WorldWideScience

Sample records for helping children outgrow

  1. Sugarcane outgrowers in Ethiopia

    Assefa Wendimu, Mengistu; Henningsen, Arne; Gibbon, Peter

    smallholders. We apply matching methods to analyze the effects of a public sugarcane outgrower scheme in Ethiopia. Participation in the outgrower scheme significantly reduces the income and asset stocks of outgrowers who contributed irrigated land to the outgrower scheme, while the effect was insignificant...

  2. Sugarcane outgrowers in Ethiopia

    Wendimu, Mengistu Assefa; Henningsen, Arne; Gibbon, Peter

    2016-01-01

    -users. Using data from the oldest and some more recently established sugarcane outgrower schemes in Ethiopia, this paper examines the effects of compulsory participation in sugarcane outgrower production on total household income and asset stocks. Because outgrowers and non-outgrowers may have some differences...

  3. Divorce: Helping Children Cope.

    Cook, Alicia S.; McBride, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Examines children's reactions to the divorce process and explores ways in which adults can promote growth and adjustment in children of divorce. Suggests ways in which parents, teachers, and counselors can help children. (RC)

  4. Horses Helping Children Grow

    Graham, Louise B.; Lindsey, Allison

    2017-01-01

    A review of Animal-Assisted Therapy and related terms such as "Animal-Assisted Activities" is presented as an introduction to the exploration of additional equine applications with children. Animal-Assisted Therapy has been studied, but Animal-Assisted Activities with children facing normal developmental struggles has not received much…

  5. Helping Children Cooperate

    Pica, Rae

    2011-01-01

    There are occasions in life when the competitive process is appropriate. But when people consider the relationships in their lives--with friends, family members, coworkers, and the larger community--they realize the value of cooperation. When adults give children the chance to cooperate, to work together toward a solution or a common goal like…

  6. Grief: Helping Young Children Cope

    Wood, Frances B.

    2008-01-01

    In their role as caregivers supporting the children they teach, it is important for teachers to understand the grieving process and recognize symptoms of grief. The author explains Elisabeth Kubler-Ross's five stages of grief and offers 10 classroom strategies to help young children cope with their feelings.

  7. Sugarcane outgrowers in Ethiopia: ’Forced’ to remain poor?

    Mengistu Assefa Wendimu; Arne Henningsen; Peter Gibbon

    2015-01-01

    Contract farming is often seen as a panacea to many of the challenges faced by agricultural production in developing countries. Given the large heterogeneity of contract farming arrangements, it is debatable whether all kinds of contract farming arrangements offer benefits to participating smallholders. We apply matching methods to analyze the effects of a public sugarcane outgrower scheme in Ethiopia. Participation in the outgrower scheme significantly reduces the income and asset stocks of ...

  8. Helping Elementary Teachers Understand Children and Divorce.

    Hrymak, Marilyn J.; Smart, Laura S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a workshop designed to help elementary teachers understand the recent literature on the effects of divorce on children and help the children through the crisis. Indicates that secondary home economics teachers may have to deal with students who have not adjusted to divorce. (JOW)

  9. Helping Young Children in Frightening Times.

    Young Children, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents ways parents and other adults can help young children deal with tragedy and violence in the wake of terrorist attacks on the United States. Suggests giving reassurance and physical comfort, providing structure and stability, expecting a range of reactions, helping children to talk if they are ready, turning off the television, and…

  10. Helping Children Explore Their Roots.

    Marsh, Mary L.

    1986-01-01

    Ways children can approach genealogical research are described, beginning with questionning older relatives and leading to libraries and census tract data. There is a certain romance and much pride in the lives of people who lived through great periods of history. (MT)

  11. Large-Scale Agriculture and Outgrower Schemes in Ethiopia

    Wendimu, Mengistu Assefa

    , the impact of large-scale agriculture and outgrower schemes on productivity, household welfare and wages in developing countries is highly contentious. Chapter 1 of this thesis provides an introduction to the study, while also reviewing the key debate in the contemporary land ‘grabbing’ and historical large...... sugarcane outgrower scheme on household income and asset stocks. Chapter 5 examines the wages and working conditions in ‘formal’ large-scale and ‘informal’ small-scale irrigated agriculture. The results in Chapter 2 show that moisture stress, the use of untested planting materials, and conflict over land...... commands a higher wage than ‘formal’ large-scale agriculture, while rather different wage determination mechanisms exist in the two sectors. Human capital characteristics (education and experience) partly explain the differences in wages within the formal sector, but play no significant role...

  12. Helping children express grief through symbolic communication.

    Segal, R M

    1984-12-01

    Communication barriers erected by grieving children delay problem resolution. Use of the expressive arts--music, art, and body movement--in symbolic communication helps them to express overwhelming feelings and cope with trauma and stress.

  13. Helping Children Develop Resiliency: Providing Supportive Relationships

    Kersey, Katharine C.; Malley, Catherine Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Helping children develop resiliency begins with positive, meaningful connections between teachers and students. This article defines the importance of encouraging children to develop characteristics related to resiliency including confidence in their ability to bounce back from setbacks, overcome challenges and frustrations. Furthermore, critical…

  14. Helping Nevada School Children Become Sun Smart

    This podcast features Christine Thompson, Community Programs Manager at the Nevada Cancer Coalition, and author of a recent study detailing a school-based program to help Nevada school children establish healthy sun safety habits and decrease UV exposure. Christine answers questions about her research and what impact her what impact the program had on children's skin health.

  15. Parental Money Help to Children and Stepchildren.

    Henretta, John C; Van Voorhis, Matthew F; Soldo, Beth J

    2014-07-01

    Divorce and remarriage have reshaped the American family giving rise to questions about the place of stepchildren in remarried families. In this article, we examine money transfers from a couple to each of their children. We introduce characteristics of the family and estimate the role of shared family membership affecting all children in the family as well as the difference that stepchild status and other individual characteristics make in transfer flows. Data are from the Health and Retirement Study. There are two central results in the analysis. Overall, provision of financial help from parents to children is a family phenomenon. While help to a particular child is episodic, differences between families in provision of help were much greater than the differences in helping one child versus another within families. Second, stepchild status does differentiate one child from another within a family. Stepchildren are disadvantaged, particularly stepchildren of the wife.

  16. Helping Young Children See Math in Play

    Parks, Amy Noelle; Blom, Diana Chang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for recognizing meaningful mathematics in common play contexts in early childhood classrooms and to offer suggestions for how teachers might intervene in these moments to help children attend to the mathematical ideas embedded in their play. In particular, the author's focus on the concepts of…

  17. How Computer Games Help Children Learn

    Shaffer, David Williamson

    2008-01-01

    This book looks at how particular video and computer games--such as "Digital Zoo", "The Pandora Project", "SodaConstructor", and more--can help teach children and students to think like doctors, lawyers, engineers, urban planners, journalists, and other professionals. In the process, new "smart games" will give them the knowledge and skills they…

  18. Helping Nevada School Children Become Sun Smart

    2017-11-28

    This podcast features Christine Thompson, Community Programs Manager at the Nevada Cancer Coalition, and author of a recent study detailing a school-based program to help Nevada school children establish healthy sun safety habits and decrease UV exposure. Christine answers questions about her research and what impact her what impact the program had on children’s skin health.  Created: 11/28/2017 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/28/2017.

  19. Parenting from prison: helping children and mothers.

    Thompson, P J; Harm, N J

    2000-01-01

    Incarceration of a mother disrupts the mother-child relationship and the child's emotional development. The researchers evaluated a 15-week parenting program in a women's prison that was designed to enhance mother-child interactions during imprisonment. Pre- and postmeasures for the 104 women were Hudson's (1982) Index of Self-Esteem, Bavolek's (1984) Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory, and semistructured questionnaires. Self-esteem and attitudes about expectations of children, corporal punishment, and family roles improved significantly. Empathy and mother-child interactions through visits and letters improved. Participants identified the most helpful components of the program. Those who had been physically, sexually, and emotionally abused and those who had used drugs and alcohol had positive results. Findings support the value of parent education for self-development of incarcerated mothers and for the welfare of their children.

  20. Children's Recognition of Pride and Guilt as Consequences of Helping and Not Helping.

    Shorr, David N.; McClelland, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between young children's age and their recognition that helping or choosing not to help can cause feelings of pride or guilt. Found age differences in identifying helping-action or inaction as causes, but little support for the hypothesis that identification of guilt as a consequence of not helping would…

  1. Parent Guidelines for Helping Children After an Earthquake

    Parent Guidelines for Helping Children after an Earthquake Being in an earthquake is very frightening, and the days, weeks, and months following are very stressful. Your children and family will recover ...

  2. What Schools Are Doing To Help the Children of Divorce.

    Sammons, William A. H.; Lewis, Jennifer M.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how teachers' observations of children can help behavioral pediatricians identify family situations contributing to marked changes in children's behavior related to divorce. Discusses ways teachers can support children of divorce, including maintaining consistency and discipline, making children feel competent, listening to the child's…

  3. Pseudoinefficacy: negative feelings from children who cannot be helped reduce warm glow for children who can be helped.

    Västfjäll, Daniel; Slovic, Paul; Mayorga, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    In a great many situations where we are asked to aid persons whose lives are endangered, we are not able to help everyone. What are the emotional and motivational consequences of "not helping all"? In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that negative affect arising from children that could not be helped decreases the warm glow of positive feeling associated with aiding the children who can be helped. This demotivation from the children outside of our reach may be a form of "pseudoinefficacy" that is non-rational. We should not be deterred from helping whomever we can because there are others we are not able to help.

  4. Pseudoinefficacy: Negative feelings from children who cannot be helped reduce warm glow for children who can be helped

    Daniel eVästfjäll

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In a great many situations where we are asked to aid persons whose lives are endangered, we are not able to help everyone. What are the emotional and motivational consequences of not helping all? In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that negative affect arising from children that could not be helped decreases the warm glow of positive feeling associated with aiding the children who can be helped. This demotivation from the children outside of our reach may be a form of pseudoinefficacy that is nonrational. We should not be deterred from helping whomever we can because there are others we are not able to help.

  5. Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests

    ... Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Tips to Help Children through Their Medical Tests Send Us Your ... them through the procedure. A caring grownup can help the child cope with any physical pain or ...

  6. Helping Children Deal with the Nuclear Threat.

    Schirmer, Peggy

    1982-01-01

    Suggests how elementary school teachers can address the topic of nuclear warfare with young children. Emphasizes that educating children for peace requires that parents and teachers (1) recognize and deal with the anxieties provoked by nuclear war and that (2) they provide role models by participating in the antinuclear movement. (GC)

  7. A guide to help children understand cancer

    ... approach will depend on your child's age and maturity. Here is a general guide. CHILDREN AGES 0 ... child understands cancer. www.cancer.net/coping-and-emotions/communicating-loved-ones/how-child-understands-cancer . Updated ...

  8. Helping Children Exposed to Domestic Violence

    ... for Families - Vietnamese Spanish Facts for Families Guide Domestic Violence and Children No. 109; Updated April 2013 As ... each year. This kind of violence is called domestic violence or intimate partner violence. The US Department of ...

  9. Training Helps Autistic Children Emerge from Solitude

    1994-01-01

    Amother considers her child to be a continuation of her own life, and places her own desires that she cannot achieve on her child. A child is a mother’s sun, a mother’s hope. In this world, however, there exists another group of mothers whose children have autism. These children act as if they are completely alone, do not interact with others, and even refuse the love of

  10. Safety and Children: How Schools Can Help.

    Hatkoff, Amy

    1994-01-01

    Explores the role that schools can play in providing direction, guidance, and support to children and adolescents in the face of growing violence in society and in schools. Discusses the development and implementation of preventive measures such as additions to the curriculum, mentoring programs, child abuse and neglect programs, parent education,…

  11. Helping Parents Reduce Children's Television Viewing

    Jason, Leonard A.; Fries, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Parents and educators around the country are concerned about the amount of time children watch television. Part of this concern stems from the fact that a considerable amount of violence is regularly portrayed on television. In addition, those youngsters who watch an excessive amount of television have little time for developing other interests…

  12. Icon arrays help younger children's proportional reasoning.

    Ruggeri, Azzurra; Vagharchakian, Laurianne; Xu, Fei

    2018-06-01

    We investigated the effects of two context variables, presentation format (icon arrays or numerical frequencies) and time limitation (limited or unlimited time), on the proportional reasoning abilities of children aged 7 and 10 years, as well as adults. Participants had to select, between two sets of tokens, the one that offered the highest likelihood of drawing a gold token, that is, the set of elements with the greater proportion of gold tokens. Results show that participants performed better in the unlimited time condition. Moreover, besides a general developmental improvement in accuracy, our results show that younger children performed better when proportions were presented as icon arrays, whereas older children and adults were similarly accurate in the two presentation format conditions. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? There is a developmental improvement in proportional reasoning accuracy. Icon arrays facilitate reasoning in adults with low numeracy. What does this study add? Participants were more accurate when they were given more time to make the proportional judgement. Younger children's proportional reasoning was more accurate when they were presented with icon arrays. Proportional reasoning abilities correlate with working memory, approximate number system, and subitizing skills. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  13. Questions Children Ask: Helping Children Adjust When a Parent Has Kidney Failure

    ... Advocacy Donate A to Z Health Guide Questions Children Ask: Helping Children Adjust When a Parent Has Kidney Failure Print ... future plans. If a parent develops kidney failure, children have questions too. Some children are outspoken and ...

  14. Helping Young Children become Citizens of the World

    Swiniarski, Louise Boyle

    2006-01-01

    Global education gives a framework for teaching children the responsibilities of being world citizen. It helps children find their place in the world community, where they accept differences among cultures and people. It should not be an add-on activity, or a once a year event, but one that integrates international themes into daily curriculum. In…

  15. Young Children Help Others to Achieve Their Social Goals

    Beier, Jonathan S.; Over, Harriet; Carpenter, Malinda

    2014-01-01

    From early in development, humans have strong prosocial tendencies. Much research has documented young children's propensity to help others achieve their unfulfilled goals toward physical objects. Yet many of our most common and important goals are social--directed toward other people. Here we demonstrate that children are also inclined, and able,…

  16. Crossing a Broad Gray Line to Help Children

    Allen, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    Helping students with mental health issues sometimes presents teachers with the dilemma of following the letter of school rules or doing what is best for the child. One teacher tells her story of crossing such lines, but only in service to children. She also outlines what teachers can and should do to help students who need mental health services.

  17. Helping Children Cope with Fears: Using Children's Literature in Classroom Guidance.

    Nicholson, Janice I.; Pearson, Quinn M.

    2003-01-01

    Many children are dealing with adult fears, such as death, crime, and war at early ages. School counselors can help children cope with these fears using stories from children's literature. The role that children's literature can play in teaching these coping skills is discussed along with strategies for choosing books. (Contains 33 references.)…

  18. Development: Ages & Stages--Helping Children Manage Fears

    Poole, Carla; Miller, Susan A.; Church, Ellen Booth

    2004-01-01

    By watching, listening, and offering gentle reassurance, you can help young children work through their fears. Sudden noises, movement, or unfamiliar people often frighten babies. After 12 months of nurturing experiences with familiar teachers and routines, a baby is more prepared and less easily startled. Preschoolers have a variety of fears such…

  19. Helping Children Learn Vocabulary during Computer-Assisted Oral Reading

    Gregory Aist

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses an indispensable skill using a unique method to teach a critical component: helping children learn to read by using computer-assisted oral reading to help children learn vocabulary. We build on Project LISTEN’s Reading Tutor, a computer program that adapts automatic speech recognition to listen to children read aloud, and helps them learn to read (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~listen. To learn a word from reading with the Reading Tutor, students must encounter the word and learn the meaning of the word in context. We modified the Reading Tutor first to help students encounter new words and then to help them learn the meanings of new words. We then compared the Reading Tutor to classroom instruction and to human-assisted oral reading as part of a yearlong study with 144 second and third graders. The result: Second graders did about the same on word comprehension in all three conditions. However, third graders who read with the 1999 Reading Tutor, modified as described in this paper, performed statistically significantly better than other third graders in a classroom control on word comprehension gains – and even comparably with other third graders who read one-on-one with human tutors.

  20. Helping Children and Families Deal With Divorce and Separation.

    Cohen, George J; Weitzman, Carol C

    2016-12-01

    For the past several years in the United States, there have been more than 800 000 divorces and parent separations annually, with over 1 million children affected. Children and their parents can experience emotional trauma before, during, and after a separation or divorce. Pediatricians can be aware of their patients' behavior and parental attitudes and behaviors that may indicate family dysfunction and that can indicate need for intervention. Age-appropriate explanation and counseling for the child and advice and guidance for the parents, as well as recommendation of reading material, may help reduce the potential negative effects of divorce. Often, referral to professionals with expertise in the social, emotional, and legal aspects of the separation and its aftermath may be helpful for these families. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. The Children of the Night need your help

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The “Children of the Night” is a colloquial name given to children suffering from Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a genetic disorder that causes extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light. When affected individuals are exposed to the sun, their skin undergoes alterations that can quickly develop into cancer. Special equipment has been developed to protect them from UV exposure but it is uncomfortable and very expensive. The association THE Port has a project to help the children afflicted by the disorder and their families and is looking for experts who can contribute.   Visiting the Synchrocyclotron. Their homes are kept in darkness and they leave them only at nighttime. During the day they can’t go anywhere without a special suit that protects their skin and eyes from the sun’s rays. Mutant genes in their DNA impair their bodies’ capacity to repair and accurately replicate DNA damaged by UV light. This deficiency causes cancers to develo...

  2. SELF-HELP GROUPS FOR PARENTS WITH MENTALLY RETARDED CHILDREN

    Vaska STANCHEVA-POPKOSTADINOVA

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available This presentation concerns a group for parents of mentally retarded children.A group of these parents receives professional help and environmental support. The parents are encouraged to assume responsibility in the everyday life educational process of their children.As Baker / 1980 / states: “ If parents cope better on daily basis with the child who has mental retardation, not only the child but also the parents would benefit”.Taking part in the group gave the parents:· the opportunity to meet other parents with the same children;· to talk to other parents and feel less isolated;· to share information and experiences, skills and ideas;· the opportunity to listen to the needs and problems of other parents;· to change the ways of working to meet the child’s needs;· share information about the possibilities of education and services;· parents are encouraged to meet together to support one another;· parents need a special approach to many problems existing in their families.· the education in the group puts the beginning of the work with the parents.The idea is to gather the efforts of specialists from different fields and to establish multi-disciplinary group aiming to work with the parents and create a good collaboration and partnership between them in order to improve the living conditions and services to the retarded persons.This paper reports on the development, evaluation and dissemination of the program for education of parents with mentally retarded children. At the Symposium we will be able to present the results of the effectiveness of the education.

  3. Ten Tips for Parents to Help Their Children Avoid Teen Pregnancy

    ... we do » Resource library » Ten tips for parents Ten Tips for Parents to Help Their Children Avoid Teen Pregnancy Publication Created with Sketch. Ten Tips for Parents to Help Their Children Avoid ...

  4. Issues and Strategies Involved in Helping Homeless Parents of Young Children Strengthen Their Self-Esteem

    Swick, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Homeless parents of young children face many stressors that erode their self-esteem. This article articulates these stressors and how they negatively impact homeless parents and their children. Strategies for helping parents empower themselves and their children are explained.

  5. Children's reasoning about the refusal to help : The role of need, costs, and social perspective taking

    Sierksma, Jellie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357399609; Thijs, Jochem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/187457344; Verkuijten, Maykel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073378542; Komter, Aafke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070789282

    2014-01-01

    Children (n = 133, aged 8-13) were interviewed about helping situations that systematically varied in recipient's need for help and the costs for the helper. In situations where helping a peer involved low costs, children perceived a moral obligation to help that was independent of peer norms,

  6. Children's Reasoning About the Refusal to Help: The Role of Need, Costs, and Social Perspective Taking

    Sierksma, J.; Thijs, J.T.; Verkuyten, M.J.A.M.; Komter, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Children (n=133, aged 8-13) were interviewed about helping situations that systematically varied in recipient's need for help and the costs for the helper. In situations where helping a peer involved low costs, children perceived a moral obligation to help that was independent of peer norms,

  7. The Role of Baked Egg and Milk in the Diets of Allergic Children.

    Robinson, Melissa L; Lanser, Bruce J

    2018-02-01

    Baked egg and baked milk are tolerated by most children who are allergic to hen's egg and cow's milk. Incorporating baked goods into the diets of allergic children may help them outgrow their primary allergy more quickly, with changes observed akin to immunotherapy. Benefits may also include increased quality of life and improved nutritional status. The search for a reliable biomarker to predict tolerance to baked goods is ongoing. Most children with a milk or egg allergy who are not previously tolerating egg or milk in baked goods should be offered an observed oral food challenge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Techno-Economic Models for Optimised Utilisation of Jatropha curcas Linnaeus under an Out-Grower Farming Scheme in Ghana

    Isaac Osei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Techno-economic models for optimised utilisation of jatropha oil under an out-grower farming scheme were developed based on different considerations for oil and by-product utilisation. Model 1: Out-grower scheme where oil is exported and press cake utilised for compost. Model 2: Out-grower scheme with six scenarios considered for the utilisation of oil and by-products. Linear programming models were developed based on outcomes of the models to optimise the use of the oil through profit maximisation. The findings revealed that Model 1 was financially viable from the processors’ perspective but not for the farmer at seed price of $0.07/kg. All scenarios considered under Model 2 were financially viable from the processors perspective but not for the farmer at seed price of $0.07/kg; however, at seed price of $0.085/kg, financial viability was achieved for both parties. Optimising the utilisation of the oil resulted in an annual maximum profit of $123,300.

  9. 'Between the woods and the water' – The policy and legislative environment for outgrowing at the regional level: KwaZulu–Natal

    Zingel, J

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available in the privatisation of state forestry assets, but the process is unlikely to lead to a deeper empowerment and redistribution towards local outgrower and contractor interests, since the criteria allow for city based interests to access the associated equity, which... at reducing gearing and commitments in land); where existing outgrowing interests such as the stronger growers, sharecroppers and contractors can be accomodated in development companies driven by specialist managers, and which do not devolve ownership...

  10. Helping Children with Disabilities Cope with Disaster and Traumatic Events

    ... Events General Information Caring for Children in a Disaster This web site from CDC has information for families, schools, and healthcare providers during and after crises and disasters. Children and Youth—SAMHSA Disaster Behavioral Health Information ...

  11. Children's intergroup helping: The role of empathy and peer group norms

    Sierksma, Jellie; Thijs, Jochem; Verkuijten, Maykel

    2014-01-01

    Two studies examined children's (8- to 13-year-olds) intergroup helping intentions. In Study 1, 856 children indicated their intention to help national in-group or out-group peers in a high need situation and in either a public or private context. Results showed that children's empathic tendencies

  12. In-group bias in children's intention to help can be overpowered by inducing empathy

    Sierksma, J.; Thijs, J.T.; Verkuyten, M.J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental vignette study was conducted among children (8-13years) to examine whether inducing empathic understanding is an effective intervention to overpower peer group boundaries in children's helping. Children were induced or not induced to empathize with the recipient of help, who was or

  13. Helping Foster Children in School: A Guide for Foster Parents, Social Workers and Teachers

    DeGarmo, John

    2015-01-01

    "Helping Foster Children in School" explores the challenges that foster children face in schools and offers positive and practical guidance tailored to help the parents, teachers and social workers supporting them. Children in care often perform poorly at school both in terms of their behavior and their academic performance, with many…

  14. Mechanism of the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucoside by germinating and outgrowing spores of Bacillus species.

    Setlow, B; Cabrera-Martinez, R-M; Setlow, P

    2004-01-01

    To determine the mechanism of the hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (beta-MUG) by germinating and outgrowing spores of Bacillus species. Spores of B. atrophaeus (formerly B. subtilis var. niger, Fritze and Pukall 2001) are used as biological indicators of the efficacy of ethylene oxide sterilization by measurement of beta-MUG hydrolysis during spore germination and outgrowth. It was previously shown that beta-MUG is hydrolysed to 4-methylumbelliferone (MU) during the germination and outgrowth of B. atrophaeus spores (Chandrapati and Woodson 2003), and this was also the case with spores of B. subtilis 168. Germination of spores of either B. atrophaeus or B. subtilis with chloramphenicol reduced beta-MUG hydrolysis by almost 99%, indicating that proteins needed for rapid beta-MUG hydrolysis are synthesized during spore outgrowth. However, the residual beta-MUG hydrolysis during spore germination with chloramphenicol indicated that dormant spores contain low levels of proteins needed for beta-MUG uptake and hydrolysis. With B. subtilis 168 spores that lacked several general proteins of the phosphotransferase system (PTS) for sugar uptake, beta-MUG hydrolysis during spore germination and outgrowth was decreased >99.9%. This indicated that beta-MUG is taken up by the PTS, resulting in the intracellular accumulation of the phosphorylated form of beta-MUG, beta-MUG-6-phosphate (beta-MUG-P). This was further demonstrated by the lack of detectable glucosidase activity on beta-MUG in dormant, germinated and outgrowing spore extracts, while phosphoglucosidase active on beta-MUG-P was readily detected. Dormant B. subtilis 168 spores had low levels of at least four phosphoglucosidases active on beta-MUG-P: BglA, BglH, BglC (originally called YckE) and BglD (originally called YdhP). These enzymes were also detected in spores germinating and outgrowing with beta-MUG, but levels of BglH were the highest, as this enzyme's synthesis was induced ca 100-fold

  15. Helping children and adults cope with parental infidelity.

    Lusterman, Don-David

    2005-11-01

    This article addresses the impact of discovered marital infidelity on the couple's young children, adolescents, and adult children. It distinguishes between two types of infidelity, affairs and womanizing, and suggests differential treatments for each. Treatment must address the impact of the secrecy, which is always part of infidelity, and the boundary violations that occur when a child is directly involved in the infidelity or in its aftermath. Four clinical cases illustrate therapeutic interventions for children suffering from their parent's infidelity.

  16. Bribes for Behaving: Why Behaviorism Doesn't Help Children Become Good People.

    Kohn, Alfie

    1994-01-01

    Argues against using punishment and rewards to motivate children, maintaining that, although penalties and prizes may change behavior in the short term, they do not help children become responsible decision makers in the long term. (MDM)

  17. Weight-based Teasing and Bullying in Children: How Parents Can Help

    ... Weight-based Teasing and Bullying in Children: How Parents Can Help Page Content Children with obesity have to deal with many challenges beyond pressures to lose weight. They may also be teased ...

  18. Bounded helping : How morality and intergroup relations shape children's reasoning about helping

    Sierksma, J.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this book was to provide insight into children’s (8-13 years) cognition about helping behavior. Whereas developmental research has examined children’s prosociality in terms of dispositions and abilities, it tends to overlook the relation between recipient and helper as well as the

  19. Helping Mixed Heritage Children Develop "Character and Resilience" in Schools

    Lewis, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    Recent UK government policy suggests that all schools have a key role to play in building "character and resilience" in children. This article draws on data from a wider research project, exploring the school experiences of mixed White/Black Caribbean and mixed White/Black African children in two London secondary schools. Because data…

  20. Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in the Montessori Classroom: Introduction

    Nehring Massie, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Catherine Nehring Massie provides important contextual information in considering children with attentional challenges. She discusses the prevalence of attentional challenges in today's culture and the contributing factors. She gives a general overview of the spectrum of attentional challenges and some of the indicators in children. Her history of…

  1. What Kind of School Board Member Would Help Homeless Children?

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1989-01-01

    Homelessness is a growing problem in every part of the United States. Federal legislation requires state plans for educating homeless children, but will provide less than $23 per child. Summarizes some of the state plans and suggests steps school boards can take to provide homeless children with public education. (MLF)

  2. The Heterogeneity of Children of Alcoholics: Emotional Needs and Help-Seeking Propensity.

    Hinson, Renee C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined parental alcoholism and help-seeking behavior in college students classified as children of alcoholics (COAs, n=83), Help-seeking COAs (n=51), Controls (n=86), and Help-seeking Controls (n=90). Findings revealed that help-seeking appeared to be the more significant variable for discriminating differences in emotional needs of college…

  3. Helping yourself helps others: Linking children's emotion regulation to prosocial behavior through sympathy and trust.

    Song, Ju-Hyun; Colasante, Tyler; Malti, Tina

    2018-06-01

    Although emotionally well-regulated children are more likely to behave prosocially, the psychological processes that connect their emotion regulation abilities and prosocial behavior are less clear. We tested if other-oriented sympathy and trust mediated the links between emotion regulation capacities (i.e., resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA], negative emotional intensity, and sadness regulation) and prosocial behavior in an ethnically diverse sample of 4- and 8-year-olds (N = 131; 49% girls). Resting RSA was calculated from children's electrocardiogram data in response to a nondescript video. Sympathy was child and caregiver reported, whereas negative emotional intensity, sadness regulation, trust, and prosocial behavior were caregiver reported. Regardless of age, higher resting RSA was linked to higher sympathy, which was associated with higher prosocial behavior. The positive link between sadness regulation and prosocial behavior was mediated by higher sympathy and trust. Children's other-oriented psychological processes may play important roles in translating certain emotion regulation capacities into prosocial behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Helping Emotionally Disturbed Children Deal with the Separation Process.

    Kreger, Robert D.; Kreger, Linda R.

    1989-01-01

    The article presents examples of emotionally disturbed children's reactions to separation from a teacher with whom they have become involved. Suggestions are offered for facilitating healthy separation from the teacher. (JDD)

  5. Children's Sympathy, Guilt, and Moral Reasoning in Helping, Cooperation, and Sharing: A 6-Year Longitudinal Study

    Malti, Tina; Ongley, Sophia F.; Peplak, Joanna; Chaparro, Maria P.; Buchmann, Marlis; Zuffianò, Antonio; Cui, Lixian

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the role of sympathy, guilt, and moral reasoning in helping, cooperation, and sharing in a 6-year, three-wave longitudinal study involving 175 children (M[subscript age] 6.10, 9.18, and 12.18 years). Primary caregivers reported on children's helping and cooperation; sharing was assessed behaviorally. Child sympathy was assessed…

  6. Helping to alleviate pain for children having venepuncture.

    Gilboy, Siobhan

    2009-10-01

    This article reviews the literature on venepuncture and children. The evidence on the use of topical agents namely tetracaine (amethocaine) gel and lidocaine\\/prilocaine cream is discussed, along with the use and benefits of distraction techniques and parental presence to make this an easier procedure for the child, their families and the nurse.

  7. Birthday Cake Activity Structured Arrangement for Helping Children Determining Quantities

    Mariana, Neni

    2010-01-01

    Few researches have been concerned about relation between children's spatial thinking and number sense. Narrowing for this small research, we focused on one component of spatial thinking, that is structuring objects, and one component of number senses, that is cardinality by determining quantities. This study focused on a design research that was…

  8. Task Persistence Mediates the Effect of Children's Literacy Skills on Mothers' Academic Help

    Kikas, Eve; Silinskas, Gintautas

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed at examining the relationship between children's task persistence, mothers' academic help, and the development of children's literacy skills (reading and spelling) at the beginning of primary school. The participants were 870 children, 682 mothers, and 53 class teachers. Data were collected three times--at the…

  9. The Social Organisation of Help during Young Children's Use of the Computer

    Davidson, Christina

    2012-01-01

    This article examines some of the ways that young children seek and provide help through social interaction during use of the computer in the home. Although social interaction is considered an important aspect of young children's use of computers, there are still few studies that provide detailed analysis of how young children accomplish that…

  10. Technology Can Help Young Children Succeed. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c70

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with disabilities are discovering that carefully selected computer software and mobile apps can provide many benefits such as improved self-esteem, a longer attention span, and inclusion among family and other children that help their children succeed at home and in school. PACER's Simon Technology Center (STC) can help…

  11. Parental Presence and Encouragement Do Not Influence Helping in Young Children

    Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Young children begin helping others with simple instrumental problems from soon after their first birthdays. In previous observations of this phenomenon, both naturalistic and experimental, children's parents were in the room and could potentially have influenced their behavior. In the two current studies, we gave 24-month-old children the…

  12. The ethnography of help - Supporting families with children with intellectual disabilities

    Summers, N.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis explored parents’ of children with learning disabilities perceptions of family support workers’ helping strategies. A qualitative approach drawing on the principles of ethnography was used to explore the experiences of six families of the helping strategies adopted by family workers and posed three research questions:\\ud (1) What are the perceptions of parents, of children with learning disabilities, of the helping strategies of family support workers?\\ud (2) How do parents unders...

  13. The relation between young children's physiological arousal and their motivation to help others.

    Hepach, Robert; Vaish, Amrisha; Müller, Katharina; Tomasello, Michael

    2017-10-10

    Children are motivated to help others from an early age. However, little is known about the internal biological mechanisms underlying their motivation to help. Here, we compiled data from five separate studies in which children, ranging in age from 18 months to 5.5 years, witnessed an adult needing help. In all studies, we assessed both (1) children's internal physiological arousal via changes in their pupil dilation, and (2) the latency and likelihood of them providing help. The results showed that the greater the baseline-corrected change in children's internal arousal in response to witnessing the need situation, the faster and more likely children were to help the adult. This was not the case for the baseline measure of children's tonic arousal state. Together, these results suggest that children's propensity to help is systematically related to their physiological arousal after they witness others needing help. This sheds new light on the biological mechanisms underlying not only young children's social perception but also their prosocial motivation more generally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. BIRTHDAY CAKE ACTIVITY STRUCTURED ARRANGEMENT FOR HELPING CHILDREN DETERMINING QUANTITIES

    Neni Mariana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Few researches have been concerned about relation between children’s spatialthinking and number sense. Narrowing for this small research, we focused onone component of spatial thinking, that is structuring objects, and onecomponent of number senses, that is cardinality by determining quantities. Thisstudy focused on a design research that was conducted in Indonesia in which weinvestigated pre-school children’s (between 2 and 3.5 years old ability inmaking structured arrangement and their ability to determine the quantities bylooking at the arrangements. The result shows us that some of the children wereable to make such arrangement. However, the children found difficulties eitherto determine quantities from those arrangements or to compare some structuresto easily recognize number of objects.Keywords: structures, structured arrangement, cardinality DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.1.1.790.53-70

  15. Birthday Cake Activity Structured Arrangement for Helping Children Determining Quantities

    Neni Mariana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Few researches have been concerned about relation between children’s spatial thinking and number sense. Narrowing for this small research, we focused on one component of spatial thinking, that is structuring objects, and one component of number senses, that is cardinality by determining quantities. This study focused on a design research that was conducted in Indonesia in which we investigated pre-school children’s (between 2 and 3.5 years old ability in making structured arrangement and their ability to determine the quantities by looking at the arrangements. The result shows us that some of the children were able to make such arrangement. However, the children found difficulties either to determine quantities from those arrangements or to compare some structures to easily recognize number of objects.

  16. What You Want Versus What's Good for You: Paternalistic Motivation in Children's Helping Behavior.

    Martin, Alia; Lin, Kelsey; Olson, Kristina R

    2016-11-01

    Children help others to complete their goals. Yet adults are sometimes motivated to help others in a "paternalistic" way, overriding a recipient's desires if they conflict with the recipient's best interests. Experiments investigated whether 5-year-olds (n = 100) consider a recipient's desire, and the consequences of fulfilling this desire, when helping. Children overrode a request for chocolate in favor of giving fruit snacks, if chocolate would make the recipient sick. Children did not override a request for chocolate in favor of carrots, even if chocolate would make the recipient sick, but they gave carrots if the recipient requested them. By age 5, children balance different motivations when helping, considering the recipient's desires, consequences of fulfilling them, and alternative forms of helping available. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  17. Drug use among street children and adolescents: what helps?

    Yone Gonçalves de Moura

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated to frequent and heavy drug use among street children and adolescents aged 10 to 18 years. A sample of 2,807 street children and adolescents from the 27 Brazilian state capital cities was analyzed. A World Health Organization questionnaire for non-students was adapted for use in Brazil. Data analysis was performed using logistic regression and decision tree models. Factors inversely associated with frequent and heavy drug use were: being age nine to 11 years (OR = 0.1; school attendance (OR = 0.3; daily time (one to five hours spent on the streets (OR = 0.3 and 0.4; not sleeping on the streets (OR = 0.4; being on the streets for less than one year (OR = 0.4; maintenance of some family bonds (OR = 0.5; presence on the streets of a family member (OR = 0.6; not suffering domestic violence (OR = 0.6; being female (OR = 0.8. All of these variables were significant at the p < 0.05 level. The findings suggest that being younger, having family bonds and engagement in school are important protective factors that affect drug use among this population and should be considered in the formulation of public policies.

  18. Helping activate children through the use of video games

    Lomax, Jørn Vollan

    2015-01-01

    The video games industry is now one of the biggest entertainment industries in the world. Forb es magazine estimates that the video game industry will sell games for 70 billion dollars by the end of 2015, and the biggest growth is in the mobile market. While most of the video game industry is creating games strictly for entertainment purp oses, there is a growing demand for games that can b e used for other applications. This pap er will lo ok into making games that help chi...

  19. Children's Exposure to Partner Violence in Homes Where Men Seek Help for Partner Violence Victimization.

    Douglas, Emily M; Hines, Denise A

    2016-05-01

    In the last several decades, the field of family violence has paid increasing attention to children's exposure to partner violence (CEPV). Most of this research has focused on the children of women seeking help for partner violence (PV) victimization. In this paper we examine exposure to PV among children of men who sought help for PV victimization ( n =408), as compared with children of men in a population-based sample ( n =666). We examined children's exposure to psychological, physical, and sexual PV and also examined CEPV that is perpetrated by women, men, or both partners. The results show that CEPV is higher among children of helpseeking men than among children of men from the population-based sample, and that most of that PV is perpetrated by the female partner. We did not find differences in CEPV based in child age or gender. We discuss implications for the field of family violence professionals.

  20. Oncofertility: A New Medical Specialty Helping Young Cancer Patients Have Children

    ... Oncofertility: A New Medical Specialty Helping Young Cancer Patients Have Children Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of ... old problem: the fertility needs of young cancer patients. The word itself was coined through NIH-sponsored ...

  1. Choosing Great Books for Babies: Helping Children Develop a Life-Long Love of Reading

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how a great choice of books could help children develop a life-long love of reading. Every teacher wants to boost a baby's chances in later success. The single most powerful tool a teacher has for awakening a deep love of books and learning is to read to children daily. Reading should become a loved, intimate activity filled…

  2. The Effectiveness of Supermarket Posters in Helping to Find Missing Children

    Lampinen, James Michael; Arnal, Jack; Hicks, Jason L.

    2009-01-01

    One approach used to help find missing children is to place posters of them at the exits of supermarkets. The present research addresses the question of how effective that approach is likely to be. Posters of 8 missing children were displayed on a bulletin board at a cooperating grocery store. Customers leaving the store completed a survey and…

  3. Dance Movement as a Way to Help Children Affected by War

    Levy, Fran J.; Ranjbar, Azita; Dean, Colleen Hearn

    2006-01-01

    In the midst of the violence of the 21st century, many children fear that they or someone they know will lose a relative or friend through terrorism. Professionals in dance movement therapy, dance education, and physical education can help children to overcome their fears in order to feel safe and to build self-esteem. This article examines how…

  4. Helping Children Succeed after Divorce: Building a Community-based Program in a Rural County.

    Johnson, Diane E.

    2000-01-01

    A court-mandated parent education course aimed at reducing effects of divorce on children was evaluated by 1,400 participants over 5 years. Most respondents highly recommended the course and said it helped them become aware of their children's point of view and how to prevent long-term emotional problems. (SK)

  5. Nightmare Help: A Guide for Adults Working with Children (Slide Talk).

    Wiseman, Ann Sayre

    This slide talk offers advice to adults to help children cope with nightmares. Children are encouraged (1) to assume power over the dream by drawing it; (2) separate the frightened part of the self from the problem-solving self; (3) let the picture describe the problem; (4) ask the picture to speak; (5) see how the dreamer's power matches the…

  6. Young Children Want to See Others Get the Help They Need

    Hepach, Robert; Vaish, Amrisha; Grossmann, Tobias; Tomasello, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Children's instrumental helping has sometimes been interpreted as a desire to complete action sequences or to restore the physical order of things. Two-year-old children (n = 51) selectively retrieved for an adult the object he needed rather than one he did not (but which equally served to restore the previous order of things), and those with…

  7. Effects of Peer Presence on Helping in Introverted and Extroverted Children.

    Suda, William; Fouts, Gregory

    1980-01-01

    In a simulated emergency situation, 38 introverted and 38 extroverted sixth-grade children were tested in the presence or absence of same-sex confederate peer. In the presence of a peer, more extroverts actively helped than introverts, with no difference occurring for children tested alone. Introverts and extroverts preferred passive and active…

  8. Help-Seeking After Domestic Violence: The Critical Role of Children.

    Rasool, Shahana

    2016-05-01

    Limited knowledge is available on the conditions that contribute to women's help-seeking after domestic violence in South Africa. Qualitative research conducted with 17 abused women in shelters in South Africa indicate that the best interests of children are influential both in women's decisions to stay in abusive relationships and to seek help. The personal decisions of women to seek help are influenced by powerful social discourses on the best interests of the child. Policy and practice that advocate for the best interests of the child need to prioritize the safety of both mothers and their children in domestic violence situations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Children's Intrinsic Motivation to Provide Help Themselves After Accidentally Harming Others.

    Hepach, Robert; Vaish, Amrisha; Tomasello, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Little is known about the flexibility of children's prosocial motivation. Here, 2- and 3-year-old children's (n = 128) internal arousal, as measured via changes in pupil dilation, was increased after they accidentally harmed a victim but were unable to repair the harm. If they were able to repair (or if they themselves did not cause the harm and the help was provided by someone else) their arousal subsided. This suggests that children are especially motivated to help those whom they have harmed, perhaps out of a sense of guilt and a desire to reconcile with them. Young children care not only about the well-being of others but also about the relationship they have with those who depend on their help. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  10. Telemedicine is helping the parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders living in remote and deprived areas.

    Stuckey, Ruth; Domingues-Montanari, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Telecommunication technologies are advancing rapidly with huge investment to improve infrastructure in rural areas. Telemedicine brings the benefits of telecommunication to healthcare, especially in resource-limited and remote communities. The recent literature on telemedicine in paediatrics will be reviewed, with particular focus on its application to help children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their families living in remote regions and/or low-income countries, and gaps identified for future research. Studies show that telemedicine can enable a family's access to appropriately qualified help that physically may only be available hundreds of miles away, helping to overcome geographic barriers. Telemedicine can also train parents and equip them with the knowledge and skills to better care for their children. Despite some technological barriers to implementation, telemedicine can help transform all stages of autism treatment. However, more studies are required in low- and middle-income countries to fully elucidate the benefits offered by telemedicine to autistic children and their families.

  11. Children's Reasoning about the Refusal to Help: The Role of Need, Costs, and Social Perspective Taking

    Sierksma, Jellie; Thijs, Jochem; Verkuyten, Maykel; Komter, Aafke

    2014-01-01

    Children (n = 133, aged 8-13) were interviewed about helping situations that systematically varied in recipient's need for help and the costs for the helper. In situations where helping a peer involved low costs, children perceived a moral obligation to help that was independent of peer norms, parental authority, and reciprocity…

  12. Children's and Adolescents' Accounts of Helping and Hurting Others: Lessons About the Development of Moral Agency.

    Recchia, Holly E; Wainryb, Cecilia; Bourne, Stacia; Pasupathi, Monisha

    2015-01-01

    This study examined children's and adolescents' narrative accounts of everyday experiences when they harmed and helped a friend. The sample included 100 participants divided into three age groups (7-, 11-, and 16-year-olds). Help narratives focused on the helping acts themselves and reasons for helping, whereas harm narratives included more references to consequences of acts and psychological conflicts. With age, however, youth increasingly described the consequences of helping. Reasons for harming others focused especially on the narrator's perspective whereas reasons for helping others were centered on others' perspectives. With age, youth increasingly drew self-related insights from their helpful, but not their harmful, actions. Results illuminate how reflections on prosocial and transgressive experiences may provide distinct opportunities for constructing moral agency. © 2015 The Authors. Child Development © 2015 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  13. Black and White Parents' Willingness to Seek Help for Children's Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms.

    Thurston, Idia B; Hardin, Robin; Decker, Kristina; Arnold, Trisha; Howell, Kathryn H; Phares, Vicky

    2018-01-01

    Understanding social and environmental factors that contribute to parental help-seeking intentions is an important step in addressing service underutilization for children in need of treatment. This study examined factors that contribute to parents' intentions to seek formal and informal help for child psychopathology (anxiety and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder [ADHD]). A total of 251 parents (N = 128 mothers, N = 123 fathers; 49% Black, 51% White) read 3 vignettes describing children with anxiety, ADHD, and no diagnosis. Measures of problem recognition, perceived barriers, and formal (pediatricians, psychologists, teachers) and informal (religious leaders, family/friends, self-help) help seeking were completed. Four separate hierarchical logistic regression models were used to examine parental help-seeking likelihood from formal and informal sources for internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Predictors were socioeconomic status, parent race, age, and sex, parent problem recognition (via study vignettes), and perceived barriers to mental health service utilization. Mothers were more likely than fathers to seek help from pediatricians, psychologists, teachers, and religious leaders for child anxiety and pediatricians, religious leaders, and self-help resources for child ADHD. Black parents were more likely to seek help from religious leaders and White parents were more likely to use self-help resources. Problem recognition was associated with greater intentions to seek help from almost all formal and informal sources (except from friends/family). Understanding factors that contribute to parental help seeking for child psychopathology is critical for increasing service utilization and reducing the negative effects of mental health problems. This study highlights the importance of decreasing help-seeking barriers and increasing problem recognition to improve health equity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Help seeking by parents in military families on behalf of their young children.

    O'Grady, Allison E Flittner; Wadsworth, Shelley MacDermid; Willerton, Elaine; Cardin, Jean-François; Topp, David; Mustillo, Sarah; Lester, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, many children have experienced a parental deployment, increasing their risk for emotional and behavioral problems. Research in the general population has shown that while many services are available for families with children experiencing problems, the rate of service utilization is low. This study examined help-seeking processes in military families in relation to children's problems. We collected data on emotional and behavioral problems from a sample of military parents with children ranging in age from zero to 10 years. While prevalence of children with problems was similar to prior research, results in this study suggested that military parents were alert to problems. Although military parents' help-seeking processes were similar to those documented in civilian studies in many respects, we did not find a significant gender difference in the recognition of problems. Furthermore, we found that children's experiences of deployment were related to use of services. Families who used services most often relied on primary care providers. These findings suggest military families are mindful of the possibility of their children having problems. In addition, many families utilize civilian services. Therefore, it is important to ensure that front-line civilian providers fully understand the context of military family issues. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Comic strips help children understand medical research: targeting the informed consent procedure to children's needs.

    Grootens-Wiegers, Petronella; de Vries, Martine C; van Beusekom, Mara M; van Dijck, Laura; van den Broek, Jos M

    2015-04-01

    Children involved in medical research often fail to comprehend essential research aspects. In order to improve information provision, a participatory approach was used to develop new information material explaining essential concepts of medical research. A draft of a comic strip was developed by a science communicator in collaboration with pediatricians. The draft was presented to children participating in a clinical trial and to two school classes. Children were consulted for further development in surveys and interviews. Subsequently, the material was revised and re-evaluated in four school classes with children of varying ages and educational levels. In the first evaluation, children provided feedback on the storyline, wording and layout. Children thought the comic strip was 'fun' and 'informative'. Understanding of 8 basic research aspects was on average 83% and all above 65%, illustrating that children understood and remembered key messages. A comic strip was developed to support the informed consent process. Children were consulted and provided feedback. The resulting material was well understood and accepted. Involving children in the development of information material can substantially contribute to the quality of the material. Children were excited to participate and to 'be a part of science'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evidence of Diplopia in Children's Headache Drawings Helps to Differentiate Pseudotumor Cerebri From Migraine.

    Lee, Erica B; Edelman, Fredrick S; Stafstrom, Carl E

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to determine whether children's headache drawings can distinguish between pseudotumor cerebri and migraine. Headache features associated with pseudotumor cerebri (pseudotumor; idiopathic intracranial hypertension) are nonspecific and are difficult to distinguish clinically from migraines. Children's headache drawings have a high predictive value for migraine versus nonmigraine headaches. We hypothesized that drawings could help to differentiate pediatric headaches due to pseudotumor cerebri from those associated with migraines. Children aged six to 18 years old attending university hospital pediatric neurology clinics were asked to draw a picture of how their headache feels. From our database of children's headache drawings, pictures by children with clinically diagnosed pseudotumor were compared with migraine drawings. Headache drawings of 21 children (16 females) with pseudotumor were compared with those of 518 children with migraine. Pseudotumor drawings depicted a variety of symptoms including pounding pain (n = 11), pressure-like pain (n = 3), photophobia (3), dizziness (1), and recumbency (1). Severe pain indicators included hammers, bombs, anvil, and vise grip. Positive visual phenomena included scintillations, scotomata, or blurring (n = 8). Negative visual phenomena included field defects (n = 2). Pseudotumor drawings were similar to migraine drawings except that 6 of 21 pseudotumor drawings (28.6%) depicted diplopia (crossed eyes, double images), whereas only three of 518 migraine drawings (0.6%) depicted diplopia (P drawings than migraine drawings. In all other respects, headache drawings by children with pseudotumor cerebri were similar to those drawn by children with migraine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Finding the Cause: Verbal Framing Helps Children Extract Causal Evidence Embedded in a Complex Scene

    Butler, Lucas P.; Markman, Ellen M.

    2012-01-01

    In making causal inferences, children must both identify a causal problem and selectively attend to meaningful evidence. Four experiments demonstrate that verbally framing an event ("Which animals make Lion laugh?") helps 4-year-olds extract evidence from a complex scene to make accurate causal inferences. Whereas framing was unnecessary when…

  18. Children's early helping in action: Piagetian developmental theory and early prosocial behavior.

    Hammond, Stuart I

    2014-01-01

    After a brief overview of recent research on early helping, outlining some central problems, and issues, this paper examines children's early helping through the lens of Piagetian moral and developmental theory, drawing on Piaget's "Moral Judgment of the Child" (Piaget, 1932/1997), "Play, Dreams, and Imitation in Childhood" (Piaget, 1945/1951), and the "Grasp of Consciousness" (Piaget, 1976). Piaget refers to a level of moral development in action that precedes heteronomous and autonomous moral reasoning. This action level allows children to begin to interact with people and objects. In his later work, Piaget explores the gradual construction of understanding from this activity level. Taken together, these elements of Piagetian theory provide a promising conceptual framework for understanding the development of early helping.

  19. Effects of Prosocial, Neutral, and Violent Video Games on Children's Helpful and Hurtful Behaviors.

    Saleem, Muniba; Anderson, Craig A; Gentile, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    Recent research reveals that playing prosocial video games increases prosocial cognitions, positive affect, and helpful behaviors [Gentile et al., 2009; Greitemeyer and Osswald, 2009, 2010, 2011]. These results are consistent with the social-cognitive models of social behavior such as the general learning model [Buckley and Anderson, 2006]. However, no experimental studies have examined such effects on children. Previous research on violent video games suggests that short-term effects of video games are largely based on priming of existing behavioral scripts. Thus, it is unclear whether younger children will show similar effects. This research had 9-14 years olds play a prosocial, neutral, or violent video game, and assessed helpful and hurtful behaviors simultaneously through a new tangram measure. Prosocial games increased helpful and decreased hurtful behavior, whereas violent games had the opposite effects. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Building Knowledge Structures by Testing Helps Children With Mathematical Learning Difficulty.

    Zhang, Yiyun; Zhou, Xinlin

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical learning difficulty (MLD) is prevalent in the development of mathematical abilities. Previous interventions for children with MLD have focused on number sense or basic mathematical skills. This study investigated whether mathematical performance of fifth grade children with MLD could be improved by developing knowledge structures by testing using a web-based curriculum learning system. A total of 142 children with MLD were recruited; half of the children were in the experimental group (using the system), and the other half were in the control group (not using the system). The children were encouraged to use the web-based learning system at home for at least a 15-min session, at least once a week, for one and a half months. The mean accumulated time of testing on the system for children in the experimental group was 56.2 min. Children in the experimental group had significantly higher scores on their final mathematical examination compared to the control group. The results suggest that web-based curriculum learning through testing that promotes the building of knowledge structures for a mathematical course was helpful for children with MLD. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2014.

  1. Children's Avoidance of Interrupting Others' Activities in Requesting Help: Cultural Aspects of Considerateness.

    Ruvalcaba, Omar; Rogoff, Barbara; López, Angélica; Correa-Chávez, Maricela; Gutiérrez, Kris

    2015-01-01

    To be able to collaborate skillfully, people need to coordinate well with others, taking into account how their actions fit with those of their partners. This is a key aspect of an approach to learning called Learning by Observing and Pitching In, hypothesized to be common in many Indigenous-heritage communities of the Americas. This chapter considers cultural values that emphasize considerateness and awareness of how one's actions impact others such as the Mexican cultural value of respeto and cultural differences in children's efforts to avoid interrupting others' activity. US Mexican-heritage children showed more evidence of avoiding interrupting the ongoing activity of an adult when they requested help, compared with European American children from families with extensive schooling experience. Most of the Mexican-heritage children's requests for help that gave evidence of avoiding interruption were made nonverbally, which may facilitate unobtrusive requests. There were no significant differences among children from two US Mexican-heritage backgrounds varying in experience with Western schooling and likely experience with Indigenous-American practices, suggesting that the Mexican cultural value of respeto and associated considerateness is widespread even among US Mexican-heritage families with extensive experience with Western schooling and life in the United States. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Rhythm of Life helping children to respond to their parents’ divorce

    Adriana Müller

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents and discusses a possibility of group intervention based on narrative therapy, specifically with the application of the methodology ‘Rhythm of Life'. The participants of this project were children of divorced parents, between 7 and 12 years old. Participants met once a week, in an 8-week program. The focus of these meetings was to build a safe identity territory, to talk about these problems, and to look for answers to their doubts. The methodology helped them to achieve these aims. This experience was positive for both the children and the outside witnesses, creating resonance in everyone who listens to their songs.

  3. Factors Mediating Dysphoric Moods and Help Seeking Behaviour Among Australian Parents of Children with Autism.

    Snow, Matthew; Donnelly, James

    2016-06-01

    This study compared levels of state affect, dysphoric mood, and parenting sense of competence in Australian parents of children with or without autism. The effects of personality and location on the parents' experience were also examined, while controlling for current affect. Possible relationships among personality, location factors and help-seeking behavior were also explored in parents of children with autism. Prior findings of higher dysphoric mood levels in parents of children with autism were supported, as was the positive correlation between dysphoric moods and Neuroticism levels. Parenting Sense of Competence did not differ across locations, and there were no parent type by location interactions. Access to services among parents of a child with autism did not moderate dysphoria levels.

  4. [One of the approaches to psychological-pedagogical help to children with severe movement disorders].

    Levchenko, I Iu; Simonova, T N

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to work out an effective model of complex help to children with severe movement disorders. We examined 440 preschoolers with children cerebral palsy with severe movement disorders and 70 children with mild movement disorders. Functions of motor, emotional-personal and cognitive spheres and independence status with determination of 5 levels were studied in 47 patients. Three groups (from the group without concomitant (sensor, intellectual etc) disorders to the group with most severe disorders) were singled out. The authors characterize the model as an open integral system of methods, tools and ways providing the adaptation of children in response to external circumstances and changes in the state of patients. The creation of a correction-developing environment, consisting of 3 components: spatial-objective, technological (methodological) and social, is discussed. We present results of the development of children, evaluated by the following indices: general technique, sensory perceptive development, social adaptation, anxiety, cognitive activity, from 1997 to 2008. The 15 year follow-up demonstrated the stability of achieved positive results.

  5. Helping Teachers to Help Children Living with a Mentally Ill Parent: Teachers' Perceptions on Identification and Policy Issues

    Bibou-Nakou, I.

    2004-01-01

    The material presented here is based on a pilot European project (Daphne Project, 2000/EU funding, collaboration of Greece and England) regarding parental mental illness and children's welfare and needs (1).The presentation focuses upon the responses of a group of teachers working in primary education in relation to identification issues and…

  6. Social robotics to help children with autism in their interactions through imitation

    Pennazio Valentina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to reflect on the main variables that make social robotics efficient in an educational and rehabilitative intervention. Social robotics is based on imitation, and the study is designed for children affected by profound autism, aiming for the development of their social interactions. Existing research, at the national and international levels, shows how children with autism can interact more easily with a robotic companion rather than a human peer, considering its less complex and more predictable actions. This contribution also highlights how using robotic platforms helps in teaching children with autism basic social abilities, imitation, communication and interaction; this encourages them to transfer the learned abilities to human interactions with both adults and peers, through human–robot imitative modelling. The results of a pilot study conducted in a kindergarten school in the Liguria region are presented. The study included applying a robotic system, at first in a dyadic child–robot relation, then in a triadic one that also included another child, with the aim of eliciting social and imitative abilities in a child with profound autism.

  7. Delaware Longitudinal Study of Fraction Learning: Implications for Helping Children With Mathematics Difficulties.

    Jordan, Nancy C; Resnick, Ilyse; Rodrigues, Jessica; Hansen, Nicole; Dyson, Nancy

    The goal of the present article is to synthesize findings to date from the Delaware Longitudinal Study of Fraction Learning. The study followed a large cohort of children ( N = 536) between Grades 3 and 6. The findings showed that many students, especially those with diagnosed learning disabilities, made minimal growth in fraction knowledge and that some showed only a basic grasp of the meaning of a fraction even after several years of instruction. Children with low growth in fraction knowledge during the intermediate grades were much more likely to fail to meet state standards on a broad mathematics measure at the end of Grade 6. Although a range of general and mathematics-specific competencies predicted fraction outcomes, the ability to estimate numerical magnitudes on a number line was a uniquely important marker of fraction success. Many children with mathematics difficulties have deep-seated problems related to whole number magnitude representations that are complicated by the introduction of fractions into the curriculum. Implications for helping students with mathematics difficulties are discussed.

  8. Helping the In-Group Feels Better: Children's Judgments and Emotion Attributions in Response to Prosocial Dilemmas

    Weller, Drika; Lagattuta, Kristin Hansen

    2013-01-01

    Five- to 13-year-old European American children ("N" = 76) predicted characters' decisions, emotions, and obligations in prosocial moral dilemmas. Across age, children judged that characters would feel more positive emotions helping an unfamiliar child from the racial in-group versus out-group (African American), happier ignoring the…

  9. Low-Income Parents: How Do Working Conditions Affect Their Opportunity To Help School-Age Children at Risk?

    Heymann, S. Jody; Earle, Alison

    2000-01-01

    Examined the working conditions faced by parents who has at least one child in need of help for educational or behavioral problems using data for 1,878 families from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Mother and Child Survey. Data show that low-income parents often lack the paid leave and flexibility they need to help children with…

  10. Does surgery help in reducing stigma associated with drug refractory epilepsy in children?

    Bajaj, Jitin; Tripathi, Manjari; Dwivedi, Rekha; Sapra, Savita; Gulati, Sheffali; Garg, Ajay; Tripathi, Madhavi; Bal, Chandra S; Chandra, Sarat P

    2018-03-01

    Epilepsy has several comorbidities and associated stigma. Stigma associated with epilepsy is well known and prevalent worldwide. Surgical treatment is an established treatment for drug refractory epilepsy. Following surgery in children, it is possible that the stigma may reduce, but such an effect has not been studied earlier. Analysis of prospectively collected data was performed for pediatric patients at a single tertiary center for treating epilepsy. Child stigma scale, as described by Austin et al., was used to evaluate stigma both pre- and postoperatively. Analysis was done using Paired t test. In this study, following surgery, there was significant reduction of stigma (Pstigma despite having good seizure outcome. Surgery in drug-resistant epilepsy helps in reducing stigma. Seizure reduction is probably not the only factor responsible for a change in stigma outcome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exploring Helpful Nursing Care in Pediatric Mental Health Settings: The Perceptions of Children with Suicide Risk Factors and Their Parents.

    Montreuil, Marjorie; Butler, Kat J D; Stachura, Michal; Pugnaire Gros, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive study explored helpful nursing care from the perspective of children with suicide-associated risk factors, and their parents. Data were collected through participant observation followed by a debriefing session with children, and semi-structured interviews with parents. The inductive analysis revealed four themes of helpful interventions: (1) caring for the child as a special person; (2) caring for the parents; (3) managing the child's illness; and (4) creating a therapeutic environment. The study findings highlight the importance of the relational aspect of nursing care and provide important insights related to family-centered and strengths-based practice with children at increased risk for suicide later in life.

  12. Getting Along with Others: An Activity Book. Charts and Tips To Help You Teach Social Skills to Children and Reward Their Good Behavior. Grades Pre K-6.

    Herron, Ron

    Noting that children need to learn to cooperate with peers, older children, adults, and parents, this activity book presents 30 charts to help parents help their children learn and practice social skills. The illustrations, coloring activities, and rewards for parents to offer are designed to keep children entertained and motivated. The book…

  13. Adaptation of the children of migrant workers to the new social and cultural space: pedagogical help and support

    Nataliia Sabat

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the value of the pedagogic help and support in the adaptation of migrants to the new circumstances of social and cultural space. The basic needs of the children from the specified category are characterized, and if we meet these needs will have the successful adaptation. The essence of information, instrumental emotional support was revealed. It was proven that the school serves the important medium to conduct such activities as the usual environment where a child with a family of migrants stays, talks, feels comfortable. The necessity of the cooperation between the teachers, educators, social educator and psychologist, administration is emphasized in helping the children of migrant workers in the process of adapting to the new social and cultural space.Key words: children of migrants, adaptation, educational help, pedagogic support, social and cultural space.

  14. Maternal Parenting Styles, Homework Help, and Children's Literacy Development in Language Minority and Finnish-Speaking Families

    Sikiö, Riitta; Siekkinen, Martti; Holopainen, Leena; Silinskas, Gintautas; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of mothers' (language minority mothers, LM, n = 49, and Finnish-speaking mothers, MP, n = 368) parenting styles and maternal help with their children's homework in the children's (mean age 11.43 years) literacy skills at fourth grade in Finland. In addition, the moderating effect of a child's gender on…

  15. Social disparities in children's vocabulary in early childhood. Does pre-school education help to close the gap?

    Becker, Birgit

    2011-03-01

    Children start school with differing levels of skills. Thus, children of different social origin have different probabilities of educational success right from the start of their school career. This paper analyses how the gap in language abilities of children with different social backgrounds develops from age three to five. A focus lies on the question whether pre-school education can help to close this gap. The data of the UK Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) show that children's score on a standardized vocabulary test strongly depends on their parents' education. These social differences remain stable or even increase slightly over the two-year period. Using fixed effect models, it is demonstrated that children of higher educated parents can improve their vocabulary more strongly than children whose parents have a lower educational level. Participation in an early education institution positively affects the vocabulary development of children with lower educated parents while there is no significant pre-school effect for children of higher educated parents. The results indicate that pre-school attendance does not lead to a catching-up process of children with lower educated parents. But without pre-school attendance, the gap between children of higher and lower educated parents widens even further. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2011.

  16. Help-Seeking Behavior for Children with Acute Respiratory Infection in Ethiopia: Results from 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey.

    Astale, Tigist; Chenault, Michelene

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infection is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among children under five years of age in Ethiopia. While facilities have been implemented to address this problem they are underused due to a lack in help-seeking behavior. This study investigates factors related to the help-seeking behavior of mothers for children with acute respiratory infection using data from the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey. Data on 11,030 children aged 0-59 months obtained through interviewing women aged 15-49 years throughout Ethiopia was available. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine which factors are related to help-seeking behavior for acute respiratory infection. In the two weeks prior to the survey, 773(7%) of the children were reported to have symptoms of acute respiratory infection while treatment was sought for only 209 (27.2%). The odds ratio for acute respiratory infection was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.2-2.0) for rural residence with only 25.2% of these mothers seeking help compared to 46.4% for mothers with an urban residence. Smaller family size, younger mothers' age and having had prenatal care had a statistically significant odds ratio greater than 1 for both urban and rural residences. Highest wealth index had a statistically significant odds ratio greater than 1 for rural residence only, whereas primary education or higher had a statistically significant odds ratio greater than 1 for urban residence. Children from rural areas are more at risk for acute respiratory infection while their mothers are less likely to seek help. Nevertheless, there is also underuse of available services in urban areas. Interventions should target mothers with less education and wealth and older mothers. Expanding prenatal care among these groups would encourage a better use of available facilities and subsequently better care for their children.

  17. Teachers' Ability and Help Attributions and Children's Math Performance and Task Persistence

    Tõeväli, Paula-Karoliina; Kikas, Eve

    2016-01-01

    The present longitudinal study examined the reciprocal relationships between teachers' causal attributions and children's math performance and task persistence. In total, 760 elementary school children and their teachers participated in this study. The children were tested in math twice, at the end of the second and third grades. At both time…

  18. Can Executive Functions Help to Understand Children with Mathematical Learning Disorders and to Improve Instruction?

    Desoete, Annemie; De Weerdt, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Working memory, inhibition and naming speed was assessed in 22 children with mathematical learning disorders (MD), 17 children with a reading learning disorder (RD), and 45 children without any learning problems between 8 and 12 years old. All subjects with learning disorders performed poorly on working memory tasks, providing evidence that they…

  19. Helping Children with Visual Impairment Develop Humour: A Review of the Literature

    Pagliano, Paul J.; Zambone, Alana M.; Kelley, Pat

    2007-01-01

    Humor is a highly regarded attribute and often forms the basis of childhood friendships. As much humor is visual, children with visual impairment are particularly vulnerable to missing out on this type of development. Recent research indicates that children can be taught to develop their sense of humor. Therefore, children with visual impairment…

  20. Listening to Music: Helping Children Regulate Their Emotions and Improve Learning in the Classroom

    Foran, Lucille M.

    2009-01-01

    Early education teachers are familiar with using music and rhythm as tools for learning language and building memory. However, the potential of music to help across all special education settings is largely unexplored. Work with music has been widely judged helpful in cases of psychological trauma, yet people do not know why it is helpful. The…

  1. Children's perceptions of others' kindness in helping: the endocentric motivations of pride and guilt.

    Shorr, D N

    1993-09-01

    Elementary school and college students rated the kindness of helping by story protagonists with different attributed motivations. Of particular interest was the effect of the endocentric (self-serving) motivations of anticipated pride and guilt on the kindness ratings. A number of prosocial theorists view such endocentrically motivated helping as less altruistic than exocentrically (other-serving) motivated helping. Compared with helping attributed to the exocentric motivation of sympathy, helping attributed to guilt avoidance led to lower ratings of kindness by all but second graders. Pride-attributed helping, however, did not result in lower kindness ratings at any grade level. The motivational attributions of praise and reward attainment and criticism and punishment avoidance led to relatively low kindness ratings, with the two avoidance motivations leading to the lowest ratings. The latter finding suggests an alternative explanation of the kindness ratings for guilt-motivated helping.

  2. Drawing helps children to talk about their presenting problems during a mental health assessment.

    Woolford, Junie; Patterson, Tess; Macleod, Emily; Hobbs, Linda; Hayne, Harlene

    2015-01-01

    When children require mental health services, clinicians need to conduct assessments that are developmentally sensitive and that include the child's point of view. Drawing is a popular tool that is commonly used in clinical settings. Research on drawing in experimental settings has confirmed that the opportunity to draw while talking increases the amount of verbal information that children report during an interview. The present research examined whether drawing also facilitates children's self reports during a mental health assessment. A total of 33 5-12-year-old children were asked either to draw and tell about their presenting problem or to tell only. Children who drew and told provided twice as much verbal information as children who told only. Further, interviewers in the draw and tell condition used a greater number of minimal responses than did interviewers in the tell only condition. These data have important implications for clinical practice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Self-Recognition in Live Videos by Young Children: Does Video Training Help?

    Demir, Defne; Skouteris, Helen

    2010-01-01

    The overall aim of the experiment reported here was to establish whether self-recognition in live video can be facilitated when live video training is provided to children aged 2-2.5 years. While the majority of children failed the test of live self-recognition prior to video training, more than half exhibited live self-recognition post video…

  4. Number Sense: Strategies for Helping Preschool through Grade 3 Children Develop Math Skills

    Witzel, Bradley S.; Ferguson, Christine J.; Mink, Deborah V.

    2012-01-01

    Number sense development in young children has been linked to future math achievement in a manner similar to the way phonological awareness (i.e., children's awareness and use of sounds within a language to make meaning) has been linked to reading achievement (e.g., Kosanovich, Weinstein, & Goldman 2009). That is, they may be indicators of future…

  5. "Daddy, Read to Me": Fathers Helping Their Young Children Learn to Read.

    Ortiz, Robert W.; McCarty, Laurie L.

    1997-01-01

    Reports that not much is known about the role of fathers' involvement in their children's early reading development. Provides background information concerning research into fathers' involvement in early literacy development. Offers various suggestions on encouraging fathers to become involved with their children's early literacy activities. (PA)

  6. Biblio-Therapeutic Book Creations by Pre-Service Student Teachers: Helping Elementary School Children Cope

    Haeseler, Lisa Ann

    2009-01-01

    Many elementary school children may cope with difficult life struggles such as disabilities, abuse, loss, and identity issues. This article details original, student generated, biblio-therapeutic book creations and how this genre teaches positive ways for children at-risk to cope with tough life circumstances. Pre-service, elementary college…

  7. Children Become "Real Scientists" as They Help to Monitor the Health of Their Local Estuary

    Beaumont, Brent

    2014-01-01

    The author explains how the children at his primary school in New Zealand are inspired by their involvement in environmental monitoring. Shellfish surveys are conducted annually in New Zealand in order to establish the health of their estuaries. By involving the children in this national monitoring programme, prepared by the Hauraki Gulf Forum (an…

  8. Where in the World? Ways to Help Young Gifted Children Think Globally

    Sandberg-Howe, Carol

    2016-01-01

    What parent doesn't hope to give their children "the world," and at the earliest possible age start their journey in becoming responsible global citizens? Through play, children as young as 3 years old can assume active roles in learning important cultural-historical concepts. At home, parents can provide cultural information and…

  9. Anxiety in Children with Mood Disorders: A Treatment Help or Hindrance?

    Cummings, Colleen M.; Fristad, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role of comorbid anxiety in treatment outcome for children with mood disorders (N = 165; age 8-11) participating in Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP). Assessments occurred at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months for two randomly assigned groups: immediate treatment and 1-year wait-list. Most children (69%) had…

  10. Children's Television Commercials Containing Nutritional Information: When Do They Help? When Do They Hinder?

    Ross, Rhonda P.; And Others

    This study assessed the accuracy of judgments of 100 school-age children (5-11 years of age) as to the presence of real fruit content in three sets of cereals and beverages advertised on TV: real fruit, nonfruit, and artificially flavored products. In the baseline session accuracy increased with age, but children at each age misjudged the real…

  11. The Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) Model: Helping Promote Children's Health, Development, and Safety

    Dubowitz, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Child maltreatment affects millions of children each year. health care providers are increasingly called upon to address such psychosocial problems facing many families. In this article, the authors describe a practical approach to further enhance pediatric primary care and make it more responsive to the needs of children and families. The Safe…

  12. The Advantages of High/Scope: Helping Children Lead Successful Lives.

    Schweinhart, Lawrence J.; Weikart, David P.

    1999-01-01

    The High/Scope educational approach emphasizes child-initiated learning activities for preschool/elementary school children. A research study shows that compared to children receiving direct instruction, High/Scope kids later showed more prosocial and less antisocial behaviors. Another study showed that poor High/Scope students had better…

  13. Distinguishing Features of Cuban Children Referred for Professional Help Because of ADHD: Looking beyond the Symptoms

    Schneider, Barry H.; Normand, Sebastien; Sotares deToro, Maria del Pilar; Santana Gonzalez, Yorkys; Guilarte Tellez, Jorge Antonio; Carbonell Naranjo, Migdalia; Musle, Miriam; Diaz Socarras, Felix Javier; Robaey, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To distinguish Cuban children clinically referred because of ADHD from an at-risk community sample and a community control group in terms of symptoms, associated difficulties and impairment of family and peer relations. Method: Parents and teachers of 1,036 children (6-8 years old) completed an established ADHD rating scale and a…

  14. Helping military children cope with parental deployment: role of attachment theory and recommendations for mental health clinicians and counselors.

    Miller, Laurence; Miller, Halle B; Bjorklund, David

    2010-01-01

    Military deployment of a parent carries with it a number of stresses for children, all centering around uncertainty, instability and unpredictability. This article conceptualizes military deployment and relocation stress in the context of attachment theory, and describes the types of adverse outcomes that can occur as the result of impaired attachment. It then presents a set of practical recommendations for mental health clinicians and counselors for helping children and families cope productively and negotiate the developmental hurdles associated with maintaining healthy attachment and family stability in the face of military deployment.

  15. Disability and stigma: how Japanese educators help parents accept their children's differences.

    Kayama, Misa; Haight, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this report, part of a larger ethnographic study, the authors examined the support Japanese elementary school educators provide to parents of children with relatively mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities, such as learning disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, and high-functioning autism. Conditions that affect children's learning and behaviors are widespread, but cultures vary in responses to children with such difficulties and their families. In many cultures, disability remains a sensitive issue due to lingering stigma. Japan's recent implementation of special education services for children with mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities provided a unique context in which to examine otherwise taken-for-granted beliefs and practices related to disability. Participant observations in a Japanese elementary school and individual interviews with educators and parents suggest that parents' sensitivity to other people's "eyes," or stigma, can be an obstacle to their acceptance of their children's need for special education, permission for their children to receive services, and collaboration with educators. Educators supported parents through a steadfast focus on emotional support, communication, relationship building, and partnerships. Japanese practices and adults' reflections on stigma provide a broader context for international, school, and other social workers to reflect on their own beliefs and practices with families of children with disabilities.

  16. Guided self-help for mental health disorders in children and young people with chronic neurological conditions: A qualitative evaluation.

    Bennett, Sophie D; Coughtrey, Anna E; Heyman, Isobel; Greally, Suzanna; Clarkson, Harriet; Bhattacharyya, Tuhina; Lewis, Corah; Varadkar, Sophia; Shafran, Roz

    2018-03-09

    Children with neurological conditions such as epilepsy are at high risk of developing mental health disorders. Guided self-help can be used to increase access to psychological therapies. When developing and evaluating interventions, it is important to obtain the views of service-users about their acceptability. A telephone-guided self-help intervention was used to treat common mental health difficulties in children and young people with neurological conditions. The intervention was not adapted in content to account for chronic illness. This study therefore reports on qualitative interviews with participants to determine the acceptability of the intervention. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 participants (25 parents and 2 young people) who had undertaken a telephone-delivered guided self-help intervention for common mental health difficulties in the context of a paediatric neurological condition. Transcripts were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Thirteen themes were extracted, organised into three main domains, which covered: the practicalities of telephone guided self-help treatment; the outcomes of the intervention; and the extent to which adaptation was needed for chronic illness. Most families found the intervention helpful in working towards their specific goals and noticed changes for the child and/or parents and family. Participants had a positive experience of the intervention and the majority of parents found the standard intervention with individualised goals sufficient to meet the young person's mental health needs. Copyright © 2018 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. How getting noticed helps getting on: successful attention capture doubles children's cooperative play

    Yuill, Nicola; Hinske, Steve; Williams, Sophie-Elizabeth; Leith, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative social interaction is a complex skill that involves maintaining shared attention and continually negotiating a common frame of reference. Privileged in human evolution, cooperation provides support for the development of social-cognitive skills. We hypothesize that providing audio support for capturing playmates' attention will increase cooperative play in groups of young children. Attention capture was manipulated via an audio-augmented toy to boost children's attention bids. Stu...

  18. Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters: What Parents Can Do

    ... Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters: What Parents Can Do Download PDF Download ePub Download Mobi Order ... They also may have thoughts of revenge. What can parents do to help? After violence or disaster, ...

  19. How Can Parents and Teachers Cultivate Creative Climates to Help Children Become Innovators?

    Kim, KH

    2018-01-01

    When we consider the ultimate goal of bringing innovation to our education programs, a key consideration is whether or not we are helping our students themselves become innovative, creative thinkers and actors.

  20. A Multicomponent Intervention Helped Reduce Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in Economically Disadvantaged Hispanic Children.

    Feng, Du; Song, Huaxin; Esperat, M Christina; Black, Ipuna

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of a multicomponent intervention program on consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), and lifestyle factors associated with SSB intake, in Hispanic children from low-income families. A five-wave longitudinal study using a quasi-experimental design was conducted. Five elementary schools in West Texas served as the setting. Participants included 555 predominantly Hispanic children (ages 5-9 years) from low-income families and their parents (n = 525). A multicomponent intervention program was implemented. Children's anthropometric measures were obtained. Their weight status was determined based on body mass index for age and gender. Parents responded to a demographic questionnaire, a shelf inventory, an acculturation scale, and a family survey. Growth curve analyses were used to test differences between intervention and comparison participants' SSB intake and to examine potential covariates. Comparison group children's daily SSB intake significantly increased over time (B = 1.06 ± .40 ounces per month, p food intake, and more types of SSBs available at home were associated with higher SSB intake. Risk factors of childhood obesity were associated with each other. The intervention program produced a modest reduction in SSB consumed by economically disadvantaged and predominantly Hispanic children. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  1. Helping Children with Attentional Challenges in a Montessori Classroom: The Role of the Occupational Therapist

    Luborsky, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Barbabra Luborsky links the medical field and Montessori pedagogy to address atypical attention in children through the lens of the occupational therapist. She provides an overview of attention and sensory processing disorders and then informs about particular diagnoses, particularly ADHD and its comorbidity with other diagnoses. Her specific…

  2. After the Storm: Helping Children Cope with Trauma after Natural Disasters

    Simmons, Krystal T.; Douglas, Denika Y.

    2018-01-01

    Though adults undoubtedly suffer tremendous stress in the aftermath of natural disasters such as Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria, it is often the most vulnerable, the children, who are most traumatized and possess the fewest coping skills. Signs of child psychological trauma such as symptoms commonly associated with posttraumatic stress…

  3. Real Life Calls for Real Books: Literature to Help Children Cope with Family Stressors

    Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth; Crawford, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a rationale and related practical suggestions for using literature as a support system for social-emotional development as children cope with the stresses, anxieties, and feelings of loss that can occur in family life. The authors discusses types of books, how to choose them, and how teachers can use authentic literature to…

  4. Helping Parents of Young Children with Disabilities Become Consumers of Early Intervention: A Marketing Approach.

    Fugate, Douglas L.; Fugate, Janet M.

    1995-01-01

    This article suggests the use of marketing techniques to disseminate information products to parents of young children with disabilities. A marketing plan might include the following steps: determination of market needs, market segmentation and target marketing, marketing goals and objectives, marketing strategy, marketing mix tactics, and control…

  5. Factors Mediating Dysphoric Moods and Help Seeking Behaviour among Australian Parents of Children with Autism

    Snow, Matthew; Donnelly, James

    2016-01-01

    This study compared levels of state affect, dysphoric mood, and parenting sense of competence in Australian parents of children with or without autism. The effects of personality and location on the parents' experience were also examined, while controlling for current affect. Possible relationships among personality, location factors and…

  6. Systematic Instruction for Retarded Children: The Illinois Program. Part III: Self-Help Instruction.

    Linford, Maxine D.; And Others

    The manual for programed instruction of self care skills for trainable mentally handicapped children consists of dressing, dining, grooming, and toilet training. Teaching methods used include behavioral analysis and management, task analysis, and errorless learning. The lesson plans in each section are programed to maximize the child's success at…

  7. Substitute Care Providers: Helping Abused and Neglected Children. The User Manual Series.

    Watson, Kenneth

    This manual for child welfare staff and foster/adoptive parents is intended to provide guidelines for serving abused and neglected children who are in family foster care and adoption. The first section is on substitute care and permanency planning and offers an historical perspective on substitute care and definitions of family foster care and…

  8. You Can Help Your Country: English Children's Work during the Second World War

    Mayall, Berry; Morrow, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    Using a rich collection of archives, school histories, photographs and memoirs, this book charts and discusses the contributions English children made to the war effort during World War II. As men and women were increasingly called up for war work, as the country needed to grow as much food as possible, and as the war effort required ever…

  9. Helping Children To Manage Emotions which Trigger Aggressive Acts: An Approach through Drama in School.

    Johnson, Colleen

    2001-01-01

    Suggests ways in which drama can be used to: explore issues that often give rise to aggression or violence; give space to articulate and respond to emotions; model and practice non-violent response to aggression; consider the consequences of one's actions; empower children to stand up to bullying; and channel energy into performance. (TJQ)

  10. What Helps Children Eat Well? A Qualitative Exploration of Resilience among Disadvantaged Families

    Williams, Lauren K.; Veitch, Jenny; Ball, Kylie

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that persons of low socioeconomic position consume generally a less healthy diet. Key determinants of unhealthy eating among disadvantaged individuals include aspects of the family and external environment. Much less is known about family and environmental determinants of healthy eating among social disadvantaged children. The aim…

  11. Helping Children Learn Mathematics through Multiple Intelligences and Standards for School Mathematics.

    Adams, Thomasenia Lott

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics 2000 process-oriented standards of problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connections, and representation as providing a framework for using the multiple intelligences that children bring to mathematics learning. Presents ideas for mathematics lessons and activities to…

  12. Helping Early Childhood Educators to Understand and Assess Young Children's Mathematical Minds

    Ginsburg, Herbert P.

    2016-01-01

    This issue of "ZDM Mathematics Education" focuses on the formative assessment of young children's mathematical thinking, with an emphasis on computer-based approaches drawing upon on cognitive and educational research. The authors discuss several different assessment methods, including clinical interviewing, observation, and testing,…

  13. The development of tool manufacture in humans: what helps young children make innovative tools?

    Chappell, Jackie; Cutting, Nicola; Apperly, Ian A; Beck, Sarah R

    2013-11-19

    We know that even young children are proficient tool users, but until recently, little was known about how they make tools. Here, we will explore the concepts underlying tool making, and the kinds of information and putative cognitive abilities required for children to manufacture novel tools. We will review the evidence for novel tool manufacture from the comparative literature and present a growing body of data from children suggesting that innovation of the solution to a problem by making a tool is a much more challenging task than previously thought. Children's difficulty with these kinds of tasks does not seem to be explained by perseveration with unmodified tools, difficulty with switching to alternative strategies, task pragmatics or issues with permission. Rather, making novel tools (without having seen an example of the required tool within the context of the task) appears to be hard, because it is an example of an 'ill-structured problem'. In this type of ill-structured problem, the starting conditions and end goal are known, but the transformations and/or actions required to get from one to the other are not specified. We will discuss the implications of these findings for understanding the development of problem-solving in humans and other animals.

  14. Did "The Beaver" Question My Authority? Helping Children Learn about Respect

    Meidl, Christopher; Meidl, Tynisha

    2009-01-01

    In trying to make sense of how to navigate the duality of approaches to how children learn respect toward others--the "takes a village" community-oriented approach (that includes teachers) or the "I know my child best/go it alone" family autonomy approach--teachers need to understand that families are trying to navigate "parenting" their children…

  15. Strategies for Helping Parents of Young Children Address Challenging Behaviors in the Home

    Chai, Zhen; Lieberman-Betz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Challenging behavior can be defined as any repeated pattern of behavior, or perception of behavior, that interferes with or is at risk of interfering with optimal learning or engagement in prosocial interactions with peers and adults. It is generally accepted in young children that challenging behaviors serve some sort of communicative purpose--to…

  16. Knee alignment can help predict sedentary behaviour in children: a pilot study.

    Shultz, S P; Kagawa, M; Fink, P W; Hills, A P

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to introduce knee alignment as a potential predictor of sedentary activity levels in boys and girls. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and anthropometric assessment were conducted on 47 children (21 boys and 26 girls; 5-14 y) and their gender-matched parent. Body Mass Index (BMI) and abdominal-to-height ratio were calculated. Lower extremity alignment was determined by anatomic tibiofemoral angle (TFA) measurements from DXA images. Time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary activities were obtained from a parent-reported questionnaire. Stepwise multiple regression analyses identified anthropometric, musculoskeletal, and activity factors of parents and children for predicting total time spent in sedentary behaviour. Weight, total sedentary time of parents and TFA are moderate predictors of sedentary behaviour in children (R2=0.469). When stratifying for gender, TFA and total sedentary time of the parent, as well as waist circumference, are the most useful predictors of sedentary behaviour in boys (R2=0.648). However, weight is the only predictor of sedentary behaviour in girls (R2=0.479). Negative associations between TFA and sedentary behaviour indicate that even slight variations in musculoskeletal alignment may influence a child's motivation to be physically active. Although growth and development is complicated by many potentialities, this pilot study suggests that orthopaedic factors should also be considered when evaluating physical activity in children.

  17. Beyond Sibling Rivalry: How To Help Your Children Become Cooperative, Caring, and Compassionate. An Owl Book.

    Goldenthal, Peter

    Based on the premise that sibling relationships need to be viewed in the context of the family as a whole, this book provides practical guidelines and tools for parents to reduce friction between children and to resolve sibling conflict. Using many different types of family problems as examples, the book illustrates that how siblings relate to one…

  18. My Child Is Diagnosed with Asthma, Now What?: Motivating Parents to Help Their Children Control Asthma

    Stepney, Cesalie; Kane, Katelyn; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric asthma is often undiagnosed, and therefore untreated. It negatively impacts children's functioning, including school attendance and performance, as well as quality of life. Schoolwide screening for asthma is becoming increasingly common, making identification of possible asthma particularly relevant for school nurses. Nurses may need to…

  19. Structuring Word Problems for Diagnostic Teaching: Helping Teachers Meet the Needs of Children with Mild Disabilities.

    Parmar, Rene S.; Cawley, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Matrix organization can be used to construct math word problems for children with mild disabilities. Matrix organization specifies the characteristics of problems, such as problem theme or setting, operations, level of computation complexity, reading vocabulary level, and need for classification. A sample scope and sequence and 16 sample word…

  20. Looking Forward: Games, Rhymes and Exercises To Help Children Develop Their Learning Abilities.

    von Heider, Molly

    The range of games, rhymes, songs, and exercises for children collected in this book are based on Rudolf Steiner's educational philosophy and are designed to lay the foundation for sound later learning. The book's chapters are: (1) "Learning Aids"; (2) "The Early Years"; (3) "Foot Exercises: Kindergarten or Class I, 5-7…

  1. The development of tool manufacture in humans: what helps young children make innovative tools?

    Chappell, Jackie; Cutting, Nicola; Apperly, Ian A.; Beck, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    We know that even young children are proficient tool users, but until recently, little was known about how they make tools. Here, we will explore the concepts underlying tool making, and the kinds of information and putative cognitive abilities required for children to manufacture novel tools. We will review the evidence for novel tool manufacture from the comparative literature and present a growing body of data from children suggesting that innovation of the solution to a problem by making a tool is a much more challenging task than previously thought. Children's difficulty with these kinds of tasks does not seem to be explained by perseveration with unmodified tools, difficulty with switching to alternative strategies, task pragmatics or issues with permission. Rather, making novel tools (without having seen an example of the required tool within the context of the task) appears to be hard, because it is an example of an ‘ill-structured problem’. In this type of ill-structured problem, the starting conditions and end goal are known, but the transformations and/or actions required to get from one to the other are not specified. We will discuss the implications of these findings for understanding the development of problem-solving in humans and other animals. PMID:24101620

  2. Acute mastoiditis in children: Middle ear cultures may help in reducing use of broad spectrum antibiotics.

    Garcia, Catarina; Salgueiro, Ana Bárbara; Luís, Catarina; Correia, Paula; Brito, Maria João

    2017-01-01

    Acute mastoiditis (AM) is a suppurative infection of the mastoid air cells, representing the most frequent complication of acute otitis media. AM remains an important entity in children due to its potential complications and sequelae. We aim to describe the cases of AM admitted at our department, identify risk factors potentially associated with complications and analyse the changes in clinical approach of AM over time. Case review of clinical files of children admitted with acute mastoiditis from June 1996 to May 2013 at a Lisbon metropolitan area hospital. Data was divided into two groups (prior and after May 2005) in order to evaluate changes in AM approach over the years. 135 AM episodes were included. The median age was 3.8 years and 42% children were less than 24 months of age. Symptoms at presentation included fever (69%), ear pain (56%) and otorrhea (40%). Complications occurred in 22% patients and were more common in children under 24 months (33% vs 15%, p ≤ 0.01). Leukocyte count was significantly higher in children with complications (16.7 vs 14.5 × 10 9 /μL, p ≤ 0.05) as was C-Reactive Protein value (13 vs 6.3 mg/dL, p ≤ 0.001). There was a significant association between the development of complications and C-Reactive Protein value at admission (OR 1.892; IC95%: 1.018-2.493, p ≤ 0.01). The optimal cut-off value was 7.21 mg/dL. Over time there was a significant increase in middle ear cultures obtained by tympanocentesis during surgery (2% vs 16%, p ≤ 0,01) and also a decrease in the use of broad spectrum antibiotherapy as initial treatment (52% vs 25%,p ≤ 0,001). Children under 24 months, with high leukocyte count or with high C-Reactive Protein value should be monitored closely since complications tend to be more frequent. A CRP value of 7.21 mg/dL at admission seems to be a good cut-off to monitor children for potential complications. Throughout the period analysed more cultures were performed allowing identification of

  3. Encouraging Reading through an Enactive Method: Strategies for Hearing Impaired Children.

    Winzer, M. A.

    The paper describes the enactive method, an alternative approach to introducing and teaching reading to young hearing impaired children. The method actively involves the child as a processor of the material rather than as a passive consumer. The approach is established for a short period of time each day until the student outgrows its original…

  4. [How much can school staff help children with diabetes type 1 in school?].

    Tahirović, Husref; Toromanović, Alma

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate, according to parents and their children with diabetes, how far school personnel have an understanding of diabetes and is trained to provide appropriate treatment of diabetes emergencies. The study included 37 children and adolescents with diabetes type 1 (17 girls and 20 boys) from 31 schools in the Canton of Tuzla, aged 7-18 years. A descriptive research method was used in the study and for data gathering a closed type survey was used. Only 13 or 35.3 % of the 37 surveyed parents were satisfied with the care of their child with diabetes at school, while 24 or 64.7 % parents expressed dissatisfaction with it. According to the parents' statements, class teachers are 100 % informed about the existence of students with diabetes type 1 at their schools, while PE teachers (97.9 %) and the headmasters of the schools (81.1 %) are less well-informed. Regarding the question about whether the school personnel is trained for diabetes-related tasks, the parents answered YES in 25.7 % cases; 54.3 % of them answered NO, and 20 % of them answered DON'T KNOW. However, only 35.2 % of parents found that some of the employees at the school are trained to recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia while the number of positive answers concerning treatment of hypoglycemia (18.9 %) or glucagon administration (13.5 %) was much lower. The answer to the question: "Is blood glucose testing allowed in the classroom?" in 91.5 % cases was YES, 5.7 % NO and in 2.8 % of cases was DON'T KNOW. The results of our survey show that children with diabetes do not have appropriate diabetes care in school.

  5. Does Regular Breakfast Cereal Consumption Help Children and Adolescents Stay Slimmer? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Anne de la Hunty

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review systematically the evidence on breakfast cereal consumption and obesity in children and adolescents and assess whether the regular consumption of breakfast cereals could help to prevent excessive weight gain. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies relating breakfast cereal consumption to BMI, BMI z-scores and prevalence of obesity as the outcomes. Results: 14 papers met the inclusion criteria. The computed effect size for mean BMI between high consumers and low or non-consumers over all 25 study subgroups was -1.13 kg/m2 (95% CI -0.81, -1.46, p Conclusion: Overall, the evidence reviewed is suggestive that regular consumption of breakfast cereals results in a lower BMI and a reduced likelihood of being overweight in children and adolescents. However, more evidence from long-term trials and investigations into mechanisms is needed to eliminate possible confounding factors and determine causality.

  6. Beyond the Pencil: Expanding the Occupational Therapists’ Role in Helping Young Children to Develop Writing Skills

    Hope K . Gerde PhD

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapists (OTs play an important role in early childhood classrooms as vital members of the educational team, particularly for young children’s writing development. Children’s emergent writing is a foundational literacy skill, which begins to develop well before they enter elementary school. However, early childhood classrooms are lacking in supports for early writing development. OTs are experts in guiding the development of early writing skills in young children and, therefore, should be considered as critical members of the early literacy curriculum team. This paper identifies the critical role emergent writing plays in early childhood literacy development and how to effectively assess young children’s writing ability. Practical guidance is provided to identify specific ways that OTs can merge their occupation-centered approach with their expertise in writing to serve as a key resource for classroom teachers and enhance the writing development of all children. Specific strategies are included for encouraging OTs to expand their approaches to writing beyond handwriting.

  7. How getting noticed helps getting on: successful attention capture doubles children's cooperative play

    Yuill, Nicola; Hinske, Steve; Williams, Sophie E.; Leith, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative social interaction is a complex skill that involves maintaining shared attention and continually negotiating a common frame of reference. Privileged in human evolution, cooperation provides support for the development of social-cognitive skills. We hypothesize that providing audio support for capturing playmates' attention will increase cooperative play in groups of young children. Attention capture was manipulated via an audio-augmented toy to boost children's attention bids. Study 1 (48 6- to 11-year-olds) showed that the augmented toy yielded significantly more cooperative play in triads compared to the same toy without augmentation. In Study 2 (33 7- to 9-year-olds) the augmented toy supported greater success of attention bids, which were associated with longer cooperative play, associated in turn with better group narratives. The results show how cooperation requires moment-by-moment coordination of attention and how we can manipulate environments to reveal and support mechanisms of social interaction. Our findings have implications for understanding the role of joint attention in the development of cooperative action and shared understanding. PMID:24904453

  8. Care and support of orphaned and vulnerable children at school: helping teachers to respond

    Lesley Wood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is acknowledged that teacher training programmes around HIV in most of sub-Saharan Africa appear not to have been very effective in assisting teachers to respond to the demands placed on them by the pandemic. In response to the need identified by international development agencies, for research into teacher education and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, this study investigated teacher perceptions of the effectiveness of training programmes offered in a specific school district in South Africa to equip them to deal with issues arising from having orphans and vulnerable children in their classrooms. A qualitative research design was followed to purposively select teachers who had attended the departmental training to participate in focus groups to explore the phenomenon of teaching orphaned and vulnerable children. The findings that emerged from the thematic data analysis provided supporting evidence that current teacher education approaches in this regard are not perceived to be effective. The results are used to suggest guidelines for an alternative approach to the current forms of HIV and AIDS training for teachers that is more likely to be sustainable, culturally appropriate and suited to the context.

  9. CONFERENCE: HELPING AND SUPPORTING PARENTS WITH CHILDREN WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER

    Filip JURTOSKI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Macedonian scientific society for autism (MSSA has finished conducting the second year of the project „Equity and social inclusion through positive parenting“ together with their partner organizations and universities from Great Britain, Croatia, Cyprus and Belgium. From the very beginning, the project has the goal to conduct training sessions which are specifically designed for parents of children with autism and who look into subjects and areas which the parents themselves have chosen through previous conducted research based on their need for knowledge for certain specific areas of the autistic spectrum disorder (ASD. So far there have been 5 training sessions that were held, and there are 2 more training sessions that are planned to be held until the end of the project which will be conducted in Bitola and probably Debar. As one of the goals of the project is to hold conferences in each partner country where we inform the wider public about the project and its achievements, as well as which methods and in which ways should be implemented so that we improve the condition of the people with ASD and their families. The next conference that will be held is on the 1st of November in the Museum of the Macedonian Struggle for Independence in Skopje, and it will be intended primarily for parents of children with ASD and professionals from the field of autism. All that are interested may apply on the e-mail president@mssa.org.mk, or fill out a google form online. At the conference there are lecturers who will present their presentations, such as Prof. Dr. David Preece form the University of Northhampton from England, Ron Fortuna from the organization Target Autism from England, Angela Capper from the organization Target Autism from England, Julia Hardcastle (parent from England from the organization Autism Concern, Angela Winstanley from AASP from Cyprus, Dr. Jasmina Trosanska, Filip Jurtoski and Prof. Dr. Vladimir Trajkovski from MSSA from

  10. [Using fairy tales and narrative strategies with the help of a sandpit with children suffering from conduct disorders].

    Konz, M

    2006-01-01

    Our research, focussed on art therapy with primary school children, guided us to the footsteps of women pioneers in the research about children's psyche, like Anna Freud, Melanie Klein, Margaret Loewenfeld, Dora Kalff. We have been inspired by their very personal but nevertheless somehow similar type of research, to work with the children in a blue sand pit, where they could construct and play their personal fairy tales. Thus they share with us their momentary preoccupations, without being forced to talk about them. They are revealing their internal structures, and are integrating, by narration and projection on those figurines in action, their deficient defense mechanisms as well as their negative tendencies. Based on this approach, we expect that there will by an amelioration of their social skills, an enhancement of their intrinsic motivation, and a diminution of their conduct disorders. The analyze will be done by questionnaires and rating scales constructed especially for this research, as well as by sociograms, with the help of descriptive non parametric statistics.

  11. ?Maybe I will give some help?. maybe not to help the eyes but different help?: an analysis of care and support of children with visual impairment in community settings in Malawi

    Gladstone, M.; McLinden, M.; Douglas, G.; Jolley, E.; Schmidt, E.; Chimoyo, J.; Magombo, H.; Lynch, P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Visual impairment in children is common in low and middle?income settings. Whilst visual impairment (VI) can impact on the development of children, many reach full potential with appropriate early intervention programmes. Although there is increased emphasis on early child development globally, it is not yet clear how to provide specific programmes for children with VI in low and middle?income settings. This study aims to identify facilitators and barriers to the provision...

  12. Learning Behaviours of Low-Achieving Children's Mathematics Learning in Using of Helping Tools in a Synchronous Peer-Tutoring System

    Tsuei, Mengping

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of low-achieving children's use of helping tools in a synchronous mathematics peer-tutoring system on the children's mathematics learning and their learning behaviours. In a remedial class, 16 third-grade students in a remedial class engaged in peer tutoring in a face-to-face synchronous online environment during a…

  13. Could Trends in Time Children Spend with Parents Help Explain the Black-White Gap in Human Capital? Evidence from the American Time Use Survey

    Patterson, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely believed that the time children spend with parents significantly impacts human capital formation. If time varies significantly between black and white children, this may help explain the large racial gap in test scores and wages. In this study, I use data from the American Time Use Survey to examine the patterns in the time black and…

  14. How Americans Can Help Children with Mental Illness, and Their Families, Help Themselves. Connect for Kids: Guidance for Grown-Ups.

    Louv, Richard

    This article highlights the untended mental health needs of children across the United States. Citing troubling mental health statistics, the author suggests creating a community culture that does not stigmatize or ignore mental health problems, specifically by making prevention and treatment the rule. One of the potential stumbling blocks…

  15. The Effects of Theory of Mind and Self-Regulation Skills on Helping Behaviors in 3-4-Year-Old Children

    Muhammed Sukru Aydin; Sema Karakelle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of theory of mind and self-regulation skills on children’s helping behavior. Total of 104 children aging between 36-59 months, participated in the study. Helping behavior was measured with an instrumental helping task. Scaling of Theory-of-Mind tasks were used in measuring theory of mind. As for measuring self-regulation, peg tapping task were used. In order to control receptive language abilities of children, Turkish Expressive a...

  16. Mastering of musical rhythm by pre-school age children with speech disorders with the help of dance-correction program trainings

    N.B. Petrenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that regular listening to specially selected music develops children’s cognitive abilities. Musical influence optimizes many important functions of brain: increases mental workability; accelerates processing of information; improves short term memory. Besides, sensitivity of visual and hearing analyzers strengthens, as well as regulation of arbitrary movements; indicators of verbal and non verbal intellect improve. Purpose: to determine peculiarities of musical rhythm’s mastering by pre-school age children with speech disorders with the help of dance-correction program trainings. Material: the categories of the tested children: children of age - 4-5 and 5-6 years with speech disorders and healthy pre-school age children. Children of 4-5 years’ age composed: main group (n=12, control group (n=16; group of healthy children (n=24. For assessment of verbal thinking and rhythm-motor (or dance abilities we used complex of tests of constantly increasing difficulty. Results: we found that under influence of dance-correcting exercises activation of rhythm-motor abilities and development of cognitive functions happened in children. We also found main functional peculiarities of musical rhythm’s mastering by pre-school age children. It was determined that by the end of pedagogic experiment, main groups of children approached to groups of healthy peers by all tested characteristics. Conclusions: it is recommended to include correcting components (fit ball - dance gymnastic, tales-therapy, logo-rhythm trainings, and game fitness in trainings by choreographic program.

  17. iPad: Efficacy of Electronic Devices to Help Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Communicate in the Classroom

    Sankardas, Sulata Ajit; Rajanahally, Jayashree

    2017-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are known to have difficulty in social communication, with research indicating that children with ASD fail to develop functional speech (Lord and Rutter, 1994). Over the years a number of Augmented and Alternate Communication (AAC) devices have been used with children with ASD to overcome this barrier…

  18. Perfect Prophets, Helpful Hippos, and Happy Endings: Noah and Jonah in Children's Bible Storybooks in the United States

    Dalton, Russell W.

    2007-01-01

    This article is based on a study of hundreds of children's bible storybooks available in the United States from 1850 to the present and focuses on the way the biblical stories of Noah and Jonah have been retold for children. These children's bible storybooks lend insight into the American church's changing assumptions about the purpose of the…

  19. Participation in child protection. Essential for helpful care for children and families with disabilities. : From theory to daily practice

    Smits, Veronica; Snelders, Maartje

    The William Schrikker Group is a national organization for child protection, youth probation and foster care in The Netherlands. With over 550 family supervisors we provide support to children with disabilities and to children of parents with disabilities. Almost 10.000 children are our clients. In

  20. Como los padres ocupados pueden ayudar a sus hijos a aprender y desarrollarse (How Busy Parents Can Help Their Children Learn and Develop). Early Childhood Digest.

    Mayer, Ellen; Kreider, Holly; Vaughan, Peggy

    Although parents are often very busy with work and family responsibilities, there are many things they can do to help their school-age children learn and develop. This Spanish-language early childhood digest for parents provides tips obtained from parents of first and second graders in the School Transition Study on creative ways to stay involved…

  1. Guided self-help interventions for mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Bennett, Sophie; Heyman, Isobel; Coughtrey, Anna; Simmonds, Jess; Varadkar, Sophia; Stephenson, Terence; DeJong, Margaret; Shafran, Roz

    2016-11-04

    Rates of mental health disorders are significantly greater in children with physical illnesses than in physically well children. Children with neurological conditions, such as epilepsy, are known to have particularly high rates of mental health disorders. Despite this, mental health problems in children with neurological conditions have remained under-recognised and under-treated in clinical settings. Evidence-based guided self-help interventions are efficacious in reducing symptoms of mental health disorders in children, but their efficacy in reducing symptoms of common mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions has not been investigated. We aim to pilot a guided self-help intervention for the treatment of mental health disorders in children with neurological conditions. A pilot randomised controlled trial with 18 patients with neurological conditions and mental health disorders will be conducted. Participants attending specialist neurology clinics at a National UK Children's Hospital will be randomised to receive guided self-help for common mental health disorders or to a 12-week waiting list control. Participants in the treatment group will receive 10 sessions of guided self-help delivered over the telephone. The waiting list control group will receive the intervention after a waiting period of 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure is reduction in symptoms of mental health disorders. Exclusion criteria are limited to those at significant risk of harm to self or others, the presence of primary mental health disorder other than anxiety, depression or disruptive behaviour (e.g. psychosis, eating disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder) or intellectual disability at a level meaning potential participants would be unable to access the intervention. The study has ethical approval from the Camden and Islington NHS Research Ethics Committee, registration number 14.LO.1353. Results will be disseminated to patients, the wider public, clinicians and

  2. The Effects of Theory of Mind and Self-Regulation Skills on Helping Behaviors in 3-4-Year-Old Children

    Muhammed Sukru Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the effects of theory of mind and self-regulation skills on children’s helping behavior. Total of 104 children aging between 36-59 months, participated in the study. Helping behavior was measured with an instrumental helping task. Scaling of Theory-of-Mind tasks were used in measuring theory of mind. As for measuring self-regulation, peg tapping task were used. In order to control receptive language abilities of children, Turkish Expressive and Receptive Language Test (TIFALDI was applied. Results of the analyses indicated that there were significant relations between theory of mind and selfregulation skills and helping behavior, however, multiple regression analyses showed that the main predictor of helping behavior was theory of mind, but not self-regulation skills after controlling for age and receptive language. Results were discussed with respect to the literature, in relation to the role of theory of mind and self-regulation skills in explaining helping behavior.

  3. Getting Help

    ... Parents & Students Home > Special Features > Getting Help Getting Help Resources from NIAAA Treatment for Alcohol Problems: Finding ... and find ways to make a change. Professional help Your doctor. Primary care and mental health practitioners ...

  4. Parents Helping Their Children Learn to Read: The Effectiveness of Paired Reading and Hearing Reading in a Developing Country Context

    Shah-Wundenberg, Mihika; Wyse, Dominic; Chaplain, Roland

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports research that investigated parental support for children's reading of English in an inner-city school in the developing country context of an Indian city, Ahmedabad. Children had oral proficiency in the regional language but were beginning to acquire conventional forms of literacy in English. Sociocultural mediation theory…

  5. Behavioral and Nondirective Guided Self-Help for Parents of Children with Externalizing Behavior: Mediating Mechanisms in a Head-To-Head Comparison.

    Katzmann, Josepha; Hautmann, Christopher; Greimel, Lisa; Imort, Stephanie; Pinior, Julia; Scholz, Kristin; Döpfner, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    Parent training (PT) delivered as a guided self-help intervention may be a cost- and time-effective intervention in the treatment of children with externalizing disorders. In face-to-face PT, parenting strategies have repeatedly been identified as mediating mechanisms for the decrease of children's problem behavior. Few studies have examined possible mediating effects in guided self-help interventions for parents. The present study aimed to investigate possible mediating variables of a behaviorally oriented guided self-help program for parents of children with externalizing problems compared to a nondirective intervention in a clinical sample. A sample of 110 parents of children with externalizing disorders (80 % boys) were randomized to either a behaviorally oriented or a nondirective guided self-help program. Four putative mediating variables were examined simultaneously in a multiple mediation model using structural equation modelling. The outcomes were child symptoms of ADHD and ODD as well as child externalizing problems, assessed at posttreatment. Analyses showed a significant indirect effect for dysfunctional parental attributions in favor of the group receiving the behavioral program, and significant effects of the behavioral program on positive and negative parenting and parental self-efficacy, compared to the nondirective intervention. Our results indicate that a decrease of dysfunctional parental attributions leads to a decrease of child externalizing problems when parents take part in a behaviorally oriented guided self-help program. However, none of the putative mediating variables could explain the decrease in child externalizing behavior problems in the nondirective group. A change in dysfunctional parental attributions should be considered as a possible mediator in the context of PT.

  6. Supportive or suggestive: Do human figure drawings help 5- to 7-year-old children to report touch?

    Brown, Deirdre A; Pipe, Margaret-Ellen; Lewis, Charlie; Lamb, Michael E; Orbach, Yael

    2007-02-01

    The authors examined the accuracy of information elicited from seventy-nine 5- to 7-year-old children about a staged event that included physical contact-touching. Four to six weeks later, children's recall for the event was assessed using an interview protocol analogous to those used in forensic investigations with children. Following the verbal interview, children were asked about touch when provided with human figure drawings (drawings only), following practice using the human figure drawings (drawings with instruction), or without drawings (verbal questions only). In this touch-inquiry phase of the interview, most children provided new information. Children in the drawings conditions reported more incorrect information than those in the verbal questions condition. Forensically relevant errors were infrequent and were rarely elaborated on. Although asking children to talk about innocuous touch may lead them to report unreliable information, especially when human figure drawings are used as aids, errors are reduced when open-ended prompts are used to elicit further information about reported touches. Copyright 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of a nursing psychoeducative intervention as a helping tool in children´s mourning work

    Maria del Carmen Pérez González

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The children grief has many special characteristics determinated by the childhood features. Several studies consider that children may have anxiety reactions, fears, depression and disadaptated behaviour when a relative is fort.The objective of this study is to know the effectiveness of a psychoeducative intervention of a Primary Care nurse in preventing misadaptative behaviours related to grief in children.To achieve this objective, a randomized controlled trial with an experimental group and a control group has been designed. 198 children and teenagers will be included in it (there will be randomized assigned 98 on each group from 5 to16 years old, having been affected of a relating grief, belonging to the Primary Care Centers of the 9, 10 and 11 areas in Madrid Community. Children and teenagers included in the experimental group will take a psychoeducative intervention based on 7 individualized weekly sessions. Measures of the punctuations obtained on the Children Behaviour Test will be made when children will be included in the study and after 3, 6 and 12 months.

  8. Technologies of work with disadvantaged children in The Children’s Help Center (DasStädttischeKinderhilfzentrum), Düsseldorf

    Abramenko A. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The experience of visiting The Children’s Help Center (children’s temporary home) in Düsseldorf, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany is described in this article. There disadvantage children, orphans & temporary without parental custody are kept. The base of social work & help to disadvantaged children’s & such a families in Germany is reported in this article. The types of work in children’s temporary home are described. The examples of Center project activity how to involve resources of the region...

  9. When Stroop helps Piaget: An inter-task positive priming paradigm in 9-year-old children.

    Linzarini, A; Houdé, O; Borst, G

    2015-11-01

    To determine whether inhibitory control is domain general or domain specific in school children, we asked 40 9-year-old children to perform an inter-task priming paradigm in which they responded to Stroop items on the primes and to Piaget number conservation items on the probes. The children were more efficient in the inhibition of a misleading "length-equals-number" heuristic in the number conservation task if they had successfully inhibited a previous prepotent reading response in the Stroop task. This study provides evidence that the inhibitory control ability of school children generalizes to distinct cognitive domains, that is, verbal for the Stroop task and logico-mathematical for Piaget's number conservation task. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing and evaluating health education learning package (HELP) to control soil-transmitted helminth infections among Orang Asli children in Malaysia.

    Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Lim, Yvonne A L; Nasr, Nabil A; Sady, Hany; Atroosh, Wahib M; Mahmud, Rohela

    2014-09-02

    This study was carried out to develop a health education learning package (HELP) about soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections, and to evaluate what impact such a package could have in terms of reducing the incidence and intensity of STH infections among Orang Asli schoolchildren in Pahang, Malaysia. To identify the key risk factors of STH in Orang Asli communities, we applied an extensive mixed methods approach which involved an intensive literature review, as well as community-based discussions with children, their parents, teachers and health personnel, whilst also placing the children under direct observation. To evaluate the package, 317 children from two schools in Lipis, Pahang were screened for STH infections, treated by a 3-day course of albendazole and then followed up over the next 6 months. The knowledge of teachers, parents and children towards STH infections were assessed at baseline and after 3 months. The developed package consists of a half day workshop for teachers, a teacher's guide book to STH infections, posters, a comic book, a music video, a puppet show, drawing activities and an aid kit. The package was well-received with effective contributions being made by teachers, children and their parents. The incidence rates of hookworm infection at different assessment points were significantly lower among children in the intervention school compared to those in the control school. Similarly, the intensity of trichuriasis, ascariasis and hookworm infections were found to be significantly lower among children in the HELP group compared to those in the control group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the package significantly improved the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) of Orang Asli people and the knowledge of teachers towards STH infections. A school-based health education learning package (HELP) was developed which displayed a significant impact in terms of reducing the intensity of all three main STH infections, as well as in reducing the

  11. Translation of the Children Helping Out--Responsibilities, Expectations and Supports (CHORES) questionnaire into Brazilian-Portuguese: semantic, idiomatic, conceptual and experiential equivalences and application in normal children and adolescents and in children with cerebral palsy.

    Amaral, Maíra; Paula, Rebeca L; Drummond, Adriana; Dunn, Louise; Mancini, Marisa C

    2012-01-01

    The participation of children with disabilities in daily chores in different environments has been a therapeutic goal shared by both parents and rehabilitation professionals, leading to increased demand for instrument development. The Children Helping Out: Responsibilities, Expectations and Supports (CHORES) questionnaire was created with the objective of measuring child and teenager participation in daily household tasks. To translate the CHORES questionnaire into Brazilian Portuguese, evaluate semantic, idiomatic, experiential, and conceptual equivalences, apply the questionnaire to children and teenagers with and without disabilities, and test its test-retest reliability. Methodological study developed through the following stages: (1) translation of the questionnaire by two different translators; (2) synthesis of translations; (3) back-translation into English; (4) analysis by an expert committee to develop the pre-final version; (5) test-retest reliability; (6) administration to a sample of 50 parents of children with and without disabilities. The CHORES translation was validated in all stages. The implemented adaptations aimed to improve the understanding of the instrument's content by families of different socioeconomic and educational levels. The questionnaire showed strong consistency within a 7 to 14-day interval (ICCs=0.93 a 0.97; p=0.0001). After application, there was no need to change any items in the questionnaire. The translation of the CHORES questionnaire into Brazilian Portuguese offers a unique instrument for health professionals in Brazil, enabling the documentation of child and teenager participation in daily household tasks and making it possible to develop scientific investigation on the topic.

  12. Ultrasound imaging in children with acute abdominal pain - can it help to decrease the rate of negative appendectomies?

    Niedzielski, J.; Miodek, M.; Kucharski, P.; Sokal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of high-resolution ultrasound (US) with graded compression in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis.Material/Methods: The medical records of 664 consecutive children with acute abdominal pain treated between 2007 and 2009 were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed; 408 children (61.4 %) underwent appendectomy and 256 patients were treated conservatively (38.6 %). High-resolution US was performed in 570 out of 664 patients (85.8 %). The US data were verified by intraoperative findings or by clinical follow-up. Results: Out of 664 children, 408 underwent appendectomy and 256 were treated conservatively. US was performed in 570 out of 664 children (85.8 %); in 327/408 children (80.1 %) with AA and in 243/256 children (94.9 %) with negative diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity for US was 66.6% and 77.4%, respectively. If histopathological diagnosis of catarrhal appendicitis was considered a negative (unnecessary) appendectomy, the sensitivity was 68.6 % (p=0.87), and specificity was 67 % (p=0.29). Positive and negative predictive values of US were 79.9 % and 63.1 %, respectively. After recalculating results, positive predictive value decreased to 59.8% (p=0.036) and negative predictive value increased to 74.8 % (p=0.2). The rate of false negative results was 13.1 % (75/572) and the rate of false positives was 19.2 % (110/572). The negative appendectomy rate was 27.4 % (112/408). Conclusions: High-resolution ultrasonography provides an accurate and specific test for acute appendicitis and is recommended by the authors as an examination of choice in children with acute abdominal pain. (authors)

  13. What helps children to be more active and less sedentary? Perceptions of mothers living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

    Veitch, J; Hume, C; Salmon, J; Crawford, D; Ball, K

    2013-01-01

      Increasing children's participation in physical activity and decreasing time spent in sedentary behaviours is of great importance to public health. Despite living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods, some children manage to engage in health-promoting physical activity and avoid high levels of screen-based activities (i.e. watching TV, computer use and playing electronic games). Understanding how these children manage to do well and whether there are unique features of their home or neighbourhood that explain their success is important for informing strategies targeting less active and more sedentary children. The aim of this qualitative study was to gain in-depth insights from mothers regarding their child's resilience to low physical activity and high screen-time.   Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 38 mothers of children who lived in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in urban and rural areas of Victoria, Australia. The interviews were designed to gain in-depth insights about perceived individual, social and physical environmental factors influencing resilience to low physical activity and high screen-time.   Themes relating to physical activity that emerged from the interviews included: parental encouragement, support and modelling; sports culture in a rural town; the physical home and neighbourhood environment; child's individual personality; and dog ownership. Themes relating to screen-time behaviours encompassed: parental control; and child's individual preferences.   The results offer important insights into potential avenues for developing 'resilience' and increasing physical activity and reducing screen-time among children living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods. In light of the negative effects of low physical activity and high levels of screen-time on children's health, this evidence is urgently needed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. [Between psychiatry and youth welfare--help and support for children of mentally ill parents in the tension field of the disciplines].

    Wagenblass, S; Schone, R

    2001-09-01

    A mental illness of parents brings up a high burden for the affected children. The professionals working in psychiatry and social work are getting a rising knowledge of the specific problems these children have. Anyway, there are only a few useful treatments offered for this group of people. There are a lot of reasons for this lag in take care of. It's not only based on the financial situation or the personnel structure which must be mentioned as reasons for children of parents with mental illness for not asking for help. It's also the incomplete knowledge of the caregivers. But first of all the writer wants to show that the tension in this working field brings up the main problems. For solving these problems the article gives some advice for crossing over the borderlines and build up a communication between the institutions which are involved.

  15. Instruction to Help Young Children Develop Language and Literacy Skills: The Roles of Program Design and Instructional Guidance

    Gunn, Barbara; Vadasy, Patricia; Smolkowski, Keith

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the kinds of instructional activities that young children need to develop basic language and literacy skills based on recent research and program evaluations. This includes approaches to develop alphabetic understanding, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and oral language. Activities and materials from the Pre-kindergarten…

  16. Early Gesture Provides a Helping Hand to Spoken Vocabulary Development for Children with Autism, Down Syndrome, and Typical Development

    Özçaliskan, Seyda; Adamson, Lauren B.; Dimitrova, Nevena; Baumann, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Typically developing (TD) children refer to objects uniquely in gesture (e.g., point at a cat) before they produce verbal labels for these objects ("cat"). The onset of such gestures predicts the onset of similar spoken words, showing a strong positive relation between early gestures and early words. We asked whether gesture plays the…

  17. Do Social Stories Help to Decrease Disruptive Behaviour in Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorders? A Review of the Published Literature

    Rhodes, Christine

    2014-01-01

    A structured search and identification of themes within the literature regarding the use of Social Stories to decrease disruptive behaviour in children with autistic spectrum disorders is presented. The examination of seven studies showed that the Social Story intervention was successful for the majority of the participants, although the level of…

  18. Evidence for the Effectiveness of Visual Supports in Helping Children with Disabilities Access the Mainstream Primary School Curriculum

    Foster-Cohen, Susan; Mirfin-Veitch, Brigit

    2017-01-01

    Removing barriers to learning for children with mild to moderate disabilities in mainstream primary classrooms calls for creative approaches that exploit the cognitive and sensory strengths of each child. Although their efficacy has not been fully explored, pictorial, symbolic and written supports are often used with the intention of helping…

  19. Self-Advocacy: The Importance of Building Interpersonal-Communication and Help-Seeking Skills in Elementary School Children

    Gasparini, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Now, more so than in the past, children have been deprived of the opportunity to learn and exercise effective interpersonal communication skills. Interpersonal communication skills, for elementary students, are important in the development of a student's ability to self-advocate. The purpose of this study is to identify techniques in which…

  20. Impact, meaning and need for help and support: The experience of parents caring for children with disabilities, life-limiting/life-threatening illness or technology dependence.

    Whiting, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Parenting a child with complex needs or disabilities is a challenging proposition. This study, which drew upon of the experiences of the parents of 34 children (in 33 families), set out to explore the themes of impact, need for help and support and meaning/sense-making as they were related by parents. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, and an emerging theoretical framework was validated through the use of a series of mind-maps(®) which were presented to individual parents as the basis for a second round (verificational) interview. Parents were nominated into the study by health care professions who were asked to identify the subject children to one of three separate sub-groups: children with a disability; children with a life-limiting/life-threatening illness or children with a technology dependence. Comparisons were made between the three study sub-groups in order to identify areas of consistency and of inconsistency. A fourth study theme - 'battleground' emerged from entirely within the data set. Sense-making occupied a central position within the overall theoretical framework for the study and parental perception of 'battleground' presented as significant element of parental sense-making, particularly in the context of their relationships with professional staff. © The Author(s) 2012.

  1. Como ayudar a su hijo con la tarea escolar: Para los padres con ninos en la primaria y la secundaria (Helping Your Child with Homework: For Parents of Children in Elementary through Middle School).

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of Intergovernmental and Interagency Affairs.

    Homework is an opportunity for children to learn and for families to be involved with their children's education, but helping children with homework is not always easy. This Spanish-language booklet is designed to provide parents of elementary and middle grades students with an understanding of the purpose and nature of homework and offers…

  2. Make a Difference at Your School! CDC Resources Can Help You Implement Strategies to Prevent Obesity Among Children and Adolescents

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reviews scientific evidence to determine which school-based policies and practices are most likely to improve key health behaviors among young people, including physical activity and healthy eating. In this document, the CDC identifies ten strategies to help schools prevent obesity by promoting…

  3. Symptoms of Mental Health Problems: Children's and Adolescents' Understandings and Implications for Gender Differences in Help Seeking

    MacLean, Alice; Hunt, Kate; Sweeting, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Amidst concerns that young people's mental health is deteriorating, it is important to explore their understandings of symptoms of mental health problems and beliefs around help seeking. Drawing on focus group data from Scottish school pupils, we demonstrate how they understood symptoms of mental health problems and how their characterisations of…

  4. Teacher Satisfaction with School and Psychological Well-Being Affects Their Readiness to Help Children with Mental Health Problems

    Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Peeter; Värnik, Airi; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Balint, Maria; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Feldman, Dana; Haring, Christian; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Poštuvan, Vita; Tubiana, Alexandra; Sarchiapone, Marco; Wasserman, Camilla; Carli, Vladimir; Hoven, Christina W.; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In support of a whole-school approach to mental health promotion, this study was conducted to find out whether and how significantly teachers' satisfaction with school and their subjective psychological well-being are related to the belief that they can help pupils with mental health problems. Design: Cross-sectional data were collected…

  5. Can human rights standards help protect children and youth from the detrimental impact of alcohol beverage marketing and promotional activities?

    Chapman, Audrey R

    2017-01-01

    The alcohol industry in the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) region promotes demand for alcohol products actively through a number of channels, including advertising and sponsorship of sports and other events. This paper evaluates whether human rights instruments that Latin American countries have ratified can be used to limit children's exposure to alcohol advertising and promotion. A review was conducted of the text of, and interpretative documents related to, a series of international and regional human rights instruments ratified by most countries in the LAC region that enumerate the right to health. The Convention on the Rights of the Child has the most relevant provisions to protect children and youth from alcohol promotion and advertising. Related interpretive documents by the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child affirm that corporations hold duties to respect and protect children's right to health. Human rights norms and law can be used to regulate or eliminate alcohol beverage marketing and promotional activities in the Latin American region. The paper recommends developing a human rights based Framework Convention on Alcohol Control to provide guidance. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring is helpful in managing children with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    Rossi, Paolo; Isoldi, Sara; Mallardo, Saverio; Papoff, Paola; Rossetti, Danilo; Dilillo, Anna; Oliva, Salvatore

    2018-04-05

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is very common in the paediatric age group. There is no single and reliable test to distinguish between physiologic and pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux, and this lack of clear distinction between disease and normal can have a negative impact on the management of children. To evaluate the usefulness of 24-h oesophageal pH-impedance study in infants and children with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Patients were classified by age groups (A-C) and reflux-related symptoms (typical and atypical). All underwent pH-impedance study. If the latter suggested an abnormal reflux, patients received therapy in accordance with NASPGHAN/ESPGHAN recommendations, while those with normal study had an additional diagnostic work-up. The efficacy of therapy was evaluated with a specific standardized questionnaire for different ages. The study was abnormal in 203/428 patients (47%) while normal in 225/428 (53%). Of those with abnormal study, 109 exhibited typical symptoms (54%), and 94 atypical (46%). The great majority of the patients with abnormal study were responsive to medical anti-reflux therapy. We confirm the utility of prolonged oesophageal pH-impedance study in detecting gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in children and in guiding therapy. Performing oesophageal pH-impedance monitoring in children with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is helpful to establish the diagnosis and avoid unnecessary therapy. Copyright © 2018 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Daily Living Skills Training in Virtual Reality to Help Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Real Shopping Scenario

    Adjorlu, Ali; Høeg, Emil Rosenlund; Mangano, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a study conducted to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of Virtual Reality (VR) applied to daily living skills (DLS) training of individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In collaboration with a teacher at a school for children and adolescents...... with mental disorders, a head-mounted display based VR simulation of a supermarket was built and valuated with the purpose of developing the shopping skills of students diagnosed with ASD. A comparative between-group experiment was conducted on 9 participants, with initiated VR training following a baseline...

  8. System of the ophthalmologic help premature children with retinopathy of prematurity in the Central region of Russia

    A. V. Tereshchenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Functional results analysis of ophthalmologic help system for premature infants, which includes the full cycle of early revelation, treatment and regular medical check-up activities for patients with ROP in Central region of Russia.Methods: Fields for ROP screening were performed in premature infants medical care units by clinic specialists. Infants with re- vealed ROP were directed to Kaluga Branch of IRtC «Eye Microsurgery» for detailed diagnostic examination and subsequent treatment and monitoring.Results: In 2003-2011 454 fields in Kaluga, tula, Bryansk, and Orel regions were made. 8861 infants were examined. ROP was found in 1834 infants (20.7%. 823 different interventions for infants with active ROP were performed: 737 retinal lasercoagulations, 3-ports vitrectomy — 72, lensvitrectomy — 14. the total efficacy of the treatment was 92.9%.Conclusion: the ophthalmologic help system for premature infants in Central region of Russia combines all directions from de-tailed diagnostic to hich-technology treatment. It allows to reproduce one all over the Russian Federation territory.

  9. System of the ophthalmologic help premature children with retinopathy of prematurity in the Central region of Russia

    A. V. Tereshchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Functional results analysis of ophthalmologic help system for premature infants, which includes the full cycle of early revelation, treatment and regular medical check-up activities for patients with ROP in Central region of Russia.Methods: Fields for ROP screening were performed in premature infants medical care units by clinic specialists. Infants with re- vealed ROP were directed to Kaluga Branch of IRtC «Eye Microsurgery» for detailed diagnostic examination and subsequent treatment and monitoring.Results: In 2003-2011 454 fields in Kaluga, tula, Bryansk, and Orel regions were made. 8861 infants were examined. ROP was found in 1834 infants (20.7%. 823 different interventions for infants with active ROP were performed: 737 retinal lasercoagulations, 3-ports vitrectomy — 72, lensvitrectomy — 14. the total efficacy of the treatment was 92.9%.Conclusion: the ophthalmologic help system for premature infants in Central region of Russia combines all directions from de-tailed diagnostic to hich-technology treatment. It allows to reproduce one all over the Russian Federation territory.

  10. Toddlers Help a Peer.

    Hepach, Robert; Kante, Nadine; Tomasello, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Toddlers are remarkably prosocial toward adults, yet little is known about their helping behavior toward peers. In the present study with 18- and 30-month-old toddlers (n = 192, 48 dyads per age group), one child needed help reaching an object to continue a task that was engaging for both children. The object was within reach of the second child who helped significantly more often compared to a no-need control condition. The helper also fulfilled the peer's need when the task was engaging only for the child needing help. These findings suggest that toddlers' skills and motivations of helping do not depend on having a competent and helpful recipient, such as an adult, but rather they are much more flexible and general. © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  11. Search Help

    Guidance and search help resource listing examples of common queries that can be used in the Google Search Appliance search request, including examples of special characters, or query term seperators that Google Search Appliance recognizes.

  12. Twelve-Month Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Based Guided Self-Help for Parents of Children on Cancer Treatment.

    Cernvall, Martin; Carlbring, Per; Wikman, Anna; Ljungman, Lisa; Ljungman, Gustaf; von Essen, Louise

    2017-07-27

    A substantial proportion of parents of children on cancer treatment report psychological distress such as symptoms of post-traumatic stress (PTSS), depression, and anxiety. During their child's treatment many parents also experience an economic burden. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of Internet-based guided self-help for parents of children on cancer treatment. This study was a parallel randomized controlled trial comparing a 10-week Internet-based guided self-help program, including weekly support from a therapist via encrypted email, with a wait-list control condition. The intervention was based on cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and focused on psychoeducation and skills to cope with difficult thoughts and feelings. Primary outcome was self-reported PTSS. Secondary outcomes were self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, health care consumption, and sick leave during the past month. Outcomes were assessed pre- and postintervention and at 12-month follow-up. Parents of children on cancer treatment were invited by health care personnel at pediatric oncology centers, and parents meeting the modified symptom criteria on the PCL-C were included in the study. Self-report assessments were provided on the Web. A total of 58 parents of children on cancer treatment (median months since diagnosis=3) were included in the study (intervention n=31 and control n=27). A total of 18 participants completed the intervention, and 16 participants in each group participated in the 12-month follow-up. Intention-to-treat analyses revealed significant effects in favor of the intervention on the primary outcome PTSS, with large between-group effect sizes at postassessment (d=0.89; 95% CI 0.35-1.43) and at 12-month follow-up (d=0.78; 95% CI 0.25-1.32). Significant effects in favor of the intervention on the secondary outcomes depression and anxiety were also observed. However, there was no evidence for intervention efficacy on health care consumption or

  13. Helping Them Grow.

    Kreidler, William J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Three articles present suggestions to help elementary teachers promote student development. The first describes games that encourage a sense of community. The second deals with making parent teacher conferences a positive experience. The third discusses how to give confused children who are involved in custody battles an alternative to acting out.…

  14. A Guide for Reading: How Parents Can Help Their Children Be Ready To Read and Ready To Learn = Guia Para Leer: Como los padres pueden preparar a sus hijos a leer y aprender desde la infancia.

    White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, Washington, DC.

    As part of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, this brochure (in English and Spanish) provides a guide to assist parents in helping their children become ready to read and to learn. The suggestions include: (1) talking to infants/toddlers to help them learn to speak and understand the meaning of words; (2)…

  15. Helping Families: To Help Themselves.

    International Journal of Family Therapy, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Considers various social changes affecting the American family including: the rise in single-person households; growing percentage of older adults; the increase in single-parent families; and the increase in working married women. Discusses various needs of children and older adults, as well as the role of community organizations. Prepared by The…

  16. Does language help regularity learning? The influence of verbalizations on implicit sequential regularity learning and the emergence of explicit knowledge in children, younger and older adults.

    Ferdinand, Nicola K; Kray, Jutta

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed at investigating the ability to learn regularities across the life span and examine whether this learning process can be supported or hampered by verbalizations. For this purpose, children (aged 8-10 years) and younger (aged 19-30 years) and older (aged 70-80 years) adults took part in a sequence learning experiment. We found that verbalizing sequence-congruent information during learning is a powerful tool to generate explicit knowledge and it is especially helpful for younger adults. Although recent research suggests that implicit learning can be influenced by directing the participants' attention to relevant aspects of the task, verbalizations had a much weaker influence on implicit than explicit learning. Our results show that verbalizing during learning slows down reaction times (RTs) but does not influence the amount of implicit learning. Especially older adults were not able to overcome the cost of the dual-task situation. Younger adults, in contrast, show an initial dual-tasking cost that, in the case of a helpful verbalization, is overcome with practice and turns into a RT and learning benefit. However, when the verbalization is omitted this benefit is lost, that is, better implicit learning seems to be confined to situations in which the supporting verbalization is maintained. Additionally, we did not find reliable age differences in implicit learning in the no verbalization groups, which speaks in favor of age-invariant models of implicit learning across the life span. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Helping Grieving Children and Teenagers

    ... of them, and will likely experience feelings of insecurity, clinginess, and abandonment. May worry that they are ... question their faith or their understanding of the world. May not be receptive to support from adult ...

  18. Helping Children with Congenital CMV

    ... loss can affect your child’s ability to develop communication, language, and social skills. Bringing your child to services such as speech, ... maintained by: Office of the Associate Director for Communication, Digital Media Branch, Division of Public Affairs ... Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov TOP

  19. May functional imaging be helpful for behavioral assessment in children? Regions of motor and associative cortico-subcortical circuits can be differentiated by laterality and rostrality

    Julia M. August

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cortico-subcortical circuits are organized into the sensorimotor, associative and limbic loop. These neuronal preconditions play an important role regarding the understanding and treatment of behavioral problems in children. Differencing evidence argues for a lateralized organization of the sensorimotor loop and a bilateral (i.e. non-lateralized organization of the associative loop. However, a firm behavioral-neurobiological distinction of these circuits has been difficult, specifically in children. Objectives: Thus, the aim was a comprehensive functional visualization and differentiation of the sensorimotor and the associative circuit during childhood. As a new approach, laterality and rostrality features were used to distinguish between the two circuits within one single motor task. Methods: 24 healthy boys performed self-paced index finger tapping with each hand separately during functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla. Results: A contrast analysis for left against right hand movement revealed lateralized activation in typical sensorimotor regions such as primary sensorimotor cortex, caudal supplementary motor area (SMA, caudal putamen and thalamus. A conjunction analysis confirmed bilateral involvement of known associative regions including pre-SMA, rostral SMA and rostral putamen. Conclusion: A functional visualization of two distinct corticostriatal circuits is provided in childhood. Both, the sensorimotor and associative circuit may be discriminated by their laterality characteristics already in minors. Additionally, the results support the concept of a modified functional subdivision of the SMA in a rostral (associative and caudal (motor part. A further development of this approach might help to nurture behavioral assessment and neurofeedback training in child mental health.

  20. 'Maybe I will give some help…. maybe not to help the eyes but different help': an analysis of care and support of children with visual impairment in community settings in Malawi.

    Gladstone, M; McLinden, M; Douglas, G; Jolley, E; Schmidt, E; Chimoyo, J; Magombo, H; Lynch, P

    2017-07-01

    Visual impairment in children is common in low and middle-income settings. Whilst visual impairment (VI) can impact on the development of children, many reach full potential with appropriate early intervention programmes. Although there is increased emphasis on early child development globally, it is not yet clear how to provide specific programmes for children with VI in low and middle-income settings. This study aims to identify facilitators and barriers to the provision of a developmental stimulation programme for children with VI in rural and urban Malawi. We undertook 6 focus groups, 10 home observations and 20 in-depth interviews with carers of children with VI under 6 years in urban and rural Southern Malawi. We utilised topic guides relating to care, play, communication and feeding. Qualitative data were subject to thematic analysis that included placing themes within Bronfenbrenner's ecological framework. We established authenticity of themes through feedback from participants. We identified themes within Bronfenbrenner's framework at five levels: (1) blindness acting as a barrier to stimulation and communication, health and complex needs all affecting the individual child; (2) understanding of VI, ability to be responsive at the microsystem level of the carer; (3) support from other carers at microsystem level within a mesosystem; (4) support from other professionals (knowledge of, identification and management of children with VI, responsibilities and gender roles, environmental safety and prejudice, stigma and child protection all at the level of the exosystem. This study has revealed the requirements needed in order to produce meaningful and appropriate programmes to support nutrition, care and early stimulation for children with VI in this and similar African settings. This includes supporting carers to understand their child's developmental needs, how to better communicate with, feed and stimulate their child; offering advice sensitive to carers

  1. The Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP — An Overview of and Recommendations Arising from the Conceptualisation and Development of an Innovative Approach to Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Children and Their Families

    Jenny Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the rise in childhood obesity, there remains a paucity of evidence for effective interventions that engage children and parents sufficiently to make and sustain lifestyle behaviour change. The Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP is a school-located obesity prevention programme, which has been developed with teachers, families and healthcare professionals. The underpinning assumption in the development of HeLP was to take a relational approach to changing behaviour, building relationships with the schools, children and their families to create supportive environments for healthy lifestyle choices. Thus, HeLP was conceptualised as a complex intervention within a complex system and developed as a dynamic, evolving set of processes to support and motivate children towards healthy behaviours. The delivery methods used are highly interactive and encourage identification with and ownership of the healthy lifestyle messages so that the children are motivated to take them home to their parents and effect change within the family. We have good evidence that HeLP engages schools and children such that they want to participate in the Programme. Results from an exploratory trial showed that the Programme is feasible and acceptable and has the potential to change behaviours and affect weight status. This paper presents an overview of and recommendations arising from the conceptualization; development and evaluation of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme as part of a special issue focusing on novel approaches to the global problem of childhood obesity.

  2. To Help or Not to Help? The Relation between Jewish Children's Perceptions of Their Parent Attitudes about Bullying and Pro-Social Engagement with Classmates in Bullying Instances

    Joel, Penny

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to focus on the influence that children's perceptions of their parents' attitudes about bullying has on their own attitudes about bullying and defending victims, as well as their actual defending behavior and general pro-social behavior. This study utilizes data collected for a previous study of the BRAVE bully…

  3. Como ayudar a su hijo durante los primeros anos de la adolescencia: Para los padres con ninos entre las edades de 10 a 14 anos (Helping Your Child through Early Adolescence: For Parents of Children from 10 through 14).

    Paulu, Nancy

    Recognizing that parents and families can greatly influence the development of their 10- through 14-year-olds, this Spanish-language booklet is part of a national effort to provide parents with the latest research and practical information to help them support their children both at home and in school. The booklet is organized in 13 sections…

  4. Ayudando a Ninos Dotados a Volar: Una Guia Practica para Padres y Maestros (Helping Gifted Children Soar: A Practical Guide for Parents and Teachers).

    Strip, Carol A.

    Intended for parents of gifted children, this book, in Spanish, stresses the importance of positive relationships between parents and teachers as they work to meet children's academic, emotional, and social needs. Individual chapters address the following topics: (1) parenting the gifted child as a wild roller coaster ride; (2) determining whether…

  5. Awareness, understanding, and help seeking for behaviour problems by parents of primary school age children in Central Jakarta: A qualitative study

    Tjhin Wiguna

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion This study emphasizes the need to increase parents’ awareness and understanding and helping agencies so they can recognize the problems accurately and overcome the barriers appropriately. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:18-25].

  6. Impacts of online peer support for children with asthma and allergies: It just helps you every time you can't breathe well".

    Stewart, Miriam; Letourneau, Nicole; Masuda, Jeffrey R; Anderson, Sharon; McGhan, Shawna

    2013-01-01

    Children with asthma and allergies experience social isolation and gaps in social support particularly from peers. The objective of this pilot study was to design and test an accessible online support intervention for these children. Support was delivered by peer mentors with asthma and allergies and a professional. Weekly support groups were conducted over 8 weeks using Go to Meeting and Club Penguin. Quantitative measures and a qualitative interview were administered. Significant increases in perceived support and support-seeking coping and trends in decreased loneliness emerged at post-test. Participants also reported increased self-confidence and satisfaction with the intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of active stakeholder involvement on recruitment, retention and engagement of schools, children and their families in the cluster randomised controlled trial of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP): a school-based intervention to prevent obesity.

    Lloyd, J; McHugh, C; Minton, J; Eke, H; Wyatt, K

    2017-08-14

    Recruitment and retention of participants is crucial for statistical power and internal and external validity and participant engagement is essential for behaviour change. However, many school-based interventions focus on programme content rather than the building of supportive relationships with all participants and tend to employ specific standalone strategies, such as incentives, to improve retention. We believe that actively involving stakeholders in both intervention and trial design improves recruitment and retention and increases the chances of creating an effective intervention. The Healthy Lifestyles Programme, HeLP (an obesity prevention programme for children 9-10 years old) was developed using intervention mapping and involved extensive stakeholder involvement in both the design of the trial and the intervention to ensure that: (i) delivery methods were suitably engaging, (ii) deliverers had the necessary skills and qualities to build relationships and (iii) the intervention dovetailed with the National Curriculum. HeLP was a year-long intervention consisting of 4 multi-component phases using a range of delivery methods. We recruited 1324 children from 32 schools from the South West of England to a cluster-randomised controlled trial to determine the effectiveness of HeLP in preventing obesity. The primary outcome was change in body mass index standard deviation score (BMI SDS) at 24 months post randomisation. Secondary outcomes included additional anthropometric and behavioural (physical activity and diet) measures at 18 and 24 months. Anthropometric and behavioural measures were taken in 99%, 96% and 94% of children at baseline, 18 and 24 months, respectively, with no differential follow up between the control and intervention groups at each time point. All children participated in the programme and 92% of children and 77% of parents across the socio-economic spectrum were considered to have actively engaged with HeLP. We attribute our excellent

  8. Manejando las burlas: Como los padres pueden ayudar a sus hijos (Easing the Teasing: How Parents Can Help Their Children). ERIC Digest.

    Freedman, Judy S.

    Children who are teased on a school bus, in class, or during recess often do not want to return to school. Unfortunately, teasing can occur anywhere, and it is difficult to prevent--despite the best efforts of parents, teachers, and school administrators to create a more cooperative atmosphere. This Spanish-language Digest discusses different…

  9. Helping the Helpers: An International Training Program for Professionals Providing Social Services for HIV-Positive Children and Their Families in Southern Kazakhstan

    Tartakovsky, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Over one hundred children and some of their parents were infected with HIV in state hospitals in the Chimkent region in Southern Kazakhstan. After this tragedy, the Regional Department of Public Health organized social services for these families and asked the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) to provide them with training and…

  10. Beyond Piñatas, Fortune Cookies, and Wooden Shoes: Using the World Wide Web to Help Children Explore the Whole Wide World

    Kirkwood, Donna; Shulsky, Debra; Willis, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The advent of technology and access to the internet through the World Wide Web have stretched the traditional ways of teaching social studies beyond classroom boundaries. This article explores how teachers can create authentic and contextualized cultural studies experiences for young children by integrating social studies and technology. To…

  11. Observation of the Effectiveness of Drama Method in Helping to Acquire the Addition-Subtraction Skills by Children at Preschool Phase

    Soydan, Sema; Quadir, Seher Ersoy

    2013-01-01

    Principal aim of this study is to show the effectiveness of the program prepared by researchers in order to enable 6 year-old children attending pre-school educational institutions to effectively gain addition subtraction skills through a drama-related method. The work group in the research comprised of 80 kids who continued their education in…

  12. Helping Youth Decide: A Workshop Guide.

    Duquette, Donna Marie; Boo, Katherine

    This guide was written to complement the publication "Helping Youth Decide," a manual designed to help parents develop effective parent-child communication and help their children make responsible decisions during the adolescent years. The workshop guide is intended to assist people who work with families to provide additional information and…

  13. The enigma of number: why children find the meanings of even small number words hard to learn and how we can help them do better.

    Michael Ramscar

    Full Text Available Although number words are common in everyday speech, learning their meanings is an arduous, drawn-out process for most children, and the source of this delay has long been the subject of inquiry. Children begin by identifying the few small numerosities that can be named without counting, and this has prompted further debate over whether there is a specific, capacity-limited system for representing these small sets, or whether smaller and larger sets are both represented by the same system. Here we present a formal, computational analysis of number learning that offers a possible solution to both puzzles. This analysis indicates that once the environment and the representational demands of the task of learning to identify sets are taken into consideration, a continuous system for learning, representing and discriminating set-sizes can give rise to effective discontinuities in processing. At the same time, our simulations illustrate how typical prenominal linguistic constructions ("there are three balls" structure information in a way that is largely unhelpful for discrimination learning, while suggesting that postnominal constructions ("balls, there are three" will facilitate such learning. A training-experiment with three-year olds confirms these predictions, demonstrating that rapid, significant gains in numerical understanding and competence are possible given appropriately structured postnominal input. Our simulations and results reveal how discrimination learning tunes children's systems for representing small sets, and how its capacity-limits result naturally out of a mixture of the learning environment and the increasingly complex task of discriminating and representing ever-larger number sets. They also explain why children benefit so little from the training that parents and educators usually provide. Given the efficacy of our intervention, the ease with which it can be implemented, and the large body of research showing how early

  14. Comparison of gut-directed hypnotherapy and unspecific hypnotherapy as self-help format in children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized pilot study.

    Gulewitsch, Marco D; Schlarb, Angelika A

    2017-12-01

    Psychosocial treatments for chronic abdominal pain in childhood or adolescence are effective, but time consuming and hardly available. In the present study, gut-directed hypnotherapy (GDHT) and unspecific hypnotherapy (UHT) were compared to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a hypnotherapeutic self-help intervention. Children/adolescents between 6 and 17 years of age with chronic abdominal pain were randomized to GDHT or UHT. The treatment period was 12 weeks each. Measurements were performed before and after treatment. The primary outcome was a pain diary. Analysis was carried out as per protocol. Of 45 participants included, 13 were lost to follow-up. Thirty-two participants (14 GHDT, 18 UHT) were analyzed. Dropouts had higher pain severity. Completers in both conditions showed good adherence and a similar decrease in days with pain and pain duration. Pain intensity decreased only in the UHT condition. Eleven participants (two GDHT, nine UHT) achieved clinical remission (>80% improvement) and 13 participants (seven GDHT, six UHT) improved significantly (30-80%). Results suggest a high efficacy of standardized home-based hypnotherapy for children/adolescents with abdominal pain. Children/adolescents with high pain severity are at risk of dropping out. The UHT condition showed slight evidence of superiority, but conditions were equivalent on most outcomes. Taken together, self-help approaches based on hypnotherapy could close a treatment gap and prevent chronification.

  15. Going Online: Helping Technical Communicators Help Translators.

    Flint, Patricia; Lord van Slyke, Melanie; Starke-Meyerring, Doreen; Thompson, Aimee

    1999-01-01

    Explains why technical communicators should help translators. Offers tips for creating "translation-friendly" documentation. Describes the research and design process used by the authors to create an online tutorial that provides technical communicators at a medical technology company the information they need to help them write and…

  16. What future research should bring to help resolving the debate about the efficacy of EEG-neurofeedback in children with ADHD

    Madelon A. Vollebregt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a rising amount of randomized controlled trials, reviews, and meta-analyses relating to the efficacy of electroencephalographic-neurofeedback (EEG-NF in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD have been published. Although clinical reports and open treatment studies suggest EEG-NF to be effective, double blind placebo-controlled studies as well as a rigorous meta-analysis failed to find support for the efficacy of EEG-NF. Since absence of evidence does not equate with evidence of absence, we will outline how future research might overcome the present methodological limitations. To provide conclusive evidence for the presence or absence of the efficacy of EEG-NF in the treatment of ADHD, there is a need to set up a well-designed study that ensures optimal implementation and embedding of the training, and possibly incorporates different forms of neurofeedback.

  17. Depression--Medicines To Help You

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Depression--Medicines To Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... medicines for depression. Important Warnings about Medicines for Depression Children and teens who take antidepressants may be ...

  18. Do fatty acids help in overcoming reading difficulties? A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and carnosine supplementation on children with dyslexia.

    Kairaluoma, L; Närhi, V; Ahonen, T; Westerholm, J; Aro, M

    2009-01-01

    There are claims that dietary supplementation of unsaturated fatty acids could help children with dyslexia to overcome their reading problems. However, these claims have not yet been empirically tested. This study was designed to test whether dietary supplementation was superior to placebo in treating reading, spelling or other reading-related skills of children with dyslexia. The experimental group (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, n = 30) ate dietary supplements and the control group (placebo, n = 31) placebos during the 90-day treatment period. The supplements contained omega-3 fatty acid (ethyl-EPA, 500 mg/day) and carnosine (400 mg/day). The groups were matched for reading skills, grade, gender, attention problems, intelligence and amount of special education. The literacy-related skills of the two groups were assessed before and after the treatment period. No group differences were observed between EPA and placebo in measures of reading accuracy or speed, spelling, decoding fluency, arithmetical skills, reading-related language skills, attention or behavioural problems. The present findings do not support the hypothesis that omega-3 fatty acid (ethyl-EPA) or carnosine has a role in the treatment of reading and spelling problems in children with dyslexia.

  19. Helping Your Overweight Child.

    National Inst. of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Currently, at least one child in five is overweight. Although children have fewer health problems from weight than adults, overweight children are at high risk for many health problems including heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke. Several factors are cited as to why children become overweight. Genetics, lack of exercise, and…

  20. Helping Your Child Who is Overweight

    ... check your child's overall health and growth over time and tell you if weight management may be helpful. Many children who are still ... jungle gym at the playground or joining a sports team or dance class. Help your child find ... time with the computer, television, cell phone, and other ...

  1. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Help Teens Manage Diabetes Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table ... healthy behaviors, and conflict resolution. The CST training helps diabetic teens to make good decisions when it ...

  2. Help prevent hospital errors

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000618.htm Help prevent hospital errors To use the sharing features ... in the hospital. If You Are Having Surgery, Help Keep Yourself Safe Go to a hospital you ...

  3. Help with Hives

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Help With Hives KidsHealth / For Kids / Help With Hives What's in this article? What Are ... about what happened. The doctor can try to help figure out what might be causing your hives, ...

  4. A helping hand

    Mirjam de Klerk; Alice de Boer; Sjoerd Kooiker; Inger Plaisier; Peggy Schyns

    2014-01-01

    Original title: Hulp geboden   The help provided to people with a care need is about to undergo major changes in the Netherlands. People who need help will be expected to rely more on help from members of their network. What are the opportunities for informal carers and volunteers, and where

  5. Helping for Change

    Neuringer, Allen; Oleson, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    In "Helping for Change," Allen Neuringer and Kathryn Oleson describe another strategy that individuals can use to achieve their green goals. You might ask, "How can helping someone else help me change when I'm in the habit of not fulfilling my own promises?" The authors answer that question by explaining how the social reinforcement in a helping…

  6. How to help teachers' voices.

    Saatweber, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that teachers are at high risk of developing occupational dysphonia, and it has been widely accepted that the vocal characteristics of a speaker play an important role in determining the reactions of listeners. The functions of breathing, breathing movement, breathing tonus, voice vibrations and articulation tonus are transmitted to the listener. So we may conclude that listening to the teacher's voice at school influences children's behavior and the perception of spoken language. This paper presents the concept of Schlaffhorst-Andersen including exercises to help teachers improve their voice, breathing, movement and their posture. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Handi Helps, 1985

    Handi Helps, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The six issues of Handi Helps presented here focus on specific issues of concern to the disabled, parents, and those working with the disabled. The two-page handi help fact sheets focus on the following topics: child sexual abuse prevention, asthma, scoliosis, the role of the occupational therapist, kidnapping, and muscular dystrophy. Each handi…

  8. Hooked on Helping

    Longhurst, James; McCord, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In this article, teens presenting at a symposium on peer-helping programs describe how caring for others fosters personal growth and builds positive group cultures. Their individual thoughts and opinions are expressed.

  9. Does Taking Photographs Help?

    Hand, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Since many people tend to use photographs as memory anchors, this author decided she wanted to know whether the process of capturing and manipulating an image taken during a learning activity would act as a memory anchor for children's visual, auditory and kinaesthetic memories linked to their cognitive learning at the time. In plain English,…

  10. Helping Families Succeed in Two Worlds.

    Murray, Vivian

    Kamehameha Schools' Prekindergarten Educational Program (PREP) was started in 1978 to prepare at-risk Hawaiian families and their children for success in school. PREP's direct services include: (1) parent-infant educational services, including home visits to help parents prepare for a new baby and later learn appropriate child development…

  11. Helicopter Parents Help Students, Survey Finds

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Helicopter parents, notorious for hovering over their college-age children, may actually help students thrive, according to this year's National Survey of Student Engagement. Students whose parents intervene on their behalf--38 percent of freshmen and 29 percent of seniors--are more active in and satisfied with college, says the monstrous annual…

  12. Help Your Child Learn To Write Well.

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    Addressing parents, this pamphlet describes ways to help children learn to write well and thereby excel in school, enjoy self-expression, and become more self-reliant. Writing is discussed as a practical, job-related, stimulating, social, and therapeutic activity that receives inadequate attention in many schools. It is emphasized that writing is…

  13. Being 'green' helps profitability?

    Austin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Pollution reduction beyond regulatory compliance is gaining momentum among firms, but managers ask if being 'green' helps profitability. Evidence suggests it doesn't hurt, but when we see environmentally attractive firms with sound financial performance, it cannot yet say which is cause and which is effect [it

  14. Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism.

    Wilhoit, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how and why college students commit plagiarism, suggesting techniques that instructors can use to help student avoid plagiarism. Instructors should define and discuss plagiarism thoroughly; discuss hypothetical cases; review the conventions of quoting and documenting material; require multiple drafts of essays; and offer responses…

  15. Help with Hearing

    ... be placed early to help speech and language development. If your child needs “tubes” (see below), they can be put ... example, instead of saying the sound /t/, your child may always substitute the sound /k/. The words “toy” and "truck” then come out as “kay” and “ ...

  16. Helping Kids Handle Worry

    ... world around them, preteens also may worry about world events or issues they hear about on the news or at ... the news. Parents can help by discussing these issues, offering accurate ... and stress about a world event that's beyond your control, kids are likely ...

  17. Helping Struggling Teachers.

    Tucker, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    About 5 to 15 percent of teachers in 2.7 million public-education classrooms are marginal or incompetent. Assistance plans offer structure, purpose, and remedial help. Plans have six components: definition of the problem, statement of objectives, intervention strategies, a timeline, data-collection procedures, and final judgment. (MLH)

  18. Toddlers' Prosocial Behavior: From Instrumental to Empathic to Altruistic Helping

    Svetlova, Margarita; Nichols, Sara R.; Brownell, Celia A.

    2010-01-01

    The study explored how the meaning of prosocial behavior changes over toddlerhood. Sixty-five 18- and 30-month-olds could help an adult in 3 contexts: instrumental (action based), empathic (emotion based), and altruistic (costly). Children at both ages helped readily in instrumental tasks. For 18-month-olds, empathic helping was significantly more…

  19. Exploring a method for evaluation of preschool and school children with autism spectrum disorder through checking their understanding of the speaker's emotions with the help of prosody of the voice.

    Horie, Mayumi; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2017-11-01

    We attempted to evaluate the ability of 125 preschool and school children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD children) to understand the intentions of those speaking to them using prosody of the voice, by comparing it with that of 119 typically developing children (TDC) and 51 development-age-matched children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD children), and to explore, based on the results, a method for objective evaluation of children with ASD in the early and later periods of childhood. Phrases routinely used by children were employed in the task administered to the children, with the prosody of the voice speaking these phrases changed to express the four emotions (acceptance, rejection, bluff and fooling). The percentage of children with ASD who could correctly identify the emotion of "fooling" was significantly lower than that of TDC, at each developmental age (corresponding to middle kindergarten class to sixth year of elementary school). On the other hand, in the children with ADHD, while the correct answer rate for identifying the emotion of "fooling" was significantly lower than that in the TDC and higher than that in the ASD children at development ages corresponding to the early years of elementary school, it did not differ significantly from that in the TDC and was higher than that ASD children at development ages corresponding to the later years of elementary school. These results indicate that children with ASD find it particularly difficult to understand the emotion of fooling by listening to speech with discrepancy between the meaning of the phrases and the emotion expressed by the voice, although the prosody of the voice may serve as a key to understanding the emotion of the speakers. This finding also suggests that the prosody of the voice expressing this emotion (fooling) may be used for objective evaluation of children with ASD. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  20. Burnout: need help?

    Sari Azade

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout syndrome is a psychological situation induced with working, especially in high-risk parts of the hospitals that affects the physical and mental conditions of the staff. The aim is to identify the characteristics of the staff related to Burnout Syndrome in the Emergency Department (ED. Methods The study includes the Maslach Burnout Inventory and other new individual research questions. The responders were the volunteers and comprised physicians, nurses, nurses' aides from EDs of all urban state hospitals of Adana (43.3%. Burnout scores were analyzed with regard to individual characteristics; supplementary work, marital status, the number of children, occupation, salary, career satisfaction, satisfaction in private life. Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskall-Wallis test were performed using SPSS 15.00. Results There were no relation between Burnout scores and supplementary work, marital status, number of children, occupation, salary, private life satisfaction, except for career satisfaction. Conclusion Presence and severity of Burnout syndrome were linked to career satisfaction without personal features and salaries. All branches of healthcare occupations in ED seem to have been affected by Burnout Syndrome similarly.

  1. Burnout: need help?

    Gulalp, Betul; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Sari, Azade; Koseoglu, Zikret

    2008-12-05

    Burnout syndrome is a psychological situation induced with working, especially in high-risk parts of the hospitals that affects the physical and mental conditions of the staff. The aim is to identify the characteristics of the staff related to Burnout Syndrome in the Emergency Department (ED). The study includes the Maslach Burnout Inventory and other new individual research questions. The responders were the volunteers and comprised physicians, nurses, nurses' aides from EDs of all urban state hospitals of Adana (43.3%). Burnout scores were analyzed with regard to individual characteristics; supplementary work, marital status, the number of children, occupation, salary, career satisfaction, satisfaction in private life. Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskall-Wallis test were performed using SPSS 15.00. There were no relation between Burnout scores and supplementary work, marital status, number of children, occupation, salary, private life satisfaction, except for career satisfaction. Presence and severity of Burnout syndrome were linked to career satisfaction without personal features and salaries. All branches of healthcare occupations in ED seem to have been affected by Burnout Syndrome similarly.

  2. Corona helps curb losses

    Laasonen, M.; Lahtinen, M.; Lustre, L.

    1996-11-01

    The greatest power losses in electricity transmission arise through a phenomenon called load losses. Corona losses caused by the surface discharge of electricity also constitute a considerable cost item. IVS, the nationwide network company, is investigating corona- induced losses, and has also commissioned similar research from IVO International, the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and from Tampere University of Technology. The research work strives to gain more in-depth knowledge on the phenomenon of frosting and its impact on corona losses. The correct prediction of frost helps reduce corona losses, while also cutting costs considerably. (orig.)

  3. Foundation helps refurbish buildings

    Camenzind, B.

    2006-01-01

    This article looks at the activities of the Swiss 'Climate-Cent' foundation, which is helping support the energetic refurbishment of building envelopes. The conditions which have to be fulfilled to receive grants are explained. Work supported includes the replacement of windows and the insulation of roofs and attics as well as outside walls. Details on the financial support provided and examples of projects supported are given. The source of the finance needed to provide such support - a voluntary levy on petrol - and further support provided in certain Swiss cantons is commented on

  4. Technology for helping people

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    The first THE Port hackathon problem-solving workshop was held at CERN from 31 October to 2 November in the framework of the 60th anniversary celebrations. The aim of the event was to develop technological projects that can help to solve the day-to-day needs of people living in areas of the planet that experience conflicts or natural disasters.   Collage of shots from THE Port hackathon. Credit: THE Port association The event was dedicated to humanitarian and social topics inspired by members of non-governmental organisations‬. “There is plenty of room for technology to help in humanitarian fields. That’s why we came up with the idea of bringing people together to work on these topics,” explains Ines Knäpper, Project Manager of THE Port hackathon. “We started six months ago setting up THE Port association.* The success of the event was only possible because of the joint effort of a team of roughly twenty people. They were inspired by the aim...

  5. Migraine Variants in Children

    ... Headaches in Children FAQ Migraine Variants In Children Children Get Migraines Too! Learn More Migraine Information Find Help Doctors & Resources Get Connected Join the Conversation Follow Us on Social Media Company About News Resources Privacy Policy Contact Phone: ...

  6. ‘Maybe I will give some help…. maybe not to help the eyes but different help’: an analysis of care and support of children with visual impairment in community settings in Malawi

    McLinden, M.; Douglas, G.; Jolley, E.; Schmidt, E.; Chimoyo, J.; Magombo, H.; Lynch, P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Visual impairment in children is common in low and middle‐income settings. Whilst visual impairment (VI) can impact on the development of children, many reach full potential with appropriate early intervention programmes. Although there is increased emphasis on early child development globally, it is not yet clear how to provide specific programmes for children with VI in low and middle‐income settings. This study aims to identify facilitators and barriers to the provision of a developmental stimulation programme for children with VI in rural and urban Malawi. Methods We undertook 6 focus groups, 10 home observations and 20 in‐depth interviews with carers of children with VI under 6 years in urban and rural Southern Malawi. We utilised topic guides relating to care, play, communication and feeding. Qualitative data were subject to thematic analysis that included placing themes within Bronfenbrenner's ecological framework. We established authenticity of themes through feedback from participants. Results We identified themes within Bronfenbrenner's framework at five levels: (1) blindness acting as a barrier to stimulation and communication, health and complex needs all affecting the individual child; (2) understanding of VI, ability to be responsive at the microsystem level of the carer; (3) support from other carers at microsystem level within a mesosystem; (4) support from other professionals (knowledge of, identification and management of children with VI, responsibilities and gender roles, environmental safety and prejudice, stigma and child protection all at the level of the exosystem. Discussion This study has revealed the requirements needed in order to produce meaningful and appropriate programmes to support nutrition, care and early stimulation for children with VI in this and similar African settings. This includes supporting carers to understand their child's developmental needs, how to better communicate with, feed and stimulate

  7. Nurses struggle to help pupils with long-term conditions.

    Longhurst, Chris

    2016-10-07

    Most school nurses are not confident they can give essential support to pupils with long-term health conditions. Research by the National Children's Bureau found that, due to heavy workloads and the need to work across several schools, nine out of ten school nurses were less confident they can help children with conditions such as diabetes and asthma.

  8. Help Helps, but Only so Much: Research on Help Seeking with Intelligent Tutoring Systems

    Aleven, Vincent; Roll, Ido; McLaren, Bruce M.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    Help seeking is an important process in self-regulated learning (SRL). It may influence learning with intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs), because many ITSs provide help, often at the student's request. The Help Tutor was a tutor agent that gave in-context, real-time feedback on students' help-seeking behavior, as they were learning with an ITS.…

  9. Helping Your Child through Early Adolescence -- Helping Your Child Series

    ... Bibliography Acknowledgements Tips to Help Your Child through Early Adolescence No Child Left Behind Printable ... Information About... Transforming Teaching Family and Community Engagement Early Learning Helping Your Child Our mission is to promote student achievement and ...

  10. Compensatory help-seeking in young and older adults: does seeking help, help?

    Alea, Nicole; Cunningham, Walter R

    2003-01-01

    Asking other people for help is a compensatory behavior that may be useful across the life span to enhance functioning. Seventy-two older and younger men and women were either allowed to ask for help or were not allowed to ask for help while solving reasoning problems. Although the older adults answered fewer problems correctly, they did not seek additional help to compensate for their lower levels of performance. Younger adults sought more help. There were no age differences, however, in the types of help sought: indirect help (e.g., hints) was sought more often than direct help (e.g., asking for the answer). Exploratory analyses revealed that one's ability level was a better indicator than age of the utility of help-seeking. Findings are interpreted in the context of social and task-related influences on the use of help-seeking as a compensatory behavior across the life span.

  11. Helping HELP with limited resources: the Luquillo experience

    F.N. Scatena; JR Ortiz-Zayas; J.F. Blanco-Libreros

    2008-01-01

    By definition the HELP approach involves the active participation of individuals from a wide range of disciplines and backgrounds, including representatives of industry, academics, natural resource managers, and local officials and community leaders. While there is considerable enthusiasm and support for the integrated HELP approach, a central problem for all HELP...

  12. EPIC: Helping School Life and Family Support Each Other.

    Montgomery, David

    1992-01-01

    Born out of a 1981 murder, Buffalo (New York) Public Schools' EPIC (Effective Parenting Information for Children) program successfully combines parenting, effective teaching, and community programs to help family and school life support each other. Under EPIC, teachers are advised to help students acquire 23 skills involving self-esteem, rules,…

  13. Helpful Entry Level Skills Checklist--Revised Manual [and] Helpful Entry Level Skill Checklist--Revised Edition.

    Child Development Centers of the Bluegrass, Lexington, KY.

    The Helpful Entry Level Skills Checklist was designed to assist preschool teachers in selecting functional skills that children (including children with disabilities) may need to make a successful transition into the public schools. These skills, for the most part, deal with attending, compliance, ability to follow directions, turn taking, ability…

  14. Como Ayudar a sus Hijos a Aprender Ciencia (Helping Your Child Learn Science).

    Paulu, Nancy; Martin, Margery

    Because most parents say they do not or cannot help their children with science, this booklet was designed to help them do so, easily and with pleasure for both parent and child. The introduction presents information on why and how parents should help their children and provides a general orientation to the ideas and activities offered in the…

  15. New Vaccines Help Protect You

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues New Vaccines Help Protect You Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... with a few deaths. Therefore, this vaccine will help reduce one of our most common and potentially ...

  16. Help My House Program Profile

    Learn about Help My House, a program that helps participants reduce their utility bills by nearly 35 percent through low-cost loans for EE improvements. Learn more about the key features, approaches, funding sources, and achievements of this program.

  17. Mental Illness in Children: Know the Signs

    ... how you can help. By Mayo Clinic Staff Mental illness in children can be hard for parents to ... help they need. Understand the warning signs of mental illness in children and how you can help your ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) ... uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, ...

  19. Children and Divorce.

    West, Suzanne E.

    Some basic principles are discussed that can help divorcing parents understand the feelings and behaviors of their children, and guidelines are suggested for parents wanting to help their children adjust to the divorce-induced changes in their lives. The process of divorce is discussed in terms of children's experience, cause and effect, and time.…

  20. Scientists help children victims of the Chernobyl reactor accident. Report on project phase 1 and annex to the report on phase 1: 1.4.1993 - 31.3.1996

    Reiners, C.; Pfob, H.

    1997-12-01

    The bilateral project of Belarus and Germany was commissioned on 1.04.1993 and is placed under the scientific guidance of the Gemeinschaftsausschuss Strahlenforschung. In the framework of the project part devoted to ''therapy and medical training'', covering the period from 1.04.1993 until 31.03.1996, all in all 99 children from Belarus suffering from advanced-stage tumors of the thyroid received a special radio-iodine therapy in Germany. In about 60% of the children complete removal of the tumor was achieved. Another task of the project was to train over the reporting period 41 doctors and physicists from Belarus in the fields of nuclear medical diagnostic evaluation and therapy of thyroid tumors. The project part ''biological dosimetry'' was to investigate the role of micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes, and whether their presence in the lymphocytes permits to derive information on the radiation dose received even several years after the reactor accident. The scientists also examained the role of the micronuclei in follow-up examinations of the radio-iodine therapy. Further studies used the relatively large number of tumors in the children, as compared to the literature available until the accident, to examine whether there are specific mutation patterns to be found in tumot suppressor genes (p-53) in thyroid tumors which might be used as indicators revealing radiation-induced onset of tumor growth. The project part ''retrospective dosimetry and risk analysis'' was in charge of detecting information answering the question of whether the release of I-131, suspected to be critical nuclide, really was the cause of enhanced incidence of thyroid tumors in the children. The project part ''coordination and examination center at Minsk'' was to establish and hold available the support required by the GAST project participants. (orig./CB) [de

  1. Allowing the Voices of Parents To Help Shape Teaching and Learning.

    Nicholson, Karen; Evans, Judith F.; Tellier-Robinson, Dora; Aviles, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    Three teachers describe how parents of deaf, severely disabled, and bilingual children participated in their children's learning. Qualitative research methods were used to help parents share their knowledge with teachers. (SK)

  2. Peer support: helping to influence cultural change.

    Whitmore, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Breastfeeding peer support schemes in Blackpool and Lancashire work closely with midwifery and other partners to offer additional support and encouragement to breastfeeding mothers. Employed and volunteer peer supporters deliver a systematic service in target areas delivering workshops to pregnant mothers, supporting new mothers in hospital, including in the neonatal units, in mothers' homes and in groups at children's centres. Working with health, children's centres, public health and councils, the peer supporters were instrumental in Fleetwood town agreeing to always welcome breastfeeding. They worked with teachers, public health and infant feeding coordinators to deliver a month-long breastfeeding campaign at a local college and, working with health visitors, have engaged with grandmothers to find out how they feel they can help support new mothers. Skilled supervision is essential to ensuring peer supporters work safely and continue to develop their skills and knowledge. Volunteer coordinators play a key role in valuing and organising volunteers.

  3. Help!

    Adams, Caralee

    2006-01-01

    This article presents ten time-saving ideas for teachers. One great time-saving tip is to come in an hour early once or twice a week for grading papers. It is also a great idea if teachers will not give tests on Friday in order to reduce their weekend work.

  4. Helping your teen with depression

    Teen depression - helping; Teen depression - talk therapy; Teen depression - medicine ... teen the most. The most effective treatments for depression are: Talk therapy Antidepressant medicines If your teen ...

  5. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure Page Content Article Body Teens are more ... younger the first time they had intercourse. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure “The pressure on teenagers to have sex ...

  6. Children and Firearms

    ... TV, in movies and videos, and/or playing violent video games. Parents should help protect their children from the ... watch TV, movies, and videos with children; restrict violent video games; limit TV; and disapprove of the violent episodes ...

  7. Toddlers Selectively Help Fair Agents

    Luca Surian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research showed that infants and toddlers are inclined to help prosocial agents and assign a positive valence to fair distributions. Also, they expect that positive and negative actions directed toward distributors will conform to reciprocity principles. This study investigates whether toddlers are selective in helping others, as a function of others’ previous distributive actions. Toddlers were presented with real-life events in which two actresses distributed resources either equally or unequally between two puppets. Then, they played together with a ball that accidentally fell to the ground and asked participants to help them to retrieve it. Participants preferred to help the actress who performed equal distributions. This finding suggests that by the second year children’s prosocial actions are modulated by their emerging sense of fairness.HighlightsToddlers (mean age = 25 months are selective in helping distributors.Toddlers prefer helping a fair rather than an unfair distributor.Toddlers’ selective helping provides evidence for an early sense of fairness.

  8. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words—some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (SES, parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n=62), and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness, and may help identify children at risk for starting behind. PMID:22235920

  9. „Small children are not able to ask that their essential needs be satisfied ...” – the role of Mariavite parochial communities in Łódź in helping children during the World War I [„Dziatwa mała nie jest w stanie prosić o zaspokojenie swych nieodzownych potrzeb”1 – rola łódzkich mariawickich wspólnot parafialnych w niesieniu pomocy dzieciom podczas I wojny światowej

    Joanna SOSNOWSKA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its very beginning, the life of the Mariavite community focused around parishes and churches. It was the parishes that satisfied the religious needs of their members but also performed social functions related to education, culture, and welfare issues. Before, as well as during. World War I, the Mariavite Church was one of the largest religious communities in Łódź. Mariavite parishes in Łódź were established several years before World War I, in the period when Mariavite parishes, independent from the Roman Catholic Church, were organised. The first Mariavite church was built in December 1906, the next in September 1907, and the third and the last after a year, in September 1908. Apart from churches and chapels erected with exceptional speed, institutions for adult parish members and their children were also established, such as libraries, reading rooms, classrooms for girls and boys, schools, shelters, and flats for poor families. They were supposed to serve Mariavite Church members. Directly after the outbreak of the World War I, Łódź Mariavite clergy joined aid campaigns organized in parishes. Food was provided for adults and children on a larger scale; meals were prepared and served in Mariavite parochial kitchens. In that period, care and education institutions for children continued to perform their tasks; however, they intensified their activities aimed at providing meals, clothes, and shoes. The overriding task of Mariavite shelters included care, religious and moral education, and helping children of pre-school age (3–7. Aid was provided to children from poor families of factory workers and craftsmen.

  10. Going Local to Find Help

    ... Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury Going Local to Find Help Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... phone numbers, maps and directions, such as To Find Out More: Visit www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/ ...

  11. Menopause: Medicines to Help You

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Email Print Print and Share (PDF 375 KB) Menopause (sometimes called “the change of life”) is a ...

  12. Drug use among street children and adolescents: what helps? Uso de drogas entre crianças e adolescentes em situação de rua: o que ajuda?

    Yone Gonçalves de Moura

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated to frequent and heavy drug use among street children and adolescents aged 10 to 18 years. A sample of 2,807 street children and adolescents from the 27 Brazilian state capital cities was analyzed. A World Health Organization questionnaire for non-students was adapted for use in Brazil. Data analysis was performed using logistic regression and decision tree models. Factors inversely associated with frequent and heavy drug use were: being age nine to 11 years (OR = 0.1; school attendance (OR = 0.3; daily time (one to five hours spent on the streets (OR = 0.3 and 0.4; not sleeping on the streets (OR = 0.4; being on the streets for less than one year (OR = 0.4; maintenance of some family bonds (OR = 0.5; presence on the streets of a family member (OR = 0.6; not suffering domestic violence (OR = 0.6; being female (OR = 0.8. All of these variables were significant at the p O objetivo do estudo foi verificar fatores associados ao uso frequente e pesado de drogas entre adolescentes em situação de rua no Brasil. Estudo transversal com amostra representativa nacional de 2.807 crianças e adolescentes (10-18 anos. Foi usado um questionário da Organização Mundial da Saúde adaptado para o Brasil e análise dos dados, modelo de regressão logística. Fatores inversamente associados ao uso frequente e pesado de drogas: faixa etária entre 9-11 anos (OR = 0,1; frequentar escola (OR = 0,3; permanecer entre 1 e 5 horas na rua (OR = 0,3 e 0,4; não dormir na rua (OR = 0,4; estar na rua há menos de um ano (OR = 0,4; manter algum vínculo familiar (OR = 0,5; permanecer na rua com algum membro da família (OR = 0,6; não ter sofrido violência doméstica (OR = 0,6; gênero feminino (OR = 0,8. Todas essas variáveis apresentaram p < 0,05. Os achados sugerem que ser mais jovem, ficar menos tempo na rua e manter vínculos com escola e família são importantes fatores de proteção para essa popula

  13. Helping Teachers Help Themselves: Professional Development That Makes a Difference

    Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Tannehill, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    For school administrators to facilitate impactful teacher professional development, a shift in thinking that goes beyond the acquisition of new skills and knowledge to helping teachers rethink their practice is required. Based on review of the professional development literature and our own continued observations of professional development, this…

  14. Tourette Syndrome: Help Stop Bullying

    ... work on Tourette Syndrome Tourette Association information on bullying What it’s like to have Tourette – Mary tells her story What children wish people knew about Tourette Syndrome CDC Children’s Mental Health StopBullying.gov Features Media Sign up for Features ...

  15. In-group bias in children’s intention to help can be overpowered by inducing empathy

    Sierksma, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357399609; Thijs, J.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/187457344; Verkuijten, M.J.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073378542

    An experimental vignette study was conducted among children (8-13years) to examine whether inducing empathic understanding is an effective intervention to overpower peer group boundaries in children's helping. Children were induced or not induced to empathize with the recipient of help, who was or

  16. Nurturing a Self-Help Group

    Marsha A. Schubert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In April 1987, the parent of a child who was both learning disabled and intellectually gifted and talented and a professional educator (the author founded Parents of Gifted and Learning-Disabled Students of Northern Virginia, a self-help group for people who were dealing with the challenges posed by such children. The article begins with a background explaining the need for such a group followed by a history of the group and a description of how it functioned. It then details ways in which the author and the group interacted over the course of 5 years. A major component of this interaction was the members’ partnering in a research study with the author—a process now known as participatory action research (PAR—and the outcomes of that partnership.

  17. Helping as Coping by Siblings of the Disabled.

    Midlarsky, Elizabeth; Hannah, Mary Elizabeth

    Research has shown that siblings can experience either negative or positive mental health outcomes as a result of having a brother or sister with disabilities. When maladjustment occurs, it is frequently attributed to the stress of excessive helping. This research-based paper proposes that siblings of children with disabilities, perceiving…

  18. Sex Education: New Resources Help Parents Talk with Kids.

    Witt, Virginia

    2002-01-01

    To help parents talk with children about sexual health, the Kaiser Family Foundation and National PTA developed a series of free resources for parents (e.g., the booklet "Talking with Kids: A Parent's Guide to Sex Education") to increase parent involvement and communication around sex education. This paper notes the importance of parents…

  19. Child Care Helps America Work and Learn. Issue No. 1

    Child Care Bureau, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Helps America Work and Learn" is a new publication produced by the Child Care Bureau. This new series will highlight some of the many Recovery Act-funded child care success stories from communities across the country that illustrate how the Bureau is working toward the shared goal of supporting children and families. This…

  20. Shape Your Family's Habits: Helping Kids Make Healthy Choices

    ... kids to be active. When it comes to food and physical activity, what you say and do around your children can have a lasting effect. Work ... Choices Help Kids Form Healthy Habits Be a role model. Eat healthy family meals together. Walk or ride ...

  1. Unpaid help: who does what?

    Mirjam de Klerk; Alice de Boer; Sjoerd Kooiker; Peggy Schyns

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Informele hulp: wie doet er wat? There is currently a great deal of interest in the Netherlands in people’s reliance on their own networks in times of need. What can people do for each other when someone needs help because of health problems? And what are they already

  2. Helping fans to get fit.

    Trueland, Jennifer

    A health and weight loss programme supported by nurses and delivered by professional football clubs in Scotland has been hailed a success in helping men to lose weight sustainably. It uses participants love of football to motivate them to make healthy lifestyle changes.

  3. HELP: Healthy Early Literacy Program

    Rader, Laura A.

    2008-01-01

    A daily intensive supplemental reading and writing program was developed to assist students who were: 1. identified with a language disability and 2. identified as at-risk for reading failure in an urban elementary school. The purpose of the program was to help these students understand and develop the connection between oral and written language…

  4. Osteoporosis Treatment: Medications Can Help

    ... help Osteoporosis treatment may involve medication along with lifestyle change. Get answers to some of the most common ... 2017. Khan M, et al. Drug-related adverse events of osteoporosis therapy. ... and management of osteoporosis. European Journal of Rheumatology. 2017;4: ...

  5. Motivational Maturity and Helping Behavior

    Haymes, Michael; Green, Logan

    1977-01-01

    Maturity in conative development (type of motivation included in Maslow's needs hierarchy) was found to be predictive of helping behavior in middle class white male college students. The effects of safety and esteem needs were compared, and the acceptance of responsibility was also investigated. (GDC)

  6. Exercises to help prevent falls

    ... help prevent falls because it can: Make your muscles stronger and more flexible Improve your balance Increase how ... To make your calves and ankle muscles stronger: Hold on to a solid ... of a chair. Stand with your back straight and slightly bend ...

  7. Innovation at UNICEF: How to Help Balance an Asymmetric World

    Fabian, Christopher

    2017-01-10

    Using science, technology, and venture investment to help balance an asymmetric world How do we find solutions to the greatest challenges facing humanity? UNICEF\\'s Office of Innovation (www.unicefstories.org) helps the world\\'s leading children\\'s organization use new methods and approaches to identify, invest in, and scale open source technologies that benefit children, and the world. This talk will share our approach to developing solutions to billion-person problems - a hybrid between the world of Silicon Valley venture capital and the world of global development, policy, and governmental change. Chris will discuss using data, science, and failure to drive investment and development decisions, as well as issues in developing good companies that also want to do good. Examples from Uganda, Estonia, China, Nigeria, and more show that new portfolios of (sometimes surprisingly simple) technologies can create global collaborations around issues important to us all.

  8. Why humans might help strangers

    Nichola Jayne Raihani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans regularly help strangers, even when interactions are apparently unobserved and unlikely to be repeated. Such situations have been simulated in the laboratory using anonymous one-shot games (e.g. prisoner's dilemma where the payoff matrices used make helping biologically altruistic. As in real-life, participants often cooperate in the lab in these one-shot games with non-relatives, despite that fact that helping is under negative selection under these circumstances. Two broad explanations for such behavior prevail. The 'big mistake' or 'mismatch' theorists argue that behavior is constrained by psychological mechanisms that evolved predominantly in the context of repeated interactions with known individuals. In contrast, the cultural group selection theorists posit that humans have been selected to cooperate in anonymous one-shot interactions due to strong between-group competition, which creates interdependence among in-group members. We present these two hypotheses before discussing alternative routes by which humans could increase their direct fitness by cooperating with strangers under natural conditions. In doing so, we explain why the standard lab games do not capture real-life in various important aspects. First, asymmetries in the cost of perceptual errors regarding the context of the interaction (one-shot versus repeated; anonymous versus public might have selected for strategies that minimize the chance of making costly behavioral errors. Second, helping strangers might be a successful strategy for identifying other cooperative individuals in the population, where partner choice can turn strangers into interaction partners. Third, in many real-world situations individuals are able to parcel investments such that a one-shot interaction is turned into a repeated game of many decisions. Finally, in contrast to the assumptions of the prisoner's dilemma model, it is possible that benefits of cooperation follow a non-linear function of

  9. Motivational maturity and helping behavior.

    Haymes, M; Green, L

    1977-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the independent influences of conative development (the Maslow needs hierarchy) upon behavioral aspects of prosocial orientations. It provides a behavioral demonstration of conative effects in a helping paradigm, among college-age men. A comparison of the conative data across the ages of 15-22 provided a cross-sectional view of conative development itself. Conative maturity was found to be predictive of greater helping among college-age men. Situational demands were demonstrated which tended to mask, but not override, these predispositional influences on helping. The cross-sectional data on conative development point to probable movement to early esteem concerns among high school men who have reached the conative level of love and belonging. On the other hand, the stability across the years of 15-22 of proportion of safety concerns suggests fixation of such concerns in those exhibiting them in high school. Results are discussed in terms of conative growth for development of prosocial orientations.

  10. Communicating with Young Children

    Harrelson, Peggy O'Neill, 1947-

    2009-01-01

    Communicating positively with young children helps them develop confidence, feelings of self-worth, and good relationships with others. Adults sometimes have difficulty communicating positively with children when feelings are involved-either their own or the child's. This publication explores ways for parents to improve their communication with children.

  11. Children and Hypertension.

    Carter, Denise

    1983-01-01

    Since children as young as seven years old can suffer from hypertension, all children should have blood pressure checked during physical examinations. Guidelines for testing children's blood pressure are presented along with suggestions about what schools and parents can do to help deal with the problem. (PP)

  12. Perceptions of Help Given to Healthy Older Mothers by Adult Daughters: Ways of Initiating Help and Types of Help Given

    Martini, Tanya S.; Grusec, Joan E.; Bernardini, Silvia Cortese

    2003-01-01

    Older mother-adult daughter dyads (N = 43) addressed two issues pertaining to the ways in which help is initiated (offered, requested, and imposed help) and type of help given (instrumental help, advice, and emotional support) a) mothers' reasoning about these aspects of help, and b) daughters' understanding of mothers' feelings. Both groups noted…

  13. Using Sociodrama to Help Young Children Problem Solve

    McLennan, Deanna Marie Pecaski

    2012-01-01

    Sociodrama is an arts-based, action-oriented tool of individual and collective social exploration and creative problem solving that allows participants to explore and find potential resolutions to issues of concern and conflict in their lives. This article describes how Early Years educators can begin to implement basic sociodrama into their…

  14. How children learn to read and how to help them

    Cullingford, Cedric

    2013-01-01

    This is an introductory guide to the theoretical and practical aspects of the development of reading skills. The book looks at the success or failure of various techniques and provides underpinning theory.

  15. Parental alienation: when parents and children need help

    Marta Filipa Mendonça Gomes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The social changes that are contributing to modifications in family structure are also, among others, associated with an increase in divorces and difficulties in parenting. In this context, there are specific problems that arise such as parental alienation, where one of the parents, through manipulative strategies and maneuvers, tries to tarnish the image of the other, seeking to exclude him of child's life, destroying their bonding. Often, these actions can turn on false allegations of child abuse. For this reason it becomes even more important raising awareness on this issue. This article will focus the concept of parental alienation, as well as its causes, manifestations and effects that are associated with their practice.

  16. Helping Children Cope With Medical Tests and Interventions

    Lang, E.V.; Viegas, J.; Bleeker, C.P.; Bruhn, J.; Geffen, G.J. van

    2017-01-01

    Medical procedures and tests become a challenge when anxiety and pain make it difficult for the patient to cooperate or remain still when needed. Fortunately, a short intervention with hypnoidal language at the onset of a procedure induces a positive and sustained change in the way pain and anxiety

  17. Music Teachers and Music Therapists: Helping Children Together.

    Patterson, Allyson

    2003-01-01

    Provides background information on music therapy. Discusses how music therapy works in the public school setting and offers advice to music teachers. Explores music therapy and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, addressing the benefits of having access to music therapists. (CMK)

  18. Speed Math for Kids Helping Children Achieve Their Full Potential

    Handley, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Popular Australian author and inspirational teacher, Bill Handley, has developed and, over the years, refined methods of teaching mathematics and learning strategies that have achieved amazing results. His best-selling book, Speed Mathematics convinced readers that people who excel at maths use better strategies and are not necessarily more intelligent.This book contains additional methods and applications based on the strategies taught in Speed Mathematics that make the principles clearer, encourage creative thought, and are just plain fun. The book was written for young people but people of

  19. Helping Minority Children in School Psychology: Failures, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Frisby, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Observations that led to the development of the book, "Meeting the Psychoeducational Needs of Minority Students: Evidence-Based Guidelines for School Psychologists and Other School Personnel" (Frisby, 2013), will be discussed. This will be followed by a summary of the wide variety of the difficult and complex issues embedded within…

  20. Seven Ways Parents Help Children Unleash Their Talents

    Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    In his work, psychologist Benjamin Bloom concluded that almost all people can learn anything if provided with the right conditions, and that when a child commits to a talent area, parents must commit as well. Author Ken Kiewra studied real-world prodigies in various domains and shares his perspective on the conditions necessary for success and on…

  1. Helping Children/ Youth with RSD/ CRPS Succeed in School

    ... allowed to walk in the back of the classroom or in the hallway periodically without disruption to others to stretch and move for pain reduction ✔ Establish routines and schedules for learning and extracurricular activities ✔ Be ...

  2. Helping Children with Disabilities through Animal-Assisted Therapy

    Watts, Katie; Everly, Janet Stout

    2009-01-01

    The Delta Society defines animal-assisted therapy as "a goal-directed intervention in which an animal is incorporated as an integral part of the clinical healthcare treatment process." Unlike other animal-assisted activities, animal-assisted therapy, or AAT, is led by a professional such as a physical therapist, occupational therapist,…

  3. Beat gestures help preschoolers recall and comprehend discourse information.

    Llanes-Coromina, Judith; Vilà-Giménez, Ingrid; Kushch, Olga; Borràs-Comes, Joan; Prieto, Pilar

    2018-08-01

    Although the positive effects of iconic gestures on word recall and comprehension by children have been clearly established, less is known about the benefits of beat gestures (rhythmic hand/arm movements produced together with prominent prosody). This study investigated (a) whether beat gestures combined with prosodic information help children recall contrastively focused words as well as information related to those words in a child-directed discourse (Experiment 1) and (b) whether the presence of beat gestures helps children comprehend a narrative discourse (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, 51 4-year-olds were exposed to a total of three short stories with contrastive words presented in three conditions, namely with prominence in both speech and gesture, prominence in speech only, and nonprominent speech. Results of a recall task showed that (a) children remembered more words when exposed to prominence in both speech and gesture than in either of the other two conditions and that (b) children were more likely to remember information related to those words when the words were associated with beat gestures. In Experiment 2, 55 5- and 6-year-olds were presented with six narratives with target items either produced with prosodic prominence but no beat gestures or produced with both prosodic prominence and beat gestures. Results of a comprehension task demonstrated that stories told with beat gestures were comprehended better by children. Together, these results constitute evidence that beat gestures help preschoolers not only to recall discourse information but also to comprehend it. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Patrizia Piotti

    Full Text Available Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor. The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the

  5. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs' abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human's goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs' behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs' behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs' neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human's vocal communication and the presence of the

  6. Do Dogs Provide Information Helpfully?

    Piotti, Patrizia; Kaminski, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are particularly skilful during communicative interactions with humans. Dogs’ abilities to use human communicative cues in cooperative contexts outcompete those of other species, and might be the result of selection pressures during domestication. Dogs also produce signals to direct the attention of humans towards outside entities, a behaviour often referred to as showing behaviour. This showing behaviour in dogs is thought to be something dogs use intentionally and referentially. However, there is currently no evidence that dogs communicate helpfully, i.e. to inform an ignorant human about a target that is of interest to the human but not to the dog. Communicating with a helpful motive is particularly interesting because it might suggest that dogs understand the human’s goals and need for information. In study 1, we assessed whether dogs would abandon an object that they find interesting in favour of an object useful for their human partner, a random novel distractor, or an empty container. Results showed that it was mainly self-interest that was driving the dogs’ behaviour. The dogs mainly directed their behaviour towards the object they had an interest in, but dogs were more persistent when showing the object relevant to the human, suggesting that to some extent they took the humans interest into account. Another possibility is that dogs’ behaviour was driven by an egocentric motivation to interact with novel targets and that the dogs’ neophila might have masked their helpful tendencies. Therefore, in study 2 the dogs had initial access to both objects, and were expected to indicate only one (relevant or distractor). The human partner interacted with the dog using vocal communication in half of the trials, and remaining silent in the other half. Dogs from both experimental groups, i.e. indicating the relevant object or indicating the distractor, established joint attention with the human. However, the human’s vocal communication and the presence

  7. REACHING THE COMPUTING HELP DESK

    Miguel MARQUINA; Roger WOOLNOUGH; IT/User Support

    1999-01-01

    The way to contact the Computing Help Desk (also known as 'UCO' and hosted by IT Division as an entry point for general computing issues) has been streamlined in order to facilitate access to it. A new telephone line and email address have been set: Phone number: 78888Email: Helpdesk@cern.chhopefully easier to remember. Both entries are operational since last December. The previous number and email address remain valid and have been turned into aliases of the above. However we encourage using the latter at your convenience from now on. For additional information please see the article published at the CERN Computing Newsletter 233:http://consult.cern.ch/cnl/233/art_uco.htmlDo not hesitate to contact us (by email to User.Relations@cern.ch) for additional information or feedback regarding this matter.Nicole Cremel, Miguel Marquina, Roger WoolnoughIT/UserSupport

  8. REACHING THE COMPUTING HELP DESK

    Miguel Marquina

    2000-01-01

    You may find it useful to glue the information below, e.g. near/at your computer, for those occasions when access to computer services is not possible. It presents the way to contact the Computing Help Desk (hosted by IT Division as an entry point for general computing issues). Do not hesitate to contact us (by email to User.Relations@cern.ch) for additional information or feedback regarding this matter.Your contact for general computing problems or queriesPhone number:(+41 22 76) 78888Opening Hours:From Monday to Friday 8:30-17:30Email:Helpdesk@cern.chWeb:http://consult.cern.ch/service/helpdeskMiguel MarquinaIT Division/UserSupport

  9. Plutonium helps probe protein, superconductor

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Scientists are finding that plutonium can be a useful research tool that may help them answer important questions in fields as diverse as biochemistry and solid-state physics. This paper reports that U.S. research involving plutonium is confined to the Department of Energy's national laboratories and centers around nuclear weapons technology, waste cleanup and disposal, and health effects. But at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists also are using plutonium to probe the biochemical behavior of calmodulin, a key calcium-binding protein that mediates calcium-regulated processes in biological systems. At Argonne National Laboratory, another team is trying to learn how a superconductor's properties are affected by the 5f electrons of an actinide like plutonium

  10. Endocarditis - children

    Valve infection - children; Staphylococcus aureus - endocarditis - children; Enterococcus - endocarditis- children; Streptococcus viridians - endocarditis - children; Candida - endocarditis - children; Bacterial endocarditis - children; Infective ...

  11. Intervention: Help a Loved One Overcome Addiction

    Intervention: Help a loved one overcome addiction An intervention can motivate someone to seek help for alcohol or drug misuse, compulsive eating, or ... successful. By Mayo Clinic Staff It's challenging to help a loved one struggling with any type of ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  13. Vietnam seeks help expanding voluntary surgical contraception.

    Piet-pelon, N J; Sukop, S

    1992-07-01

    Recent surveys by the Vietnamese Ministry of Health suggest that 60% of married women desire no more children. Yet only 2% of currently married women and less than 1/2 of 1% of their partners use sterilization. Underscoring the high unmet need for effective family planning, over 1 million abortions (legal in Vietnam for the past 20 years) are performed annually. This rate corresponds to 1 abortion for every live birth. The Ministry of Health has recently welcomed a variety of organizations, including AVSC, whose assistance can help expand the country's family planning programs. Sorely lacking in supplies, equipment, and trained personnel, Vietnam has merited priority status--2nd only to China and India--from the UNFPA, which has committed $36 million over the next 4 years. Other organizations currently working in Vietnam include the Population Council, the Population Crisis Committee, and the International Planned Parenthood Federation. Despite enormous casualties during the war years, and a decrease since the 1970s in average family size from 6 to 4 children, the population of Vietnam has continued to grow rapidly, far outpacing economic growth. Currently 67 million, the population is expected to reach 80 million by the year 2000. The average Vietnamese annual income is only $195, among the lowest in the world. Doi moi, the process of economic reform begun in 1986, coupled with new government incentives for families who have no more than 2 children, is changing the face of family planning in Vietnam. Newly opened pharmacies sell imported birth control pills and condoms (to those who can afford them), while government hospitals and health clinics provide mainly IUDs, in addition to limited supplies of pills and condoms. Throughout the country, some 8000 community-level health centers are staffed by nurse-midwives trained in family planning. Voluntary sterilization is available at the district, provincial, and national hospitals. All married women may obtain family

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Full Text Available ... your child’s body. MRI may be used to help diagnose or monitor treatment for a variety of ... uses of the procedure? MRI is used to help diagnose a wide range of conditions in children ...

  15. Isotopes Help Design Better Nutrition Programmes

    Mohamad, Daud

    2014-01-01

    Good nutrition is essential for good health. To ensure proper nutrition, energydense fat, protein and carbohydrates need to be accompanied by vitamins and minerals. Malnutrition is the result of too much food or too little food and a lack of variety in the kinds of food eaten. More than 30% of young children suffer from some form of malnutrition with devastating consequences for health, learning, future earning potential, economic development, resilience and security. Undernutrition in early life, when accompanied by excessive weight gain later in childhood, increases the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally, with at least 2.8 million adults dying each year from diseases related to overweight or obesity such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and some forms of cancer. Stable isotope techniques play an important role in the development and monitoring of interventions against malnutrition. Compared to other conventional techniques, these methods, which do not involve radiation, offer much more sensitive and specific measurements. They can be used to establish the ratio of lean tissue to fat in body composition; to estimate the number of calories spent each day; to determine whether breastfed babies are exclusively breastfed according to the recommendations issued by the World Health Organization (WHO); to assess a person’s vitamin A reserves; and to establish how well iron and zinc are utilized from local foods and diets. This provides Member States with information to help them design or improve their national health and nutrition programmes

  16. Helping You Help Me: The Role of Diagnostic (In)congruence in the Helping Process within Organizations

    Fisher, Colin M.; Pillemer, Julianna; Amabile, Teresa M.

    2014-01-01

    Through an inductive, multi-method field study at a major design firm, we investigated the helping process in project work and how that process affects the success of a helping episode, as perceived by help-givers and/or -receivers. We used daily diary entries and weekly interviews from four project teams, and a separate sample of critical incident interviews, to induce process models of successful and unsuccessful helping episodes. We found that, in unsuccessful episodes, help-givers and -re...

  17. Naturally occurring tolerance acquisition to foods in previously allergic children is characterized by antigen specificity and associated with increased subsets of regulatory T cells.

    Qamar, N; Fishbein, A B; Erickson, K A; Cai, M; Szychlinski, C; Bryce, P J; Schleimer, R P; Fuleihan, R L; Singh, A M

    2015-11-01

    Food allergy affects approximately 6-8% of children, and increasing in prevalence. Some children naturally outgrow their food allergy without intervention, but the mechanisms by which this occurs remain poorly understood. We sought to investigate the role of regulatory T cells in the development of naturally acquired tolerance. Fifty-eight children (1-18 years) with either egg or peanut allergy, recent acquisition of natural tolerance to egg or peanut, or no food allergy were studied. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from these groups were stimulated with relevant antigen for 48 h and flow cytometry performed to characterize both surface (CD3, CD4, CD25, CD14, CD19, and CD127) and intracellular markers (IL-10, Foxp3, and IL-5). Resting PBMC from naturally tolerant patients had significantly increased CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127loFoxp3+ cells, when compared to allergic or control patients (mean 6.36 vs. 2.37 vs. 2.62%, respectively, P naturally tolerant patients also had increased IL-10-expressing CD25+CD127lo cells (6.33 vs. 1.65 vs. 0.7, P naturally tolerant patients suggests an important role for regulatory T cell subsets in the acquisition of natural tolerance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Street children

    Rončević Nevenka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to UNICEF, street child is any child under the age of 18 for whom the street has become home and/or source of income and which is not adequately protected or supervised by adult, responsible person. It has been estimated that there are between 100 and 150 million street children worldwide. Life and work on the street have long term and far-reaching consequences for development and health of these children. By living and working in the street, these children face the highest level of risk. Street children more often suffer from the acute illness, injuries, infection, especially gastrointestinal, acute respiratory infections and sexually transmitted diseases, inadequate nutrition, mental disorders, and drug abuse. They are more often victims of abuse, sexual exploitation, trafficking; they have higher rate of adolescent pregnancy than their peers from poor families. Street children and youth have higher rates of hospitalization and longer hospital stay due to seriousness of illness and delayed health care. Street children/youth are reluctant to seek health care, and when they try, they face many barriers. Street children are invisible to the state and their number in Serbia is unknown. Recently, some non­governmental organizations from Belgrade, Novi Sad and Nis have recognized this problem and tried to offer some help to street children, by opening drop­in centers, but this is not enough. To solve this problem, an engagement of the state and the whole community is necessary, and primary responsibility lies in health, social and educational sector. The best interests of the child must serve as a basic guideline in all activities aimed at improving health, quality of life and rights of children involved in the life and work in the street.

  19. Paying it forward: How helping others can reduce the psychological threat of receiving help

    Alvarez, K.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows that receiving help could be psychologically harmful for recipients, and passing on help to others after receiving help ("helping forward") is a good strategy to improve and restore help recipients' self-competence. Participants (N=87) received autonomy- or dependency-oriented help

  20. Helping your child understand a cancer diagnosis

    ... or movie together, or buy your child some comic books. Visit with other children who have had ... guide for parents. www.cancer.gov/publications/patient-education/children-with-cancer.pdf . Updated September 2015. Accessed ...

  1. The Power of Caring to Help Kids Adjust and Achieve Is Now Documented

    Black, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Teacher warmth and support, say University of Virginia researchers Bridget Hamre and Robert Pianta, have unparalleled power to help children adjust and achieve. Their 2005 study of 910 first-grade students included 5- and 6-year-olds whose mothers had low-level education and children identified with "significant behavior, social, and/or…

  2. Innovative Strategies to Help Families Cope with the Effects of Domestic Violence

    Haeseler, Lisa Ann

    2011-01-01

    Women and children coping with issues of domestic violence abuse urgently require help from early childhood professionals. The U.S. Department of Justice (2008) details these women and children are in peril. This article focuses on female domestic violence abuse. It presents some warning signs of domestic violence. It also offers steps on how to…

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Full Text Available ... What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders that are congenital (present at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to ...

  4. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    ... because they disproportionately affect impoverished people. More on: Neglected Tropical Diseases Prevention One of the most important ways to help prevent these parasitic diseases is to teach children the importance of washing hands correctly with soap ...

  5. Hodgkin lymphoma - children

    ... families share common experiences may help ease your stress. American Childhood Cancer Organization - www.acco.org Leukemia and ... Cancer - Hodgkin lymphoma - children; Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma ... Cancer Institute website. Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma treatment (PDQ) - health professional ...

  6. Home safety - children

    ... that you are going to shoot someone. Help children understand the difference between real guns and weapons they see on TV, movies, or video games. A gunshot can permanently injure or kill someone. ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Full Text Available ... also very helpful. Often, a monitor with children's programming and/or children’s DVDs are available in the ... techniques for a variety of indications, and the functional information gained from nuclear medicine exams is often ...

  8. Ibuprofen dosing for children

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000772.htm Ibuprofen dosing for children To use the sharing features ... much of this medicine can be harmful. How Ibuprofen can Help Your Child Ibuprofen is a type ...

  9. Hurricane Katrina: Barriers to Mental Health Services for Children Persist in Greater New Orleans, Although Federal Grants Are Helping to Address Them. Testimony before the Ad Hoc Subcommittee on Disaster Recovery, Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. GAO-09-935T

    Bascetta, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    The greater New Orleans area has yet to fully recover from the effects of Hurricane Katrina, which made landfall on August 29, 2005. One issue of concern in the recovery is the availability of mental health services for children. It is estimated that in 2008 about 187,000 children were living in the greater New Orleans area. Many children in the…

  10. Tips to Help You Get Active

    ... A Step in the Right Direction Tips to Help You Get Active View or Print All Sections ... and quality of life. Being more active may help you manage your weight. Starting Physical Activity Healthy ...

  11. Help Protect Babies from Whooping Cough

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Help Protect Babies from Whooping Cough Language: English (US) ... Emails Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, ...

  12. Help, Resources and Information: National Opioids Crisis

    ... Search Search Help, Resources and Information National Opioids Crisis Search Search Need Help? Call the National Helpline ... HHS 5-POINT STRATEGY TO COMBAT THE OPIOIDS CRISIS BETTER ADDICTION PREVENTION, TREATMENT, AND RECOVERY SERVICES BETTER ...

  13. Self-Help Groups and Professional Helpers.

    Balgopal, Pallassana R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Suggests innovative solutions for mutual benefits for self-help groups and the professionals. Through a derivative paradigm the role of the professional helper within self-help groups is presented. (Author/BL)

  14. Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile

    ... Subscribe July 2014 Print this issue Health Capsule Physical Activity Helps Seniors Stay Mobile En español Send us your comments A carefully structured, moderate physical activity program helped vulnerable older people maintain their mobility. ...

  15. Anticipated Guilt for Not Helping and Anticipated Warm Glow for Helping Are Differently Impacted by Personal Responsibility to Help

    Erlandsson, Arvid; Jungstrand, Amanda Å.; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    One important motivation for people behaving prosocially is that they want to avoid negative and obtain positive emotions. In the prosocial behavior literature however, the motivations to avoid negative emotions (e.g., guilt) and to approach positive emotions (e.g., warm glow) are rarely separated, and sometimes even aggregated into a single mood-management construct. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anticipated guilt if not helping and anticipated warm glow if helping are influenced similarly or differently when varying situational factors related to personal responsibility to help. Helping scenarios were created and pilot tests established that each helping scenario could be formulated both in a high-responsibility version and in a low-responsibility version. In Study 1 participants read high-responsibility and low-responsibility helping scenarios, and rated either their anticipated guilt if not helping or their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e., separate evaluation). Study 2 was similar but here participants rated both their anticipated guilt if not helping and their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e., joint evaluation). Anticipated guilt was clearly higher in the high-responsibility versions, but anticipated warm glow was unaffected (in Studies 1a and 1b), or even higher in the low-responsibility versions (Study 2). In Studies 3 (where anticipated guilt and warm glow were evaluated separately) and 4 (where they were evaluated jointly), personal responsibility to help was manipulated within-subjects. Anticipated guilt was again constantly higher in the high-responsibility versions but for many types of responsibility-manipulations, anticipated warm glow was higher in the low-responsibility versions. The results suggest that we anticipate guilt if not fulfilling our responsibility but that we anticipate warm glow primarily when doing over and beyond our responsibility. We argue that future studies investigating motivations for helping

  16. Help Options in CALL: A Systematic Review

    Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a systematic review of research investigating help options in the different language skills in computer-assisted language learning (CALL). In this review, emerging themes along with is-sues affecting help option research are identified and discussed. We argue that help options in CALL are application resources that do not only seem…

  17. 6 FAQs About Helping Someone Quit Smoking

    Many people want to help their friends and loved ones quit smoking. But, they often don't know how. Here are 6 frequently asked questions about how to help someone quit smoking to help you get the information you need.

  18. Meteorology/Oceanography Help - Naval Oceanography Portal

    section Advanced Search... Sections Home Time Earth Orientation Astronomy Meteorology Oceanography Ice You are here: Home › Help › Meteorology/Oceanography Help USNO Logo USNO Info Meteorology/Oceanography Help Send an e-mail regarding meteorology or oceanography products. Privacy Advisory Your E-Mail

  19. LITERATURE FOR YOUNG CHILDREN.

    LEWIS, CLAUDIA

    THE QUALITIES WHICH MAKE STORYBOOKS AND PICTURE BOOKS APPEALING TO PRESCHOOL CHILDREN AND THOSE WHICH HELP THEM UNDERSTAND AND MASTER THE USES OF LANGUAGE ARE DISCUSSED BRIEFLY. DIFFERENT TYPES OF BOOKS THAT APPEAL TO PRESCHOOL CHILDREN ARE PRESENTED--BOOKS THAT ENCOURAGE THE HEALTHY EXPRESSION OF EMOTIONS, BOOKS THAT ENABLE THEM TO PARTICIPATE,…

  20. Rhythmic Activities for Children.

    Practical Pointers, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Focusing on the development of fundamental rhythm skills involved in music and movement activities, this teaching guide emphasizes activities that will help children express their feelings and communicate with others, develop perceptual and motor skills, and enhance sensory awareness. Suggestions for involving handicapped children and examples of…

  1. Empowering Children to Cope with Teasing

    ... control will foster relationships, increase compliance, and improve self-esteem. Children who learn, practice, and Amy Smith • Child Life ... Every Kid’s Guide to Personal Power and Positive Self-Esteem by Gershen Kaufman, & ... Can Help their Children. •Pope, A., 2003. Advice for Parents: Helping Children ...

  2. Children with pervasive refusal.

    Lask, B; Britten, C; Kroll, L; Magagna, J; Tranter, M

    1991-01-01

    Four children are described with a potentially life threatening condition manifested by profound and pervasive refusal to eat, drink, walk, talk, or care for themselves in any way over a period of several months. The multiplicity and severity of the symptoms in these children do not fit comfortably into any existing diagnostic category. Long term and highly skilled nursing and psychiatric care is required to help these children to recover. The possible causes of this syndrome are discussed.

  3. Nourishing Children with Books

    Nickols-Richardson, Sharon Michelle, 1965-; Parra, Danielle Elizabeth; Serrano, Elena Lidia

    2009-01-01

    Books with food and nutrition topics, cultural food patterns, and physical activity themes help to improve the quality of life of children by exposing them to a variety of foods and activities through creative stories. This guide helps parents and caregivers select books that achieve this goal.

  4. Helping Behavior in Executives' Global Networks

    Miller, Stewart; Mors, Marie Louise; McDonald, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on research on helping behavior in networks at the upper echelons, we develop and test theory about helping behavior in senior executive networks. We examine the location and relational dependence of the network contact. Our results reveal that executives are more likely to perceive...... insiders in their network to be helpful, but geographic location has no effect on expectations of receiving help. With regards to relational dependence: executives who are more dependent on their contacts are more likely to perceive them to be helpful. We also look at whether perceived helpfulness affects...... an executive’s willingness to engage in risky new business development -- an important performance indicator - and indeed find that those executives that perceive their networks to be helpful are more likely to be willing to take risky decisions. We test these arguments using primary data on 1845 relationships...

  5. Effects of Oxytocin Administration on Receiving Help.

    Human, Lauren J; Woolley, Joshua D; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2017-11-27

    Receiving help can be a "mixed blessing." Despite the many psychosocial benefits it can carry, it sometimes has negative psychological consequences, such as loss in self-esteem or enhanced guilt. It is, therefore, important to understand the factors that modify responses to receiving help from others. We explored the role of the hormone oxytocin (OT) on affective and social responses to receiving help, given the putative role of OT in social bonding and attunement. To this end, we manipulated whether help was received from a same-sex interaction partner (confederate) versus a control condition, crossed with a double-blind administration of intranasal OT (vs. placebo), and examined subjective and observer-rated participant responses to help. We observed significant interactions between OT and the help manipulation. In the placebo condition, receiving help from the interaction partner compared with the control condition had negative consequences, such that participants reported greater negative affect and came to view themselves and their interaction partners more negatively after interacting together on several tasks. What is important, however, is that OT administration buffered against these negative subjective responses to receiving help. Further, outside observers rated participants who received OT administration as expressing greater happiness and gratitude in response to help, relative to those who received placebo. In sum, in the context of receiving help from a stranger, oxytocin administration fostered more positive affective and social responses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Formal home help services and institutionalization

    Yamada, Yukari; Siersma, Volkert; Avlund, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The effect of home help services has been inconsistent. Raising the hypothesis that receiving small amounts of home help may postpone or prevent institutionalization, the aim of the present study is to analyze how light and heavy use of home help services was related to the risk...... for institutionalization. The study was a secondary analysis of a Danish intervention study on preventive home visits in 34 municipalities from 1999 to 2003, including 2642 home-dwelling older people who were nondisabled and did not receive public home help services at baseline in 1999 and who lived at home 18 months...... after baseline. Cox regression analysis showed that those who received home help services during the first 18 months after baseline were at higher risk of being institutionalized during the subsequent three years than those who did not receive such services. However, receiving home help for less than 1h...

  7. Sturdy oaks : oil women never whine - they just outgrow the old gender culture and change it

    Jaremko, G.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of working conditions for women in the oil industry is chronicled, with particular reference to obstacles experienced by women professionals to rise to executive levels. The observations recorded here are based on pioneering research in a doctoral dissertation accepted by the University of Calgary's management faculty in 1998, entitled: T he frontier cowboy myth and entrepreneurialism on the culture of the Alberta oil industry: Professional women's coping strategies: An interpretive study of women's experience'. Obstacles to women rising to the top in the industry are attributed to the demands and challenges of a frontier environment that characterize much of the oil industry, and the world of concrete problems in which oil men live and work, a world in which rationality and objectivity tend to create unambiguous clarity. Some changes have become evident in recent years, but they have not yet penetrated the top levels. There is some effort to accommodate women, but there is still a long way to go to achieve acceptance

  8. The Post-Privatization Role of Out-growers' Associations in Rural Capital Accumulation

    Isager, Lotte; Fold, Niels; Nsindagi, Thobias

    2018-01-01

    Contract farming is widely promoted by multilateral agencies as an engine of economic growth in developing countries. The agencies often stress the need for governments to create strong farmers' organizations that can shoulder the risks associated with contractual relationships with large...... a crucial position with regard to classic agrarian questions of land, labour and capital accumulation....

  9. Outgrowing the Immaturity Myth: The Cost of Defending From Neonatal Infectious Disease

    Danny Harbeson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Newborns suffer high rates of mortality due to infectious disease—this has been generally regarded to be the result of an “immature” immune system with a diminished disease-fighting capacity. However, the immaturity dogma fails to explain (i greater pro-inflammatory responses than adults in vivo and (ii the ability of neonates to survive a significantly higher blood pathogen burden than of adults. To reconcile the apparent contradiction of clinical susceptibility to disease and the host immune response findings when contrasting newborn to adult, it will be essential to capture the entirety of available host-defense strategies at the newborn’s disposal. Adults focus heavily on the disease resistance approach: pathogen reduction and elimination. Newborn hyperactive innate immunity, sensitivity to immunopathology, and the energetic requirements of growth and development (immune and energy costs, however, preclude them from having an adult-like resistance response. Instead, newborns also may avail themselves of disease tolerance (minimizing immunopathology without reducing pathogen load, as a disease tolerance approach provides a counterbalance to the dangers of a heightened innate immunity and has lower-associated immune costs. Further, disease tolerance allows for the establishment of a commensal bacterial community without mounting an unnecessarily dangerous immune resistance response. Since disease tolerance has its own associated costs (immune suppression leading to unchecked pathogen proliferation, it is the maintenance of homeostasis between disease tolerance and disease resistance that is critical to safe and effective defense against infections in early life. This paradigm is consistent with nearly all of the existing evidence.

  10. Helping the Homeless in School and Out

    Holgersson-Shorter, Helena

    2010-01-01

    However much the recession might be receding, the effects remain deep and cruel to families living in poverty. Many have fallen through their communities' social safety nets. Today, families with young children comprise 41% of the nation's homeless population. According to the Institute of Children and Poverty, more than 1.35 million kids in the…

  11. Helping Your Kid Make the Grade.

    Dornbusch, Sandy

    Research indicates that students' activities and relationships with their parents predict grades more surely than parental education, family income, ethnicity, sex, and family structure. Children with extremely permissive parents do not do well and children with extremely authoritarian parents do worse. Inconsistent parenting is even more strongly…

  12. Risk of power in helping professions.

    BÁRTEK, Lukáš

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses aspects of helping professions that could represent a certain ?risk? of using power; it especially focuses on a social work sphere. In the first part, the thesis deals with basic terms that are essential for this issue. It pays attention to power itself and its specifications and connections to the helping professions. Further, it focuses on characteristics of terms that apply to the helping professions and social work or on a formulation of aspects which represent a ris...

  13. Anticipated Guilt for not Helping and Anticipated Warm Glow for Helping are Differently Impacted by Personal Responsibility to Help

    Arvid Erlandsson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One important motivation for people behaving prosocially is that they want to avoid negative and obtain positive emotions. In the prosocial behavior literature however, the motivations to avoid negative emotions (e.g. guilt and to approach positive emotions (e.g. warm glow are rarely separated, and sometimes even aggregated into a single mood-management construct. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anticipated guilt if not helping and anticipated warm glow if helping are influenced similarly or differently when varying situational factors related to personal responsibility to help. Helping scenarios were created and pilot tests established that each helping scenario could be formulated both in a high-responsibility version and in a low-responsibility version. In Study 1 participants read high-responsibility and low-responsibility helping scenarios, and rated either their anticipated guilt if not helping or their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e. separate evaluation. Study 2 was similar but here participants rated both their anticipated guilt if not helping and their anticipated warm glow if helping (i.e. joint evaluation. Anticipated guilt was clearly higher in the high-responsibility versions, but anticipated warm glow was unaffected (in Studies 1a and 1b, or even higher in the low-responsibility versions (Study 2. In Studies 3 (where anticipated guilt and warm glow were evaluated separately and 4 (where they were evaluated jointly, personal responsibility to help was manipulated within-subjects. Anticipated guilt was again constantly higher in the high-responsibility versions but for many types of responsibility-manipulations, anticipated warm glow was higher in the low-responsibility versions. The results suggest that we anticipate guilt if not fulfilling our responsibility but that we anticipate warm glow primarily when doing over and beyond our responsibility. We argue that future studies investigating motivations for

  14. The Relational Antecedents of Interpersonal Helping

    Stea, Diego; Pedersen, Torben; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2017-01-01

    networks are also associated with cognitive costs, which may reduce the focal employee's ability to both recognize the need for help and engage in helping behaviours. For these reasons, the authors assert an inverted U-shaped relation between the size of an ego's social network and engagement in helping...... behaviour. However, high-quality relationships imply higher mutual understanding between the actors, and hence lower cognitive costs. In turn, the position (and threshold) of the curve between network size and interpersonal helping should be influenced by the quality of the relationship between the provider...

  15. Caring for Young Children in the Home.

    Birckmayer, Jennifer; And Others

    Group leaders of 10- to 13-year-olds may use this program guide to help the preteens interact with young children through six discussion meetings and five visits with a preschool child at home. Discussion topics concern (1) the family environment of young children, (2) children's play; (3) children's play areas at home, (4) safety at home, (5)…

  16. Responding to Children's Fears: A Partnership Approach.

    Sorin, Reesa

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study into children's fears and suggests that forging partnerships between parents, children, and teachers is one positive step toward addressing fear in young children. Defines partnerships and asserts that they can help in better recognizing fear displays in young children and in sharing ideas about best practice in responding to…

  17. Consejos para los Padres Sobre la Lectura: Informacion e Ideas para Ayudar a los Ninos Desde la Infancia Hasta Octavo Grado a Tener Exito en la Lectura (Tips for Parents about Reading: Information and Ideas for Helping Children through Grade Eight Succeed with Reading).

    Davis, Deborah; Lewis, Jan Patricia

    Noting that all parents want the best school experience for their children, this booklet, in Spanish, gives parents some ideas about what to expect at different ages and stages of reading development, suggestions for what parents can do at home, and a list of favorite books parents can find in most libraries for parents and children to read.…

  18. Quantum entanglement helps in improving economic efficiency

    Du Jiangfeng; Ju Chenyong; Li Hui

    2005-01-01

    We propose an economic regulation approach based on quantum game theory for the government to reduce the abuses of oligopolistic competition. Theoretical analysis shows that this approach can help government improve the economic efficiency of the oligopolistic market, and help prevent monopoly due to incorrect information. These advantages are completely attributed to the quantum entanglement, a unique quantum mechanical character

  19. Natural and Professional Help during Marital Disruption.

    Toro, Paul A.; Zax, Melvin

    Although few people bring their psychological problems to mental health professionals, research in the area of 'natural' help is rudimentary. To investigate the process and effectiveness of natural professional groups in helping individuals experiencing marital disruption, 42 helpers (14 mental health professionals, 14 divorce lawyers, and 14…

  20. High School Peer Helping: A Program Evaluation.

    Kilgariff, Lisa; Solomon, Mindy; Zanotti, Mary; Chambliss, Catherine

    Peer helpers can act as liaisons to high school guidance departments by identifying problems, making appropriate referrals, and encouraging others to obtain professional help if necessary. An active program can help ensure that in the future students are better prepared to handle conflicts that arise within marriage, career, and family. This study…

  1. Causal Indicators Can Help to Interpret Factors

    Bentler, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    The latent factor in a causal indicator model is no more than the latent factor of the factor part of the model. However, if the causal indicator variables are well-understood and help to improve the prediction of individuals' factor scores, they can help to interpret the meaning of the latent factor. Aguirre-Urreta, Rönkkö, and Marakas (2016)…

  2. Servant Leadership: Teaching the Helping Professional

    Fields, Joyce W.; Thompson, Karen C.; Hawkins, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Robert Greenleaf's principles of servant leadership are relevant to the helping professions, including empowerment and development of others, service to others, and open and participatory leadership. The study of servant leadership was infused into an undergraduate senior capstone experience (an internship) for emerging helping professionals…

  3. Helping Behavior in Multinational Executive Networks

    Mors, Marie Louise; Miller, Stewart; McDonald, Michael

    This study develops a framework that draws upon the socio-psychology and network literatures to explain helping behavior in an executive’s multinational network. Focusing on executives' perceptions of willingness to help, we examine network structure (geographic and organizational boundaries), st...

  4. Quantum entanglement helps in improving economic efficiency

    Du, Jiangfeng; Ju, Chenyong; Li, Hui

    2005-02-01

    We propose an economic regulation approach based on quantum game theory for the government to reduce the abuses of oligopolistic competition. Theoretical analysis shows that this approach can help government improve the economic efficiency of the oligopolistic market, and help prevent monopoly due to incorrect information. These advantages are completely attributed to the quantum entanglement, a unique quantum mechanical character.

  5. Inhalant allergies in children.

    Mims, James W; Veling, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Children with chronic or recurrent upper respiratory inflammatory disease (rhinitis) should be considered for inhalant allergies. Risk factors for inhalant allergies in children include a first-degree relative with allergies, food allergy in infancy, and atopic dermatitis. Although inhalant allergies are rare in infancy, inhalant allergies are common in older children and impair quality of life and productivity. Differentiating between viral and allergic rhinitis can be challenging in children, but the child's age, history, and risk factors can provide helpful information. Allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for asthma, and if one is present, medical consideration of the other is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Guided self-help for the treatment of pediatric obesity.

    Boutelle, Kerri N; Norman, Gregory J; Rock, Cheryl L; Rhee, Kyung E; Crow, Scott J

    2013-05-01

    Clinic-based programs for childhood obesity are not available to a large proportion of the population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a guided self-help treatment of pediatric obesity (GSH-PO) compared with a delayed treatment control and to evaluate the impact of GSH-PO 6-months posttreatment. Fifty overweight or obese 8- to 12-year-old children and their parents were randomly assigned to immediate treatment or to delayed treatment. The GSH-PO includes 12 visits over 5 months and addresses key components included in more intensive clinic-based programs. Children and parents in the immediate treatment arm were assessed at time 1 (T1), participated in GSH-PO between T1 and T2, and completed their 6-month posttreatment assessment at T3. Children and parents in the delayed treatment arm were assessed at T1, participated in GSH-PO between T2 and T3, and completed their 6-month posttreatment assessment at T4. The main outcome measures were BMI, BMI z score, and percentage overweight (%OW). Children in the immediate treatment GSH-PO arm decreased their BMI significantly more than did the delayed treatment arm (BMI group × time = -1.39; P < .001). Similar results were found for BMI z score and %OW. At the 6-month posttreatment assessment, changes resulting from GSH-PO were maintained for BMI z score and %OW but not BMI (BMI time effect = -0.06, not significant; BMI z score time effect = -0.10, P < .001; %OW time effect = -4.86, P < .05). The GSH-PO showed initial efficacy in decreasing BMI for children in this study. Additional efficacy and translational studies are needed to additionally evaluate GSH-PO.

  7. The role of stigma in parental help-seeking for child behavior problems.

    Dempster, Robert; Wildman, Beth; Keating, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between stigma and parental help-seeking after controlling for demographics, child behavior, and barriers to treatment. One hundred fifteen parents of children ages 4 to 8 years were surveyed during well-child visits in a rural pediatric primary care practice. Parental perceptions of stigma toward parents and children were both assessed. Parents believe that children are more likely to be stigmatized by the public and personally impacted by stigma. In linear regression analyses, parents rated themselves as more likely to attend parenting classes with lower levels of self-stigma and greater levels of personal impact of stigma. Stigma toward the child was not associated with help-seeking. Child behavior moderated the relationship between stigma and parental help-seeking. When referring parents to treatment, providers should address potential stigma concerns. Future research should assess both the impact of the stigma of attending treatment and the stigma of having a child with behavior problems.

  8. Brief Intervention Helps Adolescents Curb Substance Use

    ... January 02, 2013 Lori Whitten, NIDA Notes Contributing Writer Drug- and alcohol-involved middle and high school ... and Alaska Natives Asians Children College Students Employees Hispanics or Latinos Inmates and Parolees International Populations LGBT ...

  9. The likelihood of Latino women to seek help in response to interpersonalvictimization: An examination of individual, interpersonal and socioculturalinfluences

    Chiara Sabina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Help-seeking is a process that is influenced by individual, interpersonal, and sociocultural factors. Thecurrent study examined these influences on the likelihood of seeking help (police, pressing charges,medical services, social services, and informal help for interpersonal violence among a national sample ofLatino women. Women living in high-density Latino neighborhoods in the USA were interviewed by phonein their preferred language. Women reporting being, on average, between "somewhat likely" and "verylikely" to seek help should they experience interpersonal victimization. Sequential linear regression resultsindicated that individual (age, depression, interpersonal (having children, past victimization, andsociocultural factors (immigrant status, acculturation were associated with the self-reported likelihood ofseeking help for interpersonal violence. Having children was consistently related to a greater likelihood toseek all forms of help. Overall, women appear to respond to violence in ways that reflects their ecologicalcontext. Help-seeking is best understood within a multi-layered and dynamic context.

  10. Empathic Concern and the Desire to Help as Separable Components of Compassionate Responding.

    Ministero, Lauren M; Poulin, Michael J; Buffone, Anneke E K; DeLury, Shane

    2018-04-01

    When do people experience versus regulate responses to compassion-evoking stimuli? We hypothesized that compassionate responding is composed of two factors-empathic concern and the desire to help-and that these would be differentially affected by perspective taking and self-affirmation. Exploratory (Study 1) and confirmatory (Study 2) factor analyses indicated that a compassion measure consisted of two factors corresponding to empathic concern and the desire to help. In Study 1 ( N = 237), participants with high emotion regulation ability reported less empathic concern for multiple children than for one, but perspective taking prevented this effect. In Study 2 ( N = 155), participants reported less desire to help multiple children, but only in the presence of self-affirmation. In both the studies, empathic concern predicted greater distress while the desire to help predicted greater chances of donating. Compassionate responding may consist of two separable facets that collapse under distinct conditions and that predict distinct outcomes.

  11. HIV and AIDS: Medicines to Help You

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Free Publications HIV and AIDS--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet ... You take these combination drugs along with other HIV drugs.) Brand Name Other Names Combivir lamivudine and ...

  12. How NGOs have helped shape resettlement

    Amy Slaughter

    2017-01-01

    NGOs have a rich history of involvement in case identification and referral for resettlement, and have helped to increase numbers, improve processes and make resettlement more equitable, and accountable, for refugees.

  13. Practical-theological facilitation as skilled helping

    Elmo Pienaar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discussed the idea of skilled helping in relation to what has been put forward as practical theological facilitation. It has been argued that various helping relationships, amongst which the author refers to coaching, facilitation, and therapy has more in common than what differentiates them if epistemology is viewed as a unifying concept. As such the scope of practical theology in terms of the contexts and themes in which it might be involved is said to widen. The public dimension of the organisational context, more so than the congregational context, has been put forward as an important habitus of practical-theological facilitation. The organisational involvement of the practical-theological facilitator in terms of professional-vocational skilled helping takes on an actual role through facilitation and other helping modalities.

  14. Smoking - Medicines to Help You Quit

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Smoking - Medicines To Help You Quit Share Tweet Linkedin ... associated with the use of the medicine. Quit Smoking Tips Quit Smoking… for yourself and for those ...

  15. Are There Treatments That Can Help Me?

    ... impact on your life. Are there treatments that can help me? Tinnitus does not have a cure ... preparations has been proved effective in clinical trials. Can I do anything to prevent tinnitus or keep ...

  16. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Beating Depression …Help Is Available Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... treatments are available from your physician. Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  17. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Click here for the Color Version (PDF 533KB) High blood pressure is a serious illness. High blood pressure is ...

  18. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...

  19. Sociological perspectives on self-help groups

    Adamsen, L; Rasmussen, J M

    2001-01-01

    and significance of self-help groups. FINDINGS: New empirical sociological evidence shows that health care professionals - nurses, psychologists, social workers - have become an integrated part and thus essential actors in self-help groups within as well as outside the framework of the formal health care system...... that it is necessary to introduce new aspects and themes for discussion in the health care debate and the work that goes beyond the predominantly individual orientated treatment and care function....

  20. Family involvement and helping behaviour in teams

    Brummelhuis, L.L. ten; Lippe, T. van der; Kluwer, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Helping behavior at work has become increasingly important, with organizations making more and more use of cooperative work practices. The difficulty is that employees are facing growing demands beyond the workplace. This study investigates the mechanisms by which family involvement (family structure, family tasks, family support) affects helping behavior in teams. Based on a sample of 495 team members, the results show that having a supportive partner and performing care tasks increase helpi...

  1. Motivational interviewing: helping patients move toward change.

    Richardson, Luann

    2012-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a valuable tool for nurses to help patients address behavior change. MI has been found effective for helping patients with multiple chronic conditions, adherence issues, and lifestyle issues change their health behaviors. For Christian nurses, MI is consistent with biblical principles and can be seen as a form of ministry. This article overviews the process of MI, stages of change, and offers direction for further learning.

  2. Using Digital Storytelling to Help First-Grade Students' Adjustment to School

    Fokides, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    When coming to school for the first time, children might face a number of adjustment problems. The study presents the results of a project which used digital storytelling for helping first-grade primary school students during this transitional period. It was examined whether, through the development of the digital stories, students could understand how the school functions and whether this process helped them to change their attitudes and behaviors, thus achieving a smoother adaptation to the...

  3. A Trip to the Zoo: Children's Words and Photographs.

    DeMarie, Darlene

    Field trips are a regular part of many programs for young children. Field trips can serve a variety of purposes, such as exposing children to new things or helping children to see familiar things in new ways. The purpose of this study was to learn the meaning children gave to a field trip. Cameras were made available to each of the children in a…

  4. "Our Guinea Pig Is Dead!" Young Children Cope with Death.

    Thomason, Nita Davison

    1999-01-01

    Describes how children develop a concept of death, and presents suggestions for classroom experiences to help young children cope with death. Considers children's attendance at funerals and how to answer children's questions about death. Lists 14 children's books about death. (KB)

  5. Asking for Help: A Relational Perspective on Help Seeking in the Workplace

    van der Rijt, Janine; Van den Bossche, Piet; van de Wiel, Margje W. J.; De Maeyer, Sven; Gijselaers, Wim H.; Segers, Mien S. R.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the complexity of today's organizations, help seeking behavior is considered as an important step to problem solving and learning in organizations. Yet, help seeking has received less attention in organizational literature. To increase the potential impact of help seeking on learning, it is essential to understand which…

  6. Help-Seeking and Help-Giving for Teen Dating Violence

    Weisz, Arlene N.; Black, Beverly M.

    2009-01-01

    This article is based on numerous research projects conducted by the authors on adolescent dating violence. It reviews the results of those projects as they relate to how teens seek help for dating violence and how teens provide help to their friends in violent dating relationships. It concludes with helpful strategies for adults who work with…

  7. The Grieving Process in Children: Strategies for Understanding, Educating, and Reconciling Children's Perceptions of Death.

    Willis, Clarissa A.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of how young children understand death, and offers concrete strategies for talking to children about death and suggestions for teachers about how to help children of various ages through grief and mourning. Highlights developmental differences in four components of children's understanding of death: irreversibility, finality,…

  8. Predicting help-seeking behavior: The impact of knowing someone close who has sought help.

    Disabato, David J; Short, Jerome L; Lameira, Diane M; Bagley, Karen D; Wong, Stephanie J

    2018-02-15

    This study sought to replicate and extend research on social facilitators of college student's help seeking for psychological problems. We collected data on 420 ethnically diverse college students at a large public university (September 2008-May 2010). Students completed a cross-sectional online survey. We found that students who were aware of close others' (eg, family, friends) help seeking were two times more likely to have sought formal (eg, psychologist) and informal (eg, clergy) help themselves. Tests of moderation revealed the incremental effect (ie, controlling for help-seeking attitudes, internalizing symptoms, cultural demographics) of close others' formal help seeking was strong and significant for men (R 2 = 0.112), while it was negligible and nonsignificant for women (R 2 = .002). We discuss the importance for students-particularly men-to learn about close others' help seeking for facilitating their own help seeking during times of distress.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in children. Preparation will depend on the type ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost- ... to protect the welfare of your child, including close monitoring. Because children are more sensitive to radiation, ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such ... abdomen help determine causes of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... children. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT is used to help ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Full Text Available ... children. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT is used to help ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  16. Muslim Youth Cry Out for Help!

    van de Wetering, W.B.S.; Budak, B.; el Bouayadi- van de Wetering, W.B.S.; Miedema, Siebren

    2012-01-01

    The problems Muslim youth experience in Dutch secular postmodern society. Muslim children and youth are confronted with conflicting norms, values, and expectations at home, in the mosque and in school. If they do not find adults who are able to clarify the conflicts that may arise from this

  17. A Handbook for Helping Parents "Group."

    Bell, Catherine; And Others

    A home based project serving special needs children 0 to 5 years old in a rural area developed a mothers' group designed to increase parents' self esteem, decrease their isolation, and provide more information about their child's development. An introductory section outlines general assumptions of the group and describes a sequence of activities…

  18. Might video games help remedy childhood obesity?

    Obesity is the most prevalent health problem among children in the United States and globally, leading to diverse health problems and staggering costs. Most child obesity prevention interventions are not working well, or not at all. Part of the problem is that the causes of child obesity are not cle...

  19. Chimpanzees help each other upon request.

    Shinya Yamamoto

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of altruism has been explained mainly from ultimate perspectives. However, it remains to be investigated from a proximate point of view how and in which situations such social propensity is achieved. We investigated chimpanzees' targeted helping in a tool transfer paradigm, and discuss the similarities and differences in altruism between humans and chimpanzees. Previously it has been suggested that chimpanzees help human experimenters by retrieving an object which the experimenter is trying to reach. In the present study, we investigated the importance of communicative interactions between chimpanzees themselves and the influence of conspecific partner's request on chimpanzees' targeted helping.We presented two tool-use situations (a stick-use situation and a straw-use situation in two adjacent booths, and supplied non-corresponding tools to paired chimpanzees in the two booths. For example, a chimpanzee in the stick-use situation was supplied with a straw, and the partner in the straw-use situation possessed a stick. Spontaneous tool transfer was observed between paired chimpanzees. The tool transfer events occurred predominantly following recipients' request. Even without any hope of reciprocation from the partner, the chimpanzees continued to help the partner as long as the partner required help.These results provide further evidence for altruistic helping in chimpanzees in the absence of direct personal gain or even immediate reciprocation. Our findings additionally highlight the importance of request as a proximate mechanism motivating prosocial behavior in chimpanzees whether between kin or non-kin individuals and the possible confounding effect of dominance on the symmetry of such interactions. Finally, in contrast to humans, our study suggests that chimpanzees rarely perform acts of voluntary altruism. Voluntary altruism in chimpanzees is not necessarily prompted by simple observation of another's struggle to attain a goal

  20. Responses to Change Helping People Make Transitions

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing state of many organizations is one of change. People who experience major change tend to exhibit one of four patterns of response: entrenched, overwhelmed, poser, or learner. As a leader, you need to understand the patterns of response that people express and to customize intervention strategies to help them make the transition. People can pass through a given response stage and move to one that is more effective--especially if you provide timely intervention and support. This guidebook will help you understand how people, including yourself, are responding to change and what you c

  1. Why Blue-Collar Blacks Help Less

    Smith, Sandra Susan; Young, Kara Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Why are blue-collar blacks less likely to help jobseekers than jobholders from other ethnoracial groups or even than more affluent blacks? Drawing from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 97 black and Latino workers at one large, public sector employer, we find that blue-collar black workers both helped less proactively and rejected more requests for assistance than did blue-collar Latino and white-collar black workers. We attribute blue-collar blacks’ more passive engagement to their...

  2. How To Help Your Child Choose a Career. New and Revised Edition. Today's Youth and Tomorrow's Careers Edition.

    Otto, Luther B.

    This edition of a handbook aimed at helping parents help their children make a career choice has been rewritten and updated. New material begins with the introduction, which provides a rationale for involving parents in their sons' and daughters' career decisions. Other new material includes sections on women and work, minorities and work,…

  3. Rotation placements help students' understanding of intensive care.

    Abbott, Lisa

    2011-07-01

    It is vital that children's nursing students are fit for practice when they qualify and are able to meet various essential skills as defined by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). To gain the knowledge and skills required, students need placements in areas where high dependency and potentially intensive care are delivered. Efforts to maximise the number of students experiencing intensive care as a placement have led to the development of the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) rotation, increasing placements on the PICU from 5 to 40 per cent of the student cohort per year. The lecturer practitioner organises the rotation, providing credible links between university and practice areas, while supporting students and staff in offering a high-quality placement experience. Students say the rotation offers a positive insight into PICU nursing, helping them develop knowledge and skills in a technical area and creating an interest in this specialty.

  4. Acculturation and Help-Seeking Behavior in Consultation: A Sociocultural Framework for Mental Health Service

    Pham, Andy V.; Goforth, Anisa N.; Chun, Heejung; Castro-Olivo, Sara; Costa, Annela

    2017-01-01

    Many immigrant and ethnic minority families demonstrate reluctance to pursue or utilize mental health services in community-based and clinical settings, which often leads to poorer quality of care for children and greater likelihood of early termination. Cultural variations in help-seeking behavior and acculturation are likely to influence…

  5. Spelling Pronunciations Help College Students Remember How to Spell Difficult Words

    Ocal, Turkan; Ehri, Linnea C.

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that children benefit from a spelling pronunciation strategy in remembering the spellings of words. The current study determined whether this strategy also helps adults learn to spell commonly misspelled words. Participants were native English speaking college students (N = 42), mean age 22.5 years (SD = 7.87). An experimental…

  6. Pathways to care : help-seeking for child and adolescent mental health problems

    Zwaanswijk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Although emotional and behavioural problems are relatively common in children and adolescents, they are rarely brought to the attention of general practitioners (GPs) or mental health professionals. The main aim of this study was to investigate the process of help-seeking for child and adolescent

  7. Survivors of Downsizing: Helpful and Hindering Experiences

    Amundson, Norman E.; Borgen, William A.; Jordan, Sharalyn; Erlebach, Anne C.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one downsizing survivors from both the private and public sector were interviewed to determine incidents that either helped or hindered their transition through 1 or more organizational downsizings. A critical incident technique was used to analyze and organize the data around themes that emerged, themes were represented by both positive…

  8. Text Maps: Helping Students Navigate Informational Texts.

    Spencer, Brenda H.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that a text map is an instructional approach designed to help students gain fluency in reading content area materials. Discusses how the goal is to teach students about the important features of the material and how the maps can be used to build new understandings. Presents the procedures for preparing and using a text map. (SG)

  9. Perceived Helpfulness of Teachers in Clinical Courses

    Moate, Randall M.; Holm, Jessica M.; West, Erin M.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical courses are important in the development of students pursuing a master's degree in clinical mental health counseling (CMHC). Despite the importance of clinical courses, little is known about what CMHC students perceive as being helpful about their teachers of clinical courses. To investigate this, we sought the viewpoints of beginning…

  10. How Advertising History Helps Explain Current Practices.

    Lanfranco, Leonard W.

    Students majoring in advertising can benefit from a study of that field in its historical context because such study helps them to understand current practices and to foresee future developments. One model of teaching advertising history within a required course about advertising and society begins with some basic definitions of the advertising…

  11. Changing Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Help.

    Chrisler, Joan C.

    Despite the increasing acceptance of the value of psychotherapy, there are still those who think people should solve their own problems. A study was conducted to investigate the attitudes of college students toward seeking professional help before and after taking a course in abnormal psychology to determine whether exposure to the purposes and…

  12. Teacher Burnout: Will Talking about It Help?

    Grossnickle, Donald R.

    1980-01-01

    Teachers are beginning to collectively voice their complaints about the stresses they face in school. While talking about the problems of low morale and poor school climate won't solve these problems, the public is being alerted that teachers need help, not further criticism. (SJL)

  13. CERN helps Grid cmputing into the mainstream

    Moran, Nuala

    2006-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, has launched the seocnd phase of Openlab, its partnership with IT companies for the development of advanced computing facilities. The industrial partners in this phase, Hewlett Packard, Intel and Oracle, will help build on the experience from the last three years when Openlab worked on cluster and Grid computing (1 page)

  14. Social Exchange in the Natural Helping Interaction.

    Kendall, Karen S.; Kenkel, Mary Beth

    1989-01-01

    Examines rewards and costs to "natural helpers," service-providers separate from any established group. Survey of 19 rural helpers identifies lack of appreciation, time and energy loss, and emotional-spiritual fatigue as costs of helping. Suggests mental health professionals collaborate with helpers. Recommends ways of enlisting helpers'…

  15. Cultural Intentionality: The Core of Effective Helping.

    Ivey, Allen E.

    1987-01-01

    Responds to Lloyd by cautioning counselors regarding the centrality of multicultural awareness in counseling curricula. Maintains the primacy of culture cannot be denied as the first dimension in our thinking as professional helpers. Cultural intentionality is proposed as a metagoal of the helping process--the integration of cultural awareness…

  16. Teaching Primary Science: How Research Helps

    Harlen, Wynne

    2010-01-01

    The very first edition of "Primary Science Review" included an article entitled "Teaching primary science--how research can help" (Harlen, 1986), which announced that a section of the journal would be for reports of research and particularly for teachers reporting their classroom research. The intervening 24 years have seen…

  17. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... affects millions of people worldwide each year. Pneumonia can often be prevented and can usually be treated. ...

  18. Family involvement and helping behavior in teams

    Brummelhuis, L.L. ten; Lippe, A.G. van der; Kluwer, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Helping behavior at work has become increasingly important, with organizations making more and more use of cooperative work practices. The difficulty is that employees are facing growing demands beyond the workplace. This study investigates the mechanisms by which family involvement ( family

  19. Family involvement and helping behaviour in teams

    Brummelhuis, L.L. ten; Lippe, T. van der; Kluwer, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Helping behavior at work has become increasingly important, with organizations making more and more use of cooperative work practices. The difficulty is that employees are facing growing demands beyond the workplace. This study investigates the mechanisms by which family involvement (family

  20. Erikson's Psychosocial Theories Help Explain Early Adolescence.

    Manning, M. Lee

    1988-01-01

    Middle school educators can design a learning environment for early adolescents based on Erik Erikson's social development theories, which divide human life into eight psychological stages. The identity versus role confusion stage characterizing adolescence will significantly determine the developing person's future. Schools can help learners…

  1. Tips for Helping a Person With Diabetes

    2007-10-04

    This podcast gives suggestions for helping a person with diabetes manage the disease.  Created: 10/4/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/6/2007.

  2. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  3. Women Empowerment Through Self-Help Groups

    Alemu, Sintayehu Hailu; Kempen, Van Luuk; Ruben, Ruerd

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the impact of self-help groups (SHGs) in apple production on empowering women in the Chencha district of Southern Ethiopia. Impact is traced on the basis of a cross-sectional survey among SHG members and nonmembers, using propensity score matching. Apart from the attitudinal

  4. Love and her place in helping professions

    MARTYNKOVÁ, Ester

    2011-01-01

    - Basic concepts: charity, helping professions, client, social worker, social work - describe "love if", "love it" and "I love you and love dot". Their advantages and disadvantages compared. - explanation of the meaning of unconditional love - types and application of unconditional love in the work of social worker - implementation (adoption process) - the answer to the question we need to change?

  5. Helping Students Reflect: Lessons from Cognitive Psychology

    Poole, Gary; Jones, Lydia; Whitfield, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The challenges of teaching students to reflect on experience and, thus, learn from it, are better understood with the application of constructs from cognitive psychology. The present paper focuses on two such constructs--self-schemas and scripts--to help educators better understand both the threats and opportunities associated with effective…

  6. Model playground for autistic children

    Castro, Thais; Castro, Alberto; Lima, David

    2017-01-01

    Children with autism often have difficulties in learning the social skills and norms of peer social interaction, which severely affect and limit their social lives. Aiming at addressing this issue, through design, we developed a digital-analogue model playground to help them understand and cope...... of social skills and norms through peer learning activities amongst children with autism....

  7. Teaching Science to Dyslexic Children

    Ward, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Working in a school with a high proportion of dyslexic children has helped this author to discover and improve her teaching of science. Officially, dyslexia is seen as "a specific learning difficulty that hinders the learning of literacy skills. This problem of managing verbal codes in memory is neurologically based." Many children come to the…

  8. Early Children's Literature and Aging

    McGuire, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased longevity is a worldwide phenomenon placing emphasis on the need for preparation for life's later years. Today's children will be the older adults of tomorrow. A resource that can help to educate them about aging and prepare them for the long life ahead is early children's literature (Preschool-Primary). This literature can provide…

  9. Factors influencing intention to help and helping behaviour in witnesses of bullying in nursing settings.

    Báez-León, Carmen; Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo; Aguirre-Camacho, Aldo; Olmos, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    The role played by witnesses of bullying in nursing settings remains little studied, despite their potential relevance in explaining the onset and development of bullying. The objective of this study was to develop a model to account for witnesses' intention to help and helping behaviour in response to bullying in a nursing setting. Three hundred and thirty-seven witnesses completed self-report measures of variables predicting intention to help and helping behaviour. A full structural model was constructed using structural equation modelling. The intention to help victims was elicited by tension, group identity, support to peers' initiative to intervene and absence of fear of retaliation. However, engagement in helping behaviour was only predicted by the absence of fear of retaliation. This study shows that witnesses of bullying in nursing settings do not remain impassive, but their experienced discomfort and intention to help victims is not sufficient to predict helping behaviour. Fear of possible retaliation if intervening in favour of victims constitutes a crucial factor explaining witnesses' hesitation to help victims. Several implications for the implementation of policies directed at eradicating bullying in nursing settings are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Mental disorders in Australian 4- to 17- year olds: Parent-reported need for help.

    Johnson, Sarah E; Lawrence, David; Sawyer, Michael; Zubrick, Stephen R

    2018-02-01

    To describe the extent to which parents report that 4- to 17-year-olds with symptoms meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria for mental disorders need help, the types of help needed, the extent to which this need is being met and factors associated with a need for help. During 2013-2014, a national household survey of the mental health of Australia's young people (Young Minds Matter) was conducted, involving 6310 parents (and carers) of 4- to 17-year-olds. The survey identified 12-month mental disorders using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children - Version IV ( n = 870) and asked parents about the need for four types of help - information, medication, counselling and life skills. Parents of 79% of 4- to 17-year-olds with mental disorders reported that their child needed help, and of these, only 35% had their needs fully met. The greatest need for help was for those with major depressive disorder (95%) and conduct disorder (93%). Among these, 39% of those with major depressive disorder but only 19% of those with conduct disorder had their needs fully met. Counselling was the type of help most commonly identified as being needed (68%). In multivariate models, need for counselling was higher when children had autism or an intellectual disability, in blended families, when parents were distressed, and in the most advantaged socioeconomic areas. Many children and adolescents meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria for mental disorders have a completely unmet need for help, especially those with conduct disorders. Even with mild disorders, lack of clinical assessment represents an important missed opportunity for early intervention and treatment.

  11. Easing the Pain of Divorce through Children's Literature.

    Kramer, Pamela A.; Smith, Gail G.

    1998-01-01

    Describes children's typical reactions to divorce and practical techniques that teachers and caregivers can use in helping children deal with divorce. The use of bibliotherapy is described as a means to help children. An annotated bibliography of select literature is provided, along with descriptions of developmentally appropriate activities that…

  12. The advertising and children's audience

    A.S. Teletov; T.Ye. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    The aim of article. The article shows that today more and more citizens supply from advertising. Children's perception of the world is radically different from the adults’ perception. Modern advertising industry affects children's audience more and more. The aim of the article is to analyze the impact of advertising on children's audience with further proposals. The results of the analysis. Some social critics believe that advertising provides new information that helps to be more adaptive...

  13. ATLAS helps shed light on the retina

    2007-01-01

    Technology developed for high-energy physics has led to the discovery of a retinal cell that eluded biologists for 40 years. The 512 electrode array, inspired by silicon microstrip detector technology in ATLAS, records the electrical activity of retinal neurones.ATLAS expertise have crossed over to biology enabling the discovery of a retinal cell type that may help humans see motion. The research, carried out by ATLAS collaborators at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and by neurobiologists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, appeared in the 10 October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience and may help open biologists’ eyes to the uses of techniques developed in high-energy physics. At least 22 different types of primate retinal output cell are known from anatomical studies, but the functions of only a handful of these have been determined. The cells discovered have been ca...

  14. Book Ownership and Young Children's Learning

    Tadesse, Selamawit; Washington, Patsy

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that there are positive effects when young children read and explore books for pleasure, as such activities help build the skills and knowledge that are critical to schooling. Reading for pleasure is facilitated when children have access to books in their own homes. There are great variations in children's book ownership…

  15. Health Insurance and Children with Disabilities

    Szilagyi, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Few people would disagree that children with disabilities need adequate health insurance. But what kind of health insurance coverage would be optimal for these children? Peter Szilagyi surveys the current state of insurance coverage for children with special health care needs and examines critical aspects of coverage with an eye to helping policy…

  16. Lifestyle Assessment: Helping Patients Change Health Behaviors

    Ciliska, Donna; Wilson, Douglas M. C.

    1984-01-01

    This article is the second in a series of six on lifestyle assessment and behavior change. The first article presented an assessment tool called FANTASTIC, which has been tested for reliability and is currently in wide use. After assessment, family physicians must help patients decide to change—and give them guidance on how to change—unhealthy behaviors. This article explains how the family physician can use educational, behavioral and relaxation strategies to increase patients' motivation, m...

  17. Online Counseling: Prioritizing Psychoeducation, Self-Help, and Mutual Help for Counseling Psychology Research and Practice

    Chang, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This reaction article extends the research and practice recommendations for online counseling from the Major Contribution to the November 2005 issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" by prioritizing research and practice in online psychoeducation, self-help, and mutual help. Research suggests that tens of millions of Americans use the Internet for…

  18. Psychological Help-Seeking Attitudes and Barriers to Help-Seeking in Young People in Turkey

    Koydemir, Selda; Erel, Ozge; Yumurtaci, Duygu; Sahin, Gozde Nur

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research sought to understand the needs of Turkish university students related to adjustment to university, the sources they seek help from, their attitudes about and barriers to psychological help-seeking. Data analysis of interview transcriptions from 15 undergraduates identified several themes. Interpersonal problems,…

  19. Help Central: Creating a Help Desk and Knowledge Portal in SharePoint

    Ennis, Lisa A.; Tims, Randy S.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the authors' implementation of Help Central, a site within the Lister Hill Library Collection on the University of Alabama-Birmingham's SharePoint server. Initially, Help Central was designed to address the inadequacies in the library's old, static HTML web-based support system, including haphazard issue reporting by staff…

  20. Natural and professional help: a process analysis.

    Tracey, T J; Toro, P A

    1989-08-01

    Differences in the helping interactions formed by mental health professionals, divorce lawyers, and mutual help group leaders were examined. Fourteen members of each of these three helper groups (N = 42) met independently with a coached client presenting marital difficulties. Using ratings of ability to ameliorate the personal and emotional problems presented, the 42 helpers were divided (using a median split) into successful and less successful outcome groups. The responses of each of the pairs were coded using the Hill Counselor Verbal Response Category System. The sequence of client-helper responses were examined using log-linear analysis as they varied by type of helper and outcome. Results indicated that successful helpers (regardless of type of helper) tended to use directives (e.g., guidance and approval-reassurance) differently from less successful helpers. Successful helpers used directives following client emotional expression and not following factual description. In addition, clear differences in helper responses by helper type and outcome were found. Each helper type had unique patterns of responses that differentiated successful from less successful outcomes. Client responses were found to vary across helper type even when given the same helper preceding response. Results are discussed with respect to the unique goals of each helping relationship and the different shaping process involved in each.

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Full Text Available ... exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Full Text Available ... both imaging exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders ...

  3. Can Parents Treat their Anxious Child using CBT? A Brief Report of a Self-Help Program

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Christiansen, Bianca Munkebo; Walczak, Monika Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We developed and tested a self-help program with minimal therapist involvement for parents of anxious children. Method: The program focused on transfer of control from therapist to parents of children with moderate anxiety, and consisted of two therapist-led workshops, a Facebook group......, and Cool Kids manuals for parents and children. The sample consisted of 20 families, and 17 completed treatment. Results: After treatment, intent-to-treat analyses indicated that 65% of the children were free of all anxiety disorders. The corresponding figure for completers was 76.5%. Conclusion: Our...... results suggest that parent-based self-help groups focusing on transfer of control may be a cost-effective way of providing treatment to children with moderate anxiety...

  4. Helping older adults to help themselves: the role of mental health literacy in family members.

    White, Margaret; Casey, Leanne

    2017-11-01

    Family members may play an important role in the health and well-being of older adults. However, little is known about the factors that influence the likelihood of family members supporting older relatives to seek help from mental health professionals for mental health concerns. Mental health literacy is associated with people's help-seeking intentions regarding their own mental health concerns, and some studies have suggested it may play a role in help-seeking on behalf of others. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether mental health literacy is associated with adults' likelihood of supporting an older relative to seek professional help for mental health concerns. Two hundred and sixty-three participants completed a measure of mental health literacy and responded to a hypothetical scenario by indicating their likelihood of supporting an older relative experiencing mental health problems to seek help from various sources. Mental health literacy was positively associated with intentions to support older relative's help-seeking. Interventions to increase the mental health literacy of the relatives of older adults may lead to additional support for older adults' help-seeking for mental health concerns.

  5. K-Based Help desk System

    Mohamad Safuan Sulaiman; Abdul Muin Abdul Rahman; Norzalina Nasirudin; Khairiel Adyani Abdul Ghani

    2011-01-01

    K-based Help desk system is a knowledge oriented web based system that provides support to technical service providers in order to improve delivery of their services. It is a multi-centric system which focuses not only on end-users but the various levels of technical support services as well as the management through the utilization of knowledge which resides and grows within the system. Though providing user friendly system and capturing technical knowledge to improve efficiencies are the main objectives of this system, educating users with technical information through the knowledge utilization system are the spin-off target from this implementation. This is achieved by preventing the service providers from handling repetitive complaints which may have similarity in nature. Once a complaint has been resolved, the system captures the solution as an item in the knowledge database. The captured knowledge will then enable service requesters or users to get some ideas regarding their complaints from information or knowledge of other similar complaints besides providing relevant knowledge to the service provider such as the techniques used in solving problems and the performance among the technical support staffs. As for the management, this system helps in the decision making process in which the statistics features provide some knowledge on the number of equipment that frequently and consistently failed. This then leads to some understanding of the equipment that may create lost to the organization in terms of time and money. This system has been tested and implemented in IT Center (IT) and Engineering Division (BKJ) and is at the initial process of implementation in the Instrumentation and Automation Center (IAC) at Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia). The system has helped in achieving a higher level of user satisfaction and a faster growth in technical knowledge repository that will serve as the institutional memory of Nuclear Malaysia and this will be

  6. Learning to recommend helpful hotel reviews

    O'Mahony, Michael P.; Smyth, Barry

    2009-01-01

    User-generated reviews are a common and valuable source of product information, yet little attention has been paid as to how best to present them to end-users. In this paper, we describe a classification-based recommender system that is designed to recommend the most helpful reviews for a given product. We present a large-scale evaluation of our approach using TripAdvisor hotel reviews, and we show that our approach is capable of suggesting superior reviews compared to a number of alternat...

  7. Mythbusting Medical Writing: Goodbye, Ghosts! Hello, Help!

    Hamilton, Cindy W; Gertel, Art; Jacobs, Adam; Marchington, Jackie; Weaver, Shelley; Woolley, Karen

    To meet ethical and scientific obligations, authors should submit timely, high-quality manuscripts. Authors, however, can encounter ethical (e.g., authorship designation) and practical (e.g., time and resource limitations) challenges during manuscript preparation. Could professional medical writers-not ghostwriters-help authors address these challenges? This essay summarizes evidence countering three myths that may have hindered authors from considering the use of professional medical writers. Authors with sufficient time, writing expertise, and reporting guideline knowledge may meet their obligations without writing assistance. Unfortunately, not all authors are in this position. Decisions about writing support should be based on evidence, not myths.

  8. Trying-out a walking help

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2016-01-01

    that constitute the trial as a joint activity in which the impaired participant becomes a competent participant and independent walker. The analysis is based on video recordings from a case study in which a person with brain injury is trying out a new type of walking help. The trial is understood as a situated...... learning process in which the participants prepare, enact and assess the performance of the technology supported walking. The paper distinguishes two iterative phases in which the impaired person is constituted as an independent walker: the adjustment and assessment of a body-device relation and, further...

  9. How to help the patient motivate himself?

    Grimaldi, A

    2012-03-01

    In order to help a patient with a chronic disease motivate himself, caregivers spontaneously make use of reason with a view to having the patient share the caregivers' point of view, in other words, to some extent, transforming the care recipient into a caregiver. However, it is not unusual for a caregiver suffering from the disease in which he specializes not to treat himself in compliance with the rules he recommends to his patients. Man is a trinity with three instances of the self. In addition to the "rational self" that tends towards the universal, there is also an "animal self" subject to powerful, frequently imperious, primary needs which may be compared to impulsions, compulsions and addictions. Lastly, there is an "identity self", an irreducible singularity, governed by the law of optimizing pleasure or, in any event, avoiding moral distress. The patient has to learn to navigate between objectives oriented by reason, more or less imperious urges and the striving for well-being and avoidance of moral distress. These various instances of the "self" have a distinct relationship with the norm and with time. Psychologists recognize two types of motivation: intrinsic motivation, an activity implemented for itself, and extrinsic motivation, an activity practiced for its secondary beneficial effects. Clearly, caring for oneself derives from an extrinsic motivation. This motivation may be very powerful but is frequently of limited duration. Helping a patient suffering from a chronic disease motivate himself over time thus consists in helping the patient take on board an extrinsic motivation in order for the treatment to become a routine or a source of satisfaction or even pleasure. The physician has to promote the acquisition of self-care skills and a feeling of success in the patient. The physician is also to help the patient negotiate the optimum compromise between his "rational self" and his "identity self" by acting as the advocate of the two parties, while not

  10. Tests to Help Plan Opportunity Moves

    2005-01-01

    Rover engineers check how a test rover moves in material chosen to simulate some difficult Mars driving conditions. The scene is inside the In-Situ Instrument Laboratory at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. These tests in early May 2005 were designed to help plan the best way for the rover Opportunity to drive off of a soft-sand dune that the rover dug itself into the previous week. The mixture of sandy and powdery material brought in for these specific tests matched the way the soil underneath Opportunity caked onto wheels, filling the spaces between the cleats on the wheels.

  11. Keyword: help! Online resources for disaster preparedness.

    Hart, Amadie H; Cushman, Margaret J

    2002-01-01

    Health care organizations such as home care agencies should have post-disaster contingency plans in place that include contacts with the local, county, or state emergency management office, local branch of the Red Cross, and a clearly identified point person within the agency to coordinate disaster response efforts. Home care agencies must plan for the far-reaching effects that disasters can have on people in the community. This article provides some online resources to help you, your organization, and your family prepare for unexpected events.

  12. Bipolar Disorder in Children

    2014-01-01

    Although bipolar disorder historically was thought to only occur rarely in children and adolescents, there has been a significant increase in children and adolescents who are receiving this diagnosis more recently (Carlson, 2005). Nonetheless, the applicability of the current bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria for children, particularly preschool children, remains unclear, even though much work has been focused on this area. As a result, more work needs to be done to further the understanding of bipolar symptoms in children. It is hoped that this paper can assist psychologists and other health service providers in gleaning a snapshot of the literature in this area so that they can gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and other behaviors that may be relevant and be informed about potential approaches for assessment and treatment with children who meet bipolar disorder criteria. First, the history of bipolar symptoms and current diagnostic criteria will be discussed. Next, assessment strategies that may prove helpful for identifying bipolar disorder will be discussed. Then, treatments that may have relevance to children and their families will be discussed. Finally, conclusions regarding work with children who may have a bipolar disorder diagnosis will be offered. PMID:24800202

  13. Preventing gun injuries in children.

    Crossen, Eric J; Lewis, Brenna; Hoffman, Benjamin D

    2015-02-01

    Firearms are involved in the injury and death of a large number of children each year from both intentional and unintentional causes. Gun ownership in homes with children is common, and pediatricians should incorporate evidence-based means to discuss firearms and protect children from gun-related injuries and violence. Safe storage of guns, including unloaded guns locked and stored separately from ammunition, can decrease risks to children, and effective tools are available that pediatricians can use in clinical settings to help decrease children's access to firearms. Furthermore, several community-based interventions led by pediatricians have effectively reduced firearm-related injury risks to children. Educational programs that focus on children's behavior around guns have not proven effective. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2015. All rights reserved.

  14. WE-H-201-01: The Opportunities and Benefits of Helping LMICs: How Helping Them Can Help You

    Pollard, J. [MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The desperate need for radiotherapy in low and mid-income countries (LMICs) has been well documented. Roughly 60 % of the worldwide incidence of cancer occurs in these resource-limited settings and the international community alongside governmental and non-profit agencies have begun publishing reports and seeking help from qualified volunteers. However, the focus of several reports has been on how dire the situation is and the magnitude of the problem, leaving most to feel overwhelmed and unsure as to how to help and why to get involved. This session will help to explain the specific ways that Medical Physicists can uniquely assist in this grand effort to help bring radiotherapy to grossly-underserved areas. Not only can these experts fulfill an important purpose, they also can benefit professionally, academically, emotionally and socially from the endeavor. By assisting others worldwide with their skillset, Medical Physicists can end up helping themselves. Learning Objectives: Understand the need for radiotherapy in LMICs. Understand which agencies are seeking Medical Physicists for help in LMICs. Understand the potential research funding mechanisms are available to establish academic collaborations with LMIC researchers/physicians. Understand the potential social and emotional benefits for both the physicist and the LMIC partners when collaborations are made. Understand the potential for collaboration with other high-income scientists that can develop as the physicist partners with other large institutions to assist LMICs. Wil Ngwa - A recent United Nations Study reports that in developing countries more people have access to cell phones than toilets. In Africa, only 63% of the population has access to piped water, yet, 93% of Africans have cell phone service. Today, these cell phones, Skype, WhatsApp and other information and communication technologies (ICTs) connect us in unprecedented ways and are increasingly recognized as powerful, indispensable to global

  15. WE-H-201-01: The Opportunities and Benefits of Helping LMICs: How Helping Them Can Help You

    Pollard, J.

    2016-01-01

    The desperate need for radiotherapy in low and mid-income countries (LMICs) has been well documented. Roughly 60 % of the worldwide incidence of cancer occurs in these resource-limited settings and the international community alongside governmental and non-profit agencies have begun publishing reports and seeking help from qualified volunteers. However, the focus of several reports has been on how dire the situation is and the magnitude of the problem, leaving most to feel overwhelmed and unsure as to how to help and why to get involved. This session will help to explain the specific ways that Medical Physicists can uniquely assist in this grand effort to help bring radiotherapy to grossly-underserved areas. Not only can these experts fulfill an important purpose, they also can benefit professionally, academically, emotionally and socially from the endeavor. By assisting others worldwide with their skillset, Medical Physicists can end up helping themselves. Learning Objectives: Understand the need for radiotherapy in LMICs. Understand which agencies are seeking Medical Physicists for help in LMICs. Understand the potential research funding mechanisms are available to establish academic collaborations with LMIC researchers/physicians. Understand the potential social and emotional benefits for both the physicist and the LMIC partners when collaborations are made. Understand the potential for collaboration with other high-income scientists that can develop as the physicist partners with other large institutions to assist LMICs. Wil Ngwa - A recent United Nations Study reports that in developing countries more people have access to cell phones than toilets. In Africa, only 63% of the population has access to piped water, yet, 93% of Africans have cell phone service. Today, these cell phones, Skype, WhatsApp and other information and communication technologies (ICTs) connect us in unprecedented ways and are increasingly recognized as powerful, indispensable to global

  16. Helping CERN give back to society

    2014-01-01

    The CERN & Society mission: ‘To spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society.’   Digital library schools in Africa, Arts@CERN, a beam line for schools competition and perhaps soon a dedicated biomedical research facility: CERN infrastructure and expertise have a great influence on society, and we have the potential to do much more. For that, however, we need help, and that’s why we have launched the CERN & Society initiative, which this week sees the publication of a new website for those who want to understand more about how our research touches everyday life, as well as for those who wish to help CERN in this new endeavour. Fundamental research fulfils a very human need. The quest to understand the universe we live in is as old as humanity itself, and CERN is in the vanguard of that effort today. For our scientists and engineers, pushing technology to the limit is part of their day job, and in doing so they ...

  17. Insomnia patients' help-seeking experiences.

    Cheung, Janet M Y; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Armour, Carol L; Glozier, Nicholas; Saini, Bandana

    2014-03-04

    Timely access to appropriate treatment is important for optimizing insomnia management. To date, little is known about insomnia patients' treatment experiences or how they access and engage with the available health care resources. This study sought to capture the help-seeking experiences and behavioral patterns of patients with insomnia who are seeking or receiving specialist care. A purposive sample of 26 insomnia patients from specialist sleep and mental health clinics located in metropolitan New South Wales, Australia was recruited. Participants completed a brief questionnaire, followed by an in-depth, semi-structured interview. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using framework analysis. Three key themes emerged from the data: patients' sleep beliefs, treatment beliefs, and accessing specialized care. The findings show that daytime symptoms arising from insomnia serve as important illness cues for patients to seek medical help. In addition, participants' treatment pathways highlight factors that prevent the widespread use of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), including limited awareness about CBT-I, tentative referral mechanisms, limited service providers, and the high cost of CBT-I.

  18. Observing human movements helps decoding environmental forces.

    Zago, Myrka; La Scaleia, Barbara; Miller, William L; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    Vision of human actions can affect several features of visual motion processing, as well as the motor responses of the observer. Here, we tested the hypothesis that action observation helps decoding environmental forces during the interception of a decelerating target within a brief time window, a task intrinsically very difficult. We employed a factorial design to evaluate the effects of scene orientation (normal or inverted) and target gravity (normal or inverted). Button-press triggered the motion of a bullet, a piston, or a human arm. We found that the timing errors were smaller for upright scenes irrespective of gravity direction in the Bullet group, while the errors were smaller for the standard condition of normal scene and gravity in the Piston group. In the Arm group, instead, performance was better when the directions of scene and target gravity were concordant, irrespective of whether both were upright or inverted. These results suggest that the default viewer-centered reference frame is used with inanimate scenes, such as those of the Bullet and Piston protocols. Instead, the presence of biological movements in animate scenes (as in the Arm protocol) may help processing target kinematics under the ecological conditions of coherence between scene and target gravity directions.

  19. Scale model helps Duke untie construction snags

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear power plant model, only 60 percent complete, has helped Duke Power identify over 150 major design interferences, which, when resolved, will help cut capital expense and eliminate scheduling problems that normally crop up as revisions are made during actual plant construction. The model has been used by construction, steam production, and design personnel to recommend changes that should improve material handling, operations, and maintenance procedures as well as simplifying piping and cabling. The company has already saved many man-hours in material take-off, material management, and detailed drafting and expects to save even more with greater use of, and improvement in, its modeling program. Duke's modeling program was authorized and became operational in November 1974, with the first model to be the Catawba Nuclear Station. This plant is a two-unit station using Westinghouse nuclear steam supply systems in tandem with General Electric turbine-generators, horizontal feedwater heaters, and Foster Wheeler triple pressure condensers. Each unit is rated 1142 MWe

  20. Who gets help for pre-school communication problems? Data from a prospective community study.

    Skeat, J; Wake, M; Ukoumunne, O C; Eadie, P; Bretherton, L; Reilly, S

    2014-03-01

    Pre-school communication problems are common, with implications for school readiness and educational achievement. Help is available from a variety of community healthcare providers. This study examined the extent to which help is received, and the predictors of service receipt. Prospective community study, in Melbourne, Victoria. At age 4 years, we assessed the speech, receptive and expressive language and fluency of 1607 children and gave feedback to their parents. At age 5 years, 983 families provided data on service use for communication problems between and 4 and 5 years. We compared service use between participants with and without impairment, and used logistic regression to estimate the strength of association between potential predictors (gender, socio-economic status, maternal education, English-speaking background status, family history of speech and language problems and parent concern) and service use (binary outcome). Data were available for both communication status and service use for 753 children. Only 44.9% of the 196 children with communication impairment received help from a professional. Furthermore, 7% of the 557 that did not meet criteria for communication impairment nevertheless received help from a professional. Parent concern was the strongest predictor of service use (adjusted odds ratio = 9.0; 95% CI: 5.6-14.8). Both over- and under-servicing for communication problems were evident. This study shows that accessing help for communication problems requires more than simply informing parents about the problem and having services available; there is a need for systematic support to get the right children to services. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Children Physical Activity Motivation

    Chen, Ang

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is critical to healthy development of children. It is well documented that helping children develop and sustain a physically active lifestyle requires children to become motivated. Many studies have been conducted in the past 2.5 decades on determinants and correlates for children and adolescents' physical activity…

  2. Attitudinal barriers to help-seeking and preferences for mental health support among Australian fathers.

    Giallo, Rebecca; Dunning, Melissa; Gent, Angela

    2017-07-01

    To (a) identify attitudinal barriers to help-seeking for mental health difficulties among fathers of young children; (b) explore the relationships between perceived barriers to help-seeking and mental health difficulties (i.e. depressive, anxiety, stress symptoms); (c) identify socio-demographic factors associated with barriers to help-seeking; and (d) identify fathers' preferences for mental health support. One in 10 Australian fathers experience mental health difficulties in the early parenting period. Low rates of help-seeking and under-utilisation of health care services are key issues for the provision of mental health support to fathers at this important life stage. The sample consisted of 154 fathers of young children (aged 0-8 years) participating in an Australian online survey on parent wellbeing and parenting. The Barriers to Help-Seeking Scale assessed fathers' attitudinal barriers to help-seeking for mental health support. Socio-demographic factors related to fathers' employment, education, and family composition were assessed. The most common attitudinal barriers to help-seeking were: (a) the need for control and self-reliance in managing one's own problems, (b) a tendency to downplay or minimise problems, and (c) a sense of resignation that nothing will help. A range of demographic (i.e. age, educational attainment) factors were associated with these barriers. The most common preferences for support were internet-based information resources, followed by support provided by general practitioners and maternal child health nurses. These findings have important implications for health promotion, health services and clinical approaches to promoting the health and wellbeing of fathers.

  3. Safe and Responsible Online Behaviors for Children

    Shu-Hsien L. Chen

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet makes new learning opportunities possible for children by offering vast amount of resources and powerful communication means Oftentimes, the Internet is the first resource children choose for information seeking. Other than schoolwork related resources,the Internet. contains unlimited interesting and entertaining information for children. As going online becomes a favorite pastime for millions of children,teachers and parents need to caution children about the negative side of the Internet. They need to teach children online safety and responsibility, and further,monitor their online behaviors. The article, first, discusses the possible threats to childrens online safety, including potential sex offenders, pornographic materials,and unethical marketing tactics aimed at children. Then, it addresses unethical and irresponsible behaviors, such as plagiarism, spamming, and hacking, which are committed or may be committed by children. Finally, the article explains how teachers and parents can help children become responsible and ethical Internet users.

  4. When Children Have Children

    ... see Facts for Families: #62 Talking to Your Kids About Sex #4 The Depressed Child #5 Child Abuse: The Hidden Bruises #15 The Adopted Child #66 Helping Teenagers with Stress #30 ... the Campaign for America’s Kids . Your support will help us continue to produce ...

  5. Helping Veterans and Their Families Fight On!

    Megan Hazle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This new generation of veterans is coming home to families, friends, employers, and communities that likely do not understand military culture, nor the effects that military service and reintegration have on a veteran’s life, leading to the next war – the Reintegration War. Military servicemembers, veterans, and their families face challenges within the Reintegration War that are different from their civilian counterparts and are complicated by military-specific circumstances. In order to more effectively and efficiently address the challenges servicemembers, veterans, and their families face, we need to work together in a comprehensive effort. Strategies are presented to help win the Reintegration War and ease the transition for servicemembers, veterans, and their families.

  6. Market forces can help lower waste volumes

    Stavins, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Market forces can go a long way toward helping communities solve their mounting solid-waste problems. In most communities the increasing costs of solid-waste disposal are invisible to the average homeowner because they are buried in local property tax rates. Even in the few communities that list disposal costs separately on tax bills, individual costs are not related to the volume of waste generated. Fundamental to an effective waste-management strategy is the removal of these distortions by getting the prices right. But even with improved price signals, there is no silver bullet of public policy for solid- and hazardous-waste management. Until the ubiquitous NIMBY (Not In My Backyard) problem is addressed, even the most innovative set of waste management policies will remain, at best, a partial solution

  7. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre.

    Spyridon Samothrakis

    Full Text Available Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman's model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear.

  8. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre

    Samothrakis, Spyridon; Fasli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman’s model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear. PMID:26524352

  9. Helping Your Heart with Nuclear Imaging

    Madsen, Michael Amdi

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA is helping in the fight against cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) by assisting its Member States in using nuclear science and technology to track and monitor CVDs. Nuclear imaging techniques allow doctors to look inside a patient’s body and see how organs function without running the risk of surgery. CVDs kill more people than just about anything else on the planet. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that roughly 30 per cent of all deaths in 2008 were caused by CVDs. That number is increasing, and by 2030 the WHO estimates that more than 23 million people will die annually from CVDs. For comparison, that is equivalent to roughly the entire population of a medium-sized country

  10. Managing Data in Help4Mood

    Maria K. Wolters

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Help4Mood is a system that supports the treatment of people with depression in the community. It collects rich cognitive, psychomotor, and motor data through a Personal Monitoring System and a Virtual Agent, which is then analysed by a Decision Support System; analysis results are fed back to patients and their treating clinicians. In this paper, we describe how the complex data is managed and discuss ethical issues. Data is stored in functional units that correspond to treatment relevant entities. Custom XML DTDs are defined for each unit, which are used to exchange information between system components. As far as possible, observations and findings are coded using SNOMED CT to ensure interoperability with other applications such as Electronic Health Records.

  11. Emotional Sentence Annotation Helps Predict Fiction Genre.

    Samothrakis, Spyridon; Fasli, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Fiction, a prime form of entertainment, has evolved into multiple genres which one can broadly attribute to different forms of stories. In this paper, we examine the hypothesis that works of fiction can be characterised by the emotions they portray. To investigate this hypothesis, we use the work of fictions in the Project Gutenberg and we attribute basic emotional content to each individual sentence using Ekman's model. A time-smoothed version of the emotional content for each basic emotion is used to train extremely randomized trees. We show through 10-fold Cross-Validation that the emotional content of each work of fiction can help identify each genre with significantly higher probability than random. We also show that the most important differentiator between genre novels is fear.

  12. Can Resilience Help? Coping with Job Stressor

    Uju Violet Alola

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Workplace incivility is a serious issue in an organization, this is of the fact that uncivil act is costly to the organization, employee health, performance, turnover intention. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the importance of workplace incivility on hotel employees using IBM Amos 22. And, using questionnaire method as a research tool for the quantitative study, a total of 153 questionnaires were used to assess the effect of workplace incivility on hotel employees in four and five star-hotels in Lagos Nigeria. Bagozzi’s Appraisal-Emotional reactions theory was applied to this study. We found out that resilience fully mediated the relationship between work place incivility and turnover intention. The estimated results obtained suggest that workplace incivility has a negative effect on employee. Suggestions were made to human resource management on how to help employee stand the stress of this effect.

  13. Can "patient keeper" help in-patients?

    Al-Hinnawi, M F

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present our "Patient Keeper" application, which is a client-server medical application. "Patient Keeper" is designed to run on a mobile phone for the client application and on a PC for the server application using J2ME and JAVA2, respectively. This application can help doctors during visits to their patients in hospitals. The client application allows doctors to store on their mobile phones the results of their diagnoses and findings such as temperature, blood pressure, medications, analysis, etc., and send this information to the server via short message service (SMS) for storage in a database. The server can also respond to any request from the client and send the result via Bluetooth, infrared, or over the air. Experimental results showed a significant improvement of the healthcare delivery and reduction for in-patient stay.

  14. OSART Works to Help Member States

    Kaiser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear safety is a never ending pursuit for improvement, and one of the more prominent IAEA efforts that help Member States achieve higher levels of safety is the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme. In OSART missions, the IAEA coordinates internationally-based teams of experts who conduct reviews of operational safety performance at nuclear power plants. The IAEA on 14 June 2013 marked the 30th anniversary of OSART. In 1983, the Agency conducted its first OSART mission to the Kori Nuclear Power Plant in the Republic of Korea, and it conducted a total of 174 OSART missions over the following 30 years. The reviews have been done in 34 nations at 103 nuclear sites. (author)

  15. Saildrone fleet could help replace aging buoys

    Voosen, Paul

    2018-03-01

    In April, two semiautonomous drones, developed by Saildrone, a marine tech startup based in Alameda, California, in close collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Washington, D.C., are set to return from an 8-month tour of the Pacific Ocean. This the first scientific test for the drones, which are powered only by the wind and sun, in the Pacific Ocean. The voyage is an important step in showing that such drones, carrying 15 different sensors, could help replace an aging and expensive array of buoys that are the main way scientists sniff out signs of climate-disrupting El Niño events. If successful, scientists envision fleets of similar drones spreading across the ocean, inviting thoughts of what it could be like to do oceanography without a ship.

  16. Tanker self-help spill recovery systems

    Smedley, J B; Wainwright, J G; Ehman, T K

    1991-12-01

    An investigation was conducted of the circumstances in which oil spills occur from tankers at sea by analyzing available historical oil spill data. A data base of marine oil spills greater than 134 tonnes occurring from 1974 and June 1990, included in an appendix, was among the information analyzed. The analysis showed that marine oil spills of 5,000 tonnes and greater account for 39.4% of the accidents yet 94.7% of the total spilled quantity; 84% of those spills occur in vessels of 20,000 deadweight tonnes and larger. Of spills over 5,000 tonnes, 78.5% occur outside of harbor or pier areas where spill response equipment may not be readily available. Over 50% of spills are caused by groundings or collisions where the vessel crew might be able to respond in mitigating and controlling the outflow of oil. The review suggested that tanker self-help systems warrant serious consideration. Potential self-help systems are described, ranging from additives such as bioremediation, dispersants, and solidifiers to equipment such as portable pumps, booms, and skimmers. Candidate systems were examined in terms of their safety, ease of operation, practicability, and effectiveness. Their possible performance was then assessed for the case of major marine oil spills that have occurred in Canadian waters. Four systems are identified as potential candidates for further evaluation and possible implementation: internal oil transfer, hydrostatic loading, external oil lightering, and contingency planning. A system design is evaluated and its benefits and possible implementation are outlined, based on integration of the preferred attributes of the above four options. Recommendations for implementation are also provided. 28 refs., 6 figs., 33 tabs.

  17. Guide to Children's Services: 1975-76. Take Stock in Texas: Invest in Children.

    Texas State Dept. of Community Affairs, Austin. Office of Early Childhood Development.

    A reference manual of statewide programs for children under age 6 in Texas, this Guide is designed to help public officials, community groups, professionals who work with children and other interested citizens identify and obtain assistance in meeting the needs of children and families. Information is given on state and public agencies, private…

  18. Voices of Children, Parents and Teachers: How Children Cope with Stress during School Transition

    Wong, Mun

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how children's perceptions of stress factors and coping strategies are constructed over time. Children were interviewed before and after they made the transition from preschool to primary school. This study also explores teachers' and parental strategies in helping children to cope with stress at school. The sample included 53…

  19. Scientists help children victims of the Chernobyl reactor accident. Report on project phase 1 and annex to the report on phase 1: 1.4.1993 - 31.3.1996; Wissenschaftler helfen Tschernobyl-Kindern. Bericht der Phase I und Anhang zum Bericht der Phase I: 1.4.1993 - 31.3.1996

    Reiners, C [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Streffer, C [Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Strahlenbiologie; Voigt, G; Paretzke, H G [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Heinemann, G [Preussische Elektrizitaets-AG (Preussenelektra), Hannover (Germany); Pfob, H [Badenwerk AG, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The bilateral project of Belarus and Germany was commissioned on 1.04.1993 and is placed under the scientific guidance of the Gemeinschaftsausschuss Strahlenforschung. In the framework of the project part devoted to ``therapy and medical training``, covering the period from 1.04.1993 until 31.03.1996, all in all 99 children from Belarus suffering from advanced-stage tumors of the thyroid received a special radio-iodine therapy in Germany. In about 60% of the children complete removal of the tumor was achieved. Another task of the project was to train over the reporting period 41 doctors and physicists from Belarus in the fields of nuclear medical diagnostic evaluation and therapy of thyroid tumors. The project part ``biological dosimetry`` was to investigate the role of micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes, and whether their presence in the lymphocytes permits to derive information on the radiation dose received even several years after the reactor accident. The scientists also exmained the role of the micronuclei in follow-up examinations of the radio-iodine therapy. Further studies used the relatively large number of tumors in the children, as compared to the literature available until the accident, to examine whether there are specific mutation patterns to be found in tumot suppressor genes (p-53) in thyroid tumors which might be used as indicators revealing radiation-induced onset of tumor growth. The project part ``retrospective dosimetry and risk analysis`` was in charge of detecting information answering the question of whether the release of I-131, suspected to be critical nuclide, really was the cause of enhanced incidence of thyroid tumors in the children. The project part ``coordination and examination center at Minsk`` was to establish and hold available the support required by the GAST project participants. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Am 01.04.1993 wurde ein bilateral weissrussisch-deutsches Projekt begonnen, das unter der wissenschaftlichen Begleitung des

  20. Informational Books for Children

    Tri Mega Asri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The ignorance of reading activity is a result of condition in which people are not accustomed to read because they are not familiar with the culture of writing. It is fueled by the entry of telecommunications technologies and broadcasting, especially children digital native generation. The ability to speak and communicate in children is very influential in the development of social interaction. Besides the language and communication skills are directly related to the process of thinking and developments in the search for solutions to problems in children. Informational books is one medium that can help the development of language and communication skills in children. Informational books can convey knowledge of all the things they want to know the child, about science, about everything that exists and happens around the child to see the writing in a language that has a characteristic and image. The method used is literature study and data collection techniques to conduct a study review of the relevant literature. Informational books children as a means of communication, various forms of media including books have a major influence in shaping attitudes and behavior of children. A wide variety of informational books that has developed its own current trend where its use on children in need of assistance