13 single, one divorced, and 33 married; 5 of the 7 women who took part in the survey were single and without any child. The love of the profession (65%), the social status it confers (37%) and the honour tied to the profession (27%) were the main motives of choosing the profession. The decision of doing medical studies was taken during secondary studies by 45 of the 52 persons. The faculty of medicine of Lomé has been the study frame to general medicine studies of 35 persons (67%). The low payment (83%), the poverty of the patients (83%), the narrowness of the technical platform (79%), the insufficiency of cares structures in paramedical personnel (67%), the insufficiency of continuing education (60%), and the lack or insufficiency of drugs (58%) were the main problems encountered during their professional experience by the people questioned. 22 medical doctors (43%) have estimated that their profession has given them a particular social status. Only 8 medical doctors have found that the real things they have gone trough in the profession matches with the idea they had, while 32 (62

  17. Ethical issues in genetic counselling with special reference to haemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuswamy, Vasantha

    2011-10-01

    Genetic counselling is provided in places where genetic tests are carried out. The process involves pre-test counselling as well as post-test counselling to enable the individuals to face the situation and take appropriate decisions with the right frame of mind. Major ethical principles which govern the attitudes and actions of counsellors include: respect for patient autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, or taking action to help benefit others and prevent harm, both physical and mental, and justice, which requires that services be distributed fairly to those in need. Other moral issues include veracity, the duty to disclose information or to be truthful, and respect for patient confidentiality. Nondirective counselling, a hallmark of this profession, is in accordance with the principle of individual autonomy. High prevalence of haemoglobinopathies with availability of good and sensitive carrier detection tests and prenatal diagnostic techniques makes these good candidates for population screening of carriers along with genetic counselling for primary prevention of the disease. Screening of the extended family members of the affected child, high risk communities and general population screening including antenatal women are the main target groups for planning a Haemoglobinopathy control programme. A critical mass of trained genetic counsellors who have understanding of the ethical issues and its appropriate handling with the required sensitivity is needed in India.

  18. Counselling Communication Skills

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emeka Egbochuku

    concern for the person we examine the most effective way to help them ... impact of the problem on her client's psychological well-being. The ... Empathic responding circumnavigates all the other skills. ... he is ashamed. ... 'I'm yawning again and I can see it's off-putting to you. .... to reach new perspectives in their own time.

  19. Mrs Hitler and her doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Sandy

    2005-12-01

    The doctor who attended the mother of Adolf Hitler in her terminal illness has been blamed as a cause of the Holocaust. The medical details recorded of this professional relationship are presented and discussed. Dr Bloch's medical care of Mrs Hitler was consistent with the prevailing medical practice of the management of fungating breast carcinoma. Indeed, the general practitioner's care and attention of the family appear to have been astute and supportive. There is nothing to suggest that Dr Bloch's medical care was other than competent. Doctors who have the (mis)fortune to professionally attend major figures of history may be unfairly viewed, despite their appropriate and adequate care.

  20. The Doctorate in Chemistry. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, Ronald

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  1. Do doctors attending sexualoffence victims have to notify sexualoffence suspects that their patients who were forced to have unprotected sexual intercourse are HIVpositive What should doctors do

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D J McQuoid-Mason

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The question has been asked as to whether doctors attending sexual-offence victims have to notify sexual-offence suspects that their patients who were forced to have unprotected sexual intercourse are HIV-positive. It is submitted that the common law requires doctors to warn endangered third parties where such persons may suffer injury as a result of interactions with their patients, and that this applies to patients who have tested positive for HIV. The ethical rules of the Health Professions Council of South Africa also require doctors to breach the confidentiality rule against the consent of their patients who have tested HIV-positive, where the sexual partner of a patient is known, and after counselling such patients still refuse to allow disclosure – provided there is no risk of consequential harm to such patients. The dilemma of doctors treating HIV-positive patients is sometimes resolved where, in terms of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters Amendment Act No. 32 of 2007, a court order for the compulsory testing of the suspect has been obtained and the suspect knows his or her HIV status. Recommendations are made for what doctors should do in such cases.

  2. Doctor-patient communication in Southeast Asia: a different culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramita, Mora; Nugraheni, Mubarika D F; van Dalen, Jan; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-03-01

    Studies of doctor-patient communication generally advocate a partnership communication style. However, in Southeast Asian settings, we often see a more one-way style with little input from the patient. We investigated factors underlying the use of a one-way consultation style by doctors in a Southeast Asian setting. We conducted a qualitative study based on principles of grounded theory. Twenty residents and specialists and 20 patients of a low or high educational level were interviewed in internal medicine outpatient clinics of an Indonesian teaching hospital and two affiliated hospitals. During 26 weeks we engaged in an iterative interview and coding process to identify emergent factors. Patients were generally dissatisfied with doctors' communication style. The doctors indicated that they did not deliberately use a one-way style. Communication style appeared to be associated with characteristics of Southeast Asian culture, the health care setting and medical education. Doctor-patient communication appeared to be affected by cultural characteristics which fell into two broad categories representing key features of Southeast Asian culture, "social distance" and "closeness of relationships", and to characteristics categorized as "specific clinical context". Consideration of these characteristics could be helpful in promoting the use of a partnership communication style.

  3. Learning through inter- and intradisciplinary problem solving: using cognitive apprenticeship to analyse doctor-to-doctor consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Pachler, Norbert; Nierle, Julia; Genewein, Urs

    2012-12-01

    Today's healthcare can be characterised by the increasing importance of specialisation that requires cooperation across disciplines and specialities. In view of the number of educational programmes for interdisciplinary cooperation, surprisingly little is known on how learning arises from interdisciplinary work. In order to analyse the learning and teaching practices of interdisciplinary cooperation, a multiple case study research focused on how consults, i.e., doctor-to-doctor consultations between medical doctors from different disciplines were carried out: semi-structured interviews with doctors of all levels of seniority from two hospital sites in Switzerland were conducted. Starting with a priori constructs based on the 'methods' underpinning cognitive apprenticeship (CA), the transcribed interviews were analysed according to the principles of qualitative content analysis. The research contributes to three debates: (1) socio-cognitive and situated learning, (2) intra- and interdisciplinary learning in clinical settings, and (3), more generally, to cooperation and problem solving. Patient cases, which necessitate the cooperation of doctors in consults across boundaries of clinical specialisms, trigger intra- as well as interdisciplinary learning and offer numerous and varied opportunities for learning by requesting doctors as well as for on-call doctors, in particular those in residence. The relevance of consults for learning can also be verified from the perspective of CA which is commonly used by experts, albeit in varying forms, degrees of frequency and quality, and valued by learners. Through data analysis a model for collaborative problem-solving and help-seeking was developed which shows the interplay of pedagogical 'methods' of CA in informal clinical learning contexts.

  4. Why doctors have difficulty with sex histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, J M; Laux, L F; Thornby, J I

    1990-06-01

    Studies have shown that physicians' performance has not been as good as it should be in detecting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and in counseling patients about their transmission. The AIDS pandemic has underscored the need to find out why this is true. In our study, we identified the major reasons physicians believe other doctors fail to take adequate sex histories. Scales were then developed to measure the three principal reasons given by these physicians: embarrassment, belief that the sex history is not relevant to the patient's chief complaint, and belief by the physicians that they are not adequately trained. When 350 senior medical students were surveyed, 93% thought that knowledge of a patient's sexual practices is an important part of their patient's medical history, but 50% felt poorly trained to take this history and 25% felt embarrassed to ask the necessary questions. To learn why some students score well on these three dimensions and others do not, a limited number of personal attributes were measured and correlated with the scores on these three measures. Shyness and social anxiety as a personal trait predicted which student was most likely to experience embarrassment in taking a sex history. A nonsympathetic view of patients' psychosocial problems was the variable most closely related to the belief that the sex history was of little importance in understanding a patient's problem. Students who believed this most strongly were the same ones who were most homophobic, authoritarian, and had the greatest fear of AIDS infection. The sense of not feeling adequately trained to take a sex history related most strongly to low self-esteem. How these barriers to STD risk assessment might be overcome is discussed.

  5. A new definition of Genetic Counseling: National Society of Genetic Counselors' Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta, Robert; Biesecker, Barbara Bowles; Bennett, Robin L; Blum, Sandra; Hahn, Susan Estabrooks; Strecker, Michelle N; Williams, Janet L

    2006-04-01

    The Genetic Counseling Definition Task Force of the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) developed the following definition of genetic counseling that was approved by the NSGC Board of Directors: Genetic counseling is the process of helping people understand and adapt to the medical, psychological and familial implications of genetic contributions to disease. This process integrates the following: Interpretation of family and medical histories to assess the chance of disease occurrence or recurrence. Education about inheritance, testing, management, prevention, resources and research. Counseling to promote informed choices and adaptation to the risk or condition. The definition was approved after a peer review process with input from the NSGC membership, genetic professional organizations, the NSGC legal counsel, and leaders of several national genetic advocacy groups.

  6. Marriage Counseling: A Christian Approach to Counseling Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Everett L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Describes approach to marriage counseling based on cognitive behavioral therapy and structural and strategic marital therapies aimed at Christian couples. Uses shared Christian values between counselor and clients to promote increased marital commitment, marital satisfaction, and personal spiritual growth. Maintains marital satisfaction might be…

  7. Counseling as an Art: The Creative Arts in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    In this book counseling approaches with a variety of populations are examined using these creative arts: music; dance/movement; imagery; visual arts; literature; drama; and play and humor. It is noted that all of these arts are process-oriented, emotionally sensitive, socially directed, and awareness-focused. Chapter 1 discusses the history,…

  8. Continuum of Counseling Goals: A Framework for Differentiating Counseling Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Presents counseling goals in a developmental continuum similar in concept to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Discusses ego development goals, socialization goals, developmental goals, self-esteem goals, and self-realization goals and describes characteristics and implications of the continuum. (JAC)

  9. Motivational Counseling: Implications for Counseling Male Juvenile Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Samir H.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Glover, Michelle Muenzenmeyer

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) often appear unmotivated to change, which thus necessitates a therapeutic approach that matches "resistant" client characteristics. In this article, the authors review common traits of JSOs, introduce motivational counseling as an effective treatment modality, and offer a case illustration. (Contains 1 table and 1…

  10. Single Session Web-Based Counselling: A Thematic Analysis of Content from the Perspective of the Client

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, S. N.; Lubman, D. I.; Cheetham, A.; Dowling, N. A.; Jackson, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the exponential growth of non-appointment-based web counselling, there is limited information on what happens in a single session intervention. This exploratory study, involving a thematic analysis of 85 counselling transcripts of people seeking help for problem gambling, aimed to describe the presentation and content of online…

  11. [Effect of doctor-patient communication education on oral clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Tang, Yu; He, Yan; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of doctor-patient communication education on dental clinical practice. The process of 61 dental interns' clinical practice was divided into two stages. The dental interns were taught with traditional teaching method in the first stage. Doctor-patient communication and communication skill training were added to the second stage. Scale of medical student's doctor-patient communication behavior was used to evaluate the dental interns' behavior by themselves after two stages. The SEGUE frame work was used to evaluate the dental interns' behavior by teachers after two stages. All statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software package. The result of scale of medical student's doctor-patient communication behavior was analyzed using Fisher exact test or Chi-square test. The score of the SEGUE frame work was analyzed using Student's t test. The result of Scale of medical student's doctor-patient communication behavior showed only 37.71% of dental interns could establish good doctor-patient relationship in the first stage. After doctor-patient communication and communication skill training, the percentage became 75.4%. The result of the SEGUE frame work showed the score was raised from 16.066±3.308 to 21.867±2.456, and a significant difference was found between the two stages. Doctor-Patient communication education can improve dental interns' communication skills and help to establish a good doctor-patient relationship.

  12. The defense counsel's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Peter J; Plump, Joan D; Courtney, Marcie A

    2005-04-01

    In all likelihood, most orthopedic surgeons today will be the subject of a lawsuit related to the care and treatment of a patient. This article is designed to provide physicians with pertinent material to help prepare for what seems to have become the inevitable--the medical malpractice lawsuit. There are a number of things that can be done to minimize the chance that a surgeon will be sued. Keeping informed about recent developments in orthopaedics, developing a good relationship with patients, and maintaining good documentation are just a few of the ways to help reduce the chances of being named in a potential lawsuit. Additionally, we offer physicians who have been sued assistance in getting through the litigation process, which at times can be daunting. Logical suggestions, such as not discussing a case with anyone other than a spouse and/or an attorney and not altering the medical records and larger concepts, including the importance of developing a relationship with an attorney, understanding the attorney-client privilege, and adequately preparing for the deposition and trial are discussed at length. Although it is not possible to be completely prepared for the day one gets sued, this article should provide insight and information necessary to enable surgeons to face each element of the lawsuit with some knowledge and control.

  13. Personality traits of Australian nurses and doctors: challenging stereotypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Diann S; Eley, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    This study compared temperament and character traits of Australian registered nurses and general practitioners. A cross-sectional quantitative design used the Temperament and Character Inventory. Total sample size was 426. Only main effects were detected. Nurses were higher in the temperament traits of Novelty Seeking and Reward Dependence, lower in the character traits of Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness but higher in Self-Transcendence compared with the sample of doctors. Differences in personality profiles between registered nurses and general practitioners might challenge existing stereotypes between these professions. Further exploration of traits exclusive to and shared among health professions would supplement a broad conceptualization of specialities and support the enhancement of appropriate training and career counselling. Awareness of one's temperament and character can lead to a clearer understanding of how they function in the workplace and might encourage reflection on and insight into the implications of their personality and career plans. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Newborn jaundice - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaundice - what to ask your doctor; What to ask your doctor about newborn jaundice ... What causes jaundice in a newborn child? How common is newborn jaundice? Will the jaundice harm my child? What are the ...

  15. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - child; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - child ... should I discuss with my child's teachers about epilepsy? Will my child need to take medicines during ...

  16. Doctoral Program Selection Using Pairwise Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadisina, Suresh K.; Bhasin, Vijay

    1989-01-01

    The application of a pairwise comparison methodology (Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process) to the doctoral program selection process is illustrated. A hierarchy for structuring and facilitating the doctoral program selection decision is described. (Author/MLW)

  17. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  18. Angina - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about angina and heart disease; Coronary artery disease - what to ask your doctor ... the signs and symptoms that I am having angina? Will I always have the same symptoms? What ...

  19. The Plight of the Woman Doctoral Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Engin Inel; Holmstrom, Robert W.

    1974-01-01

    This study investigated factors underlying discrimination against woman doctoral students. Analyses revealed that faculty attitudes and behavior toward woman doctoral students contributed significantly to their emotional stresses and self-doubts. (Author/NE)

  20. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... What type of symptoms or problems will my child have? Will my child have problems thinking or ...

  1. Employee and family assistance video counseling program: a post launch retrospective comparison with in-person counseling outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veder, Barbara; Pope, Stan; Mani, Michèle; Beaudoin, Kelly; Ritchie, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Access to technologically mediated information and services under the umbrella of mental and physical health has become increasingly available to clients via Internet modalities, according to a recent study. In May 2010, video counseling was added to the counseling services offered through the Employee and Family Assistance Program at Shepell·fgi as a pilot project with a full operational launch in September 2011. The objective of this study was to conduct a retrospective post launch examination of the video counseling service through an analysis of the reported clinical outcomes of video and in-person counseling modalities. A chronological sample of 68 video counseling (VC) cases and 68 in-person (IP) cases were collected from a pool of client clinical files closed in 2012. To minimize the variables impacting the study and maintain as much clinical continuity as possible, the IP and the VC clients must have attended clinical sessions with any one of six counselors who provided both the VC and the IP services. The study compared the two counseling modalities along the following data points (see glossary of terms): (1) client demographic profiles (eg, age, gender, whether the sessions involved individuals or conjoint sessions with couples or families, etc), (2) presenting issue, (3) average session hours, (4) client rating of session helpfulness, (5) rates of goal completion, (6) client withdrawal rates, (7) no show and late cancellation rates, and (8) pre/post client self-assessment. Specific to VC, we examined client geographic location. Data analysis demonstrates that the VC and the IP showed a similar representation of presenting issues with nearly identical outcomes for client ratings of session helpfulness, rates of goal completion, pre/post client self-assessment, average session duration, and client geographic location. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of withdrawal from counseling, no shows, and late cancellations between

  2. Heidbreder to head Office of Legal Counsel

    OpenAIRE

    Hincker, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    Kay Heidbreder of Blacksburg, has been appointed University Counsel by the Virginia Attorney General and will head the university's legal office. Heidbreder, who holds the position of assistant attorney general, has been associate general counsel at Virginia Tech since 1985.

  3. Preferences for Depression Help-Seeking Among Vietnamese American Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Mozeleski, Jin E; Tsoh, Janice Y; Gildengorin, Ginny; Cao, Lien H; Ho, Tiffany; Kohli, Sarita; Lam, Hy; Wong, Ching; Stewart, Susan; McPhee, Stephen J; Nguyen, Tung T

    2017-11-11

    Culture impacts help-seeking preferences. We examined Vietnamese Americans' help-seeking preferences for depressive symptoms, through a telephone survey (N = 1666). A vignette describing an age- and gender-matched individual with depression was presented, and respondents chose from a list of options and provided open-ended responses about their help-seeking preferences. Results showed that 78.3% would seek professional help, either from a family doctor, a mental health provider, or both; 54.4% preferred to seek help from a family doctor but not from a mental health provider. Most (82.1%) would prefer to talk to family or friends, 62.2% would prefer to look up information, and 50.1% would prefer to get spiritual help. Logistic regression analysis revealed that preferences for non-professional help-seeking options (such as talking to friends or family, looking up information, and getting spiritual help), health care access, and perceived poor health, were associated with increased odds of preferring professional help-seeking. This population-based study of Vietnamese Americans highlight promising channels to deliver education about depression and effective help-seeking resources, particularly the importance of family doctors and social networks. Furthermore, addressing barriers in access to care remains a critical component of promoting professional help-seeking.

  4. Proceedings of Arcom Doctoral Workshop Research Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Lloyd

    2018-01-01

    Editorial Editorial Welcome to this special doctoral workshop on Research Methodology which forms part of what is now a well-established support mechanism for researchers in the discipline of the Built Environment and more particularly construction management. The ARCOM doctoral series, around now for some seventeen years, has addressed many of the diverse research areas that PhD researchers in the discipline have chosen to focus on in their doctoral journey. This doctoral workshop has as ...

  5. Hybrid Doctoral Program: Innovative Practices and Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvich, Dori; Manning, JoAnn; McCormick, Kathy; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper reflects on how one mid-Atlantic University innovatively incorporated technology into the development of a hybrid doctoral program in educational leadership. The paper describes a hybrid doctoral degree program using a rigorous design; challenges of reworking a traditional syllabus of record to a hybrid doctoral program; the perceptions…

  6. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... Alzheimer's Association. Dementia Care Practice Recommendations ... in a Home Setting. Updated 2009. Alz.org. www.alz.org/national/ ...

  7. The Trouble with Doctoral Aspiration Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, James

    2018-01-01

    This article attends to the affective-political dimensions of doctoral aspiration. It considers why doctoral students continue to hope for an 'academic good life' in spite of the depressed and precarious features of the academic present. The article emerges from 2013 research with ten doctoral students in the Arts and Social Sciences, at a…

  8. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Migraine - what to ask your doctor; Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster headache - what to ask your doctor ... How can I tell if the headache I am having is dangerous? What are ... headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? What medical ...

  9. 36 CFR 1211.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1211.425 Section 1211.425 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1211.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling...

  10. Counseling Ethics Education Experience: An Interpretive Case Study of the First Year Master's Level Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Noor Syamilah

    2013-01-01

    Counseling ethics competency is an important part of counselor identity development as required by the counseling profession training standards, and counseling ethics education is one major component of knowledge acquisition in counseling profession. Counselor educators and counselor education training programs have a core responsibility to…

  11. Declining Counseling Research in Counseling Psychology Journals: Is the Sky Falling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Scheel et al. note a rather precipitous decline over the past 30 years in the number and proportion of counseling-related research articles appearing in "Journal of Counseling Psychology" ("JCP") and "The Counseling Psychologist" ("TCP"). Certainly, counseling psychology as a field has changed over its 65-year history, and a great deal of that…

  12. Group Counseling in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusse, Rachelle; Goodnough, Gary E.; Lee, Vivian V.

    2009-01-01

    Group counseling is an effective intervention when working in a school setting. In this article, the authors discuss the different kinds of groups offered in schools, types of group interventions, strategies to use in forming groups, and how to collaborate with others in the school. Because leading groups in schools is a specialized skill, the…

  13. Board Certification in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Susan L.; Lichtenberg, James W.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Although specialty board certification by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) has been a valued standard for decades, the vast majority of counseling psychologists do not pursue board certification in the specialty. The present article provides a brief history of board certification in general and some historical information about…

  14. Using Meditation in Addiction Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark E.; DeLorenzi, Leigh de Armas; Cunningham, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Meditation has been studied as a way of reducing stress in counseling clients since the 1960s. Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, and new wave behavior therapies incorporate meditation techniques in their programs. This article identifies meditation's curative factors and limitations when using meditation in addiction settings.

  15. Counseling Intervention in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusateri-Vlach, Nancy F.; Moracco, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Recounts the history of cancer treatment to illustrate the long-standing tradition of a holistic approach to the investigation and treatment of cancer, discusses the growing emphasis on holistic cancer treatment and the importance of counseling in such treatment. (Author)

  16. AAPI college students' willingness to seek counseling: the role of culture, stigma, and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Na-Yeun; Miller, Matthew J

    2014-07-01

    This study tested 4 theoretically and empirically derived structural equation models of Asian, Asian American, and Pacific Islanders' willingness to seek counseling with a sample of 278 college students. The models represented competing hypotheses regarding the manner in which Asian cultural values, European American cultural values, public stigma, stigma by close others, self-stigma, and attitudes toward seeking professional help related to willingness to seek counseling. We found that Asian and European American cultural values differentially related to willingness to seek counseling indirectly through specific indirect pathways (public stigma, stigma by close others, self-stigma, and attitudes toward seeking professional help). Our results also showed that the magnitude of model-implied relationships did not vary as a function of generational status. Study limitations, future directions for research, and implications for counseling are discussed.

  17. 24 CFR 214.300 - Counseling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to provide specified types of counseling nationally. (6) All participating agencies that offer group educational sessions must also offer individual counseling on the same topics covered in the group educational... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling services. 214.300...

  18. 75 FR 32496 - Housing Counseling Outcomes Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... counseling agencies seeking assistance to either purchase a home (pre-purchase clients) or to resolve or... months following the recipt of counseling to complete a survey about their conseling experience and their...-funded housing counseling agencies seeking assistance to either purchase a home (pre-purchase clients) or...

  19. Professional Counseling in Taiwan: Past to Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuh-Jen; Wang, Shu-Ching; Combs, Don C.; Lin, Yi-Chun; Johnson, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Because of the recent introduction of a licensure law, professional counseling has grown rapidly in Taiwan after decades of slow development. The authors provide a historical review of the development of professional counseling in Taiwan and discuss the current status and future trajectory of professional counseling in Taiwan.

  20. 24 CFR 206.41 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling. 206.41 Section 206.41... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.41 Counseling. (a) List... receive counseling. (b) Information to be provided. A counselor must discuss with the mortgagor: (1) The...

  1. 20 CFR 638.517 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling. 638.517 Section 638.517 Employees... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.517 Counseling. The center operator shall establish and conduct an ongoing structured counseling program in accordance with procedures issued by the...

  2. Identifying Role Diffusion in School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astramovich, Randall L.; Hoskins, Wendy J.; Gutierrez, Antonio P.; Bartlett, Kerry A.

    2013-01-01

    Role ambiguity in professional school counseling is an ongoing concern despite recent advances with comprehensive school counseling models. The study outlined in this article examined role diffusion as a possible factor contributing to ongoing role ambiguity in school counseling. Participants included 109 graduate students enrolled in a…

  3. 28 CFR 551.113 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 551.113 Section 551.113... Pretrial Inmates § 551.113 Counseling. (a) When consistent with institution security and good order, pretrial inmates may be allowed the opportunity to receive counseling services with convicted inmates. (b...

  4. Guiding the Family: Practical Counseling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Bernice Bronia; McAbee, Harold V.

    This book, intended as a text for therapists and counselors in family counseling, is based on principles of Adlerian psychology. The first chapter examines Adlerian theory and family counseling. Basic principles of individual psychology are applied to family counseling, and the goals of children with disturbing behavior are discussed. Reasons why…

  5. Understanding Philosophical Counseling | Sivil | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    philosophical counseling by exploring its points of convergence to and deviation from its complimentary parts – philosophy and counseling. The practical and applied orientation of philosophical counseling seems worlds apart from what many consider to exemplify philosophy – theoretical, intellectual and abstract concern ...

  6. Outcomes of Career Counseling with Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Linda

    1981-01-01

    Describes a career counseling program for adult females. Reports questionnaire results used to assess the effectiveness of that program. Male as well as female clients seemed to derive both attitudinal and occupational benefits from career counseling and expressed positive views of the career counseling process. (Author)

  7. Counseling in the Elementary Feeder Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Virginia

    This brief paper presents the concept of transition counseling between a junior high school and its feeder school(s), designed to make the change from elementary into junior high less traumatic. Aside from routine sixth grade counseling, the counselors expanded their base of counseling to include all types of problems as well as all grade levels.…

  8. Globalization and Counseling: Professional Issues for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorelle, Sonya; Byrd, Rebekah; Crockett, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Scholars have examined globalization for many years in terms of its impact on individuals, but it remains a concept not often discussed in the counseling literature. As counseling transforms from a Western-based practice to a global phenomenon, it is important to understand professional counseling within an international and multicultural context.…

  9. A Framework for Chaos Theory Career Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Robert G. L.

    2010-01-01

    Theory in career development counselling provides a map that counsellors can use to understand and structure the career counselling process. It also provides a means to communicate this understanding and structuring to their clients as part of the counselling intervention. The chaos theory of careers draws attention to the complexity,…

  10. Counseling in Switzerland: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roslyn; Henning, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    The authors review counseling in Switzerland and compare it with counseling in the United States. They evaluate the role of professional associations and programs and argue that the evolution of counseling is situated within the history and economic, social, and political systems of Switzerland. Findings suggest that Swiss counselors are ready to…

  11. Investigation of the relationship between convenient visits and doctors' fatigue using burnout and work engagement scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yuuki; Hoshiko, Michiko; Morimatsu, Yoshitaka; Mori, Mihoko; Kushino, Nanae; Ishitake, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue caused by high workload is often responsible for the high attrition among doctors, and has contributed to a disruption in community medicine. In order to address this problem, institutional mechanisms at the hospital level are required. Previous studies have shown that systemic measures at the hospital level and a change in the mindset of patients can help manage the problem. "Convenient visits" refer to emergency visits for non-emergency problems. It is an avoidable cause of high workload on doctors. Convenient visits also refer to emergency consultation for non-emergency symptoms. As this is a new phenomenon, its relationship with doctors' fatigue needs further research. We investigated the relationship between convenient visits and doctors' fatigue using burnout and work engagement scales. We selected 44 hospitals, with >200 beds each, in provincial cities of prefectures with a doctor-population ratio lower than the national average. These cities were considered likely to manifest the phenomenon of 24-hour society and include overworked doctors. Ordinance-designated cities were excluded from this study owing to wide population variability. Three doctors from each hospital were randomly selected from among physicians, surgeons, and pediatricians. We distributed questionnaires (a questionnaire concerning convenient visits, Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale) to 132 doctors. Forty-two doctors responded to the survey. The median proportion of convenient visits among emergency visits was 50%. Sixty percent of the doctors surveyed were annoyed by convenient visits. Other doctors indicated good collaboration between the hospitals and communities or that they were not currently annoyed by convenient visits, although they had been annoyed previously. The emotional exhaustion in doctors, who worked in hospitals that did not restrict convenient visits, was significantly higher than in those who worked in hospitals

  12. The effect of the doctor's sex on the doctor-patient relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Judith

    1982-01-01

    The differences between male and female doctors are investigated, and what patients expect from their doctors is examined. Some conclusions are drawn from the preferences which patients express for male and female doctors and from the different outcomes of male and female doctor-patient interactions.

  13. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  14. Standards for the Reporting of Genetic Counseling Interventions in Research and Other Studies (GCIRS): an NSGC Task Force Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Gillian W; Babu, D; Myers, M F; Zierhut, H; McAllister, M

    2017-06-01

    As the demand for evidence to support the value of genetic counseling increases, it is critical that reporting of genetic counseling interventions in research and other types of studies (e.g. process improvement or service evaluation studies) adopt greater rigor. As in other areas of healthcare, the appraisal, synthesis, and translation of research findings into genetic counseling practice are likely to be improved if clear specifications of genetic counseling interventions are reported when studies involving genetic counseling are published. To help improve reporting practices, the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) convened a task force in 2015 to develop consensus standards for the reporting of genetic counseling interventions. Following review by the NSGC Board of Directors, the NSGC Practice Guidelines Committee and the editorial board of the Journal of Genetic Counseling, 23 items across 8 domains were proposed as standards for the reporting of genetic counseling interventions in the published literature (GCIRS: Genetic Counseling Intervention Reporting Standards). The authors recommend adoption of these standards by authors and journals when reporting studies involving genetic counseling interventions.

  15. Evidence, Emotion and Eminence: A Qualitative and Evaluative Analysis of Doctors' Skills in Macroallocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Siun; Little, Miles; Hooker, Claire

    2018-03-24

    In this analysis of the ethical dimensions of doctors' participation in macroallocation we set out to understand the skills they use, how they are acquired, and how they influence performance of the role. Using the principles of grounded moral analysis, we conducted a semi-structured interview study with Australian doctors engaged in macroallocation. We found that they performed expertise as argument, bringing together phronetic and rhetorical skills founded on communication, strategic thinking, finance, and health data. They had made significant, purposeful efforts to gain skills for the role. Our findings challenge common assumptions about doctors' preferences in argumentation, and reveal an unexpected commitment to practical reason. Using the ethics of Paul Ricoeur in our analysis enabled us to identify the moral meaning of doctors' skills and learning. We concluded that Ricoeur's ethics offers an empirically grounded matrix for ethical analysis of the doctor's role in macroallocation that may help to establish norms for procedure.

  16. Factors influencing elderly women's mammography screening decisions: implications for counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Roger B

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although guidelines recommend that clinicians consider life expectancy before screening older women for breast cancer, many older women with limited life expectancies are screened. We aimed to identify factors important to mammography screening decisions among women aged 80 and older compared to women aged 65–79. Methods Telephone surveys of 107 women aged 80+ and 93 women aged 65–79 randomly selected from one academic primary care practice who were able to communicate in English (60% response rate. The survey addressed the following factors in regards to older women's mammography screening decisions: perceived importance of a history of breast disease, family history of breast cancer, doctor's recommendations, habit, reassurance, previous experience, mailed reminder cards, family/friend's recommendations or experience with breast cancer, age, health, and media. The survey also assessed older women's preferred role in decision making around mammography screening. Results Of the 200 women, 65.5% were non-Hispanic white and 82.8% were in good to excellent health. Most (81.3% had undergone mammography in the past 2 years. Regardless of age, older women ranked doctor's recommendations as the most important factor influencing their decision to get screened. Habit and reassurance were the next two highly ranked factors influencing older women to get screened. Among women who did not get screened, women aged 80 and older ranked age and doctor's counseling as the most influential factors and women aged 65–79 ranked a previous negative experience with mammography as the most important factor. There were no significant differences in preferred role in decision-making around mammography screening by age, however, most women in both age groups preferred to make the final decision on their own (46.6% of women aged 80+ and 50.5% of women aged 65–79. Conclusion While a doctor's recommendation is the most important factor influencing

  17. Factors influencing elderly women's mammography screening decisions: implications for counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonberg, Mara A; McCarthy, Ellen P; York, Meghan; Davis, Roger B; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2007-11-16

    Although guidelines recommend that clinicians consider life expectancy before screening older women for breast cancer, many older women with limited life expectancies are screened. We aimed to identify factors important to mammography screening decisions among women aged 80 and older compared to women aged 65-79. Telephone surveys of 107 women aged 80+ and 93 women aged 65-79 randomly selected from one academic primary care practice who were able to communicate in English (60% response rate). The survey addressed the following factors in regards to older women's mammography screening decisions: perceived importance of a history of breast disease, family history of breast cancer, doctor's recommendations, habit, reassurance, previous experience, mailed reminder cards, family/friend's recommendations or experience with breast cancer, age, health, and media. The survey also assessed older women's preferred role in decision making around mammography screening. Of the 200 women, 65.5% were non-Hispanic white and 82.8% were in good to excellent health. Most (81.3%) had undergone mammography in the past 2 years. Regardless of age, older women ranked doctor's recommendations as the most important factor influencing their decision to get screened. Habit and reassurance were the next two highly ranked factors influencing older women to get screened. Among women who did not get screened, women aged 80 and older ranked age and doctor's counseling as the most influential factors and women aged 65-79 ranked a previous negative experience with mammography as the most important factor. There were no significant differences in preferred role in decision-making around mammography screening by age, however, most women in both age groups preferred to make the final decision on their own (46.6% of women aged 80+ and 50.5% of women aged 65-79). While a doctor's recommendation is the most important factor influencing elderly women's mammography screening decisions, habit and reassurance

  18. Speech Communication Education and Classroom Instruction: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1982 (Vol. 43 Nos. 1 through 6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The eight titles deal with the following topics: (1) the effects of self-instructional and discrimination communication training on the development of confrontation skills in prepracticum counseling trainees, (2) cross-cultural…

  19. For People with Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor For People With Osteoporosis: How to Find a Doctor Isabel ... a doctor with expertise in osteoporosis. For many people, finding a doctor who is knowledgeable about osteoporosis ...

  20. Effective Doctoral Education: Interpreting Factors and Outcomes of Success through a New Framework, Autoethnography, and Quantitative Study of Passion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nathan Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this disquisition is to increase knowledge about the factors and outcomes of success in doctoral education. Enhanced understanding about the factors and outcomes of success could help optimize effectiveness of the complex systems that educate doctoral students. To achieve the purpose of this disquisition, three manuscripts were…

  1. SELF-REPORTED HEALTH, ILLNESS AND SELF-CARE AMONG DOCTORS OF MEERUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This document provides insight on lifestyle and healthcare status of doctors based on key findings from a survey conducted in Meerut City, (U.P. India. Objectives: 1.To study the lifestyle pattern among the doctors of Allopathy and Ayurveda & teachers of local private Medical college, local private Dental college. 2. To study the (self-reported prevalence of common non-communicable diseases in the same. 3. To know the pattern of healthy lifestyle practices adopted by the doctors. Material & Methods: The Cross-sectional study was conducted with the help of a pre-designed and pre-tested questionnaire which was filled by the faculty of local private Medical College, Dental college, Ayurvedic doctors and local practicing doctors of allopathy and Ayurveda. Verbal consent was implied. A purposive sample of 240 doctors [60 each from Medical and Dental colleges and 60 each from allopathy private practitioners (p.p.allo. and ayurvedic private practitioners (p.p.ayur.] were given the questionnaire-and response rate was 84%. The data was entered in Microsoft excel 2007 to know the frequency of the various lifestyle pattern. Results: 47.5% of the doctors had raised B.M.I. (Body Mass Index- more than 25; 21% of the doctors were smokers, 10% were current drinkers and 32% were hypertensive. Only 2.5% were found to be diabetic in our study. About 52% of the doctors exercised regularly. 32.5% were trained for yoga. Conclusion:This study implies that a large proportion of doctors themselves do not follow the healthy lifestyle and are having lifestyle diseases like obesity, hypertension etc. Interestingly, there was not much difference between doctors doing private practice or teaching in Medical/Dental College.

  2. Going Online: Helping Technical Communicators Help Translators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Patricia; Lord van Slyke, Melanie; Starke-Meyerring, Doreen; Thompson, Aimee

    1999-01-01

    Explains why technical communicators should help translators. Offers tips for creating "translation-friendly" documentation. Describes the research and design process used by the authors to create an online tutorial that provides technical communicators at a medical technology company the information they need to help them write and…

  3. Counseling Issues: Addressing Behavioral and Emotional Considerations in the Treatment of Communication Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Aaron

    2018-02-06

    Counseling is an important fundamental professional activity and an established component of the speech-language pathology/audiology scope of practice as documented by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2004a, 2016a). Appropriate incorporation of counseling into practice can optimize service provision, help address comorbid behavioral and emotional reactions to communication disorders, and enhance prognosis. Practitioner insecurity in incorporating counseling into practice has been documented by Phillips and Mendel (2008), as well as Atkins (2007). This tutorial seeks to present general counseling constructs and treatment applications primarily utilizing a humanistic counseling perspective. This tutorial incorporated relevant publications from communication disorders and counseling psychology literature databases over a 3-year period. The tutorial evolved through interviews with practicing speech-language pathology practitioners and educators and was undertaken to provide transparency and clarity to support the assertions and recommendations offered. This tutorial organizes and presents general counseling considerations along with specific suggestions, which can help practitioners who are seeking to expand their understanding, skill, and confidence in incorporating counseling into their practice. The tutorial identifies some of the potential and impactful comorbid emotional and behavioral responses to experiencing a communication disorder and/or to the treatment process for the communication disorder issue(s). Theoretically grounded considerations for mitigating such potentially impactful responses are offered. Continued and enhanced efforts may be necessary to meet American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's mandate for universal incorporation of empirically supported counseling approaches and in advancing universal speech-language pathology/audiology training in this area. It is hoped that this tutorial serves as an initial guide for addressing

  4. [Interpersonal games as a method for doctors' occupational stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samborska-Sablik, Anna; Sablik, Zbigniew; Gaszyński, Tomasz; Drożdż, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Doctors are frequently expose to stress during their occupational work. It is mainly the result of burdens caused by taking care of patients, dysfunctional arrangements of the health care system and difficult relationships in their workplace. Chronic stress brings negative emotions and they need to cope with them . Doctors, willing to achieve it, may initiate interpersonal games with the hidden motive of restoring their internal balance. Based on transactional analysis, the authors describe some of the games which may be found in doctors' environment: "How to get out of there", "Mine is better than yours", "Scapegoat", "Fault" and "double bind". The outcome of the games may be receiving a support, proving a benefit derived from stress, getting the feeling of being not guilty, justification, or releasing emotions in apparently unintended way. Interpersonal games may help stressed doctors to get rid of internal tension but at the same time they may be a source of stress for other participants in the games. The way to limit their destructive impact is to create such administrative and organizational solutions which allow to make working conditions more friendly. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  5. Becoming a caregiver: attachment theory and poorly performing doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adshead, Gwen

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, I review a theoretical paradigm (attachment theory) which facilitates an understanding of how human care-giving and care-eliciting behaviours develop and are maintained over the lifespan. I argue that this paradigm has particular utility in: (i) the training of doctors; (ii) understanding why some doctors and medical students experience high levels of stress, and (iii) developing interventions to help those who struggle to manage high levels of work-related stress. I carried out a review of key texts and previously published studies of attachment styles in caregivers. Large-scale epidemiological studies, using valid and reliable measures, show that insecure attachment styles are found in a proportion of normal populations of both males and females. Insecure attachment is associated with impaired stress management and subtle deficits in care-giving sensitivity. It is reasonable to assume that a proportion of students entering medical training and doctors with performance problems may have insecure attachment styles which influence how they approach their training experience and how they manage occupational stress. Attachment theory is a useful paradigm for thinking about training as a professional caregiver. Insecure early attachment experiences may be a risk factor for poor stress management in some medical students and doctors who are exposed to increasing demands as carers. These findings lead to suggestions for possible research and support interventions.

  6. The impact of delivery style on doctors' experience of stress during simulated bad news consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joanne; Brown, Rhonda; Dunn, Stewart

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between doctors' bad news delivery style and their experience of physiological stress during simulated bad news consultations. 31 doctors participated in two simulated breaking bad news (BBN) consultations. Delivery style was categorized as either blunt, forecasting or stalling (i.e. avoidant), based on the time to deliver the bad news and qualitative analysis of the interaction content and doctor's language style. Doctors' heart rate (HR) and skin conductance (SC) were recorded in consecutive 30s epochs. Doctors experienced a significant decrease in HR (F(1,36)=44.9, p.05) or SC (F(2,48)=.66, p>.05). Doctors experience heightened stress in the pre-news delivery phase of breaking bad news interactions. Delaying the delivery of bad news exposes doctors to a longer period of increased stress.This suggests that medical students and doctors should be taught to deliver bad news without delay, to help mitigate their response to this stressful encounter. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. A concordance-based study to assess doctors' and nurses' mental models in Internal Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Blondon

    Full Text Available Interprofessional collaboration between doctors and nurses is based on team mental models, in particular for each professional's roles. Our objective was to identify factors influencing concordance on the expectations of doctors' and nurses' roles and responsibilities in an Internal Medicine ward. Using a dataset of 196 doctor-nurse pairs (14x14 = 196, we analyzed choices and prioritized management actions of 14 doctors and 14 nurses in six clinical nurse role scenarios, and in five doctor role scenarios (6 options per scenario. In logistic regression models with a non-nested correlation structure, we evaluated concordance among doctors and nurses, and adjusted for potential confounders (including prior experience in Internal Medicine, acuteness of case and gender. Concordance was associated with number of female professionals (adjusted OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.73, for acute situations (adjusted OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.13 to 3.62, and in doctor role scenarios (adjusted OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.65. Prior experience and country of training were not significant predictors of concordance. In conclusion, our concordance-based approach helped us identify areas of lower concordance in expected doctor-nurse roles and responsibilities, particularly in non-acute situations, which can be targeted by future interprofessional, educational interventions.

  8. A Handbook for Doctoral Supervisors Stan Taylor and Nigel Beasley A Handbook for Doctoral Supervisors Routledge 256 £24.99 0415335450 0415335450 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    It can often be an enlightening affair to be made aware of the limitations of one's knowledge on a subject in which one is gainfully employed - having read this book, I am grateful for such a salutary experience. As a doctoral supervisor, I feel justified in considering myself better informed and equipped to perform a role for which, there is very little contemporary literature available. The manner in which Taylor and Beasley have comprehensively tackled this omission, going beyond the usual checklist for supervisors, is a huge strength of the book, bringing to life the real world of doctoral supervision. This text is a timely publication given the momentous changes of the past decade in terms of the doctorate, modes and methods of study, the candidate population and new demands upon supervisors. Although the book appears to be primarily written for a UK audience it is relevant to all those involved in helping the doctoral candidate achieve their goal.

  9. Summary of the report Asn n. 2006 E.N.S.T.R. 019 - I.G.A.S. n. R.M. 2007-015 P. on the radiotherapy accident occurring at Epinal, presented by Guillaume WACK (Asn) and the doctor Francoise LALANDE, member of the General Inspection of social affairs, with the help of Marc David SELIGMAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    In may 2004, the protocol of conformal radiotherapy applied to the prostate tumors has been modified. The change concerned the use of dynamic wedges in place of static wedges. This change supposed to change also the parameters of the calculation of irradiation intensity but this will not be made for some patients. This error could be corrected if the in vivo dosimetry had been kept and if the calculation of the number of monitors units had been maintained. 23 patients were submitted to an overexposure between the 6. may 2004 and the 1. august 2005. The first symptoms appeared in january 2005. The patients consulted their personal practitioner who sent them to a gastro-enterologist. The endoscopy revealed the existence of a rectitis which went by aggravating. In August, 2005 they were ten patients with severe hurts. During summer 2005, a radiotherapist doctor and a radio physicist found the error of overdose, They warned the manager of the hospital who warned in her turn, the D.D.A.S.S. (department direction of sanitary and social affairs) and A.R.H. (regional authority of hospitalization). Only seven patients were informed of the overdose, the sixteen other ones supposed wrongly unhurt, were not informed about the accident. The national authorities (I.R.S.N.) were warned in july 2006. Between september 2005 and september 2006 four patients died. Ten patients had severe damages, nine a moderate one. The report gives some propositions to avoid these kind of accidents in the future. (N.C.)

  10. Intersectionality research in counseling psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzanka, Patrick R; Santos, Carlos E; Moradi, Bonnie

    2017-10-01

    This article introduces the special section on intersectionality research in counseling psychology. Across the 4 manuscripts that constitute this special section, a clear theme emerges: a need to return to the roots and politics of intersectionality. Importantly, the 2 empirical articles in this special section (Jerald, Cole, Ward, & Avery, 2017; Lewis, Williams, Peppers, & Gadson, 2017) are studies of Black women's experiences: a return, so to speak, to the subject positions and social locations from which intersectionality emanates. Shin et al. (2017) explore why this focus on Black feminist thought and social justice is so important by highlighting the persistent weaknesses in how much research published in leading counseling psychology journals has tended to use intersectionality as a way to talk about multiple identities, rather than as a framework for critiquing systemic, intersecting forms of oppression and privilege. Shin and colleagues also point to the possibilities intersectionality affords us when scholars realize the transformative potential of this critical framework. Answers to this call for transformative practices are foregrounded in Moradi and Grzanka's (2017) contribution, which surveys the interdisciplinary literature on intersectionality and presents a series of guidelines for using intersectionality responsibly. We close with a discussion of issues concerning the applications of intersectionality to counseling psychology research that spans beyond the contributions of each manuscript in this special section. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Medical Paraclinical Standards, Political Economy of Clinic, and Patients’ Clinical Dependency; A Critical Conversation Analysis of Clinical Counseling in South of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalateh Sadati, Ahmad; Iman, Mohammad Taghi; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite its benefits and importance, clinical counseling affects the patient both psychosocially and socially. Illness labeling not only leads to many problems for patient and his/her family but also it imposes high costs to health care system. Among various factors, doctor-patient relationship has an important role in the clinical counseling and its medical approach. The goal of this study is to evaluate the nature of clinical counseling based on critical approach. Methods: The context of research is the second major medical training center in Shiraz, Iran. In this study, Critical Conversation Analysis was used based on the methodologies of critical theories. Among about 50 consultation meetings digitally recorded, 33 were selected for this study. Results: Results show that the nature of doctor-patient relationship in these cases is based on paternalistic model. On the other hand, in all consultations, the important values that were legitimated with physicians were medical paraclinical standards. Paternalism in one hand and standardization on the other leads to dependency of patients to the clinic. Conclusion: Although we can’t condone the paraclinical standards, clinical counseling and doctor-patient relationship need to reduce its dominance over counseling based on interpretation of human relations, paying attention to social and economical differences of peoples and biosocial and biocultural differences, and focusing on clinical examinations. Also, we need to accept that medicine is an art of interaction that can’t reduce it to instrumental and linear methods of body treatment. PMID:25349858

  12. Medical paraclinical standards, political economy of clinic, and patients' clinical dependency; a critical conversation analysis of clinical counseling in South of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalateh Sadati, Ahmad; Iman, Mohammad Taghi; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran

    2014-07-01

    Despite its benefits and importance, clinical counseling affects the patient both psychosocially and socially. Illness labeling not only leads to many problems for patient and his/her family but also it imposes high costs to health care system. Among various factors, doctor-patient relationship has an important role in the clinical counseling and its medical approach. The goal of this study is to evaluate the nature of clinical counseling based on critical approach. The context of research is the second major medical training center in Shiraz, Iran. In this study, Critical Conversation Analysis was used based on the methodologies of critical theories. Among about 50 consultation meetings digitally recorded, 33 were selected for this study. RESULTS show that the nature of doctor-patient relationship in these cases is based on paternalistic model. On the other hand, in all consultations, the important values that were legitimated with physicians were medical paraclinical standards. Paternalism in one hand and standardization on the other leads to dependency of patients to the clinic. Although we can't condone the paraclinical standards, clinical counseling and doctor-patient relationship need to reduce its dominance over counseling based on interpretation of human relations, paying attention to social and economical differences of peoples and biosocial and biocultural differences, and focusing on clinical examinations. Also, we need to accept that medicine is an art of interaction that can't reduce it to instrumental and linear methods of body treatment.

  13. Can "patient keeper" help in-patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinnawi, M F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present our "Patient Keeper" application, which is a client-server medical application. "Patient Keeper" is designed to run on a mobile phone for the client application and on a PC for the server application using J2ME and JAVA2, respectively. This application can help doctors during visits to their patients in hospitals. The client application allows doctors to store on their mobile phones the results of their diagnoses and findings such as temperature, blood pressure, medications, analysis, etc., and send this information to the server via short message service (SMS) for storage in a database. The server can also respond to any request from the client and send the result via Bluetooth, infrared, or over the air. Experimental results showed a significant improvement of the healthcare delivery and reduction for in-patient stay.

  14. Financial Stress, Financial Literacy, Counselling and the Risk of Homelessness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Steen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Poor financial literacy may lead to poor life choices. These life choices can create or contribute to financial stress with adverse consequences - not the least of which may be homelessness. These issues are relatively well understood, but there is limited research on the link between financial stress, financial literacy and counselling, and homelessness. Specifically, there has been little research on how improved financial literacy and appropriate financial counselling might help to prevent homelessness. This paper synthesises existing literature on this topic and considers these issues using the ABCX family stress model of Hill (1958 using data from an Australian program aimed at alleviating family homelessness, the Home Advice Program. We provide evidence that suggests that case management and support which incorporates financial counselling and financial literacy can assist in moderating the impact of financial stress and help those at risk of homelessness. The findings have implications for public policy in the areas of financial education, consumer finance, and social services provision.

  15. Which female cancer patients fail to receive fertility counseling before treatment in the state of Georgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Helen B; Howards, Penelope P; Kramer, Michael R; Mertens, Ann C; Spencer, Jessica B

    2016-12-01

    To assess which characteristics are associated with failure to receive fertility counseling among a cohort of young women diagnosed with cancer. Population-based cohort study. Not applicable. A total of 1,282 cancer survivors, of whom 1,116 met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. None. The main outcome in this study was whether or not women reported receiving any information at the time of their cancer diagnosis on how cancer treatment might affect their ability to become pregnant. Forty percent of cancer survivors reported that they did not receive fertility counseling at the time of cancer diagnosis. Women were more likely to fail to receive counseling if they had only a high school education or less or if they had given birth. Cancer-related variables that were associated with a lack of counseling included not receiving chemotherapy as part of treatment and diagnosis with certain cancer types. Counseling about the risk of infertility and available fertility preservation options is important to cancer patients. Additionally, counseling can make women aware of other adverse reproductive outcomes, such as early menopause and its associated symptoms. Less-educated women and parous women are at particular risk of not getting fertility-related information. Programs that focus on training not just the oncologist, but also other health care providers involved with cancer care, to provide fertility counseling may help to expand access. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. African American Women’s Limited Knowledge and Experiences with Genetic Counseling for Hereditary Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Vanessa B.; Graves, Kristi D.; Christopher, Juleen; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Talley, Costellia; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast cancer have the potential benefit of early detection and early interventions in African American women. However, African American women have low use of these services compared to White women. We conducted two focus groups with African American women diagnosed with breast cancer (affected group, n=13) and women with at least one first-degree relative with breast/ovarian cancer (unaffected group, n= 8). A content analysis approach was employed to analyze interview data. Breast cancer survivors had more knowledge about genetic counseling and testing than participants who were unaffected with cancer. However, knowledge about genetic counseling was limited in both groups. Barriers to pursuing genetic counseling and testing included poor understanding of the genetic counseling and testing process, fear of carrying the mutation, concerns about discrimination, and cost. Motivators to participate in genetic counseling and testing included desire to help family members, insurance coverage, and potential of benefiting the larger African American community. Education efforts are needed to increase genetic counseling and testing awareness in the African American community. PMID:24186304

  17. African American women's limited knowledge and experiences with genetic counseling for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Vanessa B; Graves, Kristi D; Christopher, Juleen; Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Talley, Costellia; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2014-06-01

    Genetic counseling and testing for hereditary breast cancer have the potential benefit of early detection and early interventions in African American women. However, African American women have low use of these services compared to White women. We conducted two focus groups with African American women diagnosed with breast cancer (affected group, n = 13) and women with at least one first-degree relative with breast/ovarian cancer (unaffected group, n = 8). A content analysis approach was employed to analyze interview data. Breast cancer survivors had more knowledge about genetic counseling and testing than participants who were unaffected with cancer. However, knowledge about genetic counseling was limited in both groups. Barriers to pursuing genetic counseling and testing included poor understanding of the genetic counseling and testing process, fear of carrying the mutation, concerns about discrimination, and cost. Motivators to participate in genetic counseling and testing included desire to help family members, insurance coverage, and potential of benefiting the larger African American community. Education efforts are needed to increase genetic counseling and testing awareness in the African American community.

  18. Urgent need of a doctor

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    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON (24H/24H): 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY r...

  19. Urgent Need of a Doctor

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    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCE (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 POLICE 117 ANTI POISON CENTRE (24H/24H) 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL  112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04.50-49-65-83 MATERNITY Rue Am&...

  20. Urgent Need of a Doctor

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    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 PAEDIATRIC EMERGENCIES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 • HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCE (GENEVE AND VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 POLICE 117 ANTI POISON CENTRE (24H/24H) 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL  112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: • HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04.50-49-65-83 MATERNITY Rue Am...

  1. Urgent need of a doctor

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    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or : SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or : ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTS Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON 24H/24H: 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL : 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 1...

  2. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

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    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or: SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or: ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON: 24H/24H 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 17 r...

  3. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

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    GENEVE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor Or : SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) 022 748-49-50 Or : ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (07H-23H) 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest 022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES PEDIATRIQUES 30 Bd de la Cluse 022 382-45-55 MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest 022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer 022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 022 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES ADULTES Meyrin 022 719-66-80 EMERGENCIES: AMBULANCES (GENEVE ET VAUD) 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 022 767-44-44 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON: 24H/24H 01-251-51-51 EUROPEAN EMERGENCY CALL: 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-65 EMERGENCIES rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-65-83 MATERNITY rue Amédée VIII de Savoie 04-50-49-66-07 HOPITAL D'ANNEMASSE 17 rue du Jura, Ambilly 04-50-87-47-47 EMERGENCIES 17 rue...

  4. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    GENEVA PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor  Or SOS MEDECINS (24H/24H) Or ASSOC. MEDECINS DE GENEVE (7H-23H) 022 748-49-50 022 322-20-20 PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL CANTONAL 24 Micheli du Crest  022 372-33-11 / 022 382-33-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES  30 Bd de la Cluse  022 382-45-55  MATERNITY 24 Micheli du Crest  022 382-68-16 / 022 382-33-11 CLINIQUE OPHTALMOLOGIQUE 22 Alcide Jentzer  022 382-84-00 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR  Meyrin  022 719-61-11 URGENCES ADULTES  Meyrin  022 719-66-80  URGENCES : AMBULANCE (GENEVE ET VAUD) : 144 FIRE BRIGADE CERN 767-44-44  FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CENTRE ANTI-POISON 24H/24H  01-251-51-510 APPEL D'URGENCE EUROPEEN 112 FRANCE PATIENT NOT FIT TO BE MOVED: Call your family doctor (ou­or 15) PATIENT CAN BE MOVED: HOPITAL DE ST. JULIEN  Rue Amédée VIII de Savoie&a...

  5. Doctor's dilemma (medical decision making)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    Disagreement between experts is presumed to be uncommon in medical diagnosis. Radiology is considered to be a particularly objective means of diagnosis and expert radiographic interpretation is expected to be infallible. Five military radiologists were made to review independently chest radiographs of 1256 patients recorded in four image formats and interpret each as positive or negative for tuberculosis. The results were unexpected. Ability to detect tuberculosis varied little between various image formats but the extent of disagreement between doctors was remarkable. The number of cases judged positive varied from 56 to 100 among the five readers. Of cases judged positive at least once, the mean rate of disagreement between pairs of readers was 19%. The validity of these findings have been confirmed repeatedly in several subsequent trials. Other diagnostic modalities show equally surprising rates of diagnostic dissonance. Extensive observer disagreement was found to be a universal problem in medical diagnosis, giving credence to the proverbial adage that 'no two doctors agree'. The magnitude of disagreement between experts is the principal theoretic problem of diagnosis. Even a stochastic theory of diagnosis is devised which accounts for the disagreement between experts, where the disagreement approaches a theoretic maximum even for ideal diagnosticians

  6. Doctor shopping: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Hall, Joanne M

    2012-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a significant problem in the United States that poses a serious health risk to Americans and is therefore significant to the field of nursing. The prescription drugs that are designated in the United States as having abuse potential are called controlled or scheduled drugs. The most common types of abused prescription drugs are benzodiazepines prescribed for anxiety, opioids prescribed for pain, and stimulants prescribed for attention deficit disorder. These prescription drugs are abused by taking larger doses than prescribed for nonmedical use to achieve a high or euphoric feeling, or are sold illicitly for profit. In 2009, there were 2.4 million nonmedical users of prescription opioids in the United States. These prescription drugs are often obtained by seeing multiple prescribers, often under false pretenses or with complicity from the prescribers that leads to abuse and illicit sales. The term doctor shopping has been used not only to refer to this phenomenon but has also had other meanings throughout the past decades. Thus, concept analysis is the focus of this article for clarification using the Walker and Avant method. Health implications and suggestions for minimizing doctor shopping are included.

  7. Doctoral education in a successful ecological niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; Lund, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly communities are dependent on and often measured by their ability to attract and develop doctoral students. Recent literature suggests that most scholarly communities entail ecological niches in which the doctoral students learn the codes and practices of research. In this article, we...... successful doctoral education because it: 1) fleshes out the professional attitude that is necessary for becoming a successful researcher in the department, 2) shapes and adapts the doctoral students’ desires to grasp and identify with the department’s practices, and 3) provides the doctoral students...... explore the microclimate in an ecological niche of doctoral education. Based on a theoretical definition of microclimate as the emotional atmosphere that ties group members together and affects their actions, we conducted a case study that aimed to describe the key features of the microclimate...

  8. Women who doctor shop for prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Julie; Thomas, Sandra P

    2014-04-01

    Doctor shopping is a term used to describe a form of diversion of prescription drugs when patients visit numerous prescribers to obtain controlled drugs for illicit use. Gender differences exist in regard to prescription drug abuse and methods of diversion. The purpose of this phenomenological study guided by the existential philosophy of Merleau-Ponty was to understand the lived experience of female doctor shoppers. Interviews were conducted with 14 women, which were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Included in the findings are figural aspects of the participants' experience of doctor shopping related to the existential grounds of world, time, body, and others. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) feeding the addiction, (b) networking with addicts, (c) playing the system, and (d) baiting the doctors. The findings suggest several measures that nurses can take to reduce the incidence of doctor shopping and to provide better care for female doctor shoppers.

  9. Pharmaceutical counseling: Between evidence-based medicine and profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, S N; Akhmetova, T

    2015-01-01

    The number of pharmacies, which produce drug formulations locally, has recently considerably reduced in Russia. Pharmacies mainly operate as retailers of industrially manufactured drugs.Pharmaceutical consultation of customers at pharmacies aimed at responsible self-medication is the most popular and accessible feature of pharmaceutical care. In Russia there is a significant list of medicines approved for sale in pharmacies on a non-prescription basis that is specified in the product label. In this regard, the role of pharmacists in public health in Russia increases. Pharmacist, working directly with population, is an important figure for the rational use of medicines. This type of work requires high level of professional training and appropriate ethics. To explore the current status of pharmaceutical counseling in Russia. Situation analysis, surveys of pharmacists. Our experience in the system of postgraduate professional education, the results of the survey of pharmacists, and the long-term dialogue with pharmacists allowed us to identify several unresolved issues in the work of a pharmacist selling non-prescription drugs.Lack of differentiation in the functions of a pharmacist with a higher education and pharmaceutical technologist: In production/industrial pharmacy technicians are engaged in manufacturing of pharmaceutical formulations. However, due to the loss of production functions technologists had to move away from production laboratories of apothecaries to the sales area. Currently, the apothecary's assignment to receive prescriptions and dispense medications can be fulfilled by either a pharmacist or a pharmaceutical technician. It significantly discerns the pharmacy from the medical organization with clearly delineated functions of doctors and nurses. Russian regulations should consider the level of education required for high-quality pharmaceutical counseling.Contradiction between the pharmacist's special functions and trade procedure with the lack of

  10. Identifying poor performance among doctors in NHS organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Scallan, Samantha; Leach, Camilla; Rickenbach, Mark

    2013-10-01

    To account for the means by which poor performance among career doctors is identified by National Health Service organizations, whether the tools are considered effective and how these processes may be strengthened in the light of revalidation and the requirement for doctors to demonstrate their fitness to practice. This study sought to look beyond the 'doctor as individual'; as well as considering the typical approaches to managing the practice of an individual, the systems within which the doctor is working were reviewed, as these are also relevant to standards of performance. A qualitative review was undertaken consisting of a literature review of current practice, a policy review of current documentation from 15 trusts in one deanery locality, and 14 semi-structured interviews with respondents with an overview of processes in use. The framework for the analysis of the data considered tools at three levels: individual, team and organizational. Tools are, in the main, reactive--with an individual focus. They rely on colleagues and others to speak out, so their effectiveness is hindered by a reluctance to do so. Tools can lack an evidence base for their use, and there is limited linking of data across contexts and tools. There is more work to be done in evaluating current tools and developing stronger processes. Linkage between data sources needs to be improved and proactive tools at the organizational level need further development to help with the early identification of performance issues. This would also assist in balancing a wider systems approach with a current over emphasis on individual doctors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The effectiveness of telephone counselling and internet- and text-message-based support for smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Ettrup, Lise S; Dalum, Peter; Bech, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    counselling group compared with the booklet group (7.3% vs. 3.6%, OR=2.2 (95% CI 1.2-4.0)), There was no clear evidence of a difference in prolonged abstinence between the reactive telephone counselling group or the internet-based smoking cessation program and the booklet group: 1.8% vs. 3.6%, OR=0.8 (95% CI...... 0.6-1.2) and 5.3% vs. 3.6%, OR=1.6 (95% CI 0.8-3.0) respectively. In the proactive telephone counselling group, the cost per additional 12-month quitter compared with the booklet group was £644. CONCLUSIONS: Proactive telephone counselling was more effective than a self-help booklet in achieving......AIM: To compare the effectiveness of proactive telephone counselling, reactive telephone counselling and an internet- and text messages-based intervention with a self-help booklet for smoking cessation. DESIGN: A randomised controlled trial with equal allocation to four conditions: 1) Proactive...

  12. The Cape doctor 1807-1910: perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Howard

    2004-01-01

    This chapter contrasts the Cape doctor in 1807 and in 1910, and finds that, in a whole variety of ways, the differences between the two were not of degree but of kind. Underlying this sea-change was the germ revolution of the late Victorian era, which transformed the Cape doctor out of all recognition, thereby laying important foundations for the development of the twentieth-century South African doctor.

  13. Medication communication between nurses and doctors for paediatric acute care: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrott, Narelle; Kinney, Sharon; Newall, Fiona; Williams, Allison; Cranswick, Noel; Wong, Ian; Manias, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    To examine how communication between nurses and doctors occurred for managing medications in inpatient paediatric settings. Communication between health professionals influences medication incidents' occurrence and safe care. An ethnographic study was undertaken. Semi-structured interviews, observations and focus groups were conducted in three clinical areas of an Australian tertiary paediatric hospital. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using the Medication Communication Model. The actual communication act revealed health professionals' commitment to effective medication management and the influence of professional identities on medication communication. Nurses and doctors were dedicated to providing safe, effective medication therapy for children, within their scope of practice and perceived role responsibilities. Most nurses and junior doctors used tentative language in their communication while senior doctors tended to use direct language. Irrespective of language style, nurses actively engaged with doctors to promote patients' needs. Yet, the medical hierarchical structure, staffing and attendant expectations influenced communication for medication management, causing frustration among nurses and doctors. Doctors' lack of verbal communication of documented changes to medication orders particularly troubled nurses. Nurses persisted in their efforts to acquire appropriate orders for safe medication administration to paediatric patients. Collaborative practice between nurses and doctors involved complex, symbiotic relationships. Their dedication to providing safe medication therapy to paediatric patients facilitated effective medication management. At times, shortcomings in interdisciplinary communication impacted on potential and actual medication incidents. Understanding of the complexities affecting medication communication between nurses and doctors helps to ensure interprofessional respect for each other's roles and inherent demands

  14. Call for change in prenatal counseling for Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Linda L; McCabe, Edward R B

    2012-03-01

    The American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A is to be congratulated for taking a leadership role by publishing a number of papers challenging the status quo of prenatal counseling for Down syndrome and of care for children and adults with Down syndrome. Parents want to know about the future abilities and potential of their fetus with Down syndrome, not simply negative medical information that may be outdated. Those providing counseling and those providing medical care could benefit from contact with individuals with Down syndrome outside the medical context. It is imperative that each person with Down syndrome be viewed as a unique individual with particular talents. Medical care providers should work with parents to help the child or adult with Down syndrome reach his/her goals. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Doctoral education in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2013-01-01

    Doctoral education is a major priority for European universities. In the context of the Bologna Process the importance of doctoral education as the third cycle of higher education and the first stage of a young researchers career, and thus in linking the European Higher Education and Research Areas, was first highlighted in the 2003 Berlin Report. The core component of doctoral training is the advancement of knowledge through original research. considering the need for structured doctoral programs and the need for transparent supervision and assessment, we note that the normal workload of the third cycle in most countries would correspond 3-4 years full time. This is spirit of the new Spanish Doctoral Law. Then, universities should ensure that their doctoral programmes promote interdisciplinary training and the development of transferable skills, thus meeting the needs of the wider employment market. We need to achieve and overall increase in the numbers of doctoral candidates taking up research careers as early stage researchers and also increase the employability as a normal way as it is the case of other advance countries. In Spain, universities with doctoral nuclear programmes and the CIEMAT, with the sponsorship of the nuclear sector, a doctoral school in nuclear science and engineering should be created to enhance the research careers of Young students for the future of nuclear activities in Spain. (Author)

  16. The genomic era and serious mental illness: a potential application for psychiatric genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jehannine C; Honer, William G

    2007-02-01

    Genetic counseling is an important clinical service that is routinely offered to families affected by genetic disorders or by complex disorders for which genetic testing is available. It is not yet routinely offered to individuals with serious mental illnesses and their families, but recent findings that beliefs about the cause of mental illness can affect an individual's adaptation to the illness suggest that genetic counseling may be a useful intervention for this population. In a genetic counseling session the counselor discusses genetic and environmental contributors to disease pathogenesis; helps individuals explore conceptions, fears, and adaptive strategies; and provides nondirective support for decision making. Expected outcomes may include reductions in fear, stigma, and guilt associated with a psychiatric diagnosis; improvements in adherence to prescribed medications; declines in risk behaviors; and reductions in misconceptions about the illness. The authors endorse a multidisciplinary approach in which a psychiatrist and genetic counselor collaborate to provide comprehensive psychiatric genetic counseling.

  17. Kesahan dan Kebolehpercayaan Modul I-Sc (Islamic Spiritual Counseling ke atas Pelajar Bermasalah Tingkah Laku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD NOOR SAPER

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a counselling module based on Islamic perspective namely ‘Islamic Spiritual Counselling Module”’(i-SCM. This module was based on model of Tazkiyat al-Nafs by Imam Ghazali. Validity test was conducted based on assessments from various experts of psychology, counselling and religious fields. Reliability test was conducted on 46 secondary school students in one school. Results obtained showed that the overall reliability coefficient of this module was very high; Cronbach Alpha 0.927. Feedback from the respondents on the module was positive. This study could help expand further religion-related counseling module to assist counsellors in dealing with adolescents’ social problems.

  18. Doctors' learning experiences in end-of-life care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Anette; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti

    2017-01-01

    death could even be welcomed. Through challenging dialogues dealing with family members’ hope and trust, they learnt how to adjust words and decisions according to family and patient’s life story. Interdisciplinary role models helped them balance uncertainty and competence in the intermediate position......Background: Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life...... care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors’ learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. Methods: House officers in nursing homes (n = 16) participated in three focus group interviews. Interviews were audiotaped...

  19. Hospitalized children's representations of their relationship with nurses and doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsano, Paola; Majorano, Marinella; Vignola, Valentina; Cardinale, Elisa; Izzi, Giancarlo; Nuzzo, Maria Josè

    2013-09-01

    This article reports an explorative study which aims to investigate hospitalized children's views of their relationships with nurses and doctors. Twenty-seven school-aged children and adolescents from 6 to 15 years old in the paediatric haematology and oncology ward of an Italian hospital participated in the study. Each participant was asked to draw him or herself with a doctor or nurse from the ward while they were doing something. The drawings were analysed using Pictorial Assessment of Interpersonal Relationships (PAIR) and a qualitative analysis. The results showed that the participants viewed their relationships with health professionals positively, in particular with the nurses. This relationship was perceived as close, intimate, cohesive and without conflict. In some cases it became an emotional bond. Finally, this relationship helped the patients to cope with painful and uncomfortable medical procedures, which gradually became familiar and accepted. The clinical implications of this study are discussed.

  20. Multiple and multidimensional transitions from trainee to trained doctor: a qualitative longitudinal study in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lisi; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Morrison, Jill; Muldoon, Janine; Needham, Gillian; Siebert, Sabina; Rees, Charlotte

    2017-12-01

    To explore trainee doctors' experiences of the transition to trained doctor, we answer three questions: (1) What multiple and multidimensional transitions (MMTs) are experienced as participants move from trainee to trained doctor? (2) What facilitates and hinders doctors' successful transition experiences? (3) What is the impact of MMTs on trained doctors? A qualitative longitudinal study underpinned by MMT theory. Four training areas (health boards) in the UK. 20 doctors, 19 higher-stage trainees within 6 months of completing their postgraduate training and 1 staff grade, associate specialist or specialty doctor, were recruited to the 9-month longitudinal audio-diary (LAD) study. All completed an entrance interview, 18 completed LADs and 18 completed exit interviews. Data were analysed cross-sectionally and longitudinally using thematic Framework Analysis. Participants experienced a multiplicity of expected and unexpected, positive and negative work-related transitions (eg, new roles) and home-related transitions (eg, moving home) during their trainee-trained doctor transition. Factors facilitating or inhibiting successful transitions were identified at various levels: individual (eg, living arrangements), interpersonal (eg, presence of supportive relationships), systemic (eg, mentoring opportunities) and macro (eg, the curriculum provided by Medical Royal Colleges). Various impacts of transitions were also identified at each of these four levels: individual (eg, stress), interpersonal (eg, trainees' children spending more time in childcare), systemic (eg, spending less time with patients) and macro (eg, delayed start in trainees' new roles). Priority should be given to developing supportive relationships (both formal and informal) to help trainees transition into their trained doctor roles, as well as providing more opportunities for learning. Further longitudinal qualitative research is now needed with a longer study duration to explore transition journeys for

  1. Counseling activity in single-session online counseling with adolescents: an adherence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardon, Lydia; Bagraith, Karl S; King, Robert John

    2011-09-01

    While online counseling is increasingly utilized, little is known about what counseling work takes place in the online environment. The aim of this study was to quantify online counseling activity by determining counselors' adherence to the widely used model in which they had been trained. Transcripts (n=85) of online counseling with adolescents were evaluated, using a standardized and psychometrically sound instrument. We found that, while counseling in 53% of transcripts progressed through each of the key stages of counseling, the focus of most sessions was information gathering; and goal exploration and action planning were typically superficial and often absent. Possible reasons for low counseling depth are discussed and recommendations made for the further development of online counseling.

  2. Counseling on Sun Protection and Indoor Tanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Sophie J; Gottschlich, Elizabeth A; Holman, Dawn M; Watson, Meg

    2017-12-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends clinical counseling for individuals ages 10 to 24 years to decrease skin cancer risk. A national, random sample of US American Academy of Pediatrics members practicing primary care in 2002 (response rate 55%) and 2015 (response rate 43%). Surveys explored attitudes and experiences regarding sun protection counseling; indoor tanning questions were added in 2015. χ 2 tests compared demographics and counseling responses across years, and multivariable logistic regression models examined counseling predictors. More pediatricians in 2015 (34%) than in 2002 (23%) reported discussing sun protection during recent summer months with ≥75% of patients. This pattern held across all patient age groups (each P tanning at least once with 10 to 13 year-old patients; approximately half discussed this with older adolescents. Most (70%) did not know if their states had laws on minors' indoor tanning access; those stating they knew whether a law existed counseled more. Although improved, sun protection counseling rates remain low. Indoor tanning counseling can be improved. Because early-life exposure to UV radiation increases risk and clinician counseling can positively impact prevention behaviors, pediatricians have an important role in skin cancer prevention; counseling may save lives. Time constraints remain a barrier. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Genetic Counseling: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Craniosynostosis as a clinical and diagnostic problem: molecular pathology and... Article: GENETICS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Genetic counseling for congenital ... March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation Also in Spanish ...

  4. Persisting Dreams: The Impact of the Doctoral Socialization Process on Latina Post-Doctoral Career Aspirations

    OpenAIRE

    Westerband, Yamissette

    2016-01-01

    Latinas are underrepresented within the professorate and within doctoral programs, particularly within Research Intensive Institutions. This dissertation explores how the doctoral socialization process impacts the pipeline from the Ph.D. to scholarly careers for Latinas in Research universities. Given the low numbers of representation and production at the doctoral level for Latinas, what happens when they do enter Ph.D. programs? Their doctoral experience must be marked in one way or anot...

  5. Experiences of counselling in the emergency department during the waiting period: importance of family participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavilainen, Eija; Salminen-Tuomaala, Mari; Kurikka, Sirpa; Paussu, Paula

    2009-08-01

    To describe patients' experiences of counselling, defined as information giving and advice by nursing staff, in the emergency department. A particular focus was on the waiting period and on the importance of family participation in counselling. Counselling is a widely studied topic in nursing. Too little is known about counselling in emergency departments and especially about participation of family members and suitability of counselling for the patient's life situation. Descriptive quantitative study. Data were collected by questionnaires from patients (n = 107) visiting a hospital emergency department. The data were subjected to statistical analysis. Forty-two per cent of patients arrived at the emergency department with a family member: spouse or cohabiting partner, mother, father or daughter. Patients were fairly satisfied with the counselling. The presence of a family member was important to the majority of patients (75%). About half of the patients wanted information concerning their illness, condition and treatment to be given to their family members. Those visiting the department with a family member were more satisfied with counselling and felt that it promoted their participation in care. It is to encourage patients' family members to participate in counselling situations in emergency departments. However, the type of information passed on to family members should be carefully discussed and prepared. Patients' family members seem to be important partners in counselling situations. The presence of family members supports patients in the emergency department during the waiting period and helps them orientate in their situation. When family members are present, issues which patients wish to discuss should be carefully planned. Family presence should be encouraged in emergency departments.

  6. General Counsel`s office FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.10.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, S.R.

    1994-09-01

    The General Counsel`s office provides legal counsel to all levels of WHC management; administers the intellectual property program; coordinates all WHC investigative activity and supports WHC activities to ensure compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, DOE directives, contractual provisions, and other requirements. In so doing, the Office of General Counsel supports the Hanford site mission of transforming the Hanford site into an environmentally attractive and economically sustainable community. This document briefs the FY95 site support plan.

  7. When doctors cross the line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, M K

    1994-05-01

    Everybody's doing it. Lawyers. Professors. Yes, even doctors. Professionals in positions of authority and trust are taking a closer look at how they relate to their clients, students, or patients. Perhaps it all started with Anita Hill, the woman who sounded the wake-up call that was heard around America with the message that sexual harassment, even sexual innuendo, will no longer be tolerated. It's a new day and age. Today, for ethical as well as practical reasons, some bar associations (including Minnesota's) are warning lawyers not to have sex with clients, and many colleges are forbidding professors from getting involved with students. The American Medical Association and state medical boards are also re-evaluating the rules, because in today's climate even something as simple as a pat on the knee can get a physician in trouble.

  8. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  9. Doctoral research on cadastral development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagdas, Volkan; Stubkjær, Erik

    2009-01-01

    of the countries concerned. The cadastre, however, is the core of both systems as it provides for systematic and official descriptions of land parcels or real property units. The research mentioned often has a development perspective, and in this article we will motivate the introduction of the research domain...... of cadastral development. This research is multi-disciplinary and draws on elements of theories and methodologies from the natural, the social, the behavioral, and the formal sciences. During the last decade or so, doctoral dissertations have come to constitute a substantial part of this research effort...... with a call for a shared terminology and a shared set of concepts which may contribute to further theory building within the cadastral domain. Udgivelsesdato: OCT...

  10. A national benchmarking survey of student counselling centres/units ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study further found that the majority of counselling centres/units had one or more staff members with specialised training in areas such as HIV/AIDS counselling, sexual abuse counselling and multicultural counselling. In 2007, these counselling centres/units saw on average 18 per cent of enrolled students as ...

  11. 15 CFR 0.735-38 - Availability for counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability for counseling. 0.735-38... AND CONDUCT Administration § 0.735-38 Availability for counseling. (a) The General Counsel of the... part; and (3) Coordinate the counseling services provided under this part and assure that counseling...

  12. Current Institutional Trends in Research Productivity in Counseling Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelman, Nathan M.; Uffelman, Rachel A.; Wagner, Kimberly S.; Diegelman, Sally A.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated institutional publication activity in counseling psychology journals for the 10-year period from 1993 to 2002. Four journals reported by counseling psychology training directors as prime publication outlets for the field of counseling psychology were used: "Journal of Counseling Psychology," "The Counseling Psychologist,"…

  13. Australian doctors and the visual arts. Part 3. Doctor-artists in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D G

    1986-06-09

    The contribution of doctors to the visual arts is being discussed in a series of six articles. The first two articles dealt with doctors and the visual arts in New South Wales. In this, the third, doctor-artists in Victoria are discussed.

  14. Inequality and Doctoral Education: Exploring the "Rules" of Doctoral Study through Bourdieu's Notion of Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopaul, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    While studies have examined a myriad of issues in doctoral study, much of this research has not employed the tools of major social and cultural thinkers to the dynamics of doctoral education. This paper explores the use of Bourdieu's notion of field to render visible the practices and contexts of doctoral education that produce inequalities across…

  15. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  16. On Doctoral Student Development: Exploring Faculty Mentoring in the Shaping of African American Doctoral Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of faculty mentorship in the shaping of African American doctoral student success. A case analysis framework is used to investigate the belief systems that doctoral students held about their doctoral experience. Data collection involved a one-phase semi-structured interview protocol used to gather information…

  17. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Help Teens Manage Diabetes Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table ... healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to make good decisions when it ...

  18. Help prevent hospital errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000618.htm Help prevent hospital errors To use the sharing features ... in the hospital. If You Are Having Surgery, Help Keep Yourself Safe Go to a hospital you ...

  19. The Process and Experience of Online Group Counseling for Masters-Level Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresti, Jason Michael

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored the process and experience of online group counseling using a text-based synchronous program, particularly addressing how the process compares to face-to-face group counseling. Six students in a masters-level group counseling class voluntarily chose to participate for eight sixty minute online sessions on a weekly basis,…

  20. Religion and Spirituality in Group Counseling: Beliefs and Practices of University Counseling Center Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Brian C.; Cornish, Marilyn A.; Wade, Nathaniel G.; Tucker, Jeritt R.

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-four counselors at 9 university counseling centers participated in a study regarding religion and spirituality (R/S) in group counseling. The majority indicated that R/S is an appropriate topic for group counseling and that some religious and spiritual interventions are appropriate to use. However, counselors rarely use these interventions.…