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Sample records for helping doctors counsel

  1. Does a self-referral counselling program reach doctors in need of help? A comparison with the general Norwegian doctor workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gude Tore

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doctors have a relatively high degree of emotional distress, but seek help to a lesser degree and at a later stage than other academic groups. This can be deleterious for themselves and for their patients. Prevention programs have therefore been developed but it is unclear to what extent they reach doctors in need of help. This study describes doctors who participated in a self-referrral, easily accessible, stress relieving, counselling program in Norway, and compares them with a nationwide sample of Norwegian doctors. Methods Two hundred and twenty seven (94% of the doctors, 117 women and 110 men, who came to the resort centre Villa Sana, Modum, Norway, between August 2003 and July 2005, agreed to participate in the study. Socio-demographic data, reasons for and ways of help-seeking, sick-leave, symptoms of depression and anxiety, job stress and burnout were assessed by self-reporting questionnaires. Results Forty-nine percent of the Sana doctors were emotionally exhausted (Maslach compared with 25% of all Norwegian doctors. However, they did not differ on empathy and working capacity, the other two dimensions in Maslach's burnout inventory. Seventy-three percent of the Sana doctors could be in need of treatment for depression or anxiety based on their symptom distress scores, compared with 14% of men and 18% of women doctors in Norway. Twenty-one percent of the Sana doctors had a history of suicidal thoughts, including how to commit the act, as compared to 10% of Norwegian doctors in general. Conclusion Sana doctors displayed a higher degree of emotional exhaustion, symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as job related stress, compared with all Norwegian doctors. This may indicate that the program at Villa Sana to a large extent reaches doctors in need of help. The counselling intervention can help doctors to evaluate their professional and private situation, and, when necessary, enhance motivation for seeking adequate

  2. Does a self-referral counselling program reach doctors in need of help? A comparison with the general Norwegian doctor workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rø, Karin E Isaksson; Gude, Tore; Aasland, Olaf G

    2007-03-16

    Doctors have a relatively high degree of emotional distress, but seek help to a lesser degree and at a later stage than other academic groups. This can be deleterious for themselves and for their patients. Prevention programs have therefore been developed but it is unclear to what extent they reach doctors in need of help. This study describes doctors who participated in a self-referrral, easily accessible, stress relieving, counselling program in Norway, and compares them with a nationwide sample of Norwegian doctors. Two hundred and twenty seven (94%) of the doctors, 117 women and 110 men, who came to the resort centre Villa Sana, Modum, Norway, between August 2003 and July 2005, agreed to participate in the study. Socio-demographic data, reasons for and ways of help-seeking, sick-leave, symptoms of depression and anxiety, job stress and burnout were assessed by self-reporting questionnaires. Forty-nine percent of the Sana doctors were emotionally exhausted (Maslach) compared with 25% of all Norwegian doctors. However, they did not differ on empathy and working capacity, the other two dimensions in Maslach's burnout inventory. Seventy-three percent of the Sana doctors could be in need of treatment for depression or anxiety based on their symptom distress scores, compared with 14% of men and 18% of women doctors in Norway. Twenty-one percent of the Sana doctors had a history of suicidal thoughts, including how to commit the act, as compared to 10% of Norwegian doctors in general. Sana doctors displayed a higher degree of emotional exhaustion, symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as job related stress, compared with all Norwegian doctors. This may indicate that the program at Villa Sana to a large extent reaches doctors in need of help. The counselling intervention can help doctors to evaluate their professional and private situation, and, when necessary, enhance motivation for seeking adequate treatment.

  3. The Help-Seeking in Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    This study examined help-seeking in career counseling by investigating factors that influence students' intention to consult a career counseling center. Nine hundred and eighteen participants were given the Attitudes toward Career Counseling Scale (ATCCS), an information brochure about the career counseling center; the Intention to Consult a…

  4. The Doctorate in Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altekruse, Michael K.

    1991-01-01

    Compares the doctorate in counselor education and that in counseling psychology. Describes similarities in models, history, professional memberships, and residence of programs; and discusses differences in accreditation, professional organizations, and training. Presents a case for cooperative coexistence. (PVV)

  5. Doctor of Professional Counseling: The Next Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Stephen; Cade, Rochelle; Locke, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    Professional doctorates have been established in the allied health professions by clinicians seeking the highest levels of independent practice. Allied health professional doctorates include nursing practice (DNP), occupational therapy (OTD), psychology (PsyD), social work (DSW), and marriage and family therapy (DMFT). Lessons learned from the…

  6. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Trainees' Satisfaction with Clinical Methods Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Kristen Ann

    2015-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral trainees' satisfaction with their clinical methods training is an important predictor of their self-efficacy as counselors, persistence in graduate programs, and probability of practicing psychotherapy in their careers (Fernando & Hulse-Killacky, 2005; Hadjipavlou & Ogrodniczuk, 2007; Morton & Worthley,…

  7. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students' Training Experiences in Primary Care Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jared

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on counseling psychology doctoral students' perspectives regarding their practicum training experience in primary care psychology. The four participants included three females and one male. Semi-structured individual and focus group interviews were used to explore participants' experiences. The participants described…

  8. A Phenomenological Investigation of Counseling Doctoral Students Becoming Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jessica M.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Godwin Weisberger, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    Women often face challenges when balancing academic and familial responsibilities (Gilbert, 2008); Trepal & Stinchfield, 2012). This phenomenological study explored women's (N = 10) experiences of becoming mothers during a doctoral program in counseling. The results highlight the importance of mentorship and other protective factors associated…

  9. Helping Inuit clients: cultural relevance and effective counselling

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, Marja

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this study was to investigate the fit between Inuit conceptions of effective helping and Western counselling. Study Design/Methods. The essential components and value foundations of effective Western counselling, including multicultural counselling, were identified from primary and secondary counselling texts. Inuit traditional values and helping practices were identified from the transcripts of interviews with Inuit elders. Interviews with 5 younger Inuit provide...

  10. Counseling Health Psychology: Assessing Health Psychology Training within Counseling Psychology Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L.; Torrey, Carrie L.; Lewis, Brian L.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    Training directors of American Psychological Association-approved counseling psychology doctoral programs completed a questionnaire assessing (a) student and faculty involvement in health-related research, practice, and teaching; (b) health-related research conducted by students and faculty; and (c) programs' expectations and ability to…

  11. Counselling needs and experience of junior hospital doctors.

    OpenAIRE

    Garrud, P

    1990-01-01

    A sample of 106 senior house officers who had graduated from Nottingham University in 1987 was surveyed about their experience of and need for careers guidance, performance appraisal, and stress counselling. Of the 80 who replied, a quarter had received no careers guidance and a quarter no feedback about their work performance. Many reported having had difficulties in their post, but few had received help from senior staff or their consultant. The perceived needs for counselling were consider...

  12. [Virtual counselling: online help for adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaupt, Ulrike

    2004-10-01

    The internet provides a new platform for communication especially used by teenagers and young adults. Professional counselling in this medium offers the chance to reach especially those individuals perhaps not reachable through existing counselling services. With this in mind, the internet portal bke (youth counselling of the Federal conference for Educational Counselling) was inaugurated in October 2000. It offers the following services: Group Chat, Discussion Forum and E-Mail Counselling. The experience made in this project phase indicates that professional counselling in this medium can reach individuals directly, who would otherwise not or only with difficulty be reached by the ordinary counselling services on offer. This is due to the fact that the internet is easily accessible, offers anonymity and therefore presents no noteworthy access barrier to overcome. This seems to apply especially to traumatised teenagers and young adults. Online counselling offers great opportunities exactly in these cases. The special task of a counsellor is to grasp this opportunity whilst at the same time having an awareness of the mediums limitations.

  13. Active coping strategies. From self-help to psychological counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, A G; Nevin, R S; Christen, J A

    1986-10-01

    Everyone must accept a certain measure of responsibility for dealing with personal stresses. This article suggests various active, constructive, self-help strategies. It specifically focuses on the advantages of adopting positive attitudes, maintaining a sense of humor, engaging in a variety of activities, identifying and relabeling stresses, and using multiple, active coping techniques. Demonstrating how professional psychologic counseling may help the individual in effectively dealing with personal problems, the article also defines and delineates counseling. It explains why one should seek professional help, tells how to select a counselor, describes the types of counseling available, advises ways to best utilize the counseling process, and discusses the length and costs of treatments.

  14. Culturally Considerate School Counseling: Helping without Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kim L.

    2010-01-01

    The author brings her counseling expertise, personal experience, and compassionate perspective to this practical resource that cultivates "cultural competence"--essential for work with diverse populations. Expanding the definition of culture, this book addresses how biases have evolved in new and challenging ways, and provides strategies to help…

  15. Leisure Experience among Students Seeking Counseling Help

    OpenAIRE

    Sumaiya Anwar; Shaheen Islam

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to underline the benefit of leisure in maintaining and restoring psychological wellbeing. Pattern of leisure and its relation to mental health and life satisfaction was investigated on 30 university students who sought mental health counseling. A structured leisure related questionnaire [1], Bangla version GHQ-12 [2] and SWLS [3] were used. The findings highlighted the importance of incorporating mindful-practice of leisure activities that promote interrelatedness.

  16. Financial Stress and Financial Counseling: Helping College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Sonya L.; Canale, Anthony; Fernatt, Fred; Stutz, Kristen; Tibbetts, Racquel

    2015-01-01

    This study had two distinct purposes. First, to determine the predictors of financial stress among college students who sought free peer-based financial counseling from a large Midwestern university (N = 675). Secondly, to determine the effectiveness of the particular financial counseling center from a subsample of those who sought help (N = 97).…

  17. Helping Inuit clients: cultural relevance and effective counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Marja

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the fit between Inuit conceptions of effective helping and Western counselling. The essential components and value foundations of effective Western counselling, including multicultural counselling, were identified from primary and secondary counselling texts. Inuit traditional values and helping practices were identified from the transcripts of interviews with Inuit elders. Interviews with 5 younger Inuit provided information about the counselling needs of contemporary Inuit. Grounded theory analysis of all texts and interview transcripts was used to determine each informant group's conceptions of the elements of effective counselling. A comparative chart was then constructed of the important relationship factors, strategies and process, and effective interventions identified by each informant group. The values and relationship factors of effective counselling are similar in traditional and Western helping, and these same factors are important to the contemporary Inuit interviewed. Affective, behavioural and cognitive interventions were used traditionally; modern generic counselling also uses a variety of strategies from these three primary categories. Cognitive and cognitive-behavioural approaches to problem-solving were traditionally of primary importance, with expression of feelings also seen as essential. Western and traditional Inuit helping correspond, and cognitive/cognitive-behavioural approaches especially complement Inuit cultural practice.

  18. Avoidance of Counseling: Psychological Factors that Inhibit Seeking Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, David L.; Wester, Stephen R.; Larson, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    How do counselors reach out to individuals who are reluctant to seek counseling services? To answer this question, the authors examined the research on the psychological help-seeking barriers from counseling, clinical and social psychology, as well as social work and psychiatry. Specific avoidance factors that have been identified in the mental…

  19. Physical activity habits of doctors and medical students influence their counselling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobelo, F; Duperly, J; Frank, E

    2009-02-01

    Doctors are well positioned to provide physical activity (PA) counselling to patients. They are a respected source of health-related information and can provide continuing preventive counselling feedback and follow-up; they may have ethical obligations to prescribe PA. Several barriers to PA counselling exist, including insufficient training and motivation of doctors and improvable, personal PA habits. Rates of exercise counselling by doctors remain low; only 34% of US adults report exercise counselling at their last medical visit. In view of this gap, one of the US health objectives for 2010 is increasing the proportion of patients appropriately counselled about health behaviours, including exercise/PA. Research shows that clinical providers who themselves act on the advice they give provide better counselling and motivation of their patients to adopt such health advice. In summary, there is compelling evidence that the health of doctors matters and that doctors' own PA practices influence their clinical attitudes towards PA. Medical schools need to increase the proportion of students adopting and maintaining regular PA habits to increase the rates and quality of future PA counselling delivered by doctors.

  20. What Counseling Psychologists Can Do to Help Returning Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danish, Steven J.; Antonides, Bradley J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the needs of service members and their families who have fought or are fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan and who have sustained psychological and/or physical injuries and how counseling psychologists can help. The focus is twofold: (a) to help the reader better understand those who have served and how what…

  1. Teaching Statistics in APA-Accredited Doctoral Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology: A Syllabi Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Anna S.; Ripley, Jennifer S.; Hook, Joshua; Erspamer, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Although statistical methods and research design are crucial areas of competency for psychologists, few studies explore how statistics are taught across doctoral programs in psychology in the United States. The present study examined 153 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology and aimed…

  2. An educational model for improving diet counselling in primary care. A case study of the creative use of doctors' own diet, their attitudes to it and to nutritional counselling of their patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Palmvig, Birthe; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire......Nutritional counseling; Nutritional education; Nutritional assessment; Primary care; Continuing medical education; Doctors' diet; Doctors attitudes; Doctors' knowledge; Body mass index; Educational model; Food frequency questionaire...

  3. Peer counselling for doctors in Norway: A qualitative study of the relationship between support and surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson Rø, Karin; Veggeland, Frode; Aasland, Olaf G

    2016-08-01

    Peer support can entail collegial responsibility for counselling and support as well as reactions to academic or ethical failure. These considerations can be complementary, but also conflicting. This article focuses on how the peer support programme in Norway addresses these considerations. Focus group interviews held with Norwegian peer counsellors from August 2011 to June 2012 were analysed by a stepwise deductive-inductive method. Based on organisational theory, two "ideal types" of counsellors were identified from the data, and these were then used to reanalyse the text. We found that the organisational framework is associated with the peer counsellors' role conception and thereby the relationship between the counsellor and the help-seeking doctor. The relationship between informal frameworks like collegiality, confidence and discretion, and more formalized incentive-driven frameworks, appear to influence the accessibility to peer support, the mandate to provide relevant help and the understanding of what peer support represents. The study showed the need for a continuous awareness of a balance between the informal and the more formalized elements in the framework for peer support. This is of importance for how the service can contribute to better health among doctors and to secure quality and safety in the treatment of patients. The analysis can also be used to demonstrate the consequences of how the peer support program is designed - such as the degree of formalisation and the balance between "hard" and "soft" ways to regulate the interaction between peer counsellors and doctors - for the ability to achieve the stated objectives of the service. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Meeting the Challenges of Completing a Counseling Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Susan R.; Ullery, Elizabeth K.; Millner, Vaughn S.; Cobia, Debra C.

    1999-01-01

    Tasks of a doctoral program are discussed, including selecting a program, maneuvering through initial experiences, making adjustments, completing coursework, preparing for comprehensive examinations, choosing an internship, and completing the dissertation. (Author)

  5. The State of Ethical Training for Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Linda S.; Ranft, Victor A.

    1993-01-01

    Surveyed 50 student representatives from American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in professional psychology on exposure to and type of ethics education, and perception of preparedness to deal with ethical dilemmas. Found that 94% of programs required training in ethics and that most students felt prepared for legal and…

  6. Counseling, Guidance, and the Morality of Help-Giving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael J.

    1971-01-01

    A review of: (1) The Counseling Center in Higher Education, Phillip J. Gallagher and George D. Demos, (2) The Guidance Process, Herman J. Peters, (3) Counseling and Guidance in the Twentieth Century: Reflections and Reformulations, William H. Van Hoose and John J. Pietrofesa, and (4) Value Orientations in Counseling and Psychotherapy: The Meanings…

  7. Factors That Help and Hinder Scientific Training in Counseling and Clinical Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Margaret M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to better understand scientific training within clinical and counseling psychology doctoral programs. A primary goal is to extend previous research by expanding the scientific training outcome variables from research interest and productivity to include additional characteristics of scientific mindedness such as…

  8. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, K.; Faber, M.J.; Arah, O.A.; Elwyn, G.; Lombarts, K.M.; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy-makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  9. Doctor performance assessment in daily practise: does it help doctors or not? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, Karlijn; Faber, Marjan J.; Arah, Onvebuchi A.; Elwyn, Glyn; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Wollersheim, Hub C.; Grol, Richard P. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT Continuous assessment of individual performance of doctors is crucial for life-long learning and quality of care. Policy makers and health educators should have good insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the methods available. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the

  10. Helping Doctors and Patients Make Sense of Health Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigerenzer, Gerd; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Kurz-Milcke, Elke; Schwartz, Lisa M; Woloshin, Steven

    2007-11-01

    Many doctors, patients, journalists, and politicians alike do not understand what health statistics mean or draw wrong conclusions without noticing. Collective statistical illiteracy refers to the widespread inability to understand the meaning of numbers. For instance, many citizens are unaware that higher survival rates with cancer screening do not imply longer life, or that the statement that mammography screening reduces the risk of dying from breast cancer by 25% in fact means that 1 less woman out of 1,000 will die of the disease. We provide evidence that statistical illiteracy (a) is common to patients, journalists, and physicians; (b) is created by nontransparent framing of information that is sometimes an unintentional result of lack of understanding but can also be a result of intentional efforts to manipulate or persuade people; and (c) can have serious consequences for health. The causes of statistical illiteracy should not be attributed to cognitive biases alone, but to the emotional nature of the doctor-patient relationship and conflicts of interest in the healthcare system. The classic doctor-patient relation is based on (the physician's) paternalism and (the patient's) trust in authority, which make statistical literacy seem unnecessary; so does the traditional combination of determinism (physicians who seek causes, not chances) and the illusion of certainty (patients who seek certainty when there is none). We show that information pamphlets, Web sites, leaflets distributed to doctors by the pharmaceutical industry, and even medical journals often report evidence in nontransparent forms that suggest big benefits of featured interventions and small harms. Without understanding the numbers involved, the public is susceptible to political and commercial manipulation of their anxieties and hopes, which undermines the goals of informed consent and shared decision making. What can be done? We discuss the importance of teaching statistical thinking and

  11. Do Counseling Master's Program Websites Help? Prospective Students' Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Lillian M.; Salgado, Roy; White, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    To see how students understand information about counseling programs from school websites, in January and February, 2012, 43 undergraduates (most women) at a co-educational religious college in the southeastern U. S. obtained website information about accreditation, tuition, and number of hours and faculty on 14 schools in Louisiana. They also…

  12. Helping Children Accept Death and Dying through Group Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Constance D.

    1978-01-01

    A brief historical perspective of research confirms the necessity of including children in discussions about death education. A taped counseling session with several preadolescent boys demonstrates the importance of accepting the deep feelings and fears that children must deal with in order to be free from unnatural anxiety about death. (Author)

  13. Relationships among Personality, Expectations about Counseling, and Help-Seeking Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakhnovets, Regina

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships among personality variables, counseling expectations, and help-seeking attitudes. Participants (N = 411) completed the Revised NEO (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to New Experiences) Personality Inventory (Costa & McCrae, 1992), the Expectations About Counseling Questionnaire-Brief Form (Tinsley,…

  14. Online Counselling in Secondary Schools: Would Students Seek Help by This Medium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasheen, K. J.; Shochet, I.; Campbell, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Students in secondary schools experience problems that can impact on their well-being and educational outcomes. Although "face-to-face" counselling is available in most Australian secondary schools, many students, particularly boys, do not seek appropriate help. Research suggests that online counselling can be effective and increase…

  15. Personalized contraceptive counseling: helping women make the right choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Janelle; Abutouk, Mona; Roque, Karen; Sridhar, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Unintended pregnancy is a significant problem with medical, social, and economic consequences. Half of unintended pregnancies are a result of no contraceptive use; while the other half results from contraceptive inconsistencies, or method failure. Women have an array of contraceptive options to choose from, each of which differs significantly in terms of usage, efficacy, side effects, risks, and noncontraceptive benefits. Determining the best tool for communication is a challenge. In addition, the choice of contraceptive method differs among women with medical problems. Not all contraceptive methods are suitable for women with certain medical problems. In this review, we discuss different methods of counseling and the tools available for sharing contraception information.

  16. Therapy and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... system of rewards and reinforcement of positive behavior.Psychoanalysis. This type of treatment encourages you to think ... work, marriage and family therapy, rehabilitation counseling, and psychoanalysis. Your family doctor can help you choose the ...

  17. Physical Dimensions of Counseling: Perspective for the Helping Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilyer, James C.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The effects of physical fitness programs on graduate students suggest that these programs can improve physiological functioning. Intense, systematic physical fitness programs, when delivered in a helping relationship, help improve self-concept, reduce depression, anxiety, somatic complaints, tension, and fatigue, reduce the effect of fear, and…

  18. [Counselling versus a self-help manual for tinnitus outpatients: a comparison of effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konzag, T A; Rübler, D; Bloching, M; Bandemer-Greulich, U; Fikentscher, E; Frommer, J

    2006-08-01

    Counselling is a basic psychological intervention for chronic tinnitus the effectiveness of which has not yet been evaluated. The therapeutic effect of counselling was compared to that of a self-help manual. Outcome was analysed for tinnitus disability, tendency to become chronic, and accompanying psychiatric disorders. A total of 75 tinnitus outpatients were randomly assigned to group counselling (n=35) and self-help (n=40). Tinnitus disability, general psychological disturbances, depression, anxiety, coping and illness beliefs were measured using questionnaires (TQ, SCL-90-R, BDI, BAI, FKV, KKG) administered before and after treatment and at a 6-month follow-up. Psychiatric disorders (DSM-IV) were assessed using the CIDI. Counselling and the self-help manual had a significant effect on tinnitus disability, showing most profit for participants with a high level of tinnitus distress. The significant reduction in tinnitus distress was maintained at the 6-month follow-up. There was, however, no difference between the two treatment-groups. Effect-sizes for patients with DSM-IV-diagnoses were smaller. For tinnitus outpatients without psychiatric comorbidity, self-help manuals can be an effective first treatment.

  19. Indigenous Models of Helping in Nonwestern Countries: Implications for Multicultural Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Courtland C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined indigenous models of helping in selected non-Western countries (Barbados, Korea, Nigeria, Pakistan, Singapore, Sudan. and Zambia) to investigate status of psychology, counseling, and related mental health professions in these countries. Findings from mental health professionals in these countries revealed three types of problems for which…

  20. Pharyngalgia: self-treatment or the qualified help of the family doctor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podpletnia O.A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-treatment by pharmaceuticals is an actual problem of health care, patients more and more often address to the pharmacist, not visiting the family doctor for various reasons. In this case, the role of the pharmacist is not limited to the release of non-prescription drugs "at the request or insistence of the patient." This situation requires from the pharmacist not only specialist knowledge of the pharmacology of drugs, but also a professional approach to the diagnosis and treatment of symptoms and syndromes. Pharmacoepidemiologic research of the department of General and Clinical Pharmacy showed that about 93% of population of Dnepropetrovsk use pharmaceuticals without preliminary consultation with the doctor. The pharmacist in time having recognized the leading symptoms, having provided symptomatic treatment with OTC-medicines and having convinced the patient to ask for the qualified help of the doctor is a link between the patient and the family doctor. In the article by the example of one of the most common symptoms – pharyngalgia – difficulties of diagnostics which is impossible without a deep knowledge of clinical medicine are shown and the need of administering prescription drugs in most cases is confirmed, which in turn is possible only after consultation of the family doctor in most cases.

  1. Helping Hospitalized Smokers: A Factorial RCT of Nicotine Patches and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Sharon E; Gamst, Anthony C; Brandstein, Kendra; Seymann, Gregory B; Klonoff-Cohen, Hillary; Kirby, Carrie A; Tong, Elisa K; Chaplin, Edward; Tedeschi, Gary J; Zhu, Shu-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Most smokers abstain from smoking during hospitalization but relapse upon discharge. This study tests the effectiveness of two proven treatments (i.e., nicotine patches and telephone counseling) in helping these patients stay quit after discharge from the hospital, and assesses a model of hospital-quitline partnership. This study had a 2×2 factorial design in which participants were stratified by recruitment site and smoking rate and randomly assigned to usual care, nicotine patches only, counseling only, or patches plus counseling. They were evaluated at 2 and 6 months post-randomization. A total of 1,270 hospitalized adult smokers were recruited from August 2011 to November 2013 from five hospitals within three healthcare systems. Participants in the patch condition were provided 8 weeks of nicotine patches at discharge (or were mailed them post-discharge). Quitline staff started proactively calling participants in the counseling condition 3 days post-discharge to provide standard quitline counseling. The primary outcome measure was self-reported 30-day abstinence at 6 months using an intention-to-treat analysis. Data were analyzed from September 2015 to May 2016. The 30-day abstinence rate at 6 months was 22.8% for the nicotine patch condition and 18.3% for the no-patch condition (p=0.051). Nearly all participants (99%) in the patch condition were provided nicotine patches, although 36% were sent post-discharge. The abstinence rates were 20.0% and 21.1% for counseling and no counseling conditions, respectively (p=0.651). Fewer than half of the participants in the counseling condition (47%) received counseling (mean follow-up sessions, 3.6). Provision of nicotine patches proved feasible, although their effectiveness in helping discharged patients stay quit was not significant. Telephone counseling was not effective, in large part because of low rates of engagement. Future interventions will need to be more immediate to be effective. This study is registered at

  2. Addressing stress-related impairment in doctors. A survey of providers' and doctors' experience of a funded counselling service in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Wayne; Cookson, Tim

    2009-08-07

    In January 2006 the Medical Protection Society (MPS) and Medical Assurance Society (MAS) commenced a jointly funded counselling service for stressed doctors in New Zealand. Stressed and impaired doctors may impact negatively on patient care. This study aims to investigate the service's utilisation, acceptability, and utility, and to consider whether the service may improve the delivery of health services. Psychologist or psychiatrist providers of the service between January 2006 and July 2008 were asked to anonymously complete a questionnaire about the service. They forwarded a questionnaire to their Dr-clients requesting demographic and other data, and ideas as to how the service might be improved. 28 out of 41 providers submitted data on 39 out of 55 Dr-clients. 25 of the Dr-clients returned completed questionnaires. Most Dr-clients requiring 3 or fewer sessions suffered from work-related stress; those needing 10 or more sessions had diagnoses including depression, bipolar disease, prior sexual abuse, and personality disorders. Dr-clients valued confidentiality, choice, and independence of the provider, and funding of the service. They believed the service contributed to them remaining in or returning to work. Providers identified stress in both the work and home environment, noting that these overlapped. Respondents identified the need for greater publicity about the service. The MPS/MAS-funded counselling service is effective and well received, but there is insufficient awareness of its availability. Stress may result in impaired performance which can impact negatively on patient care, and the provision of counselling for stressed doctors can potentially improve the delivery of health services in New Zealand.

  3. Whom are we counselling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, J

    1985-12-01

    Non-directional counseling of patients is introduced experientially in a 5-day residential course at the College of Ripon and New York St. John in England. Groups of 3 work on real problems presented by a doctor, with some sessions videotaped for later analysis. Over the past 5 years, 200 doctors, primarily trainees, have participated in the course. The doctors ranged in age from 25-60 years, and participated for a variety of reasons. Increasing frustration with traditional medicine, doubts about career or specialty choice, and doubts about their ability to help others were among the reasons cited for participation. The course is emotionally intense for both students and tutors, but a feeling of camaraderie develops, particularly between the trio members. Although the course was not intended to provide psychotherapy for doctors, the exploration of a patient's problem can lead to a process of self-discovery. Tutors felt keenly the inability to offer proper personal counseling for some of the participants, which highlighted the current lack of organized counseling services for doctors. The rate of suicide, drug abuse, and marital problems in the medical profession is indicative of the need for such counseling. But, because of self and public perceptions about the omnipotence of doctors, it is questionable that doctors would avail themselves of counseling services. This course might provide a realistic option, in that its overt aim is teaching a skill while covertly offering a limited amount of personal counseling.

  4. [Cardiac rehabilitation with lifestyle counselling after myocardial infarction: it helps, but not everyone undergoes it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reulings, Petra G; van der Lans, Sylvia M

    2012-01-01

    A healthy lifestyle helps to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. This also applies after myocardial infarction (MI), as it considerably reduces the likelihood of relapse. One element of the cardiac rehabilitation process is lifestyle counselling. In 2010, the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate conducted a study into lifestyle counselling during the cardiac rehabilitation programme. The results showed that only a limited number of post-MI patients actually do take part in a cardiac rehabilitation programme. Furthermore, the lifestyle counselling which is provided during the programme is not being conducted entirely in accordance with the Dutch Cardiac Rehabilitation Practice Guideline; therefore, its effects on patient health can, and should, be improved. To this end, the cardiac rehabilitation centres are currently working on improving their programmes and the inspectorate will review the results in the latter part of 2012. Moreover, various initiatives have been taken to increase the level of participation in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  5. Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) or APA Doctoral Accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Thomas J.

    The Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), as a corporate affiliate of the American Association for Counseling and Development, is the accrediting agency for the world's largest association for counseling. CACREP has been in consultation with the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) staff…

  6. Perfectionism and Marital Satisfaction among Graduate Students: A Multigroup Invariance Analysis by Counseling Help-seeking Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foo Fatt Mee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to measure the latent mean difference in perfectionism and marital satisfaction by counseling help-seeking attitudes. The respondents were 327 married graduate students from a research university in Malaysia. An online self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The respondents completed the Almost Perfect Scale- Revised, Dyadic Almost Perfect Scale, Marital Satisfaction Scale, and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychology Help Scale. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examined the instruments and the results indicated that construct validity were achieved. The latent mean difference in perfectionism and marital satisfaction by counseling help-seeking attitudes were tested using multigroup invariance analysis. The respondents with negative attitudes toward counseling help-seeking (n = 159 reported a higher latent mean in perfectionism but a lower latent mean in marital satisfaction compared to those with positive attitudes toward counseling help-seeking (n = 168. The implications of these findings for counseling services are discussed.

  7. Help-Seeking for Stressful Events among Chinese College Students in Taiwan: Roles of Gender, Prior History of Counseling, and Help-Seeking Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiaowen

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the help-seeking behavior that Chinese college students used to cope with stressful events and the roles that gender, previous counseling experience, and help-seeking attitudes played in predicting informal and formal help-seeking behavior. Nine hundred ninety-five first-year Chinese college students at a private…

  8. Helping clinicians deliver consistent HIV prevention counseling to their HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Janet J; Kang Dufour, Mi-Suk; Koester, Kimberly A; Rose, Carol Dawson; Shade, Starley B; Maiorana, Andres; Morin, Stephen F

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of HIV risk assessment and behavioral counseling by clinicians in HIV clinical settings is one component in a comprehensive "positive prevention" strategy to help patients reduce their transmission risk behavior. Clinicians engage in behavioral prevention inconsistently, however, depending on whether patients are new to a practice or are established in regular care and on their attitudes and characteristics of their practices. We analyzed clinician reports of behavioral prevention delivered before and after participation in a large federal demonstration project of positive prevention interventions. The interventions that were part of this project were successful in increasing behavioral prevention among both new and returning patients. Prior to study interventions, clinicians reported counseling 69% of new patients and 52% of returning patients. In follow-up interviews 12 months after receiving training, clinicians reported delivering prevention messages to 5% more new patients and 9% of returning patients (both phelp clinicians more consistently deliver behavioral prevention messages to their HIV-infected patients.

  9. Helping Couples Fulfill the "Highest of Life's Goals": Mate Selection, Marriage Counselling, and Genetic Counseling in United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillwell, Devon

    2016-02-01

    This article traces the history of modern genetic counseling to mate selection and marriage counselling practices of the early-20th century. Mate selection revolved around a belief that human heredity could be improved and genetic diseases eradicated through better breeding. Marriage counselling, though interested in reproduction, was also concerned with the emotional and psychological well-being of couples. These two practices coalesced most obviously in the work of well-known geneticist Sheldon Reed. Even as marriage and genetic counselling diverged in the post-WWII period, vestiges of these practices remain in contemporary counseling experiences with family planning and genetic screening programs. Emphasizing points of continuity between "positive" eugenic ideologies and modern genetic practices elaborates the diverse origins of genetic counseling. It also exposes how genetic counselors have become involved in genetic enterprises beyond standard clinical settings, and prods at key issues in the interaction between genetic science and social values.

  10. How Different Insights from a Variety of Theories Might Help Ethical Decision-Making in Educational Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveit, Anne Dorthe; Sunde, Annikken Louise

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how different insights from a variety of theories might help ethical decision making in educational counselling and highlight the need for reflection. A framework for ethical decision making based on basic features of counselling, namely the interlocutors' practice or "acts", is proposed. There are…

  11. Education and counselling group intervention for women treated for gynaecological cancer: does it help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekse, Ragnhild Johanne Tveit; Blaaka, Gunnhild; Buestad, Ingjerd; Tengesdal, Ellen; Paulsen, Anita; Vika, Margrethe

    2014-03-01

    Women who have been through gynaecological cancer, experience challenges on many levels after diagnosis and treatment. Studies show that, in order to help women in their rehabilitation process, there is a need for holistic care and follow-up. The aim of this qualitative study is to provide insight into women's own lived experiences of participating in an education and counselling group intervention after curative treatment for gynaecological cancer. A qualitative study based on data from three focus groups with 17 women who had participated in a nurse-led education and counselling group intervention after treatment for gynaecological cancer. The main findings show that participation in the rehabilitation group was described as a special community of mutual understanding and belonging. Education and the sharing of knowledge provided a clearer vocabulary for, and understanding of, the women's own lived experiences. The presence of dedicated and professional care workers was reported to be essential for the outcome of the group intervention. Attending a nurse-led education and counselling group intervention had a positive impact on various aspects of the women's lived experiences. The programme also provided professionals with important insights into the patients' views and feelings regarding cancer treatment, trajectories and rehabilitation. This knowledge has already proven itself useful in clinical practice for improving staff communication skills and psycho-social support related to gynaecological cancer care. © 2013 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Country doctors in literature: helping medical students understand what rural practice is all about.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna; Longenecker, Randall

    2005-08-01

    Rural family medicine residencies and practices continue to have difficulty attracting applicants and practitioners. Students facing decisions about rural training or practice may be deterred by negative stereotypes or a lack of understanding about rural experience. Renewed efforts to foster students' interest and influence students' intent toward rural practice are sorely needed. The authors report one such innovative strategy that used literary sources, many written by rural physicians, to trigger discussion and reflection among a group of 11 medical students who volunteered in 2004 to participate in a two-day retreat sponsored by The Ohio State University College of Medicine Rural Health Scholars program. Participants first attended a presentation designed to help them understand the relevance of textual study of narratives by and about country doctors to their own experiences (during rural clerkships) in rural practice and as a vehicle for clarifying their concerns and questions. Through small-group study and discussion of excerpts from these texts, participants identified notable characteristics of rural inhabitants and their physicians; distinctive attitudes toward illness and medical care; and stresses and rewards of rural practice. They also wrote poems and essays in response to prompts about rural doctoring. Students used reading and writing as triggers to better comprehend and reflect on intangibles such as the nature of small-town life, relative professional isolation, and the unique aspects of the doctor-patient relationship in rural practice. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations suggest that this literature-based approach was enjoyable and stimulating for students, provided useful insights, and reinforced their interest in rural practice.

  13. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... been added to your dashboard . KEY POINTS Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes, birth defects and medical ... in your area. What is genetic counseling? Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes , birth defects and other ...

  14. Physical activity of Estonian family doctors and their counselling for a healthy lifestyle: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rätsep Anneli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity offers major health benefits and counselling for it should be integrated into the medical consultation. Based on the literature, the personal health behaviour of the physician (including physical activity is associated with his/her approach to counselling patients. Our hypothesis is that family doctors (FD in Estonia are physically active and their recommendation to counsel patients with chronic diseases to use physical activity is high. The study was also interested in how FDs value physical activity among other important determinants of a healthy lifestyle, e.g. nutrition, non-consumption of alcohol, and non-smoking. Methods Physicians on the electronic list were contacted by e-mail and sent a questionnaire. The first part assessed physical activity by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ short form. Self-reported physical activity during one week was calculated as total physical activity in minutes per week (MET min/week. The second part of the questionnaire included questions about the counselling of patients with chronic disease concerning their physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. The study focused on female FDs because 95% of the FDs in Estonia are women and to avoid bias related to gender. Results 198 female FDs completed the questionnaire. 92% reported that they exercised over the past 7 days to a moderate or high level of physical activity. Analysis revealed no statistically significant relationship between the level of physical activity and general characteristics (age, living area, body mass index [BMI], time spent sitting. FDs reported that patients with heart problems, diabetes, and obesity seek their advice on physical activity more often than patients with depression. Over 94% of the FDs claimed that they counsel their patients with chronic diseases about exercising. According to the FDs' reports, the most important topic in counselling patients for a healthy

  15. Physical activity of Estonian family doctors and their counselling for a healthy lifestyle: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suija, Kadri; Pechter, Ulle; Maaroos, Jaak; Kalda, Ruth; Rätsep, Anneli; Oona, Marje; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2010-06-18

    Physical activity offers major health benefits and counselling for it should be integrated into the medical consultation. Based on the literature, the personal health behaviour of the physician (including physical activity) is associated with his/her approach to counselling patients. Our hypothesis is that family doctors (FD) in Estonia are physically active and their recommendation to counsel patients with chronic diseases to use physical activity is high. The study was also interested in how FDs value physical activity among other important determinants of a healthy lifestyle, e.g. nutrition, non-consumption of alcohol, and non-smoking. Physicians on the electronic list were contacted by e-mail and sent a questionnaire. The first part assessed physical activity by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form. Self-reported physical activity during one week was calculated as total physical activity in minutes per week (MET min/week). The second part of the questionnaire included questions about the counselling of patients with chronic disease concerning their physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. The study focused on female FDs because 95% of the FDs in Estonia are women and to avoid bias related to gender. 198 female FDs completed the questionnaire. 92% reported that they exercised over the past 7 days to a moderate or high level of physical activity. Analysis revealed no statistically significant relationship between the level of physical activity and general characteristics (age, living area, body mass index [BMI], time spent sitting). FDs reported that patients with heart problems, diabetes, and obesity seek their advice on physical activity more often than patients with depression. Over 94% of the FDs claimed that they counsel their patients with chronic diseases about exercising. According to the FDs' reports, the most important topic in counselling patients for a healthy lifestyle was physical activity. This study showed that

  16. The relationship of counseling and self-help participation to patient outcomes in DATOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, R M; Craddock, S G; Hubbard, R L; Rounds-Bryant, J L

    1999-12-01

    Using a sample of 927 cocaine patients enrolled in programs in three modalities included in the national Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies (DATOS), this investigation examined the relationship of three dimensions of treatment process on after-treatment cocaine and heavy alcohol use and predatory illegal activity. Logistic regression revealed significant reductions in all three outcomes and strong effects of treatment duration and after-treatment self-help, conditional on the modality. Results did not support the hypothesized relationship between treatment outcomes and amounts of counseling and during-treatment self-help. Findings support the robustness of duration effects and after-treatment self-help and contribute to the measurement methodology for calibrating treatment intensity. The strong after-treatment self-help effect in the two residential and inpatient modalities suggests these programs can improve treatment outcomes by making referral to after-treatment self-help participation a standard practice and installing mechanisms to increase the likelihood of attendance at least twice weekly during the year after treatment.

  17. Interactive "Video Doctor" counseling reduces drug and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-positive patients in diverse outpatient settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Gilbert

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide "prevention with positives" in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors.We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003-September 2006 at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476 were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a "Video Doctor" via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months. Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (-2.3 vs. -1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and -2.7 vs. -0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months.The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual-level reductions in days of ongoing drug use and number of casual sex partners compared with the

  18. Multicultural Training of Clinical and Counseling Psychology Doctoral Students: Ideals vs. Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bryana F. C.

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA), which is the advocating body for the field of psychology, emphasizes the importance of multicultural competencies for researchers and clinicians (APA, 2003; 2010). Graduate students are the field's future professionals. The multicultural training of doctoral level clinical and counseling…

  19. The Critical Policy Discourse Analysis Frame: Helping Doctoral Students Engage with the Educational Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses an issue of increasing significance in the context of taught educational doctorates and argues that this may have wider applicability for doctoral students across a range of social science disciplines. It identifies the need to engage with policy analysis as a key element of such programmes and attempts to address students'…

  20. Helping men make an informed decision about prostate cancer screening: a pilot study of telephone counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Mary E; Luckmann, Roger S; Rosal, Milagros; White, Mary Jo; LaPelle, Nancy; Partin, Melissa; Cranos, Caroline; Leung, Katherine G; Foley, Christine

    2011-02-01

    Evaluate a computer-assisted telephone counseling (CATC) decision aid for men considering a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test. Eligible men were invited by their primary care providers (PCPs) to participate. Those consenting received an educational booklet followed by CATC. The counselor assessed stage of readiness, reviewed booklet information, corrected knowledge deficits and helped with a values clarification exercise. The materials presented advantages and disadvantages of being screened and did not advocate for testing or for not testing. Outcome measures included changes in stage, decisional conflict, decisional satisfaction, perceived vulnerability and congruence of a PSA testing decision with a pros/cons score. Baseline and final surveys were administered by telephone. There was an increase in PSA knowledge (p<0.001), and in decisional satisfaction (p<0.001), a decrease in decisional conflict (p<0.001), and a general consistency of those decisions with the man's values. Among those initially who had not made a decision, 83.1% made a decision by final survey with decisions equally for or against screening. The intervention provides realistic, unbiased and effective decision support for men facing a difficult and confusing decision. Our intervention could potentially replace a discussion of PSA testing with the PCP for most men. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The doctor's role in helping dying patients with cancer achieve peace: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Megan; Butow, Phyllis; Olver, Ian

    2014-10-01

    Being at peace is important for the quality of life of dying cancer patients, but its features, and the role of the doctor in facilitating peace, are unclear. We sought to understand the features of a peaceful patient, and patients' preferences regarding the role of the doctor in facilitating a sense of peace. A grounded theory approach was used with semi-structured interviews. Patients were asked about the things that gave their life meaning and a sense of peace and how the doctor could support their spiritual well-being. Patients were also questioned about their concerns for their future. In total, 15 cancer patients with advanced disease were interviewed in a variety of care settings. Patients were observed to be along a spectrum between having peace and not having peace. Features of the two extreme positions are described. Doctors could facilitate peace by developing a good relationship with cancer patients and supplying clear and honest information about what patients could expect as they approached their death. Spiritual well-being in cancer patients can be promoted by communication from doctors regarding prognosis, which allows them time to prepare for death, and recognition of their fears. However, acceptance of death does not always lead to the patient experiencing peace. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Do Korean Doctors Think a Palliative Consultation Team Would Be Helpful to Their Terminal Cancer Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hye-Young; Chang, Yoon Jung; Kawk, Kiu-Sang; Mai, Tran Thi Xuan; Choi, Jin Young; Ahn, Eun Mi; Jho, Hyun Jung; Park, So-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Hospice and palliative care services (HPC) are not commonly utilized in Korea; however, palliative care teams (PCTs) have been found to be effective at addressing the shortcomings in HPC. In this study, we attempted to outline unmet palliative care needs of terminal cancer patients and the potential benefits of PCTs as perceived by doctors in Korea. Materials and Methods We surveyed 474 doctors at 10 cancer-related academic conferences from June to November 2014 with a self-report questionnaire to assess their perceptions of end-of-life care needs and the expected effects of PCTs on caring for terminal cancer patients. Among those surveyed, 440 respondents who completed the entire questionnaire were analyzed. Results In all domains, fewer participants reported satisfaction with palliative care services than those reporting needs (p care, lengths of stay, and palliative ward availability. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that female doctors (odds ratio [OR], 2.672; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.035 to 6.892), doctors who agreed that referring my patients to a HPC means I must give up on my patient (OR, 3.075; 95% CI, 1.324 to 7.127), and doctors who had no experience with HPC education (OR, 3.337; 95% CI, 1.600 to 7.125) were associated with higher expected effectiveness of PCT activities. Conclusion The PCT activities were expected to fill the doctor’s perceived unmet HPC needs of terminal cancer patients and difficulties in communications. PMID:27506213

  3. Critical Reflection as Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter considers how doctoral education, particularly in applied settings such as education, social work, counseling, and health care, could be reimagined if it was organized around the idea and process of critical reflection: of helping students to better understand how power operates in educational environments and how students' sense of…

  4. Solution-focused premarital counseling: helping couples build a vision for their marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christine E; Murray, Thomas L

    2004-07-01

    This article outlines a solution-focused approach to premarital counseling. Solution-focused premarital counseling is a strength-based approach that focuses on a couple's resources to develop a shared vision for the marriage. Background information about premarital counseling and solution-focused therapy provide the framework for the development of intervention strategies that are grounded in the solution-focused approach. Solution-oriented interventions include solution-oriented questions, providing feedback, and the Couple's Resource Map, an original intervention that is described in this article.

  5. Counselling by primary care physicians may help patients with heartburn-predominant uninvestigated dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Pierre; Lee, Joanna; Hawes, Ian A

    2010-03-01

    To determine whether strategies to counsel and empower patients with heartburn-predominant dyspepsia could improve health-related quality of life. Using a cluster randomized, parallel group, multicentre design, nine centres were assigned to provide either basic or comprehensive counselling to patients (age range 18 to 50 years) presenting with heartburn-predominant upper gastrointestinal symptoms, who would be considered for drug therapy without further investigation. Patients were treated for four weeks with esomeprazole 40 mg once daily, followed by six months of treatment that was at the physician's discretion. The primary end point was the baseline change in Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire score. A total of 135 patients from nine centres were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There was a statistically significant baseline improvement in all domains of the QOLRAD questionnaire in both study arms at four and seven months (Pcounselling group than in the basic counselling group (1.77 versus 1.47, respectively); however, this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.07). After seven months, the overall mean baseline change in QOLRAD score between the comprehensive and basic counselling groups was not statistically significant (1.69 versus 1.56, respectively; P=0.63). A standardized, comprehensive counselling intervention showed a positive initial trend in improving quality of life in patients with heartburn-predominant uninvestigated dyspepsia. Further investigation is needed to confirm the potential benefits of providing patients with comprehensive counselling regarding disease management.

  6. A template-based computerized instruction entry system helps the comunication between doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Toshihiro; Mihara, Naoki; Nakagawa, Rie; Manabe, Shiro; Shimai, Yoshie; Teramoto, Kei; Matsumura, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    In a hospital, doctors and nurses shares roles in treating admitted patients. Communication between them is necessary and communication errors become the problem in medical safety. In Japan, verbal instruction is prohibited and doctors write their instruction on paper instruction slips. However, because it is difficult to ascertain revision history and the active instructions on instruction slips, human errors can occur. We developed template-based computerized instruction entry system to reduce ward workloads and contribute to medical safety. Templates enable us to input the instructions easily and standardize the descriptions of instructions. By standardizing and combine the instruction into one template for one instruction item, the systems could prevent instructions overlap. We created sets of templates (e.g., admission set, preoperative set), so that doctors could enter their instructions easily. Instructions entered via any of the sets can be subdivided into separate items by the system before being submitted, and can also be changed on a per-item basis. The instructions were displayed as calendar form. Calendar form represents the instruction shift and current active instructions. We prepared 382 standardized instruction templates. In our system, 66% of instructions were entered via templates, and 34% were entered as free-text comments. Our system prevents communication errors between medical staff.

  7. Breast cancer worry among women awaiting mammography: is it unfounded? Does prior counseling help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinemann, Susan K; Chun, Maria B J; Huynh, Dustin H; Loui, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of breast cancer anxiety and risk counseling in women undergoing mammography, and the association with known risk factors for cancer. Women awaiting mammography were surveyed regarding anxiety, prior breast cancer risk counseling, demographic and risk factors. Anxiety was assessed via 7-point Likert-type scale (LS). Risk was defined by Gail model or prior breast cancer. Data were analyzed by nonparametric methods; significance determined at alpha = 0.05. Of 227 women surveyed, 54 were classified "higher risk". Counseling prevalence was similar (52%) for all ethnic groups, but higher (72%, PCounseling by primary care physicians (PCP) did not correlate with lower worry scores. It was concluded that most women awaiting mammography are not unduly anxious. Additionally, the findings showed a correlation between a woman's concern about developing cancer with known risk factors and rural residence.

  8. Nicotine patches and quitline counseling to help hospitalized smokers stay quit: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Sharon; Zhu, Shu-Hong; Gamst, Anthony; Kirby, Carrie; Brandstein, Kendra; Klonoff-Cohen, Hillary; Chaplin, Edward; Morris, Timothy; Seymann, Gregory; Lee, Joshua

    2012-08-01

    Hospitalized smokers often quit smoking, voluntarily or involuntarily; most relapse soon after discharge. Extended follow-up counseling can help prevent relapse. However, it is difficult for hospitals to provide follow-up and smokers rarely leave the hospital with quitting aids (for example, nicotine patches). This study aims to test a practical model in which hospitals work with a state cessation quitline. Hospital staff briefly intervene with smokers at bedside and refer them to the quitline. Depending on assigned condition, smokers may receive nicotine patches at discharge or extended quitline telephone counseling post-discharge. This project establishes a practical model that lends itself to broader dissemination, while testing the effectiveness of the interventions in a rigorous randomized trial. This randomized clinical trial (N = 1,640) tests the effect of two interventions on long-term quit rates of hospitalized smokers in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The interventions are (1) nicotine patches (eight-week, step down program) dispensed at discharge and (2) proactive telephone counseling provided by the state quitline after discharge. Subjects are randomly assigned into: usual care, nicotine patches, telephone counseling, or both patches and counseling. It is hypothesized that patches and counseling have independent effects and their combined effect is greater than either alone. The primary outcome measure is thirty-day abstinence at six months; a secondary outcome is biochemically validated smoking status. Cost-effectiveness analysis is conducted to compare each intervention condition (patch alone, counseling alone, and combined interventions) against the usual care condition. Further, this study examines whether smokers' medical diagnosis is a moderator of treatment effect. Generalized linear (binomial) mixed models will be used to study the effect of treatment on abstinence rates. Clustering is accounted for with hospital-specific random effects. If this

  9. Nicotine patches and quitline counseling to help hospitalized smokers stay quit: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummins Sharon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitalized smokers often quit smoking, voluntarily or involuntarily; most relapse soon after discharge. Extended follow-up counseling can help prevent relapse. However, it is difficult for hospitals to provide follow-up and smokers rarely leave the hospital with quitting aids (for example, nicotine patches. This study aims to test a practical model in which hospitals work with a state cessation quitline. Hospital staff briefly intervene with smokers at bedside and refer them to the quitline. Depending on assigned condition, smokers may receive nicotine patches at discharge or extended quitline telephone counseling post-discharge. This project establishes a practical model that lends itself to broader dissemination, while testing the effectiveness of the interventions in a rigorous randomized trial. Methods/design This randomized clinical trial (N = 1,640 tests the effect of two interventions on long-term quit rates of hospitalized smokers in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The interventions are (1 nicotine patches (eight-week, step down program dispensed at discharge and (2 proactive telephone counseling provided by the state quitline after discharge. Subjects are randomly assigned into: usual care, nicotine patches, telephone counseling, or both patches and counseling. It is hypothesized that patches and counseling have independent effects and their combined effect is greater than either alone. The primary outcome measure is thirty-day abstinence at six months; a secondary outcome is biochemically validated smoking status. Cost-effectiveness analysis is conducted to compare each intervention condition (patch alone, counseling alone, and combined interventions against the usual care condition. Further, this study examines whether smokers’ medical diagnosis is a moderator of treatment effect. Generalized linear (binomial mixed models will be used to study the effect of treatment on abstinence rates. Clustering is accounted

  10. Intercultural encounters in counselling and psychotherapy--communication with the help of interpreters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk-Ansohn, Mechthild; Gurris, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Treatment and rehabilitation of torture victims and persons traumatized by war or persecution can require working in an intercultural setting, as is the case when working with refugees and migrants. The following article offers practical advice for diagnostics, counselling and treatment of patients from other cultures who are not speaking the language of the therapist.

  11. Effective dietary counseling: helping patients find and follow "the way" to eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, David L

    2002-01-01

    The leading causes of mortality in the U.S. are well known: cardiovascular disease, cancer and stroke. But, in the field of preventive medicine, the argument is made that these are not the causes of death, but rather the mechanisms of death, in turn the result of true, underlying causes. Of the more than 2 million deaths that occur each year in the U.S., more than 1 million are premature and "preventable" through the modification of lifestyle and environmental exposures. Due to the epidemic of obesity and overweight, a clinical practice that neglects patient nutrition (or physical activity) patterns is neglecting the leading causes of death for patients. On this basis, routine counseling to promote healthful eating is encouraged by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and there is evidence that physician training in nutrition enhances counseling.

  12. [Successful patient-activated help call for a doctor during in-hospital stay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mette Mejlby; Hasselkvist, Birgith; Thordal, Sofie; Riiskjær, Erik; Kelsen, Jens

    2014-09-29

    Department of Medicine, Randers Regional Hospital, conducted a study of patient-activated help call, involving 1,050 patients with nearly 3,700 days in-hospital stay. Patients were encou-raged to bypass traditional clinical hierarchy of communication when they felt, that their concern was not met by the staff. Three help calls were related to the management of pain. In two cases it resulted in a surgical procedure. A survey including 104 patients revealed that one third reported that patient safety was improved by the initiative and nearly three quarters re-ported that they would be willing to activate the call.

  13. Pre-natal counselling--helping couples make decisions following the diagnosis of severe heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menahem, Samuel; Grimwade, James

    2005-07-01

    The prenatal diagnosis of a major cardiac abnormality tends to precipitate a crisis for the affected parents. In a setting of grief and emotional distress, there is the challenge to provide meaningful information of the abnormality, its need for intervention and likely outcome, so as to enable the parents, if allowed the option, to come to a fully informed decision as to whether to continue with the pregnancy. This discussion paper reviews the difficulties encountered in counselling affected parents being mindful of the psychological constraints prevalent at the time. While an accurate and detailed diagnosis is important for the professionals, the information required by the parents needs to be simple and focussed on the questions raised by them as they relate to quality of life issues to be experienced by their yet unborn infant/child growing into an adult.

  14. [Evaluation of a Self-Help Supported Counseling Concept for Children and Adolescents with Disproportional Short Stature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohenkohl, A C; Sommer, R; Kahrs, S; Bullinger, M; Klingebiel, K-H; Quitmann, J H

    2016-01-01

    Disproportionate short stature may impair the quality of life (QoL) of patients and their families. This study aimed to evaluate a self-help supported counseling concept to increase the QoL of the participants. QoL data from 58 children/adolescents (8-17 years) with a diagnosis of achondroplasia was collected at 2 measurement points during one year using the the QoLISSY questionnaire (self-/parental report). Differences before and after participation vs. non-participation in the intervention were evaluated using a linear mixed model. The longitudinal results show a greater increase of QoL in the active intervention group compared to a passive control group (p=0,005). The increase in the self-reported QoL of affected patients was significantly higher than for the parent-report (p=0,048). The study shows that patients with achondroplasia benefit from a self-help supported counseling concept. However, this should be tested in a randomized trial. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Predictors of cessation treatment outcome and treatment moderators among smoking parents receiving quitline counselling or self-help material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Kathrin; Otten, Roy; Kleinjan, Marloes; Bricker, Jonathan B; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2014-12-01

    Several cessation treatments effectively enhance cessation, but it is not always clear which treatment may be most suitable for a particular client. We examined predictors of treatment outcome and treatment moderators among smoking parents in the Netherlands. We conducted secondary analyses of a randomized controlled trial in which smoking parents received either quitline counselling (n=256) or a self-help brochure (n=256). Data collection was completed in October 2012. Endpoints were 7-day point prevalence abstinence and 6-month prolonged abstinence at 12-month follow-up. Potential predictors and moderators included socio-demographic characteristics, smoking-related variables, and child-related variables. Male gender, higher employment status, lower daily cigarette consumption, higher levels of confidence in quitting, presence of a child with a chronic respiratory illness, and wanting to quit for the health of one's child predicted abstinence at 12months. Significant treatment moderators were intention to quit and educational level. Quitline counselling was effective regardless of intention to quit and educational level, but self-help material was less effective among less motivated and lower educated parents. Certain subgroups of smokers, such as parents who are concerned about the health of their child, are particularly receptive to cessation support. Individual characteristics should be considered in treatment selections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Helping clients think through their causal models: application to counseling clients to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkule, Jennifer A; Alemi, Farrokh

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a model for therapy using active investigation of causal attributions made by the client. Causal attributions guide behavior. Often wrong attributions (excuses) force the individual to waste effort and time in making changes that do not lead to desired behavior. Many focus on their motivation and not external causes of their behavior. As a consequence, they relapse into old habits when their motivation waivers. Others gather information that is not causally linked to their behavior, and therefore of little use in understanding the mechanism for change. The role of clinician is envisioned as being to guide the clients to seek causal explanations for their behavior, to correct false attributions, and to help the clients use the causal mechanisms they have found to change their behavior. In theory, at least, it is expected that when causes of the unhealthy behavior are removed, lasting change will occur and the client is less likely to go through cycles of improvement and relapse. This article shows how the clinician can conduct causal analysis of the client's behavior. This model for therapy is in the tradition of solution-focused approaches to helping individuals make psychological and behavioral changes. A case example is also presented, where the client is trying to increase his or her exercise patterns.

  17. Postpartum adolescents' contraceptive counselling preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sober, Stephanie; Shea, Judy A; Shaber, Allison G; Whittaker, Paul G; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2017-04-01

    The optimal approach for provision and timing of postpartum contraceptive counselling for adolescents has not been established. To reduce repeat pregnancies from current USA levels of nearly 20%, a better understanding is needed of postpartum adolescent females' preferences regarding contraceptive counselling and delivery. Semi-structured interviews with 30 USA postpartum teens (97% Black) explored pregnancy prevention and contraceptive counselling. Transcripts were independently coded by two researchers and inter-rater reliability calculated using Kappa coefficients. With a standard content analysis approach, common themes were identified, coded and summarized. Findings indicated pregnancy prevention was important - two thirds of subjects reported becoming pregnant 'too soon', almost all did not desire another child for at least 6 years and most indicated that pregnancy prevention was either 'very' or 'extremely' important right now. The subjects described doctors and their prenatal clinic as their most accurate sources of contraception information, but stated that doctors and parents were the most helpful sources. All were comfortable discussing contraception with providers and had a desire for shared decision making. While many had received written materials, most preferred in-person contraceptive counselling. Optimally, participants suggested that contraceptive counselling would be provided by a physician, begin antepartum and almost all preferred to leave the hospital with their chosen method of contraception. Pregnancy prevention is important for postpartum adolescents as most desired to delay future childbearing. In-person contraceptive counselling should begin in the antepartum period and include provision of contraception prior to discharge.

  18. What supervisors and universities can do to enhance doctoral student experience (and how they can help themselves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Dawn C; Denicolo, Pam M

    2017-05-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a flurry of government papers and policy reports worldwide calling for increased number and diversity of doctoral researchers and a broadening of the curriculum to meet the developing needs of respective national 'knowledge-driven' economies. This has been followed by position papers and best practice examples of employability skills development in boundary-crossing doctoral programmes, especially in response to these initiatives. However, there is a disassociation between this ample literature expounding the new doctorate with its broader remit, inclusivity and production of 'industry-ready' graduates and the comparatively sparse literature on the doctoral candidates' experiences of their programmes and career readiness. Within this review, we briefly outline international government initiatives and examples of the responses by Life Science and Biomedical doctoral programmes to address these various challenges. Furthermore, we explore the recent literature on the lived experience of doctoral researchers by examining their perception of the recent changes to the research context to make recommendations for universities and supervisors on how to better support an ever more diverse doctoral population for a wide range of career opportunities. Examples of how doctoral researchers themselves can make the best of currently available opportunities are also provided. © FEMS 2017.

  19. Helping Her Heal: a pilot study of an educational counseling intervention for spouses of women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Frances Marcus; Cochrane, Barbara B; Fletcher, Kristin A; Zahlis, Ellen H; Shands, Mary Ellen; Gralow, Julie R; Wu, Salene M; Schmitz, KrisAnn

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer is known to cause substantial anxiety, depressed mood, and diminished marital functioning in the diagnosed woman's spouse. Despite the scope and magnitude of these issues, few intervention studies have included spouses or addressed the causes of their lower functioning. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the short-term impact of a 5-session, clinic-based, educational counseling intervention for spouses whose wife was recently diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. The goals of the intervention were to enhance spouses' skills and confidence to communicate and interpersonally support his wife about the breast cancer as well as improve spouses' self-care, depressed mood, anxiety, and marital adjustment. Pre-post-test results obtained from 20 spouses from valid and reliable standardized questionnaires showed significant improvements in spouses' depressed mood, anxiety, skills, self-confidence, and self-care. Confidential post-intervention interviews with spouses and wives included detailed examples of positive changes in the spouse's communication and support to his wife about the breast cancer, diminished tension in the spouse, and improved quality in the couple's relationship. Further evaluation of the Helping Her Heal Program is warranted within a clinical trial.

  20. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth / For Parents / Prenatal Genetic Counseling What's ... how can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating ...

  1. Is telephone counselling a useful addition to physician advice and nicotine replacement therapy in helping patients to stop smoking? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, R D; Pipe, A; Dafoe, W A

    1999-06-01

    The authors evaluated the incremental efficacy of telephone counselling by a nurse in addition to physician advice and nicotine replacement therapy in helping patients to stop smoking. The trial was conducted at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. A total of 396 volunteers who smoked 15 or more cigarettes daily were randomly assigned to either of 2 groups: usual care (control group) and usual care plus telephone counselling (intervention group); the groups were stratified by sex and degree of nicotine dependence. Usual care involved the receipt of physician advice on 3 occasions, self-help materials and 12 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy. Telephone counselling was provided by a nurse at 2, 6 and 13 weeks after the target quit date. Point-prevalent quit rates were determined at 52 weeks after the target quit date. The point-prevalent quit rates at 52 weeks did not differ significantly between the control and intervention groups (24.1% v. 23.4% respectively). The quit rates did not differ significantly at the secondary measurement points of 4, 12 and 26 weeks. Brief physician assistance, along with nicotine replacement therapy, can help well-motivated smokers to quit. Three additional sessions of telephone counselling by a nurse were ineffective in increasing quit rates. This form of assistance may be useful in the absence of physician advice or when self-selected by patients.

  2. A Decade of Counseling Services in One College of Veterinary Medicine: Veterinary Medical Students' Psychological Distress and Help-Seeking Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Adryanna A S; Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R

    Much has been discussed about the high prevalence of psychological distress among veterinary medical students. Studies investigating general samples of veterinary medical students indicate that, on average, depression and anxiety symptoms are present at higher rates than in comparison samples. However, little is known about veterinary medical students who seek counseling. This study intends to expand the literature on veterinary student well-being, as the first to examine a sample of veterinary medical students seeking counseling services. It offers an overview of student distress and help-seeking trends from a decade of counseling services provided in one College of Veterinary Medicine (CVM) in the US. The sample includes data from 279 participants. Results indicate a steady increase in students seeking counseling over the last decade. First-year students sought services at higher rates but second-year students experienced the greatest distress when compared to other cohorts. Students seeking counseling services experienced levels of overall distress, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and social role concerns that were, on average, above cut-off scores. Physical health was significantly associated with student distress, suggesting opportunities for intervention.

  3. Marriage Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to improve a troubled relationship. You can use marriage counseling to help with many specific issues, including: Communication problems Sexual difficulties Conflicts about child rearing or blended families Substance abuse Anger Infidelity ...

  4. Is training effective? A study of counseling psychology doctoral trainees in a psychodynamic/interpersonal training clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E; Baumann, Ellen; Shafran, Naama; Gupta, Shudarshana; Morrison, Ashley; Rojas, Andrés E Pérez; Spangler, Patricia T; Griffin, Shauna; Pappa, Laura; Gelso, Charles J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated changes over 12 to 42 months in 23 predoctoral trainees during their externship training in a psychodynamic/interpersonal psychotherapy clinic. Over time, trainees increased in client-rated working alliance and real relationship, therapist-rated working alliance, client-rated interpersonal functioning, ability to use helping skills (e.g., challenges, immediacy), higher-order functioning (e.g., conceptualization ability, countertransference management), feelings about themselves as therapists (e.g., more authentic, more self-aware), and understanding about being a therapist (e.g., theoretical orientation, curiosity about client dynamics). In contrast, trainees did not change in engaging clients (return after intake or for at least 8 sessions), judge-rated psychodynamic techniques in third and ninth sessions across clients (although trainees used more cognitive-behavioral techniques over time in third but not ninth sessions), or changes in client-rated symptomatology. Trainees primarily attributed changes to graduate training, individual and group supervision, research participation, and working with clients. Implications for training and research are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Can reduce--the effects of chat-counseling and web-based self-help, web-based self-help alone and a waiting list control program on cannabis use in problematic cannabis users: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael P; Haug, Severin; Wenger, Andreas; Berg, Oliver; Sullivan, Robin; Beck, Thilo; Stark, Lars

    2013-11-14

    In European countries, including Switzerland, as well as in many states worldwide, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance after alcohol and tobacco. Although approximately one in ten users develop serious problems of dependency, only a minority attends outpatient addiction counseling centers. The offer of a combined web-based self-help and chat counseling treatment could potentially also reach those users who hesitate to approach such treatment centers and help them to reduce their cannabis use. This paper presents the protocol for a three-armed randomized controlled trial that will test the effectiveness of a web-based self-help intervention in combination with, or independent of, tailored chat counseling compared to a waiting list in reducing or enabling the abstention from cannabis use in problematic users. The primary outcome will be the weekly quantity of cannabis used. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of days per week on which cannabis is used, the severity of cannabis use disorder, the severity of cannabis dependence, cannabis withdrawal symptoms, cannabis craving, the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other non-cannabis illicit drugs, changes in mental health symptoms, and treatment retention. The self-help intervention will consist of 8 modules designed to reduce cannabis use based on the principles of motivational interviewing, self-control practices, and methods of cognitive behavioral therapy. The two additional individual chat-counseling sessions in the additional chat condition will be based on the same therapy approaches and tailored to participants' self-help information data and personal problems. The predictive validity of participants' baseline characteristics on treatment retention and outcomes will be explored. To the best of our knowledge, this will be the first randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of online self-help therapy in combination or without chat counseling in reducing or enabling the

  6. Helping family doctors detect vulnerable caregivers after an emergency department visit for an elderly relative: results of a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciampi Antonio

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family doctors have been ascribed a role in monitoring patients and their informal caregivers. Little is known about the factors that might alert physicians to changing circumstances or needs of the caregivers. The study objective was to examine changes in family caregivers' quality of life following an emergency department (ED visit by an older community-dwelling relative that might cue doctors to subsequent caregiver distress. Methods A longitudinal study with follow-up at 1- and 4-months was conducted in the EDs of 4 hospitals in Montreal, Canada. Caregivers reported on demographics and quality of life (SF-36. Patients reported on demographics and functional disability. Multiple linear regression for repeated measures was used to evaluate changes in caregiver quality of life and factors related to these changes. Results 159 caregivers (60.5 yrs ± 15.8%; 73.0% female, including 68 (42.8% spouses, 60 (37.7% adult children, and 31 (19.5% other relatives participated. Following an initial ED visit by older relatives, caregiver general health and physical functioning declined over time, while mental health status improved. Compared to the other relative caregiver group, spouses were at increased risk for decline in general health, mental health, and physical functioning at 1 month, while adult children were at increased risk for decline in physical health at 1 month. Conclusion Spouses were most at risk for decline in quality of life. Primary care physicians who become aware of an ED visit by an elderly person may be alerted to possible subsequent deterioration in family caregivers, especially spouses.

  7. Subtyping based on readiness and confidence: the identification of help-seeking profiles for gamblers accessing web-based counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, S N; Lubman, D I; Iyer, R; Gao, C X; Dowling, N A

    2015-03-01

    Problem gamblers are not a homogeneous group and recent data suggest that subtyping can improve treatment outcomes. This study administered three readiness rulers and aimed to identify subtypes of gamblers accessing a national web-based counselling service based on these rulers. Participants were 1204 gamblers (99.4% problem gamblers) who accessed a single session of web-based counselling in Australia. Measures included three readiness rulers (importance, readiness and confidence to resist an urge to gamble), demographics and the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI). Gamblers reported high importance of change [mean = 9.2, standard deviation (SD) = 1.51] and readiness to change (mean = 8.86, SD = 1.84), but lower confidence to resist an urge to gamble (mean = 3.93, SD = 2.44) compared with importance and readiness. The statistical fit indices of a latent class analysis identified a four-class model. Subtype 1 was characterized by a very high readiness to change and very low confidence to resist an urge to gamble (n = 662, 55.0%) and subtype 2 reported high readiness and low confidence (n = 358, 29.7%). Subtype 3 reported moderate ratings on all three rulers (n = 139, 11.6%) and subtype 4 reported high importance of change but low readiness and confidence (n = 45, 3.7%). A multinomial logistic regression indicated that subtypes differed by gender (P counselling comprise four distinct subgroups based on self-reported levels of readiness to change, confidence to resist the urge to gamble and importance of change. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Doctors' involvement in torture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesper, Sonntag

    2008-01-01

    Doctors from both non-democratic and democratic countries are involved in torture. The majority of doctors involved in torture are doctors at risk. Doctors at risk might compromise their ethical duty towards patients for the following possible reasons: individual factors (such as career, economic or ideological reasons), threats, orders from a higher ranking officer, political initiatives, working in atrocity-producing situations or dual loyalty. In dual loyalty conflicts, factors that might compromise doctors' ethical obligations towards detainees/patients are: ideological totalitarianism, moral disengagement, victim blame, patriotism, individual factors or threats. Another important reason why doctors are involved in torture is that not all doctors are trained in addressing human rights issues of detainees. Torture survivors report that they have experienced doctors' involvement in torture and doctors themselves report that they have been involved in torture. Testimonies from both torture survivors and doctors demonstrate that the most common way doctors are involved is in the diagnosis/medical examination of torture survivors/prisoners. And it is common before, during and after torture. Both torture survivors and doctors state that doctors are involved during torture by treatment and direct participation. Doctors also falsify journals, certificates and reports. When doctors are involved in torture it has devastating consequences for both torture survivors and doctors. The consequences for the survivors can be mistrust of doctors, avoidance of seeking doctors' help and nightmares involving doctors. Mistrust and avoidance of doctors could be especially fatal to the survivor, as it could mean a survivor who is ill may not seek medical attention. When the unambiguous role of the doctor as the protector and helper of people is questioned, it affects the medical profession all over the world.

  9. Cultural competence in working with the Arab Australian community: a conceptual review and the experience of the Arab Council Australia (ACA) gambling help counselling service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazbouh-Moussa, Randa; Ohtsuka, Keis

    2017-01-01

    Although Culturally And Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities participate less in gambling than the general population, those who gamble are more likely to show signs of disordered gambling (Moore and Ohtsuka International Gambling Studies, 1, 87-101, 2001; Raylu and Oei Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1087-1114, 2004; Yamine and Thomas The impact of gaming on specific cultural groups, Victorian Casino and Gaming Authority, Melbourne, 2000). Research data on gambling problems and interventions in the Arab Australian community are extremely scarce. Therefore, this article will present an overview of the Arab Australian community and cultural issues regarding gambling within the Arab Australian community. Identifying these issues is important to work effectively with Arab Australians clients and those from other CALD backgrounds. The article also presents a conceptual review of peer-reviewed research articles on cultural competence in working with the Arab clients, the overview of Arab migration history to Australia and a summary of recent events that suggest a tension between Arab and non-Arab Australian communities. Observations and experiences that were encountered during the gambling counselling service operating in the Australian Arab community in New South Wales are also discussed. The research data to validate the effectiveness and positive impact of cultural competence are still in its early stages. However, a small number of community education resources have been available for working with the Arab community. From the data in annual reviews on the Arab Council Australia gambling counselling service, it was identified that cultural beliefs and expectations influence risk-taking decisions, identification of gambling issues, and preference of help seeking within the client's social network. Further, culturally-specific sensitive issues related to political and global security events, which in turn influenced openness and willingness for the help

  10. A three-year cohort study of the relationships between coping, job stress and burnout after a counselling intervention for help-seeking physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson Ro, Karin E; Tyssen, Reidar; Hoffart, Asle; Sexton, Harold; Aasland, Olaf G; Gude, Tore

    2010-04-27

    Knowledge about important factors in reduction of burnout is needed, but there is a dearth of burnout intervention program studies and their effects among physicians. The present three-year follow-up study aimed to investigate the roles of coping strategies, job stress and personality traits in burnout reduction after a counselling intervention for distressed physicians. 227 physicians who attended a counselling intervention for burnout at the Resource Centre Villa Sana, Norway in 2003-2005, were followed with self-report assessments at baseline, one-year, and three-year follow-up. Main outcome measures were emotional exhaustion (one dimension of burnout), job stress, coping strategies and neuroticism. Changes in these measures were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA. Temporal relationships between changes were examined using structural modelling with cross-lagged and synchronous panel models. 184 physicians (81%, 83 men, 101 women) completed the three-year follow-up assessment. Significantly reduced levels of emotional exhaustion, job stress, and emotion-focused coping strategies from baseline to one year after the intervention, were maintained at three-year follow-up.Panel modelling indicated that changes in emotion-focused coping (z = 4.05, p help-seeking physicians.

  11. A three-year cohort study of the relationships between coping, job stress and burnout after a counselling intervention for help-seeking physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffart Asle

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about important factors in reduction of burnout is needed, but there is a dearth of burnout intervention program studies and their effects among physicians. The present three-year follow-up study aimed to investigate the roles of coping strategies, job stress and personality traits in burnout reduction after a counselling intervention for distressed physicians. Methods 227 physicians who attended a counselling intervention for burnout at the Resource Centre Villa Sana, Norway in 2003-2005, were followed with self-report assessments at baseline, one-year, and three-year follow-up. Main outcome measures were emotional exhaustion (one dimension of burnout, job stress, coping strategies and neuroticism. Changes in these measures were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA. Temporal relationships between changes were examined using structural modelling with cross-lagged and synchronous panel models. Results 184 physicians (81%, 83 men, 101 women completed the three-year follow-up assessment. Significantly reduced levels of emotional exhaustion, job stress, and emotion-focused coping strategies from baseline to one year after the intervention, were maintained at three-year follow-up. Panel modelling indicated that changes in emotion-focused coping (z = 4.05, p Conclusion A sequential relationship indicated that reduction in emotion-focused coping and in job stress preceded reduction in emotional exhaustion. As a consequence, coping strategies and job stress could be important foci in intervention programs that aim to reduce or prevent burnout in help-seeking physicians.

  12. Outplacement Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowdell, Richard L.; And Others

    This monographs discusses outplacement counseling (the process of helping a terminated employee secure new employment) in business and industry and in higher education. The first section, outplacement in business and industry, describes the emergence of outplacement services and discusses benefits and problems associated with the service. The…

  13. Internet-Based Self-Help Career Assessments and Interventions: Challenges and Implications for Evidence-Based Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gati, Itamar; Asulin-Peretz, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A major characteristic of the 21st century with significant implications on career decision making is the growing prevalence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Challenges involving ICT-based self-assessment and self-help interventions aimed at facilitating career decision making are discussed. Specifically, this article focuses…

  14. A Web-Based Self-Help Intervention With and Without Chat Counseling to Reduce Cannabis Use in Problematic Cannabis Users: Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael P; Wenger, Andreas; Berg, Oliver; Beck, Thilo; Stark, Lars; Buehler, Eveline; Haug, Severin

    2015-10-13

    After alcohol and tobacco, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance in many countries worldwide. Although approximately one in ten users develops serious problems of dependency, only a minority attend outpatient addiction counseling centers. A Web-based intervention could potentially reach those users who hesitate to approach such treatment centers. To test the efficacy of a Web-based self-help intervention with and without chat counseling-Can Reduce-in reducing the cannabis use of problematic cannabis users as an alternative to outpatient treatment services. Altogether, 436 participants were recruited by various online and offline media for the Web-based trial. A total of 308 of these were eligible for study participation and were randomly allocated in an unblinded manner to either self-help with chat (n=114), self-help without chat (n=101), or a waiting list control group (n=93). The fully automated self-help intervention consisted of eight modules designed to reduce cannabis use, and was based on the principles of motivational interviewing, self-control practices, and methods of cognitive behavioral therapy. Additional individual chat counseling sessions were based on the same therapeutic principles. The sessions were conducted by trained counselors and addressed participants' personal problems. The main outcomes were the frequency (number of days) and quantity of cannabis use (number of standardized joints) per week, as entered into the consumption diary at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included self-reported symptoms of cannabis use disorder, severity of cannabis dependence, risky alcohol use, and mental health symptoms. Intervention participation and retention were extracted from the user progress data and the consumption diary, respectively. Can Reduce participants were older (U=2.296, P=.02) and reported a greater number of cannabis use days at baseline than patients who entered outpatient treatment with cannabis

  15. A Web-Based Self-Help Intervention With and Without Chat Counseling to Reduce Cannabis Use in Problematic Cannabis Users: Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Andreas; Berg, Oliver; Beck, Thilo; Stark, Lars; Buehler, Eveline; Haug, Severin

    2015-01-01

    Background After alcohol and tobacco, cannabis is the most widely used psychoactive substance in many countries worldwide. Although approximately one in ten users develops serious problems of dependency, only a minority attend outpatient addiction counseling centers. A Web-based intervention could potentially reach those users who hesitate to approach such treatment centers. Objective To test the efficacy of a Web-based self-help intervention with and without chat counseling—Can Reduce—in reducing the cannabis use of problematic cannabis users as an alternative to outpatient treatment services. Methods Altogether, 436 participants were recruited by various online and offline media for the Web-based trial. A total of 308 of these were eligible for study participation and were randomly allocated in an unblinded manner to either self-help with chat (n=114), self-help without chat (n=101), or a waiting list control group (n=93). The fully automated self-help intervention consisted of eight modules designed to reduce cannabis use, and was based on the principles of motivational interviewing, self-control practices, and methods of cognitive behavioral therapy. Additional individual chat counseling sessions were based on the same therapeutic principles. The sessions were conducted by trained counselors and addressed participants' personal problems. The main outcomes were the frequency (number of days) and quantity of cannabis use (number of standardized joints) per week, as entered into the consumption diary at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included self-reported symptoms of cannabis use disorder, severity of cannabis dependence, risky alcohol use, and mental health symptoms. Intervention participation and retention were extracted from the user progress data and the consumption diary, respectively. Results Can Reduce participants were older (U=2.296, P=.02) and reported a greater number of cannabis use days at baseline than patients who

  16. Cultural competence in working with the Arab Australian community: a conceptual review and the experience of the Arab Council Australia (ACA gambling help counselling service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randa Mazbouh-Moussa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although Culturally And Linguistically Diverse (CALD communities participate less in gambling than the general population, those who gamble are more likely to show signs of disordered gambling (Moore and Ohtsuka International Gambling Studies, 1, 87–101, 2001; Raylu and Oei Clinical Psychology Review, 23, 1087–1114, 2004; Yamine and Thomas The impact of gaming on specific cultural groups, Victorian Casino and Gaming Authority, Melbourne, 2000. Research data on gambling problems and interventions in the Arab Australian community are extremely scarce. Therefore, this article will present an overview of the Arab Australian community and cultural issues regarding gambling within the Arab Australian community. Identifying these issues is important to work effectively with Arab Australians clients and those from other CALD backgrounds. The article also presents a conceptual review of peer-reviewed research articles on cultural competence in working with the Arab clients, the overview of Arab migration history to Australia and a summary of recent events that suggest a tension between Arab and non-Arab Australian communities. Observations and experiences that were encountered during the gambling counselling service operating in the Australian Arab community in New South Wales are also discussed. The research data to validate the effectiveness and positive impact of cultural competence are still in its early stages. However, a small number of community education resources have been available for working with the Arab community. From the data in annual reviews on the Arab Council Australia gambling counselling service, it was identified that cultural beliefs and expectations influence risk-taking decisions, identification of gambling issues, and preference of help seeking within the client’s social network. Further, culturally-specific sensitive issues related to political and global security events, which in turn influenced openness and

  17. Sustaining walk-in counselling services: an economic assessment from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Susan; Stalker, Carol A; Cait, Cheryl-Anne; Josling, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Introducing single-session walk-in counselling services in a counselling agency virtually eliminated a lengthy wait list and reduced costly no-shows for scheduled counselling. A pilot study found that client distress decreased significantly following the single session, and a high proportion of clients were "ready for change." The service diverts clients from using hospitals and family doctors/walk-in clinics and toward using community social services. It also enables an earlier return to work and usual activities. The social benefits (reduced hospital use and faster return to work) exceed the cost of the service. This information is helping to make the case for sustaining and expanding these services.

  18. Intimate partner violence victims' acceptance and refusal of on-site counseling in emergency departments: Predictors of help-seeking behavior explored through a 5-year medical chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Anna Wai-Man; Wong, Janet Yuen-Ha; Lo, Ruby Tsz-Fung; Chan, Pik-Ying; Wong, John Kit-Shing; Lau, Chu-Leung; Kam, Chak-Wah

    2017-12-24

    Healthcare services constitute the first formal support that many intimate partner violence (IPV) victims receive and a link to formal welfare and psychological support. The help-seeking behavior for psychosocial support, e.g., Accident and Emergency Departments (AED) onsite counseling, is key to developing effective support for IPV victims. This study aimed to strengthen the health-welfare support link to aid IPV prevention in AEDs by investigating the acceptance and refusal of on-site counseling by IPV victims. A retrospective cohort study retrieved and reviewed all records of IPV victims presenting at the AEDs of two Hong Kong hospitals between 2010 and 2014. A total of 157 male and 823 female IPV victims were identified, 295 of whom refused on-site counseling. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the association between help-seeking and demographic and violent injury-related factors. The odds of help-seeking via on-site counseling were significantly lower for victims with mental illness (aOR=0.49; 95% CI=0.27, 0.88). After controlling for all demographic characteristics, mental illness, and drug abuse information, sex remained an independent predictor of help-seeking (aOR=2.62; 95% CI=1.45, 4.74); victims who had experienced >2 abuse incidents were more likely to seek help than those who had experienced ≤2 abuse incidents (aOR=1.90; 95% CI=1.11, 3.26). The factors associated with help-seeking from on-site services by IPV victims reflect the need for multidisciplinary collaborative work aimed at IPV prevention. Healthcare professionals require training on how to promote help-seeking behavior targeted specifically for male and female IPV victims according to their needs and preferences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Choosing a Family Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history, and lifestyle. These help determine possible health risk factors.Research shows that people who have a family doctor have better overall health outcomes, lower death rates, and lower total costs of care.Things to considerFamily doctors know ...

  20. Patient-doctor communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutsch, Carol

    2003-09-01

    randomized clinical trials and analytic studies of physician-patient communication confirmed a positive influence of quality communication on health outcomes. Continuing research in this arena is important. For a successful and humanistic encounter at an office visit, one needs to be sure that the patient's key concerns have been directly and specifically solicited and addressed. To be effective, the clinician must gain an understanding of the patient's perspective on his or her illness. Patient concerns can be wide ranging, including fear of death, mutilation, disability; ominous attribution to pain symptoms; distrust of the medical profession; concern about loss of wholeness, role, status, or independence; denial of reality of medical problems; grief; fear of leaving home; and other uniquely personal issues. Patient values, cultures, and preferences need to be explored. Gender is another element that needs to be taken into consideration. Ensuring key issues are verbalized openly is fundamental to effective patient-doctor communication. The clinician should be careful not to be judgmental or scolding because this may rapidly close down communication. Sometimes the patient gains therapeutic benefit just from venting concerns in a safe environment with a caring clinician. Appropriate reassurance or pragmatic suggestions to help with problem solving and setting up a structured plan of action may be an important part of the patient care that is required. Counseling around unhealthy or risky behaviors is an important communication skill that should be part of health care visits. Understanding the psychology of behavioral change and establishing a systematic framework for such interventions, which includes the five As of patient counseling (assess, advise, agree, assist, and arrange) are steps toward ensuring effective patient-doctor communication. Historically in medicine, there was a paternalistic approach to deciding what should be done for a patient: the physician knew best

  1. Use of mental health counseling as adolescents become young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jennifer W; Adams, Sally H; Burns, Jane; Brindis, Claire D; Irwin, Charles E

    2008-09-01

    Despite parallels in mental health needs among adolescents and young adults, there is a paucity of evidence regarding use of mental health services in young adulthood. Using a longitudinal sample, this study compares rates of mental health counseling use between adolescents and young adults, examines characteristics and predictors of counseling use for young adults, and identifies reasons for foregone care among those with mental health needs in young adulthood. Secondary data analysis was conducted on a nationally representative sample of 10,817 participants from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Data were derived from an initial survey collected in 1995 (mean age, 15.8 years) and a follow-up survey collected 7 years later (mean age, 21.5 years). Among individuals with depressive symptomology, young adults reported significantly lower rates of counseling use compared with adolescents. When taking into account the severity of mental health problems, female gender, high maternal education, school attendance, and receipt of routine physical examinations were significantly predictive of counseling use among young adults. Young adults of black ethnicity were significantly less likely to receive counseling compared with those of white ethnicity. Overall, 4% of young adults reported foregoing health care in the past year, despite self-reported mental health needs. Inability to pay, belief that the problem would go away, and lack of time were commonly cited reasons for any type of foregone health care. However, concerns regarding physician's care (i.e., fear of what the doctor would say or do, and belief that the doctor would be unable to help) were more frequently mentioned by those who acknowledged a need for counseling services. Low rates of mental health counseling persist from adolescence to young adulthood. Findings such as increased counseling service use among those receiving routine physical examinations, as well as reported concerns of

  2. A three-year cohort study of the relationships between coping, job stress and burnout after a counselling intervention for help-seeking physicians

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaksson Ro, Karin E; Tyssen, Reidar; Hoffart, Asle; Sexton, Harold; Aasland, Olaf G; Gude, Tore

    2010-01-01

    .... The present three-year follow-up study aimed to investigate the roles of coping strategies, job stress and personality traits in burnout reduction after a counselling intervention for distressed physicians...

  3. Teaching tobacco dependence treatment and counseling skills during medical school: rationale and design of the Medical Students helping patients Quit tobacco (MSQuit) group randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Rashelle B; Geller, Alan; Churchill, Linda; Jolicoeur, Denise; Murray, David M; Shoben, Abigail; David, Sean P; Adams, Michael; Okuyemi, Kola; Fauver, Randy; Gross, Robin; Leone, Frank; Xiao, Rui; Waugh, Jonathan; Crawford, Sybil; Ockene, Judith K

    2014-03-01

    Physician-delivered tobacco treatment using the 5As is clinically recommended, yet its use has been limited. Lack of adequate training and confidence to provide tobacco treatment is cited as leading reasons for limited 5A use. Tobacco dependence treatment training while in medical school is recommended, but is minimally provided. The MSQuit trial (Medical Students helping patients Quit tobacco) aims to determine if a multi-modal and theoretically-guided tobacco educational intervention will improve tobacco dependence treatment skills (i.e. 5As) among medical students. 10 U.S. medical schools were pair-matched and randomized in a group-randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether a multi-modal educational (MME) intervention compared to traditional education (TE) will improve observed tobacco treatment skills. MME is primarily composed of TE approaches (i.e. didactics) plus a 1st year web-based course and preceptor-facilitated training during a 3rd year clerkship rotation. The primary outcome measure is an objective score on an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) tobacco-counseling smoking case among 3rd year medical students from schools who implemented the MME or TE. MSQuit is the first randomized to evaluate whether a tobacco treatment educational intervention implemented during medical school will improve medical students' tobacco treatment skills. We hypothesize that the MME intervention will better prepare students in tobacco dependence treatment as measured by the OSCE. If a comprehensive tobacco treatment educational learning approach is effective, while also feasible and acceptable to implement, then medical schools may substantially influence skill development and use of the 5As among future physicians. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Models of Counselling Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgary Univ. (Alberta).

    University counseling centers usually follow one of a variety of themes or "models," although not in pure form. Perhaps the oldest is the vocational counseling model, which concentrates on helping students find suitable careers. In the psychotherapy model, most student concerns are seen for their personal content. Another model, student affairs…

  5. Counseling in teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Dorthe Busk

    Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant-orientated pilotp......Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant......-orientated pilotproject about counseling in teacher education. The aim was to acquire knowledge about how students perceive counseling. This knowledge could help uncover potential areas of development for counselingpractice. In the pilotproject it is tested if the chosen method is suitable for bigger qualitative study...

  6. Counseling the Coronary Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, Caryl; Semmler, Maynard

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses counseling sessions designed to a) help the coronary patient adjust to cardiovascular disease, b) diminish patient anxieties and fears, and c) educate the patient and family members on controlling risk factors to deter another coronary attack. (JS)

  7. A three-year cohort study of the relationships between coping, job stress and burnout after a counselling intervention for help-seeking physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffart Asle; Tyssen Reidar; Isaksson Ro Karin E; Sexton Harold; Aasland Olaf G; Gude Tore

    2010-01-01

    Background Knowledge about important factors in reduction of burnout is needed, but there is a dearth of burnout intervention program studies and their effects among physicians. The present three-year follow-up study aimed to investigate the roles of coping strategies, job stress and personality traits in burnout reduction after a counselling intervention for distressed physicians. Methods 227 physici...

  8. Bibliography for Curriculum Development in Counseling Skills for the Helping Professions. Human Resources Research Organization, Research Product D2-72-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabright, Carol L.

    This report presents a compilation of bibliographic material gathered during an evaluation undertaken by the Human Resources Research Organization for the U.S. Department of Labor. The evaluation concerned a special USTES Counselor Training Program designed to provide the equivalent of one year of full-time education in vocational counseling with…

  9. Family Planning Handbook for Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Ronald L., Ed.

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) believes that all people have the right to family planning information, including premarital and marital counseling, contraception information, and sex education. This physician's handbook is designed to provide all doctors with the necessary instructions on the latest family planning methods…

  10. Help for the Caregiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chosen to help where the caregiver needs it. Education and Information Coping Skills Counseling Family Meetings Home Care Help Hospice Care for the Cancer Patient Caregivers have a very hard job and it's ...

  11. Evaluating the efficacy of a web-based self-help intervention with and without chat counseling in reducing the cocaine use of problematic cocaine users: the study protocol of a pragmatic three-arm randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael P; Maier, Larissa J; Wenger, Andreas; Stark, Lars; Berg, Oliver; Beck, Thilo; Quednow, Boris B; Haug, Severin

    2015-07-10

    Web-based self-help interventions that aim to reduce problematic substance use are able to reach "hidden" consumer groups in the general population who often fear stigmatization and thus avoid institutional addiction treatment. In Western European countries, including Switzerland, cocaine is the most widely used psychoactive substance after alcohol, tobacco, and cannabis. Although approximately one in six users develop serious problems of dependency, only a minority seeks help from psychiatrists or in outpatient counseling centers or psychiatric hospitals. Offering web-based therapy treatment may potentially reach users who hesitate to approach institutional treatment services and help them reduce their cocaine use before they get into more serious trouble. The study will use a three-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) design to test the efficacy of a web-based self-help intervention with or without guided chat counseling compared with that of a waiting list control condition in reducing or stopping cocaine use. The primary outcome measure will be the weekly quantity of cocaine used. Secondary outcome measures will include the number of cocaine use days in the past 30 days, the severity of cocaine dependence, the use of alcohol, tobacco, and/or other illicit drugs, changes in mental health symptoms, and treatment retention. The self-help intervention will consist of eight modules that are designed to reduce cocaine use and depression symptoms. These modules are based on the principles of Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, such as Behavioral Self-Management. The three individual chat therapy sessions will be based on the same therapy approaches and will be tailored to participants' self-help data and aim to assist the reinstatement of social rewards and the improvement of social support and relationships. This study will be the first RCT to test the effectiveness of a web-based self-help intervention in combination with or without

  12. Doctoral surplus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities in the United States are producing about 25% more doctorates in science and engineering than the U.S. economy can absorb, according to a new study by the Rand Corporation and Stanford University's Institute for Higher Education Research. The study looked at 13 science and engineering fields, covering 210 doctorate-granting institutions and more than 1,000 educational institutions that employ people with doctorates. The study was done by Stanford Professor William Massy and Charles Goldman of Rand, with graduate students Marc Chun and Beryle Hsiao.The researchers found that supply and demand do not work in the usual way to regulate the employment market for doctoral candidates. In labor markets, when job opportunities decrease, fewer people usually seek to enter the field. In the case of Ph.D.s, however, the researchers found that neither departments nor prospective doctoral students take close accounting of the doctorate employment gap.

  13. Counseling Women: Overview and Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, Joy Anne; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The papers in this section are a review of the literature related to counseling women. They review documents on the history of sexist helping practices. Together, they reveal the need for a systematic intervention by the helping professions to rectify potentially inadequate, inappropriate, or damaging treatment of women in counseling. (Author)

  14. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  15. [Tranfusion counseling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbil, R; Fabrigli, P; Garraud, O

    2009-05-01

    In this article, we present transfusion counseling; its organization, actors, their formations and we deal with factual positions. Transfusion counseling needs better identification, tending to a homogeneous organization between every bloodbank centre.

  16. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Jan 19,2018 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  17. Choose your doctorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Jeremy

    2007-02-01

    The development of education options for nurses has been inexorable and it is increasingly the case that senior nurses are considering a doctorate as the logical next step in their educational career. Such individuals need to make important decisions as to whether they should embark on a taught doctorate, professional doctorate or a traditional PhD. Each of these options will necessitate a considerable investment in time and money as well as the sacrifice of quality time and spare time over a significant number of years. A doctorate is not for everyone. Those still reading this text may be asking 'could this possibly be for me'? This paper will try to help the reader decide which if any option to take. It is suggested that nurses will now turn to the doctoral degree as their next adventure in academic study. It is argued that this development is not being controlled by management forces and indeed cannot be controlled by them. This last is chiefly because the move towards doctoral education is led by individuals who choose to study for a doctorate simply because they can. The paper considers what choices are available to nurses who wish to pursue a doctoral programme of study. In particular, this paper considers what new developments in doctoral courses are becoming available and what advantage there may be in studying for one of the newer professional doctorates rather than a traditional PhD. The material here is the result of a review of the literature on recent developments in doctoral education for nurses. The existing provision by UK and other universities was also reviewed, the data being collected by an informal review of universities' advertising material. It is inevitable that some nurses who are already qualified to degree and masters degree will take advantage of the doctoral degree opportunities which now newly present themselves. For nurses in practice, the advantages of the professional doctorate is that it is more structured, enables more peer and

  18. Doctors Today

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-03-01

    Doctors’ relationship with patients and their role in society is changing. Until the 1960s doctors concentrated on the welfare of patients with less emphasis placed on patients’ rights1. Over recent decades there has been increasing empowerment of the individual across all facets of society including health care. Doctors continue to be perceived as having expertise and authority over medical science. Patients, however, now hold sway over questions of values or preferences. We all must be aware of this change in the doctor- patient interaction. We need to be more aware of the outcomes that patients view as important. The concept of shared decision-making with the patient is now widely appreciated. The process involves a change in mind set particularly for doctors who trained in an earlier era.

  19. Doctor Shopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Doctor shopping is defined as seeing multiple treatment providers, either during a single illness episode or to procure prescription medications illicitly. According to the available literature, prevalence rates of doctor shopping vary widely, from 6.3 to 56 percent. However, this variability is partially attributable to research methodology, including the study definition of doctor shopping as well as the patient sample. The reasons for doctor shopping are varied. Some patient explanations for this phenomenon relate to clinician factors, such as inconvenient office hours or locations, long waiting times, personal characteristics or qualities of the provider, and/or insufficient communication time between the patient and clinician. Some patient explanations relate to personal factors and include both illness factors (e.g., symptom persistence, lack of understanding or nonacceptance of the diagnosis or treatment) as well as psychological factors (e.g., somatization, prescription drug-seeking). Importantly, not all doctor shopping is driven by suspect motivations. Being aware of these various patient justifications for doctor shopping is important in understanding and managing these challenging patients in the clinical setting, whether they emerge in psychiatric or primary care environments. PMID:23346518

  20. Relationship among Factors of Seeking Professional Help

    OpenAIRE

    永井, 智; 小池, 春妙

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among factors of seeking professional help in Japanese university students. Two hundred and thirty-eight students completed a questionnaire about their attitude toward seeking professional help, intention to seek professional help, concerns regarding counseling, expectations from counseling, help-seeking preference, and previous counseling experience. An analysis of variance indicated that( a) students who have previous counseling experience had a more...

  1. Cultural Accommodation Model of Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The current article provides an overview to the cultural accommodation model (CAM) of counseling (Leong & Lee, 2006) that may help guide employment counselors' work. The integrative multidimensional model of cross-cultural counseling (Leong, 1996), a precursor to the CAM, is also reviewed.

  2. Vocational Counselling and First Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darou, Wes G.

    Some First Nations communities in northern Ontario have requested vocational counseling services to help youth select careers and reduce student attrition. However, Euro-American counseling practices may not be appropriate for Native clients. This paper describes the approach of the Anishanabek Educational Institute (AEI), which was established to…

  3. Adlerian Counseling for Parent Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Fred P.

    The helping professions must aid parents in understanding their children and in providing parents with methods to improve family relationships. Adlerian counseling is presented as one potentially useful method of reaching this goal. The basic principles and democratic philosophy of Adlerian counseling are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the…

  4. The counselees' self-reported request for psychological help in genetic counseling for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer: Not only psychopathology matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vos (Joël); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); F. Menko (Fred); J.M. Collee (Margriet); E.B.G. Garcia; A. Tibben (Arend)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground Several studies have shown that counselees do not experience psychopathological levels of distress after DNA test result disclosure. However, it has not systematically been studied whether the absence of psychopathology also means that counselees do not want to receive help.

  5. The counselees' self-reported request for psychological help in genetic counseling for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer : not only psychopathology matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Joel; van Asperen, Christi J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Menko, Fred H.; Collee, Margriet J.; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Tibben, Aad

    Background Several studies have shown that counselees do not experience psychopathological levels of distress after DNA test result disclosure. However, it has not systematically been studied whether the absence of psychopathology also means that counselees do not want to receive help. Their

  6. Psychological counselling and indigenous African knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological counselling relates to basic humanity and universal values such as the regard for human dignity, healthy socialisation, and emotional health. Counselling individuals who experience emotional or relational problems is a function of the helping and health care professions. Effective counselling should provide ...

  7. Marriage Counselling in Multicultural Society, Nigerian Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses marriage counselling in Multicultural society: Nigerian experience. The researcher sees Multicultural Counselling as a helping relationship, which involves two or more persons with different culture, beliefs and environment. The paper discusses how multicultural counselling can be applied in marriage ...

  8. The Career Counseling with Underserved Populations Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Providing effective career counseling to culturally diverse individuals is not the same as helping those from majority cultures. The Career Counseling With Underserved Populations model aids career counselors in supporting underserved populations as they strive to address their important career counseling issues.

  9. Retain Valuable Employees with Career Adaptation Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Marcia P.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the goals of career adaptation counseling: to keep good people who may be dissatisfied; to make people who may have slipped more productive; and to save outplacement, recruitment, and training costs. Examines how counseling can help solve broad career issues, and how communication is crucial to the counseling process. (CT)

  10. Infusing Counseling Skills in Test Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Melanie E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents an instructional model based on Neurolinguistic Programming that links counseling student course work in measurement and test interpretation with counseling techniques and theory. A process incorporating Neurolinguistic Programming patterns is outlined for teaching graduate students the counseling skills helpful in test interpretation.…

  11. Companions: An Adjunct to Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Barry W.; Michaud, Patrick A.

    1971-01-01

    Undergraduates were trained to help the counseling staff by serving as models in demonstrating patterns of social behavior for clients, and as listeners to those having adjustment problems in college. (CJ)

  12. Family Group Counseling for Alcoholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    kinsella, Samuel B.

    1970-01-01

    After personal involvement as a group leader with alcoholics under treatment and their families, the author stresses the need for this type of counseling to educate family on alcoholism and to help dispel their prejudices. (Author/CJ)

  13. Contemporary Counseling and Its Discontents: A Counselogist on Homo Consultans

    OpenAIRE

    Kargul, Józef

    2014-01-01

    The paper addresses risks and threats inherent in the “counseling boom”, which has affected the actual modes of help provision in guidance/counseling, and generated a unique “counseling fashion” for counseling of various kinds and hence, of various quality. Offering a critical analysis of counseling, the author proposes a few hypotheses about the phenomenon and posits that: (1) Some of the current counseling interventions—also within career counseling—are clearly market-driven; (2) Neoliberal...

  14. Osteopathic Medical Student Administered Smoking Cessation Counseling is an Effective Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Barbara; Chez, Ariel; Carpenter, Taissia; Hubert, Laura; Hewan-Lowe, Lissa; Ozcan, Asli; Sahni, Sonu

    2016-04-01

    Physician counseling on the risks of tobacco smoking and the benefits of cessation has been shown to be an effective method of increasing the rate of smoking cessation. Using the "Help Your Patients Quit Smoking: A Coaching Guide" also referred to as the "7A's of Smoking Cessation" guideline from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is thought to be effective to convey the importance of smoking cessation. To study the efficacy of the "7A's of Smoking Cessation" guideline counseling conducted by osteopathic medical students. Osteopathic medical students were trained to counsel smokers for 3-10 min based on New York City Department of Health's "7A's of Smoking Cessation" guidelines by a licensed physician. Students then counseled health fair participants who were cigarette smokers for 3-10 min. Postcounseling, participants were administered an 4 question survey to evaluate the effect counseling had on their desire to quit smoking. Survey data were collected and analyzed. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for this study. A total of 13 anonymous health fair participants who were also smokers were administered both counseling sessions and surveys. 11/13 (84.6%) participants stated that the session motivated them to quit smoking. 9/13 (69.2%) participants responded that they were now motivated to discuss smoking cessation with their doctor after being counseled. Of these participants 12/13 (92.3%) had previously attempted to quit smoking without success. Participants reported an increased willingness to stop smoking after being counseled by osteopathic medical students. Participants also reported an increased motivation to discuss smoking cessation with their physician. These findings indicate that smoking cessation counseling administered by osteopathic medical students effectively in encouraging smokers to consider reduction or cessation of tobacco use.

  15. Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral education covers the “third cycle” of degrees following the bachelor’s and the master’s degree. The education of researchers is necessary for developing music therapy as a scientific discipline and calls for a certain research culture that not only brings knowledge on research...... with an integration of science and practice. This leads to a description of the principles of problem-based learning as a social constructive approach, problematization, self-directed learning and learning community. The chapter is concluded with an example of a model of doctoral education, the Aalborg model, where...... the coursework, supervision, and curriculum is based on problem-based learning. About the book: 'International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World,' the first anthology of its kind, edited by Professor Karen Goodman, brings noted educators from Brazil, Canada...

  16. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain Language Talking to Your Doctor Part I: Preparing for Your Medical ... pharmacists are also good sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , ...

  17. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their families. Clinical Geneticists Clinical geneticists are medical doctors with special training in genetics. In addition to educating families about genetic conditions, they perform clinical exams and order lab tests to diagnose the causes ...

  18. Disparities in safe sex counseling & behavior among individuals with substance dependence: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amore, Meredith M; Cheng, Debbie M; Allensworth-Davies, Donald; Samet, Jeffrey H; Saitz, Richard

    2012-12-31

    Despite the vast literature examining disparities in medical care, little is known about racial/ethnic and mental health disparities in sexual health care. The objective of this study was to assess disparities in safe sex counseling and resultant behavior among a patient population at risk of negative sexual health outcomes. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis among a sample of substance dependent men and women in a metropolitan area in the United States. Multiple logistic regression models were used to explore the relationship between race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic black; Hispanic; non-Hispanic white) and three indicators of mental illness (moderately severe to severe depression; any manic episodes; ≥ 3 psychotic symptoms) with two self-reported outcomes: receipt of safe sex counseling from a primary care physician and having practiced safer sex because of counseling. Among 275 substance-dependent adults, approximately 71% (195/275) reported ever being counseled by their regular doctor about safe sex. Among these 195 subjects, 76% (149/195) reported practicing safer sex because of this advice. Blacks (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.71; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36,5.42) and those reporting manic episodes (AOR: 2.41; 95% CI: 1.26,4.60) had higher odds of safe sex counseling. Neither race/ethnicity nor any indicator of mental illness was significantly associated with practicing safer sex because of counseling. Those with past manic episodes reported more safe sex counseling, which is appropriate given that hypersexuality is a known symptom of mania. Black patients reported more safe sex counseling than white patients, despite controlling for sexual risk. One potential explanation is that counseling was conducted based on assumptions about sexual risk behaviors and patient race. There were no significant disparities in self-reported safer sex practices because of counseling, suggesting that increased counseling did not differentially affect safe sex behavior

  19. Uptake of genetic counselling services by patients with cystic fibrosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-05-09

    , and the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg. Correspondence to: Shelley Macaulay, e-mail: shelley.macaulay@nhls.ac.za. Keywords: cystic fibrosis, genetic counselling, doctor referrals, at-risk relatives, carrier ...

  20. OVERVIEW OF SCHOOL GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Donald A. Odeleye

    2017-01-01

    Education in the broadest sense is aimed at helping individuals become more productive members of the society. At the heart of the whole pedagogy is Guidance and Counselling, which has been positively correlated with effective learning outcomes. Primarily, School Guidance and Counselling services are geared towards helping students know themselves, the world around them and make optimal decisions for enhanced future for all. This paper presents guidance and counselling services provided in th...

  1. Counseling Needs of Gifted Students: An Analysis of Intake Forms at a University-Based Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jin Eun; Moon, Sidney M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions of the counseling needs of gifted children from the perspective of parents who sought help from a fee-based counseling center for gifted students. The counseling center provided assessment and educational and career guidance, as well as family social/emotional counseling, all of which were…

  2. Integrating Motivational Interviewing into a Basic Counseling Skills Course to Enhance Counseling Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarussi, Melanie H.; Tyler, Jessica M.; Littlebear, Sarah; Hinkle, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI), a humanistic counseling style used to help activate clients' motivation to change, was integrated into a basic counseling skills course. Nineteen graduate-level counseling students completed the Counselor Estimate of Self-Efficacy at the start and conclusion of the course. Significant differences were found between…

  3. Counseling through Images: Using Photography to Guide the Counseling Process and Achieve Treatment Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginicola, Misty M.; Smith, Cheri; Trzaska, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Creative approaches to counseling help counselors to meet the needs of diverse populations. The utility of photography in counseling has been demonstrated through several case studies; however, clear implications of how photography relates to the counseling process have not been well delineated. The existing literature on phototherapy is reviewed…

  4. Teaching Genetic Counseling Skills: Incorporating a Genetic Counseling Adaptation Continuum Model to Address Psychosocial Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugar, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Genetic counselors are trained health care professionals who effectively integrate both psychosocial counseling and information-giving into their practice. Preparing genetic counseling students for clinical practice is a challenging task, particularly when helping them develop effective and active counseling skills. Resistance to incorporating these skills may stem from decreased confidence, fear of causing harm or a lack of clarity of psycho-social goals. The author reflects on the personal challenges experienced in teaching genetic counselling students to work with psychological and social complexity, and proposes a Genetic Counseling Adaptation Continuum model and methodology to guide students in the use of advanced counseling skills.

  5. Probing, impelling, but not offending doctors: the role of the internet as an information source for patients' interactions with doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Chan

    2011-12-01

    The Internet has become a major health information source for many patients, and they might discuss the information they get from the Internet with their doctors. I explored how the Internet as an information source influences cancer patients' communication with their doctors in Taiwan, where the doctor-patient relationship is traditionally doctor dominated. Forty-six cancer patients or families participated in seven focus group discussions. I conducted inductive analysis to examine themes emerging from discussions. Participants searched for information on the Internet to probe and verify their doctors' competence. Participants took responsibility for understanding the doctors' jargon, and the Internet helped them to do that. The Internet also helped participants spur doctors to think further about their condition, but these patients did so cautiously, with an effort not to offend doctors. The Internet as an information source did help participants talk to doctors, but the effect on changing the doctor-dominant nature of the relationship was limited.

  6. Medication counseling for thyroxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication from the National Indian Patient-centered Thyroid Management group provides a useful tool to help in medication counseling during hypothyroidism management. The authors classify and list aspects of thyroxine use which must be discussed with patients on thyroxine supplementation or replacement. Issues related to concomitant food and medications intake, preconception and pregnancy management, as well as sick day care, are also discussed.

  7. COUNSELING MULTIKULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUZLIAH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multicutural is a term used to describe one's view of the variety of life in the world, or cultural policy emphasizing their acceptance of diversity, and a wide range of cultures (multicultural that exist in society regarding values, system, culture, customs and politics that they profess. The effectiveness of counseling depends on many factors the most important is the relation to each other, and mutual understanding between counselor and client. Cultural differences that exist in this country requires the counselor needs to understand the different cultures that exist. Importance of multicultural for counselors as a form of consciousness that the counselor and client have cultural differences. Multicultural counseling a counseling relationship with the concept that there is a counselor with a client who has a cultural background, values and different lifestyles. Building a good relationship when the counseling process takes place so that the counselor can understand the culture of its clients one of the key attitudes that exist within konsleor is empathy. Counselors who have empathy will be able to understand the way the world through the perspective of the client.

  8. Outplacement Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony S.; Dai, Sheila

    Rapid changes in technology and the economy have led to major staff reductions in the workplace, and have increased the need to assist displaced employees with outplacement counseling that is responsive, cost-effective, humane, and on-going. College counselors have the basic skills to effectively expand their role in this field in ways that…

  9. Examining Internationalization in U.S. Counseling Psychology Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Erica J.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.; Aegisdottir, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather more information about the process of internationalization in U.S. counseling psychology programs. Participants included 26 training directors and 83 doctoral students, representing 32 of the 63 APA-accredited counseling psychology programs. Results suggested that the presence of international training…

  10. Counseling for Work and Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mary Sue

    2012-01-01

    Counseling for work and relationship is a social constructionist perspective, informed by feminist and social justice values, and responsive to radical changes in contemporary lives, that fosters a shift in vocational psychology from helping people develop careers to helping people construct lives through work and relationship. The first and major…

  11. The Practice of Self-Care among Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Mary G.; Devries, Sabina R.; Wardle, Elizabeth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Self-care behavior is recognized as an important component for the helping professional who practices in the field of counseling or who is training to become a helping professional. Occupational stress and burnout in the field of counseling is of great concern. This study examined the practice of self-care among master level counseling students to…

  12. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... communication. Remember that nurses and pharmacists are also good sources of information. How to Talk to your Doctor Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health Español Talking to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute ( ...

  13. [Influence of patients' attitude on doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zheng; Qiu, Ze-qi; Zhang, Tuo-hong

    2009-04-18

    To describe the doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship and find out the influencing factors of the patients, gathering evidence to improve the doctor-patient relationship. This study was a cross-sectional study, in which doctors and nurses in 10 hospitals of Beijing, Shandong and Chongqing were surveyed with structured questionnaires and in-depth interviews. The mean score of the doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship was 59.97, which was much lower than the patients'. The patients' socio-demographic characteristics, social economic status (SES) and behavior characteristics influence the interaction of the doctors and the patients. The doctors' satisfaction of the doctor-patient relationship was influenced by the patients' trust. The doctors' perspective is helpful to define the tension and the cause of the doctor-patient relationship. The patients' characteristics have important influence on the doctor-patient relationship. It's necessary to take action on the patients to improve the doctor-patient relationship.

  14. Female physicist doctoral experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine P. Dabney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The underrepresentation of women in physics doctorate programs and in tenured academic positions indicates a need to evaluate what may influence their career choice and persistence. This qualitative paper examines eleven females in physics doctoral programs and professional science positions in order to provide a more thorough understanding of why and how women make career choices based on aspects both inside and outside of school and their subsequent interaction. Results indicate that female physicists experience conflict in achieving balance within their graduate school experiences and personal lives and that this then influences their view of their future careers and possible career choices. Female physicists report both early and long-term support outside of school by family, and later departmental support, as being essential to their persistence within the field. A greater focus on informal and out-of-school science activities for females, especially those that involve family members, early in life may help influence their entrance into a physics career later in life. Departmental support, through advisers, mentors, peers, and women’s support groups, with a focus on work-life balance can help females to complete graduate school and persist into an academic career.

  15. Can Local Citation Analysis of Master's and Doctoral Theses Help Decision-Making about the Management of the Collection of Periodicals? A Case Study in Psychology and Education Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyereisen, Pierre; Spoiden, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzed reference lists in a large number of master's and doctoral theses in a university library of psychology and education sciences. It compared citation counts to other indicators of the use of periodicals. The usefulness and limitations of these statistics are discussed in relation to decision-making in subscriptions' management.…

  16. Patients' attitudes to doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A survey was conducted on 1,012 people in the Oxford Region to determine their general attitude to doctors' age, sex and colour and to various aspects of doctor/patient communication. Results indicate that whereas there were no prejudices about appearance there was a significant degree of dissatisfaction with information given by doctors in general and hospital doctors in particular.

  17. Artificial Intelligence, Counseling, and Cognitive Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Greg; And Others

    With the exception of a few key writers, counselors largely ignore the benefits that Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Cognitive Psychology (CP) can bring to counseling. It is demonstrated that AI and CP can be integrated into the counseling literature. How AI and CP can offer new perspectives on information processing, cognition, and helping is…

  18. Developments in infertility counselling and its accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Infertility counselling was placed in a unique position by the passage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and the requirement that couples being treated should be offered counselling. However professional counselling was, and largely still is, at a stage at which there was no universal agreement on the knowledge, standards or qualifications required for practice. Nevertheless, infertility counselling became the first example of counselling to be required by statute, beyond the more generalised requirement in adoption birth records access. Counselling is intended to describe skilled talking therapy offered by a professional with specific training and qualifications directed to helping individuals and couples to achieve goals they own themselves. The therapeutic intervention of counselling is primarily directed to helping clients in a stressful situation to deploy their own coping skills effectively and thus make the difficult choices inseparable from ART. Counselling outcome research consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the sort of counselling delivered in assisted conception units with mild-moderate anxiety and depression delivered by skilled and experienced practitioners. This article reviews the role of counsellors as members of the assisted conception clinical team and the status of regulation and accreditation in this very new profession.

  19. Neuropsychological Counseling in Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul C.

    1992-01-01

    Explores integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology in hospital setting. Sees example of such interchange occurring in rehabilitation unit or hospital where psychologist has responsibilities for helping patients, families, and staff to understand implications of central nervous system dysfunction and to adapt to changes. Discusses…

  20. Counseling Adolescents with Problem Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marecek, Jeanne

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the psychosocial context of unintended teenage pregnancies, including emotional and cognitive development during adolescence, family and peer relations, and norms for gender-appropriate sexual expression. The main goal in counseling is helping clients reach and implement an informed and fulled integrated decision about the pregnancy.…

  1. Counseling According to don Juan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvino, Charles J.; Lee, James L.

    1975-01-01

    This article specifies a number of precepts put forth by don Juan, a Yaqui Indian sorcerer. It also outlines the consequences of each precept for counselors. The intent is to facilitate the emergence of a new reality for counseling and other helping professions. (Author/BW)

  2. Ayudele! [Help Him!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Maria Gutierrez, Comp.; Almance, Sofia, Comp.

    Written in Spanish and English, the booklet briefly discusses what parents can do to help their child learn at school. The booklet briefly notes the importance of getting enough sleep; eating breakfast; praising the child; developing the five senses; visiting the doctor; having a home and garden; talking, listening, and reading to the child;…

  3. Counseling in Pacific Rim Countries: Past-Present-Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evraiff, William, Ed.

    Counseling has emerged in the 20th century as one of three major helping professions, the others being psychology and social work. The United States has had a significant influence on the development of counseling all over the world. An outcome of the International Counseling in the 21 Century Conferences has been the recognition that, regardless…

  4. Mental Health Counseling: A Developmental Process and Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Allen E.

    1989-01-01

    Comments on Weikel and Palmo's article and discusses critical issues for future of mental health counseling: (1) identity of mental health counseling; (2) its relationship to other helping professions; and (3) distinctive nature of practice of mental health counseling. Argues a psychoeducational and developmental focus may be critical for specific…

  5. Student Athletes' Perceived Barriers to and Preferences for Seeking Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Renee L.; Levy, Jacob J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate attitudes of intercollegiate student athletes regarding their use of counseling services. The authors assessed student athletes' perceived barriers to seeking counseling services and their preferred characteristics of a helping professional. Several barriers to counseling were identified. Results…

  6. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  7. Coaching doctoral students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene; Kobayashi, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we focus on individual coaching carried out by an external coach as a new pedagogical element that can impact doctoral students’ sense of progress in doctoral education. The study used a mixed methods approach in that we draw on quantitative and qualitative data from the evaluation...... of a project on coaching doctoral students. We explore how coaching can contribute to the doctoral students’ development of a broad set of personal competences and suggest that coaching could work as a means to engender self-management and improve relational competences. The analysis of the participants’ self......-reported gains from coaching show that doctoral students experience coaching as an effective method to support the doctoral study process. This study also provides preliminary empirical evidence that coaching of doctoral students can facilitate the doctoral study process so that the doctoral students experience...

  8. Cost incentives for doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schottmüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    If doctors take the costs of treatment into account when prescribing medication, their objectives differ from their patients' objectives because the patients are insured. This misalignment of interests hampers communication between patient and doctor. Giving cost incentives to doctors increases...... welfare if (i) the doctor's examination technology is sufficiently good or (ii) (marginal) costs of treatment are high enough. If the planner can costlessly choose the extent to which doctors take costs into account, he will opt for less than 100%. Optimal health care systems should implement different...... degrees of cost incentives depending on type of disease and/or doctor....

  9. A Study of the Personality Characteristics of Medical Doctors in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Study of the Personality Characteristics of Medical Doctors in the Federal Capital Territory Hospitals. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH. AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE ... Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling.

  10. Doctoral Women: Managing Emotions, Managing Doctoral Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Claire; Mowbray, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of women doctoral students and the role of emotion during doctoral candidature. The paper draws on the concept of emotional labour to examine the two sites of emotional investment students experienced and managed during their studies: writing and family relationships. Emotion is perceived by many dominant…

  11. How does a doctor study other doctors being doctors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Torsten

    The intension of this presentation is to encourage debate on auto-ethnography in medical systems. The empirical starting point will be my present study of how young doctors learn to make decisions about diagnosis and treatment of the individual patient. The study is an ethnographic field study......, among other doctors, at departments where I have worked. My parents, my sister and my grandfather are doctors. So reflections and experiences concerning medicine and being a doctor are integrated parts of my personal history and identity. Will I be capable of critical reflection on something...... that is a part of me? How can I represent the experience and learning of my informants without simply reproducing my own experience? This makes the project both anthropology-at-home and auto-ethnography. I will present an example from the field work to illustrate the many ways in which the auto- part...

  12. Finding the Right Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Finding the Right Doctor Updated:Mar 6,2017 Choosing the right doctor for you ... health Answers by Heart Fact Sheets Learn and live with our downloadable patient information sheets . Dozens of ...

  13. Genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Neto, João Monteiro de

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this review of genetic counseling (GC) is to describe the current concepts and philosophical and ethical principles accepted by the great majority of countries and recommended by the World Health Organization, the stages of the process, its results and the psychological impact that a genetic disease has on a family. The concepts presented are based on an historical synthesis of the literature on GC since the 1930s until today, and the articles cited represent the most important research published which today provides the foundation for the theory and practice of GC. The modern definition of GC is a process of communication that deals with the human problems related with the occurrence of a genetic disease in a family. It is of fundamental importance that health professionals are aware of the psychological aspects triggered by genetic diseases and the ways in which these can be managed. In the field of human and medical genetics we are still living in a phase in which technical and scientific aspects predominate, with little emphasis on the study of emotional reactions and people's processes of adaptation to these diseases, which leads to clients having a low level of understanding of the events that have taken place, with negative consequences for family life and for society. The review concludes by discussing the need to refer families with genetic diseases for GC and the need for professionals working in this area to invest more in humanizing care and developing non-directive psychological GC techniques.

  14. Building doctoral ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2018-01-01

    During the recent years doctoral education has ultimately left its seclusion within the disciplines and become part of national and global policy agendas, claimed to ensure societal welfare and financial growth. As a consequence more resources have been allocated to the formalization and professi......, and discusses how institutions and doctoral programmes could use such sprawling spaces for learning to build doctoral ecologies and to strengthening existentially based pedagogies within doctoral education....

  15. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) Español Aging Planning Your Doctor Visit , NIHSeniorHealth.gov Videos: Talking ... A Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your Doctor Presentation Toolkit , National ...

  16. Doctoral Scientists in Oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    The purpose of this report was to classify and count doctoral scientists in the United States trained in oceanography and/or working in oceanography. Existing data from three sources (National Research Council's "Survey of Earned Doctorates," and "Survey of Doctorate Recipients," and the Ocean Sciences Board's "U.S. Directory of Marine…

  17. Scholarly Promotion of Professional School Counseling: School Counselors and the "Georgia School Counseling Association Journal"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Rhonda M.

    2008-01-01

    School counseling is a relative newcomer in the landscape of helping professions. Although the school counseling profession has roots in Davis' "guidance" curriculum introduced in the Grand Rapids, Michigan public school system's curriculum in 1907 and Parson's Vocational Bureau Movement of 1909, much has changed over the last 100 years.…

  18. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper.

  19. Burnout and Doctors: Prevalence, Prevention and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Doctors are exposed to high levels of stress in the course of their profession and are particularly susceptible to experiencing burnout. Burnout has far-reaching implications on doctors; patients and the healthcare system. Doctors experiencing burnout are reported to be at a higher risk of making poor decisions; display hostile attitude toward patients; make more medical errors; and have difficult relationships with co-workers. Burnout among doctors also increases risk of depression; anxiety; sleep disturbances; fatigue; alcohol and drug misuse; marital dysfunction; premature retirement and perhaps most seriously suicide. Sources of stress in medical practice may range from the emotions arising in the context of patient care to the environment in which doctors practice. The extent of burnout may vary depending on the practice setting; speciality and changing work environment. Understanding dynamic risk factors associated with burnout may help us develop strategies for preventing and treating burnout. Some of these strategies will be reviewed in this paper. PMID:27417625

  20. 76 FR 24041 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; HUD Housing Counseling Program-Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... Counseling Agencies and maintains a toll free housing counseling hotline, performance reviews help HUD ensure... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; HUD Housing Counseling... information: Title of Proposal: HUD Housing Counseling Program--Agency Performance Review. OMB Control Number...

  1. Career counselling in the 21st century: South African institutions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some salient aspects of 21st century career counselling, including the history of career counselling in South Africa and elsewhere, the need for a changed approach to career counselling at all levels, and the interplay between the different waves in psychology are explicated. Helping models in career counselling, the ...

  2. Helping students become the medical teachers of the future--the Doctors as Teachers and Educators (DATE) Programme of Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, V; Fuller, J H; Evans, D E

    2010-08-01

    In the United Kingdom (UK), learning about teaching is an integral part of the General Medical Council's recommendations for the undergraduate medical curriculum. Yet often, implementing this aspect of learning presents a challenge to curriculum organisers in terms of content, timing and student interest. PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES AND STRUCTURE: The Doctors as Teachers and Educators (DATE) programme was set up at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry specifically to meet the requirements for development in teaching. Although largely practical, the two-day programme offers an introduction to educational theory and the teaching requirements for junior doctors in training. The methods used are lectures and group work within plenary sessions, followed by small group micro-teaching sessions. The DATE programme has now been undertaken by over 900 graduates. We evaluated the Date programme by means of end-of-course questionnaires completed by two cohorts of students during the 2007/8 academic year and through the use of Nominal Group Technique in 2008/9. In line with the goals of the evaluation, the data on students' views were analysed to elicit self-reported learning and develop the programme. Response rates of the two cohorts to the surveys were high (80% and 98%). Nearly 100% of the students reported through the survey that they had gained confidence in teaching. In the nominal groups, students indicated that they had gained insight into educational principles like student-centredness and gained an appreciation for the nature of educational evidence and scholarship. They challenged the curriculum organisers to achieve an appropriate balance between theory and practice. A programme about teaching at the undergraduate medical level can be well-received by students; the DATE model could be transferred to other international contexts.

  3. Doctors' Perception and Expectations of the Role of the Pharmacist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Only 50 % of the doctors thought that pharmacists apply their drug knowledge in practice while 11 % indicated that pharmacists routinely counselled their patients. Conclusion: The .... reason for their interaction was to check on the availability of a medicine in the pharmacy. (83.3 %), medicine alternatives (61.9 %), side.

  4. Mexican American Women Pursuing Counselor Education Doctorates: A Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Tamara J.; Carney, JoLynn V.

    2016-01-01

    The authors used narrative inquiry and Anzaldúa's (1999) bordlerlands theory to understand the cultural experiences of 5 Mexican American women in doctoral programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. Results indicated that participants navigated multiple cultural spheres and that the…

  5. Emotional reactions of medical doctors and students following the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... medical training; psychological services; work environment; coping with the family of the deceased; and facing mortality. Conclusion: From the study it was concluded that doctors needed enhanced training in communication skills and communicating death to the patients' families. Bereavement counselling and debriefing ...

  6. Doctors' lifestyles vital for SA's health – global expert

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    He says research shows that doctors who smoke and present as overweight or obese are 'far less likely' to counsel their patients or become effective disease prevention agents, let alone engage in any public discourse on legislative health measures. Speaking at a Discovery Vitality Institute media breakfast at Cape Town's ...

  7. Understanding the Researcher Identity Development of Counselor Education and Supervision Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Margaret R.; Helm, Heather M.

    2017-01-01

    Counselor education and supervision (CES) doctoral students play an important role in contributing to knowledge in the counseling profession. CES doctoral students were interviewed to explore their researcher identity, a unique self-concept that possibly includes research self-efficacy and interest. Issues critical to facilitating researcher…

  8. Supplement to listing of accredited doctoral, internship, and postdoctoral training programs in health service psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Provides an announcement from the Commission on Accreditation for the following status changes for accredited doctoral (clinical, counseling, school, or a combination there of and developed practice area), doctoral internship, and postdoctoral residency programs in health service psychology as of April 2, 2017. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Supplement to listing of accredited doctoral, internship, and postdoctoral training programs in professional psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Commission on Accreditation has provided a list announcing the following status changes for Accredited doctoral (clinical, counseling, school, or a combination thereof and developed practice area), doctoral internship, and postdoctoral residency programs in professional psychology as of April 1, 2016. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. A Roadmap to the Professionalization of Guidance and Counselling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emeka Egbochuku

    restore morale simply by listening in an empathic manner;. 5. creating a framework for change by providing exploratory schemes that help clients understand their ..... aspect that is rarely talked about in counselling circle. This will further help to check the current practice that allows virtually anybody to counsel or claim to be ...

  11. An Existential Approach to Cross-Cultural Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vontress, Clemmont E.

    1988-01-01

    Defines existentialism, culture, and cross-cultural counseling and explains how various existential concepts can serve as guidelines for cross-cultural counseling. Advocates finding approach to help counselors and counselor trainees understand how their own cultural identities affect their ability to help culturally different clients. (NB)

  12. Benefits of Required Counseling for Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Holm, Jessica M.; Daly, Cynthia M.

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students experience mental health distress. The authors investigated the benefits of required counseling services at a training clinic for students enrolled in counseling courses. Results indicated that after receiving services, students ("N" = 55) reported decreases in overall problems, depressive symptoms, and anxiety…

  13. Nurse practitioner practice patterns for exercise counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Tawnya Horsley; Belza, Basia; Brown, Marie-Annette

    2009-02-01

    To describe nurse practitioner (NP) practice patterns for exercise counseling for adults. Using a cross-sectional design, participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that ascertained barriers and facilitators encountered when providing exercise counseling. Participants included 398 NPs, who averaged 11 years in practice (SD = 7.9) and worked in a variety of practice areas. In a given week, about half (48%) of the NPs counseled more than 50% of their patients for exercise. The majority of participants (84%) agreed that exercise counseling is as valuable an intervention as prescribed medication. More than half (59%) of the participants exercised regularly. Barriers and facilitators to exercise counseling were predominantly a patient's lack of interest and the length of the patient visit. Specific strategies were identified for older adults and individuals residing in rural areas who may require more tailored exercise counseling. Participants demonstrated strong values about exercise counseling and observed that exercise had clear benefits for their patients. NP respondents offered recommendations focused on safety and adherence that can be used to improve exercise counseling. Exercise is a crucial component of preventative health care. Studies have shown that healthcare provider recommendations can be effective in helping patients increase their exercise and activity.

  14. Practise what you preach: health behaviours and stress among non-consultant hospital doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, Sinéad

    2016-02-01

    High rates of psychological distress, depression and suicide have been reported among doctors. Furthermore, many doctors do not access healthcare by conventional means. This study aimed to increase understanding regarding non-consultant hospital doctors\\' (NCHDs\\') response to stress and barriers to accessing supports, and identify possible solutions. Medical manpower departments in 58 hospitals distributed a 25-item questionnaire to 4,074 NCHDs; we received 707 responses (response rate, 17.4%). 60% of NCHDs were unable to take time off work when unwell; \\'letting teammates down\\' (90.8%) and \\'difficulty covering call\\' (85.9%) were the leading reasons. \\'Being too busy\\' (85%), \\'self-prescription\\' (66.6%) and \\'self-management\\' (53.1%) were ranked highest in deterring NCHDs from visiting a general practitioner (GP). 22.9% of NCHDs would not attend a GP with anxiety or depression until they began to feel hopeless, helpless or suicidal. 12.2% would not seek help at all. 55% of respondents (n = 330) had to move away from partners or dependants due to work, negatively affecting the social supports of 82.9%. Possible practical solutions were explored. NCHDS are a vulnerable population and have a particularly challenging lifestyle. Key recommendations include improved GP and counselling access for NCHDs, and addressing the culture of self-treatment and poor health behaviours through undergraduate and postgraduate education.

  15. Edo Journal of Counselling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edo Journal of Counselling, the official publication of Edo Chapter of Counselling Association of Nigeria publishes original well researched and well articulated papers/articles on all issues relating to counselling and psychology that use a variety of appropriate approaches to the conduct of theoretical, empirical and ...

  16. Outplacement as Transition Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes outplacement counseling as a process that enables management to deal with the problem of the employee who must be released or the staff that must be reduced. Discusses the process of outplacement counseling, the stages of transition counseling, and techniques to be implemented. (BH)

  17. Quality Career Counselling Services. A Policy Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Dorothy I.; Bezanson, M. Lynne

    This workbook was created as a "do it yourself" tool for helping organizations and career counseling services develop policies and standards to enhance the quality of services. The process is aimed at helping articulate policies that are sensible for each organization and challenging and achievable by staff. It is intended to be a…

  18. Predicting Burnout and Career Choice Satisfaction in Counseling Psychology Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Murdock, Nancy L.; Koetting, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral students (N = 284) from 53 training programs throughout the United States anonymously completed online measures of burnout, career choice satisfaction, global stress, role conflict, social support (from family/friends, advisors, other students) and psychological sense of community (SOC) in the doctoral program. Two…

  19. resuscitation among Nigerian doctors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), first described in 1960, is observed to be poorly applied in quality and quantum, hence, the need to ascertain its correct knowledge and practice among Nigerian doctors. Methods: Questionnaires were distributed randomly to doctors in a Nigerian University.

  20. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NIH Website NIH Employee Intranet Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines ... Talking With Your Doctor , NIH News in Health Español Talking to Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) ...

  1. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Your Doctor , National Eye Institute (NEI) Español Aging Planning Your Doctor Visit , NIHSeniorHealth.gov Videos: Talking with ... Us Contact Us Bookmark & Share Email Updates Social Media & Outreach Twitter Facebook YouTube Footer NIH Home En ...

  2. [Needs and quality of counseling in long-term care : User perspective on counseling services in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, N; Oetting-Roß, C; Büscher, A

    2017-01-13

    A wide range of counseling services with a variety of counseling purposes have been established in Germany to support care recipients and their relatives; however, there is a lack of quality criteria that are based on the counseling needs from the user's perspective. To summarize empirical knowledge on counseling needs and quality of counseling services from the user perspective and identification of counseling-specific understanding of users. A literature search was conducted in the databases CareLit®, LIVIVO and SpringerLink with additional online research via Google and MetaGer. Analysis of the literature and discussion on the state of research. A trustful relationship between counselor and user as well as the orientation to the user's individual situation are key elements of counseling that have been found helpful; however, a differentiated view of the diverse user groups and counseling purposes is lacking. In order to include the user's perspective in conceptual approaches for counseling and to define user-generated quality criteria, further scientific research is needed regarding the counseling needs of different user groups. Consideration must be given to particular care situations that involve various counseling purposes. Particularly vulnerable groups need special support in working out their counseling needs.

  3. Knowledge of patients’ visual experience during cataract surgery: a survey of eye doctors in Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauqir Mohammad Zain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent studies have recommended that ophthalmologists must be aware of the visual sensations (and their associated anxiety/fear experienced by patients undergoing cataract surgery. We assessed the knowledge of a group of eye doctors in Pakistan regarding these phenomena. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey. Eye doctors (ophthalmologists, residents and medical officers attending the Ophthalmological Society of Pakistan Annual Conference 2011, in Karachi were invited to participate in the study. A self-administered structured questionnaire was used to examine their knowledge of visual sensations and their associated anxiety/fear experienced by patients during cataract surgery. Simple frequencies and proportions were calculated to describe the data. Results A total of 150 ophthalmologists, residents and medical officers were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 68 (45.3% responded. The mean age (±SD of the participants was 42.9 (13.2 years. The proportion of participants who thought that patients could experience visual sensations during cataract surgery under regional anaesthesia was 89.7% and that under topical anaesthesia was 73.5%. The most frequently cited sensations included: light perception, changes in light brightness, movements, instruments and surgeon’s hands or fingers. The eye doctors estimated that 38.9% and 64.3% patients would see at least something during cataract surgery under regional anaesthesia and topical anaesthesia, respectively. They also believed that 24.2%-36.9% of patients may experience anxiety/fear as a result of visual sensations during such surgery. Approximately half of the eye doctors did not think that retained vision was a source of fear or anxiety for the patients. While most of them acknowledged the importance of preoperative counselling in helping to alleviate such fear/anxiety, the majority of them did not regularly counsel their patients on what to expect during

  4. Biblical counselling regarding inner change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Campbell-Lane

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of inner change is not only the ultimate goal of counselling; it is also a central concept of the gospel. Biblical counselling entails a Scriptural understanding of the nature of change and aims at helping the counsellee change his/her inner life under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Change is the essence of the process of sanctification, entailing “putting off” (laying off sinful ways of life, renewing the mind, and ”putting on” (“clothing” oneself with godly ways of life (Eph. 4:22 ff.; Col. 3:8 ff.; Rom. 12:1-2. Although believers have a new identity in Christ, they still suffer from the effect of sin and have to grow in sanctification. Often the believer has not been instructed about changing previous irrational and unbiblical beliefs, behaviour, and habits, and he/she thus still integrates these negative results of sin into his/her new life. Unless old patterns are replaced with new ones, the counsellee can revert to sinful habits, unbiblical beliefs and behavioural patterns. A pastoral counsellor thus needs to teach the counsellee that God has made provision for him/her to change. A worldly anthropology-psychology is entirely opposed to the Biblical doctrines of sin and sanctification. Effective Biblical counselling depends on a Biblical anthropology and world view. A Biblical counsellor should promote holiness and a lifestyle in accordance with Biblical guidelines, thus shaping the counsellee to the likeness of Jesus Christ. When a Biblical counsellor ministers the Word of God in a life-transforming way, then God himself changes the counsellee from the inside out. A counsellor may not ignore sin and its effect as it will limit the effectiveness of counselling in facilitating lasting change in the life of a counsellee. It is important that a Biblical counseller understands the nature of change and is equipped with knowledge about, and the character of change.

  5. Telephone counselling for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Lindsay F; Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie; Perera, Rafael; Lancaster, Tim

    2013-08-12

    Telephone services can provide information and support for smokers. Counselling may be provided proactively or offered reactively to callers to smoking cessation helplines. To evaluate the effect of proactive and reactive telephone support via helplines and in other settings to help smokers quit. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register for studies of telephone counselling, using search terms including 'hotlines' or 'quitline' or 'helpline'. Date of the most recent search: May 2013. randomized or quasi-randomised controlled trials in which proactive or reactive telephone counselling to assist smoking cessation was offered to smokers or recent quitters. One author identified and data extracted trials, and a second author checked them. The main outcome measure was the risk ratio for abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up. We selected the strictest measure of abstinence, using biochemically validated rates where available. We considered participants lost to follow-up to be continuing smokers. Where trials had more than one arm with a less intensive intervention we used only the most similar intervention without the telephone component as the control group in the primary analysis. We assessed statistical heterogeneity amongst subgroups of clinically comparable studies using the I² statistic. We considered trials recruiting callers to quitlines separately from studies recruiting in other settings. Where appropriate, we pooled studies using a fixed-effect model. We used a meta-regression to investigate the effect of differences in planned number of calls, selection for motivation, and the nature of the control condition (self help only, minimal intervention, pharmacotherapy) in the group of studies recruiting in non-quitline settings. Seventy-seven trials met the inclusion criteria. Some trials were judged to be at risk of bias in some domains but overall we did not judge the results to be at high risk of bias. Among

  6. The doctoral learning penumbra. Darkness, creativity, and meaningful others in doctoral education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Robinson, Gill; Wisker, Gina

    This paper presents our cross-national research into what we term the ‘doctoral learning penumbra’, which covers the diverse, unnoticed, and often unrecognised forms of help and support that doctoral students draw from during their PhD, and which are vital for completion. Our aim is to better...... understand the range of different actors, support systems, and meaningful others, which to a high degree shape and influence doctoral education, but without receiving acknowledgement, and sometimes without awareness even, of the Graduate Schools and research programmes that educate present and future...

  7. Individual behavioural counselling for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Tim; Stead, Lindsay F

    2017-03-31

    Individual counselling from a smoking cessation specialist may help smokers to make a successful attempt to stop smoking. The review addresses the following hypotheses:1. Individual counselling is more effective than no treatment or brief advice in promoting smoking cessation.2. Individual counselling is more effective than self-help materials in promoting smoking cessation.3. A more intensive counselling intervention is more effective than a less intensive intervention. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register for studies with counsel* in any field in May 2016. Randomized or quasi-randomized trials with at least one treatment arm consisting of face-to-face individual counselling from a healthcare worker not involved in routine clinical care. The outcome was smoking cessation at follow-up at least six months after the start of counselling. Both authors extracted data in duplicate. We recorded characteristics of the intervention and the target population, method of randomization and completeness of follow-up. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically-validated rates where available. In analysis, we assumed that participants lost to follow-up continued to smoke. We expressed effects as a risk ratio (RR) for cessation. Where possible, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect (Mantel-Haenszel) model. We assessed the quality of evidence within each study using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and the GRADE approach. We identified 49 trials with around 19,000 participants. Thirty-three trials compared individual counselling to a minimal behavioural intervention. There was high-quality evidence that individual counselling was more effective than a minimal contact control (brief advice, usual care, or provision of self-help materials) when pharmacotherapy was not offered to any participants (RR 1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.40 to 1.77; 27 studies, 11,100 participants; I 2 = 50%). There was

  8. The Profile and Empathy Level of Helping Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Lulu L. Loyola

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study looked into the demographic profile and empathy level of helping professionals enrolled at West Visayas State University, College of Education, Graduate School taking up Master of Education (M.Ed. major in Guidance and Counseling and Doctor of Philosophy in Education (Ph.D. in Ed. major in Psychology and Guidance. Results showed that the participants taking graduate education in the field of teacher education, psychology, guidance and counseling were generally female, younger and are actively teaching. Majority were beginners in the Ph.D. program. Except for the category on sex where females had significantly higher empathy level than males, all the participants had an average level of empathy. However, looking at their individual mean scores, it appeared that the older respondents, married, are teaching and are finishing their degrees had higher mean. These results seem to imply that the females, those with more experience, married, in the field of teaching, and have more training had higher levels of empathy.

  9. Contextualising eating problems in individual diet counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Tange; Køster, Allan

    2014-01-01

    than is usually the case in diet counselling, motivational interviewing and health coaching. We suggest the use of narrative practice as a critical and context-sensitive counselling approach to eating problems. Principles of externalisation and co-researching are combined within a counselling framework...... that employs logistic, social and discursive eating problems as analytic categories. Using cases from a health clinic situated at the Metropolitan University College in Copenhagen, we show that even if the structural conditions associated with eating problems may not be solvable through individual counselling...... sessions, exploration of the complex structures of food and eating with the client can provide agency by helping them navigate within the context of the problem. We also exemplify why a reflexive and critical approach to the way health is perceived by clients should be an integrated part of diet...

  10. Group counseling to enhance adolescents' close friendships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Zipora; Freidman, Yaffa; Kashti, Ytzhak; Sharabany, Ruth

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of group counseling on adolescents' intimacy with a close friend. The study population was comprised of 174 residential and day students of seven ninth-grade classes in a residential school in Israel. All participants were socially disadvantaged, with a problematic family background. They were randomly divided into experimental and control conditions: group counseling versus an in-class enrichment program. School personnel in the helping professions conducted all counseling groups after receiving training and supervision. Results of the counseling intervention showed a significant late effect in intimacy growth with a close friend. None of the three covariates (gender, residency, divorce) had a significant impact on results. The results support, to some extent, the dual process model of relationship development.

  11. Psychosocial characteristics of women and men attending infertility counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmann, T; Scherg, H; Strowitzki, Th; Verres, R

    2009-02-01

    Little is known about the psychosocial characteristics of infertile couples seeking psychological help. This study describes couples attending infertility counselling. Questionnaires pertaining to socio-demographic factors, motives for wanting a child, lay aetiology of their infertility, dimensions of life and partnership satisfaction, and a complaints list were completed by 974 women and 906 men. Of those who indicated an openness to counselling, almost half actually attended infertility counselling, and two groups, 'no counselling' (358 women and 292 male partners) and 'taking up counselling' (275 women and 243 male partners), were therefore compared. More couples with stressful life events were found in the counselling group. For women taking up counselling, psychological distress, in the form of suffering from childlessness and depression as well as subjective excessive demand (as a potential cause for infertility), was higher in comparison to women not counselled. The higher distress for men in the counselling group was indicated by relative dissatisfaction with partnership and sexuality and by accentuating the women's depression. Infertile couples seeking psychological help are characterized by high levels of psychological distress, primarily in women. The women's distress seems to be more important for attending infertility counselling than that of the men.

  12. Predicting Factors of Drop Out Counseling Process in University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer ÖZER

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predicting factors the drop out the counseling process . Methods: The study group consists of 555 college students admitted to a Counseling and Guidance Center (CGC and participated in at least one session of counseling after the first view in the 2013-2014 academic year. As a data collection tool, an "Application Form" on the demographic information and the "Brief Symptom Inventory" was applied to the students; and independent samples t-test and binary logistic regression techniques were used in the analysis of the collected data. Results: According to the analysis results, the age of the students attending the counseling process was found to be higher than those who drop out, but no significant difference was found in their psychometric properties in terms of continuation of the counseling process. Only the age of clients and their previous psychiatric help history was found to predict the dropping out counseling process early. Conclusion: Drop outs are less frequently observed in clients having a previous psychiatric help experience. In addition, it was determined that older clients less frequently drop out the counseling process. [JCBPR 2015; 4(1.000: 18-25

  13. Predicting Factors of Drop Out Counseling Process in University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer OZER

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predicting factors the drop out the counseling process. Methods: The study group consists of 555 college students admitted to a Counseling and Guidance Center (CGC and participated in at least one session of counseling after the first view in the 2013-2014 academic year. As a data collection tool, an “Application Form” on the demographic information and the “Brief Symptom Inventory” was applied to the students; and independent samples t-test and binary logistic regression techniques were used in the analysis of the collected data. Results: According to the analysis results, the age of the students attending the counseling process was found to be higher than those who drop out, but no significant difference was found in their psychometric properties in terms of continuation of the counseling process. Only the age of clients and their previous psychiatric help history was found to predict the dropping out counseling process early. Conclusion: Drop outs are less frequently observed in clients having a previous psychiatric help experience. In addition, it was determined that older clients less frequently drop out the counseling process

  14. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. Learn how ...

  15. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Health Literacy Clear & Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain ... Español More Information For more information about this publication, contact OD OCPL Inquiries . This page last reviewed ...

  16. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Public Liaison » Clear Communication Clear Communication Clear Communication Science, Health, and Public Trust Health Literacy Clear & Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your Doctor Plain ...

  17. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor ... Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library Resources Research Resources Clinical Research Resources Safety, Regulation and Guidance More » Quick ...

  18. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. Learn how to ...

  19. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Simple Clear Health from NIH Cultural Respect Language Access Talking to Your ... Resources from NIH You can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ...

  20. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications ... Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  1. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ... Institute on Aging (NIA) Cancer Communication in Cancer Care , National Cancer Institute (NCI) Español Complementary and Integrative ...

  2. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Information More » Quick Links NCI NEI NHLBI NHGRI NIA NIAAA NIAID NIAMS NIBIB NICHD NIDCD NIDCR NIDDK ... Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your Doctor Presentation Toolkit , National Institute ...

  3. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... concerns before your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend or family member with you. Take notes about what the doctor says, or ask a friend or family member to take notes for you. ...

  4. Going to the Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sound quite right, the doctor will want to investigate further. Look in your ears, nose, and throat: ... Us Print Resources Send to a Friend Permissions Guidelines About KidsHealth Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us ...

  5. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... appointment: Write down a list of questions and concerns before your appointment. Consider bringing a close friend ... Talking with Your Doctor: A Guide for Older People , National Institute on Aging (NIA) Talking With Your ...

  6. Talking to Your Doctor

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    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ... Matters NIH Record Research & Training Medical Research Initiatives Science Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics ...

  7. Understanding Your Doctors and Other Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There may be a way to meet your caregiver’s needs and your needs. Where can you find more information about your illness or condition? You can ask another doctor for their opinion. Visit your local library. Ask the people who work at the library for help. If you use ...

  8. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  9. Differential growth in doctor-patient communications skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M van Es, Judith; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet; Visser, Mechteld R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Although doctor-patient communication is considered a core competency for medical doctors, the effect of training has not been unequivocally established. Moreover, knowledge about the variance in the growth of different skills and whether certain patterns in growth can be detected could help us to

  10. Personal Study Planning in Doctoral Education in Industrial Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahenius, K.; Martinsuo, M.

    2010-01-01

    The duration of doctoral studies has increased in Europe. Personal study planning has been considered as one possible solution to help students in achieving shorter study times. This study investigates how doctoral students experience and use personal study plans in one university department of industrial engineering. The research material…

  11. Internationalization of the Counseling Profession: Meaning, Scope and Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Mun; Noonan, Brigid M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study sought to clarify the meaning and delineate the scope of internationalization of the counseling profession. Using a qualitative approach, the study recruited a panel of eight experts to help generate a consensus statement on the meaning of internationalization to the counseling profession and to delineate a five-theme scope of…

  12. Life-Flow Leisure Counseling for Older Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Larry C.

    1980-01-01

    Work is a primary source of self-satisfaction and self-definition for many people. Transition to leisure is often difficult for older persons. Leisure counseling helps older persons find self-satisfaction and adjust to their situations. Suggestions for effective leisure counseling are presented. (Author/BEF)

  13. Making Minds Matter: Infusing Mindfulness into School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadlock-Marlo, Rebecca L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for the integration of mindfulness interventions into school counseling. Mindfulness practices currently are neither widely known nor well utilized in the school counseling environment. Implementation of mindfulness in schools may help students increase academic performance, develop social…

  14. The Use of Clinical Hypnosis in a College Counseling Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Herbert A.

    This report describes the use of hypnosis at the Hiram College Counseling Center, a counseling technique that has been especially helpful in academic, athletic, and personal improvement areas. The induction techniques of hypnosis are described as well as the use of hyperempiria. The use of hypnosis in improving study habits and alleviating test…

  15. Effectiveness of counseling at primary health facilities: Level of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Education and employment were associated with good knowledge on MTCT of HIV. Women had positive attitudes towards HIV counseling and ... Effective counseling on PMTCT in the PHFs will bridge the identified knowledge gap and help in reduction of pediatric HIV. African Health sciences Vol 14 No. 1 March 2014 ...

  16. Understanding Unearned Privilege: An Experiential Activity for Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Katrina; Lusk, Aisha; Miller, Laura Christina; Dodier, Oscar Esteban; Salazar, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development stresses the importance of counselors to develop multicultural competencies that include attitudes, knowledge, and skills. Counselor educators face the challenge of helping their students develop multicultural counseling competence including an awareness of unearned privilege. This…

  17. Parents' knowledge and attitude regarding their child's cancer and effectiveness of initial disease counseling in pediatric oncology patients

    OpenAIRE

    Manjusha Nair; Lidiya T Paul; P T Latha; Kusumakumary Parukkutty

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine parent's knowledge, attitude and psychosocial response regarding their child's cancer and treatment after initial disease counseling by doctor. Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaire based study of 43 mothers of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients undergoing treatment in pediatric oncology division. Mothers received initial counseling regarding their child's cancer and treatment from the doctor. Questionnaire was administered 2-6 months after initial couns...

  18. The 'reformation' of counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Lotter

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the Reformation took place some four hundred years ago, one area in which reformation is really needed today is the counselling of people. Since Wilhelm Wundt started the “study of the mind” in 1879, William James and Sigmund Freud followed and secular psychology gradually has developed to take the “front seat”; hence moving Biblical counselling, which has been practised since the times of the New Testament, to the “back burner”. This development had been going on for the greater part of the 20th century, up to the publication of Competent to Counsel by Jay E. Adams in 1970. In the model for counselling suggested by Adams, the principles of the Reformation of the sixteenth century, Soli Deo Gloria, Soli Scriptura, Soli Fidei, Sola Gratia, etc. were again implemented in assisting and counselling people with personal and interpersonal problems. The epistomological and anthropological approach of secular psychology differs radically from that of Biblical principles, thus necessitating a new “reformation” of counselling. Within this new form counselling, inter alia, implies the following: the Word of God has its rightful place, sin has to be taken seriously and the work of the Holy Spirit should be recognised. In this article it is proposed that the “reformation” of counselling was started by scholars with a Biblical Reformational approach and that this method of counselling followed the parameters of the Reformation of the sixteenth century. This “reformation” developed into a new direction in counselling and still continues today with fascinating new frontiers opening up for Biblical counselling.

  19. Doctors with dyslexia: strategies and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Rachel; Alexander, Gail; Mann, Richard; Kibble, Sharon; Scallan, Samantha

    2017-10-01

    Looking beyond dyslexia as an individual doctor's issue requires adjusting a working environment to better serve the needs of doctors with dyslexia. With an increasing number of doctors disclosing dyslexia at medical school, how can educators best provide this support? Our research looks at the impact of dyslexia on clinical practice and the coping strategies used by doctors to minimise the effect. Qualitative data were collected from 14 doctors with dyslexia using semi-structured interviews and by survey. 'In situ' demonstration interviews were conducted in order to understand how dyslexia is managed in the workplace from first-hand experience. Employers and educators who have responsibility for meeting the needs of this group were also consulted. Even in cases of doctors who had a diagnosis, they often did not disclose their dyslexia to their employer. Study participants reported having developed individual ways of coping and devised useful 'workarounds'. Support from employers comes in the form of 'reasonable adjustments', although from our data we cannot be sure that such adjustments contribute to an 'enabling' work environment. Supportive characteristics included the opportunity to shadow others and the time and space to complete paperwork on a busy ward. How can educators best provide support [for doctors with dyslexia]? Doctors with dyslexia need to be helped to feel comfortable enough to disclose. Educators need to challenge any negative assumptions that exist as well as promote understanding about the elements that contribute to a positive working environment. As a result of the research there is now practice available for educators to identify evidence-based strategies and resources. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  20. Counseling psychology trainees' social justice interest and commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew J; Sendrowitz, Kerrin

    2011-04-01

    Scholars within the field of counseling psychology have for some time now articulated eloquent and compelling calls for attending to social justice in the social sciences. To date, counseling psychologists have been at the forefront of addressing social justice issues in research, practice, and professional development. The present study advances empirical perspectives on social justice by testing the external validity of M. J. Miller et al.'s (2009) social-cognitive model of social justice interest and commitment in a sample of 229 doctoral trainees in counseling psychology. Present findings support the ability of the model to explain, in part, counseling psychology trainees' social justice interest and commitment. In addition, the present study provides novel findings that demonstrate the direct and indirect ways in which program training environment and personal moral imperative relate to social justice interest and commitment. Study limitations, future directions for research, and implications for training are discussed. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  1. [Career counselling and choice of speciality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillevang, G.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences. The cou......Career counselling is meant to support and ensure an early and relevant choice of specialty. Self-awareness regarding personality, life goals, wishes for family life, and lifestyle is of help in narrowing down the number of specialties to those that fit personal attitudes and preferences....... The counsellor must be aware that the trainees' subjective opinions about the specialties may not be in line with the actual conditions. Hence, career counselling should provide factual knowledge about the specialties including information on the working conditions and defining characteristics of the specialties...

  2. Follow-up effects of a tailored pre-counseling website with question prompt in breast cancer genetic counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, Akke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Ausems, Margreet G E M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/18756969X

    Objective: Pre-counseling education helps counselees to prepare for breast cancer genetic counseling and might subsequently result in more positive experiences, improved cognitive outcomes and more experienced control. This study assessed the effects of a website with tailored information and a

  3. Follow-up effects of a tailored pre-counseling website with question prompt in breast cancer genetic counseling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albada, A.; Dulmen, S. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pre-counseling education helps counselees to prepare for breast cancer genetic counseling and might subsequently result in more positive experiences, improved cognitive outcomes and more experienced control. This study assessed the effects of a website with tailored information and a

  4. Medical thrillers: doctored fiction for future doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpy, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Medical thrillers have been a mainstay of popular fiction since the late 1970s and still attract a wide readership today. This article examines this specialized genre and its core conventions within the context of professionally-based fiction, i.e. the class of thrillers written by professionals or former professionals. The author maps this largely unchartered territory and analyzes the fictional representations of doctors and medicine provided in such novels. He argues that medical thrillers, which are not originally aimed at specialized readers and sometimes project a flawed image of medicine, may be used as a pedagogical tool with non-native learners of medical English.

  5. Beyond spaces of counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Mads; Nissen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The article articulates experiments with spatial constructions in two Danish social work agencies, basing on (a) a sketchy genealogical reconstruction of conceptualisations and uses of space in social work and counselling, (b) a search for theoretical resources to articulate new spaces, and (c...... spaces are forms of spatialisations which might be taken as prototypical in attempts to develop social work and counselling...

  6. Narrative Dietary Counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard Jakobsen, Nina; Kaufmann, Lisbeth; Hennesser, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Using cases and empirical data from a research and development project at a Danish prevention center, this study explores whether and how the use of narrative dietary counseling can strengthen dietitians' relationships and collaboration with clients who are chronically ill. The results of the study...... dietary counseling empowered clients and improved relationship building and collaboration between client and dietitian....

  7. Marketing Counseling: Caveat Emptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Holly A.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by questioning whether marketing is a justifiable means to a worthwhile end. Examines language of marketing, juxtaposes marketing and counseling metaphors to highlight conflicting philosophies, and concludes that counselors should not abandon philosophical traditions of their…

  8. Malpractice in Counseling Neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1992-01-01

    Responds to earlier four articles on integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology by noting that neuropsychology occurs in settings with high risk of legal complaints. Contends that aspiration to press counseling psychology toward clinical neuropsychology should be filtered through consideration for legal risk. Explores legal…

  9. Counseling Gay Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gerald P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a brief historical context for today's changing popular and professional attitudes. Some current counseling procedures used with adolescent homosexuals are discussed. The legal aspects of counseling gay adolescents conclude the article, followed by an annotated bibliography of suggested reading. (Author)

  10. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  11. Islamic approach in counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin Hamjah, Salasiah; Mat Akhir, Noor Shakirah

    2014-02-01

    A religious approach is one of the matters emphasized in counseling today. Many researchers find that there is a need to apply the religious element in counseling because religion is important in a client's life. The purpose of this research is to identify aspects of the Islamic approach applied in counseling clients by counselors at Pusat Kaunseling Majlis Agama Islam Negeri Sembilan (PKMAINS). In addition, this research also analyses the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS with reference to al-Quran and al-Sunnah. This is a qualitative research in the form of case study at PKMAINS. The main method used in this research is interview. The research instrument used is interview protocol. The respondents in this study include 9 counselors who serve in one of the counseling centers in Malaysia. This study also uses questionnaire as an additional instrument, distributed to 36 clients who receive counseling service at the center. The findings of the study show that the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS may be categorized into three main aspects: aqidah (faith), ibadah (worship/ultimate devotion and love for God) and akhlaq (moral conduct). Findings also show that the counseling in these aspects is in line with Islamic teachings as contained in al-Quran and al-Sunnah.

  12. Helping a loved one with a drinking problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol abuse - helping a loved one; Alcohol use - helping a loved one References Moyer VA; Preventive Services Task Force. Screening and behavioral counseling interventions in primary care to reduce alcohol misuse: ...

  13. Evaluation of preparatory psychosocial counselling for medically assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Lila Z; Newton, Christopher R; MacLean-Brine, Deborah; Feyles, Valter

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated couples' perceptions of preparatory psychosocial counselling prior to participation in medically assisted reproduction (MAR). Eighty-three couples about to undergo IUI treatment were asked about their expectations regarding a subsequent single psychosocial counselling session and assessed in terms of their levels of infertility-specific stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Afterwards, participants rated their satisfaction with different elements of the session. Almost two-thirds of women and one-half of men expected counselling to be important, and the majority anticipated that the session would be helpful and informative. Views of preparatory counselling were significantly more positive afterwards, indicating that a focused session addressing issues of treatment concerns, goal setting and managing infertility stress was more beneficial than anticipated. Those experiencing higher levels of infertility-specific stress expected the counselling session to be more important, and elevated stress and greater utilization of social support were predictive of post-counselling satisfaction. Preparatory psychosocial counselling provided with a specific and practical focus appears to be a potentially important and helpful service prior to MAR. Clinics should not assume that patients can accurately judge the benefits of counselling before actually engaging in the session. Identifying patients most likely to benefit and providing a clear rationale may further increase receptivity to this proactive counselling service. While patients characterize this intervention as beneficial, it is not yet known if these benefits translate into improved management of treatment procedures.

  14. Marie Curie's Doctoral Thesis: Prelude to a Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Traces the life and research techniques of Marie Curie's doctoral dissertation leading to the discovery and purification of radium from ore. Reexamines the discoveries of other scientists that helped lead to this separation. (ML)

  15. Toward Integrity in Financial Aid Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Paul G.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses ethical problems associated with financial aid counseling including: disseminating financial aid information, advising on independent status, judging students true needs, communicating between high school and college, helping parents and students understand programs, drop in enrollment of lower income students, public/private college…

  16. Counseling View of Abortion in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwokhademhe, M. C.; Sowho, Paulina O.

    2015-01-01

    Guidance and counseling are twin words that help people adjust to their psychological, emotional, social and psychosocial problems which tend to occur in human life. Abortion, which is a prevalent problem in Nigeria mostly among the teenage girls, has drawn the attentions of the counselors, teachers, guardians, administrators, researchers and the…

  17. School Counseling Principles: Ethics and Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    This practical guide will sensitize the professional school counselor to legal and ethical issues involved in working with minors in school settings. Using a case study approach and more than 100 cases representing school counselors daily dilemmas, chapters help the reader connect the reality of school counseling to critical federal and state…

  18. Gender and Power in Counselling and Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Maye

    1994-01-01

    Addresses the need to reflect on how the dynamics of gender and power can be articulated together and adversely affect counseling and supervision relationships. Suggests incorporating a social analysis into supervision to help counselors clarify the political nature of some therapeutic issues, thus addressing gender stereotypes. Supports a…

  19. Outplacement Counseling from the Client's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Lee D.; Borgan, William A.

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen individuals who received outplacement counseling (OPC) were interviewed to determine which services were helpful or hindering and whether there were services they would like to have received but did not. The critical incident technique (J. Flanagan, 1954) was used to analyze the data around 16 emergent categories. Results support previous…

  20. Professional Orientation to Counseling. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacc, Nicholas A.; Loesch, Larry C.

    Since its inception, the counseling profession has continuously developed a positive identity among the helping professions. This situation appears to be the result of advancements in counselor credentialing, improved counselor preparation standards, greater governmental and other third-party payer recognition of counselors' competencies, and more…

  1. Gay Couple Counseling: Proceedings of a Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Ralph; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This is a report of a conference on gay couple counseling for members of the helping professions. Discussion topics included (1) Therapists' Panel on Female Couples, (2) Therapists' Panel on Male Couples; (3) Panel of Male Couples and (4) Panel of Female Couples. The conference was held in May, 1974 in New York and was sponsored by The Homosexual…

  2. Alcohol Screening and Counseling PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-01-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the January 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Millions of Americans drink too much, a dangerous behavior that can lead to serious health problems. Alcohol screening and counseling can help.  Created: 1/7/2014 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/7/2014.

  3. Counseling a Student Presenting Borderline Personality Disorder in the Small College Context: Case Study and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Matthew R.; Faulkner, Ginger E.

    2009-01-01

    This case study examines the dynamics and challenges associated with counseling a client experiencing borderline personality disorder in the small college institutional context. The work of counseling centers at small private institutions has been relatively unexplored in the extant college counseling literature. To help fill this gap, the current…

  4. Toward a Developmental Understanding of the Counseling Specialty: Lessons from Our Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbarger, Brett N.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses debate concerning status of counseling as a unique specialization. Hypothesizes that the counseling specialty is distinguished by its reliance on a developmental metatheory, which makes unique assumptions regarding distress, change, and the helping process. Proposes that the value of developmentalism and the counseling speciality are…

  5. Multi-Media Approach to Group Counseling with Preadolescent Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Ann E.

    1980-01-01

    Multimedia group counseling techniques for preadolescent girls are described. These techniques successfully helped them deal with changing body image, the importance of the peer group and the best friend, and the separation of self from parents. (JD)

  6. Surviving the Doctoral Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Kerlin

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This article probes the implications of neo-conservative public education policies for the future of the academic profession through a detailed examination of critical issues shaping contemporary doctoral education in U.S. and Canadian universities. Institutional and social factors such as financial retrenchment, declining support for affirmative action, downward economic mobility, a weak academic labor market for tenure-track faculty, professional ethics in graduate education, and backlash against women's progress form the backdrop for analysis of the author's survey of current doctoral students' opinions about funding, support, the job market, and quality of learning experiences.

  7. Predictors of willingness to use cyber counseling for college students with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chu-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Cyber counseling is a new method for assisting people in coping with distress. People in Taiwan are more familiar with face-to-face counseling than with cyber counseling. Using computers is the most popular activity among college students with disabilities. Cyber counseling is effective for lessening client disturbance. Therefore, cyber counseling is an alternative to face-to-face counseling. This study measured the willingness of college students with disabilities to use cyber counseling to meet their mental health needs. In addition, the predictors of the willingness to use cyber counseling were explored. The subjects were college students with disabilities who were recruited from universities in Southern Taiwan through the Internet and in college counseling centers. A total of 214 structured questionnaires were collected and subsequently analyzed using SPSS Version 18.0 through stepwise regression for discovering the crucial predictors of the willingness of college students to use cyber counseling. The crucial predictors of the willingness of college students to use cyber counseling were cyber-counseling needs, the need for cyber-counseling methods (the need to use various cyber-counseling methods), a help-seeking attitude in cyber counseling, a hearing disorder, cyber counseling need for academic achievement, and grade level. The explained proportion of variance was 65.4%. The willingness of college students with disabilities to use cyber counseling was explained according to cyber-counseling needs, cyber-counseling attitudes, disease type, and grades. Based on the results, this study offers specific suggestions and future directions for research on cyber counseling for college students with disabilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Indigenous counseling: A needed area in school counseling in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous counselling has not been given attention in Nigeria's school counselling programme. This counselling gap was created by European colonialism, which succeeded in developing in the minds of the African that anything indigenous is local, unscientific and unorthodox. Indigenous counselling is one of the ...

  9. Teledermatology Helps Doctors and Hospitals to Serve Their Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkamp, Leonard

    Telemedicine contributes to efficiency increase and leads to the accelerated development and use of the internet based electronic patient record. The broad use of telemedicine is hampered by rigid decision structures, slow adaptation processes and concern for its consequences. Health Management Practice (HMP) addresses these issues by developing, investigating and implementing telemedicine tools in a modular way. KSYOS TeleMedical Centre, the first virtual healthcare institution in The Netherlands, has successfully applied HMP on teledermatology. Teledermatology has led to high satisfaction and learning effect, 65,1% referral reduction, 40% cost savings, and better quality of care. Teledermatology is an excellent tool for hospitals to dosage their waiting list, increase and strengthen their contacts with general practitioners, and provide them and the patients with better service. HMP has enabled KSYOS to perform over 16.000 teleconsultations, expand teledermatology to other EU countries, as well as to other areas such as teleophtalmology, telespirometry and telecardiology.

  10. Conceptualising Doctoral Writing as an Affective-political Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Burford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This article offers a conceptual summary and critique of existing literature on doctoral writing and emotion. The article seeks to intervene in current debates about doctoral writing by re-positioning it as an affective-political practice Background: Over recent decades public interest in the doctorate has expanded as it has become re-framed as a key component of national success in the global knowledge economy. It is within this context that the practice of doctoral writing has crystallised as an object of interest. While researchers have examined the increased regulation, surveillance, and intensification of doctoral writing, often this work is motivated to develop pedagogies that support students to meet these new expectations. At this point, there has been limited attention to what broad changes to the meanings and practices of doctoral writing feel like for students. Methodology: The paper offers a conceptual review that examines the ways in which doctoral writing tends to be understood. A review of literature in the areas of doctoral writing, doctoral emotion, and critical studies of academic labour was undertaken in order to produce a more comprehensive understanding of the political and emotional dynamics of doctoral writing. Contribution: It is intended that this conceptual research paper help researchers attend to the emotional context of doctoral writing in the current university context. Critical studies of academic work and life are identified as a possible platform for the development of future doctoral education research, and the conceptual tool of “affective-politics” is advanced as a novel frame for approaching doctoral writing research.

  11. A survey on doctors' knowledge and attitude of treating chronic pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic non-cancer pain (CP) is one of the most common complaints that bring patients to the hospital. When pain persists, people move from doctor-to-doctor seeking for help, thus the burden of CP is huge. This study, therefore was aimed at assessing attitude and knowledge of doctors in three teaching ...

  12. Helping smokers quit improves health and budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Bryan

    2014-06-01

    (1) Treatment of smoking-related illnesses accounts for about 11 percent of Medicaid expenditures. (2) As of 2014, seven states provide comprehensive tobacco-cessation coverage to Medicaid enrollees, including individual counseling, group counseling, and seven types of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved medications. (3) Without assistance from medication or other forms of help, around 4 percent to 7 percent of quit attempts are successful; with tobacco-cessation medication use, the success rate is 25 percent.

  13. The Doctoral Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Margaret Terry

    2007-01-01

    The value of the doctorate in educational administration has been debated in recent years over its appropriateness as a qualification for superintendency. Underlying these debates are two overlapping trends. One is increasing program availability and shifts in institutional type, and the second is changes in program content and dissertation…

  14. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  15. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in Health Wellness Toolkits Grants & Funding Grants Home ...

  16. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics ... Social Media More » Quick Links NIH News in Health NIH Research ... Highlights Science Education Research in NIH Labs & Clinics Training Opportunities Library ...

  17. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staff Directory En Español Site Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z ...

  18. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » Search Health Topics Quick Links MedlinePlus Health Info NIH News in ...

  19. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu Home Health Information Health Info Lines Health Services Locator HealthCare.gov NIH Clinical Research Trials and You Talking to Your Doctor Science Education Resources Community Resources Clear Health A–Z Publications List More » ...

  20. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 4:37) Part II: Talking Openly with Your Medical Provider (3:51) Part III: Understanding Diagnosis and Treatment (3:57) More Resources from NIH You can play an active role in your health care by talking to your doctor. Clear and honest ...

  1. Controlling Depersonalized Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Outlines Gestalt therapy techniques to increase active listening and counselor/client involvement in career counseling. Discusses awareness through dialog, role playing or "presentizing," and experiential "presentizing." Presents a sample dialog as illustration. (RC)

  2. The European Research Agenda for career guidance and counseling - and beyond. ECADOC - Early stage researchers symposium 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie; Weber, Peter C.

    Research in CGC is an expanding field of research still it is important to attract doctoral candidates to commit themselves to participation in scholarly exchange at central conferences. IAEVG is a central conference to the research field of Career Guidance and Counseling. With this symposium we...... and counseling researcher. Thereby allowing for new and emerging research topics to be discussed in order to build capacity and facilitate the inclusion of Early stage researchers. Abstract The Early stage researchers (ESR) symposium sets out to facilitates new modes of participations by encouraging PhD students...... in career guidance and counseling by supporting the inclusion of new doctoral researchers to the field....

  3. Help LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Carreras,R; Lehmann,P

    1988-01-01

    première partie: Help LEP ou le tunnel de l'infini- pièce radiophonique intéréssant sur l'origine de la matière deuxième partie: Help LEP débat; suite à cette pièce interview avec 3 physiciens du Cern sur le projet LEP et le but du Cern qui est la recherche fondamentale

  4. Parents' knowledge and attitude regarding their child's cancer and effectiveness of initial disease counseling in pediatric oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Nair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine parent's knowledge, attitude and psychosocial response regarding their child's cancer and treatment after initial disease counseling by doctor. Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaire based study of 43 mothers of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients undergoing treatment in pediatric oncology division. Mothers received initial counseling regarding their child's cancer and treatment from the doctor. Questionnaire was administered 2-6 months after initial counseling and mothers self-reported their responses. Results: 83% mothers had school level education only and 84% belonged to lower and middle socio-economic status. More than 80% mothers knew the name of their child's cancer, type of treatment received by child and approximate duration of treatment. 93% knew regarding painful procedures and 84% mothers reported knowledge about chemotherapy side effects. Hope of cure and satisfaction with treatment were reported by 90% mothers. 81% mothers reported high levels of anxiety and 66% worried regarding painful procedures. As high as 60% of parents were afraid to send their child outside to play and 40% were afraid to send their child to school. 40% mothers wanted more information regarding child's higher education, married life & fertility. On statistical analysis, mother's age, educational status or family background did not influence their knowledge and attitude. Conclusion: Relevant information about child's cancer and treatment can be imparted effectively even to mothers with school level education. This knowledge helps to instill hopeful attitude, confidence and satisfaction in parents. Anxiety and fear related to cancer persists in mothers even after the initial stress period is over. Pain related to injections and procedures is a major concern in parents. Involvement of counselor in the treating team is desirable to overcome these problems.

  5. Parents' Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Their Child's Cancer and Effectiveness of Initial Disease Counseling in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manjusha; Paul, Lidiya T; Latha, P T; Parukkutty, Kusumakumary

    2017-01-01

    To examine parent's knowledge, attitude and psychosocial response regarding their child's cancer and treatment after initial disease counseling by doctor. Structured questionnaire based study of 43 mothers of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients undergoing treatment in pediatric oncology division. Mothers received initial counseling regarding their child's cancer and treatment from the doctor. Questionnaire was administered 2-6 months after initial counseling and mothers self-reported their responses. 83% mothers had school level education only and 84% belonged to lower and middle socio-economic status. More than 80% mothers knew the name of their child's cancer, type of treatment received by child and approximate duration of treatment. 93% knew regarding painful procedures and 84% mothers reported knowledge about chemotherapy side effects. Hope of cure and satisfaction with treatment were reported by 90% mothers. 81% mothers reported high levels of anxiety and 66% worried regarding painful procedures. As high as 60% of parents were afraid to send their child outside to play and 40% were afraid to send their child to school. 40% mothers wanted more information regarding child's higher education, married life & fertility. On statistical analysis, mother's age, educational status or family background did not influence their knowledge and attitude. Relevant information about child's cancer and treatment can be imparted effectively even to mothers with school level education. This knowledge helps to instill hopeful attitude, confidence and satisfaction in parents. Anxiety and fear related to cancer persists in mothers even after the initial stress period is over. Pain related to injections and procedures is a major concern in parents. Involvement of counselor in the treating team is desirable to overcome these problems.

  6. Predictors of good-quality counselling from the perspective of hospitalised chronically ill adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakinen, Pirjo; Kyngäs, Helvi; Kääriäinen, Maria

    2013-10-01

    To determine the factors that predict the quality of patient counselling from the perspective of hospitalised chronically ill adults. In view of the growing number of adults with chronic diseases and a lack of resources in health care, it would be valuable for healthcare professionals to know which factors result in good-quality counselling for such individuals. The study used a cross-sectional, descriptive design. Data were collected from chronically ill adults (n = 106) in northern Finland and were analysed using logistic regression. Counselling implementation was perceived to be of good quality if it was preplanned (odds ratio = 24·07) and patient-centred (odds ratio = 16·03) and if interaction during counselling (odds ratio = 13·27) was good. Counselling about social support (odds ratio = 14·78), preplanned counselling (odds ratio = 9·69), counselling about the results of investigations (odds ratio = 7·84) and counselling about disease progression (odds ratio = 7·66) were statistically significant predictors of the content being considered good quality. The effects of counselling on disease treatment (odds ratio = 11·33), patient-centred counselling (odds ratio = 9·75) and counselling about the effects of attitudes (odds ratio = 9·52) were statistically significant predictors of highly beneficial counselling. Counselling about the effects of disease treatment (odds ratio = 9·71) and interaction during counselling (odds ratio = 4·91) predicted the quality of counselling materials and methods. The results could be used to help healthcare professionals to ensure good-quality counselling by highlighting the areas that are most important to meet the expectations of chronically ill adults. The results can be used to develop the quality of chronically ill adults' counselling as well as to educate staff to focus better on chronically ill patients' counselling because it is necessary to develop new ways to offer more patient-centred counselling in order to

  7. Midwives' strategies in challenging dietary and weight counselling situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennberg, Anna Lena; Hamberg, Katarina; Hörnsten, Asa

    2014-10-01

    By enhancing maternal nutritional status, midwives can help women lower the risks of pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes as well as improve maternal health during pregnancy and in the long run. Dietary counselling is, on the other hand, not reported to be effective. Poor communication and conflicting messages are identified as possible barriers to adherence with recommendations. Midwives' experiences of providing dietary advice and counselling during pregnancy are sparsely reported. The aim of this study was therefore to explore midwives' strategies when faced with challenging dietary counselling situations. Seventeen midwives from different parts of Sweden and working within antenatal health care were interviewed by telephone. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Challenges were commonly experienced when counselling women who were overweight, obese, had eating disorders or were from different cultures. The midwives talked in terms of "the problematic women" when addressing counselling problems. Strategies used in challenging counselling situations were Getting acquainted; Trying to support and motivate; Pressure to choose "correctly"; Controlling and mastering; and Resigning responsibility. The results indicate that Swedish midwives' counselling strategies are quite ambiguous and need to be questioned and that counselling of vulnerable groups of women should be highlighted. We could identify a need for education of practicing midwives to develop person-centred counselling skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Penumbra: Doctoral support as drama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gill; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2017-01-01

    Much international doctoral learning research focuses on personal, institutional and learning support provided by supervisors, managed relationships,‘nudging’ robust, conceptual, critical, creative work. Other work focuses on stresses experienced in supervisor-student relationships and doctoral j...

  9. [Counseling: a tool for enhancing the communication with the patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Gil, C; Barreda-Hernández, D; Marcos-Pérez, G; Barreira-Hernández, D

    2013-01-01

    Counseling is a technique used in psychology that has shown a major impact on health: in deep, it is the methodology recommended by the Worl Health Organization to help HIV-infected patients. Although it has been translated to spanish by assisted counseling or helping relationship, counseling covers a broader concept. It is defined as an interactive process based on communication in which the clinician helps the patients to think about their own health and to take appropiate decisions based on their values and interests. In short, counseling is a tool to enhance communication with the patient, resulting very useful during clinical interview in pharmaceutical care programs in order to improve pharmacotherapy and patient safety. Copyright © 2013 SEFH. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. Reinventing The Doctor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyez Jiwa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a seismic shift in the lives of people because of technology. People are far better informed than they were in the 1980s and 1990s. Much of this information is available through the media but even more is available and archived on the internet. The forces pushing the internet into health and health care are strong and unstoppable, ensuring that the internet and the choices it offers must be part of the design of our future health care system. We are no longer content to wait in queues as we live at a faster pace than earlier generations — we don’t not have time to wait for appointments months, weeks or even days in advance. The internet offers the prospect of online consultations in the comfort of your own home. The physical examination will change as new devices are developed to allow the necessary sounds and signals emitted by our malfunctioning bodies to be recorded, interpreted and captured at a remote location. Meanwhile, for those who prefer to see a health care practitioner in person the options to consult practitioners other than doctors who can advise on our health is expanding. The reality is we can’t afford to train or pay for all the doctors we need under the current “doctor-knows-best” system of health care. Patients no longer believe the rhetoric and are already voting with their feet. Pharmacists, nurses and other allied health professionals are beginning to play a much greater role in offering relief from symptoms and monitoring of chronic diseases. Of course, the doctor of the future will still need to offer face-to-face consultations to some people most of the time or most people some of the time. The social role doctors play will continue to be important as humans will always need other humans to personally respond to their distress. As doctors reinvent themselves, the internet and the value of time with patients will be the driving forces that move us into a more sustainable future in health care.

  11. Contextualising eating problems in individual diet counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Søren T; Køster, Allan

    2014-05-01

    Health professionals consider diet to be a vital component in managing weight, chronic diseases and the overall promotion of health. This article takes the position that the complexity and contextual nature of individual eating problems needs to be addressed in a more systematic and nuanced way than is usually the case in diet counselling, motivational interviewing and health coaching. We suggest the use of narrative practice as a critical and context-sensitive counselling approach to eating problems. Principles of externalisation and co-researching are combined within a counselling framework that employs logistic, social and discursive eating problems as analytic categories. Using cases from a health clinic situated at the Metropolitan University College in Copenhagen, we show that even if the structural conditions associated with eating problems may not be solvable through individual counselling sessions, exploration of the complex structures of food and eating with the client can provide agency by helping them navigate within the context of the problem. We also exemplify why a reflexive and critical approach to the way health is perceived by clients should be an integrated part of diet counselling.

  12. Talking to Your Child's Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in your child's health? The Doctor-Patient Relationship Today, doctors are pressured to see more patients in less time and to spend less time with each patient. Insurance issues, such as the need for referrals, complicate patient care for parents as well as doctors and their ...

  13. Doctorateness as a Threshold Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafford, Vernon; Leshem, Shosh

    2009-01-01

    Achieving a doctorate presents candidates with certain challenges--undertaking the research, writing the thesis and defending both at their viva. Throughout that doctoral journey, candidates are expected to display doctorateness in their thesis via the characteristics of high-quality scholarly research. The blockages that occur and prevent…

  14. American Doctors at the Nuremberg Medical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Evelyne

    2018-01-01

    Three Hippocratic physicians played critical roles in the prosecution of 23 Nazi doctors charged with murder and torture for conducting lethal medical experiments on concentration camp prisoners. Two of the physicians, Leopold Alexander and Andrew C. Ivy, were Americans, and the other, Werner Leibbrandt, was German. At the 70th anniversary of the Doctors' Trial it is fitting to recall the three's influences and contributions to the formulation of strict research ethics rules, known as the Nuremberg Code. Their contributions help us better understand why they insisted on strict research rules and yet ultimately were unable to apply these rules to their own research. Exploring their contributions at Nuremberg may help us appreciate the continuing difficulty physician-researchers have with accepting public regulation of research.

  15. 38 CFR 21.3100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.3100.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3100 Counseling. (a) Purpose of counseling. The purpose of counseling is to...)) (b) Availability of counseling. Counseling assistance is available for— (1) Identifying and removing...

  16. How doctors search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Price, Susan; Delcambre, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Professional, workplace searching is different from general searching, because it is typically limited to specific facets and targeted to a single answer. We have developed the semantic component (SC) model, which is a search feature that allows searchers to structure and specify the search...... to context-specific aspects of the main topic of the documents. We have tested the model in an interactive searching study with family doctors with the purpose to explore doctors’ querying behaviour, how they applied the means for specifying a search, and how these features contributed to the search outcome....... In general, the doctors were capable of exploiting system features and search tactics during the searching. Most searchers produced well-structured queries that contained appropriate search facets. When searches failed it was not due to query structure or query length. Failures were mostly caused by the well...

  17. Sources of stress, coping strategies and counselling needs, among university students in Kingdom of Bahrain

    OpenAIRE

    Al Sheerawi, Amani A

    2005-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. The aim of this study was: (1) to identify the main sources of stress that affect students' level of stress, students' coping strategies and their counselling needs. (2) To identify the relationship between sources of stress and coping strategies. (3) The effect of gender and Locality on sources of stress, level of stress, coping strategies and counselling needs. This study utilised both quan...

  18. Life Satisfaction and Frequency of Doctor Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S.; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K.; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information is available about the association between life satisfaction and health care use. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Methods Participants were 6,379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50. Participants were tracked for four years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Results Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a six-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits—after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86 to 0.93). The most satisfied respondents (N=1,121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than the least satisfied (N=182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93 to 0.99). Conclusions Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs. PMID:24336427

  19. Semar puppet counseling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhrudin All Habsy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Puppet as the original local wisdom has a great role in the character building and giving a good example of how to behave, puppet is also the source or guidance of how to behave well. One of the figures in puppet that has strong characteristic as the leader, protector, patron, and also the guide for ksatria in taking the decision is Semar. Semar has the perfection ethic of Javanese person and raise as the core of the soul of Javanese people. Semar’s wisdom can be applied in the development of multi culture Counseling for Counselor and multi culture Counseling characteristic. The characteristic of multi cultural based Counselor are: (1 Prudent, (2 Helper, (3 Motivator, (4 Democratic, (5 Fair, (6Associating, (7 Sustains on the objectives, (8 Responsible, (9 Teaching, (10 Wholeheartedly, (11 Well mannered, (12 Sincere, (13 Honest, (14 Faithful, (15 Unpretentious (16 Not an anti critical, (17 Able to keep secret, and (18 Positive thinking. The application of Counseling based on the Semar’s characters is offered to develop the practice of multi cultural Counseling for the Counselors, it called puppet semar counseling model.

  20. Death Concern and the Helping Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Janet; Garlie, Norman W.

    The authors rewiew the literature on the current state of training for health professionals to cope with death and dying. They also comment on recent changes in cultural attitudes toward death. Representatives of the helping professions (counselors, teachers, nurses, doctors, clergy, social workers) should be better prepared to help people deal…

  1. INHALER COUNSELLING, THE REAL DEAL OR JUST FRESH AIR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Richard; Chander, Tiranvir; Shah, Neha; Tomlin, Steve

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate whether healthcare professionals within the local community are able to counsel paediatric patients on the essential steps required for drug delivery with multi-dose inhalers (MDI), MDIs with a spacer and turbohalers. An expert panel produced and piloted checklists for essential and good practice counselling steps. Eligible participants included healthcare professionals regularly counselling children on inhaler devices, including doctors, nurses and pharmacy team members. Participants were recruited through purposive sampling on a general paediatric ward in a major children's hospital over 2 months and local community pharmacies. Participants counselled on each technique through simulated paediatric scenarios and were assessed by a trained researcher. The audit captured 92 healthcare professionals, comprising 43 nurses, 9 doctors, 13 hospital pharmacy staff and 27 community pharmacies team members.Overall 13% (12/92) of participants counselled on all the essential criteria for an MDI inhaler. Pharmacy teams within the hospital and community saw the highest competency levels with 31% (4/13) and 30% (8/27) of staff able to discuss the essential steps respectively, no doctors or nurses were able to indentify all steps.10% (9/92) of participants were able to counsel on all essential steps for a MDI with a spacer device, with no nurse nor doctor achieving all steps. Hospital pharmacy staff were most likely to discuss all the essential steps with 6/13 staff competent and 3/27 community pharmacy team members counselled on the required steps. Commonly omitted steps included shaking the inhaler and leaving sufficient time between doses.Competency levels for turbohaler counselling were low, only 5 participants were able to counsel on the essential steps required. Commonly omitted or incorrect descriptions surrounded the priming of the device and incorrect inhalation technique. Our findings mirror those of previously published studies with an adult focused

  2. [The practice of breastfeeding counseling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Lais Graci dos Santos; Teruya, Keiko Miyasaki

    2004-11-01

    To provide health professionals with information on theory and practice of breastfeeding counseling. MEDLINE, Bireme library, Lilacs, relevant Internet websites, scientific journals, technical books, essays, theses, and national and international publications were selected, studied and used to provide information on the topic. The most important sources of data were: a publication by the World Health Organization (WHO - 1993) and the authors' experience and clinic practice in the assistance of mothers, children and families. A trained pediatrician plays a relevant role on increasing breastfeeding rates and its duration. To improve this performance, in 1993, WHO designed a 40-hour course using an important didactic strategy aimed at health professionals and mothers. The goal was to protect, promote and support maternal nursing. It is a professional way of dealing with the mother by listening and trying to understand her, offering her help on planning, taking decisions, and getting strength on how to deal with pressures, thus increasing her confidence and self-esteem. Scientific evidence proves the effectiveness of Breastfeeding Counseling. Moreover, health professional's knowledge and practice are very important to increase breastfeeding rates.

  3. Counseling Centers Lack Resources to Help Troubled Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2008-01-01

    The fatal shootings at Northern Illinois University this month were shocking yet familiar. For the second time in 10 months, a student with a record of mental-health problems went on a killing spree at a large public university. Ever since a disturbed student fatally shot 32 students and professors at Virginia Tech last April, college…

  4. Doctoral School Psychology Internships in Non-School Settings in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael B.; Kissell, Susan; Bolen, Larry M.

    2003-01-01

    This study reviewed non-school internship centers that indicated they would consider applications from school psychology doctoral students. School psychology interns devoted the majority of their time to individual and group counseling and psychotherapy and assessment and were perceived as having strengths in educational and psychological…

  5. A Doctorate Program for Leadership Personnel in Vocational Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Coll. of Education.

    The project report describes the doctoral program for leadership development in vocational education at the Ohio State University. Funded by the Education Professions Development Act, the program provided training in administration, supervision, teacher education, curriculum design and development, vocational counseling, and research to 21…

  6. Smoking cessation counseling by surgical and nonsurgical residents: opportunities for health promotion education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon R; Lai, Hollis; Bédard, Eric L R

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in North America and a major contributor to surgically treated diseases and operative complications. Counseling by residents can be an effective means of helping patients to quit smoking, and with the introduction of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and CanMEDS competency frameworks, health promotion is a required component of residency training. However, past studies have found that smoking cessation counseling by residents, and in particular surgical residents, is lacking. In light of the introduction of health promotion as a core competency in residency training, this study was designed to examine the attitudes and practices of residents at our institution regarding smoking cessation counseling, comparing surgical and nonsurgical residents and seeking to identify barriers to resident counseling. An internet-based questionnaire was distributed to all residents at the University of Alberta in the fall of 2012. Items examined residents׳ attitudes and practices related to smoking cessation counseling and barriers to counseling. Although almost all residents believed that smoking cessation was important and that counseling was part of their job as a resident, far fewer routinely practiced the counseling behaviors examined. Surgical residents were less likely to perform counseling and more likely to think that counseling was not part of their job. Surgical residents were also more likely to identify obstacles to counseling such as a lack of time and formal training. Residents, and surgical residents in particular, are missing opportunities to help their patients quit smoking and improve their health. Given their positive attitudes toward counseling, it may be possible to improve their counseling practices through simple means. By identifying obstacles to counseling and tools that may increase residents׳ tendency to perform counseling, this study can help to guide training programs

  7. Project helps build sexual responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endris, A

    1993-10-01

    Program activities are described for the Youth Counseling Services and Family Planning Education Project, established in 1990 by the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia. The project operates out of two locations and has five staff and a doctor who visits two times a week. Thus far 5300 adolescents have received contraception and about 500 youth have received medical consultations. Services include counseling, films about adolescent sexuality and contraceptive methods, booklets on family life education and contraception, and a drama group that does community outreach. Services aim to treat and prevent sexually transmitted diseases an AIDS, to improve reproductive health, and to provide family planning services. Services are a joint effort of staff, community, school teachers, and youth that aims to break down cultural barriers that prevent use of services. Material for films and theater comes from locally written or prepared materials. For example a teenager wrote the play "Yetwatwa Chorka" about adolescent pregnancy. Another radio dramatization has a plot relating to the conflict between traditional and modern values. The drama troupe also does radio dialogues about contraception and family issues and makes advertisements about condoms and HIV transmission. The producer director of media outreach is reported to be well known for his role in the productions. The centers are considered popular and more outreach is planned for out of school youth.

  8. Who Seeks Career Counselling? A Prospective Study of Personality and Career Variables among Swiss Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, Elif; Hirschi, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether career adaptability, personality, attitude towards career counselling and some demographic variables predict the help seeking behaviour in career counselling among 330 Swiss adolescents in eighth grade. The results indicated that boys were less likely to seek help and that career related variables and attitude but…

  9. Giving Counsel: Donald Capps' Contributions to Pastoral Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMothe, Ryan

    2017-10-23

    This article explores some of Donald Capps' contributions to the ministry of pastoral counseling. In particular, several key attributes of pastoral counseling as a ministry of the church are identified and discussed. This is followed by identifying six features necessary for good enough pastoral counseling. A final brief section offers some musings that I wish Capps could respond to.

  10. Evidence-based smoking cessation and the family doctor

    OpenAIRE

    Sammut, Mario R.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Malta smoking is widespread and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Family doctors are well-placed to provide smoking cessation advice to their patients. Objective The aim of this review is to assist family doctors in helping their patients quit smoking by informing them of evidence-based therapies. Method The online Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews within the Cochrane Library was searched for metaanalyses and systematic reviews related to various smoking...

  11. A Discourse Of Doctoral Qualifying Exam: A Self Observation And Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Basthomi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study, concern itself with a discourse of doctoral qualifying exam, an underresearched area of doctoral studies in the Indonesian context, concerns itself with a discourse of doctoral qualifying exam. The data for this study were drawn from naturalistic observations taking place during the doctoral ventures of the present researcher. Another methodological characteristic of the present study is the employment of selective self-reflections on the personal narratives of the researcher. The researcher attended some ten doctoral qualifying exams at one graduate school of one of Indonesian universities. The study arrived at two conspicuous features characterizing doctoral qualifying exams. Results of some comparative observations taking place in Thailand, Australia, and the United Sates are also presented to help clarify the characterization of the doctoral qualifying exams in the Indonesian university. Some recommendations for future research concerning doctoral studies will conclude the article

  12. Psychological Help-Seeking Attitudes of Helping Professional Candidates and Factors Influencing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumcagiz, Hatice

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed as descriptive to identify psychological help-seeking attitudes of helping professional candidates and factors influencing them. The research population consisted of 447 first and fourth grade students studying in the Departments of Psychological Counselling and Guidance, Psychology or Nursing at Ondokuz Mayis University.…

  13. The effectiveness of telephone counselling and internet- and text-message-based support for smoking cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Ettrup, Lise S; Dalum, Peter; Bech, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effectiveness of proactive telephone counselling, reactive telephone counselling and an internet- and text messages-based intervention with a self-help booklet for smoking cessation. DESIGN: A randomised controlled trial with equal allocation to four conditions: 1) Proactive...... telephone counselling (n=452), 2) Reactive telephone counselling (n=453), 3) Internet- and text-message-based intervention (n=453), 4) Self-help booklet (control) (n=452) SETTING: Denmark PARTICIPANTS: Smokers who had previously participated in two national health surveys were invited. Eligibility criteria...... 0.6-1.2) and 5.3% vs. 3.6%, OR=1.6 (95% CI 0.8-3.0) respectively. In the proactive telephone counselling group, the cost per additional 12-month quitter compared with the booklet group was £644. CONCLUSIONS: Proactive telephone counselling was more effective than a self-help booklet in achieving...

  14. Doctors' experience with handheld computers in clinical practice: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Schweikhart, Sharon B; Medow, Mitchell A

    2004-05-15

    To examine doctors' perspectives about their experiences with handheld computers in clinical practice. Qualitative study of eight focus groups consisting of doctors with diverse training and practice patterns. Six practice settings across the United States and two additional focus group sessions held at a national meeting of general internists. 54 doctors who did or did not use handheld computers. Doctors who used handheld computers in clinical practice seemed generally satisfied with them and reported diverse patterns of use. Users perceived that the devices helped them increase productivity and improve patient care. Barriers to use concerned the device itself and personal and perceptual constraints, with perceptual factors such as comfort with technology, preference for paper, and the impression that the devices are not easy to use somewhat difficult to overcome. Participants suggested that organisations can help promote handheld computers by providing advice on purchase, usage, training, and user support. Participants expressed concern about reliability and security of the device but were particularly concerned about dependency on the device and over-reliance as a substitute for clinical thinking. Doctors expect handheld computers to become more useful, and most seem interested in leveraging (getting the most value from) their use. Key opportunities with handheld computers included their use as a stepping stone to build doctors' comfort with other information technology and ehealth initiatives and providing point of care support that helps improve patient care.

  15. Existentialism in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Leona E.

    1971-01-01

    The counselor, in working with students, can make each choice a means through which the person clarifies his purposes and designs his own future. Every commitment of time is a serious undertaking. This, the author sees, is the fundamental message of existentialism for counseling. (Author)

  16. Stress and stress counselling.

    OpenAIRE

    Matheson, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report by the 1989 National Association of Clinical Tutors Wyeth Travelling Fellow to the United States of America. The stresses of postgraduate training and attempts to modify these are described, including stress counselling. The significance of stress and the relevance of the findings for postgraduate training in the United Kingdom are considered.

  17. "Counseling" in Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, J.

    1976-01-01

    The need to counsel patients with genetic ophthalmological problems is stressed in the article. Assessment of autosomal dominance or autosomal recessitivity in an individual is explained and sex-linked heredity is traced. Practical examples of genetic abnormalities, such as pigmentary retinopathy and chorodineremia, are discussed. (PHR)

  18. Feminist Counseling: A Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Alison

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to show that feminist counseling is part of the larger feminist perspective. The author maintains that to be a non-sexist counselor is not enough. Counselors need to encourage a feminist viewpoint in clients. The article describes how this might be done. (EJT)

  19. Counseling in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remley, Theodore P.; Bacchini, Eugenio; Krieg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The counseling profession in Italy is in an early stage of development. No university preparation programs exist, and counselors are not employed in schools. Counselors maintain private practices, work in agencies, and are employed by the government. Counselors receive their preparation in Italy from professional associations in programs that…

  20. First Cycle Counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darska, Anna

    1981-01-01

    Investigations are described that were carried out by the Centre d'Information de Documentation et d'Orientation of the Rene Descartes University to find an answer to the counseling problems arising from student admission, through coursework, and upon leaving the university to start a career. (Author/MLW)

  1. Changing doctor prescribing behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.S.; Mäkelä, M.; Vermeulen, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane Collabora......The aim of this overview was to identify interventions that change doctor prescribing behaviour and to derive conclusions for practice and further research. Relevant studies (indicating prescribing as a behaviour change) were located from a database of studies maintained by the Cochrane...... Collaboration on Effective Professional Practice. This register is kept up to date by searching the following databases for reports of relevant research: DHSS-DATA; EMBASE; MEDLINE; SIGLE; Resource Database in Continuing Medical Education (1975-1994), along with bibliographies of related topics, hand searching...... of key journals and personal contact with content area experts. Randomised controlled trials and non-equivalent group designs with pre- and post-intervention measures were included. Outcome measures were those used by the study authors. For each study we determined whether these were positive, negative...

  2. Do Counseling and Marketing Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by discussing concerns about two of Wittman's purposes for use of marketing: improved services in consumers and economic survival of counseling profession. Agrees that counseling profession needs to understand basic marketing principles used by business and health care industry;…

  3. Abraham Maslow's Legacy for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the life of Abraham Maslow, a key founder of the humanistic approach to counseling, and his contributions to the counseling field. Maintains that Maslow's innovative work was often misinterpreted by both his admirers and his critics, yet remains highly relevant to current concerns in counseling. (Author/PVV)

  4. Group Counseling with Traumatized East African Refugee Women in the United States: Using the "Kaffa" Ceremony Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewy, Michael I.; Williams, DiAnna Toliver; Keleta, Aster

    2002-01-01

    The Kaffa ceremony is a unique, culturally appropriate, group counseling intervention for female East African refugees. A counseling group is described in which the Kaffa ceremony was instrumental in helping to bridge the gap between Western counseling and East African culture, providing a context for the group members to resolve long-held trauma.…

  5. Using Stories in Elementary School Counseling: Brief, Narrative Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, Christie; Olsen, Jacob A.; Hidano, Lory

    2009-01-01

    This article describes using stories and story-telling techniques so that elementary professional school counselors can facilitate brief, narrative counseling. These approaches help counselors and students build rapport while assisting in understanding and externalizing the problem. Additionally, these interventions may help generate ideas for…

  6. Counseling and Caring Keep Teen Mothers in School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daria, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a New Jersey counseling program for pregnant girls and teen mothers that uses the school nurse to help students face realities, consider options, and stay in school. The program is part of a large assistance effort involving the school psychologist, counselors, teachers, and an alcohol abuse specialist to provide help for all students…

  7. 38 CFR 21.5100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.5100.... Chapter 32 Counseling § 21.5100 Counseling. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is: (1) To assist in... of counseling. Counseling assistance in available for— (1) Identifying and removing reasons for...

  8. [Job satisfaction among Norwegian doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylenna, Magne; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2010-05-20

    Doctors' job satisfaction has been discussed internationally in recent years based on reports of increasing professional dissatisfaction. We have studied Norwegian doctors' job satisfaction and their general satisfaction with life. A survey was conducted among a representative sample of practicing Norwegian doctors in 2008. The validated 10-item Job Satisfaction Scale was used to assess job satisfaction. 1,072 (65 %) doctors responded. They reported a mean job satisfaction of 5.3 on a scale from 1 (very dissatisfied) to 7 (very satisfied). Job satisfaction increased with increasing age. Private practice specialists reported the highest level of job satisfaction (5.8), and general practitioners reported higher job satisfaction (5.5) than hospital doctors (5.1). Among specialty groups, community doctors scored highest (5.6) and doctors in surgical disciplines lowest (5.0). While long working hours was negatively correlated with job satisfaction, the perception of being professionally updated and having part-time affiliation(s) in addition to a regular job were positively correlated with job satisfaction. 52.9 % of doctors reported a very high general satisfaction. Norwegian doctors have a high level of job satisfaction. Satisfaction with life in general is also high and at least in line with that in the Norwegian population.

  9. [Medical mistakes in doctors novels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeveld, Cornelis H Kees

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether doctors novels give a realistic picture of medical practice. Descriptive, qualitative analysis. 6 items in total from two series of doctors novels (4 Dutch 'Doctors novels' and 2 'Dr. Anne Maas' publications) were examined. The series 'Doctors novels' was translated from English, the 'Dr. Anne' novels were written by Dutch authors. The medical situations were located mostly in hospital emergency departments and operation rooms. Medical specialisms were represented mainly by surgeons, emergency care doctors, orthopaedic specialists, cardiologists and gynaecologists. In the series 'Doctors novels' most of the patients described suffered a trauma. In the 'Dr. Anne' series the patients admitted to the emergency department had a greater range of medical conditions. In the series 'Doctors novels' 3 of the 4 main characters were pregnant. In one case, giving birth was described in detail. The doctors novels which were studied give an unbalanced and distorted view of medical practice. The medical information was sometimes incorrect, partly due to lack of knowledge by the author, partly due to incorrect translation from English. The reality of medical practice was not represented accurately in either of the series investigated, although the medical information in the 'Doctors novels' series appeared to be accurate more often than that in the 'Dr. Anne' series.

  10. Impact of Pharmacist Counselling on Clozapine Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciara Ní Dhubhlaing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine is the only antipsychotic with evidence for efficacy in treatment of resistant schizophrenia but it carries a high side effect burden. Patient information is provided but may be poorly retained. This study aims to examine the impact of pharmacist counselling upon patient knowledge of clozapine. Outpatients, aged 18 years and over, attending St. Patrick’s University Hospital, Dublin, participated in this study between June and August 2015. The intervention consisted of pharmacist counselling on two occasions one month apart. Knowledge was assessed using a 28-point checklist devised from the currently available clozapine patient information sources, at baseline and after each counselling session. Ethics approval was obtained. Twenty-five participants (40% female; mean age 45.1 years, SD 9.82; 64% unemployed, 28% smokers showed an improvement in knowledge scores of clozapine from baseline to postcounselling on each occasion with an overall improvement in knowledge score, from baseline to postcounselling at one month, of 39.43%; p<0.001. This study adds to the evidence that interventions involving pharmacist counselling can improve patient knowledge, whilst the specific knowledge gained relating to recognition of side effects may help patients towards more empowerment regarding their treatment.

  11. Encouraging formative assessments of leadership for foundation doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Lindsay; Black, David; Welch, Jan; Reynolds, Peter; Penlington, Clare

    2015-08-01

    Clinical leadership is considered essential for maintaining and improving patient care and safety in the UK, and is incorporated in the curriculum for all trainee doctors. Despite the growing focus on the importance of leadership, and the introduction of the Medical Leadership Competency Framework (MLCF) in the UK, leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. Assessment is focused on clinical skills, and trainee doctors receive very little formal feedback on their leadership competencies. In this article we describe the approach taken by Health Education Kent, Sussex and Surrey (HEKSS) to raise the profile of leadership amongst doctors in training in the South Thames Foundation School (STFS). An annual structured formative assessment in leadership for each trainee has been introduced, supported by leadership education for both trainees and their supervisors in HEKSS trusts. We analysed over 500 of these assessments from the academic year 2012/13 for foundation doctors in HEKSS trusts, in order to assess the quality of the feedback. From the analysis, potential indicators of more effective formative assessments were identified. These may be helpful in improving the leadership education programme for future years. There is a wealth of evidence to highlight the importance and value of formative assessments; however, particularly for foundation doctors, these have typically been focused on assessing clinical capabilities. This HEKSS initiative encourages doctors to recognise leadership opportunities at the beginning of their careers, seeks to help them understand the importance of acquiring leadership skills and provides structured feedback to help them improve. Leadership education for doctors in training is still in its infancy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Preparing for Graduate-Level Training in Professional Psychology: Comparisons across Clinical PhD, Counseling PhD, and Clinical PsyD Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Smith, Lena

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, faculty who teach in clinical and counseling doctor of philosophy (PhD) or doctor of psychology (PsyD) programs completed surveys regarding preferences for prospective student preparations to graduate programs. Faculty expectations of minimum and ideal undergraduate training were highest for scientific methods, though…

  13. Doctors and Dr. Seuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, Dartmouth College renamed its medical school, founded in 1797, the Audrey and Theodor Geisel School of Medicine. Using the renaming of the medical school of Dartmouth College as a foil, I offer in this article a vision of what it might mean to align Theodor Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, with doctors by examining Geisel's You're Only Old Once! A Book for Obsolete Children. In this article, I derive four critiques of modern medicine from the book and offer four strategies as to how these critiques could be explored in medical education. If You're Only Old Once! is read as a pathography, I argue that it can be used as a resource for medical education.

  14. Of Course: Prerequisite Courses for Admission into APA-Accredited Clinical and Counseling Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.; Stratigis, Katerina Y.; Zimmerman, Barrett E.

    2014-01-01

    Students often inquire about which psychology courses to complete in preparation for graduate school. This study provides data that enable students and their advisors to make research-informed decisions. We surveyed the directors of the 304 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology (97%…

  15. Post-abortion family planning counselling practice among abortion service providers in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Longmei; Wu, Shangchun; Li, Jiong

    2017-01-01

    /doctor' [1.99 (1.01,3.92), 2.32 (1.22,4.40) and 2.34 (1.06,5.17), respectively]. Conclusions: The majority of providers could provide PAFP counselling to women undergone an abortion, but some of them had insufficient time to make it available. Education, knowledge about fertility and reproductive health...

  16. Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 2006/2007 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Tracy J.; Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Now in its 2006-2007 edition, this perennial bestseller is the resource students count on for the most current information on applying to doctoral programs in clinical or counseling psychology. The Insider's Guide presents up-to-date facts on 300 accredited programs in the United States and Canada. Each program's profile includes admissions…

  17. Group Consciousness and the Helping Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William

    1977-01-01

    If the counseling profession has changed in recent years, it is largely due to the effect of Third World and minority group movements and to the new questions that counselors were compelled to face. The relationship between group consciousness and the helping professions is presented. (Author)

  18. Consultation: A Model for Helping Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Ben; Arnn, John

    This handbook attempts to revise and revitalize the concept of consultation as commonly employed by members of the helping professions, particularly school counselors and student personnel workers in educational settings. The authors believe that neither counseling nor coordination provide the kind of visibility necessary for credibility, and that…

  19. Helping individuals to help themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costain, Lyndel; Croker, Helen

    2005-02-01

    Obesity is a serious and increasing health issue. Approximately two-thirds of adults in the UK are now overweight or obese. Recent public health reports firmly reinforce the importance of engaging individuals to look after their health, including their weight. They also spell out the need for individuals to be supported more actively, on many levels, to enable this 'engagement'. Meanwhile, national surveys indicate that approximately two-thirds of adults are concerned about weight control, with one-third actively trying to lose weight. This finding is hardly surprising considering current weight statistics, plus the plethora of popular diets on offer. Weight-loss methods include diet clubs, diet books, exercise, meal replacements, advice from healthcare professionals and following a self-styled diet. Obesity is a multi-factorial problem, and losing weight and, in particular, maintaining weight loss is difficult and often elusive. It is argued that the modern obesogenic or 'toxic' environment has essentially taken body-weight control from an instinctive 'survival' process to one that needs sustained cognitive and skill-based control. The evidence suggests that health professionals can help individuals achieve longer-term weight control by supporting them in making sustainable lifestyle changes using a range of behavioural techniques. These techniques include: assessing readiness to change; self-monitoring; realistic goal setting; dietary change; increased physical activity; stimulus control; cognitive restructuring; relapse management; establishing ongoing support. Consistently working in a client-centred way is also being increasingly advocated and incorporated into practice to help motivate and encourage, rather than hinder, the individual's progress.

  20. Doctors being up there and we being down here: a metaphorical analysis of talk about student/doctor-patient relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte E; Knight, Lynn V; Wilkinson, Clare E

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the metaphorical conceptualisations of student/doctor-patient relationships, as articulated by multiple stakeholders in healthcare. Eight focus group discussions with 19 patients, 13 medical students and 15 medical educators (comprising doctors, other healthcare professionals and non-clinical academics) were conducted in England and we subjected our transcribed and audiotaped data to a secondary level of data analysis i.e. systematic metaphor analysis. The analysis revealed six over-arching metaphors associated with the target domain of student/doctor-patient relationships i.e. STUDENT/DOCTOR-PATIENT RELATIONSHIPS AS WAR, HIERARCHY, DOCTOR-CENTREDNESS, MARKET, MACHINE and THEATRE. All of the metaphors (except theatre) emphasised the oppositional quality of student/doctor-patient relationships. Three of the source domains emerging from our empirical data (i.e. hierarchy, doctor-centredness, and market) relate to metaphors already employed in the non-empirical literature to discuss doctor-patient relationships (e.g. paternalism, patient-centredness, and consumerism). The three remaining source domains (i.e. war, machine and theatre) were novel in their conceptualisation of student/doctor-patient relationships, albeit that they have been reported in previous empirical literature to describe other target domains. In this paper, we discuss each of these metaphors and their associated entailments, including those found in our data and those absent from our data. We also differentiate between the unconscious use of metaphorical linguistic expressions by our participants and those serving a rhetorical function. Although analysing metaphoric talk is not without its difficulties, the construction of metaphoric models can help social researchers better understand how individuals conceptualise and construct student/doctor-patient relationships.

  1. Patient-doctor relationship: Changing perspectives and medical litigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Ganesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient doctor relational dimer has become complex with the hierarchical or fiduciary manner changing to an equal or un equal relationship. Trust and control are interchangeable, leading to increased patient requirements for disclosure and expectations of a cafeteria approach in diagnoses and management of his/her bodily condition. From any mismatch, there is a potential for medical litigation. In this context, the rise of global consumerism, the explosion of information available on the internet, and the changed manner of the medical profession from being shrouded in mystic / ceremony to trifurcation of medical services to doctoral diagnoses and management, ancillary pharmacy industry, and paramedical services like nursing, counselling and the new age quackery have contributed to this dimer.

  2. Patient-doctor relationship: Changing perspectives and medical litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K

    2009-07-01

    The patient doctor relational dimer has become complex with the hierarchical or fiduciary manner changing to an equal or un equal relationship. Trust and control are interchangeable, leading to increased patient requirements for disclosure and expectations of a cafeteria approach in diagnoses and management of his/her bodily condition. From any mismatch, there is a potential for medical litigation. In this context, the rise of global consumerism, the explosion of information available on the internet, and the changed manner of the medical profession from being shrouded in mystic / ceremony to trifurcation of medical services to doctoral diagnoses and management, ancillary pharmacy industry, and paramedical services like nursing, counselling and the new age quackery have contributed to this dimer.

  3. [Dietary counseling in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Nathalie; Haslebacher, Yvonne; Teuscher-Sick, Patricia; Fischer, Beatrice

    2013-02-01

    Information on weight management and a healthy eating is accessible to anyone. However, recommendations are inconsistent. This often leads to confusion rather than to real changes in eating behavior. The principle of a long-term weight reduction is based on the idea of achieving negative energy balance with a healthy, balanced and slightly hypocaloric diet. The regimen is neither supposed to be rigid nor should it ban any food products or food products. Changes in eating patterns come about step by step and the counseling approach should be based on the patient's habits and capabilities. The basic requirement to successfully treat obese patients is their own motivation Therefore, the timing of launching the therapy needs to be well chosen. Apart from goals directly concerning weight loss, goals related to well-being, general health and exercise should be set and pursued. However, the main focus should be on changes of dietary behavior. Dietary counseling is preferably embedded in a multidisciplinary treatment concept.

  4. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  5. The Social Work Practice Doctorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartocollis, Lina; Cnaan, Ram A.; Ledwith, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the emerging practice doctorate in social work. Based on the experience of the first such Doctor of Social Work (DSW) program, we provide information regarding the program origins and rationale, development, current structure, and future direction. Such information will enrich the discussion on the role…

  6. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment (3:57) More Resources from NIH You can play an active role in your health care ... and honest communication between you and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your ...

  7. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Commons NIH Common Fund NIH and the American Recovery Act News & Events News Releases Digital Media Kits ... make sure you understand your diagnosis, treatment, and recovery. Here are a few tips that can help ...

  8. Towards “Operating Within” the Field: Doctoral Students’ Views of Supervisors’ Discipline Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gube

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This paper considers the role of supervisors’ discipline expertise in doctoral learning from a student perspective. Background:\tDoctoral students need to develop expertise in a particular field of study. In this context, developing expertise requires doctoral students to master disciplinary knowledge, conventions and scholarship under the guidance of supervisors. Methodology\t: The study draws on a mixed-method approach, using an online survey and semi-structured interviews conducted with doctoral students. Contribution: The paper brings to the fore the role of supervisors’ discipline expertise on doctoral students’ research progress. Findings: The survey data suggest that doctoral students nominate their supervisors on the basis of their discipline expertise. They also view supervisors’ expertise as key to the development of ‘insider’ knowledge of their doctoral research. Recommendations for Practitioners: Supervisors play a pivotal role in helping doctoral students overcome intellectual barriers by imparting their discipline knowledge as well as balancing satisfactory doctoral completion rate and high quality student experience. Impact on Society\t: Doctoral supervision equips doctoral students with the right arsenal to be able to competently operate within their field and prepares them for their future research or professional career that demands a high level of discipline expertise. Future Research:\tThe scope of the findings leaves open a discussion about the experiences of doctoral students matched with non-discipline expert supervisory teams; for example, the extent of the mismatch and its ramifications.

  9. [Doctor's attendance in police custody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chariot, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Medical examination is a right for every person detained in police custody in France. Examination of detainees usually takes place in the police station so that the doctor can assess the conditions in which the detainee is being held. In some cases, such as type I diabetes care, detainees need to be examined and treated in a hospital. Doctors are subject to a duty of care and prevention. Description of recent traumatic injuries is part of the doctor's mission. They should prescribe any ongoing treatment which needs to be continued, as well as any emergency treatment required. Custody officers may monitor the detainee and administer medication. Doctor's opinion should be given in a national standard document. If the doctor considers that the custody conditions are disgraceful, they may refuse to express an opinion as to whether the detainee is fit for custody.

  10. The Macro-and Micro-Language Learning Counseling: An Autoethnographic Account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Shibata

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an example of the counselor’s role in a relatively small Self-Access Center (SAC for language learning in universities in Japan. The author has been involved with establishing and running two SACs in Japanese universities. The study used autoethnography as its research method to look closely at the counselor’s role. This study eventually helped the author to analyze the counseling she has been providing and to realize that the counselor is required to provide not only macro-counseling but also micro-counseling. Micro-counseling consists of short, informal interactions with learners which connect the learner to elements in SACs, such as teaching assistants, other language learners, and language learning materials. These micro-counseling encounters can help to create a secure space which encourages learners to engage in macro-counseling sessions which support their language learning.

  11. Evaluation of Family Planning Counselling in North Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okour, Abdulhakeem M; Saadeh, Rami A; Zaqoul, Mona

    2017-11-01

    Counselling plays a key role in enhancing reproductive services, providing contraception-related information and supporting long-term family planning for women of childbearing age. This study aimed to evaluate family planning counselling sessions in selected governmental and private clinics in northern Jordan. This cross-sectional study was conducted between January and June 2016 in Irbid, Jordan. A total of 200 women attending two private clinics affiliated with the Jordanian Association for Family Planning and Protection (JAFPP) and six governmental clinics were invited to participate in the study. Counselling sessions were attended by an independent observer and evaluated with regards to their compliance with the standard Greet, Ask, Tell, Help, Explain, Return (GATHER) framework. A total of 198 women participated in the study (response rate: 99.0%), including 80 women (40.4%) from JAFPP clinics and 118 (59.6%) from governmental clinics. In total, 42.9% of the counselling sessions were deemed adequate, with providers applying 80% or more of the GATHER framework, while 26.8% of the sessions were deemed semi-adequate and 30.3% were considered inadequate. Counselling services provided in the governmental clinics were significantly less adequate than those provided in JAFPP clinics ( P counselling services in governmental family planning centres in Jordan needs to be improved to ensure that women receive the highest possible level of care. Healthcare policymakers should therefore focus on developing and supporting effective family planning counselling services in northern Jordan.

  12. The Embedded Counseling Model: An Application to Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David Francis

    2017-01-01

    Prior research has suggested that dental students experience high rates of stress, anxiety, and mood concerns, which have been linked to poor academic performance, health concerns, and substance abuse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of an embedded counseling office at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry & Dental Clinics in its first three academic semesters. Data were gathered from students attending appointments, and two inventories were used to monitor students' counseling progress and gather psychological outcomes data: the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-34 (CCAPS-34) and the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS). In the three semesters, 55 students attended 251 counseling appointments, with an average of 4.5 appointments per student. Their presenting psychological concerns included academic concerns, time management, test anxiety, study skills, low self-esteem, self-care, interpersonal conflicts, anxiety, depression, stress management, sexual concerns, substance abuse, eating/body image concerns, work-life balance, and financial issues. The CCAPS-34 data showed that, at initial clinical assessment, students experienced moderate levels of depression, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, academic distress, and overall psychological distress; 45 (82%) showed clinically significant symptoms on at least one CCAPS-34 subscale. The ORS data further showed that the students entered counseling experiencing high levels of psychological distress. A positive relationship was found between number of counseling appointments and increased overall functioning. These results suggest that an embedded counseling office can help dental schools meet the needs of their students.

  13. Counselling challenges in haemophilia and HIV infection/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittadaki, J

    1996-01-01

    The advent of AIDS has had such a deep-reaching effect on the international haemophilia community that one can make a reasonable distinction between a pre-AIDS and a post-AIDS era in haemophilia management. In the context of counselling, however, talking about a 'before' and an 'after' in haemophilia does not (and, in our opinion, should not) necessarily imply a separation of the past from the present. Dealing with the psycho-social implications of haemophilia and HIV infection does not mean focusing exclusively on HIV-generated problems at the expense of haemophilia-related issues. Since the HIV crisis, counselling has posed the multiple challenge of: (a) assessing and alleviating the more immediate emotional effects of HIV infection; (b) paying due attention to the underlying influence of haemophilia on reaction, defence and coping; (c) formulating a flexible approach that is based on close cooperation with the medical staff and effective interpersonal communication with the counsellees.* In practice, the flexibility and effectiveness of the counselling model are promoted by means of: (a) ongoing counselling, (b) multiple counselling sites (i.e. the Haemophilia Centre and other appropriate locations), (c) interdisciplinary team-work, (d) respect for individual/ ethnic values, (e) maintenance of exo-empathy (i.e. neutrality), and (f) transfer of coping skills. The above framework can help maximize the effectiveness of counselling sessions through a personalized rapport of mutual trust and confidence between the counselling team and the counsellees.

  14. The Relationships between Doctoral Students’ Perceptions of Supervision and Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Cornér

    2017-06-01

    students develop networks both nationally and internationally. Recommendation for Researchers: A recommendation emanating from this research is to put greater emphasis on further investigation of the role of other predictors in burnout in order to enhance doctoral students’ well-being. Impact on Society: A better understanding of factors that promote lower attrition rates and enhance well-being for doctoral students is likely to lead to more efficient use of finacial and intellectual resources in academia and society more broadly. Future Research: Given the results of this study, qualitative interviews might be helpful in mapping out the dynamics that lead to attrition and to identify the mechanisms in the researcher community that support the doctoral students and enhance well-being in their doctoral journey.

  15. Models of occupational medicine practice: an approach to understanding moral conflict in "dual obligation" doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamin, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    In the United Kingdom (UK), ethical guidance for doctors assumes a therapeutic setting and a normal doctor-patient relationship. However, doctors with dual obligations may not always operate on the basis of these assumptions in all aspects of their role. In this paper, the situation of UK occupational physicians is described, and a set of models to characterise their different practices is proposed. The interaction between doctor and worker in each of these models is compared with the normal doctor-patient relationship, focusing on the different levels of trust required, the possible power imbalance and the fiduciary obligations that apply. This approach highlights discrepancies between what the UK General Medical Council guidance requires and what is required of a doctor in certain roles or functions. It is suggested that using this modelling approach could also help in clarifying the sources of moral conflict for other doctors with "dual obligations" in their various roles.

  16. Counseling utilization by ethnic minority college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Lisa K; Draper, Matthew; Barón, Augustine

    2005-08-01

    Although multicultural awareness in counseling has risen substantially in the last decade, little research has examined counseling utilization and outcomes for ethnic minorities on university campuses. A sample of 1,166 African American, Asian American, Caucasian, and Latino help-seeking university students from over 40 universities nationwide filled out the Outcome Questionnaire 45 (OQ45) at the first and last therapy sessions. Caucasian students attended significantly more sessions than all other groups. Greatest distress was found at intake in Asian American students, followed by Latino, African American, and Caucasian students. All groups appeared to benefit from therapy, as noted by a decrease in symptomatology, but none of the groups met the criteria for clinically significant change for the OQ45. Implications for therapists working with minority clients are discussed. (c) 2005 APA

  17. Response to A Different Vantage Point Commentary: Psychotherapeutic Genetic Counseling, Is it?

    OpenAIRE

    Biesecker, Barbara; Austin, Jehannine; Caleshu, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Whether genetic counseling is a form of psychotherapy is open for debate. Early practicioners in genetic counseling described it as such, and this claim has been replicated in recent publications. This commentary is a rebuttal to the claim that genetic counseling is distinct from psychotherapty. We argue that it is a a form of psychoterapy that aims to help clients manage a health threat that affects their psychological wellbeing, paralleling the goals of psychotherapy.

  18. Response to A Different Vantage Point Commentary: Psychotherapeutic Genetic Counseling, Is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesecker, Barbara; Austin, Jehannine; Caleshu, Colleen

    2017-04-01

    Whether genetic counseling is a form of psychotherapy is open for debate. Early practicioners in genetic counseling described it as such, and this claim has been replicated in recent publications. This commentary is a rebuttal to the claim that genetic counseling is distinct from psychotherapty. We argue that it is a a form of psychoterapy that aims to help clients manage a health threat that affects their psychological wellbeing, paralleling the goals of psychotherapy.

  19. Smoking cessation treatment for COPD smokers: the role of counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Ruiz, C A; Fagerström, K O

    2013-03-01

    Smoking cessation is the only therapeutic intervention that can prevent COPD smokers from the chronic progression of their disorder. The most important intervention for helping these smokers to quit is a combination of counseling plus pharmacological treatment. The characteristics of the counseling should be different depending if this intervention is offered to smokers with a previous diagnosis of COPD or if the intervention is offered to smokers who have been recently diagnoses with COPD. The counseling of patients who have been recently diagnosed should include: a) explanation of the direct relationship between smoking and COPD, b) encouraging these patients to quit and c) using of spirometry and measurements of CO as a motivational tools. The counseling of patients who have been previously diagnosed should include: a) encouragement to make a serious quit attempt, b) an intervention that increases motivation, self-efficacy and self-esteem, c) and the intervention should also control depression and be directed to weight gain control.

  20. White racial identity, color-blind racial attitudes, and multicultural counseling competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alex; Jackson Williams, Dahra

    2015-07-01

    Multicultural counseling competence (awareness, knowledge, and skills) is necessary to provide effective psychotherapy to an increasingly diverse client population (Sue, 2001). Previous research on predictors of competency among White clinicians finds that above having multicultural training, exposure to racially diverse clients, and social desirability, that White racial identity stages predict multicultural counseling competence (Ottavi et al., 1994). Research also suggests that higher color-blind racial attitudes (denying or minimizing racism in society) correlates with less advanced White racial identity stages (Gushue & Constantine, 2007). However, no studies have examined these variables together as they relate to and possibly predict multicultural counseling competence. The current study aims to add to this literature by investigating the effects of these variables together as potential predictors of multicultural counseling competence among (N = 487) White doctoral students studying clinical, counseling, and school psychology. Results of 3 hierarchical multiple regressions found above the effects of social desirability, demographic variables, and multicultural training, that colorblind racial attitudes and White racial identity stages added significant incremental variance in predicting multicultural counseling knowledge, awareness, and skills. These results add to the literature by finding different predictors for each domain of multicultural competence. Implications of the findings for future research and the clinical training of White doctoral trainees are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. How doctors view and use social media: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James; Ryan, Christopher; Harris, Anthony

    2014-12-02

    Doctors are uncertain of their ethical and legal obligations when communicating with patients online. Professional guidelines for patient-doctor interaction online have been written with limited quantitative data about doctors' current usage and attitudes toward the medium. Further research into these trends will help to inform more focused policy and guidelines for doctors communicating with patients online. The intent of the study was to provide the first national profile of Australian doctors' attitudes toward and use of online social media. The study involved a quantitative, cross-sectional online survey of Australian doctors using a random sample from a large representative database. Of the 1500 doctors approached, 187 participated (12.47%). Most participants used social media privately, with only one-quarter not using any social media websites at all (48/187, 25.7%). One in five participants (30/155, 19.4%) had received a "friend request" from a patient. There was limited use of online communication in clinical practice: only 30.5% (57/187) had communicated with a patient through email and fewer than half (89/185, 48.1%) could offer their patients electronic forms of information if that were the patients' preference. Three in five participants (110/181, 60.8%) reported not being uncomfortable about interacting with patients who had accessed personal information about them online, prior to the consultation. Most of the participants (119/181, 65.8%) were hesitant to immerse themselves more fully in social media and online communication due to worries about public access and legal concerns. Doctors have different practices and views regarding whether or how to communicate appropriately with patients on the Internet, despite online and social media becoming an increasingly common feature of clinical practice. Additional training would assist doctors in protecting their personal information online, integrating online communication in patient care, and guidance on

  2. Turning Doctors Into Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Anderson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Much of the contentious debate surrounding the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare” concerned its financing and its attempt to guarantee (near universal access to healthcare through the private insurance market.  Aside from sensationalist stories of “death panels,” much less attention went to implications of the bill for the actual provision of healthcare. Methodology: This paper examines the "patient-centered medical home" (PCMH model which has been widely promoted as a means of reviving and improving primary care (i.e. general internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatrics. Argument: The PCMH and many of its components (e.g pay-for-performance, electronic medical records were interventions that were implemented on a massive basis without any evidence of benefit. Recent research has not generally supported clinical benefits with the PCMH model. Instead it seems to designed to de-professionalize (make proletarians of health care workers and enforce corporate models of health. The core values of professional work are undermined while the PCMH does nothing to address the structural marginalization of primary care within US health care. Conclusions: The development of alternative models will require political changes. Both doctors and teachers are in a position of advocate for more progressive systems of care and education.

  3. Assessing doctors' competence: application of CUSUM technique in monitoring doctors' performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, T O; Soraya, A; Ding, L M; Morad, Z

    2002-06-01

    Quality assurance of medical practice requires assessment of doctors' performance, whether informally via a system such as peer review or more formally via one such as credentialing. Current methods of assessment are, however, subjective or implicit. More objective methods of assessment based on statistical process control technique such as cumulative sum (CUSUM) procedure may be helpful. To determine the usefulness and acceptability of CUSUM charting for assessing doctors' performance. We applied CUSUM charting to assess doctors' performance of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, renal and breast biopsies, thyroidectomy, and instrumental deliver. A CUSUM chart is a graphical representation of the trend in the outcome of a series of consecutive procedures. At acceptable levels of performance, the CUSUM curve is flat, while at unacceptable levels of performance, the curve slopes upward and eventually crosses a decision interval. When this occurs, the CUSUM chart indicates unsatisfactory performance. Thus, it provides an early warning of an adverse trend. All participating doctors found the technique useful to objectively measure their proficiency. CUSUM charts showed the progress of trainees in acquiring new skills. As they become more skillful with training, their CUSUM curves flatten. Among consultants, level CUSUM curves demonstrated ongoing maintenance of competence. All participants found the technique acceptable as a self-assessment tool. They were, however, less certain of its acceptability as a basis for credentialing. We recommend the use of CUSUM charting as a tool for personal audit at an individual level. It may also be used to show proof of technical competence for the purpose of credentialing.

  4. How To Discuss Sleep With Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How To Discuss Sleep With Your Doctor Doctors might not ... habits. Before you see the doctor, think about how to describe your problems, including: How often you have ...

  5. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  6. Masculinity in the doctor's office: Masculinity, gendered doctor preference and doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstein, Mary S; Sanchez, Diana T

    2016-03-01

    Mortality and morbidity data suggest that men have shorter life expectancies than women and outrank women on several leading causes of death. These gendered disparities may be influenced by psychosocial factors like masculinity. Three studies (Total N=546) examined the role of masculinity in men's doctor choices and doctor-patient interactions. In Studies 1 and 2, men completed measures of masculinity, gender bias, and doctor preference. Using structural equation modeling, we tested the direct relationship between masculinity and male doctor preference and the indirect relationship of masculinity on male doctor preference through an association with gendered competence stereotypes. Participants in Study 3 disclosed symptoms in private followed by disclosure to a male or female interviewer in a clinical setting. Using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), we examined the interaction among symptom reporting, masculinity and doctor gender, controlling for participant comfort. In Study 1, results suggested that masculinity encouraged choice of a male doctor directly and indirectly via beliefs that men make more competent doctors than women; Study 2 directly replicated the results of Study 1. In Study 3, independent of participant comfort, an interaction between interviewer gender and masculinity emerged such that men scoring higher on masculinity reported symptoms less consistently to male interviewers (relative to higher scoring men reporting to female interviewers); the reverse was found for men scoring low on masculinity. Taken together these studies suggest that masculinity may affect men's health by encouraging choice of a male doctor with whom doctor-patient communication may be impaired. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interventions for improving patients' trust in doctors and groups of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Alix; Cash-Gibson, Lucinda; Car, Josip; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2014-03-04

    the studies.  Interventions were of three main types; three employed additional physician training, four were education for patients and three provided additional information about doctors in terms of financial incentives or consulting style. Additionally, several different measures of trust were employed.The studies gave conflicting results. Trials showing a small but statistically-significant increase in trust included: a trial of physician disclosure of financial incentives; a trial of providing choice of physician based on concordance between patient and physician beliefs about care; a trial of group visits for new inductees into a Health Maintenance Organisation; a trial of training oncologists in communication skills; and a trial of group visits for diabetic patients. However, trust was not affected in a subsequent larger trial of group visits for uninsured people with diabetes, nor with a decision aid for helping choose statins, another trial of disclosure of financial incentives or specifically training doctors to increase trust or cultural competence. There was no evidence of harm from any of the studies. Overall, there remains insufficient evidence to conclude that any intervention may increase or decrease trust in doctors. This may be due in part to the sensitivity of trust instruments, and a ceiling effect, as trust in doctors is generally high. It may be that current measures of trust are insufficiently sensitive. Further trials are required to explore the impact of doctors' specific training or the use of a patient-centred or decision-sharing approach on patients' trust, especially in the areas of healthcare provider choice, and induction into healthcare organisation. International trials would be of particular benefit. The review was constrained by the lack of consistency between trust measurements, timeframes and populations.

  8. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    SpeakUP TM Help Prevent Errors in Your Care Home Care To prevent health care errors, patients are urged ... family members, caregivers, doctors and health care professionals. Home care organizations all across the country are working to ...

  9. Trends in nutrition and exercise counseling among adolescents in the health care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Tasha; Crawford, Patricia B

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a serious health threat, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities and those who are uninsured, yet little is known about the implementation of nutrition or exercise counseling or the combination of both among these groups. Trends in counseling by race/ethnicity and types of insurance were examined. Trend analyses were conducted with the California Health Interview Surveys among those ages 12-17 for the period 2003-2009. Race/Ethnicity: Receipt of both counseling methods declined from 2003-2009 for all racial/ethnic groups, except Hispanics and Whites, for whom increases in counseling began after 2007. Hispanics and African Americans generally reported higher levels of nutrition than exercise counseling, while Whites generally reported higher levels of exercise than nutrition counseling for the study period. INSURANCE TYPE: Receipt of both counseling methods appeared to decline from 2003-2009 among all insurance types, although after 2007, a slight increase was observed for the low-cost/free insurance group. Those with private health insurance generally received more exercise counseling than nutrition counseling over the study period. Counseling among all racial/ethnic groups and insurance types is warranted, but particularly needed for African Americans, American Indian/Alaska Natives, and the uninsured as they are at highest risk for developing obesity. Institutional and policy changes in the health care environment will be beneficial in helping to promote obesity-related counseling.

  10. Representações e práticas educativas de mães referentes a filhos atendidos pelo Conselho Tutelar Representaciones y prácticas educativas de madres que mandan a los niños acompañados por el consejo protector Representations of mothers helped by the tutoring counsel and the educational practices developed in facing the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Henrique Pereira Espíndula

    2009-03-01

    socialmente, y las cuestiones religiosas. Las prácticas educativas se basan en el diálogo y el asesoramiento. Sin embargo, las madres que la única medida práctica para resolver el problema de los niños sería la admisión. Todavía, no es conpetencia del Consejo de Tutela la aplicación desta medida. Lo que pasa es un desequilibrio entre lo que es deseado por las madres y las medidas aplicadas por el Consejo con el fin de resolver el problema.This study investigated the representations of mothers helped by the Tutoring Counsel about “problem children”; the educational practices developed in facing the problem Eleven mothers of adolescents participated in the study, with children who presented some kind of problem - involvement with drugs, being at the street situation and/or practicing minor transgressions. We utilized an interview script with an evocation question, open questions. The material was analyzed using Bardin's thematic analysis. The results show that the representation of the mothers presents elements as: uncontrollable, weak mind and rebel. The causes seem to be centered in the personal and internal characteristics; friendships and the environment where they live; lack of control; need of acquirement of socially valued goods; and religious questions. The educational practices, though, are based on dialogue and advice. However, the mothers evaluate that the only practice capable of solving the problem of their children in internship. Nevertheless, what happens is that in most cases the application of this measure does not fall under the Tutoring Counsel capabilities, creating a gap between what is sought by the mothers and the measures applied by the Counsel in order to solve the problem.

  11. How Computer Games Help Children Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, David Williamson

    2008-01-01

    This book looks at how particular video and computer games--such as "Digital Zoo", "The Pandora Project", "SodaConstructor", and more--can help teach children and students to think like doctors, lawyers, engineers, urban planners, journalists, and other professionals. In the process, new "smart games" will give them the knowledge and skills they…

  12. The Charismatic Clergyman and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    This article is an introduction to charismatic counseling. Charismatic clergy are seeing transformations of lives unlike anything experienced in their ministries before the charismatic renewal. (Author)

  13. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your health. It’s important to be ... Flickr More Social Media from NIH Footer NIH Home En Español Site Map Visitor Information Frequently Asked ...

  14. Talking to Your Doctor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and your physician can help you both make smart choices about your health. It’s important to be ... Social Media & Outreach Twitter Facebook YouTube Footer NIH Home En Español Site Map Visitor Information Frequently Asked ...

  15. 38 CFR 21.7100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7100... Bill-Active Duty) Counseling § 21.7100 Counseling. A veteran or servicemember may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is (1) To...

  16. 38 CFR 21.3102 - Required counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required counseling. 21.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3102 Required counseling. (a) Child. The VA counseling psychologist will provide counseling and assist in preparing the educational plan only if the eligible child or his or her...

  17. TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Hernández Esteve

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available TESIS DOCTORALES Doctoral dissertations María Soledad Campos Lucena: El control de las arcas municipales a través de la rendición de cuentas. La transformación del proceso del Antiguo al Nuevo régimen y la consolidación del modelo liberal: 1745-1914 The control of municipal coffers by means of account rendering. The change from Ancien Régime to the New Regime and the consolidation of liberalism: 1745-1914 Candelaria Castro Pérez: La institución parroquial a través de los registros contables del Señorío episcopal de la Villa de Agüimes. (1500-1860 The parochial institution seen through the account books of the Episcopal domain of the city of Aguimes (1500-1860 José Julián Hernández Borreguero: El Cabildo Catedral de Sevilla: organización y sistema contable. (1625-1650 Administrative and accounting organization of the Seville Cathedral. (1625-1650 Juan Lanero Fernández: El esplendor de la teneduría de libros: la partida doble en los tratados contables ingleses de la dinastia Tudor (1543-1588 Bookkeeping splendor: double-entry in the English accounting treatises at the time of the Tudor dynasty (1543-1588 María Llompart Bibiloni: Un análisis histórico-contable de la Procuración del Real Patrimonio en el Reino de Mallorca, período 1310-1330 An accounting historical análisis of the Royal Exchequer of the Kingdom of Mallorca (1310-1330

  18. Examining Multicultural Counseling Competencies of Rehabilitation Counseling Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Chandra M.

    2008-01-01

    There has been little examination of multicultural counseling competencies of rehabilitation counselor trainees. The current study examined competency development (knowledge, skills and awareness) of 68 rehabilitation counseling master's degree students across six universities. Results indicate that students did not demonstrate competence in…

  19. Addiction Counseling Accreditation: CACREP's Role in Solidifying the Counseling Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Culbreth, Jack R.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs' (CACREP) role in furthering the specialty of addiction counseling. After sharing a brief history and the role of counselor certification and licensure, the authors share the process whereby CACREP developed the first set of…

  20. 34 CFR 106.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or...

  1. 32 CFR 196.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 196.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or...

  2. 45 CFR 618.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 618.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance of...

  3. 45 CFR 2555.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 2555.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance of...

  4. When technological affordances meet interactional norms: the value of pre-screening in online chat counseling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stommel, Wyke; te Molder, Hedwig Frederica Maria

    2016-01-01

    We present a conversation analysis of openings sequences of online text-based chat counseling. Particular about this chat counseling is that the clients made available their help question through pre-screening. The data consisted of 40 chat sessions with pre-screening and 34 sessions without

  5. The Counseling Profession in Russia: Historical Roots, Current Trends, and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Christine L.; Kuzmina, Marina V.; Nadyuk, Ruslan I.

    2012-01-01

    Psychology was established in Russia before the Communist era. The social work profession was created in 1991 for a society in turmoil after the collapse of the Soviet Union. In 2011, the counseling profession officially emerged as a branch of social work called "social psychological help". Professional counseling associations are in the…

  6. 78 FR 57394 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Patient Counseling Information Section of Labeling for Human...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Patient Counseling... Counseling Information Section of Labeling for Human Prescription Drug and Biological Products--Content and Format.'' The recommendations in the draft guidance are intended to help ensure that the labeling is...

  7. Counselling as a tool for promoting peaceful co-existence in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is therefore necessary to explore ways by which counselling could serve as a tool of promoting peaceful co-existence in Nigeria. Counselling is a helping relationship which focuses on modification of human behaviours and thus professional Counsellors provide some services in order to promote human development.

  8. Barriers to Seeking School Counselling: Malaysian Chinese School Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai Shen; Kok, Jin Kuan

    2017-01-01

    School counselling services have always been unpopular among Malaysian students. Many researchers have studied what prevents students from seeking mental health services. However, there is a lack of study on the barriers to seeking help in the context of Malaysian school counselling services. Using a sample of Chinese high school students (N =…

  9. In Search of Common Threads: Linking Multicultural, Feminist, and Social Justice Counseling Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crethar, Hugh C.; Rivera, Edil Torres; Nash, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Multicultural, feminist, and social justice counseling theories are often viewed as disparate helping models. This article examines the complementary nature of these models and discusses the need to promote a clearer understanding of the ways in which these common threads can be used in counseling practice.

  10. Breastfeeding counsel against cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prameela Kannan Kutty

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer potential by breastfeeding is not fully tapped in the light of the present knowledge of the subject. Literature indicates that breastmilk has anticancer action but may underestimate its full capacity. The protective spectrum within breastmilk hints on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of it as an anticancer tool. Exclusive breastfeeding could confer protection from carcinogenesis with a greater impact than realised. A literature review was conducted using four electronic databases. Selected areas were extracted after thorough perusal of the articles. The uninitiated would take exclusive breastfeeding seriously if actively counselled as an anticancer tool. Advice on details of the breastfeeding process and holistic information on breastfeeding may endow a greater impact among the skeptics. Counselling the breastfeeding mother on information sometimes not imparted, such as on maternal nutrition, details of the process of breastfeeding, benefits of direct breastfeeding versus milk expression and her psychosocial well being may make a difference in optimising anticancer action that exists in breastmilk. Additionally, its anticancer potential provides a platform to universally improve physical and psychosocial well being of women who breastfeed. Statistics of protection by breastfeeding in some maternal and childhood cancers are evident. “Bio-geno-immuno-nutrition” of breastmilk may shield the mother and infant from carcinogenesis in more ways than appreciated. The molecular basis of mother-to-infant signals and their “energies” need to be researched. Breastfeeding as a modifiable behaviour provides cost effective nutrition with potential for both cancer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy.

  11. Doctoral Conceptual Thresholds in Cellular and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldon, David F.; Rates, Christopher; Sun, Chongning

    2017-01-01

    In the biological sciences, very little is known about the mechanisms by which doctoral students acquire the skills they need to become independent scientists. In the postsecondary biology education literature, identification of specific skills and effective methods for helping students to acquire them are limited to undergraduate education. To…

  12. Professionalism for future humanistic doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEDIGHEH EBRAHIMI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear editor Clinical environments encounter is an important part of studying medicine (1. Patient contact as an integral part of medical education occurs in various formats in the clinical settings (2, 3. During clinical training, medical students may experience high levels of stress, and some may not deal with it well. The abruptness of students’ transition to the clinical setting generated positive and negative emotions. Due to being a novice, they did not receive adequate training on how to get emotionally prepared for meeting seriously ill people. In such circumstances, the shortage of training will have predictably crucial consequences. Early clinical contact has been suggested to reduce these stresses and help the students adapt effectively to changes in the hospital climate (2. Patient contact creates an environment where each student appreciates cultural diversity and reinforces the development of clinical professional interpersonal skills through social, emotional and cognitive experiences (4, 5. It encourages validating of the relationship between patients and doctors and allows students to experience a more personal relationship with patients and nurture the ability to empathize with them, providing considerable benefits for trainees and patients. In this way, the social emotions that students experience when empathizing with a patient represent a uniquely human achievement. By internalizing their subjective interpretations of patient’s beliefs and feelings, the student’s body, brain and mind come together to produce cognition and emotion . They construct culturally relevant knowledge and make decisions about how to act and think about the patient’s problems as if they were their own. On the other hand, patient interaction in undergraduate education offers students a valuable early insight into the day-to-day role of a doctor and the patients’ perspective on specific conditions. Early experience provides a greater knowledge

  13. Smart strategies for doctors and doctors-in-training: heuristics in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwarth, Odette; Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2009-08-01

    How do doctors make sound decisions when confronted with probabilistic data, time pressures and a heavy workload? One theory that has been embraced by many researchers is based on optimisation, which emphasises the need to integrate all information in order to arrive at sound decisions. This notion makes heuristics, which use less than complete information, appear as second-best strategies. In this article, we challenge this pessimistic view of heuristics. We introduce two medical problems that involve decision making to the reader: one concerns coronary care issues and the other macrolide prescriptions. In both settings, decision-making tools grounded in the principles of optimisation and heuristics, respectively, have been developed to assist doctors in making decisions. We explain the structure of each of these tools and compare their performance in terms of their facilitation of correct predictions. For decisions concerning both the coronary care unit and the prescribing of macrolides, we demonstrate that sacrificing information does not necessarily imply a forfeiting of predictive accuracy, but can sometimes even lead to better decisions. Subsequently, we discuss common misconceptions about heuristics and explain when and why ignoring parts of the available information can lead to the making of more robust predictions. Heuristics are neither good nor bad per se, but, if applied in situations to which they have been adapted, can be helpful companions for doctors and doctors-in-training. This, however, requires that heuristics in medicine be openly discussed, criticised, refined and then taught to doctors-in-training rather than being simply dismissed as harmful or irrelevant. A more uniform use of explicit and accepted heuristics has the potential to reduce variations in diagnoses and to improve medical care for patients.

  14. A negotiation model for the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, R J

    1992-06-01

    A model has been developed to help physicians negotiate with patients in more explicit and effective ways. This model provides physician teachers and learners with a framework and a common language to describe the dynamic nature of the doctor-patient negotiation. This framework consists of three dimensions: content, relationship levels, and the problem-solving phases. The constructs of disease, illness, sickness and the patient's context are used to describe the content of negotiation: this is what the doctor and patient are talking about. Autonomy, power, control and responsibility are the constructs that define the relationship levels: autonomism, egalitarianism, parentalism, and autocracy. These levels describe how the doctor and patient relate to one another during their negotiation. The problem-solving phases are relationship building, agenda setting, assessment, problem clarification, management and closure. Teachers and learners can use this model to describe how the doctor and the patient affect the negotiation process, and how the process in turn affects the doctor-patient relationship and medical care. With practice using this model, physicians can increase their repertoire of negotiating strategies that will efficiently enhance doctor-patient collaboration, the problem-solving process and the health of the patient and family.

  15. Enhancing counselling strategies for leprosy patients through the participation scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bense, Neelmani; Das, Premal; Rao, Pamidipani Samuel Sundar; John, Annamma Succinda

    2013-09-01

    Counsellors provide psychological support, appropriate education and coping skills to persons affected by adverse events. Counselling of leprosy patients is essential to enable them to cope with perceived stigma as well as managing severe enacted stigma at home, place of work or elsewhere. Professional counselling was instituted at the Leprosy Mission Community Hospital in Naini, Allahabad District, India, in 2004. In this paper we describe how the use of the Participation Scale helped in developing Counselling strategies for a variety of leprosy patients. A random sample of 250 leprosy patients visiting the hospital for the first time during 2011-2012 were chosen, 50 each from those with only hidden patches (Grade 0a), patients with visible patches (Grade 0b), those with only anaesthesia or weakness (Grade I), patients with paralytic deformities (Grade 2a), and patients with visible disabilities and ulcers Grade 2b). The P-scale consisting of 18 items was administered in the local language (Hindi) and used by the Counsellor along with relevant clinical and socioeconomic details. There were 84 women and 166 men, distributed in all the five categories. Overall, 142 patients out of 250 (56.8%) had no participation restrictions; 39 (15.6%) had mild social restrictions; 20 (8.0%) had moderate, 28 (11.2%) had severe and 21 (84%) had extreme participation restrictions. Paradoxically, there were some cases without severe deformity who are also subjected to restrictions. Patients in Grades 0a and 0b, had practically no severe or even moderate restrictions in their social participation, but their perceived stigma was high, requiring suitable leprosy education, family counselling and coping skills to feel confident that they were capable of normal work like any of their peers. Counselling became more intensive in Grade 1 and for almost all in Grade 2, who experienced moderate to severe restrictions in meeting new people, participating in social activities and indulging in

  16. Enhancing the doctor-patient relationship: Living, dying and use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to establish whether processes around the consideration and execution of the living will help enhance the doctor-patient relationship. Studies indicate that the living will is not used frequently, and that the doctor-patient relationship is often deficient. The article explores the two primary topics – the living will, ...

  17. Digital Native and Digital Immigrant Use of Scholarly Network for Doctoral Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Ronald; Hassell, Deliesha

    2014-01-01

    The Doctoral Community Network (DC) is a learner driven, scholarly community designed to help online doctoral learners successfully complete their dissertation and program of study. While digital natives grew up in an environment immersed in technology, digital immigrants adapted to this environment through their ability to learn and adjust to…

  18. Counseling in Turkey: An Evolving Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Guneri, Oya Yerin

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of counseling and addresses the current issues and future trends of counseling in Turkey. Special emphasis is placed on the factors that impede the development of school counseling as a discipline.

  19. Adolescent health screening and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Peter; Allen, Claudia

    2012-12-15

    Serious health problems, risky behavior, and poor health habits persist among adolescents despite access to medical care. Most adolescents do not seek advice about preventing leading causes of morbidity and mortality in their age group, and physicians often do not find ways to provide it. Although helping adolescents prevent unintended pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, unintentional injuries, depression, suicide, and other problems is a community-wide effort, primary care physicians are well situated to discuss risks and offer interventions. Evidence supports routinely screening for obesity and depression, offering testing for human immunodeficiency virus infection, and screening for other sexually transmitted infections in some adolescents. Evidence validating the effectiveness of physician counseling about unintended pregnancy, gang violence, and substance abuse is scant. However, physicians should use empathic, personal messages to communicate with adolescents about these issues until studies prove the benefits of more specific methods. Effective communication with adolescents requires seeing the patient alone, tailoring the discussion to the individual patient, and understanding the role of the parents and of confidentiality.

  20. Doctor of philosophy and doctor of nursing practice as complementary degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Sandra R

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) has raised serious concerns about the discipline's continuing ability to build its body of knowledge at an appropriate rate. After noting the various concerns that have been raised that the DNP siphons off prospective doctor of philosophy (PhD) students and compromises the standing of schools of nursing in universities, the distinct but complementary roles of nurses with the two preparations are described. Rather than worry about the DNP distracting from the PhD, the argument is made that these two degrees support one another and together can help to advance the creation and translation of knowledge into the practice of the discipline. Similar discussions about the distinction between practice and research in the field of education are noted.

  1. Client Motivation and Multicultural Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2011-01-01

    This reaction article comments on the major contribution titled "Motivation and Autonomy in Counseling, Psychotherapy, and Behavior Change: A Look at Theory and Practice." It first points out the article's strengths, the primary of which was to move the construct of motivation to the center of focus in the discussion of counseling. In addition,…

  2. Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 6 of 6 ... Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling. Journal Home > Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 6 of 6 Items. 2011 ...

  3. Nonlinear Analysis in Counseling Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Richard S.; Richey Gosnell, Katelyn M.; Holmgren, Andrew; Osborne, Jason W.

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear effects are both underreported and underrepresented in counseling research. We provide a rationale for evaluating nonlinear effects and steps to evaluate nonlinear relationships in counseling research. Two heuristic examples are provided along with discussion of the results and advantages to evaluating nonlinear effects.

  4. School Counseling in China Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Timothy C.; Qiong, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the development of psychological thinking in China and social influences on the practice of school counseling today. Common problems of students are described, including anxiety due to pressure to perform well on exams, loneliness and social discomfort, and video game addiction. Counseling approaches used…

  5. Guidelines for cognitive behavioral training within doctoral psychology programs in the United States: report of the Inter-organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K; Ronan, George F; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D; Belar, Cynthia D; Berry, Sharon L; Christofff, Karen A; Craighead, Linda W; Dougher, Michael J; Dowd, E Thomas; Herbert, James D; McFarr, Lynn M; Rizvi, Shireen L; Sauer, Eric M; Strauman, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a year-long series of conferences, and developed a consensus on optimal doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology. The recommendations assume solid foundational training that is typical within applied psychology areas such as clinical and counseling psychology programs located in the United States. This article details the background, assumptions, and resulting recommendations specific to doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology, including competencies expected in the areas of ethics, research, and practice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Counselling young cannabis users by text message

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Ditte

    2010-01-01

    factual information to advice and counselling. The messages prompt reflection and awareness among the recipients, and their repetitive, serial nature plays a significant part in the process of change. This is especially true of the young people whose use of cannabis is recreational. For them, the SMS......This article presents the results of a study of two SMS services aimed at providing young people with information on cannabis and helping them to reduce their consumption of the drug. The attitude of the 12 participants in the study towards the SMS services is generally positive, but they prefer...

  7. Training Pediatric Residents to Provide Smoking Cessation Counseling to Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Collins

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess the effectiveness of a smoking cessation educational program on pediatric residents' counseling. Residents were randomly selected to receive the intervention. Residents who were trained were compared to untrained residents. Self-reported surveys and patient chart reviews were used. Measures included changes in self-reported knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of residents, and differences in chart documentation and caretaker-reported physician counseling behaviors. The intervention was multidimensional including a didactic presentation, a problem-solving session, clinic reminders, and provision of patient education materials. Results showed that residents who were trained were more likely to ask about tobacco use in their patients' households. They were also more likely to advise caretakers to cut down on or to quit smoking, to help set a quit date, and to follow up on the advice given at a subsequent visit. Trained residents were more likely to record a history of passive tobacco exposure in the medical record. These residents also reported improved confidence in their counseling skills and documented that they had done such counseling more often than did untrained residents. Caretakers of pediatric patients who smoke seen by intervention residents were more likely to report that they had received tobacco counseling. Following this intervention, pediatric residents significantly improved their behaviors, attitudes, and confidence in providing smoking cessation counseling to parents of their pediatric patients.

  8. Women's experiences with isotretinoin risk reduction counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Carly A; Papic, Melissa J; Ferris, Laura K; Lee, Jessica K; Borrero, Sonya; Prevost, Noel; Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla

    2014-04-01

    Isotretinoin, an effective anti-acne therapy, is a known teratogen that is strictly regulated through the iPLEDGE program. However, since this program has not significantly reduced rates of pregnancies exposed to isotretinoin, new strategies for reducing rates of isotretinoin-exposed pregnancies are needed. To explore women's experiences with counseling about isotretinoin risk reduction. Structured interviews were conducted between January and September 2012. Two independent coders performed content analysis using a grounded theory approach. The study participants were 16 women who had used isotretinoin to treat severe skin disease and who were recruited from a single urban community via flyers displayed on college campuses, at dermatology clinics, and at student health facilities. Perceptions of isotretinoin-associated risks and understanding of ways teratogenic risks can be avoided. Participants clearly understood that isotretinoin is teratogenic but had less understanding of contraceptive methods that effectively prevent pregnancy. Most described the counseling they received as anxiety provoking. Few were counseled about highly effective reversible contraceptives such as the subdermal implant or intrauterine contraception; most counseling focused on oral contraceptives. Women cited multiple influences on their contraceptive choices, including friends, family, physicians, the internet, and other media; however, some expressed concerns about the accuracy of these sources of information. For many, iPLEDGE was their first introduction to contraception. When presented with evidence-based information on the relative effectiveness of available contraceptives, participants expressed surprise that this was not part of the iPLEDGE materials. Since few clinicians provide women information on highly effective (ie, intrauterine or subdermal) contraceptives, the iPLEDGE program increases anxiety about isotretinoin more than it helps women feel protected from the teratogenic

  9. Factors influencing perceptions of breast cancer genetic counseling among women in an urban health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Marvella E; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Britton, Diandra; McClary, Beth; Gordon, Howard S

    2007-12-01

    The study assessed perceptions of breast cancer genetic counseling. Focus groups were conducted with twenty women (ages cancer and referred for breast cancer genetic counseling following mammography. All participants associated the words "breast cancer" with fear. African American women who received breast cancer genetic counseling may have channeled their fear into increased vigilance related to breast health. African American women who did not receive breast cancer genetic counseling were most knowledgeable about it. In contrast, Caucasian women who did not receive it reported uncertainty about the role of genetic counseling and testing in assessing breast cancer risk, mistrust in medical professionals, and lack of trust in the accuracy of genetic tests. The results could be used to help develop interventions to improve informed decision-making regarding breast cancer genetic counseling.

  10. Solution-Focused Counseling in Schools, Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John J.

    2015-01-01

    The third edition of this text covers the philosophical foundations and nuts and bolts of using solution focused counseling to help preschool-12 students resolve problems. Dr. Murphy's practical and respectful approach has been successfully applied throughout the world by school counselors, counselors in training, psychologists, social workers,…

  11. Assessment of factors associated with voluntary counseling and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of factors associated with voluntary counseling and testing uptake among students in Bahir Dar University: A case control study. ... Conclusion: In order to promote VCT service, more emphasis should be given to the knowledge and attitudes of students towards VCT, and to help the students to internalize the risk ...

  12. Counselling at the Workplace in Tanzania What can Distance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In other instances, they frustrate the workers instead of helping them to fruitful and well-informed decisions. The paper concludes that the vacuum that exists in counselling at the workplace may be damaging to some work relations, institutional services, and can be a source of job dissatisfaction and low productivity. Thus it ...

  13. Female genital mutilation and its effects: Implications for counselling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings revealed that FGM does not reduce promiscuity, that circumcised females experience depression more than uncircumcised and, that circumcised females have more difficulty than their uncircumcised counterparts in becoming sexually aroused and attaining orgasm. Psycho-counselling measures for helping ...

  14. Does Extended Telephone Callback Counselling Prevent Smoking Relapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segan, C. J.; Borland, R.

    2011-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial tested whether extended callback counselling that proactively engaged ex-smokers with the task of embracing a smoke-free lifestyle (four to six calls delivered 1-3 months after quitting, i.e. when craving levels and perceived need for help had declined) could reduce relapse compared with a revised version of…

  15. Applying the Notion of Metaphor Types to Enhance Counseling Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the notion of metaphor types to show how the more nuanced aspects of metaphor theory can be applied to counseling practice. The author suggests that metaphor types can enhance existing interview protocols designed to help clients expand the source domain imagery of their metaphors and "bridge back" the expanded imagery to…

  16. Counselling Challenges and Strategies for Cochlear Implant Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implant specialists daily observe patients and families grapple with a wide range of emotions. As nonprofessional counsellors, we can help patients address those emotions by providing more opportunities to talk about their thoughts and feelings. This paper will review some familiar counselling challenges, such as the disappointment that…

  17. Using Narrative Career Counseling with the Underprepared College Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amber N.; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Mynatt, Blair

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of students enter college underprepared. These students do not have the academic skills to take college-level courses and are placed in remedial classes. Career counseling can help underprepared college students make educated career decisions based on their current situations. This article explores the characteristics of…

  18. Providing Supplemental Counseling Experiences: Alternatives to Role-Playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazler, Richard J.; Singer, Mark J.

    This paper offers a rationale and introduction to three innovative techniques which provide initial counseling experiences to trainees in the helping professions. The development of a cooperative program with the drama department to train and utilize drama students as coached clients is described as the first technique. The second technique is…

  19. The therapeutic collaboration in life design counselling: The case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the therapeutic collaboration in a case of Life Design Counseling (LDC) with narrative change and positive career outcomes. The therapeutic collaboration-change model and correspondent coding system were used to in-tensively study the helping relationship throughout three sessions of LDC.

  20. Solving Adolescent Verbal Aggressions through Transactional Analysis Counseling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netrawati; Furqon; Yusuf, Syamsu; Rusmana, Nandang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at helping school counselors in solving issues related to adolescent verbal aggressions through implementing Transactional Analysis (TA) counseling, which was particularly given to the students in public vocational schools (SMKs) in Padang city who were majoring in engineering. Recent phenomena in Padang had revealed that among…

  1. Vital Signs – Alcohol Screening and Counseling?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-01-07

    This podcast is based on the January 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Millions of Americans drink too much, a dangerous behavior that can lead to serious health problems. Alcohol screening and counseling can help.  Created: 1/7/2014 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 1/7/2014.

  2. Increasing Positive Perceptions of Counseling: The Importance of Repeated Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Scott A.; Vogel, David L.; Gentile, Douglas A.; Wade, Nathaniel G.

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the effectiveness of repeated exposures to a video intervention based on the Elaboration Likelihood Model. The video was designed to increase help-seeking attitudes and perceptions of peer norms and to decrease the stigma associated with seeking counseling. Participants were 290 undergraduates who were randomly assigned to a…

  3. Applying Person-Centered Counseling to Sexual Minority Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoire, S. Jim; Chen, Charles P.

    2005-01-01

    Drawing attention to the very unique and complex needs of stigmatized sexual minority youth, the authors explore the therapeutic potential of person-centered counseling in helping lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender/sexual (LGBT) adolescents who are working toward the acceptance and disclosure of their sexual identity. They suggest that…

  4. Revisioning the Self: A Phenomenological Investigation into Self-Help Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Laura; Bubenzer, Donald L.; McGlothlin, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The helpfulness of self-help reading was explored through interviews with 6 female self-help readers. Themes derived through phenomenological data analysis suggested that there is a distinct structure to the self-help reading experience, including self-help reading as a medium for revisioning of self. Implications for counseling practice and…

  5. The Effects of a Genetic Counseling Educational Program on Hereditary Breast Cancer for Korean Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyoun; Cho, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Han-Wook; Park, Sue K.; Yang, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Lee, Soo-Jung; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Yong; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Moon, Nan Mo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Systematic educational programs and genetic counseling certification courses for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) have not yet been introduced in Korea. We provided and evaluated the effects of genetic counseling education on Korean healthcare providers' knowledge, awareness, and counseling skills for patients at high risk of HBOC. Methods A 3-day educational program was conducted for healthcare providers who were interested in genetic counseling for patients at high risk of HBOC. Participants who completed a knowledge test and satisfaction questionnaire were included in the present sample. Pre-post comparisons were conducted to determine the effects of the intervention. Results Significant differences between preprogram and postprogram knowledge scores were observed (p=0.002). Awareness (pcounseling significantly increased after the training. Doctors and participants with fewer years of work experience performed well on the knowledge test. Previous educational experience was correlated with increased confidence in knowledge and counseling skills. Conclusion Genetic counseling education regarding HBOC improved knowledge and awareness of HBOC and enhanced confidence in the counseling process. The effects varied according to occupation and participants' previous education. The implementation of systematic educational programs that consider participant characteristics may improve the effects of such interventions. PMID:24155764

  6. counselling communication skills

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emeka Egbochuku

    (observing, attending and responding). Active listening requires full attention; alertness to every nuance, to what is both implicitly and openly said, thereby helping the client to clarify confused feelings and thoughts. The ground skills which help counsellors in active listening include: Empathy, awareness of body language, ...

  7. URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR

    CERN Document Server

    Medical Service

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGAD 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European EmergencyCall 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors will...

  8. Effectiveness of LifeRAFT Undergraduate Helping Skills Training Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elizabeth L.; Davidson, Kenzie; Davidson, Spencer M.

    2017-01-01

    LifeRAFT, a helping skills training model for undergraduate paraprofessionals, addresses training needs for applied psychology skills for undergraduate psychology majors. LifeRAFT draws from three empirically supported psychotherapy treatments to introduce counselling theory and encourage helping skill progression. Trainees learn practical helping…

  9. Doing Good: Passion and Commitment for Helping Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Jeffrey A.

    Through the use of stories of people who are successful at performing acts of good will as a profession, this book presents the realties of helping others. The intent is to help the beginning learner cope with and offer support to their commitment to serve others. It can be used as a text in undergraduate and graduate curriculum in counseling and…

  10. Medical humanities play an important role in improving the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Song, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Wen; Xiao, Yawen

    2017-05-23

    Doctors in China have been wounded or even killed in frequent violence as conflict between doctors and patients has intensified. China has had a massive dearth of medical students over the past decade and doctors are dissatisfied with conditions in their profession. Conditions in medicine are not conducive to medical reform. This paper notes that the main factors affecting the doctor-patient relationship are a lack of humanity in medicine, the predominance of techniques and technologies, and inappropriate administration of hospitals. These factors are related to a lack of medical humanities. This paper describes several steps to make medicine more humane and to help establish a harmonious doctor-patient relationship, including improved humanities education for doctors and medical students, ending the predominance of techniques and technologies, bringing back "humanity" in medicine, and improving the administration of hospitals.

  11. The Continuing and Evolving Challenge of Race and Ethnicity in Empirical Counseling and Counseling Psychology Research: A Reply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Romero, Edward A.; Rowland, Marcy; Galvan, Nallely

    2005-01-01

    We are pleased to have our work be included alongside the work of our colleagues Bryant-Davis and Ocampo (2005 [this issue]) and Utsey, Gernat, and Hammar (2005 [this issue]) in this issue of "The Counseling Psychologist." Similarly we are thankful for the helpful and informative reactions of J. Manuel Casas (2005 [this issue]), Lisa Spanierman…

  12. Learning Dynamics in Doctoral Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie

    This doctoral research explores doctoral supervision within life science research in a Danish university. From one angle it investigates doctoral students’ experiences with strengthening the relationship with their supervisors through a structured meeting with the supervisor, prepared as part of ...... of different theoretical frameworks from the perspectives of learning as individual acquisition and a sociocultural perspective on learning contributed to a nuanced illustration of the otherwise implicit practices of supervision....... investigates learning opportunities in supervision with multiple supervisors. This was investigated through observations and recording of supervision, and subsequent analysis of transcripts. The analyses used different perspectives on learning; learning as participation, positioning theory and variation theory....... The research illuminates how learning opportunities are created in the interaction through the scientific discussions. It also shows how multiple supervisors can contribute to supervision by providing new perspectives and opinions that have a potential for creating new understandings. The combination...

  13. Solo doctors and ethical isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R J

    2009-11-01

    This paper uses the case of solo doctors to explore whether working in relative isolation from one's peers may be detrimental to ethical decision-making. Drawing upon the relevance of communication and interaction for ethical decision-making in the ethical theories of Habermas, Mead and Gadamer, it is argued that doctors benefit from ethical discussion with their peers and that solo practice may make this more difficult. The paper identifies a paucity of empirical research related to solo practice and ethics but draws upon more general medical ethics research and a study that identified ethical isolation among community pharmacists to support the theoretical claims made. The paper concludes by using the literary analogy of Soderberg's Doctor Glas to illustrate the issues raised and how ethical decision-making in relative isolation may be problematical.

  14. Looking to the Future--The Role of Master's Programs in Counseling Psychology: A Response to Quality of Master's Education: A Concern for Counseling Psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    The predoctoral relationship that counseling psychology programs have had with master's programs over the decades is being challenged in current times. A model that is developing is one that provides greater responsibility for program definition and then full faculty engagement from doctoral program faculty. With change occurring in training…

  15. Preconception Counseling for Women With Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Mark A; Bernstein, Sarah N

    2017-09-01

    All providers who care for reproductive-aged women with cardiac disease should assess these patients' desires and plans for pregnancy at every encounter. For those considering pregnancy, preconception counseling, often performed by a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, can help patients understand the potential implications of pregnancy on their health and estimate the risks of an adverse cardiac event prior to conceiving. There are cardiac conditions, such as pulmonary hypertension and aortic stenosis, in which pregnancy may be contraindicated given the high morbidity and mortality; there are tools available to help quantify a patient's risk. Furthermore, some cardiac lesions may be inherited, which may warrant parental testing or a discussion of strategies to reduce the risk of an affected child, such as the use of assisted reproductive technologies. Preconception counseling is also important to identify other maternal risk factors, such as obesity, hypertension, and tobacco use, which are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and develop a strategy to mitigate their potential risks, ideally before pregnancy. For women on medications for their heart disease or other comorbidities, a thorough review of these medications can potentially avoid an exposure to a teratogen during conception and pregnancy. Once pregnant, a patient's obstetrical provider and cardiologist should work together to outline a plan to monitor a patient's cardiac status as the normal physiologic changes of pregnancy, such as increased blood volume and cardiac output, may challenge a patient's functional status and increase the risk for an adverse outcome. Labor and delivery planning are essential to ensure patients with cardiac disease deliver at the appropriate hospital, equipped with the staff and resources to care for women with complex conditions. In summary, preconception counseling aims to stratify a patient's risk in pregnancy, inform patients of possible complications, and discuss

  16. Help with Hives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... berries, and nuts ), medicines (such as antibiotics ), and insect stings or bites . Other causes of hives are ... diagnose hives just by looking at you and hearing your story about what happened. The doctor can ...

  17. Mrs Hitler and her doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Sandy

    2005-12-01

    The doctor who attended the mother of Adolf Hitler in her terminal illness has been blamed as a cause of the Holocaust. The medical details recorded of this professional relationship are presented and discussed. Dr Bloch's medical care of Mrs Hitler was consistent with the prevailing medical practice of the management of fungating breast carcinoma. Indeed, the general practitioner's care and attention of the family appear to have been astute and supportive. There is nothing to suggest that Dr Bloch's medical care was other than competent. Doctors who have the (mis)fortune to professionally attend major figures of history may be unfairly viewed, despite their appropriate and adequate care.

  18. Management of Mass Casualties Using Doctor Helicopters and Doctor Cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Kouhei; Omori, Kazuhiko; Jitsuiki, Kei; Yoshizawa, Toshihiko; Yanagawa, Youichi

    At approximately 10 o'clock in September 2015, a minibus carrying 18 people accidentally slid backwards because of a malfunctioning brake system while climbing a steep incline on Togasayama Mountain, colliding with a van (Toyota HiAce wagon) carrying 11 people that was situated behind the minibus. Togasayama Mountain is located 1 hour by car and 10 minutes by helicopter from our hospital. The minibus slid off a roadside cliff at a height of 0.5 m and rolled over after colliding with the van. There were 7 victims with yellow tags and 22 with green tags. Two Doctor Helicopters and 1 Doctor Car cooperated with the fire departments by providing medical treatments, selection of medical facilities, and dispersion transportation. In this mass casualty event, there were no mortalities, and all of the victims recovered without sequelae. The coordinated and combined use of Doctor Helicopters and Doctor Cars in addition to the activities of the fire department in response to a mass casualty event resulted in appropriate triage, medical treatments, selection of medical facilities, and dispersion transportation. Copyright © 2017 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jacky; Gameiro, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    Five key paradigm shifts are described to illustrate the evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility. The first paradigm shift was in the 1930s when psychosomatic concepts were introduced in obstetrics and gynecology as causal factors to explain why some couples could not conceive despite the absence of organic pathology. In the second shift, the nurse advocacy movement of the 1970s stimulated the investigation of the psychosocial consequences of infertility and promoted counseling to help couples grieve childlessness when medical treatments often could not help them conceive. The third shift occurred with the advent of IVF, which created a demand for mental health professionals in fertility clinics. Mental health professionals assessed the ability of couples to withstand the demands of this new high technology treatment as well as their suitability as potential parents. The fourth shift, in the 1990s, saw reproductive medicine embrace the principles of evidence-based medicine, which introduced a much more rigorous approach to medical practice (effectiveness and safety) that extended to psychosocial interventions. The most recent paradigm shift, in the new millennium, occurred with the realization that compliance with protracted fertility treatment depended on the adoption of an integrated approach to fertility care. An integrated approach could reduce treatment burden arising from multiple sources (i.e., patient, clinic, and treatment). This review describes these paradigm shifts and reflects on future clinical and research directions for mental health professionals. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 38 CFR 21.9580 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.9580...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9580 Counseling. An individual may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. VA will apply the provisions of...

  1. 38 CFR 21.8100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.8100... Vietnam Veterans-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects Counseling § 21.8100 Counseling. An eligible child requesting or receiving services and assistance under this subpart will receive professional counseling by VR...

  2. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43 Drug counseling. (a) Drug counseling shall be provided to sentenced inmates in contract community treatment...

  3. 24 CFR 214.300 - Counseling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling services. 214.300... HOUSING COUNSELING PROGRAM Program Administration § 214.300 Counseling services. (a) Basic requirements. (1) Agencies must provide counseling to current and potential homeowners and tenants to assist them...

  4. 38 CFR 21.6100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.6100... Recipients Counseling § 21.6100 Counseling. General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under this temporary program shall be provided professional counseling services by the Vocational...

  5. 38 CFR 21.7600 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7600...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance for Members of the Selected Reserve Counseling § 21.7600 Counseling. A reservist may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during...

  6. 34 CFR 686.32 - Counseling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling requirements. 686.32 Section 686.32...) GRANT PROGRAM Administration of Grant Payments § 686.32 Counseling requirements. (a) Initial counseling. (1) An institution must ensure that initial counseling is conducted with each TEACH Grant recipient...

  7. 38 CFR 21.100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.100... Counseling § 21.100 Counseling. (a) General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under Chapter 31 shall be provided professional counseling services by Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR...

  8. Communication problems between doctors and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, R C; Matsuno, K; Mulligan, J

    1991-01-01

    Communication difficulties between hospital doctors and nurses are well documented. A survey undertaken jointly by medical and nursing administration at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, Western Australia, verified difficulties in doctor-nurse communication as perceived by doctors and nurses, as well as by ward clerks as impartial observers. Questionnaire responses revealed some impediments in the flow of communication. Both nurses and doctors perceived less frequency of difficulties in communicating with members of their own professional group than with members of the other group. Nurses with university preparation and other special clinical qualifications perceived significantly fewer communication problems with doctors than nurses with less education. Interns perceived greater frequency in difficulty communicating with nurses than did more highly qualified doctors, and female doctors who were not interns claimed fewer problems than their male counterparts. Moreover, more highly qualified male doctors who had a previous occupation acknowledged fewer doctor-nurse communication problems.

  9. Between coaching and social counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Vrana

    2012-03-01

    The basic difference between coaching and social counselling lies in a different interpretation of the client' starting situation. Social counselling understands the client' starting situation as problematic and attempts to normalize it, while coaching understands it as normal and attempts to develop it. The key similarity of the two approaches is encour- agement of the clients' own initiative. Coaching needs to be investigated within the field of developmental conceptions, since its focus on results supports, unintentionally, the dominant developmental paradigm. Focusing on solutions in coaching is questionable also within an organization, where its interests may channel the course of clients' search for their own solutions. The counselling doctrine of coaching can gain valuable insights by a reassessment of the concepts of development and normality, a domain in which it is likely to encounter social counselling.

  10. Counselling Psychology in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country's socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country's mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country's health care and education systems.

  11. Outplacement: The New Counseling Frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstead, Elizabeth; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Includes "Outplacement: The New Counseling Frontier" (Branstead); "Interview with Bob Ward"; "Ethics of Outplacement" (Axmith); "Outplacement--The View from Over Here" (Murray); "In-House Outplacement Programs for the 1990s and Beyond" (Benedict); "Government and Outplacement"…

  12. Preconception counseling for preventable risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weerawadee Chandranipapongse; Gideon Koren

    2013-01-01

    .... She contracted chickenpox and endured unnecessary anxiety. This led me to think that it would be useful to have a summary of all the preconception counseling advice we should give to our patients to ensure the best pregnancy outcomes possible...

  13. Counselling Psychology in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country’s socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country’s mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country’s health care and education systems. PMID:27867261

  14. Genetic Counseling in Military Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    mother allegedly mistreated for preeclampsia at Tripler Army Medical Center could maintain an action for medical malpractice nothwithstanding Feres.1 2...perinatologists at most military hospitals perform genetic counseling. Due to their primary responsibilities fo management of high risk pregnancies

  15. HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD sponsors housing counseling agencies throughout the country that can provide advice on buying a home, renting, defaults, foreclosures, and credit issues. This...

  16. Predictors of the Change in Self-Stigma Following a Single Session of Group Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Nathaniel G.; Post, Brian C.; Cornish, Marilyn A.; Vogel, David L.; Tucker, Jeritt R.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major obstacles to seeking psychological help is the stigma associated with counseling and therapy. Self-stigma, the fear of losing self-respect or self-esteem as a result of seeking help, is an important factor in the help-seeking process. In the present study, college students meeting a clinical cutoff for psychological symptoms…

  17. Counseling Services for Women in Marriage Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frischa Meivilona Yendi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is a bond between the outer and inner man as a husband who has not aged 25 years and women 21 years old wife is not with the purpose of achieving happiness. Marriage and family counseling is a profession that will be developed in Indonesia. Counseling emphasizes on changes contained in the family system. Stages counseling, theory and dynamics as well as the use of counseling skills in marriage and family counseling has similarities with individual counseling and group counseling.

  18. 6 CFR 17.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  19. 10 CFR 5.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the...

  20. 49 CFR 25.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  1. 29 CFR 36.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 36... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 36.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of...

  2. 22 CFR 146.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  3. 31 CFR 28.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 28.425 Section 28.425 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the....425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not...

  4. 38 CFR 23.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 23.425 Section 23.425 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Activities Prohibited § 23.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  5. 24 CFR 3.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 3.425 Section 3.425 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department... Activities Prohibited § 3.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  6. 7 CFR 15a.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Education Programs and Activities Prohibited § 15a.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the...

  7. 18 CFR 1317.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1317.425 Section 1317.425 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... Activities Prohibited § 1317.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  8. 14 CFR 1253.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1253.425 Section 1253.425 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... § 1253.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall...

  9. 22 CFR 229.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  10. 45 CFR 86.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  11. 13 CFR 113.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 113.425 Section 113.425 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS... Activities Prohibited § 113.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  12. 10 CFR 1042.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials... on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  13. Parents, Doctors and Personal Care

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    This research briefing reports on some key findings from a study of doctors and patients relationships in general and family practice medicine. The study examined how patients, all parents with young children, and general practitioners (GPs) defined what personal care means to them, what importance and value it holds, and how this varies by patients’ health and their family and social circumstances.

  14. Robert Paine Doctor Honoris Causa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Mathiesen

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Professor Emeritus Dr. Robert Paine was conferred the degree of Doctor Honoris Causa at the University of Tromsø on August 27 1998 as a recognition of his long lasting and continuing influence on the anthropological study of modern society, and in particular his many contributions to the understanding of Sami reindeer husbandry and the Sami culture in general.

  15. Transdisciplinary Qualities in Practice Doctorates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, Carol; Pizzolato, Nicola

    2018-01-01

    Doctoral programmes in which candidates research their own practice can be characterised as having transdisciplinary (TD) qualities. While most of the emphasis in the literature and in policy on TD is on research in teams, we argue for an expansion of the scope in the conception and understanding of TD research to include the way it can be…

  16. Learning through inter- and intradisciplinary problem solving: using cognitive apprenticeship to analyse doctor-to-doctor consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Pachler, Norbert; Nierle, Julia; Genewein, Urs

    2012-12-01

    Today's healthcare can be characterised by the increasing importance of specialisation that requires cooperation across disciplines and specialities. In view of the number of educational programmes for interdisciplinary cooperation, surprisingly little is known on how learning arises from interdisciplinary work. In order to analyse the learning and teaching practices of interdisciplinary cooperation, a multiple case study research focused on how consults, i.e., doctor-to-doctor consultations between medical doctors from different disciplines were carried out: semi-structured interviews with doctors of all levels of seniority from two hospital sites in Switzerland were conducted. Starting with a priori constructs based on the 'methods' underpinning cognitive apprenticeship (CA), the transcribed interviews were analysed according to the principles of qualitative content analysis. The research contributes to three debates: (1) socio-cognitive and situated learning, (2) intra- and interdisciplinary learning in clinical settings, and (3), more generally, to cooperation and problem solving. Patient cases, which necessitate the cooperation of doctors in consults across boundaries of clinical specialisms, trigger intra- as well as interdisciplinary learning and offer numerous and varied opportunities for learning by requesting doctors as well as for on-call doctors, in particular those in residence. The relevance of consults for learning can also be verified from the perspective of CA which is commonly used by experts, albeit in varying forms, degrees of frequency and quality, and valued by learners. Through data analysis a model for collaborative problem-solving and help-seeking was developed which shows the interplay of pedagogical 'methods' of CA in informal clinical learning contexts.

  17. [Difficulties of genetic counselling in rare, mainly neurogenetic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Emese; Nagy, Nikoletta; Széll, Márta

    2014-08-03

    In recent decades methods used for the investigation of the genetic background of rare diseases showed a great improvement. The aim of the authors was to demonstrate difficulties of genetic counselling and investigations in case of five rare, mainly neurogenetic diseases. During pre-test genetic counselling, the disease suspected from the clinical symptoms and the available genetic tests were considered. During post-test genetic counselling, the results of the genetic tests were discussed. In three of the five cases genetic tests identified the disease-causing genetic abnormalities, while in two cases the causative abnormalities were not identified. Despite a great improvement of the available genetic methods, the causative genetic abnormalities cannot be identified in some cases. The genetic counsellor has a key role in the assessment and interpretation of the results and in helping the family planning.

  18. The effects of counseling on fear of childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Birgitta; Karlström, Annika; Rubertsson, Christine; Hildingsson, Ingegerd

    2015-06-01

    To investigate women's experiences of attending existing counseling programs for childbirth-related fear and the effect of this counseling over time. A longitudinal survey. Three hospitals in the central north of Sweden. A selected sample of 936 women. Of these, 70 received counseling due to fear of childbirth (study-group). Data were collected with questionnaires 2 months and 1 year after giving birth with background data collected during midpregnancy. Comparisons were made between women with or without counseling. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated. Self-reported childbirth fear, experience of counseling, birth experience and preferred mode of birth. Women in the counseling group reported higher childbirth fear 1 year after giving birth (OR 5.0, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.6-9.3), they had a more negative birth experience that did not change over time (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.9) and they preferred cesarean section to a greater extent (OR 12.0, 95% CI 5.1-28.1) in the case of another birth. Also, they were more often delivered by planned cesarean section (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.4-9.1). However, 80% were satisfied with the given support. Although women were satisfied with the treatment, this study shows that counseling had a minor effect on fear of childbirth, birth experiences or cesarean section rates. To help women with their fear of childbirth, more effective methods of treatment are needed. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Emergency contraception counseling in a retail pharmacy setting: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, Denise; Payakachat, Nalin; Stafford, Rachel A

    2015-06-01

    Nonprescription emergency contraception (EC) is now available for purchase without age restrictions. This is a great opportunity for pharmacists to provide counseling to ensure that customers use EC correctly. This pilot study explored the impact of student pharmacist counseling on customer knowledge of EC in a retail pharmacy setting and assessed customer satisfaction with the counseling. Counseling was performed at 2 retail pharmacies during June and July 2012. Participants completed a 12-question pretest that measured baseline knowledge of EC prior to a 5- to 10-minute education session, followed by the same 12-question posttest. A follow-up test was conducted via telephone within 1 to 3 months after the counseling. Eighty-seven women participated with a mean age of 30.2 (standard deviation = 7.2) years. The average posttest score was significantly higher than the pretest score (11.5 ± 1.0 vs 8.5 ± 2.5; P counseling session and strongly agreed that the counseling would help them use EC correctly. Student pharmacist-provided EC counseling increased participants' EC knowledge both immediate and long term. This study suggests that EC counseling is feasible and valued by customers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Adolescents' Views of Helping Professionals: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freake, Helen; Barley, Val; Kent, Gerry

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews 54 papers exploring adolescents' own views of their interactions with doctors, mental health workers and other "helping professionals". Twelve global themes emerge repeatedly in the qualitative literature, where adolescents are asked to talk about their preferences or their experiences of receiving help from such professionals.…

  1. Sri Lankan doctors' and medical undergraduates' attitudes towards mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Sunera Mayanthi; Deane, Frank P; McLeod, Hamish J

    2010-07-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes towards mental illness can impede help-seeking and adversely affect treatment outcomes, especially if such attitudes are endorsed by medical personnel. In order to help identify targets for anti-stigma interventions, we comprehensively examined negative attitudes towards mental illness displayed by Sri Lankan doctors and medical students and compared these with equivalent UK and other international data. A self-report questionnaire originally developed in the UK was completed by medical students (n = 574) and doctors (n = 74) from a teaching hospital in Colombo. The questions assessed the presence and intensity of stigmatizing attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia, depression, panic disorder, dementia and drug and alcohol addiction. The study revealed higher levels of stigma towards patients with depression, alcohol and drug addiction in this Sri Lankan sample compared to UK data but attitudes towards schizophrenia were less stigmatized in Sri Lanka. Blaming attitudes were consistently high across diagnoses in the Sri Lankan sample. Sri Lankan medical students displayed more negative attitudes than doctors (P addiction, followed by, alcohol addiction, schizophrenia, depression, panic disorder and dementia. Sri Lankan doctors and undergraduates endorse stigmatizing attitudes towards mental illnesses and are especially prone to see patients as blameworthy. As such attitudes are likely to affect the engagement of patients in treatment and specific interventions that modify negative attitudes towards people with mental illnesses are needed. Ensuring that medical students have contact with recovered patients in community psychiatry settings may be one way of decreasing stigmatizing attitudes.

  2. Primary care providers' physical activity counseling and referral practices and barriers for cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, John D; Bellissimo, Moriah P; Watson, Kathleen B; Loustalot, Fleetwood; Fulton, Janet E; Carlson, Susan A

    2017-12-27

    The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends offering or referring adults who are overweight or obese and have additional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors to intensive behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for CVD prevention. This study determined the proportion of primary care providers (PCPs) who discussed physical activity with most of their at-risk patients and referred them to intensive behavioral counseling, and reported barriers to counseling. Our analyses used data from DocStyles 2015, a Web-based panel survey of 1251 PCPs. Overall, 58.6% of PCPs discussed physical activity with most of their at-risk patients. Among these PCPs, the prevalence of components offered ranged from 98.5% encouraging increased physical activity to 13.9% referring to intensive behavioral counseling. Overall, only 8.1% both discussed physical activity with most at-risk patients and referred to intensive behavioral counseling. Barriers related to PCPs' attitudes and beliefs about counseling (e.g., counseling is not effective) were significantly associated with both discussing physical activity with most at-risk patients and referring them to intensive behavioral counseling (adjusted odds ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.20). System-level barriers (e.g., referral services not available) were not. Just over half of PCPs discussed physical activity with most of their at-risk patients, and few both discussed physical activity and referred patients to intensive behavioral counseling. Overcoming barriers related to attitudes and beliefs about physical activity counseling could help improve low levels of counseling and referrals to intensive behavioral counseling for CVD prevention. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Ethical issues in genetic counselling with special reference to haemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuswamy, Vasantha

    2011-10-01

    Genetic counselling is provided in places where genetic tests are carried out. The process involves pre-test counselling as well as post-test counselling to enable the individuals to face the situation and take appropriate decisions with the right frame of mind. Major ethical principles which govern the attitudes and actions of counsellors include: respect for patient autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, or taking action to help benefit others and prevent harm, both physical and mental, and justice, which requires that services be distributed fairly to those in need. Other moral issues include veracity, the duty to disclose information or to be truthful, and respect for patient confidentiality. Nondirective counselling, a hallmark of this profession, is in accordance with the principle of individual autonomy. High prevalence of haemoglobinopathies with availability of good and sensitive carrier detection tests and prenatal diagnostic techniques makes these good candidates for population screening of carriers along with genetic counselling for primary prevention of the disease. Screening of the extended family members of the affected child, high risk communities and general population screening including antenatal women are the main target groups for planning a Haemoglobinopathy control programme. A critical mass of trained genetic counsellors who have understanding of the ethical issues and its appropriate handling with the required sensitivity is needed in India.

  4. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - child; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - child ... should I discuss with my child's teachers about epilepsy? Will my child need to take medicines during ...

  5. Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostomy - what to ask your doctor; What to ask your doctor about ileostomy or colostomy; Colostomy - what ... the stoma? Does insurance cover the cost of ostomy supplies? What should I do if there is ...

  6. Your Doctor's Age Might Affect Your Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Almost 19,000 doctors were involved in the patients' care. Doctors were assigned patients based on work schedules ... better patient outcomes -- including lower mortality and higher patient satisfaction -- after taking into account differences in physician qualifications," ...

  7. Newborn jaundice - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about newborn jaundice ... What causes jaundice in a newborn child? How common is newborn jaundice? Will the jaundice harm my child? What are the treatments for jaundice? How long does ...

  8. The part-time doctoral student experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Susan K; Gopaul, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Although scholarly interest in doctoral education has increased dramatically over the last two decades, much of this attention has focused on the experiences of doctoral students who are enrolled full...

  9. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... school people I should tell about my child's concussion? Can my child stay for a full day? ...

  10. [Lifespan of Doctorate and Non-doctorate Physicians in Northrine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Josef; Rausch, Tanja K

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lifespan of physicians in North Rhine depending on the criterion if they had graduated with a Dr. med. thesis under German law or not. North Rhine is part of the German federal state North Rhine-Westphalia. The date of birth and date of death of 1133 deceased physicians from the journal of the medical association of North Rhine were recorded according to their doctoral degree from January 2013 until June 2016 inclusive. For the calculation of their length of life, the descriptive statistics and for further statistical analysis, the R program 1 was applied. Physicians with a doctoral degree under German law (Dr. med.) reached an average age of 80.9 ± 12.1 years whereas physicians without a dissertation reached an age of 67.6 ± 13.8 years, on average. After correction for year of birth no significant difference between the average lifespan of the two groups could be found. The analysis of the survival data of deceased physicians showed a much longer length of life if they had graduated with a doctoral thesis under German law, which was not significant after a year of birth correction. For every statistical analysis possible confounders need to be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. [Out-Patient Psychosocial Cancer Counseling Centers and their Clients - Services Provided and Service Utilization by Patients and Patients' Relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, JürgenM; Weis, Joachim; Schreib, Melanie; Eichhorn, Svenja; Kuhnt, Susanne; Faust, Tanja; Mehnert, Anja; Ernst, Jochen

    2015-12-01

    Psychosocial cancer counseling centers represent an increasingly important part of comprehensive psychosocial cancer care. Research on the services provided by those centers is sparse, however, as is research on person-, disease-, and treatment-related characteristics of their clients. Therefore, the present study analyzes the services provided by 26 psychosocial cancer counseling centers temporarily being funded by the German Cancer Aid as well as selected characteristics of their clients. Analyses are based on data collected during 2011 by means of a documentation system specifically designed for the purposes of psychosocial cancer counseling. Testing focuses on whether cancer patients and cancer patients' relatives differ with respect to various characteristics and the services used. The results show that psychosocial and benefit counseling represent a major part of counseling services, followed by giving information and employing relaxation techniques. Clients seek counseling primarily in early phases of disease and treatment. Women with breast cancer are over-represented among clients. Analyses also reveal significant differences between cancer patients and patients' relatives. Psychotherapeutic interventions and grief-counseling are more frequent in counseling relatives, whereas benefit counseling is more frequent in working with patients. The results emphasize the relevance of outpatient psychosocial cancer counseling. They may also help support initiatives aiming at establishing psychosocial cancer counseling targeted to the needs of each individual client. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Impact of an undergraduate course on medical students’ self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices

    OpenAIRE

    Crowley J; Ball L; Leveritt MD; Arroll B; Han DY; Wall C

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Doctors are increasingly involved in the management of chronic disease and counsel patients about their lifestyle behaviours, including nutrition, to improve their health outcomes. AIM: This study aimed to assess the impact of a medical undergraduate course containing nutrition content on medical students’ self-perceived nutrition intake and self-efficacy to improve their health behaviours and counselling practices. METHODS: A total of 239 medical students enrolled in a 12...

  13. Student Support Networks in Online Doctoral Programs: Exploring Nested Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharla Berry

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: Enrollment in online doctoral programs has grown over the past decade. A sense of community, defined as feelings of closeness within a social group, is vital to retention, but few studies have explored how online doctoral students create community. Background: In this qualitative case study, I explore how students in one online doctoral program created a learning community. Methodology: Data for the study was drawn from 60 hours of video footage from six online courses, the message boards from the six courses, and twenty interviews with first and second-year students. Contribution: Findings from this study indicate that the structure of the social network in an online doctoral program is significantly different from the structure of learning communities in face-to-face programs. In the online program, the doctoral community was more insular, more peer-centered, and less reliant on faculty support than in in-person programs. Findings: Utilizing a nested communities theoretical framework, I identified four subgroups that informed online doctoral students’ sense of community: cohort, class groups, small peer groups, and study groups. Students interacted frequently with members of each of the aforementioned social groups and drew academic, social, and emotional support from their interactions. Recommendations for Practitioners: Data from this study suggests that online doctoral students are interested in making social and academic connections. Practitioners should leverage technology and on-campus supports to promote extracurricular interactions for online students. Recommendation for Researchers: Rather than focus on professional socialization, students in the online doctoral community were interested in providing social and academic support to peers. Researchers should consider how socialization in online doctoral programs differs from traditional, face-to-face programs. Impact on Society: As universities increase online offerings

  14. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... Alzheimer's Association. Dementia Care Practice Recommendations ... in a Home Setting. Updated 2009. Alz.org. www.alz.org/national/ ...

  15. Invisible Roles of Doctoral Program Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Eva Burns; Grady, Marilyn L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the roles of doctoral program specialists in Big Ten universities. Face-to-face interviews with 20 doctoral program specialists employed in institutions in the Big Ten were conducted. Participants were asked to describe their roles within their work place. The doctoral program specialists reported their…

  16. An Exploration of Darkness within Doctoral Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2016-01-01

    In doctoral education, the formal structures include the Graduate School system, PhD courses, and supervision contracts, etc. Doctoral education also takes place on informal and tacit levels, where doctoral students learn about the institutional regulations, the research field, academic craftsman...

  17. Perceptions of dental students in India about smoking cessation counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasundaram, Prakash; Sequeira, Peter Simon; Jain, Jithesh

    2011-12-01

    Smoking kills 900,000 people every year in India. Many studies have shown that counseling from a health professional is an effective method of helping patients quit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of dental students in Karnataka, India, towards smoking cessation counseling. A questionnaire study was conducted among a convenience sample of 329 dental students comprised of III year and IV year students and interns in three dental colleges in Karnataka, India. Of the 329 students who completed the questionnaire, twenty-two (7 percent) were current smokers, and fifteen (5 percent) were ex-smokers. Although 94 percent responded they were giving antismoking advice to their patients, only 47 percent said they had been taught antismoking advice suitable for patients. While a majority (95 percent) planned to advise patients about tobacco use in their professional careers, significantly fewer (66 percent) indicated that such counseling would help patients to quit. This study of dental students and interns found that a majority intended to provide smoking cessation counseling in their professional career and agreed it is part of their professional role.

  18. Another successful Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday 2 April, CERN hosted its third Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   CERN PhD students show off their posters in CERN's Main Building. Speaking to a packed house, Director-General Rolf Heuer gave the assembly's opening speech and introduced the poster session that followed. Seventeen CERN PhD students presented posters on their work, and were greeted by their CERN and University supervisors. It was a very successful event!

  19. Doctoral specialization in nursing informatics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gassert, C. A.; Mills, M. E.; Heller, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype program of doctoral study has been developed at the University of Maryland School of Nursing to prepare students with nursing expertise in the conceptualization and research of computer based information systems in hospitals, industry and other health care organizations. The graduate will be prepared to design effective nursing information systems; create innovative information technology; conduct research regarding integration of technology with nursing practice, administration, ...

  20. Continuing professional development of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder

    2017-01-01

    After graduating from medical school, all doctors need to undertake some training activities lifelong to maintain, update or develop their knowledge, skills and attitudes towards their professional practice. Continuing professional development (CPD) refers to continuing development of medical and non- medical competencies including professionalism, and interpersonal, managerial and communication skills. There is no single correct way of doing CPD. Most learning in CPD is self-directed and based on one's own learning needs. Effective CPD is characterized by the presence of three factors: a clear reason why a particular CPD needs to be undertaken, learning activities appropriate to identified needs and follow- up on learning. There are several models for CPD. However, the onus is on doctors to show that they continue to maintain appropriate professional standards after training. Here, regulation becomes essential for revalidation, monitoring and to provide the necessary impetus to make CPD mandatory. In India, the credit point system is followed by some states, but the policy to link credit hours with renewal of registration thereafter is not uniform. While the present system is able to monitor time devoted to CPD, it encourages people to gather certificates of attendance at sessions without relevance to or real interest in the subject. The quality and relevance of CPD activities matter more than the quantity of hours. Eventually, we need to move away from credit point counting towards a process of self-accreditation and reflection. Each individual will have to find appropriate methods, learn, document and present evidence that learning has happened, and show that it has been applied in practice. As a profession, we need to encourage a culture where doctors do not view CPD and recertification as a threat. Doctors will need to understand that they are accountable to their patients, and should prioritize and build CPD into their practice.