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Sample records for helminths immune modulation

  1. Coincident helminth infection modulates systemic inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary tuberculosis.

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    Parakkal Jovvian George

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB. However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity in TB is not known.We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB with or without Ss infection.Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection.Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease.

  2. Role of T cell TGF beta signaling in intestinal cytokine responses and helminthic immune modulation

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    Colonization with helminthic parasites down-regulates inflammation in murine colitis and improves activity scores in human inflammatory bowel disease. Helminths induce mucosal regulatory T cells, which are important for intestinal immunologic homeostasis. Regulatory T cell function involves cytoki...

  3. Necator americanus and helminth co-infections: further down-modulation of hookworm-specific type 1 immune responses.

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    Stefan Michael Geiger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helminth co-infection in humans is common in tropical regions of the world where transmission of soil-transmitted helminths such as Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and the hookworms Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale as well as other helminths such as Schistosoma mansoni often occur simultaneously. METHODOLOGY: We investigated whether co-infection with another helminth(s altered the human immune response to crude antigen extracts from either different stages of N. americanus infection (infective third stage or adult or different crude antigen extract preparations (adult somatic and adult excretory/secretory. Using these antigens, we compared the cellular and humoral immune responses of individuals mono-infected with hookworm (N. americanus and individuals co-infected with hookworm and other helminth infections, namely co-infection with either A. lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni, or both. Immunological variables were compared between hookworm infection group (mono- versus co-infected by bootstrap, and principal component analysis (PCA was used as a data reduction method. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to several animal studies of helminth co-infection, we found that co-infected individuals had a further downmodulated Th1 cytokine response (e.g., reduced INF-γ, accompanied by a significant increase in the hookworm-specific humoral immune response (e.g. higher levels of IgE or IgG4 to crude antigen extracts compared with mono- infected individuals. Neither of these changes was associated with a reduction of hookworm infection intensity in helminth co-infected individuals. From the standpoint of hookworm vaccine development, these results are relevant; i.e., the specific immune response to hookworm vaccine antigens might be altered by infection with another helminth.

  4. Down regulation of the TCR complex CD3 ζ-chain on CD3+ T cells: a potential mechanism for helminth mediated immune modulation

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    Laura Jane Appleby

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The CD3ζ forms part of the T cell receptor (TCR where it plays an important role in coupling antigen recognition to several intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to T cell effector functions. Down regulation of CD3ζ leads to impairment of immune responses including reduced cell proliferation and cytokine production. In experimental models helminth parasites have been shown to modulate immune responses directed against them and unrelated antigens, so called bystander antigens, but there is a lack of studies validating these observations in humans. This study focused on investigated the relationship between expression levels of the TCR CD3ζ chain with lymphocyte cell proliferation during human infection with the helminth parasite, Schistosoma haematobium which causes uro-genital schistosomiasis. Using flow cytometry, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from individuals naturally exposed to S. haematobium in rural Zimbabwe were phenotyped, and expression levels of CD3ζ on T cells were related to intensity of infection. In this population, parasite infection intensity was inversely related to CD3ζ expression levels (p<0.05, consistent with down-regulation of CD3ζ expression during helminth infection. Furthermore, PBMC proliferation was positively related to expression levels of CD3ζ (p<0.05 after allowing for confounding variables (host age, sex, infection level. CD3ζ expression levels had a differing relationship between immune correlates of susceptibility and immunity, measured by antibody responses, indicating a complex relationship between immune activation status and immunity. The relationships between the CD3ζ chain of the TCR and schistosome infection, PBMC proliferation and schistosome-specific antibody responses have not previously been reported, and these results may indicate a mechanism for the impaired T cell proliferative responses observed during human schistosome infection.

  5. [Modulation of inflammatory cells in helminth infections].

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    Bruschi, F

    1997-01-01

    In this review, different mechanisms by which helminthic parasites modulate the activities of inflammatory cells are considered. Examples are presented of parasitic products interfering with lymphocytes and their products such as antibodies, then modifying both regulation and effector response of the immune system. Furthermore, examples of interference on the complement system are illustrated. Parasites such as Ancylostoma caninum produce factors such as the neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF) capable of inhibiting the neutrophil-endothelium adhesion, whereas Trichinella spiralis produces a glycoprotein, the 45gp, which inhibits different neutrophil functions. Parasites are also able to modulate the function of the monocytes-macrophages which in some infections play a crucial role; the modulation of NO synthesis is also relevant to the host-parasite relationship. Finally, the different anti-oxidant systems of helminthic parasites are described. The comprehension of such evasion mechanisms of the immune response is necessary to develop vaccines and new drugs, but it is also useful to clarify the contribution of parasites to immune system evolution.

  6. Cathelicidin-like helminth defence molecules (HDMs: absence of cytotoxic, anti-microbial and anti-protozoan activities imply a specific adaptation to immune modulation.

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    Karine Thivierge

    Full Text Available Host defence peptides (HDPs are expressed throughout the animal and plant kingdoms. They have multifunctional roles in the defence against infectious agents of mammals, possessing both bactericidal and immune-modulatory activities. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by helminth parasites (helminth defence molecules; HDMs that exhibit similar structural and biochemical characteristics to the HDPs. Here, we have analyzed the functional activities of four HDMs derived from Schistosoma mansoni and Fasciola hepatica and compared them to human, mouse, bovine and sheep HDPs. Unlike the mammalian HDPs the helminth-derived HDMs show no antimicrobial activity and are non-cytotoxic to mammalian cells (macrophages and red blood cells. However, both the mammalian- and helminth-derived peptides suppress the activation of macrophages by microbial stimuli and alter the response of B cells to cytokine stimulation. Therefore, we hypothesise that HDMs represent a novel family of HDPs that evolved to regulate the immune responses of their mammalian hosts by retaining potent immune modulatory properties without causing deleterious cytotoxic effects.

  7. Acquired immune heterogeneity and its sources in human helminth infection.

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    Bourke, C D; Maizels, R M; Mutapi, F

    2011-02-01

    Similarities in the immunobiology of different parasitic worm infections indicate that co-evolution of humans and helminths has shaped a common anti-helminth immune response. However, recent in vitro and immuno-epidemiological studies highlight fundamental differences and plasticity within host-helminth interactions. The 'trade-off' between immunity and immunopathology inherent in host immune responses occurs on a background of genetic polymorphism, variable exposure patterns and infection history. For the parasite, variation in life-cycle and antigen expression can influence the effector responses directed against them. This is particularly apparent when comparing gastrointestinal and tissue-dwelling helminths. Furthermore, insights into the impact of anti-helminthic treatment and co-infection on acquired immunity suggest that immune heterogeneity arises not from hosts and parasites in isolation, but also from the environment in which immune responses develop. Large-scale differences observed in the epidemiology of human helminthiases are a product of complex host-parasite-environment interactions which, given potential for exposure to parasite antigens in utero, can arise even before a parasite interacts with its human host. This review summarizes key differences identified in human acquired immune responses to nematode and trematode infections of public health importance and explores the factors contributing to these variations.

  8. Type 2 immunity and wound healing: evolutionary refinement of adaptive immunity by helminths

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    Gause, William C.; Wynn, Thomas A.; Allen, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Helminth-induced type 2 immune responses, which are characterized by the T helper 2 cell-associated cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13, mediate host protection through enhanced tissue repair, the control of inflammation and worm expulsion. In this Opinion article, we consider type 2 immunity in the context of helminth-mediated tissue damage. We examine the relationship between the control of helminth infection and the mechanisms of wound repair, and we provide a new understanding of the adaptive type 2 immune response and its contribution to both host tolerance and resistance. PMID:23827958

  9. Helminth Parasites and the Modulation of Joint Inflammation

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    Chelsea E. Matisz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop better therapeutics for autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases, of which musculoskeletal disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis are particularly prevalent and debilitating. Helminth parasites are accomplished masters at modifying their hosts' immune activity, and so attention has focused on rodent-helminth model systems to uncover the workings of the mammalian immune response to metazoan parasites, with the hope of revealing molecules and/or mechanisms that can be translated into better treatments for human autoimmune and idiopathic disorders. Substantial proof-of-principal data supporting the concept that infection with helminth parasites can reduce the severity of concomitant disease has been amassed from models of mucosal inflammation. Indeed, infection with helminth parasites has been tried as a therapy in inflammatory bowel disease, and there are case reports relating to other conditions (e.g., autism; however, the impact of infection with parasitic helminths on musculoskeletal diseases has not been extensively studied. Here, we present the view that such a strategy should be applied to the amelioration of joint inflammation and review the literature that supports this contention.

  10. Immunity to helminths: resistance, regulation, and susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes.

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    Grencis, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    Helminth parasites are a highly successful group of pathogens that challenge the immune system in a manner distinct from rapidly replicating infectious agents. Of this group, roundworms (nematodes) that dwell in the intestines of humans and other animals are prevalent worldwide. Currently, more than one billion people are infected by at least one species, often for extended periods of time. Thus, host-protective immunity is rarely complete. The reasons for this are complex, but laboratory investigation of tractable model systems in which protective immunity is effective has provided a mechanistic understanding of resistance that is characterized almost universally by a type 2/T helper 2 response. Greater understanding of the mechanisms of susceptibility has also provided the basis for defining host immunoregulation and parasite-evasion strategies, helping place in context the changing patterns of immunological disease observed worldwide.

  11. Polyclonal and Specific Antibodies Mediate Protective Immunity against Enteric Helminth Infection

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    McCoy, Kathy D.; Stoel, Maaike; Stettler, Rebecca; Merky, Patrick; Fink, Katja; Senn, Beatrice M.; Schaer, Corinne; Massacand, Joanna; Oderrnatt, Bernhard; Oettgen, Hans C.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Bos, Nicolaas A.; Hengartner, Hans; Macpherson, Andrew J.; Harris, Nicola L.

    2008-01-01

    Anti-helminth immunity involves CD4(+) T cells, yet the precise effector mechanisms responsible for parasite killing or expulsion remain elusive. We now report an essential role for antibodies in mediating immunity against the enteric helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp), a natural murine parasit

  12. Immunity against Helminths: Interactions with the Host and the Intercurrent Infections

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    Emmanuelle Moreau

    2010-01-01

    mechanisms against tissue-dwelling helminths and helminths localized in the lumen of organs, and their regulation, are reviewed. Helminth infections are characterized by an association of Th2-like and Treg responses. Worms are able to persist in the host and are mainly responsible for chronic infection despite a strong immune response developed by the parasitized host. Two types of protection against the parasite, namely, premune and partial immunities, have been described. Immune responses against helminths can also participate in pathogenesis. Th2/Treg-like immunomodulation allows the survival of both host and parasite by controlling immunopathologic disorders and parasite persistence. Consequences of the modified Th2-like responses on co-infection, vaccination, and inflammatory diseases are discussed.

  13. Successful vaccination of immune suppressed recipients using Listeria vector HIV-1 vaccines in helminth infected mice.

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    Shollenberger, Lisa M; Bui, Cac; Paterson, Yvonne; Allen, Kelsey; Harn, Donald

    2013-04-12

    Vaccines for HIV, malaria and TB remain high priorities, especially for sub-Saharan populations. The question is: will vaccines currently in development for these diseases function in populations that have a high prevalence of helminth infection? Infection with helminth parasites causes immune suppression and a CD4+ Th2 skewing of the immune system, thereby impairing Th1-type vaccine efficacy. In this study, we conduct HIV vaccine trials in mice with and without chronic helminth infection to mimic the human vaccine recipient populations in Sub-Saharan Africa and other helminth parasite endemic regions of the world, as there is large overlap in global prevalence for HIV and helminth infection. Here, we demonstrate that Listeria monocytogenes functions as a vaccine vector to drive robust and functional HIV-specific cellular immune responses, irrespective of chronic helminth infection. This observation represents a significant advance in the field of vaccine research and underscores the concept that vaccines in the developmental pipeline should be effective in the target populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Helminth allergens, parasite-specific IgE and its protective role in human immunity

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    Colin Matthew Fitzsimmons

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Th2 immune response, culminating in eosinophilia and IgE production, is not only characteristic of allergy but also of infection by parasitic worms (helminths. Anti-parasite IgE has been associated with immunity against a range of helminth infections and many believe that IgE and its receptors evolved to help counter metazoan parasites. Allergens (IgE-antigens are present in only a small minority of protein families and known IgE targets in helminths belong to these same families (e.g. EF-hand proteins, tropomyosin, and PR-1 proteins.During some helminth infection, especially with the well adapted hookworm, the Th2 response is moderated by parasite-expressed molecules. This has been associated with reduced allergy in helminth endemic areas and worm infection or products have been proposed as treatments for allergic conditions. However some infections (especially Ascaris are associated with increased allergy and this has been linked to cross-reactivity between worm proteins (e.g., tropomyosins and highly similar molecules in dust mites and insects. The overlap between allergy and helminth infection is best illustrated in Anisakis simplex, a nematode that when consumed in under-cooked fish can be both an infective helminth and a food allergen. Nearly 20 molecular allergens have been isolated from this species, including tropomyosin (Ani s3 and the EF-hand protein, Ani s troponin.In this review, we highlight aspects of the biology and biochemistry of helminths that may have influenced the evolution of the IgE response. We compare dominant IgE antigens in worms with clinically important environmental allergens and suggest that arrays of such molecules will provide important information on anti-worm immunity as well as allergy.

  15. Helminth Allergens, Parasite-Specific IgE, and Its Protective Role in Human Immunity.

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    Fitzsimmons, Colin Matthew; Falcone, Franco Harald; Dunne, David William

    2014-01-01

    The Th2 immune response, culminating in eosinophilia and IgE production, is not only characteristic of allergy but also of infection by parasitic worms (helminths). Anti-parasite IgE has been associated with immunity against a range of helminth infections and many believe that IgE and its receptors evolved to help counter metazoan parasites. Allergens (IgE-antigens) are present in only a small minority of protein families and known IgE targets in helminths belong to these same families (e.g., EF-hand proteins, tropomyosin, and PR-1 proteins). During some helminth infection, especially with the well adapted hookworm, the Th2 response is moderated by parasite-expressed molecules. This has been associated with reduced allergy in helminth endemic areas and worm infection or products have been proposed as treatments for allergic conditions. However, some infections (especially Ascaris) are associated with increased allergy and this has been linked to cross-reactivity between worm proteins (e.g., tropomyosins) and highly similar molecules in dust-mites and insects. The overlap between allergy and helminth infection is best illustrated in Anisakis simplex, a nematode that when consumed in under-cooked fish can be both an infective helminth and a food allergen. Nearly 20 molecular allergens have been isolated from this species, including tropomyosin (Ani s 3) and the EF-hand protein, Ani s troponin. In this review, we highlight aspects of the biology and biochemistry of helminths that may have influenced the evolution of the IgE response. We compare dominant IgE-antigens in worms with clinically important environmental allergens and suggest that arrays of such molecules will provide important information on anti-worm immunity as well as allergy.

  16. Cohabitation in the Intestine: Interactions among Helminth Parasites, Bacterial Microbiota, and Host Immunity.

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    Reynolds, Lisa A; Finlay, B Brett; Maizels, Rick M

    2015-11-01

    Both intestinal helminth parasites and certain bacterial microbiota species have been credited with strong immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies reported that the presence of helminth infection alters the composition of the bacterial intestinal microbiota and, conversely, that the presence and composition of the bacterial microbiota affect helminth colonization and persistence within mammalian hosts. This article reviews recent findings on these reciprocal relationships, in both human populations and mouse models, at the level of potential mechanistic pathways and the implications these bear for immunomodulatory effects on allergic and autoimmune disorders. Understanding the multidirectional complex interactions among intestinal microbes, helminth parasites, and the host immune system allows for a more holistic approach when using probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, antibiotics, and anthelmintics, as well as when designing treatments for autoimmune and allergic conditions.

  17. Helminth Products Potently Modulate Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Downregulating Neuroinflammation and Promoting a Suppressive Microenvironment

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    Alberto N. Peón

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A negative correlation between the geographical distribution of autoimmune diseases and helminth infections has been largely associated in the last few years with a possible role for such type of parasites in the regulation of inflammatory diseases, suggesting new pathways for drug development. However, few helminth-derived immunomodulators have been tested in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS. The immunomodulatory activities of Taenia crassiceps excreted/secreted products (TcES that may suppress EAE development were sought for. Interestingly, it was discovered that TcES was able to suppress EAE development with more potency than dexamethasone; moreover, TcES treatment was still effective even when inoculated at later stages after the onset of EAE. Importantly, the TcES treatment was able to induce a range of Th2-type cytokines, while suppressing Th1 and Th17 responses. Both the polyclonal and the antigen-specific proliferative responses of lymphocytes were also inhibited in EAE-ill mice receiving TcES in association with a potent recruitment of suppressor cell populations. Peritoneal inoculation of TcES was able to direct the normal inflammatory cell traffic to the site of injection, thus modulating CNS infiltration, which may work along with Th2 immune polarization and lymphocyte activation impairment to downregulate EAE development.

  18. Schistosoma mansoni infection modulates the immune response against allergic and auto-immune diseases

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    Maria Ilma Araújo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection leads to a type 2-immune response with increased production of interleukin (IL-10. Evidence indicates chronic exposure to S. mansoni down regulates the type 1 immune response and prevents the onset of Th1-mediated diseases such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus and Cronh's disease. Furthermore, our own studies have revealed that chronic exposure to S. mansoni also down regulates atopic disease, Th2-mediated diseases. Our studies show an inverse association between the skin prick test reactivity and infection with S. mansoni and show the severity of asthma is reduced in subjects living in an endemic area of S. mansoni. Moreover, we hypothesize the mechanisms involved in the modulation of inflammatory response in atopic individuals, is likely dependent on IL-10 production, an anti-inflammatory cytokine elevated during helminth infections. Patients with asthma and helminth infections produced less IL-5 than patients with asthma without helminth infections, and this down regulation could, in part, be mediated by IL-10. In conclusion, helminthic infections, through induction of regulatory mechanisms, such as IL-10 production, are able to modulate the inflammatory immune response involved in the pathology of auto-immune and allergic disease.

  19. [Influence of helminthic infections and nutritional status on immune response in Venezuelan children].

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    Ortiz, D; Afonso, C; Hagel, I; Rodriguez, O; Ortiz, C; Palenque, M; Lynch, N R

    2000-09-01

    We investigated the influence of nutritional status, as determined from anthropometric measurement, and of helminthic infections on the immune response of children of low socioeconomic status in two rural communities in Venezuela: El Cardón in the state of Nueva Esparta and San Daniel in the state of Miranda. A total of 125 boys and girls between 2 and 15 years old participated in the study. Their socioeconomic stratum was determined by a modified Graffar method. A physical examination was performed, as was also an anthropometric evaluation that took into account three indicators--weight-for-height, weight-for-age, and height-for-age--according to parameters established by the World Health Organization. Other examinations included feces, secretory IgA in saliva, total serum IgE, and anti-Ascaris-specific immunoglobulins. The children in both of the communities were in strata IV and V of the of Graffar scale, with a significantly greater number of stratum V inhabitants in San Daniel (P < 0.001). The results suggest that exposure level and individual susceptibility to the parasites are determining factors in parasitic infection and immune system behavior. The intensity of the parasitic burden plays an important role in stimulating polyclonal IgE, which diminishes the effectiveness of the specific response to those infections. On the other hand, nutritional deficiencies could change the immune mechanisms of the mucous membranes, negatively influence the synthesis of secretory IgA, and stimulate the production of polyclonal IgE. Poor sanitary and socioeconomic conditions promote more exposure to gastrointestinal parasites and a deficient nutritional status, which modulates the immune response and affects serum IgE and secretory IgA production mechanisms.

  20. Harnessing the Helminth Secretome for Therapeutic Immunomodulators

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    Dana Ditgen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminths are the largest and most complex pathogens to invade and live within the human body. Since they are not able to outpace the immune system by rapid antigen variation or faster cell division or retreat into protective niches not accessible to immune effector mechanisms, their long-term survival depends on influencing and regulating the immune responses away from the mode of action most damaging to them. Immunologists have focused on the excretory and secretory products that are released by the helminths, since they can change the host environment by modulating the immune system. Here we give a brief overview of the helminth-associated immune response and the currently available helminth secretome data. We introduce some major secretome-derived immunomodulatory molecules and describe their potential mode of action. Finally, the applicability of helminth-derived therapeutic proteins in the treatment of allergic and autoimmune inflammatory disease is discussed.

  1. Helminth infections and intestinal inflammation

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    Li Jian Wang; Yue Cao; Hai Ning Shi

    2008-01-01

    Evidence from epidemiological studies indicates an inverse correlation between the incidence of certain immune-mediated diseases,including inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD),and exposure to helminths.Helminth parasites are the classic inducers of Th2 responses.The Th2-polarized T cell response driven by helminth infection has been linked to the attenuation of some damaging Th1 driven inflammatory responses,preventing some Th1-mediated autoimmune diseases in the host,including experimentally induced colitis.Helminth parasites(the porcine whipworm,Trichurissuis)have been tested for treating IBD patients,resulting in clinical amelioration of the disease.As a result,there is a great deal of interest in the research community in exploring the therapeutic use of helminth parasites for the control of immune-mediated diseases,including IBD.However,recent studies have provided evidence indicating the exacerbating effects of helminths on bacterial as well as non-infectious colitis in animal models.Therefore,a better understanding of mechanisms by which helminths modulate host immune responses in the gut may reveal novel,more effective and safer approaches to helminth-based therapy of IBD.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  2. Photodynamic immune modulation (PIM)

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    North, John R.; Hunt, David W. C.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Chan, Agnes H.; Lui, Harvey; Levy, Julia G.

    1999-09-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is accepted for treatment of superficial and lumen-occluding tumors in regions accessible to activating light and is now known to be effective in closure of choroidal neovasculature in Age Related Macular Degeneration. PDT utilizes light absorbing drugs (photosensitizers) that generate the localized formation of reactive oxygen species after light exposure. In a number of systems, PDT has immunomodulatory effects; Photodynamic Immune Modulation (PIM). Using low- intensity photodynamic regimens applied over a large body surface area, progression of mouse autoimmune disease could be inhibited. Further, this treatment strongly inhibited the immunologically- medicated contact hypersensitivity response to topically applied chemical haptens. Immune modulation appears to result from selective targeting of activated T lymphocytes and reduction in immunostimulation by antigen presenting cells. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated skin condition, exhibits heightened epidermal cell proliferation, epidermal layer thickening and plaque formation at different body sites. In a recent clinical trial, approximately one-third of patients with psoriasis and arthritis symptoms (psoriatic arthritis) displayed a significant clinical improvement in several psoriasis-related parameters after four weekly whole-body PIM treatments with verteporfin. The safety profile was favorable. The capacity of PIM to influence other human immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis is under extensive evaluation.

  3. Intestinal epithelial tuft cells initiate type 2 mucosal immunity to helminth parasites.

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    Gerbe, François; Sidot, Emmanuelle; Smyth, Danielle J; Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Dardalhon, Valérie; Cesses, Pierre; Garnier, Laure; Pouzolles, Marie; Brulin, Bénédicte; Bruschi, Marco; Harcus, Yvonne; Zimmermann, Valérie S; Taylor, Naomi; Maizels, Rick M; Jay, Philippe

    2016-01-14

    Helminth parasitic infections are a major global health and social burden. The host defence against helminths such as Nippostrongylus brasiliensis is orchestrated by type 2 cell-mediated immunity. Induction of type 2 cytokines, including interleukins (IL) IL-4 and IL-13, induce goblet cell hyperplasia with mucus production, ultimately resulting in worm expulsion. However, the mechanisms underlying the initiation of type 2 responses remain incompletely understood. Here we show that tuft cells, a rare epithelial cell type in the steady-state intestinal epithelium, are responsible for initiating type 2 responses to parasites by a cytokine-mediated cellular relay. Tuft cells have a Th2-related gene expression signature and we demonstrate that they undergo a rapid and extensive IL-4Rα-dependent amplification following infection with helminth parasites, owing to direct differentiation of epithelial crypt progenitor cells. We find that the Pou2f3 gene is essential for tuft cell specification. Pou2f3(-/-) mice lack intestinal tuft cells and have defective mucosal type 2 responses to helminth infection; goblet cell hyperplasia is abrogated and worm expulsion is compromised. Notably, IL-4Rα signalling is sufficient to induce expansion of the tuft cell lineage, and ectopic stimulation of this signalling cascade obviates the need for tuft cells in the epithelial cell remodelling of the intestine. Moreover, tuft cells secrete IL-25, thereby regulating type 2 immune responses. Our data reveal a novel function of intestinal epithelial tuft cells and demonstrate a cellular relay required for initiating mucosal type 2 immunity to helminth infection.

  4. The immune response to parasitic helminths of veterinary importance and its potential manipulation for future vaccine control strategies.

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    Foster, Neil; Elsheikha, Hany M

    2012-05-01

    Despite the increasing knowledge of the immunobiology and epidemiology of parasitic helminths of the gastrointestinal system and the cardiorespiratory system, complications arising from infections of animals and humans with these parasites are a major clinical and economic problem. This has been attributed to the high incidence of these parasites, the widespread emergence of multi-drug resistant parasite strains and the lack of effective vaccines. Efforts to develop and produce vaccines against virtually all helminths (with the exception of Dictyocaulus viviparus and some cestode species) have been hindered by the complexity of the host-parasite relationship, and incomplete understanding of the molecular and immune regulatory pathways associated with the development of protective immunity against helminths. Novel genomic and proteomic technologies have provided opportunities for the discovery and characterisation of effector mechanisms and molecules that govern the host-parasite interactions in these two body systems. Such knowledge provided clues on how appropriate and protective responses are elicited against helminths and, thus, may lead to the development of effective therapeutic strategies. Here, we review advances in the immune response to selected helminths of animal health significance, and subsequent vaccine potential. The topics addressed are important for understanding how helminths interact with host immune defences and also are relevant for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases caused by helminths.

  5. [Prolactin as a modulator of antiparasitic immunity].

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    Płociński, Przemysław; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Długońska, Henryka

    2007-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a polypeptide hormone of the pituitary origin, that expresses over 300 separate biological activities, including its involvement in the regulation of immune functions. The hormone's immune capacities are related, among others, to comitogenic activity, prevention of immune cell apoptosis, stimulation of interleukins and antibodies production. Prolactin acts as a potent positive modulator of immunity to some protozoan parasites. It is well established that the hormone stimulates IFN-gamma and many other TH1-type cytokines production during Toxoplasma gondii, Leishmania sp. and Acanthamoeba castellanii infections. Recent studies suggest that human prolactin may be a regulator of antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum. On the other hand pregnancy-associated hyperprolactinemia may have a relevant contribution to reactivation of latent infections caused by many helminthic parasites, like Ancylostoma sp. or Necator sp. It is possibly connected with the process of transmammary transmission of hookworm infection to breast-fed newborns. Moreover, an increase in endogenous circulating prolactin during late pregnancy and lactation in ewes infected with Haemonchus contortus, promotes the phenomenon of periparturient egg rise. High prolactin levels have also been seen in dairy cattle suffering from other trichostrongylids infections. In this article we have discussed the role of prolactin as an important regulator of immunity to parasites.

  6. Immune antibodies and helminth products drive CXCR2-dependent macrophage-myofibroblast crosstalk to promote intestinal repair.

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    Julia Esser-von Bieren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Helminth parasites can cause considerable damage when migrating through host tissues, thus making rapid tissue repair imperative to prevent bleeding and bacterial dissemination particularly during enteric infection. However, how protective type 2 responses targeted against these tissue-disruptive multicellular parasites might contribute to homeostatic wound healing in the intestine has remained unclear. Here, we observed that mice lacking antibodies (Aid-/- or activating Fc receptors (Fcrg-/- displayed impaired intestinal repair following infection with the murine helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hpb, whilst transfer of immune serum could partially restore chemokine production and rescue wound healing in Aid-/- mice. Impaired healing was associated with a reduced expression of CXCR2 ligands (CXCL2/3 by macrophages (MΦ and myofibroblasts (MF within intestinal lesions. Whilst antibodies and helminths together triggered CXCL2 production by MΦ in vitro via surface FcR engagement, chemokine secretion by intestinal MF was elicited by helminths directly via Fcrg-chain/dectin2 signaling. Blockade of CXCR2 during Hpb challenge infection reproduced the delayed wound repair observed in helminth infected Aid-/- and Fcrg-/- mice. Finally, conditioned media from human MΦ stimulated with infective larvae of the helminth Ascaris suum together with immune serum, promoted CXCR2-dependent scratch wound closure by human MF in vitro. Collectively our findings suggest that helminths and antibodies instruct a chemokine driven MΦ-MF crosstalk to promote intestinal repair, a capacity that may be harnessed in clinical settings of impaired wound healing.

  7. Immune antibodies and helminth products drive CXCR2-dependent macrophage-myofibroblast crosstalk to promote intestinal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser-von Bieren, Julia; Volpe, Beatrice; Sutherland, Duncan B; Bürgi, Jérôme; Verbeek, J Sjef; Marsland, Benjamin J; Urban, Joseph F; Harris, Nicola L

    2015-03-01

    Helminth parasites can cause considerable damage when migrating through host tissues, thus making rapid tissue repair imperative to prevent bleeding and bacterial dissemination particularly during enteric infection. However, how protective type 2 responses targeted against these tissue-disruptive multicellular parasites might contribute to homeostatic wound healing in the intestine has remained unclear. Here, we observed that mice lacking antibodies (Aid-/-) or activating Fc receptors (Fcrg-/-) displayed impaired intestinal repair following infection with the murine helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri (Hpb), whilst transfer of immune serum could partially restore chemokine production and rescue wound healing in Aid-/- mice. Impaired healing was associated with a reduced expression of CXCR2 ligands (CXCL2/3) by macrophages (MΦ) and myofibroblasts (MF) within intestinal lesions. Whilst antibodies and helminths together triggered CXCL2 production by MΦ in vitro via surface FcR engagement, chemokine secretion by intestinal MF was elicited by helminths directly via Fcrg-chain/dectin2 signaling. Blockade of CXCR2 during Hpb challenge infection reproduced the delayed wound repair observed in helminth infected Aid-/- and Fcrg-/- mice. Finally, conditioned media from human MΦ stimulated with infective larvae of the helminth Ascaris suum together with immune serum, promoted CXCR2-dependent scratch wound closure by human MF in vitro. Collectively our findings suggest that helminths and antibodies instruct a chemokine driven MΦ-MF crosstalk to promote intestinal repair, a capacity that may be harnessed in clinical settings of impaired wound healing.

  8. Gastrointestinal helminths may affect host susceptibility to anthrax through seasonal immune trade-offs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizauskas, Carrie A; Turner, Wendy C; Wagner, Bettina; Küsters, Martina; Vance, Russell E; Getz, Wayne M

    2014-11-12

    Most vertebrates experience coinfections, and many pathogen-pathogen interactions occur indirectly through the host immune system. These interactions are particularly strong in mixed micro-macroparasite infections because of immunomodulatory effects of helminth parasites. While these trade-offs have been examined extensively in laboratory animals, few studies have examined them in natural systems. Additionally, many wildlife pathogens fluctuate seasonally, at least partly due to seasonal host immune changes. We therefore examined seasonality of immune resource allocation, pathogen abundance and exposure, and interactions between infections and immunity in plains zebra (Equus quagga) in Etosha National Park (ENP), Namibia, a system with strongly seasonal patterns of gastrointestinal (GI) helminth infection intensity and concurrent anthrax outbreaks. Both pathogens are environmentally transmitted, and helminth seasonality is driven by environmental pressures on free living life stages. The reasons behind anthrax seasonality are currently not understood, though anthrax is less likely directly driven by environmental factors. We measured a complex, interacting set of variables and found evidence that GI helminth infection intensities, eosinophil counts, IgE and IgGb antibody titers, and possibly IL-4 cytokine signaling were increased in wetter seasons, and that ectoparasite infestations and possibly IFN-γ cytokine signaling were increased in drier seasons. Monocyte counts and anti-anthrax antibody titers were negatively associated with wet season eosinophilia, and monocytes were negatively correlated with IgGb and IgE titers. Taken together, this supports the hypothesis that ENP wet seasons are characterized by immune resource allocation toward Th-2 type responses, while Th1-type immunity may prevail in drier seasons, and that hosts may experience Th1-Th2 trade-offs. We found evidence that this Th2-type resource allocation is likely driven by GI parasite infections

  9. Migratory CD103+ dendritic cells suppress Helminth-driven Type 2 immunity through constitutive expression of IL-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batf3-dependent CD103+ and CD8alpha+ dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the development of type 1 immune responses. However, their role in type 2 immunity remains unclear. We found that Th2 cell responses were enhanced in Batf3-/- mice responding to helminth parasite antigens (Ag). As a r...

  10. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Raquel; To, Joyce; Lund, Maria E; Pinar, Anita; Mansell, Ashley; Robinson, Mark W; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Dalton, John P; Donnelly, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex that controls the production of IL-1β, a cytokine that influences the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Helminth parasites secrete molecules that interact with innate immune cells, modulating their activity to ultimately determine the phenotype of differentiated T cells, thus creating an immune environment that is conducive to sustaining chronic infection. We show that one of these molecules, FhHDM-1, a cathelicidin-like peptide secreted by the helminth parasite, Fasciola hepatica, inhibits the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β by macrophages. FhHDM-1 had no effect on the synthesis of pro-IL-1β. Rather, the inhibitory effect was associated with the capacity of the peptide to prevent acidification of the endolysosome. The activation of cathepsin B protease by lysosomal destabilization was prevented in FhHDM-1-treated macrophages. By contrast, peptide derivatives of FhHDM-1 that did not alter the lysosomal pH did not inhibit secretion of IL-1β. We propose a novel immune modulatory strategy used by F. hepatica, whereby secretion of the FhHDM-1 peptide impairs the activation of NLRP3 by lysosomal cathepsin B protease, which prevents the downstream production of IL-1β and the development of protective T helper 1 type immune responses that are detrimental to parasite survival.-Alvarado, R., To, J., Lund, M. E., Pinar, A., Mansell, A., Robinson, M. W., O'Brien, B. A., Dalton, J. P., Donnelly, S. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages. © FASEB.

  11. A family of helminth molecules that modulate innate cell responses via molecular mimicry of host antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Robinson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade a significant number of studies have highlighted the central role of host antimicrobial (or defence peptides in modulating the response of innate immune cells to pathogen-associated ligands. In humans, the most widely studied antimicrobial peptide is LL-37, a 37-residue peptide containing an amphipathic helix that is released via proteolytic cleavage of the precursor protein CAP18. Owing to its ability to protect against lethal endotoxaemia and clinically-relevant bacterial infections, LL-37 and its derivatives are seen as attractive candidates for anti-sepsis therapies. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by parasitic helminths (helminth defence molecules; HDMs that exhibit similar biochemical and functional characteristics to human defence peptides, particularly CAP18. The HDM secreted by Fasciola hepatica (FhHDM-1 adopts a predominantly α-helical structure in solution. Processing of FhHDM-1 by F. hepatica cathepsin L1 releases a 34-residue C-terminal fragment containing a conserved amphipathic helix. This is analogous to the proteolytic processing of CAP18 to release LL-37, which modulates innate cell activation by classical toll-like receptor (TLR ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. We show that full-length recombinant FhHDM-1 and a peptide analogue of the amphipathic C-terminus bind directly to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner, reducing its interaction with both LPS-binding protein (LBP and the surface of macrophages. Furthermore, FhHDM-1 and the amphipathic C-terminal peptide protect mice against LPS-induced inflammation by significantly reducing the release of inflammatory mediators from macrophages. We propose that HDMs, by mimicking the function of host defence peptides, represent a novel family of innate cell modulators with therapeutic potential in anti-sepsis treatments and prevention of inflammation.

  12. A family of helminth molecules that modulate innate cell responses via molecular mimicry of host antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark W; Donnelly, Sheila; Hutchinson, Andrew T; To, Joyce; Taylor, Nicole L; Norton, Raymond S; Perugini, Matthew A; Dalton, John P

    2011-05-01

    Over the last decade a significant number of studies have highlighted the central role of host antimicrobial (or defence) peptides in modulating the response of innate immune cells to pathogen-associated ligands. In humans, the most widely studied antimicrobial peptide is LL-37, a 37-residue peptide containing an amphipathic helix that is released via proteolytic cleavage of the precursor protein CAP18. Owing to its ability to protect against lethal endotoxaemia and clinically-relevant bacterial infections, LL-37 and its derivatives are seen as attractive candidates for anti-sepsis therapies. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by parasitic helminths (helminth defence molecules; HDMs) that exhibit similar biochemical and functional characteristics to human defence peptides, particularly CAP18. The HDM secreted by Fasciola hepatica (FhHDM-1) adopts a predominantly α-helical structure in solution. Processing of FhHDM-1 by F. hepatica cathepsin L1 releases a 34-residue C-terminal fragment containing a conserved amphipathic helix. This is analogous to the proteolytic processing of CAP18 to release LL-37, which modulates innate cell activation by classical toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that full-length recombinant FhHDM-1 and a peptide analogue of the amphipathic C-terminus bind directly to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner, reducing its interaction with both LPS-binding protein (LBP) and the surface of macrophages. Furthermore, FhHDM-1 and the amphipathic C-terminal peptide protect mice against LPS-induced inflammation by significantly reducing the release of inflammatory mediators from macrophages. We propose that HDMs, by mimicking the function of host defence peptides, represent a novel family of innate cell modulators with therapeutic potential in anti-sepsis treatments and prevention of inflammation.

  13. Host parasite communications-Messages from helminths for the immune system: Parasite communication and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Gillian; Buck, Amy H; Maizels, Rick M

    2016-07-01

    Helminths are metazoan organisms many of which have evolved parasitic life styles dependent on sophisticated manipulation of the host environment. Most notably, they down-regulate host immune responses to ensure their own survival, by exporting a range of immuno-modulatory mediators that interact with host cells and tissues. While a number of secreted immunoregulatory parasite proteins have been defined, new work also points to the release of extracellular vesicles, or exosomes, that interact with and manipulate host gene expression. These recent results are discussed in the overall context of how helminths communicate effectively with the host organism.

  14. Photosensitizers for photodynamic immune modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, John R.; Boch, Ronald; Hunt, David W. C.; Ratkay, Leslie G.; Simkin, Guillermo O.; Tao, Jing-Song; Richter, Anna M.; Levy, Julia G.

    2000-06-01

    PDT may be an effective treatment for certain immune-mediated disorders. The immunomodulatory action of PDT is likely a consequence of effects exerted at a number of levels including stimulation of specific cell signaling pathways, selective depletion of activated immune cells, alteration of receptor expression by immune and non-immune cells, and the modulation of cytokine availability. QLT0074, a potent photosensitizer that exhibits rapid clearance kinetics in vivo, is in development for the treatment of immune disorders. In comparison to the well-characterized and structurally related photosensitizer verteporfin, lower concentrations of QLT0074 were required to induce apoptosis in human blood T cells and keratinocytes using blue light for photoactivation. Both photosensitizers triggered the stress activated protein kinase (SAPK) and p38 (HOG1) pathways but not extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK) activity in mouse Pam212 keratinocytes. In cell signaling responses, QLT0074 was active at lower concentrations than verteporfin. For all in vitro test systems, the stronger photodynamic activity of QLT0074 was associated with a greater cell uptake of this photosensitize than verteporfin. In mouse immune models, sub-erythemogenic doses of QLT0074 in combination with whole body blue light irradiation inhibited the contact hypersensitivity response and limited the development of adjuvant-induced arthritis. QLT0074 exhibits activities that indicate it may be a favorable agent for the photodynamic treatment of human immune disease.

  15. Probiotics as an Immune Modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-Ji; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are nonpathogenic live microorganism that can provide a diverse health benefits on the host when consumed in adequate amounts. Probiotics are consumed in diverse ways including dairy product, food supplements and functional foods with specific health claims. Recently, many reports suggest that certain probiotic strains or multi strain mixture have potent immunomodulatory activity in diverse disorders including allergic asthma, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. However, underlying mechanism of action is still unclear and efficacy of probiotic administration is quite different depending on the type of strains and the amounts of doses. We and others have suggested that live probiotics or their metabolites could interact with diverse immune cells (antigen presenting cells and T cells) and confer them to have immunoregulatory functions. Through this interaction, probiotics could contribute to maintaining immune homeostasis by balancing pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses. However, the effect of probiotics in prevention or modulation of ongoing disease is quite diverse even within a same species. Therefore, identification of functional probiotics with specific immune regulatory property is a certainly important issue. Herein, we briefly review selection methods for immunomodulatory probiotic strains and the mechanism of action of probiotics in immune modulation.

  16. Helminth-induced Ly6Chi monocyte-derived alternatively activated macrophages suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Terrazas, Cesar; de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, Juan; Stephanie A. Amici; Jablonski, Kyle A.; Martinez-Saucedo, Diana; Lindsay M Webb; Cortado, Hanna; Robledo-Avila, Frank; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam; Terrazas, Luis I.; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Partida-Sánchez, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Helminths cause chronic infections and affect the immune response to unrelated inflammatory diseases. Although helminths have been used therapeutically to ameliorate inflammatory conditions, their anti-inflammatory properties are poorly understood. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMϕs) have been suggested as the anti-inflammatory effector cells during helminth infections. Here, we define the origin of AAMϕs during infection with Taenia crassiceps, and their disease-modulating activity o...

  17. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Taylor B; Giacomin, Paul R; Loukas, Alex; Mulvenna, Jason P; Clark, Richard J; Miles, John J

    2017-01-01

    Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating "talents" of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  18. Chronic helminth infections may negatively influence immunity against tuberculosis and other diseases of public health importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Daniel; Britton, Sven; Kassu, Afework

    2007-01-01

    , studies conducted in animals and humans living in worm-endemic areas have shown that helminths impair resistance against a number of infections of major public health importance, including TB, malaria and HIV/AIDS. Understanding such interactions could assist in the design of vaccines against...

  19. Immune-Regulatory Mechanisms of Classical and Experimental Multiple Sclerosis Drugs: A Special Focus on Helminth-Derived Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peón, Alberto N; Terrazas, Luis I

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most prevalent autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Its pathophysiology is centered on neuron myelin sheath destruction in a manner largely dependent upon CD4+/CD8+ T-cell autoreactivity against myelin antigens, inducing Th1/Th17 pathogenic responses with the resulting production of free radicals and soluble mediators that exhibit the effector mechanisms of neurodegeneration. The immune response responsible for this disease is complex and challenges modern medicine. Consequently, many experimental therapies have been proposed in addition to the classical array of immunoregulatory/ immunosuppressive drugs that are normally used to treat MS. In this review, we will describe the effects and mechanisms of action of widely used disease-modifying MS drugs as well as those of select treatments that are currently in the experimental phase. Special emphasis is placed on helminth-derived immunoregulators, as some of them have shown promising results. Additionally, we will compare the mechanisms of action of both the MS drugs and the helminth-derived treatments to discuss the potential importance of some signaling pathways in the control of MS.

  20. Interleukin 4 promotes the development of ex-Foxp3 Th2 cells during immunity to intestinal helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelly, Victoria S; Coomes, Stephanie M; Kannan, Yashaswini; Gialitakis, Manolis; Entwistle, Lewis J; Perez-Lloret, Jimena; Czieso, Stephanie; Okoye, Isobel S; Rückerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E; Brombacher, Frank; Wilson, Mark S

    2017-06-05

    Immunity to intestinal helminth infections requires the rapid activation of T helper 2 cells (Th2 cells). However, simultaneous expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (T reg cells) impedes protective responses, resulting in chronic infections. The ratio between T reg and effector T cells can therefore determine the outcome of infection. The redifferentiation of T reg cells into Th cells has been identified in hyperinflammatory diseases. In this study, we asked whether ex-T reg Th2 cells develop and contribute to type-2 immunity. Using multigene reporter and fate-reporter systems, we demonstrate that a significant proportion of Th2 cells derive from Foxp3(+) cells after Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection and airway allergy. Ex-Foxp3 Th2 cells exhibit characteristic Th2 effector functions and provide immunity to H. polygyrus Through selective deletion of Il4ra on Foxp3(+) cells, we further demonstrate IL-4 is required for the development of ex-Foxp3 Th2 cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that converting T reg cells into Th2 cells could concomitantly enhance Th2 cells and limit T reg cell-mediated suppression. © 2017 Pelly et al.

  1. Conditional IL-4/IL-13-deficient mice reveal a critical role of innate immune cells for protective immunity against gastrointestinal helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeser, K; Schwartz, C; Voehringer, D

    2015-05-01

    Approximately one-third of the world population is infected with gastrointestinal helminths. Studies in mouse models have demonstrated that the cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 are essential for worm expulsion, but the critical cellular source of these cytokines is poorly defined. Here, we compared the immune response to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in wild-type, T cell-specific IL-4/IL-13-deficient and general IL-4/IL-13-deficient mice. We show that T cell-derived IL-4/IL-13 promoted T helper 2 (Th2) polarization in a paracrine manner, differentiation of alternatively activated macrophages, and tissue recruitment of innate effector cells. However, innate IL-4/IL-13 played the critical role for induction of goblet cell hyperplasia and secretion of effector molecules like Mucin5ac and RELMβ in the small intestine. Surprisingly, T cell-specific IL-4/IL-13-deficient and wild-type mice cleared the parasite with comparable efficiency, whereas IL-4/IL-13-deficient mice showed impaired expulsion. These findings demonstrate that IL-4/IL-13 produced by cells of the innate immune system is required and sufficient to initiate effective type 2 immune responses resulting in protective immunity against N. brasiliensis.

  2. Schistosome-Derived Molecules as Modulating Actors of the Immune System and Promising Candidates to Treat Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Anderson Rodrigues Araújo; de Campos, Tatiana Amabile

    2016-01-01

    It is long known that some parasite infections are able to modulate specific pathways of host's metabolism and immune responses. This modulation is not only important in order to understand the host-pathogen interactions and to develop treatments against the parasites themselves but also important in the development of treatments against autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Throughout the life cycle of schistosomes the mammalian hosts are exposed to several biomolecules that are excreted/secreted from the parasite infective stage, named cercariae, from their tegument, present in adult and larval stages, and finally from their eggs. These molecules can induce the activation and modulation of innate and adaptive responses as well as enabling the evasion of the parasite from host defense mechanisms. Immunomodulatory effects of helminth infections and egg molecules are clear, as well as their ability to downregulate proinflammatory cytokines, upregulate anti-inflammatory cytokines, and drive a Th2 type of immune response. We believe that schistosomes can be used as a model to understand the potential applications of helminths and helminth-derived molecules against autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27635405

  3. Helminth Immunomodulation in Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Miles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminths have evolved to become experts at subverting immune surveillance. Through potent and persistent immune tempering, helminths can remain undetected in human tissues for decades. Redirecting the immunomodulating “talents” of helminths to treat inflammatory human diseases is receiving intensive interest. Here, we review therapies using live parasitic worms, worm secretions, and worm-derived synthetic molecules to treat autoimmune disease. We review helminth therapy in both mouse models and clinical trials and discuss what is known on mechanisms of action. We also highlight current progress in characterizing promising new immunomodulatory molecules found in excretory/secretory products of helminths and their potential use as immunotherapies for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

  4. Interferon Lambda: Modulating Immunity in Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syedbasha, Mohammedyaseen; Egli, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Interferon lambdas (IFN-λs; IFNL1-4) modulate immunity in the context of infections and autoimmune diseases, through a network of induced genes. IFN-λs act by binding to the heterodimeric IFN-λ receptor (IFNLR), activating a STAT phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascade. Thereby hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes are induced, which modulate various immune functions via complex forward and feedback loops. When compared to the well-characterized IFN-α signaling cascade, three important differences have been discovered. First, the IFNLR is not ubiquitously expressed: in particular, immune cells show significant variation in the expression levels of and susceptibilities to IFN-λs. Second, the binding affinities of individual IFN-λs to the IFNLR varies greatly and are generally lower compared to the binding affinities of IFN-α to its receptor. Finally, genetic variation in the form of a series of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to genes involved in the IFN-λ signaling cascade has been described and associated with the clinical course and treatment outcomes of hepatitis B and C virus infection. The clinical impact of IFN-λ signaling and the SNP variations may, however, reach far beyond viral hepatitis. Recent publications show important roles for IFN-λs in a broad range of viral infections such as human T-cell leukemia type-1 virus, rotaviruses, and influenza virus. IFN-λ also potentially modulates the course of bacterial colonization and infections as shown for Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although the immunological processes involved in controlling viral and bacterial infections are distinct, IFN-λs may interfere at various levels: as an innate immune cytokine with direct antiviral effects; or as a modulator of IFN-α-induced signaling via the suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 and the ubiquitin-specific peptidase 18 inhibitory feedback loops. In addition, the modulation of adaptive immune functions via macrophage and

  5. REHABILITATION OF AUTISM WITH IMMUNE MODULATION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijendra K. SINGH

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity may play a key role in the pathogenesis of autism, an early-onset disorder of the developing central nervous system. Viruses such as measles virus might induce autoimmunity as evidenced by a strong correlation of brain autoantibodies and measles antibodies. Autistic children also harbor brain-specific autoantibodies and elevated levels of autoimmunity-specific cytokines interleukin-12 and interferon-gamma. Collectively, there is compelling reason to believe that autism involves immune activation and autoimmunity to brain and patients show responsiveness to immune modulation therapy. Furthermore, for the purpose of identifying Autoimmune Autistic Disorder (AAD, a protocol for testing autoimmunity is developed. In this article, novel research developments are described to suggest that autoimmunity is a very important target that should be used to offer rehabilitation to autistic patients through immune therapy.

  6. Chitin modulates innate immune responses of keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chitin, after cellulose the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, is an essential component of exoskeletons of crabs, shrimps and insects and protects these organisms from harsh conditions in their environment. Unexpectedly, chitin has been found to activate innate immune cells and to elicit murine airway inflammation. The skin represents the outer barrier of the human host defense and is in frequent contact with chitin-bearing organisms, such as house-dust mites or flies. The effects of chitin on keratinocytes, however, are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We hypothesized that chitin stimulates keratinocytes and thereby modulates the innate immune response of the skin. Here we show that chitin is bioactive on primary and immortalized keratinocytes by triggering production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Chitin stimulation further induced the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR TLR4 on keratinocytes at mRNA and protein level. Chitin-induced effects were mainly abrogated when TLR2 was blocked, suggesting that TLR2 senses chitin on keratinocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We speculate that chitin-bearing organisms modulate the innate immune response towards pathogens by upregulating secretion of cytokines and chemokines and expression of MyD88-associated TLRs, two major components of innate immunity. The clinical relevance of this mechanism remains to be defined.

  7. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the design of vaccines against fasciolosis.

  8. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the design of vaccines against fasciolosis. PMID:26720149

  9. The Mannose Receptor (CD206) is an important pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in the detection of the infective stage of the helminth Schistosoma mansoni and modulates IFNγ production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paveley, Ross A; Aynsley, Sarah A; Turner, Joseph D; Bourke, Claire D; Jenkins, Stephen J; Cook, Peter C; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Mountford, Adrian P

    2011-11-01

    In this study, infective larvae of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni were shown to contain a large number of glycosylated components specific for the Mannose Receptor (MR; CD206), which is an important pattern recognition receptor (PRR) of the innate immune system. MR ligands were particularly rich in excretory/secretory (E/S) material released during transformation of cercariae into schistosomula, a process critical for infection of the host. E/S material from carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA-SE)-labelled cercariae showed enhanced binding by cells lines that over-express the MR. Conversely, uptake was significantly lower by bone marrow-derived macrophages (MΦ) from MR(-/-) mice, although they were more active as judged by enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and CD40 expression. After natural percutaneous infection of MR(-/-) mice with CFDA-SE-labelled parasites, there were fewer cells in the skin and draining lymph nodes that were CFDA-SE(+) compared with wild-type mice, implying reduced uptake and presentation of larval parasite antigen. However, antigen-specific proliferation of skin draining lymph node cells was significantly enhanced and they secreted markedly elevated levels of IFNγ but decreased levels of IL-4. In conclusion, we show that the MR on mononuclear phagocytic cells, which are plentiful in the skin, plays a significant role in internalising E/S material released by the invasive stages of the parasite which in turn modulates their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In the absence of the MR, antigen-specific CD4(+) cells are Th1 biased, suggesting that ligation of the MR by glycosylated E/S material released by schistosome larvae modulates the production of CD4(+) cell specific IFNγ.

  10. Immune modulation of resistance artery remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2012-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation plays a role in cardiovascular disease. The innate and the adaptive immune responses participate in mechanisms that contribute to inflammatory responses. It has been increasingly appreciated that different subsets of lymphocytes and the cytokines they produce modulate the vascular remodelling that occurs in cardiovascular disease. Effector T cells such as T-helper (Th) 1 (interferon-γ-producing) and Th2 lymphocytes (that produce interleukin-4), as well as Th17 (that produce interleukin-17), and T suppressor lymphocytes including regulatory T cells (Treg), which express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are involved in the remodelling of small arteries that occurs under the action of angiotensin II, deoxycorticosterone-salt and aldosterone-salt, as well as in models of hypertension such as the Dahl-salt-sensitive rat. The mechanism whereby the immune system is activated is unclear, but it has been suggested that neo-antigens may be generated by the elevation of blood pressure or other stimuli, leading to the activation of the immune response. Activated Th1 may contribute to vascular remodelling directly on blood vessels via effects of the cytokines produced or indirectly by actions on the kidney. The protective effect of Treg may be mediated similarly directly or via renal effects. These data offer promise for the discovery of new therapeutic targets to ameliorate vascular remodelling, which could lead to improved outcome in cardiovascular disease in humans.

  11. Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0423 TITLE: Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Smita...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0423 Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...immune checkpoint blockade, local CTLA-4 modulation, prostate cancer immunotherapy , prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), RNA-based vaccines 16

  12. Modulation of host immunity by beneficial microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamioudis, Christos; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2012-02-01

    In nature, plants abundantly form beneficial associations with soilborne microbes that are important for plant survival and, as such, affect plant biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Classical examples of symbiotic microbes are mycorrhizal fungi that aid in the uptake of water and minerals, and Rhizobium bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. Several other types of beneficial soilborne microbes, such as plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria and fungi with biological control activity, can stimulate plant growth by directly suppressing deleterious soilborne pathogens or by priming aboveground plant parts for enhanced defense against foliar pathogens or insect herbivores. The establishment of beneficial associations requires mutual recognition and substantial coordination of plant and microbial responses. A growing body of evidence suggests that beneficial microbes are initially recognized as potential invaders, after which an immune response is triggered, whereas, at later stages of the interaction, mutualists are able to short-circuit plant defense responses to enable successful colonization of host roots. Here, we review our current understanding of how symbiotic and nonsymbiotic beneficial soil microbes modulate the plant immune system and discuss the role of local and systemic defense responses in establishing the delicate balance between the two partners.

  13. Slamf receptors : Modulators of Phagocyte Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Driel, Boaz Job

    2015-01-01

    Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule family (Slamf) receptors can operate in three distinct modes. Slamf receptors can dictate the extent of immune responses, thereby maneuvering immunity to the optimal zone between immunopathology or autoimmunity and weak, ineffective immune responses. A second

  14. Extracellular Vesicles from a Helminth Parasite Suppress Macrophage Activation and Constitute an Effective Vaccine for Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Gillian; McCaskill, Jana L; Borger, Jessica G; Simbari, Fabio; Robertson, Elaine; Millar, Marissa; Harcus, Yvonne; McSorley, Henry J; Maizels, Rick M; Buck, Amy H

    2017-05-23

    Recent studies have demonstrated that many parasites release extracellular vesicles (EVs), yet little is known about the specific interactions of EVs with immune cells or their functions during infection. We show that EVs secreted by the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus are internalized by macrophages and modulate their activation. EV internalization causes downregulation of type 1 and type 2 immune-response-associated molecules (IL-6 and TNF, and Ym1 and RELMα) and inhibits expression of the IL-33 receptor subunit ST2. Co-incubation with EV antibodies abrogated suppression of alternative activation and was associated with increased co-localization of the EVs with lysosomes. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with EV-alum generated protective immunity against larval challenge, highlighting an important role in vivo. In contrast, ST2-deficient mice are highly susceptible to infection, and they are unable to clear parasites following EV vaccination. Hence, macrophage activation and the IL-33 pathway are targeted by H. polygyrus EVs, while neutralization of EV function facilitates parasite expulsion. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts.

  16. Toll-like receptor activation by helminths or helminth products to alleviate inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song YanXia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helminth infection may modulate the expression of Toll like receptors (TLR in dendritic cells (DCs and modify the responsiveness of DCs to TLR ligands. This may regulate aberrant intestinal inflammation in humans with helminthes and may thus help alleviate inflammation associated with human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Epidemiological and experimental data provide further evidence that reducing helminth infections increases the incidence rate of such autoimmune diseases. Fine control of inflammation in the TLR pathway is highly desirable for effective host defense. Thus, the use of antagonists of TLR-signaling and agonists of their negative regulators from helminths or helminth products should be considered for the treatment of IBD.

  17. Exosome-transported microRNAs of helminth origin: new tools for allergic and autoimmune diseases therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles-Lucas, M; Morchon, R; Simon, F; Manzano-Roman, R

    2015-04-01

    Chronic diseases associated with inflammation show fast annual increase in their incidence. This has been associated with excessive hygiene habits that limit contacts between the immune system and helminth parasites. Helminthic infections induce regulation and expansion of regulatory T cells (Treg) leading to atypical Th2 type immune responses, with downregulation of the inflammatory component usually associated with these type of responses. Many cells, including those of the immune system, produce extracellular vesicles called exosomes which mediate either immune stimulation (DCs) or immune modulation (T cells). The transfer of miRNAs contained in T-cell exosomes has been shown to contribute to downregulate the production of inflammatory mediators. It has been recently described the delivery to the host-parasite interface of exosomes containing miRNAs by helminths and its internalization by host cells. In this sense, helminth microRNAs transported in exosomes and internalized by immune host cells exert an important role in the expansion of Treg cells, resulting in the control of inflammation. We here provide relevant information obtained in the field of exosomes, cell-cell communication and miRNAs, showing the high potential of helminth miRNAs delivered in exosomes to host cells as new therapeutic tools against diseases associated with exacerbated inflammatory responses.

  18. Immune regulation by pericytes: modulating innate and adaptive immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, Rocio; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis;

    2016-01-01

    respond to a series of proinflammatory stimuli and are able to sense different types of danger through expression of functional pattern recognition receptors, contributing to the onset of innate immune responses. In this context, PC not only secrete a variety of chemokines, but they also overexpress...... adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 involved in the control of immune cell trafficking across vessel walls. In addition to their role in innate immunity, pericytes are involved in adaptive immunity. It has been reported that interaction with PC anergizes T cells, attributed, at least in part...

  19. Helminth Parasites Alter Protection against Plasmodium Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor H. Salazar-Castañon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-third of the world’s population is infected with one or more helminthic parasites. Helminth infections are prevalent throughout tropical and subtropical regions where malaria pathogens are transmitted. Malaria is the most widespread and deadliest parasitic disease. The severity of the disease is strongly related to parasite density and the host’s immune responses. Furthermore, coinfections between both parasites occur frequently. However, little is known regarding how concomitant infection with helminths and Plasmodium affects the host’s immune response. Helminthic infections are frequently massive, chronic, and strong inductors of a Th2-type response. This implies that infection by such parasites could alter the host’s susceptibility to subsequent infections by Plasmodium. There are a number of reports on the interactions between helminths and Plasmodium; in some, the burden of Plasmodium parasites increased, but others reported a reduction in the parasite. This review focuses on explaining many of these discrepancies regarding helminth-Plasmodium coinfections in terms of the effects that helminths have on the immune system. In particular, it focuses on helminth-induced immunosuppression and the effects of cytokines controlling polarization toward the Th1 or Th2 arms of the immune response.

  20. Helminth Parasites Alter Protection against Plasmodium Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Castañon, Víctor H.; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha

    2014-01-01

    More than one-third of the world's population is infected with one or more helminthic parasites. Helminth infections are prevalent throughout tropical and subtropical regions where malaria pathogens are transmitted. Malaria is the most widespread and deadliest parasitic disease. The severity of the disease is strongly related to parasite density and the host's immune responses. Furthermore, coinfections between both parasites occur frequently. However, little is known regarding how concomitant infection with helminths and Plasmodium affects the host's immune response. Helminthic infections are frequently massive, chronic, and strong inductors of a Th2-type response. This implies that infection by such parasites could alter the host's susceptibility to subsequent infections by Plasmodium. There are a number of reports on the interactions between helminths and Plasmodium; in some, the burden of Plasmodium parasites increased, but others reported a reduction in the parasite. This review focuses on explaining many of these discrepancies regarding helminth-Plasmodium coinfections in terms of the effects that helminths have on the immune system. In particular, it focuses on helminth-induced immunosuppression and the effects of cytokines controlling polarization toward the Th1 or Th2 arms of the immune response. PMID:25276830

  1. Immune regulation by pericytes: modulating innate and adaptive immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarro, Rocio; Compte, Marta; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 involved in the control of immune cell trafficking across vessel walls. In addition to their role in innate immunity, pericytes are involved in adaptive immunity. It has been reported that interaction with PC anergizes T cells, attributed, at least in part...... respond to a series of proinflammatory stimuli and are able to sense different types of danger through expression of functional pattern recognition receptors, contributing to the onset of innate immune responses. In this context, PC not only secrete a variety of chemokines, but they also overexpress......Pericytes (PC) are mural cells that surround endothelial cells (EC) in small blood vessels. PC have traditionally been endowed with structural functions, being essential for vessel maturation and stabilization. However, accumulating evidence suggest that PC also display immune properties. They can...

  2. The Hygiene Hypothesis and Its Inconvenient Truths about Helminth Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Neima; Weatherhead, Jill; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Hotez, Peter J

    2016-09-01

    Current iterations of the hygiene hypothesis suggest an adaptive role for helminth parasites in shaping the proper maturation of the immune system. However, aspects of this hypothesis are based on assumptions that may not fully account for realities about human helminth infections. Such realities include evidence of causal associations between helminth infections and asthma or inflammatory bowel disease as well as the fact that helminth infections remain widespread in the United States, especially among populations at greatest risk for inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  3. Glycoconjugates in host-helminth interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Salinger Prasanphanich

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helminths are multicellular parasitic worms that comprise a major class of human pathogens and cause an immense amount of suffering worldwide. Helminths possess an abundance of complex and unique glycoconjugates that interact with both the innate and adaptive arms of immunity in definitive and intermediate hosts. These glycoconjugates represent a major untapped reservoir of immunomodulatory compounds, which have the potential to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, and antigenic glycans, which could be exploited as vaccines and diagnostics. This review will survey current knowledge of the interactions between helminth glycans and host immunity and highlight the gaps in our understanding which are relevant to advancing therapeutics, vaccine development and diagnostics.

  4. Glycoconjugates in Host-Helminth Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Mickum, Megan L.; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Cummings, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Helminths are multicellular parasitic worms that comprise a major class of human pathogens and cause an immense amount of suffering worldwide. Helminths possess an abundance of complex and unique glycoconjugates that interact with both the innate and adaptive arms of immunity in definitive and intermediate hosts. These glycoconjugates represent a major untapped reservoir of immunomodulatory compounds, which have the potential to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, and antigenic glycans, which could be exploited as vaccines and diagnostics. This review will survey current knowledge of the interactions between helminth glycans and host immunity and highlight the gaps in our understanding which are relevant to advancing therapeutics, vaccine development, and diagnostics. PMID:24009607

  5. Life History, Immune Function, and Intestinal Helminths: Trade-Offs Among Immunoglobulin E, C-Reactive Protein, and Growth in an Amazonian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    BLACKWELL, AARON D.; SNODGRASS, J. JOSH; MADIMENOS, FELICIA C.; SUGIYAMA, LAWRENCE S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Infection with helminths is associated with shifts in host immunity, including increased production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and reduced inflammation. Given limited energy budgets, these shifts may involve changes in energy allocation toward competing demands. Here we test for potential trade-offs between growth, IgE, and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). Methods Dried blood spots and anthropometrics were collected from 162 Shuar forager-horticulturalists from a village in southeastern Ecuador. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to measure IgE and CRP. Relationships among IgE, CRP, and anthropometrics were examined in three groups: children aged 2–7 years (n = 63), children aged 8–15 (n = 61), and adults over age 18 (n = 37). Results Geometric mean IgE was 1,196 IU ml−1 while geometric mean CRP was 1.33 mg l−1. In children, IgE and CRP were negatively correlated (r = −0.21, P = 0.02, df = 122). Controlling for fat stores and age, IgE was associated with lower stature in children (t = −2.04, P = 0.04, df = 109), and adults (t = −3.29, P < 0.01, df = 33). In children there was a significant interaction between age and CRP, such that in younger children CRP was associated with shorter stature, but in older children was associated with greater stature (t = 2.15, P = 0.04, df = 109). Conclusions These results suggest that infection with helminths may have hidden costs associated with immunological changes, and that these costs may ultimately affect growth and other life history parameters. PMID:20865759

  6. Immunity and immune modulation in Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardillo, Fabíola; de Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Antas, Paulo Renato Zuquim; Mengel, José

    2015-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite reaches the secondary lymphoid organs, the heart, skeletal muscles, neurons in the intestine and esophagus among other tissues. The disease is characterized by mega syndromes, which may affect the esophagus, the colon and the heart, in about 30% of infected people. The clinical manifestations associated with T. cruzi infection during the chronic phase of the disease are dependent on complex interactions between the parasite and the host tissues, particularly the lymphoid system that may either result in a balanced relationship with no disease or in an unbalanced relationship that follows an inflammatory response to parasite antigens and associated tissues in some of the host organs and/or by an autoimmune response to host antigens. This review discusses the findings that support the notion of an integrated immune response, considering the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system in the control of parasite numbers and also the mechanisms proposed to regulate the immune response in order to tolerate the remaining parasite load, during the chronic phase of infection. This knowledge is fundamental to the understanding of the disease progression and is essential for the development of novel therapies and vaccine strategies.

  7. Helminths and malignancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennervald, Birgitte J; Polman, K.

    2009-01-01

    number of people who are exposed or infected worldwide. Carcinogenesis associated with helminth infections is a complex process, which may involve several different mechanisms, but chronic inflammation is a key feature. Host immune responses and immunopathological processes mediate inflammatory responses...... and any failure in the control of the immunological components involved in this response can lead to chronic inflammation. This may generate a microenvironment that might be conducive to the initiation and development of cancer. Inflammatory cells generate free radicals and nitrogen species, which can...

  8. The immune response and its therapeutic modulation in bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daheshia, Massoud; Prahl, James D; Carmichael, Jacob J; Parrish, John S; Seda, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Bronchiectasis (BC) is a chronic pulmonary disease with tremendous morbidity and significant mortality. As pathogen infection has been advocated as a triggering insult in the development of BC, a central role for the immune response in this process seems obvious. Inflammatory cells are present in both the airways as well as the lung parenchyma, and multiple mediators of immune cells including proteases and cytokines or their humoral products are increased locally or in the periphery. Interestingly, a defect in the immune system or suppression of immune response during conditions such as immunodeficiency may well predispose one to the devastating effects of BC. Thus, the outcome of an active immune response as detrimental or protective in the pathogenesis of BC may be dependent on the state of the patient's immunity, the severity of infection, and the magnitude of immune response. Here we reassess the function of the innate and acquired immunity in BC, the major sites of immune response, and the nature of the bioactive mediators. Furthermore, the potential link(s) between an ongoing immune response and structural alterations accompanying the disease and the success of therapies that can modulate the nature and extent of immune response in BC are elaborated upon.

  9. Biliary Innate Immunity: Function and Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Harada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary innate immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangiopathies in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and biliary atresia. Biliary epithelial cells possess an innate immune system consisting of the Toll-like receptor (TLR family and recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Tolerance to bacterial PAMPs such as lipopolysaccharides is also important to maintain homeostasis in the biliary tree, but tolerance to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA is not found. In PBC, CD4-positive Th17 cells characterized by the secretion of IL-17 are implicated in the chronic inflammation of bile ducts and the presence of Th17 cells around bile ducts is causally associated with the biliary innate immune responses to PAMPs. Moreover, a negative regulator of intracellular TLR signaling, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ, is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangitis. Immunosuppression using PPARγ ligands may help to attenuate the bile duct damage in PBC patients. In biliary atresia characterized by a progressive, inflammatory, and sclerosing cholangiopathy, dsRNA viruses are speculated to be an etiological agent and to directly induce enhanced biliary apoptosis via the expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of biliary epithelial cells is also evoked by the biliary innate immune response to dsRNA.

  10. Inulin and oligofructose: review of experimental data on immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Stephanie; Watzl, Bernhard

    2007-11-01

    Diet modulates immune functions in different ways and affects host resistance to infections. In addition to the essential nutrients in food, nonessential food constituents such as nondigestible carbohydrates also affect the immune system. First results from human intervention studies suggest that the intake of inulin (IN) and oligofructose (OF) has beneficial effects on the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. At the level of the systemic immune system, however, only minor effects have been observed in healthy adult human subjects. In contrast, data from studies with infants suggest that supplementation with a prebiotic mixture positively affects postnatal immune development and increases fecal secretory IgA. Animal studies confirm the observations from human trials and give more insight into the immune tissue- specific effects of IN/OF. A clear outcome of the animal studies is that the intestinal immune system and especially the immune cells associated with the Peyer's patches are responsive to a dietary supplement of IN/OF and/or their metabolites. The mechanisms of IN/OF include indirect effects such as a shift in the composition of the intestinal flora and the enhanced production of immunoregulatory SCFA and perhaps other bacterial metabolites. Few data suggest direct effects of IN/OF via carbohydrate receptors on intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells. In conclusion, prebiotic IN/OF clearly modulate immunological processes at the level of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, which may be associated with significant health benefits in infants and patients with intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  11. Immune-modulating therapy in acute pancreatitis: Fact or fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, bearing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment of AP remains unspecific and supportive and is mainly targeted to aggressively prevent systemic complications and organ failure by intensive care. As acute pancreatitis shares an indistinguishable profile of inflammation with sepsis, therapeutic approaches have turned towards modulating the systemic inflammatory response. Targets, among others, have included pro- and anti-inflammatory modulators, cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, adhesive molecules and platelets. Even though, initial results in experimental models have been encouraging, clinical implementation of immune-regulating therapies in acute pancreatitis has had a slow progress. Main reasons include difficulty in clinical translation of experimental data, poor understanding of inflammatory response time-course, flaws in experimental designs, need for multimodal approaches and commercial drawbacks. Whether immune-modulation in acute pancreatitis remains a fact or just fiction remains to be seen in the future. PMID:25386069

  12. Impact of Helminth Infection on the Clinical and Microbiological Presentation of Chagas Diseases in Chronically Infected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, coexisting in Chagas disease endemic areas. Helminth infections in humans may modulate the host immune system, changing the Th1/Th2 polarization. This immunological disturbance could modify the immune response to other infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between clinical, microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of Chagas disease patients, with the presence of helminth infection.A prospective observational study was conducted at Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain. Inclusion criteria were: age over 18 years, diagnosis of Chagas disease, and not having received specific treatment for Chagas disease previously to the inclusion. The study protocol included Chagas disease assessment (cardiac and digestive evaluation, detection of T. cruzi DNA measured by PCR in peripheral blood, and helminth infection diagnosis (detection of IgG anti-Strongyloides stercoralis by ELISA, microscopic examination of stool samples from three different days, and specific faecal culture for S. stercoralis larvae.Overall, 65 patients were included, median age was 38 years, 75.4% were women and most of them came from Bolivia. Cardiac and digestive involvement was present in 18.5% and 27.7% of patients respectively. T. cruzi PCR was positive in 28 (43.1% patients. Helminth infection was diagnosed in 12 (18.5% patients. No differences were observed in clinical and epidemiological characteristics between patients with and without helminth infection. Nevertheless, the proportion of patients with positive T. cruzi PCR was higher among patients with helminth infection compared with patients without helminth infection (75% vs 35.8%, p = 0.021.We observed a high prevalence of S. stercoralis infection among chronic Chagas disease patients attended in our tropical medicine unit. Strongyloidiasis was associated with significantly higher proportion of

  13. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  14. Developmental Bisphenol A Exposure Modulates Immune-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joella Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA, used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, has a widespread exposure to humans. BPA is of concern for developmental exposure resulting in immunomodulation and disease development due to its ability to cross the placental barrier and presence in breast milk. BPA can use various mechanisms to modulate the immune system and affect diseases, including agonistic and antagonistic effects on many receptors (e.g., estrogen receptors, epigenetic modifications, acting on cell signaling pathways and, likely, the gut microbiome. Immune cell populations and function from the innate and adaptive immune system are altered by developmental BPA exposure, including decreased T regulatory (Treg cells and upregulated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Developmental BPA exposure can also contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, allergy, asthma and mammary cancer disease by altering immune function. Multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus may also be exacerbated by BPA, although more research is needed. Additionally, BPA analogs, such as bisphenol S (BPS, have been increasing in use, and currently, little is known about their immune effects. Therefore, more studies should be conducted to determine if developmental exposure BPA and its analogs modulate immune responses and lead to immune-related diseases.

  15. Life history, immune function, and intestinal helminths: Trade-offs among immunoglobulin E, C-reactive protein, and growth in an Amazonian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Aaron D; Snodgrass, J Josh; Madimenos, Felicia C; Sugiyama, Lawrence S

    2010-01-01

    Infection with helminths is associated with shifts in host immunity, including increased production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and reduced inflammation. Given limited energy budgets, these shifts may involve changes in energy allocation toward competing demands. Here we test for potential trade-offs between growth, IgE, and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). Dried blood spots and anthropometrics were collected from 162 Shuar forager-horticulturalists from a village in southeastern Ecuador. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to measure IgE and CRP. Relationships among IgE, CRP, and anthropometrics were examined in three groups: children aged 2-7 years (n = 63), children aged 8-15 (n = 61), and adults over age 18 (n = 37). Geometric mean IgE was 1,196 IU ml⁻¹ while geometric mean CRP was 1.33 mg l⁻¹. In children, IgE and CRP were negatively correlated (r = -0.21, P = 0.02, df = 122). Controlling for fat stores and age, IgE was associated with lower stature in children (t = -2.04, P = 0.04, df = 109), and adults (t = -3.29, P history parameters. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Defense peptides secreted by helminth pathogens: antimicrobial and/or immunomodulator molecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Sophie; Donnelly, Sheila; Robinson, Mark W.; Dalton, John P.; Thivierge, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune response found in all living species. They possess antimicrobial activities against a broad range of organisms including bacteria, fungi, eukaryotic parasites, and viruses. HDPs also have the ability to enhance immune responses by acting as immunomodulators. We discovered a new family of HDPs derived from pathogenic helminth (worms) that cause enormous disease in animals and humans worldwide. The discovery of these peptides was based on their similar biochemical and functional characteristics to the human defense peptide LL-37. We propose that these new peptides modulate the immune response via molecular mimicry of mammalian HDPs thus providing a mechanism behind the anti-inflammatory properties of helminth infections. PMID:22973271

  17. Defense peptides secreted by helminth pathogens: antimicrobial and/or immunomodulator molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eCotton

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Host defense peptides (HDPs are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune response found in all living species. They possess antimicrobial activities against a broad range of organisms including bacteria, fungi, eukaryotic parasites and viruses. HDPs also have the ability to enhance immune responses by acting as immunomodulators. We discovered a new family of HDPs derived from pathogenic helminthes (worms that cause enormous disease in animals and humans worldwide. The discovery of these peptides was based on their similar biochemical and functional characteristics to the human defense peptide LL-37. We propose that these new peptides modulate the immune response via molecular mimicry of mammalian HDPs thus providing a mechanism behind the anti-inflammatory properties of helminth infections.

  18. Concerted activity of IgG1 antibodies and IL-4/IL-25-dependent effector cells trap helminth larvae in the tissues following vaccination with defined secreted antigens, providing sterile immunity to challenge infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Hewitson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over 25% of the world's population are infected with helminth parasites, the majority of which colonise the gastrointestinal tract. However, no vaccine is yet available for human use, and mechanisms of protective immunity remain unclear. In the mouse model of Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection, vaccination with excretory-secretory (HES antigens from adult parasites elicits sterilising immunity. Notably, three purified HES antigens (VAL-1, -2 and -3 are sufficient for effective vaccination. Protection is fully dependent upon specific IgG1 antibodies, but passive transfer confers only partial immunity to infection, indicating that cellular components are also required. Moreover, immune mice show greater cellular infiltration associated with trapping of larvae in the gut wall prior to their maturation. Intra-vital imaging of infected intestinal tissue revealed a four-fold increase in extravasation by LysM+GFP+ myeloid cells in vaccinated mice, and the massing of these cells around immature larvae. Mice deficient in FcRγ chain or C3 complement component remain fully immune, suggesting that in the presence of antibodies that directly neutralise parasite molecules, the myeloid compartment may attack larvae more quickly and effectively. Immunity to challenge infection was compromised in IL-4Rα- and IL-25-deficient mice, despite levels of specific antibody comparable to immune wild-type controls, while deficiencies in basophils, eosinophils or mast cells or CCR2-dependent inflammatory monocytes did not diminish immunity. Finally, we identify a suite of previously uncharacterised heat-labile vaccine antigens with homologs in human and veterinary parasites that together promote full immunity. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccine-induced immunity to intestinal helminths involves IgG1 antibodies directed against secreted proteins acting in concert with IL-25-dependent Type 2 myeloid effector populations.

  19. Concerted Activity of IgG1 Antibodies and IL-4/IL-25-Dependent Effector Cells Trap Helminth Larvae in the Tissues following Vaccination with Defined Secreted Antigens, Providing Sterile Immunity to Challenge Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitson, James P.; Filbey, Kara J.; Esser-von Bieren, Julia; Camberis, Mali; Schwartz, Christian; Murray, Janice; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Blair, Natalie; Robertson, Elaine; Harcus, Yvonne; Boon, Louis; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Yang, Lihua; Tu, Yizheng; Miller, Mark J.; Voehringer, David; Le Gros, Graham; Harris, Nicola; Maizels, Rick M.

    2015-01-01

    Over 25% of the world's population are infected with helminth parasites, the majority of which colonise the gastrointestinal tract. However, no vaccine is yet available for human use, and mechanisms of protective immunity remain unclear. In the mouse model of Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection, vaccination with excretory-secretory (HES) antigens from adult parasites elicits sterilising immunity. Notably, three purified HES antigens (VAL-1, -2 and -3) are sufficient for effective vaccination. Protection is fully dependent upon specific IgG1 antibodies, but passive transfer confers only partial immunity to infection, indicating that cellular components are also required. Moreover, immune mice show greater cellular infiltration associated with trapping of larvae in the gut wall prior to their maturation. Intra-vital imaging of infected intestinal tissue revealed a four-fold increase in extravasation by LysM+GFP+ myeloid cells in vaccinated mice, and the massing of these cells around immature larvae. Mice deficient in FcRγ chain or C3 complement component remain fully immune, suggesting that in the presence of antibodies that directly neutralise parasite molecules, the myeloid compartment may attack larvae more quickly and effectively. Immunity to challenge infection was compromised in IL-4Rα- and IL-25-deficient mice, despite levels of specific antibody comparable to immune wild-type controls, while deficiencies in basophils, eosinophils or mast cells or CCR2-dependent inflammatory monocytes did not diminish immunity. Finally, we identify a suite of previously uncharacterised heat-labile vaccine antigens with homologs in human and veterinary parasites that together promote full immunity. Taken together, these data indicate that vaccine-induced immunity to intestinal helminths involves IgG1 antibodies directed against secreted proteins acting in concert with IL-25-dependent Type 2 myeloid effector populations. PMID:25816012

  20. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y; Boulianne, Gabrielle L; Hoffmann, Jules A; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-02-19

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases.

  1. big bang gene modulates gut immune tolerance in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnay, François; Cohen-Berros, Eva; Hoffmann, Martine; Kim, Sabrina Y.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Hoffmann, Jules A.; Matt, Nicolas; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the intestine is detrimental to mammals. Similarly, constant activation of the immune response in the gut by the endogenous flora is suspected to be harmful to Drosophila. Therefore, the innate immune response in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster is tightly balanced to simultaneously prevent infections by pathogenic microorganisms and tolerate the endogenous flora. Here we describe the role of the big bang (bbg) gene, encoding multiple membrane-associated PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain-containing protein isoforms, in the modulation of the gut immune response. We show that in the adult Drosophila midgut, BBG is present at the level of the septate junctions, on the apical side of the enterocytes. In the absence of BBG, these junctions become loose, enabling the intestinal flora to trigger a constitutive activation of the anterior midgut immune response. This chronic epithelial inflammation leads to a reduced lifespan of bbg mutant flies. Clearing the commensal flora by antibiotics prevents the abnormal activation of the gut immune response and restores a normal lifespan. We now provide genetic evidence that Drosophila septate junctions are part of the gut immune barrier, a function that is evolutionarily conserved in mammals. Collectively, our data suggest that septate junctions are required to maintain the subtle balance between immune tolerance and immune response in the Drosophila gut, which represents a powerful model to study inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:23378635

  2. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, Genevieve M. [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada); Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Liwski, Robert S. [Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Room 206E, Dr. D. J. Mackenzie Building, Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, 5788 University Avenue, Halifax, NS, B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Mansour, Marc [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada)

    2011-08-05

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  3. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Mansour

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  4. Modulation of immune development and function by intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Srinivasan, Naren; Maloy, Kevin J

    2014-11-01

    The immune system must constantly monitor the gastrointestinal tract for the presence of pathogens while tolerating trillions of commensal microbiota. It is clear that intestinal microbiota actively modulate the immune system to maintain a mutually beneficial relation, but the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis are not fully understood. Recent advances have begun to shed light on the cellular and molecular factors involved, revealing that a range of microbiota derivatives can influence host immune functions by targeting various cell types, including intestinal epithelial cells, mononuclear phagocytes, innate lymphoid cells, and B and T lymphocytes. Here, we review these findings, highlighting open questions and important challenges to overcome in translating this knowledge into new therapies for intestinal and systemic immune disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 蠕虫及其衍生物对过敏性疾病的抑制作用%Helminth and Helminth-Derived Products Regulate the Immune Function in Allergic Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李双霞; 何多姣; 张进顺

    2011-01-01

    蠕虫感染极为普遍,全球大约有1/4人口感染,世界各地均有分布,尤其是热带农村地区的流行率最高.蠕虫病主要表现为:嗜酸性粒细胞增多,血清抗体水平增高,速发型皮肤过敏反应等.但随着蠕虫与宿主长期协同演化,二者之间不再是一味的损伤,近些年来大量流行病学调查和动物实验研究显示:部分蠕虫及其衍生物能够抑制过敏性疾病的发生发展.本文就其免疫机制及几种蠕虫在过敏性疾病中作用的研究进行综述.%Helminth infection is very popular, and there are about one quarter of the population which are infected by helminth all over the world, especially in the tropical rural areas, the prevalence rate is the highest. Helminthiasis is characterized by eosinophilia, increased serum antibodies, immediate hypersensitivity, etc. But worms and host, in the long-term co-evolution, is no longer blindly damage. In recent years, a range of epidemiological investigations and animal studies discovered that allergic reactions may be suppressed by some helminth and its derived products. This paper summarized the correlative immue mechanisms and the experimental studies of several helminth' in the allergic disease recently.

  6. Modulation of primary immune response by different vaccine adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Ciabattini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvants contribute to enhancing and shaping the vaccine immune response through different modes of action. Since the primary immune response can influence the overall quality of the response generated, here we investigate early biomarkers of adjuvanticity after primary immunization with four different adjuvants combined with the chimeric tuberculosis vaccine antigen H56. C57BL/6 mice were immunized by the subcutaneous route with different vaccine formulations, and the modulation of primary CD4+ T cell and B cell responses was assessed within draining lymph nodes, blood and spleen, 7 and 12 days after priming. Vaccine formulations containing the liposome system CAF01 or a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion (o/w Squalene, but not aluminum hydroxide (Alum or CpG ODN 1826, elicited a significant primary antigen-specific CD4+ T cell response compared to antigen alone, 7 days after immunization. The effector function of activated CD4+ T cells was skewed towards a Th1/Th17 response by CAF01, while a Th1/Th2 response was elicited by o/w Squalene. Differentiation of B cells in short-lived plasma cells, and subsequent early H56-specific IgG secretion, was observed in mice immunized with o/w Squalene or CpG adjuvants. Tested adjuvants promoted the germinal centre reaction with different magnitude. These results show that the immunological activity of different adjuvants can be characterized by profiling early immunization biomarkers after primary immunization. These data and this approach could give an important contribution to the rational development of heterologous prime-boost vaccine immunization protocols.

  7. Immune modulation of learning, memory, neural plasticity and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yirmiya, Raz; Goshen, Inbal

    2011-02-01

    Over the past two decades it became evident that the immune system plays a central role in modulating learning, memory and neural plasticity. Under normal quiescent conditions, immune mechanisms are activated by environmental/psychological stimuli and positively regulate the remodeling of neural circuits, promoting memory consolidation, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and neurogenesis. These beneficial effects of the immune system are mediated by complex interactions among brain cells with immune functions (particularly microglia and astrocytes), peripheral immune cells (particularly T cells and macrophages), neurons, and neural precursor cells. These interactions involve the responsiveness of non-neuronal cells to classical neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate and monoamines) and hormones (e.g., glucocorticoids), as well as the secretion and responsiveness of neurons and glia to low levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and TNFα, as well as other mediators, such as prostaglandins and neurotrophins. In conditions under which the immune system is strongly activated by infection or injury, as well as by severe or chronic stressful conditions, glia and other brain immune cells change their morphology and functioning and secrete high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins. The production of these inflammatory mediators disrupts the delicate balance needed for the neurophysiological actions of immune processes and produces direct detrimental effects on memory, neural plasticity and neurogenesis. These effects are mediated by inflammation-induced neuronal hyper-excitability and adrenocortical stimulation, followed by reduced production of neurotrophins and other plasticity-related molecules, facilitating many forms of neuropathology associated with normal aging as well as neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. How photons modulate wound healing via the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Mary

    2009-02-01

    The immune system is a diverse group of cells that recognize and attack foreign substances, pathogenic organisms and cancer cells. It also produces inflammation, an essential component of the wound healing process and, following the resolution of inflammation, plays a crucial role in the control of granulation tissue formation. Granulation tissue is the precursor of scar tissue. Injured skin and mucous membranes generally heal rapidly. However, some wounds are either slow to heal or fail to heal while in others overgrowth of scar tissue occurs, resulting in the production of either hypertophic or keloid scars. The modulation of wound healing in such conditions is clinically important and may even be vital. Evidence will be presented that phototherapy can modulate wound healing, and that changes induced in the immune system, in particular the secretion of soluble protein mediators including cytokines, may be involved in this modulation. The immune system has peripheral and deep components. The former, being located mainly in the skin and mucous membranes, are readily accessible to photons, which can affect them directly. The components of the immune system are linked by lymphatic vessels and blood vessels, which include many capillaries located in the sub-epithelial connective tissues of the skin and mucous membranes. The superficial location of these capillaries provides the immune cells and molecules in transit through them with ready access to photons. When these cells and molecules, some modified by exposure to photons, reach susceptible cells such as lymphocytes in the deeper parts of the immune system and cells of injured tissues, they can modify their activity. In addition to having direct effects on peripheral cells, photons can thus also produce indirect effects on cells too distant for the photons to reach them. For example, cytokines released from peripheral macrophages in response to the direct action of photons can be transported to and affect other

  9. 蠕虫对免疫相关性疾病的防治研究%The impact of helminth on the prevention and treatment of immune-mediated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚雪洁; 吴小平

    2013-01-01

    随着现代生活及医疗水平的提高,蠕虫感染率逐渐下降,缺乏蠕虫的暴露可能是免疫相关性疾病发病日益增多的一个重要环境因素.蠕虫对过敏性疾病及自身免疫性疾病的预防及治疗作用近年受到重视,得到了较多流行病学、实验及临床研究的支持.本文就蠕虫与过敏性疾病、炎症性肠病、多发性硬化、Ⅰ型糖尿病、类风湿性关节炎等免疫性疾病防治方面的研究进展作一综述.%The lack of exposure to helminth infections, as a result of improved living standards and medical conditions, may have contributed to the increased incidence of immune-mediated diseases as an important environmental factor. Basically the increasing epidemiologic studies, experimental and clinical date all support the preventive and therapeutic potential of helminth infections in allergic and autoimmune diseases. In this review, we will introduce the latest research progress on the role of helminth in the prevention and treatment of immune-mediated diseases such as allergic disease, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Immune modulation in response to stress and relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub-E-Sobhani; Haque, N; Salma, U; Ahmed, A

    2011-03-15

    Traditional medical science has kept the mind separate from the body. Recently people realize the effect of mind on health and psychoneuroimmunology is the new evolved science that describes the interactions between psyche and soma. In this review through a typical psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network the effects of psychological stress (acute, brief naturalistic and chronic) and relaxation on immune modulation has been shown. From this network Corticotrophin Releasing Factor (CRF), Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone (ACTH), Glucocorticoids (GC), alpha-endorphin and Met-enkephalin are found as important endocrine components and T cells, B cells, monocytes/macrophages, Natural Killer (NK) cells and their cytokines that is Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Interferon Gamma (IFN-alpha) and interleukins such as IL-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 etc. are found as important immune components. Finally, it has been shown that, acute, brief naturalistic and chronic stress have different immune modulatory activities which are harmful to one's homeostasis and relaxation can help to maintain that homeostasis.

  11. Plant LysM proteins: modules mediating symbiosis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Andrea A; Willmann, Roland; Desaki, Yoshitake; Grabherr, Heini M; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2012-08-01

    Microbial glycans, such as bacterial peptidoglycans, fungal chitin or rhizobacterial Nod factors (NFs), are important signatures for plant immune activation or for the establishment of beneficial symbioses. Plant lysin motif (LysM) domain proteins serve as modules mediating recognition of these different N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-containing ligands, suggesting that this class of proteins evolved from an ancient sensor for GlcNAc. During early plant evolution, these glycans probably served as immunogenic patterns activating LysM protein receptor-mediated plant immunity and stopping microbial infection. The biochemical potential of plant LysM proteins for sensing microbial GlcNAc-containing glycans has probably since favored the evolution of receptors facilitating microbial infection and symbiosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adenosine: An immune modulator of inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeff Huaqing Ye; Vazhaikkurichi M Rajendran

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common and lifelong disabling gastrointestinal disease. Emerging treatments are being developed to target inflammatory cytokines which initiate and perpetuate the immune response. Adenosine is an important modulator of inflammation and its anti-inflammatory effects have been well established in humans as well as in animal models. High extracellular adenosine suppresses and resolves chronic inflammation in IBD models. High extracellular adenosine levels could be achieved by enhanced adenosine absorption and increased de novo synthesis. Increased adenosine concentration leads to activation of the A2a receptor on the cell surface of immune and epithelial cells that would be a potential therapeutic target for chronic intestinal inflammation. Adenosine is transported via concentrative nucleoside transporter and equilibrative nucleoside transporter transporters that are localized in apical and basolateral membranes of intestinal epithelial cells, respectively. Increased extracellular adenosine levels activate the A2a receptor, which would reduce cytokines responsible for chronic inflammation.

  13. Cytoprotection: Immune and Matrix Modulation of Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    MD, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle, WA 98101 REPORT DATE: April 2013 TYPE OF REPORT...March 2010 – 14 March 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cytoprotection: Immune and Matrix Modulation of Tissue Repair 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...min) Subject 1 Subject 2 anti-CD3 5ug/ mlM FI phospho-Akt Fix T0 T5 T1 5 T3 0 0 20 40 60 80 100 Time (min) anti-CD3 5ug/ mlM FI phospho-CD3 Fix T0 T5

  14. Modulation of HLA Expression in Human Cytomegalovirus Immune Evasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aifen Lin; Huihui Xu; Weihua Yan

    2007-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) has evolved multiple mechanisms to escape the host immune recognition and innate or adaptive immune responses. Among them, hCMV has developed strategies to modulate the expression and/or function of human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), including by encoding series of infection stage-dependent hCMV proteins to detain and destroy the expression of HLA molecules on the surface of infected cells. This disturbs the antigen presentation and processing, by encoding MHC class Ⅰ homologues or selective up-regulation of particular HLA class Ⅰ molecules binding to NK cell inhibitory receptors, and by encoding specific ligand antagonists to interfere with NK cell activating receptors. Here we discussed the molecular mechanisms utilized by the hCMV to alter the formation, transportation and expression of HLA antigens on the infected cell surface. The knowledge about hCMV modulating HLA expression could benefit us to further understand the pathogenesis of viral diseases and may eventually develop novel effective immunotherapies to counteract viral infections and viral associated diseases.

  15. CD28 Aptamers as Powerful Immune Response Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pastor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CD28 is one of the main costimulatory receptors responsible for the proper activation of T lymphocytes. We have isolated two aptamers that bind to the CD28 receptor. As a monomer, one of them interfered with the binding of CD28 to its ligand (B7, precluding the costimulatory signal, whereas the other one was inactive. However, dimerization of any of the anti-CD28 aptamers was sufficient to provide an artificial costimulatory signal. No antibody has featured a dual function (i.e., the ability to work as agonist and antagonist to date. Two different agonistic structures were engineered for each anti-CD28 aptamer. One showed remarkably improved costimulatory properties, surpassing the agonistic effect of an anti-CD28 antibody. Moreover, we showed in vivo that the CD28 agonistic aptamer is capable of enhancing the cellular immune response against a lymphoma idiotype and of prolonging survival of mice which receive the aptamer together with an idiotype vaccine. The CD28 aptamers described in this work could be used to modulate the immune response either blocking the interaction with B7 or enhancing vaccine-induced immune responses in cancer immunotherapy.

  16. B cells as a target of immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawker Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available B cells have recently been identified as an integral component of the immune system; they play a part in autoimmunity through antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and complement activation. Animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS suggest that myelin destruction is partly mediated through B cell activation (and plasmablasts. MS patients with evidence of B cell involvement, as compared to those without, tend to have a worse prognosis. Finally, the significant decrease in new gadolinium-enhancing lesions, new T2 lesions, and relapses in MS patients treated with rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20 on B cells leads us to the conclusion that B cells play an important role in MS and that immune modulation of these cells may ameliorate the disease. This article will explore the role of B cells in MS and the rationale for the development of B cell-targeted therapeutics. MS is an immune-mediated disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide and is the number one cause of disability in young patients. Most therapeutic targets have focused on T cells; however, recently, the focus has shifted to the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS and the potential of B cells as a therapeutic target.

  17. Helminth parasites in pigs: new challenges in pig production and current research highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, A; Mejer, H; Nejsum, P; Thamsborg, S M

    2011-08-04

    Helminths in pigs have generally received little attention from veterinary parasitologists, despite Ascaris suum, Trichuris suis, and Oesophagostomum sp. being common worldwide. The present paper presents challenges and current research highlights connected with these parasites. In Danish swine herds, new indoor production systems may favour helminth transmission and growing knowledge on pasture survival and infectivity of A. suum and T. suis eggs indicates that they may constitute a serious threat to outdoor pig production. Furthermore, it is now evident that A. suum is zoonotic and the same may be true for T. suis. With these 'new' challenges and the economic impact of the infections, further research is warranted. Better understanding of host-parasite relationships and A. suum and T. suis egg ecology may also improve the understanding and control of human A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura infections. The population dynamics of the three parasites are well documented and may be used to study phenomena, such as predisposition and worm aggregation. Furthermore, better methods to recover larvae have provided tools for quantifying parasite transmission. Thus, an on-going study using helminth naïve tracer pigs has surprisingly demonstrated that soil infectivity with A. suum and T. suis increases during the first 2-3 years after pasture contamination. Though all three helminth species stimulate the Th2 arm of the immune system, Oesophagostomum seems weakly immunogenic, perhaps via specific modulation of the host immune system. A. suum and T. suis potently modulate the host immune response, up-regulating Th2 and down-regulating Th1. As a consequence, A. suum may compromise the efficacy of certain bacterial vaccines, whereas T. suis, which establish only short-term in humans, is a favourite candidate for down-regulating autoimmune Th1-related diseases in man. Some basic research findings have offered new possibilities for future sustainable control measures. For example

  18. VEGF and Pleiotrophin Modulate the Immune Profile of Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Kristi D.; Roland, Christina L. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 75390-8593 (United States); Brekken, Rolf A., E-mail: rolf.brekken@utsouthwestern.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 75390-8593 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 75390-8593 (United States)

    2010-05-26

    Angiogenesis, the sprouting of the existing vascular network to form new vessels, is required for the growth of solid tumors. For this reason, the primary stimulant of angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF), is an attractive target for tumor therapy. In fact, there are currently numerous anti-VEGF therapies in clinical development for the treatment of various cancers, including breast cancer. VEGF signals through two primary VEGF receptors, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2. VEGFR2 is the primary angiogenic receptor, and VEGFR1 has been implicated in macrophage chemotaxis and tumor cell survival and invasion. It has only been appreciated recently that the VEGFRs are expressed not only on endothelial cells and tumor cells but also on many host immune cells. Therefore, to better understand the effects of anti-VEGF therapy it is important to consider the effects of VEGF on all cells in the tumor microenvironment, including immune cells. Bevacizumab (Avastin{sup ®}, Genetech), which binds VEGF and inhibits interaction with VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, was approved for the treatment of metastatic HER2/NEU-negative breast cancer in 2008, however, the majority of human mammary tumors are either innately resistant or will acquire resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. This suggests that these tumors activate alternate angiogenesis pathways. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important angiogenic cytokine in breast cancer and is expressed at high levels in approximately 60% of human breast tumors. PTN functions as an angiogenic factor and promotes remodeling of the tumor microenvironment as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, PTN can have profound effects on macrophage phenotype. The present review focuses on the functions of VEGF and PTN on immune cell infiltration and function in breast cancer. Furthermore, we will discuss how anti-VEGF therapy modulates the immune cell profile.

  19. Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cell Proportions Are Diminished in Young Helminth Infected Children and Restored by Curative Anti-helminthic Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Norman Nausch; Appleby, Laura J.; Sparks, Alexandra M.; Nicholas Midzi; Takafira Mduluza; Francisca Mutapi

    2015-01-01

    Author Summary Understanding how immune responses are generated is critical for vaccine development. There are comparatively few studies on the interface between the innate and adaptive immune system in generating protective immune responses. Infections with helminth parasites, a cause of neglected tropical diseases, have a huge collective impact on public health in affected developing countries. Helminths are associated with a complex type 2 immune response mediated by cytokines characterist...

  20. Parasitic helminths and HIV-1 infection: the effect of immunomodulatory antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouser, E.E.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    In many regions of the world co-infection with parasitic helminths and HIV-1 is common. Both pathogens have major implications for the host immune system, helminths possess immunomodulatory properties whilst HIV-1 infects and kills immune cells. Currently very little is known regarding what effects

  1. Immune System Modulators with Antidepressant Effects: Evidence from Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelaira, Helena M; Maciel, Amanda L; Quevedo, Joao; Reus, Gislaine Z

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates, and currently, approximately 340 million people worldwide suffer from depression at some point in life. In view of the growing socio-economic and clinical impact, several studies have focused on the etiopathology of MDD, suggesting that not only the monoaminergic system but also other brain mechanisms may be involved in the pathophysiology of MDD. Recent studies have shown a link between inflammation and MDD and have also demonstrated that antidepressants and antiinflammatory drugs can act to reduce inflammation, thereby improving depressive symptoms. Animal models of depression are indispensable for studying the pathophysiology of this disorder and new treatments for it. Further, studies have shown that rodent models of depression are also associated with elevated levels of inflammation in the periphery and brain. This review will highlight the role of immune inflammation in MDD and the significance of immune system modulators with antidepressant effects in the treatment of MDD, based on studies using animal models of depression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Helminth infections coincident with active pulmonary tuberculosis inhibit mono- and multifunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in a process dependent on IL-10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parakkal Jovvian George

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tissue invasive helminth infections and tuberculosis (TB are co-endemic in many parts of the world and can trigger immune responses that might antagonize each other. We have previously shown that helminth infections modulate the Th1 and Th17 responses to mycobacterial-antigens in latent TB. To determine whether helminth infections modulate antigen-specific and non-specific immune responses in active pulmonary TB, we examined CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses as well as the systemic (plasma cytokine levels in individuals with pulmonary TB with or without two distinct helminth infections-Wuchereria bancrofti and Strongyloides stercoralis infection. By analyzing the frequencies of Th1 and Th17 CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells and their component subsets (including multifunctional cells, we report a significant diminution in the mycobacterial-specific frequencies of mono- and multi-functional CD4(+ Th1 and (to a lesser extent Th17 cells when concomitant filarial or Strongyloides infection occurs. The impairment in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell cytokine responses was antigen-specific as polyclonal activated T cell frequencies were equivalent irrespective of helminth infection status. This diminution in T cell responses was also reflected in diminished circulating levels of Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2- and Th17 (IL-17A and IL-17F-associated cytokines. Finally, we demonstrate that for the filarial co-infections at least, this diminished frequency of multifunctional CD4(+ T cell responses was partially dependent on IL-10 as IL-10 blockade significantly increased the frequencies of CD4(+ Th1 cells. Thus, co-existent helminth infection is associated with an IL-10 mediated (for filarial infection profound inhibition of antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell responses as well as protective systemic cytokine responses in active pulmonary TB.

  3. Oesophagostomum dentatum extract modulates T cell-dependent immune responses to bystander antigens and prevents the development of allergy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Schabussova

    Full Text Available One third of the human population is currently infected by one or more species of parasitic helminths. Certain helminths establish long-term chronic infections resulting in a modulation of the host's immune system with attenuated responsiveness to "bystander" antigens such as allergens or vaccines. In this study we investigated whether parasite-derived products suppress the development of allergic inflammation in a mouse model. We show that extract derived from adult male Oesophagostomum dentatum (eMOD induced Th2 and regulatory responses in BALB/c mice. Stimulation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells induced production of regulatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. In a mouse model of birch pollen allergy, co-administration of eMOD with sensitizing allergen Bet v 1 markedly reduced the production of allergen-specific antibodies in serum as well as IgE-dependent basophil degranulation. Furthermore, eMOD prevented the development of airway inflammation, as demonstrated by attenuation of bronchoalveolar lavages eosinophil influx, peribronchial inflammatory infiltrate, and mucus secretion in lungs and IL-4 and IL-5 levels in lung cell cultures. Reduced secretion of Th2-related cytokines by birch pollen-re-stimulated splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells was observed in eMOD-treated/sensitized and challenged mice in comparison to sensitized and challenged controls. The suppressive effects of eMOD were heat-stable. Immunization with model antigens in the presence of eMOD reduced production of antibodies to thymus-dependent but not to thymus-independent antigen, suggesting that suppression of the immune responses by eMOD was mediated by interference with antigen presenting cell or T helper cell function but did not directly suppress B cell function. In conclusion, we have shown that eMOD possesses immunomodulatory properties and that heat-stable factors in eMOD are responsible for the dramatic suppression of allergic responses in a mouse model

  4. Tamibarotene modulates the local immune response in experimental periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Wang, Linyuan; Liu, Dixin; Lin, Xiaoping

    2014-12-01

    Tamibarotene (Am80), a synthetic retinoic acid receptor (RAR), is an agonist with high specificity for RARα and RARβ. Retinoid agonists have been shown to inhibit Th17 cell polarization and to enhance forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression during the course of inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the previously unrecognized role of Am80 in regulating the immune responses of periodontitis within the oral microenvironment. The experimental model of periodontitis in mice was induced by oral infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) W83. Our results indicated that Am80 effectively suppressed alveolar bone resorption induced by P. gingivalis W83 and decreased the number of osteoclasts. We clarified that these effects were closely associated with the reduced percentage of CD4(+) retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt(+) cells and increased the percentage of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells in the gingival tissues, cervical lymph nodes (CLNs), and spleen. Furthermore, in P. gingivalis-infected mice, Am80 down-regulated mRNA expression levels of interleukin-17A (IL-17A), receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa beta ligand (RANKL), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-6, and IL-1β. Simultaneously, Am80 up-regulated expression levels of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in gingival tissues and the CLNs. Our results suggest that Am80 could protect against periodontal bone resorption, primarily through the modulation of immune responses in the oral microenvironment, and demonstrate the potential of Am80 as a novel clinical strategy for preventing periodontitis.

  5. Experimental Cannabinoid 2 Receptor-Mediated Immune Modulation in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sardinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a complex condition that results from a dysregulated immune system in response to a systemic infection. Current treatments lack effectiveness in reducing the incidence and mortality associated with this disease. The endocannabinoid system offers great promise in managing sepsis pathogenesis due to its unique characteristics. The present study explored the effect of modulating the CB2 receptor pathway in an acute sepsis mouse model. Endotoxemia was induced by intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in mice and intestinal microcirculation was assessed through intravital microscopy. We found that HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules but did not restore muscular and mucosal villi FCD in endotoxemic mice. AM630 (CB2 receptor antagonist maintained the level of adherent leukocytes induced by LPS but further reduced muscular and mucosal villi FCD. URB597 (FAAH inhibitor and JZL184 (MAGL inhibitor both reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules but did not restore the mucosal villi FCD. Using various compounds we have shown different mechanisms of activating CB2 receptors to reduce leukocyte endothelial interactions in order to prevent further inflammatory damage during sepsis.

  6. Modulation of Antiviral Immunity by Heme Oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Janyra A; González, Pablo A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible, anti-inflammatory, and cytoprotective enzyme expressed in most cell types in the organism. Under several stress stimuli, HO-1 expression and activity is up-regulated to catalyze the rate-limiting enzymatic step of heme degradation into carbon monoxide, free iron, and biliverdin. Besides its effects on cell metabolism, HO-1 is also capable of modulating host innate and adaptive immune responses in response to sepsis, transplantation, and autoimmunity, and preventing oxidative damage associated with inflammation. In addition, recent studies have reported that HO-1 can exert a significant antiviral activity against a wide variety of viruses, including HIV, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, enterovirus 71, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, dengue virus, and Ebola virus, among others. Herein, we address the current understanding of the functional significance of HO-1 against a variety of viruses and its potential as a therapeutic strategy to prevent and control viral infections. Furthermore, we review the most important features of the immunoregulatory functions for this enzyme.

  7. Pathogen mimicry of host protein-protein interfaces modulates immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    Signaling pathways shape and transmit the cell's reaction to its changing environment; however, pathogens can circumvent this response by manipulating host signaling. To subvert host defense, they beat it at its own game: they hijack host pathways by mimicking the binding surfaces of host-encoded proteins. For this, it is not necessary to achieve global protein homology; imitating merely the interaction surface is sufficient. Different protein folds often interact via similar protein-protein interface architectures. This similarity in binding surfaces permits the pathogenic protein to compete with a host target protein. Thus, rather than binding a host-encoded partner, the host protein hub binds the pathogenic surrogate. The outcome can be dire: rewiring or repurposing the host pathways, shifting the cell signaling landscape and consequently the immune response. They can also cause persistent infections as well as cancer by modulating key signaling pathways, such as those involving Ras. Mapping the rewired host-pathogen 'superorganism' interaction network - along with its structural details - is critical for in-depth understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and developing efficient therapeutics. Here, we overview the role of molecular mimicry in pathogen host evasion as well as types of molecular mimicry mechanisms that emerged during evolution.

  8. Potential of Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors in Modulating Airway Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahul Kushwah; Huibi Cao; Jim Hu

    2007-01-01

    Innate immune responses form the first line of defense against foreign insults and recently significant advances have been made in our understanding of the initiation of innate immune response along with its ability to modulate inflammation. In airway diseases such as asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, over reacting of the airway innate immune responses leads to cytokine imbalance and airway remodeling or damage. Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors have the potential to deliver genes to modulate airway innate immune responses and have many advantages over its predecessors. However, there still are a few limitations that need to be addressed prior to their use in clinical applications.

  9. Interactions between the intestinal microbiome and helminth parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiss, M M; Harris, N L

    2016-01-01

    Throughout evolution, both helminths and bacteria have inhabited our intestines. As intestinal helminths and bacteria inhabit the same environmental niche, it is likely that these organisms interact with, and impact on, each other. In addition, intestinal helminths are well known to alter intestinal physiology, permeability, mucous secretion and the production of antimicrobial peptides - all of which may impact on bacterial survival and spatial organization. Yet despite rapid advances in our understanding of host-intestinal bacteria interactions, the impact of helminths on this relationship has remained largely unexplored. Moreover, although intestinal helminths are generally accepted to possess potent immuno-modulatory activity, it is unknown whether this capacity requires interactions with intestinal bacteria. We propose that this 'ménage à trois' situation is likely to have exerted a strong selective pressure on the development of our metabolic and immune systems. Whilst such pressures remain in developing countries, the eradication of helminths in industrialized countries has shifted this evolutionary balance, possibly underlying the increased development of chronic inflammatory diseases. Thus, helminth-bacteria interactions may represent a key determinant of healthy homoeostasis.

  10. Helminth-induced Ly6Chi monocyte-derived alternatively activated macrophages suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, Cesar; de Dios Ruiz-Rosado, Juan; Amici, Stephanie A.; Jablonski, Kyle A.; Martinez-Saucedo, Diana; Webb, Lindsay M.; Cortado, Hanna; Robledo-Avila, Frank; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam; Terrazas, Luis I.; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Partida-Sánchez, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Helminths cause chronic infections and affect the immune response to unrelated inflammatory diseases. Although helminths have been used therapeutically to ameliorate inflammatory conditions, their anti-inflammatory properties are poorly understood. Alternatively activated macrophages (AAMϕs) have been suggested as the anti-inflammatory effector cells during helminth infections. Here, we define the origin of AAMϕs during infection with Taenia crassiceps, and their disease-modulating activity on the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our data show two distinct populations of AAMϕs, based on the expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 molecules, resulting upon T. crassiceps infection. Adoptive transfer of Ly6C+ monocytes gave rise to PD-L1+/PD-L2+, but not PD-L1+/PD-L2− cells in T. crassiceps-infected mice, demonstrating that the PD-L1+/PD-L2+ subpopulation of AAMϕs originates from blood monocytes. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of PD-L1+/PD-L2+ AAMϕs into EAE induced mice reduced disease incidence, delayed disease onset, and diminished the clinical disability, indicating the critical role of these cells in the regulation of autoimmune disorders. PMID:28094319

  11. Helminth infection during pregnancy: insights from evolutionary ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackwell AD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aaron D Blackwell Department of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA Abstract: Helminths are parasitic nematodes and trematodes, grouped together because of morphological similarities and commonalities in the effects infections have on hosts. These include complications such as anemia and biasing of immune responses, which can alter susceptibility for other diseases. For pregnant women, these complications might have implications for pregnancy outcomes or neonatal health. Here, I review studies of helminth infections during pregnancy, and ask the following questions: Do helminths affect maternal health or pregnancy outcomes? Are there consequences of maternal infection for infants? What are the effects of antihelminth treatment during pregnancy? The evidence suggests that the answers to these questions depend on the particular helminth species in question, maternal nutritional status, and the presence or absence of comorbid infection with other species, such as malaria. Moreover, there may also be unexpected consequences of treatment, as maternal infections can affect the priming of infant immune systems, with potential effects on infants later in life. These complex interactions suggest that a consideration of the evolutionary history of human–helminth interactions, as well as the ecological context of infections, can help to clarify an understanding of these host–parasite interactions and provide direction for future investigations. Keywords: review, helminths, pregnancy, filariasis, schistosomiasis

  12. Immune modulation by dendritic-cell-based cancer vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHAITANYA KUMAR; SAKSHI KOHLI; POONAMALLE PARTHASARATHY BAPSY; ASHOK KUMAR VAID; MINISH JAIN; VENKATA SATHYA SURESH ATTILI; BANDANA SHARAN

    2017-03-01

    The interplay between host immunity and tumour cells has opened the possibility of targeting tumour cells bymodulation of the human immune system. Cancer immunotherapy involves the treatment of a tumour by utilizing therecombinant human immune system components to target the pro-tumour microenvironment or by revitalizing theimmune system with the ability to kill tumour cells by priming the immune cells with tumour antigens. In this review,current immunotherapy approaches to cancer with special focus on dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines arediscussed. Some of the DC-based vaccines under clinical trials for various cancer types are highlighted. Establishingtumour immunity involves a plethora of immune components and pathways; hence, combining chemotherapy,radiation therapy and various arms of immunotherapy, after analysing the benefits of individual therapeutic agents,might be beneficial to the patient.

  13. Immune-modulating interventions in critically ill septic patients: pharmacological options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Palle; Tønnesen, Else

    2011-01-01

    insulin therapy have been shown to improve survival in septic patients. However, in later studies, it has been difficult to reproduce these beneficial effects. There appears to be a discrepancy between the promising effects of immune-modulating interventions in animal studies and the effects seen......Critically ill patients with severe sepsis and septic shock are characterized by a systemic inflammatory response consisting of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. Owing to the high mortality of severe sepsis, great efforts have been undertaken within the last 30 years to develop an immune......-modulating therapy to improve survival. Relatively few pharmacological immune-modulating interventions have demonstrated a beneficial impact on survival, while other studies have shown a detrimental effect of such interventions. Among the immune-modulating interventions tested, activated protein C and intensive...

  14. Bacterial sensing, cell signaling, and modulation of the immune response during sepsis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salomao, Reinaldo; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colo; Rapozo, Marjorie Marini; Baggio-Zappia, Giovana Lotici; Galanos, Chris; Freudenberg, Marina

    2012-01-01

    ...) gene, implications of innate immune cells as drivers of the adaptive response to infection, and the modulation of multiple accessory molecules that stimulate or inhibit monocyte/macrophage and lymphocyte interactions...

  15. The Polysaccharide Capsule of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176 Modulates the Host Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    REPORT The Polysaccharide Capsule of Campylobacter jejuni Modulates the Host Immune Response 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Campylobacter ...COVERED (From - To) Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - The Polysaccharide Capsule of Campylobacter jejuni Modulates the Host...Immune Response Report Title ABSTRACT Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial diarrheal disease worldwide. The organism is characterized by

  16. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiria, A.E.; Hamid, F.; Wammes, L.J.; Prasetyani, M.A.; Dekkers, O.M.; May, L.; Kaisar, M.M.; Verweij, J.J.; Guigas, B.; Partono, F.; Sartono, E.; Supali, T.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth (STH)-infec

  17. Modulation of the Innate Immune Response through the Vagus Nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.; Pickkers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system is a defense mechanism that is of vital importance to our survival. However, excessive or unwanted activation of the innate immune system, which can occur in major surgery, sepsis, trauma, ischemia-reperfusion injury and autoimmune diseases, can lead to damage of the kidneys

  18. Fish oil supplementation modulates immune function in healthy infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Lauritzen, Lotte; Kjær, Tanja M.R.

    2007-01-01

    (n-3) PUFA influence immune function in adults and may also affect immune maturation during development. This randomized trial is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate whether fish oil supplementation in late infancy modifies immune responses. The study was a 2 3 2 intervention in 64 healthy......-a, INF-g, and IL-10 concentrations in whole-blood cultures, stimulated for 22 h with LPS1phytohemaglutinin (PHA) or Lactobacillus paracasei, were also determined. IgA was measured in feces when infants were 10 mo of age. FO supplementation effectively raised erythrocyte (n-3) PUFA (P , 0.001), increased......, this study suggests a faster immune maturation with FO supplementation with no apparent reduction in immune activation. The implications for later health need further investigation. J...

  19. Modulation of Human Immune Response by Fungal Biocontrol Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinovas, Cibele; de Oliveira Mendes, Tiago A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Lima-Santos, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of biological control agents is generally regarded as safe for humans and environment, the increased exposure of agriculture workers, and consumer population to fungal substances may affect the immune system. Those compounds may be associated with both intense stimulation, resulting in IgE-mediated allergy and immune downmodulation induced by molecules such as cyclosporin A and mycotoxins. This review discusses the potential effects of biocontrol fungal components on human immune responses, possibly associated to infectious, inflammatory diseases, and defective defenses. PMID:28217107

  20. Fish oil supplementation modulates immune function in healthy infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; Lauritzen, L.; Kjaer, T.M.R.;

    2007-01-01

    (n-3) PUFA influence immune function in adults and may also affect immune maturation during development. This randomized trial is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate whether fish oil supplementation in late infancy modifies immune responses. The study was a 2 x 2 intervention in 64 healthy...... Danish infants, who received cow's milk or infant formula alone or with fish oil (FO) (3.4 +/- 1.1 mL/d) from 9 to 12 mo of age. Before and after the intervention, fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes, plasma IgE, C-reactive protein, and soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations were measured. TNF...

  1. Nutritional modulation of the immune response in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economic efficiency demanded by the poultry industry has pushed selection towards high production with improved feed conversion ratios (FCR) and high yield; however, selection based heavily on growth characteristics and other phenotypic traits has adversely affected immune competence. Despite incre...

  2. Spongionella secondary metabolites, promising modulators of immune response through CD147 receptor modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Andoni Sánchez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of the immune system can have multiple applications such as cancer treatment, and a wide type of processes involving inflammation where the potent chemotactic agent cyclophilin A (Cyp A is implicated. The Porifera phylum, in which Spongionella is encompassed, is the main producer of marine bioactive compounds. Four secondary metabolites obtained from Spongionella (Gracilin H, A, L and Tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 were described to hit Cyp A and to block the release of inflammation mediators. Based on these results some role of Spongionella compounds on other steps of the signalling pathway mediated by this chemotactic agent can be hypothesised. In the present paper we studied the effect of these four compounds on the surface membrane CD147 receptor expression, on the extracellular levels of Cyp A and on the ability to migrate of concanavalin (Con A-activated T lymphocytes. Similarly to a well-known immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CsA, Gracilin H, A, L and tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 were able to reduce the CD147 membrane expression and to block the release of Cyp A to the medium. Besides, by using Cyp A as chemotactic agent, T cell migration was inhibited when cells were previously incubated with Gracilin A and Gracilin L. These positive results lead us to test the in vivo effect of Gracilin H and L in a mouse ear delayed hypersensitive reaction. Thus, both compounds efficiently reduce the ear swelling as well as the inflammatory cell infiltration. These results provide more evidences for their potential therapeutic application in immune related diseases of Spongionella compounds.

  3. Spongionella Secondary Metabolites, Promising Modulators of Immune Response through CD147 Receptor Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jon Andoni; Alfonso, Amparo; Rodriguez, Ines; Alonso, Eva; Cifuentes, José Manuel; Bermudez, Roberto; Rateb, Mostafa E.; Jaspars, Marcel; Houssen, Wael E.; Ebel, Rainer; Tabudravu, Jioji; Botana, Luís M.

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the immune system can have multiple applications such as cancer treatment, and a wide type of processes involving inflammation where the potent chemotactic agent cyclophilin A (Cyp A) is implicated. The Porifera phylum, in which Spongionella is encompassed, is the main producer of marine bioactive compounds. Four secondary metabolites obtained from Spongionella (Gracilin H, A, L, and Tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1) were described to hit Cyp A and to block the release of inflammation mediators. Based on these results, some role of Spongionella compounds on other steps of the signaling pathway mediated by this chemotactic agent can be hypothesized. In the present paper, we studied the effect of these four compounds on the surface membrane CD147 receptor expression, on the extracellular levels of Cyp A and on the ability to migrate of concanavalin (Con A)-activated T lymphocytes. Similar to a well-known immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CsA), Gracilin H, A, L, and tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 were able to reduce the CD147 membrane expression and to block the release of Cyp A to the medium. Besides, by using Cyp A as chemotactic agent, T cell migration was inhibited when cells were previously incubated with Gracilin A and Gracilin L. These positive results lead us to test the in vivo effect of Gracilin H and L in a mouse ear delayed hypersensitive reaction. Thus, both compounds efficiently reduce the ear swelling as well as the inflammatory cell infiltration. These results provide more evidences for their potential therapeutic application in immune-related diseases of Spongionella compounds. PMID:27822214

  4. Glycan recognition at the interface of the intestinal immune system: target for immune modulation via dietary components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kivit, Sander; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Garssen, Johan; Willemsen, Linette E M

    2011-09-01

    The intestinal mucosa is constantly exposed to the luminal content, which includes micro-organisms and dietary components. Prebiotic non-digestible oligosaccharides may be supplemented to the diet to exert modulation of immune responses in the intestine. Short chain galacto- and long chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS), functionally mimicking oligosaccharides present in human milk, have been reported to reduce the development of allergy through modulation of the intestinal microbiota and immune system. Nonetheless, the underlying working mechanisms of scGOS/lcFOS are unclear. Intestinal epithelial cells lining the mucosa are known to express carbohydrate (glycan)-binding receptors that may be involved in modulation of the mucosal immune response. This review aims to provide an overview of glycan-binding receptors, in particular galectins, which are expressed by intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells. In addition, their involvement in health and disease will be addressed, especially in food allergy and inflammatory bowel disease, diseases originating from the gastro-intestinal tract. Insight in the recognition of glycans in the intestinal tract may open new avenues for the treatment of intestinal inflammatory diseases by either nutritional concepts or pharmacological intervention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modulation of immune responses in stress by Yoga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Sarika

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a constant factor in today′s fastpaced life that can jeopardize our health if left unchecked. It is only in the last half century that the role of stress in every ailment from the common cold to AIDS has been emphasized, and the mechanisms involved in this process have been studied. Stress influences the immune response presumably through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis, hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis, and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system. Various neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, hormones, and cytokines mediate these complex bidirectional interactions between the central nervous system (CNS and the immune system. The effects of stress on the immune responses result in alterations in the number of immune cells and cytokine dysregulation. Various stress management strategies such as meditation, yoga, hypnosis, and muscle relaxation have been shown to reduce the psychological and physiological effects of stress in cancers and HIV infection. This review aims to discuss the effect of stress on the immune system and examine how relaxation techniques such as Yoga and meditation could regulate the cytokine levels and hence, the immune responses during stress.

  6. Helminths and malaria co-infections are associated with elevated serum IgE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulu, Andargachew; Kassu, Afework; Legesse, Mengistu

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both helminth and malaria infections result in a highly polarized immune response characterized by IgE production. This study aimed to investigate the total serum IgE profile in vivo as a measure of Th2 immune response in malaria patients with and without helminth co-infection. METHODS......: A cross sectional observational study composed of microscopically confirmed malaria positive (N = 197) and malaria negative (N = 216) apparently healthy controls with and without helminth infection was conducted at Wondo Genet Health Center, Southern Ethiopia. A pre-designed structured format was utilized...... to collect socio-demographic and clinical data of the subjects. Detection and quantification of helminths, malaria parasites and determination of serum IgE levels were carried out following standard procedures. RESULTS: Irrespective of helminth infection, individuals infected by malaria showed significantly...

  7. Immune modulation in the treatment of respiratory infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Steve

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limitations of currently available treatment for severe respiratory infection are demonstrated by the relatively fixed mortality associated with these infections despite advances in nutrition, vaccines, antibiotics, and critical care. This might be due in part to the changing spectrum of pathogens and development of drug resistance. Cytokines are potent molecules that function as growth factors and orchestrate both innate and adaptive immune responses. Several of these factors have entered the clinical arena to support or augment the immune response. Moreover, the use of cytokines has recently been expanded to patients without an overtly defective immune system but who have either significant infection or infection with drug resistant organisms. The use of cytokines as adjuvants in the treatment of respiratory infections is reviewed.

  8. Cellular factors targeting APCs to modulate adaptive T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visperas, Anabelle; Do, Jeongsu; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity.

  9. Cellular Factors Targeting APCs to Modulate Adaptive T Cell Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabelle Visperas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fate of adaptive T cell immunity is determined by multiple cellular and molecular factors, among which the cytokine milieu plays the most important role in this process. Depending on the cytokines present during the initial T cell activation, T cells become effector cells that produce different effector molecules and execute adaptive immune functions. Studies thus far have primarily focused on defining how these factors control T cell differentiation by targeting T cells themselves. However, other non-T cells, particularly APCs, also express receptors for the factors and are capable of responding to them. In this review, we will discuss how APCs, by responding to those cytokines, influence T cell differentiation and adaptive immunity.

  10. Participation of Leukotrienes in the Immune Modulation of Oral Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Sandra R. P.; Nomizo, Auro; Frantz, Fabiani G.; Faccioli, Lúcia H.; de Matos, Ana Paula Keller; Carrilho, Emanuel; Afonso, Ana; de Freitas Anibal, Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    Oral tolerance (OT) is characterized as a peripheral immune tolerance form, in which, mature lymphocytes in lymphoid tissues associated with mucosa, become non-functional or hypo responsive due to prior oral administration of antigen. OT is an important immunological phenomenon due to its therapeutic potential in inflammatory processes and others diseases. Here we evaluated leukotriene role in the induction of OT, as well as, the production of cytokines IL-5 and IFN-γ in leukotriene deficient animals (knock-out). Our results suggested that even in the presence of OT and leukotrienes absence, cytokine IFN-γ remains being secreted, which gives us an indication of immune system specificity and also that IFN-γ participates in various immune processes. PMID:28270799

  11. Role of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 in the Immune Modulation of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Zheng, Chunquan; Lin, Hai; Li, Jing; Zhao, Keqing

    2016-02-01

    The underlying mechanisms of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on immune modulation to treat allergic diseases remain unclear. Here, we showed that the suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) is an important immune modulator expressed by MSCs, which is significantly increased by interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, we observed that SOCS3 is a crucial mediator of the anti-proliferative and functional effects of MSCs on T cells and B cells. The immune modulation of MSCs through SOCS3 is mediated by cell-cell contacts. Moreover, SOCS3 could serve as an indicator to predict the potential immune modulatory of MSCs derived from different donors. Furthermore, treatment with anti-SOCS3 Ab significantly decreased ovalbumin-specific antibodies and neutrophil infiltration in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis (AR) mice. Our results suggest that SOCS3 serves as an immune modulator interfering with T cells and B cells, and SOCS3 may act as a predictive marker for immune modulatory of MSCs.

  12. Fish oil supplementation modulates immune function in healthy infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; Lauritzen, L.; Kjaer, T.M.R.

    2007-01-01

    Danish infants, who received cow's milk or infant formula alone or with fish oil (FO) (3.4 +/- 1.1 mL/d) from 9 to 12 mo of age. Before and after the intervention, fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes, plasma IgE, C-reactive protein, and soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations were measured. TNF......(n-3) PUFA influence immune function in adults and may also affect immune maturation during development. This randomized trial is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate whether fish oil supplementation in late infancy modifies immune responses. The study was a 2 x 2 intervention in 64 healthy.......02). Feeding milk rather than formula did not affect cytokine production, but plasma soluble IL-2 receptor concentration was greater in the formula group than in the cow's milk group (P = 0.03). Since the capacity to produce INF-gamma has been proposed as a maturation marker for the immune system in early life...

  13. Fish oil supplementation modulates immune function in healthy infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Lauritzen, Lotte; Kjær, Tanja M.R.

    2007-01-01

    Danish infants, who received cow's milk or infant formula alone or with fish oil (FO) (3.4 6 1.1 mL/d) from 9 to 12 mo of age. Before and after the intervention, fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes, plasma IgE, C-reactive protein, and soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations were measured. TNF......(n-3) PUFA influence immune function in adults and may also affect immune maturation during development. This randomized trial is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate whether fish oil supplementation in late infancy modifies immune responses. The study was a 2 3 2 intervention in 64 healthy.......02). Feeding milk rather than formula did not affect cytokine production, but plasma soluble IL-2 receptor concentration was greater in the formula group than in the cow's milk group (P ¼ 0.03). Since the capacity to produce INF-g has been proposed as a maturation marker for the immune system in early life...

  14. Role of the immune system in pancreatic cancer progression and immune modulating treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideras, K; Braat, H; Kwekkeboom, J; van Eijck, C H; Peppelenbosch, M P; Sleijfer, S; Bruno, M

    2014-05-01

    Traditional chemotherapeutics have largely failed to date to produce significant improvements in pancreatic cancer survival. One of the reasons for the resilience of pancreatic cancer towards intensive treatment is that the cancer is capable of high jacking the immune system: during disease progression the immune system is converted from a system that attacks tumor cells into a support structure for the cancer, exerting trophic actions on the cancer cells. This turn-around of immune system action is achieved through mobilization and activation of regulatory T cells, myeloid derived suppressor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and fibroblasts, all of which suppress CD8 T cells and NK cells. This immune suppression occurs both through the expression of tolerance-inducing cell surface molecules, such as PD-L1, as well as through the production of "tolerogenic" cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. Based on the accumulating insight into the importance of the immune system for the outcome of pancreatic cancer patients multiple new immunotherapeutic approaches against pancreatic cancer are being currently tested in clinical trials. In this review we give an overview of both the immune escaping mechanisms of pancreatic cancer as well as the new immune related therapeutic strategies currently being tested in pancreatic cancer clinical trials.

  15. CD147: a novel modulator of inflammatory and immune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X; Song, Z; Zhang, S; Nanda, A; Li, G

    2014-01-01

    CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein, is expressed on all leukocytes, platelets, and endothelial cells. It has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological activities through interacting with multiple partners, including cyclophilins, monocarboxylate transporters, Caveolin-1, and integrins. While CD147 is best known as a potent inducer of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (hence also called EMMPRIN), it can also function as a key mediator of inflammatory and immune responses. Increased expression of CD147 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, such as asthma-mediated lung inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Therapeutic targeting of CD147 has yielded encouraging effects in a number of experimental models of human diseases, suggesting CD147 as an attractive target for treatment of inflammation-related diseases. Here we review the current understanding of CD147 expression and functions in inflammatory and immune responses and potential implications for treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  16. Modulation of host immunity and reproduction by horizontally acquired Wolbachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeault, Romain; Braquart-Varnier, Christine; Marcadé, Isabelle; Mappa, Gaëtan; Mottin, Elmina; Sicard, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    The Wolbachia are symbiotic bacteria vertically transmitted from one host generation to another. However, a growing amount of data shows that horizontal transfers of Wolbachia also frequently occur within and between host species. The consequences of the arrival of new symbionts on host physiology can be studied by their experimental introduction in asymbiotic hosts. After experimental transfers of the eight major isopod Wolbachia strains in the isopod Porcellio dilatatus only two of them (wCon and wDil) were found to (1) have no pathogenic effect on the host and (2) be able to pass vertically to the host offspring. In the present work, we studied the influence of these two strains, able to complete an horizontal transfer, on immunity and reproduction of P. dilatatus at two stages of the transfer: (1) in recipient hosts that encounter the symbionts: to test the influence of symbiont when acquired during host life and (2) in vertically infected offspring: to test the influence of a symbiotic interaction occurring all lifelong. The impact of Wolbachia varied depending on the stage: there were clearer effects in vertically infected individuals than in those that acquired the symbionts during their lives. Moreover, the two Wolbachia strains showed contrasted effects: the strain wCon tended to reduce the reproductive investment but to maintain or increase immune parameters whilst wDil had positive effects on reproductive investment but decreased the investment in some immune parameters. These results suggest that horizontally acquisition of Wolbachia can influence the balance between host immune and reproductive traits.

  17. Helminth genomics: The implications for human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Brindley

    Full Text Available More than two billion people (one-third of humanity are infected with parasitic roundworms or flatworms, collectively known as helminth parasites. These infections cause diseases that are responsible for enormous levels of morbidity and mortality, delays in the physical development of children, loss of productivity among the workforce, and maintenance of poverty. Genomes of the major helminth species that affect humans, and many others of agricultural and veterinary significance, are now the subject of intensive genome sequencing and annotation. Draft genome sequences of the filarial worm Brugia malayi and two of the human schistosomes, Schistosoma japonicum and S. mansoni, are now available, among others. These genome data will provide the basis for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in helminth nutrition and metabolism, host-dependent development and maturation, immune evasion, and evolution. They are likely also to predict new potential vaccine candidates and drug targets. In this review, we present an overview of these efforts and emphasize the potential impact and importance of these new findings.

  18. Modulation of the immune system during postpartum uterine inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Caroline G; Meier, Susanne; Hussein, Hassan; McDougall, Scott; Burke, Chris R; Roche, John R; Mitchell, Murray D

    2015-04-01

    Postpartum uterine inflammation (endometritis) in the dairy cow is associated with lower fertility at both the time of infection and after the inflammation has resolved. We hypothesized that aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the subfertility associated with uterine inflammation. The objective of this study was to characterize genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression in the endometrium of dairy cows with subclinical endometritis (SCE). Endometrial tissues were obtained at 29 days postpartum (n = 12), and microarrays were used to characterize transcription and DNA methylation. Analyses revealed 1,856 probes differentially expressed in animals with SCE (n = 6) compared with controls (CON, n = 6, P immune response. Furthermore, the top ontology terms enriched in genes that had expression data correlated to bacteriology score were: Defense response, inflammatory response, and innate immune response. Gene expression profiles in cows with subclinical endometritis in this study indicate that the immune response is activated, potentially resulting in a local proinflammatory environment in the uterus. If this period of inflammation is prolonged it could result in tissue damage or failure to complete involution of the uterus, which may create a suboptimal environment for future pregnancy.

  19. IMMUNE RBF NETWORK AND ITS APPLICATION IN THE MODULATION-STYLE RECOGNITION OF RADAR SIGNALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Xinbao; Zang Xiaogang; Zhou Xilang; Hu Guangrui

    2003-01-01

    Based on Immune Programming(IP), a novel Radial Basis Function (RBF) networkdesigning method is proposed. Through extracting the preliminary knowledge about the widthof the basis function as the vaccine to form the immune operator, the algorithm reduces thesearching space of canonical algorithm and improves the convergence speed. The application ofthe RBF network trained with the algorithm in the modulation-style recognition of radar signalsdemonstrates that the network has a fast convergence speed with good performances.

  20. Encapsulated Cellular Implants for Recombinant Protein Delivery and Therapeutic Modulation of the Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Lathuilière

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ex vivo gene therapy using retrievable encapsulated cellular implants is an effective strategy for the local and/or chronic delivery of therapeutic proteins. In particular, it is considered an innovative approach to modulate the activity of the immune system. Two recently proposed therapeutic schemes using genetically engineered encapsulated cells are discussed here: the chronic administration of monoclonal antibodies for passive immunization against neurodegenerative diseases and the local delivery of a cytokine as an adjuvant for anti-cancer vaccines.

  1. Modulation of Immune Response by Organophosphorus Pesticides: Fishes as a Potential Model in Immunotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. G. Díaz-Resendiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune response is modulated by different substances that are present in the environment. Nevertheless, some of these may cause an immunotoxic effect. In this paper, the effect of organophosphorus pesticides (frequent substances spilled in aquatic ecosystems on the immune system of fishes and in immunotoxicology is reviewed. Furthermore, some cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be involved in immunoregulation mechanisms of organophosphorus pesticides are discussed.

  2. Modulation of Immune Response by Organophosphorus Pesticides: Fishes as a Potential Model in Immunotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Resendiz, K. J. G.; Toledo-Ibarra, G. A.; Girón-Pérez, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    Immune response is modulated by different substances that are present in the environment. Nevertheless, some of these may cause an immunotoxic effect. In this paper, the effect of organophosphorus pesticides (frequent substances spilled in aquatic ecosystems) on the immune system of fishes and in immunotoxicology is reviewed. Furthermore, some cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be involved in immunoregulation mechanisms of organophosphorus pesticides are discussed. PMID:25973431

  3. Blunting the knife: development of vaccines targeting digestive proteases of blood-feeding helminth parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mark S; Ranjit, Najju; Loukas, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Proteases are pivotal to parasitism, mediating biological processes crucial to worm survival including larval migration through tissue, immune evasion/modulation and nutrient acquisition by the adult parasite. In haematophagous parasites, many of these proteolytic enzymes are secreted from the intestine (nematodes) or gastrodermis (trematodes) where they act to degrade host haemoglobin and serum proteins as part of the feeding process. These proteases are exposed to components of the immune system of the host when the worms ingest blood, and therefore present targets for the development of anti-helminth vaccines. The protective effects of current vaccine antigens against nematodes that infect humans (hookworm) and livestock (barber's pole worm) are based on haemoglobin-degrading intestinal proteases and act largely as a result of the neutralisation of these proteases by antibodies that are ingested with the blood-meal. In this review, we survey the current status of helminth proteases that show promise as vaccines and describe their vital contribution to a parasitic existence.

  4. Modulation of Toll-like receptor signaling in innate immunity by natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luxi; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    For centuries, natural products and their derivatives have provided a rich source of compounds for the development of new immunotherapies in the treatment of human disease. Many of these compounds are currently undergoing clinical trials, particularly as anti-oxidative, anti-microbial, and anti-cancer agents. However, the function and mechanism of natural products in how they interact with our immune system has yet to be extensively explored. Natural immune modulators may provide the key to control and ultimately defeat disorders affecting the immune system. They can either up- or down-regulate the immune response with few undesired adverse effects. In this review, we summarize the recent advancements made in utilizing natural products for immunomodulation and their important molecular targets, members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, in the innate immune system.

  5. Alphacoronavirus protein 7 modulates host innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jazmina L G; Becares, Martina; Sola, Isabel; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Enjuanes, Luis; Zúñiga, Sonia

    2013-09-01

    Innate immune response is the first line of antiviral defense resulting, in most cases, in pathogen clearance with minimal clinical consequences. Viruses have developed diverse strategies to subvert host defense mechanisms and increase their survival. In the transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) as a model, we previously reported that accessory gene 7 counteracts the host antiviral response by associating with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). In the present work, the effect of the absence of gene 7 on the host cell, during infection, was further analyzed by transcriptomic analysis. The pattern of gene expression of cells infected with a recombinant mutant TGEV, lacking gene 7 expression (rTGEV-Δ7), was compared to that of cells infected with the parental virus (rTGEV-wt). Genes involved in the immune response, the interferon response, and inflammation were upregulated during TGEV infection in the absence of gene 7. An exacerbated innate immune response during infection with rTGEV-Δ7 virus was observed both in vitro and in vivo. An increase in macrophage recruitment and activation in lung tissues infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus was observed compared to cells infected with the parental virus. In summary, the absence of protein 7 both in vitro and in vivo led to increased proinflammatory responses and acute tissue damage after infection. In a porcine animal model, which is immunologically similar to humans, we present a novel example of how viral proteins counteract host antiviral pathways to determine the infection outcome and pathogenesis.

  6. A gastrointestinal rotavirus infection mouse model for immune modulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Amerongen Geert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotaviruses are the single most important cause of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. The current study was conducted to assess whether colostrum containing rotavirus-specific antibodies (Gastrogard-R® could protect against rotavirus infection. In addition, this illness model was used to study modulatory effects of intervention on several immune parameters after re-infection. Methods BALB/c mice were treated by gavage once daily with Gastrogard-R® from the age of 4 to 10 days, and were inoculated with rhesus rotavirus (RRV at 7 days of age. A secondary inoculation with epizootic-diarrhea infant-mouse (EDIM virus was administered at 17 days of age. Disease symptoms were scored daily and viral shedding was measured in fecal samples during the post-inoculation periods. Rotavirus-specific IgM, IgG and IgG subclasses in serum, T cell proliferation and rotavirus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH responses were also measured. Results Primary inoculation with RRV induced a mild but consistent level of diarrhea during 3-4 days post-inoculation. All mice receiving Gastrogard-R® were 100% protected against rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Mice receiving both RRV and EDIM inoculation had a lower faecal-viral load following EDIM inoculation then mice receiving EDIM alone or Gastrogard-R®. Mice receiving Gastrogard-R® however displayed an enhanced rotavirus-specific T-cell proliferation whereas rotavirus-specific antibody subtypes were not affected. Conclusions Preventing RRV-induced diarrhea by Gastrogard-R® early in life showed a diminished protection against EDIM re-infection, but a rotavirus-specific immune response was developed including both B cell and T cell responses. In general, this intervention model can be used for studying clinical symptoms as well as the immune responses required for protection against viral re-infection.

  7. Systemic immune modulation induced by alcoholic beverage intake in obese-diabetes (db/db) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunah; Jang, Ik-Soon; Park, Junsoo; Kim, Seol-Hee; Baek, So-Young; Go, Sung-Ho; Lee, Seung-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    Alcohol over-consumption is generally immunosuppressive. In this study, the effects of single or repetitive alcohol administration on the systemic immunity of db/db mice were observed to clarify the possible mechanisms for the increased susceptibility of obese individuals to alcohol-related immunological health problems. Alcohol (as a form of commercially available 20% distilled-alcoholic beverage) was orally administered one-time or seven times over 2 weeks to db/db mice and normal C57BL/6J mice. Immunologic alterations were analyzed by observation of body weight and animal activity, along with proportional changes of splenocytes for natural killer cells, macrophages, and T and B lymphocytes. Modulation of plasma cytokine level and immune-related genes were also ascertained by micro-bead assay and a microarray method, respectively. The immune micro-environment of db/db mice was an inflammatory state and adaptive cellular immunity was significantly suppressed. Low-dose alcohol administration reversed the immune response, decreasing inflammatory responses and the increment of adaptive immunity mainly related to CD4(+) T cells, but not CD8(+) T cells, to normal background levels. Systemic immune modulation due to alcohol administration in the obese-diabetic mouse model may be useful in the understanding of the induction mechanism, which will aid the development of therapeutics for related secondary diseases.

  8. Radiation-Induce Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Riverside, CA Invited Seminar: "The Proteasome as a Senor of Stress " 3/17/04 UCLA Department of Dentistry Monthly Seminar, Los Angeles, CA Invited...affects protective antitutnor imnmunity induced by Chymotrypsin-like activity was measured using 100 pM SucLLVY-7- AdVMARTI/DC vaccination amido -4...adjuvant activity was heightened if the cells were first stressed by radiation, indicating that injury can modulate this effect. In situ induction of

  9. Iloprost modulates the immune response in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patanè Salvatore

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iloprost has been suggested to possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating actions and it is widely use as a vasodilatator in systemic sclerosis (SSc. In this study we evaluate the effect of iloprost on immune response in SSc patients. To this extend we enrolled 15 women affected by SSc and infused iloprost for 5 days. The effect of iloprost on T cells and monocytes was measured by flow cytometry, Real time PCR and measuring cytokines production in vivo and in vitro by ELISA. Results Our results demonstrate that Iloprost reduces T cell and TNF alpha production both in vivo and in vitro. It reduces T regulatory cells number, but increases their activity after immune stimulation. It increases serum IL-2 and this increase persists 28 days after the last infusion, also RANKL was increased both in vivo and in vitro. We observed no effect on IFN gamma production. Conclusions These results suggest that iloprost has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects, reducing TNF alpha production by T cells and the number of T regulatory cells and increasing IL-2 and RANKL.

  10. Iloprost modulates the immune response in systemic sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Iloprost has been suggested to possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating actions and it is widely use as a vasodilatator in systemic sclerosis (SSc). In this study we evaluate the effect of iloprost on immune response in SSc patients. To this extend we enrolled 15 women affected by SSc and infused iloprost for 5 days. The effect of iloprost on T cells and monocytes was measured by flow cytometry, Real time PCR and measuring cytokines production in vivo and in vitro by ELISA. Results Our results demonstrate that Iloprost reduces T cell and TNF alpha production both in vivo and in vitro. It reduces T regulatory cells number, but increases their activity after immune stimulation. It increases serum IL-2 and this increase persists 28 days after the last infusion, also RANKL was increased both in vivo and in vitro. We observed no effect on IFN gamma production. Conclusions These results suggest that iloprost has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects, reducing TNF alpha production by T cells and the number of T regulatory cells and increasing IL-2 and RANKL. PMID:21159177

  11. Strategies to use immune modulators in therapeutic vaccines against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzofsky, Jay A; Terabe, Masaki; Wood, Lauren V

    2012-06-01

    Cancers so much resemble self that they prove difficult for the immune system to eliminate, and those that have already escaped natural immunosurveillance have gotten past the natural immune barriers to malignancy. A successful therapeutic cancer vaccine must overcome these escape mechanisms. Our laboratory has focused on a multistep "push-pull" approach in which we combine strategies to overcome each of the mechanisms of escape. If tumor epitopes are insufficiently immunogenic, we increase their immunogenicity by epitope enhancement, improving their binding affinity to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. If the anti-tumor response is too weak or of the wrong phenotype, we use cytokines, costimulatory molecules, Toll-like receptor ligands, and other molecular adjuvants to increase not only the quantity of the response but also its quality, to push the response in the right direction. Finally, the tumor invokes multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms to defend itself, so we need to overcome those as well, including blocking or depleting regulatory cells or inhibiting regulatory molecules, to pull the response by removing the brakes. Some of these strategies individually have now been translated into human clinical trials in cancer patients. Combinations of these in a push-pull approach are promising for the successful immunotherapy of cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Strategies to use immune modulators in therapeutic vaccines against cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzofsky, Jay A.; Terabe, Masaki; Wood, Lauren V.

    2012-01-01

    Cancers so much resemble self that they prove difficult for the immune system to eliminate, and those that have already escaped natural immunosurveillance have gotten past the natural immune barriers to malignancy. A successful therapeutic cancer vaccine must overcome these escape mechanisms. Our laboratory has focused on a multistep “push-pull” approach in which we combine strategies to overcome each of the mechanisms of escape. If tumor epitopes are insufficiently immunogenic, we increase their immunogenicity by epitope enhancement, improving their binding affinity to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. If the anti-tumor response is too weak or of the wrong phenotype, we use cytokines, costimulatory molecules, Toll-like receptor ligands, and other molecular adjuvants to increase not only the quantity of the response, but also its quality, to push the response in the right direction. Finally, the tumor invokes multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms to defend itself, so we need to overcome those as well, including blocking or depleting regulatory cells or inhibiting regulatory molecules, to pull the response by removing the brakes. Some of these strategies individually have now been translated into human clinical trials in cancer patients. Combinations of these in a push-pull approach are promising for the successful immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:22595057

  13. Antimalarial Drugs as Immune Modulators: New Mechanisms for Old Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jie; Minie, Mark; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Woodward, Joshua J; Elkon, Keith B

    2017-01-14

    The best known of the naturally occurring antimalarial compounds are quinine, extracted from cinchona bark, and artemisinin (qinghao), extracted from Artemisia annua in China. These and other derivatives are now chemically synthesized and remain the mainstay of therapy to treat malaria. The beneficial effects of several of the antimalarial drugs (AMDs) on clinical features of autoimmune disorders were discovered by chance during World War II. In this review, we discuss the chemistry of AMDs and their mechanisms of action, emphasizing how they may impact multiple pathways of innate immunity. These pathways include Toll-like receptors and the recently described cGAS-STING pathway. Finally, we discuss the current and future impact of AMDs on systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and devastating monogenic disorders (interferonopathies) characterized by expression of type I interferon in the brain.

  14. A Critical Role for CLSP2 in the Modulation of Antifungal Immune Response in Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Hong Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic fungi represent a promising class of bio-insecticides for mosquito control. Thus, detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms governing anti-fungal immune response in mosquitoes is essential. In this study, we show that CLSP2 is a modulator of immune responses during anti-fungal infection in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. With a fungal infection, the expression of the CLSP2 gene is elevated. CLSP2 is cleaved upon challenge with Beauveria bassiana conidia, and the liberated CLSP2 CTL-type domain binds to fungal cell components and B. bassiana conidia. Furthermore, CLPS2 RNA interference silencing significantly increases the resistance to the fungal challenge. RNA-sequencing transcriptome analysis showed that the majority of immune genes were highly upregulated in the CLSP2-depleted mosquitoes infected with the fungus. The up-regulated immune gene cohorts belong to melanization and Toll pathways, but not to the IMD or JAK-STAT. A thioester-containing protein (TEP22, a member of α2-macroglobulin family, has been implicated in the CLSP2-modulated mosquito antifungal defense. Our study has contributed to a greater understanding of immune-modulating mechanisms in mosquitoes.

  15. [Effect of immune modulation on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal'nik, B V; Ponomareva, T S; Deriabin, P N; Denisova, T G; Mel'nikova, N N; Tugambaev, T I; Atshabar, B B; Zakarian, S B

    2014-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of the effect of polyoxidonium and betaleukin on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine in model animal experiments. Plague vaccine EV, polyoxidonium, betaleukin, erythrocytic antigenic diagnosticum for determination of F1 antibodies and immune reagents for detection of lymphocytes with F1 receptors (LFR) in adhesive test developed by the authors were used. The experiments were carried out in 12 rabbits and 169 guinea pigs. Immune modulation accelerated the appearance and disappearance of LFR (early phase) and ensured a more rapid and intensive antibody formation (effector phase). Activation by betaleukin is more pronounced than by polyoxidonium. The more rapid and intensive was the development of early phase, the more effective was antibody response to the vaccine. Immune modulation in the experiment with guinea pigs significantly increased protective activity of the vaccine. The use of immune modulators increased immunogenic (in both early and effector phases of antigen-specific response) and protective activity of the EV vaccine. A connection between the acceleration of the first phase of antigen-specific response and general intensity of effector phase of immune response to the EV vaccine was detected. ,

  16. Intercellular Trogocytosis Plays an Important Role in Modulation of Immune Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawaja Ashfaque Ahmed; Manjunatha Ankathatti Munegowda; Yufeng Xie; Jim Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Intercellular communication is an important means of molecular information transfer through exchange of membrane proteins from cells to cells. Advent of the latest analytical and imaging tools has allowed us to enhance our understanding of the cellular communication through the intercellular exchange of intact membrane patches, also called trogocytosis, which is a ubiquitous phenomenon. Immune responses against pathogens or any foreign antigens require fine immune regulation, where cellular communications are mediated by either soluble or cell surface molecules. It has been demonstrated that the membrane molecule transfer between immune cells such as dendritic and T cells can be derived through internalization/recycling pathway, dissociation-associated pathway, uptake of exosomes and membrane nanotube formations. Recent evidence implicates the trogocytosis as an important mechanism of the immune system to modulate immune responses. Exchange of membrane molecules/ antigens between immune cells has been observed for a long time, but the mechanisms and functional consequences of these transfers remain unclear. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms of trogocytosis and its physiological relevance to immune system, with special reference to T cells and the stimulatory or suppressive immune responses derived from T cells with acquired dendritic cell membrane molecules. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(4):261-269.

  17. Pneumonia, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and Early Immune-Modulator Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Yil Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is caused by infectious insults, such as pneumonia from various pathogens or related to other noninfectious events. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics are similar across severely affected patients, suggesting that a common mode of immune reaction may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of ARDS. There may be etiologic substances that have an affinity for respiratory cells and induce lung cell injury in cases of ARDS. These substances originate not only from pathogens, but also from injured host cells. At the molecular level, these substances have various sizes and biochemical characteristics, classifying them as protein substances and non-protein substances. Immune cells and immune proteins may recognize and act on these substances, including pathogenic proteins and peptides, depending upon the size and biochemical properties of the substances (this theory is known as the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis. The severity or chronicity of ARDS depends on the amount of etiologic substances with corresponding immune reactions, the duration of the appearance of specific immune cells, or the repertoire of specific immune cells that control the substances. Therefore, treatment with early systemic immune modulators (corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin as soon as possible may reduce aberrant immune responses in the potential stage of ARDS.

  18. Mucosal and systemic immune modulation by Trichuris trichiura in a self-infected individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Anders; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse; Nejsum, Peter

    2016-01-01

    trichiura colonization induced equally increased expressions of T-helper (h)1-, Th2-, Th17- and Treg-associated cytokines and transcription factors, measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed several indicators of modulation of systemic immunity during the T. trichiura infection. Plasma...

  19. Immune Response Modulation by Vitamin D: Role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu; Hirigoyen, Daniela; Naves, Rodrigo; Burgos, Paula Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays key roles as a natural immune modulator and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This review presents a summary and analysis of the recent literature regarding immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D as well as its importance in SLE development, clinical severity, and possible effects of supplementation in disease treatment.

  20. Two Lactobacillus strains, isolated from breast milk, differently modulate the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz-Ropero, M.P.; Martin, R.; Sierra, S.; Lara-Villoslada, F.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Xaus, J.; Olivares, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The ability of two different Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 and Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716), isolated from human breast milk, to modulate the immune response was examined. Methods and Results: In rodent bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), the presence of Lac

  1. Immune modulation by fish kinetoplastid parasites : a role for nitric oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeij, J.P.J.; Muiswinkel, van W.B.; Groeneveld, A.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2002-01-01

    Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii are kinetoplastid parasites infecting cyprinid fish. We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in immune modulation during T. borreli and T. carassii infection of carp. Phagocytic cells from different organs produced NO and serum nitrate levels incr

  2. Immune response modulation by Vitamin D: role in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirentxu eIruretagoyena

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D plays key roles as a natural immune modulator and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. This review presents a summary and analysis of the recent literature regarding immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D as well as its importance in SLE development, clinical severity and possible effects of supplementation in disease treatment.

  3. Two Lactobacillus strains, isolated from breast milk, differently modulate the immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz-Ropero, M.P.; Martin, R.; Sierra, S.; Lara-Villoslada, F.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Xaus, J.; Olivares, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: The ability of two different Lactobacillus strains (Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 and Lactobacillus fermentum CECT5716), isolated from human breast milk, to modulate the immune response was examined. Methods and Results: In rodent bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), the presence of Lac

  4. Efficient loading of dendritic cells following cryo and radiofrequency ablation in combination with immune modulation induces anti-tumour immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Brok, M H M G M; Sutmuller, R P M; Nierkens, S; Bennink, E J; Frielink, C; Toonen, L W J; Boerman, O C; Figdor, C G; Ruers, T J M; Adema, G J

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells that play a pivotal role in the induction of immunity. Ex vivo-generated, tumour antigen-loaded mature DC are currently exploited as cancer vaccines in clinical studies. However, antigen loading and maturation of DC directly in vivo would greatly facilitate the application of DC-based vaccines. We formerly showed in murine models that radiofrequency-mediated tumour destruction can provide an antigen source for the in vivo induction of anti-tumour immunity, and we explored the role of DC herein. In this paper we evaluate radiofrequency and cryo ablation for their ability to provide an antigen source for DC and compare this with an ex vivo-loaded DC vaccine. The data obtained with model antigens demonstrate that upon tumour destruction by radiofrequency ablation, up to 7% of the total draining lymph node (LN) DC contained antigen, whereas only few DC from the conventional vaccine reached the LN. Interestingly, following cryo ablation the amount of antigen-loaded DC is almost doubled. Analysis of surface markers revealed that both destruction methods were able to induce DC maturation. Finally, we show that in situ tumour ablation can be efficiently combined with immune modulation by anti-CTLA-4 antibodies or regulatory T-cell depletion. These combination treatments protected mice from the outgrowth of tumour challenges, and led to in vivo enhancement of tumour-specific T-cell numbers, which produced more IFN-γ upon activation. Therefore, in situ tumour destruction in combination with immune modulation creates a unique, ‘in situ DC-vaccine' that is readily applicable in the clinic without prior knowledge of tumour antigens. PMID:16953240

  5. Cellular immune activation in children with acute dengue virus infections is modulated by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Khin S; Endy, Timothy P; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Manomuth, Choompun; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Vaughn, David W; Nisalak, Ananda; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Libraty, Daniel H

    2006-09-01

    Apoptosis is an important modulator of cellular immune responses during systemic viral infections. Peripheral-blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) apoptosis and plasma soluble levels of CD95, a mediator of apoptosis, were determined in sequential samples from children participating in a prospective study of dengue virus (DV) infections. During the period of defervescence, levels of PBMC apoptosis were higher in children developing dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), the most severe form of illness, than in those with dengue fever (DF) and other, nondengue, febrile illnesses. CD8(+) T lymphocytes made up approximately half of the peak circulating apoptotic PBMCs in DHF and DF. Maximum plasma levels of soluble CD95 were also higher in children with DHF than in those with DF. The level of PBMC apoptosis correlated with dengue disease severity. Apoptosis appears to be involved in modulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses to DV infection and is likely involved in the evolution of immune responses in other viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  6. Natural Health Products, Modulation of Immune Function and Prevention of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre S. Haddad

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is increasingly found to be involved in the development of several chronic illnesses, for which allopathic medicine has provided limited tools for treatment and especially prevention. In that context, it appears worthwhile to target the immune system in order to modulate the risk of certain chronic illnesses. Meanwhile, natural health products (NHPs are generating renewed interest, particularly in the prevention and treatment of several chronic diseases. Over 20 scientists from fields related to immune function and NHPs were thus convened to establish the state of knowledge on these subjects and to explore future research directions. This review summarizes the result of discussions held during the symposium. It thus seeks to be thought provoking rather than to comprehensively cover such broad areas of research. Notably, a brief overview of the immune system is presented, including potentially useful targets and strategies to keep it in an equilibrated state, in order to prevent certain disorders. The pertinence and limitations of targeting the immune system to prevent chronic diseases is also discussed. The paper then discusses the usefulness and limitations of current experimental tools available to study the immune modulating effects of NHPs. Finally, a concise review of some of the most studied NHPs showing promising immunomodulatory activity is given, and avenues for future research are described.

  7. Controlled release strategies for modulating immune responses to promote tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Courtney M; Park, Jonghyuck; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-12-10

    Advances in the field of tissue engineering have enhanced the potential of regenerative medicine, yet the efficacy of these strategies remains incomplete, and is limited by the innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune response associated with injury or disease combined with that mounted to biomaterials, transplanted cells, proteins, and gene therapies vectors can contribute to the inability to fully restore tissue function. Blocking immune responses such as with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agents are either ineffective, as the immune response contributes significantly to regeneration, or have significant side effects. This review describes targeted strategies to modulate the immune response in order to limit tissue damage following injury, promote an anti-inflammatory environment that leads to regeneration, and induce antigen (Ag)-specific tolerance that can target degenerative diseases that destroy tissues and promote engraftment of transplanted cells. Focusing on targeted immuno-modulation, we describe local delivery techniques to sites of inflammation as well as systemic approaches that preferentially target subsets of immune populations.

  8. Beta-glucan plus ascorbic acid in neonatal calves modulates immune functions with and without Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calves often succumb to Salmonella enterica, Dublin after maternal antibody protection has abated. Enhancement of innate immunity or earlier maturation of adaptive immunity to support vaccinations with dietary immune modulators may be the best option for protection during this vulnerable period. I...

  9. Immune response modulation by curcumin in a latex allergy model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Raghavan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a worldwide increase in allergy and asthma over the last few decades, particularly in industrially developed nations. This resulted in a renewed interest to understand the pathogenesis of allergy in recent years. The progress made in the pathogenesis of allergic disease has led to the exploration of novel alternative therapies, which include herbal medicines as well. Curcumin, present in turmeric, a frequently used spice in Asia has been shown to have anti-allergic and inflammatory potential. Methods We used a murine model of latex allergy to investigate the role of curcumin as an immunomodulator. BALB/c mice were exposed to latex allergens and developed latex allergy with a Th2 type of immune response. These animals were treated with curcumin and the immunological and inflammatory responses were evaluated. Results Animals exposed to latex showed enhanced serum IgE, latex specific IgG1, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, eosinophils and inflammation in the lungs. Intragastric treatment of latex-sensitized mice with curcumin demonstrated a diminished Th2 response with a concurrent reduction in lung inflammation. Eosinophilia in curcumin-treated mice was markedly reduced, co-stimulatory molecule expression (CD80, CD86, and OX40L on antigen-presenting cells was decreased, and expression of MMP-9, OAT, and TSLP genes was also attenuated. Conclusion These results suggest that curcumin has potential therapeutic value for controlling allergic responses resulting from exposure to allergens.

  10. Glucose modulates Drosophila longevity and immunity independent of the microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galenza, Anthony; Hutchinson, Jaclyn; Campbell, Shelagh D.; Hazes, Bart; Foley, Edan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The acquisition of nutrients is essential for maintenance of metabolic processes in all organisms. Nutritional imbalance contributes to myriad metabolic disorders that include malnutrition, diabetes and even cancer. Recently, the importance of macronutrient ratio of food has emerged as a critical factor to determine health outcomes. Here we show that individual modifications to a completely defined diet markedly impact multiple aspects of organism wellbeing in Drosophila melanogaster. Through a longitudinal survey of several diets we demonstrate that increased levels of dietary glucose significantly improve longevity and immunity in adult Drosophila. Our metagenomic studies show that relative macronutrient levels not only influence the host, but also have a profound impact on microbiota composition. However, we found that elevated dietary glucose extended the lifespan of adult flies even when raised in a germ-free environment. Furthermore, when challenged with a chronic enteric infection, flies fed a diet with added glucose had increased survival times even in the absence of an intact microbiota. Thus, in contrast to known links between the microbiota and animal health, our findings uncover a novel microbiota-independent response to diet that impacts host wellbeing. As dietary responses are highly conserved in animals, we believe our results offer a general understanding of the association between glucose metabolism and animal health. PMID:26794610

  11. Interleukin-5 facilitates lung metastasis by modulating the immune microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P; Gleaves, Linda A; McLoed, Allyson G; Saxon, Jamie A; Habermann, Arun C; Connelly, Linda; Dulek, Daniel; Peebles, R Stokes; Fingleton, Barbara; Yull, Fiona E; Stathopoulos, Georgios T; Blackwell, Timothy S

    2015-04-15

    Although the lung is the most common metastatic site for cancer cells, biologic mechanisms regulating lung metastasis are not fully understood. Using heterotopic and intravenous injection models of lung metastasis in mice, we found that IL5, a cytokine involved in allergic and infectious diseases, facilitates metastatic colonization through recruitment of sentinel eosinophils and regulation of other inflammatory/immune cells in the microenvironment of the distal lung. Genetic IL5 deficiency offered marked protection of the lungs from metastasis of different types of tumor cells, including lung cancer, melanoma, and colon cancer. IL5 neutralization protected subjects from metastasis, whereas IL5 reconstitution or adoptive transfer of eosinophils into IL5-deficient mice exerted prometastatic effects. However, IL5 deficiency did not affect the growth of the primary tumor or the size of metastatic lesions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that eosinophils produce CCL22, which recruits regulatory T cells to the lungs. During early stages of metastasis, Treg created a protumorigenic microenvironment, potentially by suppressing IFNγ-producing natural killer cells and M1-polarized macrophages. Together, our results establish a network of allergic inflammatory circuitry that can be co-opted by metastatic cancer cells to facilitate lung colonization, suggesting interventions to target this pathway may offer therapeutic benefits to prevent or treat lung metastasis.

  12. Glucose modulates Drosophila longevity and immunity independent of the microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Galenza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of nutrients is essential for maintenance of metabolic processes in all organisms. Nutritional imbalance contributes to myriad metabolic disorders that include malnutrition, diabetes and even cancer. Recently, the importance of macronutrient ratio of food has emerged as a critical factor to determine health outcomes. Here we show that individual modifications to a completely defined diet markedly impact multiple aspects of organism wellbeing in Drosophila melanogaster. Through a longitudinal survey of several diets we demonstrate that increased levels of dietary glucose significantly improve longevity and immunity in adult Drosophila. Our metagenomic studies show that relative macronutrient levels not only influence the host, but also have a profound impact on microbiota composition. However, we found that elevated dietary glucose extended the lifespan of adult flies even when raised in a germ-free environment. Furthermore, when challenged with a chronic enteric infection, flies fed a diet with added glucose had increased survival times even in the absence of an intact microbiota. Thus, in contrast to known links between the microbiota and animal health, our findings uncover a novel microbiota-independent response to diet that impacts host wellbeing. As dietary responses are highly conserved in animals, we believe our results offer a general understanding of the association between glucose metabolism and animal health.

  13. Graphene Oxides Decorated with Carnosine as an Adjuvant To Modulate Innate Immune and Improve Adaptive Immunity in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunchun; Zhi, Xiao; Li, Chao; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Qiu, Xusheng; Ding, Chan; Ma, Lijun; Lu, Hongmin; Chen, Di; Liu, Guangqing; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-02-23

    Current studies have revealed the immune effects of graphene oxide (GO) and have utilized them as vaccine carriers and adjuvants. However, GO easily induces strong oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction at the site of injection. It is very necessary to develop an alternative adjuvant based on graphene oxide derivatives for improving immune responses and decreasing side effects. Carnosine (Car) is an outstanding and safe antioxidant. Herein, the feasibility and efficiency of ultrasmall graphene oxide decorated with carnosine as an alternative immune adjuvant were explored. OVA@GO-Car was prepared by simply mixing ovalbumin (OVA, a model antigen) with ultrasmall GO covalently modified with carnosine (GO-Car). We investigated the immunological properties of the GO-Car adjuvant in model mice. Results show that OVA@GO-Car can promote robust and durable OVA-specific antibody response, increase lymphocyte proliferation efficiency, and enhance CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell activation. The presence of Car in GO also probably contributes to enhancing the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through modulating the expression of some cytokines, including IL-6, CXCL1, CCL2, and CSF3. In addition, the safety of GO-Car as an adjuvant was evaluated comprehensively. No symptoms such as allergic response, inflammatory redness swelling, raised surface temperatures, physiological anomalies of blood, and remarkable weight changes were observed. Besides, after modification with carnosine, histological damages caused by GO-Car in lung, muscle, kidney, and spleen became weaken significantly. This study sufficiently suggest that GO-Car as a safe adjuvant can effectively enhance humoral and innate immune responses against antigens in vivo.

  14. Sessile alveolar macrophages communicate with alveolar epithelium to modulate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, Kristin; Gusarova, Galina A.; Islam, Mohammad N.; Subramanian, Manikandan; Cohen, Taylor S.; Prince, Alice S.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2014-02-01

    The tissue-resident macrophages of barrier organs constitute the first line of defence against pathogens at the systemic interface with the ambient environment. In the lung, resident alveolar macrophages (AMs) provide a sentinel function against inhaled pathogens. Bacterial constituents ligate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on AMs, causing AMs to secrete proinflammatory cytokines that activate alveolar epithelial receptors, leading to recruitment of neutrophils that engulf pathogens. Because the AM-induced response could itself cause tissue injury, it is unclear how AMs modulate the response to prevent injury. Here, using real-time alveolar imaging in situ, we show that a subset of AMs attached to the alveolar wall form connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junction channels with the epithelium. During lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, the AMs remained sessile and attached to the alveoli, and they established intercommunication through synchronized Ca2+ waves, using the epithelium as the conducting pathway. The intercommunication was immunosuppressive, involving Ca2+-dependent activation of Akt, because AM-specific knockout of Cx43 enhanced alveolar neutrophil recruitment and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage. A picture emerges of a novel immunomodulatory process in which a subset of alveolus-attached AMs intercommunicates immunosuppressive signals to reduce endotoxin-induced lung inflammation.

  15. Infection with diverse immune-modulating poxviruses elicits different compositional shifts in the mouse gut microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernáez, Bruno; Rastrojo, Alberto; Alcamí, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    It is often not possible to demonstrate causality within the context of gut microbiota dysbiosis-linked diseases. Thus, we need a better understanding of the mechanisms whereby an altered host immunophysiology shapes its resident microbiota. In this regard, immune-modulating poxvirus strains and mutants could differentially alter gut mucosal immunity in the context of a natural immune response, providing a controlled natural in vivo setting to deepen our understanding of the immune determinants of microbiome composition. This study represents a proof-of-concept that the use of an existing collection of different immune-modulating poxviruses may represent an innovative tool in gut microbiome research. To this end, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and RNAseq transcriptome profiling were employed as proxies for microbiota composition and gut immunophysiological status in the analysis of caecal samples from control mice and mice infected with various poxvirus types. Our results show that different poxvirus species and mutants elicit different shifts in the mice mucosa-associated microbiota and, in some instances, significant concomitant shifts in gut transcriptome profiles, thus providing an initial validation to the proposed model. PMID:28282449

  16. Bovine lactoferrin improves bone status of ovariectomized mice via immune function modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malet, Arnaud; Bournaud, Elsa; Lan, Annaïg; Mikogami, Takashi; Tomé, Daniel; Blais, Anne

    2011-05-01

    We have previously shown that bovine lactoferrin (bLF) supplementation can have a beneficial effect on postmenopausal bone loss by modulating bone formation and resorption. A direct effect of bLF on bone metabolism is support by its presence in mice blood. Moreover we know that LF plays a key role in innate immunity and recent studies have shown its ability to modulate adaptive immunity. In particular bLF ingestion prevents recruitment and activation of immune cells at inflammatory sites. We propose that LF through its ability to modulate maturation and differentiation of leucocytes can participate to abolish the deregulation induced by estrogen deficiency on T cells. This study evaluated the effects of bovine lactoferrin on immune function in ovariectomized mice. We investigated whether bLF ingestion could prevent bone loss via modulation of immune function. Three-month-old female C3H mice were either ovariectomized or sham-operated and fed for 1, 2 or 4 months with a control diet (AIN-93M) or the same diet including 10g bLF/kg diet. Bone mineral density was determined using a Lunar Piximus densitometer. The immune parameters were assessed by flow cytometry. In addition, Real-Time PCR was performed to quantify TNFα expression and plasma cytokines were measured at 4 months with Luminex. Ovariectomy induced significant changes on bone parameters and increased recruitment of macrophages, dendritic cells, and B and T cells associated with T lymphocyte activation in bone marrow. Compared to the control diet, ingestion of bLF-enriched diet for 2 months prevented T cell activation and restored dendritic and B cell populations in the bone micro-environment in ovariectomized mice. Furthermore, TNFα expression in bone was decreased by bLF supplementation after 2 and 4 months. Similarly, a decreased plasma level of TNFα was observed concomitantly to an increase of IL-10 level. In conclusion, these experiments suggest that bLF can mediate the prevention of lymphocyte

  17. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  18. Gut microbiota disturbance during helminth infection: can it affect cognition and behaviour of children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guernier, Vanina; Brennan, Bradley; Yakob, Laith; Milinovich, Gabriel; Clements, Archie C A; Soares Magalhaes, Ricardo J

    2017-01-10

    Bidirectional signalling between the brain and the gastrointestinal tract is regulated at neural, hormonal, and immunological levels. Recent studies have shown that helminth infections can alter the normal gut microbiota. Studies have also shown that the gut microbiota is instrumental in the normal development, maturation and function of the brain. The pathophysiological pathways by which helminth infections contribute to altered cognitive function remain poorly understood. We put forward the hypothesis that gastrointestinal infections with parasitic worms, such as helminths, induce an imbalance of the gut-brain axis, which, in turn, can detrimentally manifest in brain development. Factors supporting this hypothesis are: 1) research focusing on intelligence and school performance in school-aged children has shown helminth infections to be associated with cognitive impairment, 2) disturbances in gut microbiota have been shown to be associated with important cognitive developmental effects, and 3) helminth infections have been shown to alter the gut microbiota structure. Evidence on the complex interactions between extrinsic (parasite) and intrinsic (host-derived) factors has been synthesised and discussed. While evidence in favour of the helminth-gut microbiota-central nervous system hypothesis is circumstantial, it would be unwise to rule it out as a possible mechanism by which gastrointestinal helminth infections induce childhood cognitive morbidity. Further empirical studies are necessary to test an indirect effect of helminth infections on the modulation of mood and behaviour through its effects on the gut microbiota.

  19. Modulation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation downstream of pathogen perception orchestrates plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangjun; Cheng, Cheng; Cui, Fuhao; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Yu, Xiao; Meng, Xiangzong; Intorne, Aline C; Babilonia, Kevin; Li, Maoying; Li, Bo; Chen, Sixue; Ma, Xianfeng; Xiao, Shunyuan; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Metz, Richard P; Johnson, Charles D; Koiwa, Hisashi; Sun, Wenxian; Li, Zhaohu; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-12-10

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits host transcriptional reprogramming as part of the immune response. Although pathogen perception is well studied, the signaling networks orchestrating immune gene expression remain less clear. In a genetic screen for components involved in the early immune gene transcription reprogramming, we identified Arabidopsis RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 3 (CPL3) as a negative regulator of immune gene expression. MAMP perception induced rapid and transient cyclin-dependent kinase C (CDKC)-mediated phosphorylation of Arabidopsis CTD. The CDKCs, which are in turn phosphorylated and activated by a canonical MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade, represent a point of signaling convergence downstream of multiple immune receptors. CPL3 directly dephosphorylated CTD to counteract MAPK-mediated CDKC regulation. Thus, modulation of the phosphorylation dynamics of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery by MAPKs, CTD kinases, and phosphatases constitutes an essential mechanism for rapid orchestration of host immune gene expression and defense upon pathogen attacks.

  20. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species modulate innate immune response to influenza A virus in human nasal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Kim, Min-Ji; Park, Do Yang; Chung, Hyo Jin; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2015-07-01

    The innate immune system of the nasal epithelium serves as a first line of defense against invading respiratory viruses including influenza A virus (IAV). Recently, it was verified that interferon (IFN)-related immune responses play a critical role in local antiviral innate immunity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by exogenous pathogens has also been demonstrated in respiratory epithelial cells and modulation of ROS has been reported to be important for respiratory virus-induced innate immune mechanisms. Passage-2 normal human nasal epithelial (NHNE) cells were inoculated with IAV (WS/33, H1N1) to assess the sources of IAV-induced ROS and the relationship between ROS and IFN-related innate immune responses. Both STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation and the mRNA levels of IFN-stimulated genes, including Mx1, 2,5-OAS1, IFIT1, and CXCL10, were induced after IAV infection up to three days post infection. Similarly, we observed that mitochondrial ROS generation increased maximally at 2 days after IAV infection. After suppression of mitochondrial ROS generation, IAV-induced phosphorylation of STAT and mRNA levels of IFN-stimulated genes were attenuated and actually, viral titers of IAV were significantly higher in cases with scavenging ROS. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial ROS might be responsible for controlling IAV infection and may be potential sources of ROS generation, which is required to initiate an innate immune response in NHNE cells.

  1. Label-free haemogram using wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy for identifying immune-cell subset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Campbell, Elaine C.; Dholakia, Kishan; Powis, Simon J.

    2014-03-01

    Leucocytes in the blood of mammals form a powerful protective system against a wide range of dangerous pathogens. There are several types of immune cells that has specific role in the whole immune system. The number and type of immune cells alter in the disease state and identifying the type of immune cell provides information about a person's state of health. There are several immune cell subsets that are essentially morphologically identical and require external labeling to enable discrimination. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy (WMRS) with suitable machine learning algorithms as a label-free method to distinguish between different closely lying immune cell subset. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on WMRS data from single cells, obtained using confocal Raman microscopy for feature reduction, followed by Support Vector Machine (SVM) for binary discrimination of various cell subset, which yielded an accuracy >85%. The method was successful in discriminating between untouched and unfixed purified populations of CD4+CD3+ and CD8+CD3+ T lymphocyte subsets, and CD56+CD3- natural killer cells with a high degree of specificity. It was also proved sensitive enough to identify unique Raman signatures that allow clear discrimination between dendritic cell subsets, comprising CD303+CD45+ plasmacytoid and CD1c+CD141+ myeloid dendritic cells. The results of this study clearly show that WMRS is highly sensitive and can distinguish between cell types that are morphologically identical.

  2. Only small fractions of soluble ß-glucan modulate the mucosal immune system in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Przybylska, Dominika Alicja; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    For decades the ability of β-glucans to modulate immunity through activation of innate cellular components has been observed. However, toxicological effects associated with the systemic administration and dose-related immune-suppression has also been described. The superior aim of this study...... is to understand the effect of β-glucan induced modulation in carp in relation to tissue regeneration, mucosal immunity and host-pathogen interactions. Expression profiles of immune related genes will be measured in fresh water specie – common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). The methodology of the project involves...

  3. Modulations in cell-mediated immunity of Mytilus edulis following the `Sea Empress` oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyrynda, E.A.; Dyrynda, P.E.J.; Ratcliffe, N.A. [University of Wales Swansea (United Kingdom). School of Biological Sciences; Law, R.J.; Kelly, C.A.; Graham, K.L. [MAFF Fisheries Lab., Burnham-on-Crouch (United Kingdom); Pipe, R.K. [Plymouth Marine Lab. (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    The `Sea Empress` oil tanker grounded outside Milford Haven (Wales, UK) in February 1996, spilling {approx} 70,000 tonnes of crude oil and contaminating over 100 km of coastline, causing mass mortalities and strandings of at least 11 mollusc species. Intensive field monitoring commenced after the spill, examining immunity and hydrocarbon levels in the mussel, Mytilus edulis (Mollusca: Bivalvia), a commercially-harvested species which can accumulate contaminants. Comparisons of mussels from oiled and reference sites revealed significant modulations in cell-mediated immunity. Elevations in blood cell (haemocyte) numbers and decreases in superoxide generation and phagocytosis were identified in contaminated animals. The immune response of contaminated mussels gradually improved and generally showed no significant differences compared with clean mussels after 11 weeks. By then, total hydrocarbon content in contaminated mussels had declined by 70-90%, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content had decreased by over 90%. (author)

  4. The psychoneuroimmunology of music: modulation of psychological state, stress levels and immune response through participatory interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Fancourt, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Research into the health benefits of music has rapidly expanded over the last decade with recent studies showing early evidence of the ability of music to alter biomarkers of the neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems. However, it is not clear to what extent music can alter the response of the immune system. This thesis explores psychoneuroimmunological responses to music, in particular focusing on how participatory music interventions can modulate inflammatory responses. The biomarkers inv...

  5. Modulation of Caenorhabditis elegans immune response and modification of Shigella endotoxin upon interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesika, Periyanaina; Prasanth, Mani Iyer; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the pathogenesis at both physiological and molecular level using the model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans at different developmental stages in response to Shigella spp. and its pathogen associated molecular patterns such as lipopolysaccharide. The solid plate and liquid culture-based infection assays revealed that Shigella spp. infects C. elegans and had an impact on the brood size and pharyngeal pumping rate. LPS of Shigella spp. was toxic to C. elegans. qPCR analysis revealed that host innate immune genes have been modulated upon Shigella spp. infections and its LPS challenges. Non-destructive analysis was performed to kinetically assess the alterations in LPS during interaction of Shigella spp. with C. elegans. The modulation of innate immune genes attributed the surrendering of host immune system to Shigella spp. by favoring the infection. LPS appeared to have a major role in Shigella-mediated pathogenesis and Shigella employs a tactic behavior of modifying its LPS content to escape from the recognition of host immune system.

  6. The use of immune modulating drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khamis, Fahd A

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the mechanisms of action of 4 immune modulating drugs currently used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), including Alemtuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that functions by targeting CD52, an antigen primarily expressed on T and B lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages, resulting in their depletion and subsequent repopulation; Dimethyl fumarate that switches cytokine production toward a T helper 2 profile and enhances cytosolic levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, which has immune regulatory and cytoprotective effects on oligodendrocytes, neurons, and glial cells; Fingolimod functions by blocking the release of activated lymphocytes from lymph nodes by targeting sphingosin-1-phosphate receptors; Natalizumab a humanized monoclonal antibody binds α4β1-integrin resulting in reduced migration of immune cells from blood across the blood-brain barrier into the CNS. This review presents the most up to date information on mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of these immune modulators and provides future perspectives for the treatment of MS.

  7. Chemical modulators of the innate immune response alter gypsy moth larval susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick Nichole A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gut comprises an essential barrier that protects both invertebrate and vertebrate animals from invasion by microorganisms. Disruption of the balanced relationship between indigenous gut microbiota and their host can result in gut bacteria eliciting host responses similar to those caused by invasive pathogens. For example, ingestion of Bacillus thuringiensis by larvae of some species of susceptible Lepidoptera can result in normally benign enteric bacteria exerting pathogenic effects. Results We explored the potential role of the insect immune response in mortality caused by B. thuringiensis in conjunction with gut bacteria. Two lines of evidence support such a role. First, ingestion of B. thuringiensis by gypsy moth larvae led to the depletion of their hemocytes. Second, pharmacological agents that are known to modulate innate immune responses of invertebrates and vertebrates altered larval mortality induced by B. thuringiensis. Specifically, Gram-negative peptidoglycan pre-treated with lysozyme accelerated B. thuringiensis-induced killing of larvae previously made less susceptible due to treatment with antibiotics. Conversely, several inhibitors of the innate immune response (eicosanoid inhibitors and antioxidants increased the host's survival time following ingestion of B. thuringiensis. Conclusions This study demonstrates that B. thuringiensis infection provokes changes in the cellular immune response of gypsy moth larvae. The effects of chemicals known to modulate the innate immune response of many invertebrates and vertebrates, including Lepidoptera, also indicate a role of this response in B. thuringiensis killing. Interactions among B. thuringiensis toxin, enteric bacteria, and aspects of the gypsy moth immune response may provide a novel model to decipher mechanisms of sepsis associated with bacteria of gut origin.

  8. Patient-tailored modulation of the immune system may revolutionize future lung cancer treatment

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    Heuvers Marlies E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer research has devoted most of its energy over the past decades on unraveling the control mechanisms within tumor cells that govern its behavior. From this we know that the onset of cancer is the result of cumulative genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations in tumor cells leading to an unregulated cell cycle, unlimited replicative potential and the possibility for tissue invasion and metastasis. Until recently it was often thought that tumors are more or less undetected or tolerated by the patient’s immune system causing the neoplastic cells to divide and spread without resistance. However, it is without any doubt that the tumor environment contains a wide variety of recruited host immune cells. These tumor infiltrating immune cells influence anti-tumor responses in opposing ways and emerges as a critical regulator of tumor growth. Here we provide a summary of the relevant immunological cell types and their complex and dynamic roles within an established tumor microenvironment. For this, we focus on both the systemic compartment as well as the local presence within the tumor microenvironment of late-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, admitting that this multifaceted cellular composition will be different from earlier stages of the disease, between NSCLC patients. Understanding the paradoxical role that the immune system plays in cancer and increasing options for their modulation may alter the odds in favor of a more effective anti-tumor immune response. We predict that the future standard of care of lung cancer will involve patient-tailor-made combination therapies that associate (traditional chemotherapeutic drugs and biologicals with immune modulating agents and in this way complement the therapeutic armamentarium for this disease.

  9. Modulation of the arginase pathway in the context of microbial pathogenesis: a metabolic enzyme moonlighting as an immune modulator.

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    Priyanka Das

    Full Text Available Arginine is a crucial amino acid that serves to modulate the cellular immune response during infection. Arginine is also a common substrate for both inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and arginase. The generation of nitric oxide from arginine is responsible for efficient immune response and cytotoxicity of host cells to kill the invading pathogens. On the other hand, the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea via the arginase pathway can support the growth of bacterial and parasitic pathogens. The competition between iNOS and arginase for arginine can thus contribute to the outcome of several parasitic and bacterial infections. There are two isoforms of vertebrate arginase, both of which catalyze the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, but they differ with regard to tissue distribution and subcellular localization. In the case of infection with Mycobacterium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, Helicobacter, Schistosoma, and Salmonella spp., arginase isoforms have been shown to modulate the pathology of infection by various means. Despite the existence of a considerable body of evidence about mammalian arginine metabolism and its role in immunology, the critical choice to divert the host arginine pool by pathogenic organisms as a survival strategy is still a mystery in infection biology.

  10. Modulation of postoperative immune and inflammatory response by immune-enhancing enteral diet in gastrointestinal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo HaG Wu; Yan Wei Zhang; Zhao Han Wu

    2001-01-01

    AIM To evaluate if the administration of anenteral diet supplemented with glutamine,arginine and ω-3-fatty acids modulatesinflammatory and immune responses aftersurgery.METHODS A prospective randomized double-blind, clinical trial was performed. Forty-eightpatients with gastrointestinal cancer wererandomized into two groups, one group wasgiven an isocaloric and isonitrogenous standarddiet and the other was fed with the supplementeddiet with glutamine, arginine and ωo-3-fattyacids. Feedings were started within 48 hoursafter operation, and continued until day 8. Allvariables were measured before operation andon postoperative day 1 and 8. Immune responseswere determined by phagocytosis ability,respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear cells,total lymphocytes lymphocyte subsets, nitricoxide, cytokines concentration, andinflammatory responses by plasma levels of C-reactive protein, prostaglandin E2 level.RESULTS Tolerance of both formula diets wasexcellent. There were siagnificant differences inthe immunological and inflammatory responsesbetween the two groups. In supplementedgroup, phagocytosis and respiratory burst aftersurgery was higher and C-reactive protein levelwas lower (P<0.01) than in the standard group.The supplemented group had higher levels ofnitric oxide, total Iymphocytes, T lymphocytes,T-helper cells, and NK cells. Postoperativelevels of IL-6 and TNF-α were lower in thesupplemented group ( P < 0.05).CONCLUSION It was clearly established in thistrial that early postoperative enteral feeding issafe in patients who have undergone majoroperations for gastrointestinal cancer.Supplementation of enteral nutrition withglutamine, arginine, and ω-3 fatty acidspositively modulated postsurgicalimmunosuppressive and inflammatoryresponses.

  11. Immunobiotic Bifidobacteria Strains Modulate Rotavirus Immune Response in Porcine Intestinal Epitheliocytes via Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling.

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    Takamasa Ishizuka

    Full Text Available In this work, we aimed to characterize the antiviral response of an originally established porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (PIE cells by evaluating the molecular innate immune response to rotavirus (RVs. In addition, we aimed to select immunomodulatory bacteria with antiviral capabilities. PIE cells were inoculated with RVs isolated from different host species and the infective titers and the molecular innate immune response were evaluated. In addition, the protection against RVs infection and the modulation of immune response by different lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains was studied. The RVs strains OSU (porcine and UK (bovine effectively infected PIE cells. Our results also showed that RVs infection in PIE cells triggered TLR3-, RIG-I- and MDA-5-mediated immune responses with activation of IRF3 and NF-κB, induction of IFN-β and up-regulation of the interferon stimulated genes MxA and RNase L. Among the LAB strains tested, Bifidobacterium infantis MCC12 and B. breve MCC1274 significantly reduced RVs titers in infected PIE cells. The beneficial effects of both bifidobacteria were associated with reduction of A20 expression, and improvements of IRF-3 activation, IFN-β production, and MxA and RNase L expressions. These results indicate the value of PIE cells for studying RVs molecular innate immune response in pigs and for the selection of beneficial bacteria with antiviral capabilities.

  12. Beta-Glucan induced immune modulation of wound healing in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiménez, Natalia Ivonne Vera

    but not in animals. β-glucans are commonly used as immune modulators, but the mechanisms through which the modulation is achieved remains to be understood. Wound healing and tissue regeneration are essential mechanisms to ensure the survival and health of any organism. Studies based in mammalian systems have shown...... the importance of fibroblasts, macrophages, reactive oxygen species (especially hydrogen peroxide) and certain cytokines during wound healing processes. In fish however, only a few studies have been devoted tissue regeneration and modulation of cell proliferation during wound healing, even though mechanical...... injury as well as numerous diseases can severely damage fish tissues. The work presented in this thesis examines for the first time the immunomodulatory effects of β-glucans during wound healing processes in common carp. First, in order to choose the most suitable methodology for the measurement...

  13. Selective estrogen receptor modulators differentially alter the immune response of gilthead seabream juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenas, M C; Cabas, I; García-Alcázar, A; Meseguer, J; Mulero, V; García-Ayala, A

    2016-05-01

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a synthetic estrogen used in oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, tamoxifen (Tmx), a selective estrogen-receptor modulator used in hormone replacement therapy, and G1, a G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) selective agonist, differentially increased the hepatic vitellogenin (vtg) gene expression and altered the immune response in adult gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) males. However, no information exists on the effects of these compounds on the immune response of juveniles. This study aims, for the first time, to investigate the effects of the dietary intake of EE2, Tmx or G1 on the immune response of gilthead seabream juveniles and the capacity of the immune system of the specimens to recover its functionality after ceasing exposures (recovery period). The specimens were immunized with hemocyanin in the presence of aluminium adjuvant 1 (group A) or 120 (group B) days after the treatments ceased (dpt). The results indicate that EE2 and Tmx, but not G1, differentially promoted a transient alteration in hepatic vtg gene expression. Although all three compounds did not affect the production of reactive oxygen intermediates, they inhibited the induction of interleukin-1β (il1b) gene expression after priming. Interestingly, although Tmx increased the percentage of IgM-positive cells in both head kidney and spleen during the recovery period, the antibody response of vaccinated fish varied depending on the compound used and when the immunization was administered. Taken together, our results suggest that these compounds differentially alter the capacity of fish to respond to infection during ontogeny and, more interestingly, that the adaptive immune response remained altered to an extent that depends on the compound.

  14. Immune modulation with sulfasalazine attenuates immunopathogenesis but enhances macrophage-mediated fungal clearance during Pneumocystis pneumonia.

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    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available Although T cells are critical for host defense against respiratory fungal infections, they also contribute to the immunopathogenesis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP. However, the precise downstream effector mechanisms by which T cells mediate these diverse processes are undefined. In the current study the effects of immune modulation with sulfasalazine were evaluated in a mouse model of PcP-related Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (PcP-IRIS. Recovery of T cell-mediated immunity in Pneumocystis-infected immunodeficient mice restored host defense, but also initiated the marked pulmonary inflammation and severe pulmonary function deficits characteristic of IRIS. Sulfasalazine produced a profound attenuation of IRIS, with the unexpected consequence of accelerated fungal clearance. To determine whether macrophage phagocytosis is an effector mechanism of T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance and whether sulfasalazine enhances clearance by altering alveolar macrophage phagocytic activity, a novel multispectral imaging flow cytometer-based method was developed to quantify the phagocytosis of Pneumocystis in vivo. Following immune reconstitution, alveolar macrophages from PcP-IRIS mice exhibited a dramatic increase in their ability to actively phagocytose Pneumocystis. Increased phagocytosis correlated temporally with fungal clearance, and required the presence of CD4(+ T cells. Sulfasalazine accelerated the onset of the CD4(+ T cell-dependent alveolar macrophage phagocytic response in PcP-IRIS mice, resulting in enhanced fungal clearance. Furthermore, sulfasalazine promoted a TH2-polarized cytokine environment in the lung, and sulfasalazine-enhanced phagocytosis of Pneumocystis was associated with an alternatively activated alveolar macrophage phenotype. These results provide evidence that macrophage phagocytosis is an important in vivo effector mechanism for T cell-mediated Pneumocystis clearance, and that macrophage phenotype can be altered

  15. Immunization with Culex tarsalis Mosquito Salivary Gland Extract Modulates West Nile Virus Infection and Disease in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Reagan, Krystle; WANG, TIAN; Zeidner, Nordin S.; Blair, Carol D.

    2013-01-01

    Mosquito salivary proteins inoculated during blood feeding modulate the host immune response, which can contribute to the pathogenesis of viruses transmitted by mosquito bites. Previous studies with mosquito bite-naïve mice indicated that exposure to arthropod salivary proteins resulted in a shift toward a Th2-type immune response in flavivirus-susceptible mice but not flavivirus-resistant animals. In the study presented here, we tested the hypothesis that immunization with high doses of Cule...

  16. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  17. Immune particle swarm optimization of linear frequency modulation in acoustic communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haipeng Ren; Yang Zhao

    2015-01-01

    With the exploration of the ocean, underwater acoustic communication has attracted more and more attention in recent years. The underwater acoustic channel is considered to be one of the most complicated channels because it suffers from more serious multipath effect, fewer available bandwidths and quite complex noise. Since the signals experience a serious distortion after being transmitted through the underwater acoustic channel, the underwater acoustic communication experiences a high bit error rate (BER). To solve this problem, carrier waveform inter-displacement (CWID) modulation is proposed. It has been proved that CWID modulation is an effective method to decrease BER. The linear frequency modulation (LFM) carrier-waves are used in CWID modulation. The performance of the communication using CWID modulation is sensitive to the change of the frequency band of LFM carrier-waves. The immune particle swarm optimization (IPSO) is introduced to search for the optimal frequency band of the LFM carrier-waves, due to its excel ent performance in solving complicated optimization problems. The multi-objective and multi-peak optimization nature of the IPSO gives a suitable description of the relationship between the upper band and the lower band of the LFM carrier-waves. Simulations verify the improved perfor-mance and effectiveness of the optimization method.

  18. Modulation of the maternal immune system by the pre-implantation embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Caroline G

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large proportion of pregnancy losses occur during the pre-implantation period, when the developing embryo is elongating rapidly and signalling its presence to the maternal system. The molecular mechanisms that prevent luteolysis and support embryo survival within the maternal environment are not well understood. To gain a more complete picture of these molecular events, genome-wide transcriptional profiles of reproductive day 17 endometrial tissue were determined in pregnant and cyclic Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle. Results Microarray analyses revealed 1,839 and 1,189 differentially expressed transcripts between pregnant and cyclic animals (with ≥ 1.5 fold change in expression; P-value Conclusion The maternal immune system actively surveys the uterine environment during early pregnancy. The embryo modulates this response inducing the expression of endometrial molecules that suppress the immune response and promote maternal tolerance to the embryo. During this period of local immune suppression, genes of the innate immune response (in particular, antimicrobial genes may function to protect the uterus against infection.

  19. Modulation of Immunity and Inflammation by the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Aldosterone

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    N. Muñoz-Durango

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR is a ligand dependent transcription factor. MR has been traditionally associated with the control of water and electrolyte homeostasis in order to keep blood pressure through aldosterone activation. However, there is growing evidence indicating that MR expression is not restricted to vascular and renal tissues, as it can be also expressed by cells of the immune system, where it responds to stimulation or antagonism, controlling immune cell function. On the other hand, aldosterone also has been associated with proinflammatory immune effects, such as the release of proinflammatory cytokines, generating oxidative stress and inducing fibrosis. The inflammatory participation of MR and aldosterone in the cardiovascular disease suggests an association with alterations in the immune system. Hypertensive patients show higher levels of proinflammatory mediators that can be modulated by MR antagonism. Although these proinflammatory properties have been observed in other autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate these effects remain unknown. Here we review and discuss the scientific work aimed at determining the immunological role of MR and aldosterone in humans, as well as animal models.

  20. Photochemistry-based immune modulation in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilov, Oleg E.; Kosaka, Sachiko; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    The destruction of infectious pathogens by photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging modality. We demonstrated the efficacy of PDT for the management of cutaneous leishmaniasis in our previous studies. However, much remains to be done for the improvement of PDT regimens. The modulation of the immune response by photochemistry is an exciting but under-explored area of PDT research. The goal of this study is to understand the mechanisms of the augmentation of the host immune response after PDT of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). We found that PDT with phenoxiazine analogues was capable for induction of Th1 immune response due to stimulation of IL- 12 production by dendritic cells. Single PDT treatment facilitated fast healing of the CL lesions due to effective parasite eradication and augmentation of the immune system. Comparative study with different photosensitizers (PS) (porphyrins, pehnoxiazines) demonstrated different immunomodulating properties of PDT depending on chemical class of PS. Knowing the particular profiles and immunomodulating properties of the pertinent PSs allows us to select the optimal PS with regards to both the photodestructive and immunostimulating potential.

  1. Endocannabinoids alleviate proinflammatory conditions by modulating innate immune response in muller glia during inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Gopinath; Chatterjee, Nivedita

    2012-11-01

    Muller cells play a prominent role in inflammatory conditions of the retina. They are part of the retinal innate immune response. The endocannabinoid system functions as an immune modulator in both the peripheral immune system as well as the central nervous system. We hypothesized that the neuroprotective ability of exogenous endocannabinoids in the retina is partially mediated through Muller glia. This study reports that exposure to endocannabinoids in activated but not resting primary human Muller glia inhibit production of several proinflammatory cytokines, while elevating anti-inflammatory mediators. Cytokine generation in activated Muller glia is regulated by endocannabinoids through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family at multiple signaling stages. Anandamide (AEA) acts to control MAPK phosphorylation through MKP-1. Both AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) inhibit the transcription factor NF-κB and increases the regulatory protein, IL1-R-associated kinase 1-binding protein 1. Endocannabinoids also increase expression of Tristetraprolin in activated Muller cells, which is implicated in affecting AU-rich proinflammatory cytokine mRNA. We demonstrate that exogenous application of AEA and 2-AG aid in retinal cell survival under inflammatory conditions by creating an anti-inflammatory milieu. Endocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoid therapy may therefore orchestrate a molecular switch to bias the innate immune system suchthat the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine generation creates a prosurvival milieu.

  2. Immune modulation in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis exposed to North Sea produced water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannam, M.L., E-mail: marie.hannam@plymouth.ac.u [Ecotoxicology and Stress Biology Research Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon, PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Bamber, S.D.; Sundt, R.C. [IRIS - Biomiljo, Mekjarvik 12, 4070 Randaberg (Norway); Galloway, T.S. [School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Hatherly Laboratories, Prince of Wales Road, Exeter, EX4 4PS (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    The discharge of oil well produced water (PW) provides a constant source of contaminants to the marine environment including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated phenols, metals and production chemicals. High concentrations of PW cause adverse effects to exposed biota, including reduced survival, growth and reproduction. Here we explore the effects of PW on immune function in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Mussels were exposed for 21 days to sublethal PW concentrations (0.125-0.5%) and cellular parameters were measured. Cell viability, phagocytosis and cytotoxicity were inhibited after exposure to 0.25% and 0.5% PW, whilst the 0.125% PW treatment produced significant increases in these biomarker responses. This biphasic response was only observed after 7 days exposure; longer exposure periods led to a reduction in immune parameters. Results indicate that PW concentrations close to the discharge point cause modulation to cellular immunity. The implications for longer-term disease resistance are discussed. - Exposure to produced water alters immune function in the sentinel species Mytilus edulis.

  3. Modulation of social interactions by immune stimulation in honey bee, Apis mellifera, workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubert A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immune response pathways have been relatively well-conserved across animal species, with similar systems in both mammals and invertebrates. Interestingly, honey bees have substantially reduced numbers of genes associated with immune function compared with solitary insect species. However, social species such as honey bees provide an excellent environment for pathogen or parasite transmission with controlled environmental conditions in the hive, high population densities, and frequent interactions. This suggests that honey bees may have developed complementary mechanisms, such as behavioral modifications, to deal with disease. Results Here, we demonstrate that activation of the immune system in honey bees (using bacterial lipopolysaccharides as a non-replicative pathogen alters the social responses of healthy nestmates toward the treated individuals. Furthermore, treated individuals expressed significant differences in overall cuticular hydrocarbon profiles compared with controls. Finally, coating healthy individuals with extracts containing cuticular hydrocarbons of immunostimulated individuals significantly increased the agonistic responses of nestmates. Conclusion Since cuticular hydrocarbons play a critical role in nestmate recognition and other social interactions in a wide variety of insect species, modulation of such chemical profiles by the activation of the immune system could play a crucial role in the social regulation of pathogen dissemination within the colony.

  4. Gastrointestinal helminths in migratory Camel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S G Rewatkar

    Full Text Available Survey of gastrointestinal helminth parasites in camel migrated from U.P., M.P., and Rajasthan at Nagpur region was carried out in early summer, 2008. Total 28 samples (12 males and 16 females were collected from different places of Nagpur region. They revealed parasites as Trichuris sp.(50%, Strongyloides sp.(32.14%, Trichostrongylus sp.(10.71%, Nematodirus sp.(10.71%, Haemonchus sp.(14.28%, Eurytrema sp.(21.42% ,Eimeria sp.(25%, Entamoeba sp.(17.85% and Balantidium sp.(7.14%.All were found positive for mixed helminthic infection. [Vet World 2009; 2(7.000: 258-258

  5. Stress-based modulation of the immune response in molluscan hemocytes: a two-receptor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Barcia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In molluscs, hemocytes perform the molecular mechanisms related to immunity. These cells have the ability to respond to the different varieties of stress by modulating their responses. The stressors may be bacterial toxins, cytokines or growth factors, and even physical agents such as changes in temperature or oxygen partial pressure. In the first place, hemocytes synthesise catecholamines, which, in turn, modify the immune response in terms of phagocytosis or nitric oxide synthesis. According to studies on the hemocytes of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, we propose a model for a sequential action where the IL-2 receptor and its wide agonist specificity play an important role. Also, α and β-adrenergic receptors suggest the functioning of a return-to-hemocyte mechanism. The model is proposed taking into account the possible relationship between the pathways mediated by cAMP-activated protein kinase and protein kinase C in hemocytes.

  6. Melioidosis and glanders modulation of the innate immune system: barriers to current and future vaccine approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbroich, Sophie A; Lafontaine, Eric R; Hogan, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are pathogenic bacteria causing fatal infections in animals and humans. Both organisms are classified as Tier 1 Select Agents owing to their highly fatal nature, potential/prior use as bioweapons, severity of disease via respiratory exposure, intrinsic resistance to antibiotics, and lack of a current vaccine. Disease manifestations range from acute septicemia to chronic infection, wherein the facultative intracellular lifestyle of these organisms promotes persistence within a broad range of hosts. This ability to thrive intracellularly is thought to be related to exploitation of host immune response signaling pathways. There are currently considerable gaps in our understanding of the molecular strategies employed by these pathogens to modulate these pathways and evade intracellular killing. A better understanding of the specific molecular basis for dysregulation of host immune responses by these organisms will provide a stronger platform to identify novel vaccine targets and develop effective countermeasures.

  7. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  8. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria promote immune homeostasis by modulating innate immune responses to human rotavirus in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia N Vlasova

    significantly decreased MNC proliferation, suggesting that probiotics control excessive lymphoproliferative reactions upon VirHRV challenge. We conclude that in the neonatal Gn pig disease model, selected probiotics contribute to immunomaturation, regulate immune homeostasis and modulate vaccine and virulent HRV effects, thereby moderating HRV diarrhea.

  9. CRISPR/Cas and Cmr modules, mobility and evolution of adaptive immune systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Shiraz Ali; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2011-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas and CRISPR/Cmr immune machineries of archaea and bacteria provide an adaptive and effective defence mechanism directed specifically against viruses and plasmids. Present data suggest that both CRISPR/Cas and Cmr modules can behave like integral genetic elements. They tend to be located...... in the more variable regions of chromosomes and are displaced by genome shuffling mechanisms including transposition. CRISPR loci may be broken up and dispersed in chromosomes by transposons with the potential for creating genetic novelty. Both CRISPR/Cas and Cmr modules appear to exchange readily between...... the significant barriers imposed by their differing conjugative, transcriptional and translational mechanisms. There are parallels between the CRISPR crRNAs and eukaryal siRNAs, most notably to germ cell piRNAs which are directed, with the help of effector proteins, to silence or destroy transposons...

  10. Effects of the modulation of microbiota on the gastrointestinal immune system and bowel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanauchi, Osamu; Andoh, Akira; Mitsuyama, Keiichi

    2013-10-23

    The gastrointestinal tract harbors a tremendous number and variety of commensal microbiota. The intestinal mucosa simultaneously absorbs essential nutrients and protects against detrimental antigens or pathogenic microbiota as the first line of defense. Beneficial interactions between the host and microbiota are key requirements for host health. Although the gut microbiota has been previously studied in the context of inflammatory diseases, it has recently become clear that this microbial environment has a beneficial role during normal homeostasis, by modulating the immune system or bowel motor function. Recent studies revealed that microbiota, including their metabolites, modulate key signaling pathways involved in the inflammation of the mucosa or the neurotransmitter system in the gut-brain axis. The underlying molecular mechanisms of host-microbiota interactions are still unclear; however, manipulation of microbiota by probiotics or prebiotics is becoming increasingly recognized as an important therapeutic option, especially for the treatment of the dysfunction or inflammation of the intestinal tract.

  11. Modulation of innate and adaptive cellular immunity relevant to HIV-1 vaccine design by seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva, Kevin J; Kent, Stephen J; Parsons, Matthew S

    2017-01-28

    Mucosal exposure to HIV-1 infection generally occurs in the presence of semen. Immunomodulation by seminal plasma is well described in the reproductive biology literature. Little is known, however, about the impact of seminal plasma on innate and adaptive anti-HIV-1 cellular immunity. The study investigated the effects of seminal plasma on immune responses considered important for prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine development, namely innate and adaptive cellular immunity mediated by natural killer (NK) cells and T cells, respectively. The ability of seminal plasma to modulate direct, antibody-dependent and cytokine-stimulated NK cell activation was assessed utilizing intracellular cytokine staining. Direct and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity was assessed using lactate dehydrogenase release assays. The effects of seminal plasma on T-cell activation upon stimulation with staphylococcus enterotoxin B or HIV-1 Gag peptides were assessed by intracellular cytokine staining. The impact of seminal plasma on redirected cytolysis mediated by T cells was measured using lactate dehydrogenase release assays. Both direct and antibody-dependent NK cell activation were dramatically impaired by the presence of either HIV-1-uninfected or HIV-1-infected seminal plasma in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, seminal plasma suppressed both direct and antibody-dependent NK cell-mediated cytolysis, including anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cytolysis of gp120-pulsed CEM.NKr-CCR5 cells. Finally, seminal plasma attenuated both HIV-1 Gag-specific and staphylococcus enterotoxin B-induced CTL activation. Semen contains potent immunosuppressors of both NK cell and CD8 T-cell-mediated anti-HIV-1 immune responses. This could impede attempts to provide vaccine-induced immunity to HIV-1.

  12. Adrenal-Derived Hormones Differentially Modulate Intestinal Immunity in Experimental Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Patrícia Reis; Basso, Paulo José; Nardini, Viviani; Silva, Angelica; Banquieri, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal glands are able to modulate immune responses through neuroimmunoendocrine interactions and cortisol secretion that could suppress exacerbated inflammation such as in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, here we evaluated the role of these glands in experimental colitis induced by 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in C57BL/6 mice subjected to adrenalectomy, with or without glucocorticoid (GC) replacement. Mice succumbed to colitis without adrenals with a higher clinical score and augmented systemic levels of IL-6 and lower LPS. Furthermore, adrenalectomy negatively modulated systemic regulatory markers. The absence of adrenals resulted in augmented tolerogenic lamina propria dendritic cells but no compensatory local production of corticosterone and decreased mucosal inflammation associated with increased IFN-γ and FasL in the intestine. To clarify the importance of GC in this scenario, GC replacement in adrenalectomized mice restored different markers to the same degree of that observed in DSS group. Finally, this is the first time that adrenal-derived hormones, especially GC, were associated with the differential local modulation of the gut infiltrate, also pointing to a relationship between adrenalectomy and the modulation of systemic regulatory markers. These findings may elucidate some neuroimmunoendocrine mechanisms that dictate colitis outcome. PMID:27403034

  13. [Helminths in chickens in Sudan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Khawad; el-Badawi; Eisa, A M

    1977-09-01

    The identification of the helminthic parasites of the poultry in Khartoum province, during the months of October and November, 1969, 230 hens, 6--12 months old, were examined in the laboratory; 87% of the hens exhibited mono- and polyinfections. The following species were found: Subulura brumpti, Raillietina tetragona, Tetrameres americana, Gongylonema ingluvicola and Dispharynx spiralis, mostly as polyinfections.

  14. IgE, allergies and helminth parasites: a new perspective on an old conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, R G

    1996-08-01

    This paper analyses the association between infection with helminth parasites, the elevated production of IgE and the expression of allergies. Interpretations of this interaction have taken place in a scientific environment whose most secure element is the immunochemistry of allergic reactions resulting in a substantial body of literature that has sought a biological role for allergic reactivity in protective immunity directed against helminth parasites. While the association between helminth infections and elevated levels of IgE, mast cells and eosinophils is well established, a functional role for allergic reactions in protection against helminths has eluded experimental proof. Instead of this hypothesis, it is proposed that allergic reactivity is rarely present in helminth-infected individuals because allergic reactions do not function to regulate helminth infections. Data from many sources are used to establish that the 'normal' state of all mammals is to be infected with helminth parasites from shortly after birth until well into adulthood. Only in the last 100 years or so have people living in areas of high development with sophisticated water and sewage systems been able to escape helminth infection. Allergies are as conspicuously present in these human populations as they are absent in populations that are still regularly exposed to helminths. Furthermore, in populations with endemic helminthoses there is little overt expression of allergic pathology that could be connected to the acquisition or elimination of helminth parasites. Based on these observations, it is suggested that endemic helminthoses activate the Th2 system, particularly at mucosal surfaces, to provide a different level of immunological homeostasis than currently occurs in developed societies. Under these conditions, mast cells, eosinophils and IgE rarely participate in reactions that we would recognize as 'allergic', although their participation in the control of helminth infections is

  15. TRPV1 Antagonism by Capsazepine Modulates Innate Immune Response in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA

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    Elizabeth S. Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of people suffer from severe malaria every year. The innate immune response plays a determinant role in host’s defence to malaria. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 modulates macrophage-mediated responses in sepsis, but its role in other pathogenic diseases has never been addressed. We investigated the effects of capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist, in malaria. C57BL/6 mice received 105 red blood cells infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA intraperitoneally. Noninfected mice were used as controls. Capsazepine or vehicle was given intraperitoneally for 6 days. Mice were culled on day 7 after infection and blood and spleen cell phenotype and activation were evaluated. Capsazepine decreased circulating but not spleen F4/80+Ly6G+ cell numbers as well as activation of both F4/80+and F4/80+Ly6G+ cells in infected animals. In addition, capsazepine increased circulating but not spleen GR1+ and natural killer (NK population, without interfering with natural killer T (NKT cell numbers and blood NK and NKT activation. However, capsazepine diminished CD69 expression in spleen NKT but not NK cells. Infection increased lipid peroxidation and the release of TNFα and IFNγ, although capsazepine-treated group exhibited lower levels of lipid peroxidation and TNFα. Capsazepine treatment did not affect parasitaemia. Overall, TRPV1 antagonism modulates the innate immune response to malaria.

  16. Pili-like proteins of Akkermansia muciniphila modulate host immune responses and gut barrier function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunanen, Justus; Meijerink, Marjolein; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kainulainen, Veera; Klievink, Judith; Huuskonen, Laura; Aalvink, Steven; Skurnik, Mikael; Boeren, Sjef; Satokari, Reetta; Mercenier, Annick; Palva, Airi; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Gut barrier function is key in maintaining a balanced response between the host and its microbiome. The microbiota can modulate changes in gut barrier as well as metabolic and inflammatory responses. This highly complex system involves numerous microbiota-derived factors. The gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila is positively correlated with a lean phenotype, reduced body weight gain, amelioration of metabolic responses and restoration of gut barrier function by modulation of mucus layer thickness. However, the molecular mechanisms behind its metabolic and immunological regulatory properties are unexplored. Herein, we identify a highly abundant outer membrane pili-like protein of A. muciniphila MucT that is directly involved in immune regulation and enhancement of trans-epithelial resistance. The purified Amuc_1100 protein and enrichments containing all its associated proteins induced production of specific cytokines through activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. This mainly leads to high levels of IL-10 similar to those induced by the other beneficial immune suppressive microorganisms such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Together these results indicate that outer membrane protein composition and particularly the newly identified highly abundant pili-like protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila are involved in host immunological homeostasis at the gut mucosa, and improvement of gut barrier function. PMID:28249045

  17. Modulation of the immune response by probiotic strains in a mouse model of gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arienzo, Rossana; Maurano, Francesco; Lavermicocca, Paola; Ricca, Ezio; Rossi, Mauro

    2009-12-01

    Probiotic strains play an important role in modulating activities in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Elucidation of the mechanisms that mediate probiotic-driven immunomodulation may facilitate their therapeutic application for specific immune-mediated diseases or for prophylaxis. In this study, we explored the effect of different Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium lactis in transgenic mice expressing the human DQ8 heterodimer, a HLA molecule linked to Celiac Disease (CD). In vitro analysis on immature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (iBMDCs) showed that all strains up-regulated surface B7-2 (CD86), indicative of DC maturation, however, with different intensity. No strain induced appreciable levels of IL-10 or IL-12 in iBMDCs, whereas TNF-alpha expression was essentially elicited by Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus fermentum. Interestingly, these strains were found also to increase the antigen-specific TNF-alpha secretion in vivo, following co-administration of probiotic bacteria in mice mucosally immunized with the gluten component gliadin. Together these findings highlighted the ability of probiotics to exert strain-specific inductive rather than suppressive effects both on the innate and adaptive immunity in a mouse model of food antigen sensitivity.

  18. Neutrophils are dispensable in the modulation of T cell immunity against cutaneous HSV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hor, Jyh Liang; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils rapidly infiltrate sites of inflammation during peripheral infection or tissue injury. In addition to their well described roles as pro-inflammatory phagocytes responsible for pathogen clearance, recent studies have demonstrated a broader functional repertoire including mediating crosstalk between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Specifically, neutrophils have been proposed to mediate antigen transport to lymph nodes (LN) to modulate T cell priming and to influence T cell migration to infected tissues. Using a mouse model of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection we explored potential contributions of neutrophils toward anti-viral immunity. While a transient, early influx of neutrophils was triggered by dermal scarification, we did not detect migration of neutrophils from the skin to LN. Furthermore, despite recruitment of neutrophils into LN from the blood, priming and expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was unaffected following neutrophil depletion. Finally, we found that neutrophils were dispensable for the migration of effector T cells into infected skin. Our study suggests that the immunomodulatory roles of neutrophils toward adaptive immunity may be context-dependent, and are likely determined by the type of pathogen and anatomical site of infection. PMID:28112242

  19. Human Invariant Natural Killer T cells possess immune-modulating functions during Aspergillus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitzen-Heineke, Antonia; Bouzani, Maria; Schmitt, Anna-Lena; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2016-02-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause for invasive fungal infections, a disease associated with high mortality in immune-compromised patients. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells compose a small subset of T cells known to impact the immune response toward various infectious pathogens. To investigate the role of human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection, we studied their activation as determined by CD69 expression and cytokine production in response to distinct fungal morphotypes in the presence of different CD1d(+) antigen presenting cells using flow cytometry and multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among CD1d(+) subpopulations, CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs showed the highest potential to activate iNKT cells on a per cell basis. The presence of A. fumigatus decreased this effect of CD1d(+)CD1c(+) mDCs on iNKT cells and led to reduced secretion of TNF-α, G-CSF and RANTES. Production of other Th1 and Th2 cytokines was not affected by the fungus, suggesting an immune-modulating function for human iNKT cells during A. fumigatus infection.

  20. Evaluation of probiotic characteristics of newly isolated Lactobacillus spp.: immune modulation and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin; Yun, Hyun Sun; Cho, Kyu Won; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Sae Hun; Chun, Taehoon; Kim, Bongjoon; Whang, Kwang Youn

    2011-08-02

    In the current study, the probiotic potential of approximately 350 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Korean infant feces and Kimchi was investigated. Common probiotic properties of the bacterial strains, such as acid tolerance, bile tolerance and adhesion to human intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29 cells), were examined. Some strains were found to have immune modulatory and antimicrobial properties. Antagonistic activity against a panel of pathogenic bacteria was found to be strain dependent. To evaluate the immune modulatory activity of the strains, lymphocyte interferon (IFN)-γ secretion was determined in conjunction with cell proliferation. Some strains of Lactobacillus gasseri, L. fermentum and L. plantarum exhibited increased IFN-γ levels and lymphocyte proliferation. To evaluate the effects of these immune modulating lactobacilli on host life span, Caenorhabditis elegans was used as an in vivo model. Nematodes that were supplied heat-killed lactobacilli as a food source exhibited obvious differences in life span compared with those fed Escherichia coli OP50. The mean life span (determined as mean percent survival) of worms fed L. plantarum CJLP133 and L. fermentum LA12 was 13.89% and 13.69% greater, respectively, than that of control nematodes after 21 days (P=0.036 and 0.043, respectively). In addition, some of safety profiles, including hemolytic type, gelatin hydration and degradation of urea, were found to be positive. These newly identified lactobacilli hold promise for use as probiotic agents, feed additives and/or in food applications.

  1. The cell surface receptor Slamf6 modulates innate immune responses during Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, Boaz; Wang, Guoxing; Liao, Gongxian; Halibozek, Peter J; Keszei, Marton; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Bhan, Atul K; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-09-01

    The homophilic cell surface receptors CD150 (Slamf1) and CD352 (Slamf6) are known to modulate adaptive immune responses. Although the Th17 response was enhanced in Slamf6(-/-) C57BL/6 mice upon oral infection with Citrobacter rodentium, the pathologic consequences are indistinguishable from an infection of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Using a reporter-based binding assay, we show that Slamf6 can engage structures on the outer cell membrane of several Gram(-) bacteria. Therefore, we examined whether Slamf6, like Slamf1, is also involved in innate responses to bacteria and regulates peripheral inflammation by assessing the outcome of C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, the pathology and immune responses in the lamina propria of C. rodentium-infected Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice were markedly reduced as compared with those of Rag(-/-) mice. Infiltration of inflammatory phagocytes into the lamina propria was consistently lower in Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice than in Rag(-/-) animals. Concomitant with the reduced systemic translocation of the bacteria was an enhanced production of IL-22, suggesting that Slamf6 suppresses a mucosal protective program. Furthermore, administering a mAb (330) that inhibits bacterial interactions with Slamf6 to Rag(-/-) mice ameliorated the infection compared with a control antibody. We conclude that Slamf6-mediated interactions of colonic innate immune cells with specific Gram(-) bacteria reduce mucosal protection and enhance inflammation, contributing to lethal colitis that is caused by C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice.

  2. Daily exercise improves memory, stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis and modulates immune and neuroimmune cytokines in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speisman, Rachel B; Kumar, Ashok; Rani, Asha; Foster, Thomas C; Ormerod, Brandi K

    2013-02-01

    We tested whether daily exercise modulates immune and neuroimmune cytokines, hippocampus-dependent behavior and hippocampal neurogenesis in aging male F344 rats (18mo upon arrival). Twelve weeks after conditioned running or control group assignment, the rats were trained and tested in a rapid water maze followed by an inhibitory avoidance task. The rats were BrdU-injected beginning 12days after behavioral testing and killed 3weeks later to quantify cytokines and neurogenesis. Daily exercise increased neurogenesis and improved immediate and 24h water maze discrimination index (DI) scores and 24h inhibitory avoidance retention latencies. Daily exercise decreased cortical VEGF, hippocampal IL-1β and serum MCP-1, GRO-KC and leptin levels but increased hippocampal GRO-KC and IL-18 concentrations. Serum leptin concentration correlated negatively with new neuron number and both DI scores while hippocampal IL-1β concentration correlated negatively with memory scores in both tasks. Cortical VEGF, serum GRO-KC and serum MCP-1 levels correlated negatively with immediate DI score and we found novel positive correlations between hippocampal IL-18 and GRO-KC levels and new neuron number. Pathway analyses revealed distinct serum, hippocampal and cortical compartment cytokine relationships. Our results suggest that daily exercise potentially improves cognition in aging rats by modulating hippocampal neurogenesis and immune and neuroimmune cytokine signaling. Our correlational data begin to provide a framework for systematically manipulating these immune and neuroimmune signaling molecules to test their effects on cognition and neurogenesis across lifespan in future experiments. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Role of immune system modulation in prevention of type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Gamal Abdulrhman Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased incidence of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is expected worldwide. Eventually, T1DM is fatal unless treated with insulin. The expansion of interventions to prevent diabetes and the use of alternative treatments to insulin is a dream to be fulfilled. The pathophysiology in T1DM is basically a destruction of beta cells in the pancreas, regardless of which risk factors or causative entities have been present. Individual risk factors can have separate patho-physiological processes to, in turn, cause this beta cell destruction. Currently, autoimmunity is considered the major factor in the pathophysiology of T1DM. In a genetically susceptible individual, viral infection may stimulate the production of antibodies against a viral protein that trigger an autoimmune response against antigenically similar beta cell molecules. Many components of the immune system have been implicated in autoimmunity leading to β-cell destruction, including cytotoxic and helper T-cells, B-cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. The inflammatory process in early diabetes is thought to be initiated and propagated by the effect of Th1-secreted cytokines (e.g. g interferon and suppressed by Th2-secreted antiinflammatory cytokines (interleukins. Structure and function of β-cell may be modulated by using Th1/Th2-secreted cytokines. Several experimental and clinical trials of applying GAD65, Hsp60, peptide-MHC, pepetide-277 immunization, anti-CD3 infusion, and interleukins to modulate immune response in T1DM were done. Applying such trials in patients with prediabetes, will most likely be the future key in preventing Type 1 autoimmune diabetes.

  4. Acute exercise modulates BDNF and pro-BDNF protein content in immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelli, Andrea; Dimauro, Ivan; Sgrò, Paolo; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Magi, Fiorenza; Baldari, Carlo; Guidetti, Laura; Di Luigi, Luigi; Parisi, Paolo; Caporossi, Daniela

    2012-10-01

    Although several studies have shown that immune cells stimulated by in vitro stress are capable to produce neurotrophins, there is still no evidence whether physiological stress, such as exercise, can modulate the in vivo levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). This work investigated whether acute exercise modulates the expression of BDNF, pro-BDNF, and p75(NTR) in the PBMCs of 10 healthy young men who performed a cycling incremental test to exhaustion (MAX) or exercised at individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). The PBMC expression of stress response proteins and the level of circulating BDNF, vascular endothelial growth growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor subunit B, basic fibroblast growth factor pro-inflammatory, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were analyzed as well. A major finding is that both sessions of acute exercise regulated the content of BDNF isoforms within PBMCs in a manner related to the physiological stress exerted. Although the pro-BDNF increased after both MAX and IAT protocols, BDNF showed a kinetics dependent on exercise type: MAX induced a 54% protein increase immediately after exercise, followed by a significant drop 60 min after its conclusion (38% lower than the baseline). Differently, in the IAT, BDNF increased significantly up to 75% from the baseline throughout the recovery phase. All physiological parameters, as well as the p75(NTR) receptor and the stress-inducible proteins, were also differently regulated by the two exercise conditions. These data supported the hypothesis that PBMCs might produce and secrete BDNF isoforms, as well as modulate the proteins p75(NTR) , Bcl-xL, hsp90, hsp27, and αB-crystallin, as part of the physiological stress response induced by acute exercise, offering a novel example of bidirectional interaction between nervous and immune systems.

  5. Modulation of SIV and HIV DNA Vaccine Immunity by Fas-FasL Signaling

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    Jiabin Yan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Signaling through the Fas/Apo-1/CD95 death receptor is known to affect virus-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI responses. We tested whether modulating the Fas-apoptotic pathway can enhance immune responses to DNA vaccination or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV infection. Mice were electroporated with plasmids expressing a variety of pro- or anti-apoptotic molecules related to Fas signaling and then either LCMV-infected or injected with plasmid DNA expressing SIV or HIV antigens. Whereas Fas or FasL knockout mice had improved CMI, down-regulation of Fas or FasL by shRNA or antibody failed to improve CMI and was accompanied by increases in regulatory T cells (Treg. Two “adjuvant” plasmids were discovered that significantly enhanced plasmid immunizations. The adjuvant effects of Fas-associated death domain (FADD and of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (cFLIP were consistently accompanied by increased effector memory T lymphocytes and increased T cell proliferation. This adjuvant effect was also observed when comparing murine infections with LCMV-Armstrong and its persisting variant LCMV-Clone 13. LCMV-Armstrong was cleared in 100% of mice nine days after infection, while LCMV-Clone 13 persisted in all mice. However, half of the mice pre-electroporated with FADD or cFLIP plasmids were able to clear LCMV-Clone 13 by day nine, and, in the case of cFLIP, increased viral clearance was accompanied by higher CMI. Our studies imply that molecules in the Fas pathway are likely to affect a number of events in addition to the apoptosis of cells involved in immunity.

  6. Rational modulation of the innate immune system for neuroprotection in ischemic stroke

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    Diana eAmantea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system plays a dualistic role in the evolution of ischemic brain damage and has also been implicated in ischemic tolerance produced by different conditioning stimuli. Early after ischemia, perivascular astrocytes release cytokines and activate metalloproteases (MMPs that contribute to blood–brain barrier (BBB disruption and vasogenic oedema; whereas at later stages, they provide extracellular glutamate uptake, BBB regeneration and neurotrophic factors release. Similarly, early activation of microglia contributes to ischemic brain injury via the production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin (IL-1, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and proteases. Nevertheless, microglia also contributes to the resolution of inflammation, by releasing IL-10 and tumor growth factor (TGF-beta, and to the late reparative processes by phagocytic activity and growth factors production. Indeed, after ischemia, microglia/macrophages differentiate towards several phenotypes: the M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype is classically activated via toll-like receptors or interferon-γ, whereas M2 phenotypes are alternatively activated by regulatory mediators, such as ILs 4, 10, 13 or TGF-beta. Thus, immune cells exert a dualistic role on the evolution of ischemic brain damage, since the classic phenotypes promote injury, whereas alternatively activated M2 macrophages or N2 neutrophils prompt tissue remodeling and repair.Moreover, a subdued activation of the immune system has been involved in ischemic tolerance, since different preconditioning stimuli act via modulation of inflammatory mediators, including toll-like receptors and cytokine signaling pathways. This further underscores that the immuno-modulatory approach for the treatment of ischemic stroke should be aimed at blocking the detrimental effects, while promoting the beneficial responses of the immune reaction.

  7. Tinospora species: An overview of their modulating effects on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md Areeful; Jantan, Ibrahim; Abbas Bukhari, Syed Nasir

    2017-07-31

    Studies on the effects of natural immunomodulators to heal various diseases related to the immune system have been a growing interest in recent years. Amongst the medicinal plants, Tinospora species (family; Menispermaceae) have been one of the widely investigated plants for their modulating effects on the immune system due to their wide use in ethnomedicine to treat various ailments related to immune-related diseases. However, their ethnopharmacological uses are mainly with limited or without scientific basis. In this article, we have reviewed the literature on the phytochemicals of several Tinospora species, which have shown strong immunomodulatory effects and critically analyzed the reports to provide perspectives and instructions for future research for the plants as a potential source of new immunomodulators for use as medicinal agents or dietary supplements. Electronic search on worldwide accepted scientific databases (Google Scholar, Science Direct, SciFinder, Web of Science, PubMed, Wiley Online Library, ACS Publications Today) was performed to compile the relevant information. Some information was obtained from books, database on medicinal plants used in Ayurveda, MSc dissertations and herbal classics books written in various languages. T. cordifolia, T. crispa, T. sinensis, T. smilacina, T. bakis, and T. sagittata have been reported to possess significant immunomodulatory effects. For a few decades, initiatives in molecular research on the effects of these species on the immune system have been carried out. However, most of the biological and pharmacological studies were carried out using the crude extracts of plants. The bioactive compounds contributing to the bioactivities have not been properly identified, and mechanistic studies to understand the immunomodulatory effects of the plants are limited by many considerations with regard to design, conduct, and interpretation. The plant extracts and their active constituents should be subjected to more

  8. Dawn of antioxidants and immune modulators to stop HIV-progression and boost the immune system in HIV/AIDS patients: An updated comprehensive and critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurinder; Pai, Roopa S

    2015-06-01

    In the last two decades, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the retrovirus responsible for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, worldwide. Providing the optimum management of HIV/AIDS is a major challenge in the 21st century. Since, HIV-infected persons have an extended lifespan due to the development of effective antiretroviral therapies, malnutrition is becoming central factors of long-term survivors. The nutrition status of AIDS patients has a significant influence on the maintenance and optimal effectiveness of the immune system. Micronutrient therapy in combination with allopathic treatments can extend and improve the quality and quantity of life in individuals infected with HIV/AIDS. HIV infection is thought to lead to augmented oxidative stress which may in turn lead to faster development of HIV disease. Hence, antioxidants might have a significant role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. An additional approach to treating HIV infection is fortifying the immune response of infected people. Immune modulators help to activate and boost the normal immune function. The present review first describes the boon of antioxidants (especially Vitamin A) and immune modulators (cytolin, resveratrol, murabutide, setarud, tucaresol, AVR118, Immunitin (HE2000), reticulose, and interleukin-7) in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Then, providing a comparatively succinct outline on updated patents study on antioxidants and immune modulators to treat HIV/AIDS will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  9. Crustacean hyperglycemic hormones directly modulate the immune response of hemocytes in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Chen, Hao; Xu, Jianchao; Xu, Qingsong; Wang, Mengqiang; Zhao, Depeng; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-01

    A robust immune response against invading pathogens is crucial for host to survive, which depends greatly on the well balance of metabolism. Increasing evidence has indicated that some metabolic hormones, such as insulin, could modulate immune responses directly. Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) family is a group of ecdysozoans-specific peptide hormone involved in glucose metabolism and other biological events. In the present study, two members of CHH family (designated as LvCHH I and LvCHH II) in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei with one and two crustacean neurohormone domains respectively were chosen to investigate their putative modulatory roles in both glucose metabolism and immune response. LvCHH I and LvCHH II were both expressed in the sinus gland and lamina ganglionalis of eyestalks and were significantly induced after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Meanwhile, significant increases of hemolymph glucose levels were observed in shrimp at 12 and 24 h after WSSV infection while the glucose inside the hemocytes decreased at 6 h and then increased at 12 h. Gain-of-function of rLvCHHs was subsequently conducted in vivo by injecting the recombinant proteins (rLvCHH I and rLvCHH II). The hemolymph glucose increased significantly from 0.5 h to 3 h after the shrimps received an injection of rLvCHH I, while it decreased at 0.5 h and increased afterward at 3 h post rLvCHH II injection. At the meantime, significant decreases of reactive oxygen species level in hemocytes were observed at 3 h and 6 h post rLvCHH I injection, while it remained unchanged in rLvCHH II injection group. rLvCHH I and rLvCHH II could bind to the cytomembrane of primary shrimp hemocytes in vitro, and the expressions of superoxide dismutase and LvRelish increased when the hemocytes were incubated with rLvCHH I for 3 h. Meanwhile, the expression of antimicrobial peptides, crustin and penaeidin-4, were also induced by rLvCHH I and rLvCHH II. These results demonstrated that

  10. Yeast product supplementation modulated humoral and mucosal immunity and uterine inflammatory signals in transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, K; Mendonça, L G D; Hulbert, L E; Mamedova, L K; Muckey, M B; Shen, Y; Elrod, C C; Bradford, B J

    2015-05-01

    ) in the uterine samples, reflecting greater abundance of these transcripts collected on d 7 compared with d 42. A quadratic dose effect was detected for IL-6, indicating that 30 and 60g/d doses decreased uterine IL-6 mRNA. The mRNA abundance of MPO and ELANE was increased linearly by YC-EHY. Supplementation with YC-EHY enhanced measures of humoral and mucosal immunity and modulated uterine inflammatory signals and mammary gland health in transition dairy cows.

  11. A dopa decarboxylase modulating the immune response of scallop Chlamys farreri.

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    Zhi Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dopa decarboxylase (DDC is a pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-Dopa to dopamine, and involved in complex neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network. The function for DDC in the immunomodulation remains unclear in invertebrate. METHODOLOGY: The full-length cDNA encoding DDC (designated CfDDC was cloned from mollusc scallop Chlamys farreri. It contained an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 560 amino acids. The CfDDC mRNA transcripts could be detected in all the tested tissues, including the immune tissues haemocytes and hepatopancreas. After scallops were treated with LPS stimulation, the mRNA expression level of CfDDC in haemocytes increased significantly (5.5-fold, P<0.05 at 3 h and reached the peak at 12 h (9.8-fold, P<0.05, and then recovered to the baseline level. The recombinant protein of CfDDC (rCfDDC was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3-Transetta, and 1 mg rCfDDC could catalyze the production of 1.651±0.22 ng dopamine within 1 h in vitro. When the haemocytes were incubated with rCfDDC-coated agarose beads, the haemocyte encapsulation to the beads was increased significantly from 70% at 6 h to 93% at 24 h in vitro in comparison with that in the control (23% at 6 h to 25% at 24 h, and the increased haemocyte encapsulation was repressed by the addition of rCfDDC antibody (which is acquired via immunization 6-week old rats with rCfDDC. After the injection of DDC inhibitor methyldopa, the ROS level in haemocytes of scallops was decreased significantly to 0.41-fold (P<0.05 of blank group at 12 h and 0.47-fold (P<0.05 at 24 h, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These results collectively suggested that CfDDC, as a homologue of DDC in scallop, modulated the immune responses such as haemocytes encapsulation as well as the ROS level through its catalytic activity, functioning as an indispensable immunomodulating enzyme in the neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network of mollusc.

  12. Modulating the tumor immune microenvironment as an ovarian cancer treatment strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Uciane K.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2013-01-01

    After more than 30 years of iterations of surgical debulking plus chemotherapy, the need for complementary ovarian cancer treatments has become clear. In the ovarian cancer microenvironment, myeloid immunosuppressive leukocytes, lymphocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, as well as their secreted products, surface molecules and paracrine survival factors, all provide opportunities for novel interventions. The potential of targeting microenvironmental elements in ovarian cancer patients is underscored by recently successful anti-angiogenic therapies. The compartmentalized nature of ovarian cancer, its immunogenicity and its accessibility make it an ideal disease for targeting non-tumor host cells. This review discusses the ‘state-of-the-art’ of the field, with an emphasis on the potential of modulating the activity of abundant microenvironmental immune cells, which govern both angiogenesis and immunosuppression. PMID:24039628

  13. Modulation of Innate Immune Signalling by Lipid-Mediated MAVS Transmembrane Domain Oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Nobre

    Full Text Available RIG-I-like receptors detect viral RNA in infected cells and promote oligomerization of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein MAVS to induce innate immunity to viral infection through type I interferon production. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS have been shown to enhance anti-viral MAVS signalling, but the mechanisms have remained obscure. Using a biochemical oligomerization-reporter fused to the transmembrane domain of MAVS, we found that mROS inducers promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization in the plane of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These events were mirrored by Sendai virus infection, which similarly induced lipid peroxidation and promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization. Our observations point to a role for mROS-induced changes in lipid bilayer properties in modulating antiviral innate signalling by favouring the oligomerization of MAVS transmembrane domain in the outer-mitochondrial membrane.

  14. Mechanism of action and effect of immune-modulating agents in the treatment of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gharabawy, Rehab M; Ahmed, Amira S; Al-Najjar, Amal H

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the possible mechanisms through which different immune-modulating agents can produce their beneficial effects on treatment of psoriasis and to determine whether the supplementation of these agents for psoriasis patients induces regression of psoriasis. One hundred fifty participants were included in this study. The participants were divided into five groups: 1. Normal control group, 2. Psoriasis patients not taking any treatment, 3. Psoriasis patients treated with anti-psoriatic treatment (including coal tar, vitamin D3 analogues and corticosteroids). 4. Psoriasis patients treated with anti-psoriatic treatment and oral metformin (850mg twice daily) and 5. Psoriasis patients treated with anti-psoriatic treatment and oral pioglitazone (15mg once a day). Demographic characteristics, diabetic index, lipid profile and liver function tests were monitored. The CD4+ Tcells, CD8+ Tcells, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, interleukin-2 (IL-2), C-reactive protein (CRP) and ceruloplasmin (CP) were assayed. After treatment of psoriasis patients with a traditional anti-psoriatic drug in combination with metformin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARɤ) agonist (pioglitazone), the CD4+ T cells, IL-2, CRP, CP, ALT and AST levels were statistically significantly decreased compared to psoriasis patients without treatment. Positive and significant correlations between CD4+ % and IL-2, CRP, CP, ALT and AST in psoriasis patients were recorded. The activation of PPAR-γ receptors by pioglitazone results in reduced formation of the proinflammatory cytokines and infiltration by inflammatory cells. Additionally, metformin acts as a modulator of the immune system in psoriasis patients and has a remarkable effect on the early stages of psoriasis. Therefore, either pioglitazone or metformin in combination with traditional anti-psoriatic drugs provides better results in the treatment of psoriasis than does each alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS

  15. Corneal Fibroblasts as Sentinel Cells and Local Immune Modulators in Infectious Keratitis

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    Ken Fukuda

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The cornea serves as a barrier to protect the eye against external insults including microbial pathogens and antigens. Bacterial infection of the cornea often results in corneal melting and scarring that can lead to severe visual impairment. Not only live bacteria but also their components such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Gram-negative bacteria contribute to the development of inflammation and subsequent corneal damage in infectious keratitis. We describe the important role played by corneal stromal fibroblasts (activated keratocytes as sentinel cells, immune modulators, and effector cells in infectious keratitis. Corneal fibroblasts sense bacterial infection through Toll-like receptor (TLR–mediated detection of a complex of LPS with soluble cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14 and LPS binding protein present in tear fluid. The cells then initiate innate immune responses including the expression of chemokines and adhesion molecules that promote the recruitment of inflammatory cells necessary for elimination of the infecting bacteria. Infiltrated neutrophils are activated by corneal stromal collagen and release mediators that stimulate the production of pro–matrix metalloproteinases by corneal fibroblasts. Elastase produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa activates these released metalloproteinases, resulting in the degradation of stromal collagen. The modulation of corneal fibroblast activation and of the interaction of these cells with inflammatory cells and bacteria is thus important to minimize corneal scarring during treatment of infectious keratitis. Pharmacological agents that are able to restrain such activities of corneal fibroblasts without allowing bacterial growth represent a potential novel treatment option for prevention of excessive scarring and tissue destruction in the cornea.

  16. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-08-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l(-1) HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l(-1)) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l(-1)) (PRE) (n=19-21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7-8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection.

  17. Regulatory T Cells, a Potent Immunoregulatory Target for CAM Researchers: Modulating Tumor Immunity, Autoimmunity and Alloreactive Immunity (III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristo Vojdani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are the major arbiter of immune responses, mediating actions through the suppression of inflammatory and destructive immune reactions. Inappropriate Treg cell frequency or functionality potentiates the pathogenesis of myriad diseases with ranging magnitudes of severity. Lack of suppressive capability hinders restraint on immune responses involved in autoimmunity and alloreactivity, while excessive suppressive capacity effectively blocks processes necessary for tumor destruction. Although the etiology of dysfunctional Treg cell populations is under debate, the ramifications, and their mechanisms, are increasingly brought to light in the medical community. Methods that compensate for aberrant immune regulation may not address the underlying complications; however, they hold promise for the alleviation of debilitating immune system-related disorders. The dominant immunoregulatory nature of Treg cells, coupled with recent mechanistic knowledge of natural immunomodulatory compounds, highlights the importance of Treg cells to practitioners and researchers of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM.

  18. Immune Modulating Capability of Two Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bifidobacterium Strains in a Wistar Rat Model

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    Nuria Salazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermented dairy products are the usual carriers for the delivery of probiotics to humans, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus being the most frequently used bacteria. In this work, the strains Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 and Bifidobacterium longum IPLA E44 were tested for their capability to modulate immune response and the insulin-dependent glucose homeostasis using male Wistar rats fed with a standard diet. Three intervention groups were fed daily for 24 days with 10% skimmed milk, or with 109 cfu of the corresponding strain suspended in the same vehicle. A significant increase of the suppressor-regulatory TGF-β cytokine occurred with both strains in comparison with a control (no intervention group of rats; the highest levels were reached in rats fed IPLA R1. This strain presented an immune protective profile, as it was able to reduce the production of the proinflammatory IL-6. Moreover, phosphorylated Akt kinase decreased in gastroctemius muscle of rats fed the strain IPLA R1, without affecting the glucose, insulin, and HOMA index in blood, or levels of Glut-4 located in the membrane of muscle and adipose tissue cells. Therefore, the strain B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 is a probiotic candidate to be tested in mild grade inflammation animal models.

  19. Streptococcus pyogenes arginine and citrulline catabolism promotes infection and modulates innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusumano, Zachary T; Watson, Michael E; Caparon, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    A bacterium's ability to acquire nutrients from its host during infection is an essential component of pathogenesis. For the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, catabolism of the amino acid arginine via the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway supplements energy production and provides protection against acid stress in vitro. Its expression is enhanced in murine models of infection, suggesting an important role in vivo. To gain insight into the function of the ADI pathway in pathogenesis, the virulence of mutants defective in each of its enzymes was examined. Mutants unable to use arginine (ΔArcA) or citrulline (ΔArcB) were attenuated for carriage in a murine model of asymptomatic mucosal colonization. However, in a murine model of inflammatory infection of cutaneous tissue, the ΔArcA mutant was attenuated but the ΔArcB mutant was hyperattenuated, revealing an unexpected tissue-specific role for citrulline metabolism in pathogenesis. When mice defective for the arginine-dependent production of nitric oxide (iNOS(-/-)) were infected with the ΔArcA mutant, cutaneous virulence was rescued, demonstrating that the ability of S. pyogenes to utilize arginine was dispensable in the absence of nitric oxide-mediated innate immunity. This work demonstrates the importance of arginine and citrulline catabolism and suggests a novel mechanism of virulence by which S. pyogenes uses its metabolism to modulate innate immunity through depletion of an essential host nutrient.

  20. Activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy during HCV infection modulates innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrabaud, Emilie; De Muynck, Simon; Asselah, Tarik

    2011-11-01

    Autophagy, a process for catabolizing cytoplasmic components, has been implicated in the modulation of interactions between RNA viruses and their host. However, the mechanism underlying the functional role of autophagy in the viral life cycle still remains unclear. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense, membrane-enveloped RNA virus that can cause chronic liver disease. Here we report that HCV induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), which in turn activates the autophagic pathway to promote HCV RNA replication in human hepatoma cells. Further analysis revealed that the entire autophagic process through to complete autolysosome maturation was required to promote HCV RNA replication and that it did so by suppressing innate antiviral immunity. Gene silencing or activation of the UPR-autophagy pathway activated or repressed, respectively, IFN-β activation mediated by an HCV-derived pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). Similar results were achieved with a PAMP derived from Dengue virus (DEV), indicating that HCV and DEV may both exploit the UPR-autophagy pathway to escape the innate immune response. Taken together, these results not only define the physiological significance of HCV-induced autophagy, but also shed light on the knowledge of host cellular responses upon HCV infection as well as on exploration of therapeutic targets for controlling HCV infection.

  1. Trace levels of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) synergize to break tolerance to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verthelyi, Daniela; Wang, Vivian

    2010-12-22

    Therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies, replacement enzymes and toxins have significantly improved the therapeutic options for multiple diseases, including cancer and inflammatory diseases as well as enzyme deficiencies and inborn errors of metabolism. However, immune responses to these products are frequent and can seriously impact their safety and efficacy. Of the many factors that can impact protein immunogenicity, this study focuses on the role of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs) that could be present despite product purification and whether these impurities can synergize to facilitate an immunogenic response to therapeutic proteins. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and CpG ODN as IIRMIs we showed that trace levels of these impurities synergized to induce IgM, IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6 expression. In vivo, trace levels of these impurities synergized to increase antigen-specific IgG antibodies to ovalbumin. Further, whereas mice treated with human erythropoietin showed a transient increase in hematocrit, those that received human erythropoietin containing low levels of IIRMIs had reduced response to erythropoietin after the 1(st) dose and developed long-lasting anemia following subsequent doses. This suggests that the presence of IIRMIs facilitated a breach in tolerance to the endogenous mouse erythropoietin. Overall, these studies indicate that the risk of enhancing immunogenicity should be considered when establishing acceptance limits of IIRMIs for therapeutic proteins.

  2. Trace levels of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs synergize to break tolerance to therapeutic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Verthelyi

    Full Text Available Therapeutic proteins such as monoclonal antibodies, replacement enzymes and toxins have significantly improved the therapeutic options for multiple diseases, including cancer and inflammatory diseases as well as enzyme deficiencies and inborn errors of metabolism. However, immune responses to these products are frequent and can seriously impact their safety and efficacy. Of the many factors that can impact protein immunogenicity, this study focuses on the role of innate immune response modulating impurities (IIRMIs that could be present despite product purification and whether these impurities can synergize to facilitate an immunogenic response to therapeutic proteins. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS and CpG ODN as IIRMIs we showed that trace levels of these impurities synergized to induce IgM, IFNγ, TNFα and IL-6 expression. In vivo, trace levels of these impurities synergized to increase antigen-specific IgG antibodies to ovalbumin. Further, whereas mice treated with human erythropoietin showed a transient increase in hematocrit, those that received human erythropoietin containing low levels of IIRMIs had reduced response to erythropoietin after the 1(st dose and developed long-lasting anemia following subsequent doses. This suggests that the presence of IIRMIs facilitated a breach in tolerance to the endogenous mouse erythropoietin. Overall, these studies indicate that the risk of enhancing immunogenicity should be considered when establishing acceptance limits of IIRMIs for therapeutic proteins.

  3. Modulation of Acid Sphingomyelinase in Melanoma Reprogrammes the Tumour Immune Microenvironment

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    Emma Assi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory microenvironment induces tumours to acquire an aggressive and immunosuppressive behaviour. Since acid sphingomyelinase (A-SMase downregulation in melanoma was shown to determine a malignant phenotype, we aimed here to elucidate the role of A-SMase in the regulation of tumour immunogenic microenvironment using in vivo melanoma models in which A-SMase was either downregulated or maintained at constitutively high levels. We found high levels of inflammatory factors in low A-SMase expressing tumours, which also displayed an immunosuppressive/protumoural microenvironment: high levels of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs, as well as low levels of dendritic cells (DCs. In contrast, the restoration of A-SMase in melanoma cells not only reduced tumour growth and immunosuppression, but also induced a high recruitment at tumour site of effector immune cells with an antitumoural function. Indeed, we observed a poor homing of MDSCs and Tregs and the increased recruitment of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes as well as the infiltration of DCs and CD8+/CD44high T lymphocytes. This study demonstrates that change of A-SMase expression in cancer cells is sufficient per se to tune in vivo melanoma growth and that A-SMase levels modulate immune cells at tumour site. This may be taken into consideration in the setting of therapeutic strategies.

  4. Ocean acidification and pathogen exposure modulate the immune response of the edible mussel Mytilus chilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Nicole; Saavedra, Luisa M; Vargas, Cristian A; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Détrée, Camille

    2017-09-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is one of the main consequences of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), impacting key biological processes of marine organisms such as development, growth and immune response. However, there are scarce studies on the influence of OA on marine invertebrates' ability to cope with pathogens. This study evaluated the single and combined effects of OA and bacterial infection on the transcription expression of genes related to antioxidant system, antimicrobial peptides and pattern recognition receptors in the edible mussel Mytilus chilensis. Individuals of M. chilensis were exposed during 60 days at two concentrations of pCO2 (550 and 1200 μatm) representing respectively current and future scenario of OA and were then injected with the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. Results evidenced an immunomodulation following the OA exposure with an up-regulation of C-type Lectin and Mytilin B and a down-regulation of Myticin A and PGRP. This immunomodulation pattern is partially counteracted after challenge with V. anguillarum with a down-regulation of the C-type lectin and Mytilin B and the up-regulation of Myticin A. In turn, these results evidence that pCO2-driven OA scenarios might triggers specific immune-related genes at early stages of infection, promoting the transcription of antimicrobial peptides and patterns recognition receptors. This study provides new evidence of how the immune response of bivalves is modulated by higher CO2 conditions in the ocean, as well one factor for the resilience of marine population upon global change scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lactobacillus paracasei modulates the immune system of Galleria mellonella and protects against Candida albicans infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been described as a potential strategy to control opportunistic infections due to their ability to stimulate the immune system. Using the non-vertebrate model host Galleria mellonella, we evaluated whether clinical isolates of Lactobacillus spp. are able to provide protection against Candida albicans infection. Among different strains of Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum, we verified that L. paracasei 28.4 strain had the greatest ability to prolong the survival of larvae infected with a lethal dose of C. albicans. We found that the injection of 107 cells/larvae of L. paracasei into G. mellonella larvae infected by C. albicans increased the survival of these insects compared to the control group (P = 0.0001). After that, we investigated the immune mechanisms involved in the protection against C. albicans infection, evaluating the number of hemocytes and the gene expression of antifungal peptides. We found that L. paracasei increased the hemocyte quantity (2.38 x 106 cells/mL) in relation to the control group (1.29 x 106 cells/mL), indicating that this strain is capable of raising the number of circulating hemocytes into the G. mellonella hemolymph. Further, we found that L. paracasei 28.4 upregulated genes that encode the antifungal peptides galiomicin and gallerymicin. In relation to the control group, L. paracasei 28.4 increased gene expression of galiomicin by 6.67-fold and 17.29-fold for gallerymicin. Finally, we verified that the prophylactic provision of probiotic led to a significant reduction of the number of fungal cells in G. mellonella hemolymph. In conclusion, L. paracasei 28.4 can modulate the immune system of G. mellonella and protect against candidiasis. PMID:28267809

  6. Modulation and Interaction of Immune-Associated Parameters with Antioxidant in the Immunocytes of Crab Scylla paramamosain Challenged with Lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Singaram; Chen, Fang-Yi; Thilagam, Harikrishnan; Qiao, Kun; Xu, Wan-Fang; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrates are dependent on cellular and humoral immune defences against microbial infection. Scylla paramamosain is an important commercial species, but the fundamental knowledge on its immune defense related to the antioxidant and immune-associated reactions is still lacking. The study was to differentiate the responses of immune-associated parameters of haemolymph components in S. paramamosain when challenged with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). The immunostimulating effects of LPS in crab by triggering various immune parameters (phagocytosis, lysozyme, antibacterial activity, phenoloxidase, and the generation of superoxide and nitric oxide) were investigated. Results showed that the generation of free radicals, phenoloxidase, lysozyme and antibacterial activities was significantly increased through the exposure periods. Conversely, total hemocyte count and lysosomal membrane stability decreased significantly as the exposure period extended to 96 h. The relationship between the antioxidant enzymes and immune reactions due to LPS was highly significant. In addition, ROS production was positively correlated with antioxidant showing immediate response of antioxidant defense to the oxyradicals generated. Overall, the study indicated that nonspecific immune components in hemocytes of crab showed active response to the LPS stimulation, and their responses suggested that many immune-associated parameters could be modulated and interrelated with the influence of antioxidants in crustaceans.

  7. Modulation and Interaction of Immune-Associated Parameters with Antioxidant in the Immunocytes of Crab Scylla paramamosain Challenged with Lipopolysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singaram Gopalakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Invertebrates are dependent on cellular and humoral immune defences against microbial infection. Scylla paramamosain is an important commercial species, but the fundamental knowledge on its immune defense related to the antioxidant and immune-associated reactions is still lacking. The study was to differentiate the responses of immune-associated parameters of haemolymph components in S. paramamosain when challenged with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs. The immunostimulating effects of LPS in crab by triggering various immune parameters (phagocytosis, lysozyme, antibacterial activity, phenoloxidase, and the generation of superoxide and nitric oxide were investigated. Results showed that the generation of free radicals, phenoloxidase, lysozyme and antibacterial activities was significantly increased through the exposure periods. Conversely, total hemocyte count and lysosomal membrane stability decreased significantly as the exposure period extended to 96 h. The relationship between the antioxidant enzymes and immune reactions due to LPS was highly significant. In addition, ROS production was positively correlated with antioxidant showing immediate response of antioxidant defense to the oxyradicals generated. Overall, the study indicated that nonspecific immune components in hemocytes of crab showed active response to the LPS stimulation, and their responses suggested that many immune-associated parameters could be modulated and interrelated with the influence of antioxidants in crustaceans.

  8. Regulatory T-cells have a prominent role in the immune modulated vaccine response by specific oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Land, Belinda; Schijf, Marcel; van Esch, Betty C. A. M.; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Schouten, Bastiaan; Boon, Louis; Garssen, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells are increasingly important in vaccine strategies. In a Flu-vaccination model the role of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and the immune modulation by orally supplied prebiotic oligosaccharides consisting of scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS, were assessed using anti-CD25 (PC61) me

  9. Cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differentially modulated innate immunity and glucose metabolism during late systemic inflammation.

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    Bushansingh Baurhoo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella causes acute systemic inflammation by using its virulence factors to invade the intestinal epithelium. But, prolonged inflammation may provoke severe body catabolism and immunological diseases. Salmonella has become more life-threatening due to emergence of multiple-antibiotic resistant strains. Mannose-rich oligosaccharides (MOS from cells walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown to bind mannose-specific lectin of Gram-negative bacteria including Salmonella, and prevent their adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. However, whether MOS may potentially mitigate systemic inflammation is not investigated yet. Moreover, molecular events underlying innate immune responses and metabolic activities during late inflammation, in presence or absence of MOS, are unknown. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a Salmonella LPS-induced systemic inflammation chicken model and microarray analysis, we investigated the effects of MOS and virginiamycin (VIRG, a sub-therapeutic antibiotic on innate immunity and glucose metabolism during late inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that MOS and VIRG modulated innate immunity and metabolic genes differently. Innate immune responses were principally mediated by intestinal IL-3, but not TNF-α, IL-1 or IL-6, whereas glucose mobilization occurred through intestinal gluconeogenesis only. MOS inherently induced IL-3 expression in control hosts. Consequent to LPS challenge, IL-3 induction in VIRG hosts but not differentially expressed in MOS hosts revealed that MOS counteracted LPS's detrimental inflammatory effects. Metabolic pathways are built to elucidate the mechanisms by which VIRG host's higher energy requirements were met: including gene up-regulations for intestinal gluconeogenesis (PEPCK and liver glycolysis (ENO2, and intriguingly liver fatty acid synthesis through ATP citrate synthase (CS down-regulation and ATP citrate lyase (ACLY and malic enzyme (ME up-regulations. However, MOS host

  10. Altered miRNAs expression profiles and modulation of immune response genes and proteins during neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiande; Jiang, Siyuan; Cao, Yun; Yang, Yi

    2014-04-01

    The dysregulated expression of miRNAs in the immune system may be critical for immune responses to pathogens and evolve into the inflammation seen in sepsis. The aim of this study is to explore the important role of miRNAs in the regulation of the immune response during neonatal sepsis. Using a microarray we performed the miRNA expression profiling of peripheral blood leukocytes from neonates with sepsis and uninfected neonates. Based on the predicted target genes of these miRNAs we selected 26 immune-related miRNAs out of the differentially expressed miRNAs for further testing by quantitative PCR. We simultaneously detected the immune response genes by PCR array and plasma cytokine levels using a protein chip to investigate the effect of the altered miRNAs on the immune response in neonatal sepsis. There were 10 immune regulatory miRNAs whose expression was significantly changed more than two fold in the neonates with sepsis compared with the uninfected neonates. The expression levels of 11 immune response genes and the plasma levels of 15 cytokines or receptors were significantly up- or down-regulated in the neonates with sepsis compared to the uninfected neonates. This comprehensive analysis suggests that the altered miRNAs modulate the immune response during neonatal sepsis in a way that represses the inflammatory response. Our investigation demonstrated some miRNAs with altered expression levels and their probable association with the regulation of immune response during neonatal sepsis. The characteristics of the neonatal inflammatory response could be attributed to immature immune function of neonates.

  11. Helminth infections induce immunomodulation : consequences and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, Petronella Helena van

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, more than a billion people are infected with helminths. These worm infections are chronic in nature and can lead to considerable morbidity. Immunologically these infections are interesting; chronic helminth infections are characterized by skewing towards a T helper 2 type response as well

  12. Helminth infections and allergies in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amoah, Abena Serwaa

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that there is a global rise in the prevalence of asthma and other allergic disorders. Several epidemiological studies conducted in countries endemic for parasitic worms (helminths) have reported an inverse association between the presence of helminth infections and allergic d

  13. Nitric Oxide and Respiratory Helminthic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Muro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a very simple molecule that displays very important functions both in helminths (mainly those involved in respiratory pathology and in mammalian hosts. In this paper we review four issues related to interaction of NO and lung helminthic diseases. Firstly, we evaluated data available on the NO synthesis and release by helminths and their biological role. Next, we summarized the effect of antigens obtained from different phases of the biological cycle on NO production by host mammalian cells (mainly from human sources. Thirdly, we revised the evaluation of NO on the biological activities and/or the viability of respiratory helminths. Lastly, the deleterious consequences of increased production of NO during helminthic human infection are detailed.

  14. Intravenous immunoglobulins in liver transplant patients:Perspectives of clinical immune modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Shortage of appropriate donor grafts is the foremostcurrent problem in organ transplantation. As a logicalconsequence, waiting times have extended andpretransplant mortality rates were significantly increasing.The implementation of a priority-based liverallocation system using the model of end-stage liverdisease (MELD) score helped to reduce waiting listmortality in liver transplantation (LT). However, dueto an escalating organ scarcity, pre-LT MELD scoreshave significantly increased and liver recipients becamemore complex in recent years. This has finally led toposttransplant decreasing survival rates, attributedmainly to elevated rates of infectious and immunologiccomplications. To meet this challenging development,an increasing number of extended criteria donor graftsare currently accepted, which may, however, aggravatethe patients' infectious and immunologic risk profiles.The administration of intravenous immunoglobulins(IVIg) is an established treatment in patients withimmune deficiencies and other antibody-mediateddiseases. In addition, IVIg was shown to be useful intreatment of several disorders caused by deteriorationof the cellular immune system. It proved to be effectivein preventing hyperacute rejection in highly sensitizedkidney and heart transplants. In the liver transplantsetting, the administration of specific Ig againsthepatitis B virus is current standard in post-LT antiviralprophylaxis. The mechanisms of action of IVIg arecomplex and not fully understood. However, there isincreasing experimental and clinical evidence that IVIghas an immuno-balancing impact by a combinationof immuno-supporting and immuno-suppressiveproperties. It may be suggested that, especially in thecontext of a worsening organ shortage with all resultingclinical implications, liver transplant patients shouldbenefit from immuno-regulatory capabilities of IVIg.In this review, perspectives of immune modulation byIVIg and impact on outcome in liver transplant

  15. Immune modulation associated with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) blockade in patients with glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alissa A; Fisher, Jan L; Hampton, Thomas H; Christensen, Brock C; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Rahme, Gilbert J; Whipple, Chery A; Steel, Sandra E; Davis, Melissa C; Gaur, Arti B; Lewis, Lionel D; Ernstoff, Marc S; Fadul, Camilo E

    2017-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in addition to being pro-angiogenic, is an immunomodulatory cytokine systemically and in the tumor microenvironment. We previously reported the immunomodulatory effects of radiation and temozolomide (TMZ) in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. This study aimed to assess changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) populations, plasma cytokines, and growth factor concentrations following treatment with radiation, TMZ, and bevacizumab (BEV). Eleven patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were treated with radiation, TMZ, and BEV, following surgery. We measured immune-related PBMC subsets using multi-parameter flow cytometry and plasma cytokine and growth factor concentrations using electrochemiluminescence-based multiplex analysis at baseline and after 6 weeks of treatment. The absolute number of peripheral blood regulatory T cells (Tregs) decreased significantly following treatment. The lower number of peripheral Tregs was associated with a CD4+ lymphopenia, and thus, the ratio of Tregs to PBMCs was unchanged. The addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation and temozolomide led to the decrease in the number of circulating Tregs when compared with our prior study. There was a significant decrease in CD8+ cytotoxic and CD4+ recent thymic emigrant T cells, but no change in the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Significant increases in plasma VEGF and placental growth factor (PlGF) concentrations were observed. Treatment with radiation, TMZ, and BEV decreased the number but not the proportion of peripheral Tregs and increased the concentration of circulating VEGF. This shift in the peripheral immune cell profile may modulate the tumor environment and have implications for combining immunotherapy with anti-angiogenic therapy.

  16. The gut microbiota as a modulator of innate immunity during melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M; Birnie, Emma; Weehuizen, Tassili A F; Scicluna, Brendon P; Belzer, Clara; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Roelofs, Joris J T H; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom; Budding, Andries E; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2017-04-01

    Melioidosis, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an emerging cause of pneumonia-derived sepsis in the tropics. The gut microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognized as a protective mediator in host defenses against systemic infection. Here, we aimed to characterize the composition and function of the intestinal microbiota during experimental melioidosis. C57BL/6 mice were infected intranasally with B. pseudomallei and sacrificed at different time points to assess bacterial loads and inflammation. In selected experiments, the gut microbiota was disrupted with broad-spectrum antibiotics prior to inoculation. Fecal bacterial composition was analyzed by means of IS-pro, a 16S-23S interspacer region-based profiling method. A marked shift in fecal bacterial composition was seen in all mice during systemic B. pseudomallei infection with a strong increase in Proteobacteria and decrease in Actinobacteria, with an increase in bacterial diversity. We found enhanced early dissemination of B. pseudomallei and systemic inflammation during experimental melioidosis in microbiota-disrupted mice compared with controls. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling of the lung identified several genes that were differentially expressed between mice with a normal or disrupted intestinal microbiota. Genes involved in acute phase signaling, including macrophage-related signaling pathways were significantly elevated in microbiota disrupted mice. Compared with controls, alveolar macrophages derived from antibiotic pretreated mice showed a diminished capacity to phagocytose B. pseudomallei. This might in part explain the observed protective effect of the gut microbiota in the host defense against pneumonia-derived melioidosis. Taken together, these data identify the gut microbiota as a potential modulator of innate immunity during B. pseudomallei infection.

  17. Multiple helminth infection of the skin causes lymphocyte hypo-responsiveness mediated by Th2 conditioning of dermal myeloid cells.

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    Peter C Cook

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the mammalian host by schistosome larvae occurs via the skin, although nothing is known about the development of immune responses to multiple exposures of schistosome larvae, and/or their excretory/secretory (E/S products. Here, we show that multiple (4x exposures, prior to the onset of egg laying by adult worms, modulate the skin immune response and induce CD4(+ cell hypo-responsiveness in the draining lymph node, and even modulate the formation of hepatic egg-induced granulomas. Compared to mice exposed to a single infection (1x, dermal cells from multiply infected mice (4x, were less able to support lymph node cell proliferation. Analysis of dermal cells showed that the most abundant in 4x mice were eosinophils (F4/80(+MHC-II(-, but they did not impact the ability of antigen presenting cells (APC to support lymphocyte proliferation to parasite antigen in vitro. However, two other cell populations from the dermal site of infection appear to have a critical role. The first comprises arginase-1(+, Ym-1(+ alternatively activated macrophage-like cells, and the second are functionally compromised MHC-II(hi cells. Through the administration of exogenous IL-12 to multiply infected mice, we show that these suppressive myeloid cell phenotypes form as a consequence of events in the skin, most notably an enrichment of IL-4 and IL-13, likely resulting from an influx of RELMα-expressing eosinophils. We further illustrate that the development of these suppressive dermal cells is dependent upon IL-4Rα signalling. The development of immune hypo-responsiveness to schistosome larvae and their effect on the subsequent response to the immunopathogenic egg is important in appreciating how immune responses to helminth infections are modulated by repeated exposure to the infective early stages of development.

  18. Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920630 Effects of the spleen on immunestate of patients with gastric cancer.QIUDengbo (仇登波), et al. Dept General Surg,Union Hosp, Tongji Med Univ, Wuhan, 430022.Natl Med J China 1992; 72(6): 334-337. For analysing the effects of the spleen on im-mune state of gastric cancer patients.T-lym-

  19. Impact of Helminth Infections and Nutritional Constraints on the Small Intestine Microbiota.

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    Cattadori, Isabella M; Sebastian, Aswathy; Hao, Han; Katani, Robab; Albert, Istvan; Eilertson, Kirsten E; Kapur, Vivek; Pathak, Ashutosh; Mitchell, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infections and nutrition can independently alter the composition and abundance of the gastrointestinal microbiota, however, their combined effect is poorly understood. Here, we used the T. retortaeformis-rabbit system to examine how the helminth infection and host restriction from coprophagy/ready-to-absorb nutrients affected the duodenal microbiota, and how these changes related to the acquired immune response at the site of infection. A factorial experiment was performed where the bacterial community, its functionality and the immune response were examined in four treatments (Infect, Infect+Collar, Control+Collar and Control). Helminths reduced the diversity and abundance of the microbiota while the combination of parasites and coprophagic restriction led to a more diversified and abundant microbiota than infected cases, without significantly affecting the intensity of infection. Animals restricted from coprophagy and free from parasites exhibited the richest and most abundant bacterial community. By forcing the individuals to absorb nutrients from less digested food, the coprophagic restriction appears to have facilitated the diversity and proliferation of bacteria in the duodenum. Changes in the microbiota were more clearly associated with changes in the immune response for the infected than the nutrient restricted animals. The functional and metabolic characteristics of the duodenal microbiota were not significantly different between treatments. Overall, infection and diet affect the gut microbiota but their interactions and outcome can be complex. These findings can have important implications for the development of control measures to helminth infections where poor nutrition/malnutrition can also be a concern.

  20. Zoonotic helminths affecting the human eye

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    Eberhard Mark L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nowaday, zoonoses are an important cause of human parasitic diseases worldwide and a major threat to the socio-economic development, mainly in developing countries. Importantly, zoonotic helminths that affect human eyes (HIE may cause blindness with severe socio-economic consequences to human communities. These infections include nematodes, cestodes and trematodes, which may be transmitted by vectors (dirofilariasis, onchocerciasis, thelaziasis, food consumption (sparganosis, trichinellosis and those acquired indirectly from the environment (ascariasis, echinococcosis, fascioliasis. Adult and/or larval stages of HIE may localize into human ocular tissues externally (i.e., lachrymal glands, eyelids, conjunctival sacs or into the ocular globe (i.e., intravitreous retina, anterior and or posterior chamber causing symptoms due to the parasitic localization in the eyes or to the immune reaction they elicit in the host. Unfortunately, data on HIE are scant and mostly limited to case reports from different countries. The biology and epidemiology of the most frequently reported HIE are discussed as well as clinical description of the diseases, diagnostic considerations and video clips on their presentation and surgical treatment. Homines amplius oculis, quam auribus credunt Seneca Ep 6,5 Men believe their eyes more than their ears

  1. Boswellic acids target the human immune system-modulating antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

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    Henkel, Arne; Tausch, Lars; Pillong, Max; Jauch, Johann; Karas, Michael; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is the sole member of the human cathelicidin family with immune system-modulating properties and roles in autoimmune disease development. Small molecules able to interact with LL-37 and to modulate its functions have not been described yet. Boswellic acids (BAs) are pentacyclic triterpene acids that are bioactive principles of frankincense extracts used as anti-inflammatory remedies. Although various anti-inflammatory modes of action have been proposed for BAs, the pharmacological profile of these compounds is still incompletely understood. Here, we describe the identification of human LL-37 as functional target of BAs. In unbiased target fishing experiments using immobilized BAs as bait and human neutrophils as target source, LL-37 was identified as binding partner assisted by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Thermal stability experiments using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirm direct interaction between BAs and LL-37. Of interest, this binding of BAs resulted in an inhibition of the functionality of LL-37. Thus, the LPS-neutralizing properties of isolated LL-37 were inhibited by 3-O-acetyl-β-BA (Aβ-BA) and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-BA (AKβ-BA) in a cell-free limulus amoebocyte lysate assay with EC50=0.2 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Also, LL-37 activity was inhibited by these BAs in LL-37-enriched supernatants of stimulated neutrophils or human plasma derived from stimulated human whole blood. Together, we reveal BAs as inhibitors of LL-37, which might be a relevant mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of BAs and suggests BAs as suitable chemical tools or potential agents for intervention with LL-37 and related disorders.

  2. Immune Reactions against Gene Gun Vaccines Are Differentially Modulated by Distinct Dendritic Cell Subsets in the Skin.

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    Corinna Stefanie Weber

    Full Text Available The skin accommodates multiple dendritic cell (DC subsets with remarkable functional diversity. Immune reactions are initiated and modulated by the triggering of DC by pathogen-associated or endogenous danger signals. In contrast to these processes, the influence of intrinsic features of protein antigens on the strength and type of immune responses is much less understood. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of distinct DC subsets in immune reactions against two structurally different model antigens, E. coli beta-galactosidase (betaGal and chicken ovalbumin (OVA under otherwise identical conditions. After epicutaneous administration of the respective DNA vaccines with a gene gun, wild type mice induced robust immune responses against both antigens. However, ablation of langerin+ DC almost abolished IgG1 and cytotoxic T lymphocytes against betaGal but enhanced T cell and antibody responses against OVA. We identified epidermal Langerhans cells (LC as the subset responsible for the suppression of anti-OVA reactions and found regulatory T cells critically involved in this process. In contrast, reactions against betaGal were not affected by the selective elimination of LC, indicating that this antigen required a different langerin+ DC subset. The opposing findings obtained with OVA and betaGal vaccines were not due to immune-modulating activities of either the plasmid DNA or the antigen gene products, nor did the differential cellular localization, size or dose of the two proteins account for the opposite effects. Thus, skin-borne protein antigens may be differentially handled by distinct DC subsets, and, in this way, intrinsic features of the antigen can participate in immune modulation.

  3. Axl Mediates ZIKA Virus Entry in Human Glial Cells and Modulates Innate Immune Responses

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    Laurent Meertens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ZIKA virus (ZIKV is an emerging pathogen responsible for neurological disorders and congenital microcephaly. However, the molecular basis for ZIKV neurotropism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Axl is expressed in human microglia and astrocytes in the developing brain and that it mediates ZIKV infection of glial cells. Axl-mediated ZIKV entry requires the Axl ligand Gas6, which bridges ZIKV particles to glial cells. Following binding, ZIKV is internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and traffics to Rab5+ endosomes to establish productive infection. During entry, the ZIKV/Gas6 complex activates Axl kinase activity, which downmodulates interferon signaling and facilitates infection. ZIKV infection of human glial cells is inhibited by MYD1, an engineered Axl decoy receptor, and by the Axl kinase inhibitor R428. Our results highlight the dual role of Axl during ZIKV infection of glial cells: promoting viral entry and modulating innate immune responses. Therefore, inhibiting Axl function may represent a potential target for future antiviral therapies.

  4. Melatonin treatment prevents modulation of cell-mediated immune response induced by propoxur in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suke, Sanvidhan G; Pathak, Rahul; Ahmed, Rafat S; Tripathi, A K; Banerjee, B D

    2008-08-01

    The effect of melatonin, a major secretory product of the pineal gland, in attenuation of propoxur (2-isopropoxy phenyl N-methyl carbamate)-induced modulation of cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was studied in rats. Male Wistar albino rats were exposed to propoxur (a widely used pesticide) orally (10 mg/kg) and/or melatonin (10 mg/kg) orally for 4 weeks. CMI was measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), leucocyte and macrophage migration inhibition (LMI and MMI) responses and estimation of cytokines TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma levels. Rats exposed to propoxur for 4 weeks showed significant decrease in DTH, LMI and MMI responses. Propoxur also suppressed TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma production significantly. Administration of melatonin alone caused a significant increase in DTH response. Although there were no changes in the LMI and MMI response, the cytokine levels were significantly increased, as compared to control. Co-administration of melatonin along with propoxur significantly nullified the effect of the pesticide on the CMI response, except DTH and reversed levels of cytokines to near control/normal values. Thus, melatonin treatment considerably attenuated immunomodulation caused by sub-chronic treatment of propoxur in experimental animals.

  5. Environmental History Modulates Arabidopsis Pattern-Triggered Immunity in a HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE1-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Yekondi, Shweta; Chen, Po-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Hong; Yu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Keqiang; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to a fluctuating environment, and individuals exposed to contrasting environmental factors develop different environmental histories. Whether different environmental histories alter plant responses to a current stress remains elusive. Here, we show that environmental history modulates the plant response to microbial pathogens. Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to repetitive heat, cold, or salt stress were more resistant to virulent bacteria than Arabidopsis grown in a more stable environment. By contrast, long-term exposure to heat, cold, or exposure to high concentrations of NaCl did not provide enhanced protection against bacteria. Enhanced resistance occurred with priming of Arabidopsis pattern-triggered immunity (PTI)-responsive genes and the potentiation of PTI-mediated callose deposition. In repetitively stress-challenged Arabidopsis, PTI-responsive genes showed enrichment for epigenetic marks associated with transcriptional activation. Upon bacterial infection, enrichment of RNA polymerase II at primed PTI marker genes was observed in environmentally challenged Arabidopsis. Finally, repetitively stress-challenged histone acetyltransferase1-1 (hac1-1) mutants failed to demonstrate enhanced resistance to bacteria, priming of PTI, and increased open chromatin states. These findings reveal that environmental history shapes the plant response to bacteria through the development of a HAC1-dependent epigenetic mark characteristic of a primed PTI response, demonstrating a mechanistic link between the primed state in plants and epigenetics.

  6. Efficacy of an immune modulator in enzootic pneumonia of dairy calves.

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    Metzner, M; Behrmann, K; Döpfer, D; Klee, W

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this cohort study was the evaluation of the efficacy of an immune modulator in the prophylaxis, metaphylaxis and treatment of enzootic bronchopneumonia (EBP). A total of 552 dairy calves on 13 farms were included. Groups of calves were included in the study if the prevalence of respiratory disease on the first visit was at least 50%, and the number of animals aged 2-16 weeks was at least 10. Controls were treated with a placebo. Animals of both groups were treated antibiotically if body temperature exceeded 39.5 degrees C. A clinimetric system was devised and used for classifying the animals into one of seven categories (healthy, beginning respiratory disease, acute BP, subacute BP, chronic BP, acute flare-up of chronic BP, and other disease). Animals were examined clinically on days 1, 3, 10, and 28. In animals treated prophylactically, the incidence of BP on day 10 was significantly higher (51%) than in those that received the placebo (31%). In animals treated metaphylactically, the average number of treatment days was significantly lower (2.86) than in the placebo group (3.81). In animals treated therapeutically, the incidence of EBP on day 10 was significantly lower than in the placebo group.

  7. JH modulates a cellular immunity of Tribolium castaneum in a Met-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepat, Rahul; Kim, Yonggyun

    2014-04-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates diverse physiological processes in insects during entire developmental stages. Especially, the identification of Methoprene-tolerant (Met), a JH nuclear receptor, allows us to better understand molecular actions of JH to control gene expressions related with metamorphosis. However, several physiological processes including cellular immune response and some molecular actions of JH have been suspected to be mediated via its non-genomic actions. To prove its non-genomic action, JH nuclear signals were suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi) of Met or its downstream gene, Krüppel homolog 1 (Kr-h1), in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. These RNAi-treated larvae failed to undergo a normal development and suffered precocious metamorphosis. Hemocytes of T. castaneum exhibited their spreading behavior on extracellular matrix and nodule formation in response to bacterial challenge. When the larvae were treated with either RNAi of Met or Kr-h1, the hemocytes of the treated larvae were responsive to JH without any significant difference with those of control larvae. These results suggest that the response of hemocytes to JH is not mediated by its nuclear signal. On the other hand, the JH modulation of hemocyte behaviors of T. castaneum was significantly influenced by membrane and cytosolic protein activities, in which ethoxyzolamide (a specific inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase), calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) or ouabain (a specific inhibitor of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase) significantly suppressed the responsiveness of hemocytes to JH.

  8. An anti-infective peptide that selectively modulates the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Monisha G; Dullaghan, Edie; Mookherjee, Neeloffer; Glavas, Natalie; Waldbrook, Matthew; Thompson, Annick; Wang, Aikun; Lee, Ken; Doria, Silvana; Hamill, Pam; Yu, Jie Jessie; Li, Yuexin; Donini, Oreola; Guarna, M Marta; Finlay, B Brett; North, John R; Hancock, Robert E W

    2007-04-01

    We show that an innate defense-regulator peptide (IDR-1) was protective in mouse models of infection with important Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. When given from 48 h before to 6 h after infection, the peptide was effective by both local and systemic administration. Because protection by IDR-1 was prevented by in vivo depletion of monocytes and macrophages, but not neutrophils or B- and T-lymphocytes, we conclude that monocytes and macrophages are key effector cells. IDR-1 was not directly antimicrobial: gene and protein expression analysis in human and mouse monocytes and macrophages indicated that IDR-1, acting through mitogen-activated protein kinase and other signaling pathways, enhanced the levels of monocyte chemokines while reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. To our knowledge, an innate defense regulator that counters infection by selective modulation of innate immunity without obvious toxicities has not been reported previously.

  9. Gastrointestinal helminths in raccoons in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresta, Amy E; Henke, Scott E; Pence, Danny B

    2009-01-01

    Raccoons (n=590) were collected from October 1999 to August 2003 from 35 counties across Texas, and gastrointestinal tracts were examined for helminth parasites. Prevalence was calculated and differences in mean abundance were examined among habitat ecoregions, age classes, and between sexes. Twenty different species of helminths (13 nematodes, two cestodes, two acanthocephalans, and three trematodes) were positively identified in the gastrointestinal tracts of 590 raccoons in Texas. Five of the 20 helminth species collected (Physaloptera rara, Placoconus lotoris, Molineus barbatus, Atriotaenia procyonis, and Macracanthorhynchus ingens) had a prevalence >20%. The total number of individuals of these five species (n=22,777) accounted for over 86% of the total number of individuals of all helminth species (n=26,426) collected. Subsequent analyses were based on these five helminths. Mean abundance differed among habitat ecoregions, age classes, and between sexes for all five parasites evaluated. This study is the most comprehensive statewide survey ever done of gastrointestinal helminths of raccoons across Texas. The five most prevalent helminths identified have all been reported in at least one previous survey, indicating that these parasites are not new to Texas and that raccoons are not naïve to the effects these parasites have on them. It may be helpful to wildlife rehabilitators, trappers, wildlife biologists, and other professionals to be aware of parasite abundance in raccoons from different areas of the state, as frequent human-raccoon interactions occur, and some of these parasites could be harmful to humans and domestic animals.

  10. Sustained Partial Sleep Deprivation: Effects on Immune Modulation and Growth Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullington, Janet M.

    1999-01-01

    from this larger study: a 4.2 hour per night condition, and a 8.2 hour per night condition. During space flight, muscle mass and bone density are reduced, apparently due to loss of GH and IGF-I, associated with microgravity. Since >70% of growth hormone (GH) is secreted at night in normal adults, we hypothesized that the chronic sleep restriction to 4 hours per night would reduce GH levels as measured in the periphery. In this synergy project, in collaboration with the "Muscle Alterations and Atrophy Team ", we are measuring insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in peripheral circulation to test the prediction that it will be reduced by chronic sleep restriction. In addition to stress modulation of immune function, recent research suggests that sleep is also involved. While we all have the common experience of being sleepy when suffering from infection, and being susceptible to infection when not getting enough sleep, the mechanisms involved in this process are not understood and until recently have gone largely overlooked. We believe that the immune function changes seen in spaceflight may also be related to the cumulative effects of sleep loss. Moreover, in space flight, the possibility of compromised immune function or of the reactivation of latent viruses are serious potential hazards for the success of long term missions. Confined living conditions, reduced sleep, altered diet and stress are all factors that may compromise immune function, thereby increasing the risks of developing and transmitting disease. Medical complications, which would not pose serious problems on earth, may be disastrous if they emerged in space.

  11. Effects of targeted deletion of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 on immune competence and sensitivity to immune modulation by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springs, Alison E B; Karmaus, Peer W F; Crawford, Robert B; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2008-12-01

    The role of cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, in immune competence and modulation by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) was investigated in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. Immunofluorescence analysis of splenic leukocytes showed no significant differences in the percentage of T cell subsets, B cells, or macrophages between wild-type and CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. Lymphoproliferative control responses to PHA, phorbol ester plus ionomycin, or LPS and sensitivity to suppression by Delta9-THC showed no profound differences between the two genotypes, although some differences were observed in control baseline responses. Likewise, similar control responses and sensitivity to Delta9-THC were observed in mixed lymphocyte responses (MLR) and in IL-2 and IFN-gamma production in both genotypes. Conversely, humoral immune responses showed a markedly different profile of activity. Delta9-THC suppressed the in vivo T cell-dependent, anti-sheep RBC (anti-sRBC) IgM antibody-forming cell (AFC) response in wild-type but not in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice, and the in vitro anti-sRBC IgM response in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) splenocytes was too low to rigorously assess CB1/CB2 involvement in modulation by Delta9-THC. Conversely, comparable in vitro IgM AFC control responses to LPS and CD40 ligand (CD40L) activation were observed in the two genotypes. Interestingly, LPS-induced IgM responses were refractory to suppression by Delta9-THC, regardless of genotype, and CD40L-induced IgM responses were only suppressed by Delta9-THC in wild-type but not in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) B cells. Collectively, we demonstrate differential involvement of CB1 and/or CB2 in immune modulation by Delta9-THC and in some control responses. Moreover, CB1/CB2 involvement was observed in humoral responses requiring CD40-initiated signaling for suppression by Delta9-THC.

  12. Immunization with Culex tarsalis mosquito salivary gland extract modulates West Nile virus infection and disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Reagan, Krystle; Wang, Tian; Zeidner, Nordin S; Blair, Carol D

    2013-02-01

    Mosquito salivary proteins inoculated during blood feeding modulate the host immune response, which can contribute to the pathogenesis of viruses transmitted by mosquito bites. Previous studies with mosquito bite-naïve mice indicated that exposure to arthropod salivary proteins resulted in a shift toward a Th2-type immune response in flavivirus-susceptible mice but not flavivirus-resistant animals. In the study presented here, we tested the hypothesis that immunization with high doses of Culex tarsalis salivary gland extracts (SGE) with an adjuvant would prevent Th2 polarization after mosquito bite and enhance resistance to mosquito-transmitted West Nile virus (WNV). Our results indicate that mice immunized with Cx. tarsalis SGE produced increased levels of Th1-type cytokines (IFNγ and TNFα) after challenge with mosquito-transmitted WNV and exhibited both a delay in infection of the central nervous system (CNS) and significantly lower WNV brain titers compared to mock-immunized mice. Moreover, mortality was significantly reduced in the SGE-immunized mice, as none of these mice died, compared to mortality of 37.5% of mock-vaccinated mice by 8 days after infected mosquito bite. These results suggest that development of a mosquito salivary protein vaccine might be a strategy to control arthropod-borne viral pathogens such as WNV.

  13. Parasitic Helminths: New Weapons against Immunological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Osada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of allergic and autoimmune diseases is increasing in developed countries, possibly due to reduced exposure to microorganisms in childhood (hygiene hypothesis. Epidemiological and experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis is accumulating. In this context, parasitic helminths are now important candidates for antiallergic/anti-inflammatory agents. Here we summarize antiallergic/anti-inflammatory effects of helminths together along with our own study of the effects of Schistosoma mansoni on Th17-dependent experimental arthritis. We also discuss possible mechanisms of helminth-induced suppression according to the recent advances of immunology.

  14. Chronic helminth infection does not exacerbate Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Hübner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic helminth infections induce a Th2 immune shift and establish an immunoregulatory milieu. As both of these responses can suppress Th1 immunity, which is necessary for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection, we hypothesized that chronic helminth infections may exacerbate the course of MTB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Co-infection studies were conducted in cotton rats as they are the natural host for the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis and are an excellent model for human MTB. Immunogical responses, histological studies, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures were assessed two months after MTB challenge in cotton rats with and without chronic L. sigmodontis infection. Spleen cell proliferation and interferon gamma production in response to purified protein derivative were similar between co-infected and MTB-only infected animals. In contrast to our hypothesis, MTB loads and occurrence and size of lung granulomas were not increased in co-infected animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that chronic filaria infections do not exacerbate MTB infection in the cotton rat model. While these results suggest that filaria eradication programs may not facilitate MTB control, they indicate that it may be possible to develop worm-derived therapies for autoimmune diseases that do not substantially increase the risk for infections.

  15. Dietary synbiotic application modulates Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) intestinal microbial communities and intestinal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, A; Davies, S J; Waines, P; Emery, M; Castex, M; Gioacchini, G; Carnevali, O; Bickerdike, R; Romero, J; Merrifield, D L

    2013-12-01

    A feeding trial was conducted to determine the effect of dietary administration of Pediococcus acidilactici MA18/5M and short chain fructooligosaccharides (scFOS) on Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) intestinal health. Salmon (initial average weight 250 g) were allocated into triplicate sea pens and were fed either a control diet (commercial diet: 45% protein, 20% lipid) or a synbiotic treatment diet (control diet + P. acidilactici at 3.5 g kg(-1) and 7 g kg(-1) scFOS) for 63 days. At the end of this period, fish were sampled for intestinal microbiology, intestinal histology and the expression of selected immune-related genes (IL1β, TNFα, IL8, TLR3 and MX-1) in the intestine. Compared to the control fish, the total bacterial levels were significantly lower in the anterior mucosa, posterior mucosa and posterior digesta of the synbiotic fed fish. qPCR revealed good recovery (log 6 bacteria g(-1)) of the probiotic in the intestinal digesta of the synbiotic fed fish and PCR-DGGE revealed that the number of OTUs, as well as the microbial community diversity and richness were significantly higher in the anterior digesta of the synbiotic fed fish than the control. Compared to the control fed fish, the mucosal fold (villi) length and the infiltration of epithelial leucocytes were significantly higher in the anterior and posterior intestine, respectively, in the synbiotic group. Real-time PCR demonstrated that all of the genes investigated were significantly up-regulated in the anterior and posterior intestine of the synbiotic fed salmon, compared to the control group. At the systemic level, serum lysozyme activity was significantly higher in the synbiotic fed fish and growth performance, feed utilisation and biometric measurements (condition factor, gutted weight and gut loss) were not affected. Together these results suggest that the synbiotic modulation of the gut microbiota has a protective action on the intestinal mucosal cells, improving morphology and stimulating

  16. Identification of the major proteins of an immune modulating fraction from adult Fasciola hepatica released by Nonidet P40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphew, Russell M; Hamilton, Clare M; Wright, Hazel A; Dowling, David J; O'Neill, Sandra M; Brophy, Peter M

    2013-01-31

    Fasciola hepatica NP-40 released protein extract (FhNPE) exhibits potent Th1 immunosuppressive properties in vitro and in vivo. However, the protein composition of this active fraction, responsible for Th1 immune modulatory activity, has yet to be resolved. Therefore, FhNPE, a Nonidet P-40 extract, was subjected to a proteomic analysis in order to identify individual protein components. This was performed using an in house F. hepatica EST database following 2D electrophoresis combined with de novo sequencing based mass spectrometry. The identified proteins, a mixture of excretory/secretory and membrane-associated proteins, are associated with stress response and chaperoning, energy metabolism and cytoskeletal components. The immune modulatory properties of these identified protein(s) are discussed and HSP70 from F. hepatica is highlighted as a potential host immune modulator for future study.

  17. Vaccine platforms combining circumsporozoite protein and potent immune modulators, rEA or EAT-2, paradoxically result in opposing immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel J Schuldt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria greatly impacts the health and wellbeing of over half of the world's population. Promising malaria vaccine candidates have attempted to induce adaptive immune responses to Circumsporozoite (CS protein. Despite the inclusion of potent adjuvants, these vaccines have limited protective efficacy. Conventional recombinant adenovirus (rAd based vaccines expressing CS protein can induce CS protein specific immune responses, but these are essentially equivalent to those generated after use of the CS protein subunit based vaccines. In this study we combined the use of rAds expressing CS protein along with rAds expressing novel innate immune response modulating proteins in an attempt to significantly improve the induction of CS protein specific cell mediated immune (CMI responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: BALB/cJ mice were co-vaccinated with a rAd vectors expressing CS protein simultaneous with a rAd expressing either TLR agonist (rEA or SLAM receptors adaptor protein (EAT-2. Paradoxically, expression of the TLR agonist uncovered a potent immunosuppressive activity inherent to the combined expression of the CS protein and rEA. Fortunately, use of the rAd vaccine expressing EAT-2 circumvented CS protein's suppressive activity, and generated a fivefold increase in the number of CS protein responsive, IFNγ secreting splenocytes, as well as increased the breadth of T cells responsive to peptides present in the CS protein. These improvements were positively correlated with the induction of a fourfold improvement in CS protein specific CTL functional activity in vivo. CONCLUSION: Our results emphasize the need for caution when incorporating CS protein into malaria vaccine platforms expressing or containing other immunostimulatory compounds, as the immunological outcomes may be unanticipated and/or counter-productive. However, expressing the SLAM receptors derived signaling adaptor EAT-2 at the same time of vaccination with CS protein can

  18. Computational approach for identification of Anopheles gambiae miRNA involved in modulation of host immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanasambantham, Krishnaraj; Hairul-Islam, Villianur Ibrahim; Saravanan, Subramanian; Subasri, Subramaniyan; Subastri, Ariraman

    2013-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that play key roles in regulating gene expression in animals, plants, and viruses, which involves in biological processes including development, cancer, immunity, and host-microorganism interactions. In this present study, we have used the computational approach to identify potent miRNAs involved in Anopheles gambiae immune response. Analysis of 217,261 A. gambiae ESTs and further study of RNA folding revealed six new miRNAs. The minimum free energy of the predicted miRNAs ranged from -27.2 to -62.63 kcal/mol with an average of -49.38 kcal/mol. While its A + U % ranges from 50 to 65 % with an average value of 57.37 %. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted miRNAs revealed that aga-miR-277 was evolutionary highly conserved with more similarity with other mosquito species. Observing further the target identification of the predicted miRNA, it was noticed that the aga-miR-2304 and aga-miR-2390 are involved in modulation of immune response by targeting the gene encoding suppressin and protein prophenoloxidase. Further detailed studies of these miRNAs will help in revealing its function in modulation of A. gambiae immune response with respect to its parasite.

  19. Modulation of Cell-Mediated Immunity to Suppress High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Linna; Song, Kexiu; Gao, Mingming; Qu, Shen; Liu, Dexi

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effect of immune modulators, cyclosporin A and fingolimod, on high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high fat diet and injected intraperitoneally with cyclosporine A, fingolimod, or vehicle twice weekly for 15 weeks. Body weight and food intake were manually measured every other day. Glucose tolerance test, insulin sensitivity, and body composition were examined and compared between the control and the immune modulator treated animals. Tissue samples were collected at the end of the experiment and examined for serum biochemistry, histology, and mRNA levels of marker genes for inflammation, and glucose and lipid metabolism in white and brown adipose tissues and in the liver. Cyclosporine A and fingolimod suppressed high fat diet-induced weight gain, reduced hepatic fat accumulation, and improved insulin sensitivity. The beneficial effects are associated with altered expression of F4/80, Cd68, Il-6, Tnf-α, and Mcp-1 genes, which are involved in macrophage-related chronic inflammation in adipose and hepatic tissues. Immune modulation represents an important intervention for obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance.

  20. Tissue-specific activities of an immune signaling module regulate physiological responses to pathogenic and nutritional bacteria in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Robert P; Kooistra, Tristan; Chu, Stephanie W; Pagano, Daniel J; Kim, Dennis H

    2009-10-22

    Microbes represent both an essential source of nutrition and a potential source of lethal infection to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Immunity in C. elegans requires a signaling module comprised of orthologs of the mammalian Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain protein SARM, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) ASK1, and MAPKK MKK3, which activates p38 MAPK. We determined that the SARM-ASK1-MKK3 module has dual tissue-specific roles in the C. elegans response to pathogens--in the cell-autonomous regulation of innate immunity and the neuroendocrine regulation of serotonin-dependent aversive behavior. SARM-ASK1-MKK3 signaling in the sensory nervous system also regulates egg-laying behavior that is dependent on bacteria provided as a nutrient source. Our data demonstrate that these physiological responses to bacteria share a common mechanism of signaling through the SARM-ASK1-MKK3 module and suggest the co-option of ancestral immune signaling pathways in the evolution of physiological responses to microbial pathogens and nutrients.

  1. 替代性活化的巨噬细胞在蠕虫感染中的作用%Alternatively Activated Macrophages in Helminth Infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白雪; 于建立; 王峰; 赵颖; 刘明远; 王光明

    2011-01-01

    巨噬细胞不仅可以启动、调节免疫应答,也可作为最终的效应细胞.但相关研究表明巨噬细胞不仅与γ干扰素(IFN-γ)主导的Th1型反应相关,而且在Th2型反应中也发挥重要的作用,其活化途径与Th1型应答中经典活化途径的巨噬细胞存在明显不同,因此,该途径活化的巨噬细胞被称为替代性活化的巨噬细胞(AAMΦ).AAMΦ在蠕虫感染中发挥多种作用,包括控制炎症反应、促进损伤部位纤维化并进行修复,以及有效地抵抗蠕虫感染.本文综述了蠕虫感染过程中AAMΦ对疾病的发展和宿主保护方面的最新研究进展.%Macrophages not only initiate and modulate immune responses, but also are the final effector cells. Recent studies suggested that macrophages conventionally associated with IFN--y dominant Thl-type responses and also playing an essential role in the Th2-type inflammatory response, exhibit a quite different activation from the classically activated macrophages (CAM4>) stimulated during Till-type responses, therefore named as alternatively activated macrophages (AAM3>). AAM have multiple effects during helminth infection, including control of inflammatory reaction, contribution to fibrosis and repair at the site of injury, and anti-helminth effect. This article reviews recent findings regarding the role of AAM<& in the development of disease and host protection following helminth infection.[

  2. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    a reduction in size, caused by crowding, virtually nothing is known about longer-lasting effects after transmission to the definitive host. This study is the first to use in vitro cultivation with feeding of adult trematodes to investigate how numbers of parasites in the intermediate host affect the size......Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer...... and fecundity of adult parasites. For this purpose, we examined two different infracommunities of parasites in crustacean hosts. Firstly, we used experimental infections of Maritrema novaezealandensis in the amphipod, Paracalliope novizealandiae, to investigate potential density-dependent effects in single...

  3. Modulation of Host Immunity by Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Virulence Factors: A Synergic Inhibition of Both Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Canedo-Marroquín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ARTIs and high rates of hospitalizations in children and in the elderly worldwide. Symptoms of hRSV infection include bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The lung pathology observed during hRSV infection is due in part to an exacerbated host immune response, characterized by immune cell infiltration to the lungs. HRSV is an enveloped virus, a member of the Pneumoviridae family, with a non-segmented genome and negative polarity-single RNA that contains 10 genes encoding for 11 proteins. These include the Fusion protein (F, the Glycoprotein (G, and the Small Hydrophobic (SH protein, which are located on the virus surface. In addition, the Nucleoprotein (N, Phosphoprotein (P large polymerase protein (L part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex, the M2-1 protein as a transcription elongation factor, the M2-2 protein as a regulator of viral transcription and (M protein all of which locate inside the virion. Apart from the structural proteins, the hRSV genome encodes for the non-structural 1 and 2 proteins (NS1 and NS2. HRSV has developed different strategies to evade the host immunity by means of the function of some of these proteins that work as virulence factors to improve the infection in the lung tissue. Also, hRSV NS-1 and NS-2 proteins have been shown to inhibit the activation of the type I interferon response. Furthermore, the hRSV nucleoprotein has been shown to inhibit the immunological synapsis between the dendritic cells and T cells during infection, resulting in an inefficient T cell activation. Here, we discuss the hRSV virulence factors and the host immunological features raised during infection with this virus.

  4. Helminth infections in domestic dogs from Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, T. V.; Ermolenko, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Dogs are the hosts for a wide helminth spectrum including tapeworms, flatworms, and nematodes. These parasites affect the dog health and cause morbidity and mortality, especially in young and old animals. Some species, as Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Dipylidium caninum, and Echinococcus spp. are well-known zoonotic parasites worldwide, resulting in high public health risks. Poor data about canine helminth species and prevalence are available in Russia, mainly due to the absence of official guidelines for the control of dog parasites. Moreover, the consequent low quality of veterinary monitoring and use of preventive measures, the high rate of environmental contamination by dog feces and the increase of stray dog populations, make the control of the environmental contamination by dog helminths very difficult in this country. This paper reviews the knowledge on canine helminth fauna and prevalence in Russia. Practical aspects related to diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases of dogs in Russia are discussed. PMID:27956777

  5. Helminth infections in domestic dogs from Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Moskvina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dogs are the hosts for a wide helminth spectrum including tapeworms, flatworms, and nematodes. These parasites affect the dog health and cause morbidity and mortality, especially in young and old animals. Some species, as Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, Dipylidium caninum, and Echinococcus spp. are well-known zoonotic parasites worldwide, resulting in high public health risks. Poor data about canine helminth species and prevalence are available in Russia, mainly due to the absence of official guidelines for the control of dog parasites. Moreover, the consequent low quality of veterinary monitoring and use of preventive measures, the high rate of environmental contamination by dog feces and the increase of stray dog populations, make the control of the environmental contamination by dog helminths very difficult in this country. This paper reviews the knowledge on canine helminth fauna and prevalence in Russia. Practical aspects related to diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases of dogs in Russia are discussed.

  6. Innate antiviral immune signaling, viral evasion and modulation by HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Arjun; Gale, Michael

    2014-03-20

    The intracellular innate antiviral response in human cells is an essential component of immunity against virus infection. As obligate intracellular parasites, all viruses must evade the actions of the host cell's innate immune response in order to replicate and persist. Innate immunity is induced when pathogen recognition receptors of the host cell sense viral products including nucleic acid as "non-self". This process induces downstream signaling through adaptor proteins to activate latent transcription factors that drive the expression of genes encoding antiviral and immune modulatory effector proteins that restrict virus replication and regulate adaptive immunity. The interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are transcription factors that play major roles in innate immunity. In particular, IRF3 is activated in response to infection by a range of viruses including RNA viruses, DNA viruses and retroviruses. Among these viruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a major global health problem mediating chronic infection in millions of people wherein recent studies show that viral persistence is linked with the ability of the virus to dysregulate and evade the innate immune response. In this review, we discuss viral pathogen sensing, innate immune signaling pathways and effectors that respond to viral infection, the role of IRF3 in these processes and how it is regulated by pathogenic viruses. We present a contemporary overview of the interplay between HIV-1 and innate immunity, with a focus on understanding how innate immune control impacts infection outcome and disease.

  7. Fine structure and cellular responses at the host-parasite interface in a range of fish-helminth systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, B S; Bo, T; Lorenzoni, M; Shinn, A P; Giari, L

    2015-03-15

    A series of ultrastructural-based studies were conducted on the interface region in different fish-helminth systems: (a) an intestinal infection of the cestode Monobothrium wageneri in tench, Tinca tinca; (b) an extensive intestinal submucosa and mucosal infection in tench by metacercariae of an unidentified digenean trematode; (c) an intestinal infection in brown trout, Salmo trutta, by the acanthocephalan Dentitruncus truttae; (d) an extraintestinal infection by larvae of the acanthocephalan, Pomphorhynchus laevis in three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus; and (e) an infection in the livers of Eurasian minnow, Phoxinus phoxinus, by larvae of the nematode Raphidascaris acus. Endoparasitic helminths frequently cause inflammation of the digestive tract and associated organs, inducing the recruitment of various immune cells to the site of infection. In each of the fish-helminth systems that were studied, a massive hyperplastic granulocyte response involving mast cells (MCs) and neutrophils in close proximity to the helminths was documented. The current study presents data on the interface region in each fish-helminth system and documents the penetration of mast cells granules within the tegument of P. laevis larvae. No extracellular vesicles containing tegumental secretions from any of the four different taxa of endoparasitic helminths species at the host-parasite interface region were seen.

  8. HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses induced by Listeria vector vaccines are maintained in mice subsequently infected with a model helminth parasite, Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shollenberger, Lisa M; Bui, Cac T; Paterson, Yvonne; Nyhoff, Lindsay; Harn, Donald A

    2013-11-19

    In areas co-endemic for helminth parasites and HIV/AIDS, infants are often administered vaccines prior to infection with immune modulatory helminth parasites. Systemic Th2 biasing and immune suppression caused by helminth infection reduces cell-mediated responses to vaccines such as tetanus toxoid and BCG. Therefore, we asked if infection with helminthes post-vaccination, alters already established vaccine induced immune responses. In our model, mice are vaccinated against HIV-1 Gag using a Listeria vaccine vector (Lm-Gag) in a prime-boost manner, then infected with the human helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. This allows us to determine if established vaccine responses are maintained or altered after helminth infection. Our second objective asked if helminth infection post-vaccination alters the recipient's ability to respond to a second boost. Here we compared responses between uninfected mice, schistosome infected mice, and infected mice that were given an anthelminthic, which occurred coincident with the boost or four weeks prior, as well as comparing to un-boosted mice. We report that HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses generated by Listeria vector HIV-1 vaccines are maintained following subsequent chronic schistosome infection, providing further evidence that Listeria vector vaccines induce potent vaccine-specific responses that can withstand helminth infection. We also were able to demonstrate that administration of a second Listeria boost, which markedly enhanced the immune response, was minimally impacted by schistosome infection, or anthelminthic therapy. Surprisingly, we also observed enhanced antibody responses to HIV Gag in vaccinated mice subsequently infected with schistosomes.

  9. scFv from Antibody That Mimics gp43 Modulates the Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses during Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannuzzi, Grasielle Pereira; Tavares, Aldo Henrique F P; Kaihami, Gilberto Hideo; de Almeida, José Roberto Fogaça; de Almeida, Sandro Rogério; Ferreira, Karen Spadari

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides species is a prevalent systemic and progressive mycosis that occurs in Latin America. It is caused by Paracoccidioides species. Immunization with dendritic cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the scFv (pMAC/PS-scFv) that mimics the main antigen of P. brasiliensis (gp43) confers protection in experimental PCM. DCs link innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing invading pathogens and selecting the type of effector T cell to mediate the immune response. Here, we showed that DC-pMAC/PS-scFv induces the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results demonstrated that BALB/c mice infected with P. brasiliensis and treated with DC-pMAC/PS-scFv showed the induction of specific IgG production against gp43 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-4 cytokines. Analysis of regional lymph nodes revealed increases in the expression of clec7a, myd88, tlr2, gata3 and tbx21, which are involved in the immune response. Taken together, our results indicate that the scFv modulates the humoral and cellular immune responses and presents epitopes to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  10. scFv from Antibody That Mimics gp43 Modulates the Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses during Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasielle Pereira Jannuzzi

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, caused by Paracoccidioides species is a prevalent systemic and progressive mycosis that occurs in Latin America. It is caused by Paracoccidioides species. Immunization with dendritic cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the scFv (pMAC/PS-scFv that mimics the main antigen of P. brasiliensis (gp43 confers protection in experimental PCM. DCs link innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing invading pathogens and selecting the type of effector T cell to mediate the immune response. Here, we showed that DC-pMAC/PS-scFv induces the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results demonstrated that BALB/c mice infected with P. brasiliensis and treated with DC-pMAC/PS-scFv showed the induction of specific IgG production against gp43 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-4 cytokines. Analysis of regional lymph nodes revealed increases in the expression of clec7a, myd88, tlr2, gata3 and tbx21, which are involved in the immune response. Taken together, our results indicate that the scFv modulates the humoral and cellular immune responses and presents epitopes to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

  11. Modulation of Root Microbiome Community Assembly by the Plant Immune Response (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebeis, Sarah [University of North Carolina

    2013-03-01

    Sarah Lebeis of University of North Carolina on "Modulation of root microbiome community assembly by the plant immune response" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  12. Modulation of the chicken immune cell function by dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijben, J.W.C.

    2002-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) possess a wide range of biological properties, including immunomodulation. The amount, type, and ratio of dietary PUFA determine the types of fatty acids that are incorporated into immune cell membranes. Consequently, the physiological properties of immune cells an

  13. [Of worms and men--Administration of helminth products as an innovative approach to treatment of autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Yahel; Versini, Mathilde; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-07-01

    In areas where helminth infections are common, there is a low prevalence of autoimmune diseases. This observation gave rise to the hygiene hypothesis, claiming that certain organisms which were abundant in the human microenvironment hold an immunoregulatory and immunosuppressive effect, therefore, their eradication led to an increase in immune mediated diseases. This hypothesis laid the foundation for several directions of research which demonstrated an immunosuppressive and immunoregulatory effect of helminths on both the acquired and the innate immune systems. These studies led to the examination of the therapeutic potential of helminths and their components in treating different autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The administration of helminth products in murine models of these diseases exhibited a positive effect on disease expression, morbidity and mortality, as well as the ability to prevent the onset of disease to some extent (when given in a preventive protocol). Recently, a synthetic molecule composed of phosphorylcholine (a product of the nematode a. vitae) combined with the protein tuftsin, which is produced by human splenocytes, was shown to exert the aforementioned positive effects on a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). These discoveries point to a new direction in research for developing helminth-based therapies for autoimmune diseases.

  14. Exosomes secreted by nematode parasites transfer small RNAs to mammalian cells and modulate innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Amy H; Coakley, Gillian; Simbari, Fabio; McSorley, Henry J; Quintana, Juan F; Le Bihan, Thierry; Kumar, Sujai; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Lear, Marissa; Harcus, Yvonne; Ceroni, Alessandro; Babayan, Simon A; Blaxter, Mark; Ivens, Alasdair; Maizels, Rick M

    2014-11-25

    In mammalian systems RNA can move between cells via vesicles. Here we demonstrate that the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus, which infects mice, secretes vesicles containing microRNAs (miRNAs) and Y RNAs as well as a nematode Argonaute protein. These vesicles are of intestinal origin and are enriched for homologues of mammalian exosome proteins. Administration of the nematode exosomes to mice suppresses Type 2 innate responses and eosinophilia induced by the allergen Alternaria. Microarray analysis of mouse cells incubated with nematode exosomes in vitro identifies Il33r and Dusp1 as suppressed genes, and Dusp1 can be repressed by nematode miRNAs based on a reporter assay. We further identify miRNAs from the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis in the serum of infected mice, suggesting that miRNA secretion into host tissues is conserved among parasitic nematodes. These results reveal exosomes as another mechanism by which helminths manipulate their hosts and provide a mechanistic framework for RNA transfer between animal species.

  15. Immunoregulatory mechanisms in Chagas disease: modulation of apoptosis in T-cell mediated immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Ana Thereza; de Assis Silva Gomes Estanislau, Juliana; Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Carvalho, Andréa Teixeira; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Guimarães, Pedro Henrique Gazzinelli; de Souza Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Morato, Maria José; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; da Costa Rocha, Manoel Otávio; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2016-04-30

    Chronic Chagas disease presents different clinical manifestations ranging from asymptomatic (namely indeterminate) to severe cardiac and/or digestive. Previous results have shown that the immune response plays an important role, although no all mechanisms are understood. Immunoregulatory mechanisms such as apoptosis are important for the control of Chagas disease, possibly affecting the morbidity in chronic clinical forms. Apoptosis has been suggested to be an important mechanism of cellular response during T. cruzi infection. We aimed to further understand the putative role of apoptosis in Chagas disease and its relation to the clinical forms of the disease. Apoptosis of lymphocytes, under antigenic stimuli (soluble T. cruzi antigens - TcAg) where compared to that of non-stimulated cells. Apoptosis was evaluated using the expression of annexin and caspase 3(+) by T cells and the percentage of cells positive evaluated by flow cytometry. In addition activation and T cell markers were used for the identification of TCD4(+) and TCD8(+) subpopulations. The presence of intracellular and plasma cytokines were also evaluated. Analysis of the activation status of the peripheral blood cells showed that patients with Chagas disease presented higher levels of activation determined by the expression of activation markers, after TcAg stimulation. PCR array were used to evaluate the contribution of this mechanism in specific cell populations from patients with different clinical forms of human Chagas disease. Our results showed a reduced proliferative response associated a high expression of T CD4(+)CD62L(-) cells in CARD patients when compared with IND group and NI individuals. We also observed that both groups of patients presented a significant increase of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets in undergoing apoptosis after in vitro stimulation with T. cruzi antigens. In CARD patients, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressing TNF-α were highly susceptible to undergo apoptosis

  16. GanedenBC30™ cell wall and metabolites: anti-inflammatory and immune modulating effects in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Steve G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to evaluate anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties of the probiotic, spore-forming bacterial strain: Bacillus coagulans: GBI-30, (PTA-6086, GanedenBC30TM. In addition, cell wall and metabolite fractions were assayed separately to address whether biological effects were due to cell wall components only, or whether secreted compounds from live bacteria had additional biological properties. The spores were heat-activated, and bacterial cultures were grown. The culture supernatant was harvested as a source of metabolites (MTB, and the bacteria were used to isolate cell wall fragments (CW. Both of these fractions were compared in a series of in vitro assays. Results Both MTB and CW inhibited spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced ROS formation in human PMN cells and increased the phagocytic activity of PMN cells in response to bacteria-like carboxylated fluorospheres. Both fractions supported random PMN and f-MLP-directed PMN cell migration, indicating a support of immune surveillance and antibacterial defense mechanisms. In contrast, low doses of both fractions inhibited PMN cell migration towards the inflammatory mediators IL-8 and LTB4. The anti-inflammatory activity was strongest for CW, where the PMN migration towards IL-8 was inhibited down to dilutions of 1010. Both MTB and CW induced the expression of the CD69 activation marker on human CD3- CD56+ NK cells, and enhanced the expression of CD107a when exposed to K562 tumor cells in vitro. The fractions directly modulated cytokine production, inducing production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and inhibiting production of IL-2. Both fractions further modulated mitogen-induced cytokine production in the following manner: Both fractions enhanced the PHA-induced production of IL-6 and reduced the PHA-induced production of TNF-alpha. Both fractions enhanced the PWM-induced production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In addition, MTB

  17. Helminth infection impairs the immunogenicity of a Plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine, but not irradiated sporozoites, in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of an effective vaccine against malaria remains a priority. However, a significant number of individuals living in tropical areas are also likely to be co-infected with helminths, which are known to adversely affect immune responses to a number of different existing vaccines. Here we com...

  18. MicroRNA-29b modulates innate and antigen-specific immune responses in mouse models of autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolline Salama

    Full Text Available In addition to important regulatory roles in gene expression through RNA interference, it has recently been shown that microRNAs display immune stimulatory effects through direct interaction with receptors of innate immunity of the Toll-like receptor family, aggravating neuronal damage and tumour growth. Yet no evidence exists on consequences of microRNA immune stimulatory actions in the context of an autoimmune disease. Using microRNA analogues, we here show that pancreatic beta cell-derived microRNA sequences induce pro-inflammatory (TNFa, IFNa, IL-12, IL-6 or suppressive (IL-10 cytokine secretion by primary mouse dendritic cells in a sequence-dependent manner. For miR-29b, immune stimulation in RAW264.7 macrophages involved the endosomal Toll-like receptor-7, independently of the canonical RNA interference pathway. In vivo, the systemic delivery of miR-29b activates CD11b+B220- myeloid and CD11b-B220+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells and induces IFNa, TNFa and IL-6 production in the serum of recipient mice. Strikingly, in a murine model of adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes, miR-29b reduces the cytolytic activity of transferred effector CD8+ T-cells, insulitis and disease incidence in a single standalone intervention. Endogenous miR-29b, spontaneously released from beta-cells within exosomes, stimulates TNFa secretion from spleen cells isolated from diabetes-prone NOD mice in vitro. Hence, microRNA sequences modulate innate and ongoing adaptive immune responses raising the question of their potential role in the breakdown of tolerance and opening up new applications for microRNA-based immune therapy.

  19. Gastrointestinal helminths of resident wildlife at the Federal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2014-08-12

    Aug 12, 2014 ... nematode helminths of resident wild animals at the FUNAAB Zoo Park, Abeokuta. Keywords: Helminth ... research stations, sanctuaries, aquaria, circuses, and .... one single worm specie or the presence of different ova types.

  20. Regulatory T Cell and Forkhead Box Protein 3 as Modulators of Immune Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonn Mendes Soares Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3 is an essential molecular marker of regulatory T cell (Treg development in different microenvironments. Tregs are cells specialized in the suppression of inadequate immune responses and the maintenance of homeostatic tolerance. Studies have addressed and elucidated the role played by FOXP3 and Treg in countless autoimmune and infectious diseases as well as in more specific cases, such as cancer. Within this context, the present article reviews aspects of the immunoregulatory profile of FOXP3 and Treg in the management of immune homeostasis, including issues relating to pathology as well as immune tolerance.

  1. Dietary supplementation with two Lamiaceae herbs-(oregano and sage modulates innate immunity parameters in Lumbric us terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D A Vattem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lamiaceae herbs have are well known for their immunomodulatory effects, however, the mechanism by which they effect innate immune system is not clearly understood. Objective: The effect of dietary supplementation with two Lamiaceae herbs (oregano and sage modulation of on innate immunological parameters was investigated in Lumbricus terrestris. Materials and Methods: Animals were fed (ad libitum on herbs supplemented diet [(0.1% (w/v and 0.5% (w/v] for 6 days. Changes in immune competent cell counts, viability, and relative neutrophil-like cell counts were determined in response to herb treatment. Changes in nitric oxide, phagocytic activity, and respiratory burst index were also determined in response to herb treatment relative to control. Additionally, effect of herb co-treatment cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg-BW induced immunosuppression was also evaluated. Results: Our results suggested abrogation of CP-induced immunosuppression in response to co-treatment with herbs. Significant increase in nitric oxide-mediated immune-competent cell counts, viability, and differentiation into neutrophil-like cells were observed in response to dietary supplementation with Lamiaceae herbs. Significantly higher phagocytic activity relative to control was also noted in response to dietary intake of oregano and sage. However, the respiratory burst index did not increase exponentially in response to herb treatments, suggesting a potential enhancement in pathogen recognition and antioxidant defenses. Conclusion: Lamiaceae herbs may have potential immune-modulatory properties important for human health and merits further investigation.

  2. Epitope DNA vaccines against tuberculosis: spacers and ubiquitin modulates cellular immune responses elicited by epitope DNA vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang QM; Sun SH; Hu ZL; Zhou FJ; Yin M; Xiao CJ; Zhang JC

    2005-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses are crucial in the protection against tuberculosis. In this study, we constructed epitope DNA vaccines (p3-M-38) encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes of MPT64 and 38 kDa proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In order to observe the influence of spacer sequence (Ala-Ala-Tyr) or ubiquitin (UbGR) on the efficacy of the two CTL epitopes, we also constructed DNA vaccines, p3-M-S(spacer)-38, p3-Ub (UbGR)-M-S-38 and p3-Ub-M-38. The immune responses elicited by the four DNA vaccines were tested in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The cytotoxicity of T cells was detected by LDH-release method and by enzyme-linked immunospot assay for epitope-specific cells secreting interferon-gamma. The results showed that DNA immunization with p3-M-38 vaccine could induce epitope-specific CD8+ CTL response and that the spacer sequence (AAY) only enhanced M epitope presentation. The protein-targeting sequence (UbGR) enhanced the immunogenicity of the two epitopes. The finding that defined spacer sequences at C-terminus and protein-targeting degradation modulated the immune response of epitope string DNA vaccines will be of importance for the further development of multi-epitope DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

  3. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunyoung Joo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy for patients who have intractable muscle disorders may require highly regenerative cells from young, healthy allogeneic donors. Mesenchymal stem cells are currently under clinical investigation because they are known to induce muscle regeneration and believed to be immune privileged, thus making them suitable for allogeneic applications. However, it is unclear whether allogeneic and myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells retain their immunomodulatory characteristics. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on the immune characteristics of cells in vitro. We investigated the immunologic properties of mesenchymal stem cells after myogenic induction. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from C57BL/6 mice and the C3H/10T1/2 murine mesenchymal stem cell line. Two different 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine doses (0.5 and 3 µM were evaluated for their effects on mesenchymal stem cell skeletal myogenic differentiation potential, immune antigen expression, and mixed lymphocytic reactions. Using a mixed lymphocytic reaction, we determined the optimal splenocyte proliferation inhibition dose. The induction of regulatory T cells was markedly increased by the addition of 3 µM 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine–treated mesenchymal stem cells. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells do not elicit alloreactive lymphocyte proliferative responses and are able to modulate immune responses. These findings support the hypothesis that myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells may be transplantable across allogeneic barriers.

  4. Activity modulation of microbial enzymes by llama (Lama glama) heavy-chain polyclonal antibodies during in vivo immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, A; Weill, F S; Paz, M L; Cela, E M; González Maglio, D H; Leoni, J

    2012-03-01

    Since they were first described in 1993, it was found that recombinant variable fragments (rVHHs) of heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs) from Camelidae have unusual biophysical properties, as well as a special ability to interact with epitopes that are cryptic for conventional Abs. It has been assumed that in vivo raised polyclonal HCAbs (pHCAbs) should behave in a similar manner than rVHHs; however, this assumption has not been tested sufficiently. Furthermore, our own preliminary work on a single serum sample from a llama immunized with a β-lactamase, has suggested that pHCAbs have no special ability to down-modulate catalytic activity. In this work, we further explored the interaction of pHCAbs from four llamas raised against two microbial enzymes and analyzed it within a short and a long immunization plan. The relative contribution of pHCAbs to serum titer was found to be low compared with that of the most abundant conventional subisotype (IgG(1)), during the whole immunization schedule. Furthermore, pHCAbs not only failed to inhibit the enzymes, but also activated one of them. Altogether, these results suggest that raising high titer inhibitory HCAbs is not a straightforward strategy - neither as a biotechnological strategy nor in the biological context of an immune response against infection - as raising inhibitory rVHHs.

  5. The Salmonella Effector Protein SopA Modulates Innate Immune Responses by Targeting TRIM E3 Ligase Family Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kamanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium stimulates inflammatory responses in the intestinal epithelium, which are essential for its ability to replicate within the intestinal tract. Stimulation of these responses is strictly dependent on the activity of a type III secretion system encoded within its pathogenicity island 1, which through the delivery of effector proteins, triggers signaling pathways leading to inflammation. One of these effectors is SopA, a HECT-type E3 ligase, which is required for the efficient stimulation of inflammation in an animal model of Salmonella Typhimurium infection. We show here that SopA contributes to the stimulation of innate immune responses by targeting two host E3 ubiquitin ligases, TRIM56 and TRIM65. We also found that TRIM65 interacts with the innate immune receptor MDA5 enhancing its ability to stimulate interferon-β signaling. Therefore, by targeting TRIM56 and TRIM65, SopA can stimulate signaling through two innate immune receptors, RIG-I and MDA5. These findings describe a Salmonella mechanism to modulate inflammatory responses by directly targeting innate immune signaling mechanisms.

  6. Fauna Europaea: Helminths (Animal Parasitic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gibson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region, and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Helminths parasitic in animals represent a large assemblage of worms, representing three phyla, with more than 200 families and almost 4,000 species of parasites from all major vertebrate and many invertebrate groups. A general introduction is given for each of the major groups of parasitic worms, i.e. the Acanthocephala, Monogenea, Trematoda (Aspidogastrea and Digenea, Cestoda and Nematoda. Basic information for each group includes its size, host-range, distribution, morphological features, life-cycle, classification, identification and recent key-works. Tabulations include a complete list of families dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition, a list of additional specialists who helped with particular groups, and a list of higher taxa dealt with down to the family level. A compilation of useful references is appended.

  7. Evaluation of Allergy Effector Cell Function: Suppression of Basophils in Chronic Helminth Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    eosinophilia in the lung was markedly reduced, compared to uninfected sensitized controls. Some of the protection in this model was associated with...the prevention of airway eosinophilia and reduced airway hyperreactivity after OVA challenge (38). When excretory/secretory products obtained from...allergic diseases, helminths induce type 2 immune responses characterized by eosinophilia , elevated IgE levels, and CD4+ T-cell production of IL-4

  8. Considering RNAi experimental design in parasitic helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, Johnathan J; Warnock, Neil D; McVeigh, Paul; Marks, Nikki J; Mousley, Angela; Atkinson, Louise; Maule, Aaron G

    2012-04-01

    Almost a decade has passed since the first report of RNA interference (RNAi) in a parasitic helminth. Whilst much progress has been made with RNAi informing gene function studies in disparate nematode and flatworm parasites, substantial and seemingly prohibitive difficulties have been encountered in some species, hindering progress. An appraisal of current practices, trends and ideals of RNAi experimental design in parasitic helminths is both timely and necessary for a number of reasons: firstly, the increasing availability of parasitic helminth genome/transcriptome resources means there is a growing need for gene function tools such as RNAi; secondly, fundamental differences and unique challenges exist for parasite species which do not apply to model organisms; thirdly, the inherent variation in experimental design, and reported difficulties with reproducibility undermine confidence. Ideally, RNAi studies of gene function should adopt standardised experimental design to aid reproducibility, interpretation and comparative analyses. Although the huge variations in parasite biology and experimental endpoints make RNAi experimental design standardization difficult or impractical, we must strive to validate RNAi experimentation in helminth parasites. To aid this process we identify multiple approaches to RNAi experimental validation and highlight those which we deem to be critical for gene function studies in helminth parasites.

  9. Various eicosanoids modulate the cellular and humoral immune responses of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sony; Kim, Yonggyun

    2009-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) can catalyze the oxidation of C20 fatty acids to produce certain eicosanoids, which play roles in mediating immune responses in insects. Despite their critical role in insect immunity, there have been few studies of the unique effects of different eicosanoids on immune responses. This study analyzed cellular and humoral immune responses of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, using seven eicosanoids selected from two major eicosanoid subgroups: prostaglandin (PG) and leukotriene (LT), derived from catalytic activities of COX and LOX respectively. Upon bacterial challenge, all seven eicosanoids (PGA(1), PGB(2), PGD(2), PGE(1), PGE(2), PGF(1alpha), and LTB(4)) significantly induced hemocyte nodulation and phagocytosis in the presence of dexamethasone, an eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitor. However, only PGs induced cell lysis of oenocytoids to release prophenoloxidase, which resulted in an increase in phenoloxidase activity. These seven eicosanoids also induced expression of humoral immune-associated genes, including prophenoloxidase, serpin, dopa decarboxylase, cecropin, and lysozyme, in which PGB(2) and PGE(1) did not induce gene expression of prophenoloxidase. To understand the interactions between different eicosanoids, mixture effects of these eicosanoids were compared with their individual eicosanoid effects on mediating nodule formation in response to bacterial challenge. All six single PGs showed increases in nodule formation in a dose-dependent manner without significant difference among the different types. LTB(4) was more potent than the tested PGs in mediating the cellular immune response. At low doses, all combinations of two eicosanoids showed significant additive effects on nodule formation. These results indicate that immune target cells, such as hemocyte and fat body, of S. exigua can respond to different COX and LOX products to express cellular and humoral immune responses, and their overlapping, additive

  10. Identification of genetic loci in Lactobacillus plantarum that modulate the immune response of dendritic cells using comparative genome hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Meijerink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probiotics can be used to stimulate or regulate epithelial and immune cells of the intestinal mucosa and generate beneficial mucosal immunomodulatory effects. Beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotics have been established in the treatment and prevention of various intestinal disorders, including allergic diseases and diarrhea. However, the precise molecular mechanisms and the strain-dependent factors involved are poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we aimed to identify gene loci in the model probiotic organism Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 that modulate the immune response of host dendritic cells. The amounts of IL-10 and IL-12 secreted by dendritic cells (DCs after stimulation with 42 individual L. plantarum strains were measured and correlated with the strain-specific genomic composition using comparative genome hybridisation and the Random Forest algorithm. This in silico "gene-trait matching" approach led to the identification of eight candidate genes in the L. plantarum genome that might modulate the DC cytokine response to L. plantarum. Six of these genes were involved in bacteriocin production or secretion, one encoded a bile salt hydrolase and one encoded a transcription regulator of which the exact function is unknown. Subsequently, gene deletions mutants were constructed in L. plantarum WCFS1 and compared to the wild-type strain in DC stimulation assays. All three bacteriocin mutants as well as the transcription regulator (lp_2991 had the predicted effect on cytokine production confirming their immunomodulatory effect on the DC response to L. plantarum. Transcriptome analysis and qPCR data showed that transcript level of gtcA3, which is predicted to be involved in glycosylation of cell wall teichoic acids, was substantially increased in the lp_2991 deletion mutant (44 and 29 fold respectively. CONCLUSION: Comparative genome hybridization led to the identification of gene loci in L

  11. Immune Modulation by Vitamin D and Its Relevance to Food Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor H. A. Suaini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Apart from its classical function in bone and calcium metabolism, vitamin D is also involved in immune regulation and has been linked to various cancers, immune disorders and allergic diseases. Within the innate and adaptive immune systems, the vitamin D receptor and enzymes in monocytes, dendritic cells, epithelial cells, T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes mediate the immune modulatory actions of vitamin D. Vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency early in life has been identified as one of the risk factors for food allergy. Several studies have observed an association between increasing latitude and food allergy prevalence, plausibly linked to lower ultraviolet radiation (UVR exposure and vitamin D synthesis in the skin. Along with mounting epidemiological evidence of a link between vitamin D status and food allergy, mice and human studies have shed light on the modulatory properties of vitamin D on the innate and adaptive immune systems. This review will summarize the literature on the metabolism and immune modulatory properties of vitamin D, with particular reference to food allergy.

  12. Epigenetic modulation of host: new insights into immune evasion by viruse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dwaipayan Adhya; Anirban Basu

    2010-12-01

    Viruses have evolved with their hosts, which include all living species. This has been partly responsible for the development of highly advanced immune systems in the hosts. However, viruses too have evolved ways to regulate and evade the host’s immune defence. In addition to mutational mechanisms that viruses employ to mimic the host genome and undergo latency to evade the host’s recognition of the pathogen, they have also developed epigenetic mechanisms by which they can render the host’s immune responses inactive to their antigens. The epigenetic regulation of gene expression is intrinsically active inside the host and is involved in regulating gene expression and cellular differentiation. Viral immune evasion strategies are an area of major concern in modern biomedical research. Immune evasion strategies may involve interference with the host antigen presentation machinery or host immune gene expression capabilities, and viruses, in these manners, introduce and propagate infection. The aim of this review is to elucidate the various epigenetic changes that viruses are capable of bringing about in their host in order to enhance their own survivability and pathogenesis.

  13. New Method to Disaggregate and Analyze Single Isolated Helminthes Cells Using Flow Cytometry: Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava-Castro, Karen; Hernández-Bello, Romel; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé; Escobedo, Galileo; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    In parasitology, particularly in helminthes studies, several methods have been used to look for the expression of specific molecules, such as RT-PCR, western blot, 2D-electrophoresis, and microscopy, among others. However, these methods require homogenization of the whole helminth parasite, preventing evaluation of individual cells or specific cell types in a given parasite tissue or organ. Also, the extremely high interaction between helminthes and host cells (particularly immune cells) is an important point to be considered. It is really hard to obtain fresh parasites without host cell contamination. Then, it becomes crucial to determine that the analyzed proteins are exclusively from parasitic origin, and not a consequence of host cell contamination. Flow cytometry is a fluorescence-based technique used to evaluate the expression of extra-and intracellular proteins in different type cells, including protozoan parasites. It also allows the isolation and recovery of single-cell populations. Here, we describe a method to isolate and obtain purified helminthes cells. PMID:22187522

  14. Helminth infections predispose mice to pneumococcal pneumonia but not to other pneumonic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiwattanakul, Nopporn; Thomas, Paul G; Kuhn, Raymond E; Herbert, De'Broski R; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-10-01

    Pneumonia is the leading killer of children worldwide. Here, we report that helminth-infected mice develop fatal pneumonia when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mice were chronically infected with either the flatworm Taenia crassiceps or the roundworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus. Upon challenge with a pneumonic type 3 strain of S. pneumoniae (A66.1), the worm-infected mice developed pneumonia at a rate and to a degree higher than age-matched control mice as measured by bioluminescent imaging and lung titers. This predisposition to pneumonia appears to be specific to S. pneumoniae, as worm-infected mice did not show evidence of increased morbidity when challenged with a lethal dose of influenza virus or sublethal doses of Staphylococcus aureus or Listeria monocytogenes. The defect was also present when worm-infected mice were challenged with a type 2 sepsis-causing strain (D39); an increased rate of pneumonia, decreased survival, and increased lung and blood titers were found. Pneumococcal colonization and immunity against acute otitis media were unaffected. Anti-helminthic treatment in the H. polygyrus model reversed this susceptibility. We conclude that helminth coinfection predisposes mice to fatal pneumococcal pneumonia by promoting increased outgrowth of bacteria in the lungs and blood. These data have broad implications for the prevention and treatment for pneumonia in the developing world, where helminth infections are endemic and pneumococcal pneumonia is common.

  15. New Method to Disaggregate and Analyze Single Isolated Helminthes Cells Using Flow Cytometry: Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nava-Castro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In parasitology, particularly in helminthes studies, several methods have been used to look for the expression of specific molecules, such as RT-PCR, western blot, 2D-electrophoresis, and microscopy, among others. However, these methods require homogenization of the whole helminth parasite, preventing evaluation of individual cells or specific cell types in a given parasite tissue or organ. Also, the extremely high interaction between helminthes and host cells (particularly immune cells is an important point to be considered. It is really hard to obtain fresh parasites without host cell contamination. Then, it becomes crucial to determine that the analyzed proteins are exclusively from parasitic origin, and not a consequence of host cell contamination. Flow cytometry is a fluorescence-based technique used to evaluate the expression of extra-and intracellular proteins in different type cells, including protozoan parasites. It also allows the isolation and recovery of single-cell populations. Here, we describe a method to isolate and obtain purified helminthes cells.

  16. Check list of the helminths of equines in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürler, Ali Tümay; Bölükbaş, Cenk Soner; Açici, Mustafa; Umur, Sinasi

    2010-01-01

    Helminths of equines are one of the most important agents of parasitic diseases. Therefore, many studies have been conducted on helminths of equines in Turkey. In this article, a check list and prevalence rates of helminths of equines in Turkey have been given.

  17. intestinal helminthes infestation among pupils in rural and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    different risk factors for geohelminth infestation, and that the rural areas are more likely to suffer more helminthic infections than ... Key words: intestinalhelmlllth, school children, mean egg load of helminthes. ..... determinants of infestation in both-rural and urban area include ... helminthic infection and malnutrition. Nigerian ...

  18. Th2 cell-intrinsic hypo-responsiveness determines susceptibility to helminth infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke van der Werf

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The suppression of protective Type 2 immunity is a principal factor driving the chronicity of helminth infections, and has been attributed to a range of Th2 cell-extrinsic immune-regulators. However, the intrinsic fate of parasite-specific Th2 cells within a chronic immune down-regulatory environment, and the resultant impact such fate changes may have on host resistance is unknown. We used IL-4gfp reporter mice to demonstrate that during chronic helminth infection with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis, CD4(+ Th2 cells are conditioned towards an intrinsically hypo-responsive phenotype, characterised by a loss of functional ability to proliferate and produce the cytokines IL-4, IL-5 and IL-2. Th2 cell hypo-responsiveness was a key element determining susceptibility to L. sigmodontis infection, and could be reversed in vivo by blockade of PD-1 resulting in long-term recovery of Th2 cell functional quality and enhanced resistance. Contrasting with T cell dysfunction in Type 1 settings, the control of Th2 cell hypo-responsiveness by PD-1 was mediated through PD-L2, and not PD-L1. Thus, intrinsic changes in Th2 cell quality leading to a functionally hypo-responsive phenotype play a key role in determining susceptibility to filarial infection, and the therapeutic manipulation of Th2 cell-intrinsic quality provides a potential avenue for promoting resistance to helminths.

  19. β2→1-Fructans Modulate the Immune System In Vivo in a Microbiota-Dependent and -Independent Fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Floris; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M.; Elderman, Marlies; Bosveld, Margaret; El Aidy, Sahar; Hugenholtz, Floor; Borghuis, Theo; Kousemaker, Ben; Winkel, Simon; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa; de Jonge, Marien I.; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Smidt, Hauke; Schols, Henk A.; de Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown in vitro that only specific dietary fibers contribute to immunity, but studies in vivo are not conclusive. Here, we investigated degree of polymerization (DP) dependent effects of β2→1-fructans on immunity via microbiota-dependent and -independent effects. To this end, conventional or germ-free mice received short- or long-chain β2→1-fructan for 5 days. Immune cell populations in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), and Peyer’s patches (PPs) were analyzed with flow cytometry, genome-wide gene expression in the ileum was measured with microarray, and gut microbiota composition was analyzed with 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples. We found that β2→1-fructans modulated immunity by both microbiota and microbiota-independent effects. Moreover, effects were dependent on the chain-length of the β2→1-fructans type polymer. Both short- and long-chain β2→1-fructans enhanced T-helper 1 cells in PPs, whereas only short-chain β2→1-fructans increased regulatory T cells and CD11b−CD103− dendritic cells (DCs) in the MLN. A common feature after short- and long-chain β2→1-fructan treatment was enhanced 2-alpha-l-fucosyltransferase 2 expression and other IL-22-dependent genes in the ileum of conventional mice. These effects were not associated with shifts in gut microbiota composition, or altered production of short-chain fatty acids. Both short- and long-chain β2→1-fructans also induced immune effects in germ-free animals, demonstrating direct effect independent from the gut microbiota. Also, these effects were dependent on the chain-length of the β2→1-fructans. Short-chain β2→1-fructan induced lower CD80 expression by CD11b−CD103− DCs in PPs, whereas long-chain β2→1-fructan specifically modulated B cell responses in germ-free mice. In conclusion, support of immunity is determined by the chemical structure of β2→1-fructans and is partially microbiota independent. PMID:28261212

  20. β2→1-Fructans Modulate the Immune System In Vivo in a Microbiota-Dependent and -Independent Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Floris; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M; Elderman, Marlies; Bosveld, Margaret; El Aidy, Sahar; Hugenholtz, Floor; Borghuis, Theo; Kousemaker, Ben; Winkel, Simon; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa; de Jonge, Marien I; Boekschoten, Mark V; Smidt, Hauke; Schols, Henk A; de Vos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown in vitro that only specific dietary fibers contribute to immunity, but studies in vivo are not conclusive. Here, we investigated degree of polymerization (DP) dependent effects of β2→1-fructans on immunity via microbiota-dependent and -independent effects. To this end, conventional or germ-free mice received short- or long-chain β2→1-fructan for 5 days. Immune cell populations in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), and Peyer's patches (PPs) were analyzed with flow cytometry, genome-wide gene expression in the ileum was measured with microarray, and gut microbiota composition was analyzed with 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples. We found that β2→1-fructans modulated immunity by both microbiota and microbiota-independent effects. Moreover, effects were dependent on the chain-length of the β2→1-fructans type polymer. Both short- and long-chain β2→1-fructans enhanced T-helper 1 cells in PPs, whereas only short-chain β2→1-fructans increased regulatory T cells and CD11b(-)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs) in the MLN. A common feature after short- and long-chain β2→1-fructan treatment was enhanced 2-alpha-l-fucosyltransferase 2 expression and other IL-22-dependent genes in the ileum of conventional mice. These effects were not associated with shifts in gut microbiota composition, or altered production of short-chain fatty acids. Both short- and long-chain β2→1-fructans also induced immune effects in germ-free animals, demonstrating direct effect independent from the gut microbiota. Also, these effects were dependent on the chain-length of the β2→1-fructans. Short-chain β2→1-fructan induced lower CD80 expression by CD11b(-)CD103(-) DCs in PPs, whereas long-chain β2→1-fructan specifically modulated B cell responses in germ-free mice. In conclusion, support of immunity is determined by the chemical structure of β2→1-fructans and is partially microbiota independent.

  1. Novel immune-modulator identified by a rapid, functional screen of the parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The success of new sequencing technologies and informatic methods for identifying genes has made establishing gene product function a critical rate limiting step in progressing the molecular sciences. We present a method to functionally mine genomes for useful activities in vivo, using an unusual property of a member of the poxvirus family to demonstrate this screening approach. Results The genome of Parapoxvirus ovis (Orf virus was sequenced, annotated, and then used to PCR-amplify its open-reading-frames. Employing a cloning-independent protocol, a viral expression-library was rapidly built and arrayed into sub-library pools. These were directly delivered into mice as expressible cassettes and assayed for an immune-modulating activity associated with parapoxvirus infection. The product of the B2L gene, a homolog of vaccinia F13L, was identified as the factor eliciting immune cell accumulation at sites of skin inoculation. Administration of purified B2 protein also elicited immune cell accumulation activity, and additionally was found to serve as an adjuvant for antigen-specific responses. Co-delivery of the B2L gene with an influenza gene-vaccine significantly improved protection in mice. Furthermore, delivery of the B2L expression construct, without antigen, non-specifically reduced tumor growth in murine models of cancer. Conclusion A streamlined, functional approach to genome-wide screening of a biological activity in vivo is presented. Its application to screening in mice for an immune activity elicited by the pathogen genome of Parapoxvirus ovis yielded a novel immunomodulator. In this inverted discovery method, it was possible to identify the adjuvant responsible for a function of interest prior to a mechanistic study of the adjuvant. The non-specific immune activity of this modulator, B2, is similar to that associated with administration of inactivated particles to a host or to a live viral infection. Administration

  2. Prevalence and clinical relevance of helminth co-infections among tuberculosis patients in urban Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hella, Jerry; Said, Khadija; Kamwela, Lujeko; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Maroa, Thomas; Chiryamkubi, Magreth; Mhalu, Grace; Schindler, Christian; Reither, Klaus; Knopp, Stefanie; Utzinger, Jürg; Gagneux, Sébastien; Fenner, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Background Helminth infections can negatively affect the immunologic host control, which may increase the risk of progression from latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis (TB) disease and alter the clinical presentation of TB. We assessed the prevalence and determined the clinical relevance of helminth co-infection among TB patients and household contact controls in urban Tanzania. Methodology Between November 2013 and October 2015, we enrolled adult (≥18 years) sputum smear-positive TB patients and household contact controls without TB during an ongoing TB cohort study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We used Baermann, FLOTAC, Kato-Katz, point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen, and urine filtration to diagnose helminth infections. Multivariable logistic regression models with and without random effects for households were used to assess for associations between helminth infection and TB. Principal findings A total of 597 TB patients and 375 household contact controls were included. The median age was 33 years and 60.2% (585/972) were men. The prevalence of any helminth infection among TB patients was 31.8% (190/597) and 25.9% (97/375) among controls. Strongyloides stercoralis was the predominant helminth species (16.6%, 161), followed by hookworm (9.0%, 87) and Schistosoma mansoni (5.7%, 55). An infection with any helminth was not associated with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88–1.80, p = 0.22), but S. mansoni infection was (aOR 2.15, 95% CI: 1.03–4.45, p = 0.040). Moreover, S. mansoni infection was associated with lower sputum bacterial load (aOR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.38–5.26, p = 0.004) and tended to have fewer lung cavitations (aOR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.12–1.16, p = 0.088). Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni infection was an independent risk factor for active TB and altered the clinical presentation in TB patients. These findings suggest a role for schistosomiasis in modulating the pathogenesis of human TB

  3. Mucocutaneous manifestations of helminth infections: Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Omar; Downing, Christopher; Lee, Michael; Pino, Livia; Bravo, Francisco; Giglio, Patricia; Sethi, Aisha; Klaus, Sidney; Sangueza, Omar P; Fuller, Claire; Mendoza, Natalia; Ladizinski, Barry; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-12-01

    In the 21st century, despite increased globalization through international travel for business, medical volunteerism, pleasure, and immigration/refugees into the United States, there is little published in the dermatology literature regarding the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections. Approximately 17% of travelers seek medical care because of cutaneous disorders, many related to infectious etiologies. This review will focus on the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections and is divided into 2 parts: part I focuses on nematode infections, and part II focuses on trematode and cestode infections. This review highlights the clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of helminth infections. Nematodes are roundworms that cause diseases with cutaneous manifestations, such as cutaneous larval migrans, onchocerciasis, filariasis, gnathostomiasis, loiasis, dracunculiasis, strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, streptocerciasis, dirofilariasis, and trichinosis. Tremadotes, also known as flukes, cause schistosomiasis, paragonimiasis, and fascioliasis. Cestodes (tapeworms) are flat, hermaphroditic parasites that cause diseases such as sparganosis, cysticercosis, and echinococcus.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates immune reaction in mice with peripheral nerve xenotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu X

    2016-03-01

    mice than that in the spleen of XT only mice (P<0.05. Serum levels of IL-6, TNF-α, interferon-γ, and IL-17 were decreased, while IL-4 and IL-10 were stimulated by BDNF following xenotransplantation. Conclusion: BDNF reduced NK cells but increased NKT cell accumulation in the spleen of xenotransplanted mice. BDNF modulated the number of splenic T cells and its subtype cells in the mice following xenotransplantation. These findings suggest that BDNF inhibits rejection of peripheral nerve following xenotransplantation by regulating innate as well as adaptive immune reaction. Keywords: peripheral nerve, xenotransplantation, brain-derived neurotrophic factor

  5. [Helminth fauna and steroid hormones concentration of wild rodents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuliś, Karolina; Bajer, Anna; Siński, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Fragmentation of the environment by natural barriers (lakes, mountain ranges) and human activities (towns, major roads, agriculture) can lead to isolate subpopulations of hosts. The study was based in Mazury lake district in north-eastern Poland, the region rich in forests, lakes, rivers and canals, which can create impassable barriers. Population of bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus)--dominant woodland rodent--showed local differences in helminth communities in fragmented forest habitat. The sites were chosen on the basis of the similarity of their habitat structure and type, and isolation from one another. There are evidences that steroids hormones associated with stress and reproduction may mediate trade-offs between physiology and immune function.

  6. Special issue of clinical pharmacology: advances and applications in new protein therapeutics modulating tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frankel AE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Arthur E Frankel Department of Internal Medicine, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Until recent decades, the role of the immune system in harnessing tumor growth was based on anecdotal observations of increased cancers in immune-compromised patients, the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia in allogeneic stem cell transplants, and the limited but reproducible anticancer activity of several lymphokines, including interferon and interleukin (IL-2. Vaccine studies and infusions of "activated" lymphocytes yielded variable clinical responses and disease control. An improved understanding of the molecular and cell mechanisms of the innate and adaptive immune system in cancer-bearing animals and the discovery of an immune-suppressive tumor microenvironment then led to development and testing of a battery of new drug and cell-based approaches to trigger antitumor immunity. This issue of Clinical Pharmacology: Advances and Applications highlights some of the new protein-based compounds that are radically changing the cancer therapeutic landscape. The purpose of this collection of reviews is to inform the readership regarding the importance of the seismic change in cancer therapeutics and stimulate efforts to find novel niches and combinations of agents similar to recent advances in the application of cancer pathway inhibitors.

  7. Phage as a modulator of immune responses: practical implications for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Andrzej; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Ohams, Monika; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Olszowska-Zaremba, Natasza; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzena; Kłak, Marlena; Jończyk, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Gołaś, Aneta; Purchla, Sylwia; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Fortuna, Wojciech; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłosowska, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Although the natural hosts for bacteriophages are bacteria, a growing body of data shows that phages can also interact with some populations of mammalian cells, especially with cells of the immune system. In general, these interactions include two main aspects. The first is the phage immunogenicity, that is, the capacity of phages to induce specific immune responses, in particular the generation of specific antibodies against phage antigens. The other aspect includes the immunomodulatory activity of phages, that is, the nonspecific effects of phages on different functions of major populations of immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses. These functions include, among others, phagocytosis and the respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, the production of cytokines, and the generation of antibodies against nonphage antigens. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the interactions between phages and cells of the immune system, along with their implications for phage therapy. These topics are presented based on the results of experimental studies and unique data on immunomodulatory effects found in patients with bacterial infections treated with phage preparations.

  8. Bovine whey protein concentrate supplementation modulates maturation of immune system in suckling rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Marín-Gallén, Silvia; Castell, Margarida; Rodríguez-Palmero, María; Rivero, Montserrat; Franch, Angels; Castellote, Cristina

    2007-10-01

    During neonatal life, challenges from breast milk and microbial flora promote immune system maturation. Immunonutrition in these stages may become an important way to increase natural defence systems. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a daily bovine milk whey protein concentrate (WPC) supplement on the intestinal and systemic immune systems in suckling rats. The composition of intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes (IEL and LPL) was analysed by flow cytometry. Systemic and intestinal humoral immune responses were determined by sera Ig levels and Ig-secreting cell quantification by ELISA and ELISPOT, respectively. From birth, suckling Wistar rats were supplemented with WPC or standard infant formula (SIF). The WPC group showed the same proportion of most of the main mucosal cell subsets as the reference animals. However, in the first days of life WPC enhanced the innate immunity by increasing the NK cell proportion in both epithelial and lamina propria (LP) compartments. A rise in intestinal CD8alphaalpha+ IEL was also induced by WPC supplementation. A time-course of sera Ig levels and spontaneous IgA, IgM and IgG production by LPL and mononuclear cells from blood and spleen, in the WPC group, exhibited a similar pattern to those pups fed only by dam's milk. In summary, the present results show the effects of WPC on enhancing mucosal innate immunity during early life.

  9. [Helminth fauna of Bufo raddei in Transbaikalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchepina, N A; Baldanova, D R

    2010-01-01

    Helminth fauna of Bufo raddei from Transbaikalia has been studied in 2003-2007. Eleven species of parasites Nematoda were found in this host, namely Rhabdias bufonis (Schrank, 1788), Oswaldocruzia filiformis (Goeze, 1782), Oswaldocruzia yezoensis Morishita, 1926, Contracaecum osculatum (Rudolphi, 1802), Raphidascaris acus, larvae, Aplectana acuminata (Schrank, 1788), Aplectana multipapillosa Ivanitzky, 1940, Cosmocerca commutata (Diesing, 1851), Cosmocerca ornata (Dujardin, 1845), Cosmocercoids pulcher (Wilkie, 1930), and Spiroxis contortus (Rudolphi, 1819). Morhometric characters of the helminthes are given. Parasites belonging to Monogenea, Cestoda, Trematoda, and Acanthocephala were not found in 382 examined specimens of Bufo raddei.

  10. BP8, a novel peptide from avian immune system, modulates B cell developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Bin; Feng, Xiu-Li; Cao, Rui-Bing; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2014-12-01

    The bursa of Fabricius (BF) is the key humoral immune organ unique to birds, and is critical for early B-lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms through which the BF regulates B cell development are not fully understood. In this study, we isolated and identified a new bursal peptide (BP8, AGHTKKAP) by RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. BP8 promoted colony-forming pre-B formation, bound B cell precursor, regulated B cell development in vitro as well as in vivo, upstream of the EBF-E2A-Pax5 regulatory complex and increased immunoglobulin secretion. These data revealed a bursal-derived multifunctional factor BP8 as a novel biomaterial which is essential for the development of the immune system. This study elucidates further the mechanisms involved in humoral immune system and has implications in treating human diseases.

  11. Mode of Delivery Shapes Gut Colonization Pattern and Modulates Regulatory Immunity in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. F. Hansen, Camilla; S. F. Andersen, Line; Krych, Łukasz

    2014-01-01

    Delivery mode has been associated with long-term changes in gut microbiota composition and more recently also with changes in the immune system. This has further been suggested to link Cesarean section (C-section) with an increased risk for development of immune-mediated diseases such as type 1...... electrophoresis profiles was evident in adult mice. However, the adult C-section-born mice had lower proportions of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, tolerogenic CD103(+) dendritic cells, and less Il10 gene expression in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens. This demonstrates long-term systemic effect on the regulatory...... and priming of regulatory immune system in mice, and mode of delivery strongly influences this....

  12. The role of IL-10 in microbiome-associated immune modulation and disease tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levast, Benoît; Li, Zhigang; Madrenas, Joaquín

    2015-10-01

    Current research on the microbiome of humans and other species is revealing a fundamental role for the interaction between the microbiota and the immune system in determining the health status of the host. In these studies, the cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is emerging as an important player. We present here an overview of the developments in the field emphasizing how the microbiota composition and its interplay with immune cells affect the health of the host through changes in IL-10 production. In addition, we explore the function that IL-10-producing immune cells may have on the qualitative and quantitative changes in the microbiota and thus influence the balance between microbial commensalism and pathogenicity. In the last section of this review, we present a summary of the strategies that target IL-10 for therapeutic purposes using probiotics, purified proteins or biologicals.

  13. Plasticity of migrating CD1b+ and CD1b- lymph dendritic cells in the promotion of Th1, Th2 and Th17 in response to Salmonella and helminth secretions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Olivier

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are pivotal in the development of specific T-cell responses to control pathogens, as they govern both the initiation and the polarization of adaptive immunity. To investigate the capacities of migrating DCs to respond to pathogens, we used physiologically generated lymph DCs (L-DCs. The flexible polarization of L-DCs was analysed in response to Salmonella or helminth secretions known to induce different T cell responses. Mature conventional CD1b(+ L-DCs showed a predisposition to promote pro-inflammatory (IL-6, pro-Th1 (IL-12p40 and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 responses which were amplified by Salmonella, and limited to only IL-6 induction by helminth secretions. The other major population of L-DCs did not express the CD1b molecule and displayed phenotypic features of immaturity compared to CD1b(+ L-DCs. Salmonella infection reduced the constitutive expression of TNF-α and IL-4 mRNA in CD1b(- L-DCs, whereas this expression was not affected by helminth secretions. The cytokine response of T cells promoted by L-DCs was analysed in T cell subsets after co-culture with Salmonella or helminth secretion-driven CD1b(+ or CD1b(- L-DCs. T cells preferentially expressed the IL-17 gene, and to a lesser extent the IFN-γ and IL-10 genes, in response to Salmonella-driven CD1b(+ L-DCs, whereas a preferential IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-17 gene expression was observed in response to Salmonella-driven CD1b(- L-DCs. In contrast, a predominant IL-4 and IL-13 gene expression by CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells was observed after stimulation of CD1b(+ and CD1b(- L-DCs with helminth secretions. These results show that mature conventional CD1b(+ L-DCs maintain a flexible capacity to respond differently to pathogens, that the predisposition of CD1b(- L-DCs to promote a Th2 response can be oriented towards other Th responses, and finally that the modulation of migrating L-DCs responses is controlled more by the pathogen encountered than the L-DC subsets.

  14. Seasonal modulation of immunity by melatonin and gonadal steroids in a short day breeder goat Capra hircus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Somenath; Singh, Amaresh K; Haldar, Chandana

    2014-11-01

    Role of melatonin in regulation of immunity and reproduction has never been studied in detail in goats. The aim of the present study was to explore hormonal regulation of immunity in goats with special reference to melatonin. Plasma of male and female goats (n = 18 per sex per season) was processed for hormonal (estrogen, testostrone, and melatonin) and cytokine (interleukin [IL-2], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α) measurements during three seasons, i.e., summer, monsoon, and winter. To assess cell-mediated immune response, percent stimulation ratio of thymocytes was recorded during three seasons. To support and establish the modulation by hormones, Western blot analysis for expressions of melatonin receptors (MT1, MT2), androgen receptor, and estrogen receptor α and estimations of marker enzymes, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase for melatonin and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities for steroidogenesis were performed in thymus. All the hormones and cytokines were estimated by commercial kits. Biochemical, immunologic, and Western blot analyses were done by standardized protocols. We noted a significant increase in estrogen and testosterone levels (P < 0.05) in circulation during monsoon along with melatonin (P < 0.05) presenting a parallel relationship. Expressions of melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) in thymus of both the sexes were significantly high (P < 0.01) during winter. Estrogen receptor α expression in female thymus was significantly high during monsoon (P < 0.05). However, androgen receptor showed almost static expression pattern in male thymus during three seasons. Further, both arylalkylamineN-acetyltransferase and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme activities were significantly high (P < 0.05; P < 0.01, respectively) during monsoon. These results suggest that there may be a functional parallelism between gonadal steroids and melatonin as melatonin is progonadotrophic in goats. Cell-mediated immune parameters (percent stimulation

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing modulates immune responses: An updated review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Baseri-Salehi, Majid; Kheirkhah, Babak

    2017-07-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium which induces some complications in immunocompromised patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a quorum-sensing using bacterium which regulates its genes expression. The bacterium uses two famous pathways for quorum sensing entitled LasI/LasR and RhlI/RhlR systems. It has been documented that the bacteria which use quorum sensing are able to overcome immune responses. This review article aims to present recent information regarding the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems on the host immune responses. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship between eosinophils and helminth infection%嗜酸性粒细胞与蠕虫感染

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田小军; 谷俊潮; 郭增柱

    2011-01-01

    Eoeinophils (Eos)are effector cells that involve in human immune response. During helminth infection,eosinoplils are activated and their percentage can reach 40%. Eosinoplils play an important role in anti-helminth infection.This paper reviewed the structure and the function of eoeinoplils as well as the effects of eosinoplils on immunoprotection and tissue damage in anti-helminth infection.%嗜酸性粒细胞(Eosinophil,Eos)是参与人体免疫反应的一种效应细胞,当有寄生蠕虫感染时被激活,比例可高达40%,在抗蠕虫感染中具有重要作用,本文就Eos的结构、功能以及在抗蠕虫感染中的免疫保护和组织损伤作用作一综述.

  17. Modulation of neuroinflammation: The role and therapeutic potential of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in neuro-immune axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wei-Lin; Peng, Yuan-Yuan; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2017-03-22

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel (TRPV1), as a ligand-gated non-selective cation channel, has recently been demonstrated to have wide expression in the neuro-immune axis, where its multiple functions occur through regulation of both neuronal and non-neuronal activities. Growing evidence has suggested that TRPV1 is functionally expressed in glial cells, especially in the microglia and astrocytes. Glial cells perform immunological functions in response to pathophysiological challenges through pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in which TRPV1 is involved. Sustaining inflammation might mediate a positive feedback loop of neuroinflammation and exacerbate neurological disorders. Accumulating evidence has suggested that TRPV1 is closely related to immune responses and might be recognized as a molecular switch in the neuroinflammation of a majority of seizures and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we evidenced that inflammation modulates the expression and activity of TRPV1 in the central nervous system (CNS) and TRPV1 exerts reciprocal actions over neuroinflammatory processes. Together, the literature supports the hypothesis that TRPV1 may represent potential therapeutic targets in the neuro-immune axis.

  18. Modulating the innate immune response to influenza A virus: potential therapeutic use of anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eRamos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Infection by influenza A viruses (IAV is frequently characterized by robust inflammation that is usually more pronounced in the case of avian influenza. It is becoming clearer that the morbidity and pathogenesis caused by IAV is a consequence of this inflammatory response, with several components of the innate immune system acting as the main players. It has been postulated that using a therapeutic approach to limit the innate immune response in combination with antiviral drugs has the potential to diminish symptoms and tissue damage caused by IAV infection. Indeed, some anti-inflammatory agents have been shown to be effective in animal models at reducing IAV pathology as a proof of principle. The main challenge in developing such therapies is to selectively modulate signaling pathways that contribute to lung injury while maintaining the ability of the host cells to mount an antiviral response to control virus replication. However, the dissection of those pathways is very complex given the numerous components regulated by the same factors (i.e. NF kappa B transcription factors and the large number of players involved in this regulation, some of which may be undescribed or unknown. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current knowledge regarding the innate immune responses associated with tissue damage by IAV infection, the understanding of which is essential for the development of effective immunomodulatory drugs. Furthermore, we summarize the recent advances on the development and evaluation of such drugs as well as the lessons learned from those studies.

  19. Innate immunity modulation in the duodenal mucosa induced by REM sleep deprivation during infection with Trichinella spirallis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G.; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Pantaleón-Martínez, Ana M.; Velazquéz-Moctezuma, Javier; Rodriguez-Mata, Veronica; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Sleep is considered to be an important predictor of the immunity, since the absence of sleep can affect the development of the immune response, and consequently increase the susceptibility to contract an infection. The aim of the present study was to investigate if sleep deprivation and stress induce dysregulation of the duodenal mucous membrane during the acute infection with Trichinella spiralis. Our results shows that, in the intestinal mucous membrane, stress and sleep deprivation, produces different effect in the cells, and this effect depends on the studied duodenal compartment, glands or villi. The sleep deprivation affect mast cells mainly, and the stress response is more heterogeneous. Interestingly, in the duodenal mucous membrane, none population of cells in the infected groups responded equally to both conditions. These findings suggest that the response of the intestinal mucous membrane during the infection caused for T. spiralis turns out to be affected in the sleep-deprived rats, therefore, the results of the present study sustain the theory that sleep is a fundamental process that is capable of modulating the immune response of mucous membranes, particularly the one generated against the parasite Trichinella spiralis. PMID:28374797

  20. Immune modulation by a cellular network of mesenchymal stem cells and breast cancer cell subsets: Implication for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltoukhy, Hussam S; Sinha, Garima; Moore, Caitlyn A; Sandiford, Oleta A; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2017-08-01

    The immune modulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are mostly controlled by the particular microenvironment. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which can initiate a clinical tumor, have been the subject of intense research. This review article discusses investigative studies of the roles of MSCs on cancer biology including on CSCs, and the potential as drug delivery to tumors. An understanding of how MSCs behave in the tumor microenvironment to facilitate the survival of tumor cells would be crucial to identify drug targets. More importantly, since CSCs survive for decades in dormancy for later resurgence, studies are presented to show how MSCs could be involved in maintaining dormancy. Although the mechanism by which CSCs survive is complex, this article focus on the cellular involvement of MSCs with regard to immune responses. We discuss the immunomodulatory mechanisms of MSC-CSC interaction in the context of therapeutic outcomes in oncology. We also discuss immunotherapy as a potential to circumventing this immune modulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Generic tools to assess genuine carbohydrate specific effects on in vitro immune modulation exemplified by β-glucans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Anne; Grimmer, Stine; Aachmann, Finn L; Westereng, Bjørge; Kolset, Svein Olav; Knutsen, Svein Halvor

    2013-02-15

    Even if carbohydrate preparations from plant/fungal sources have a high degree of purity, observed immune-stimulation may be caused by minute sample contaminations. Using the example of different β-glucans we present a range of analytical tools crucial for validation of possible immune-stimulatory effects. Two yeast (MacroGard and Zymosan) and one cereal β-glucan (CBG40) increased IL-8 secretion by HT-29 cells considerably. Degradation of the β-glucan samples with β-glucan specific enzymes did hardly influence the effect of Zymosan and CBG40 but significantly decreased the effect of MacroGard. Stimulation of IL-8 secretion by CBG40 and Zymosan was hence not due to their β-glucan content. Instead, the effect of the CBG40 sample was due to low levels of LPS despite the inability of the known LPS inhibitor Polymyxin B to supress its stimulatory effect. We conclude that targeted enzymatic degradation of samples is a powerful validation tool to investigate carbohydrate specific immune-modulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A pair of light signaling factors FHY3 and FAR1 regulates plant immunity by modulating chlorophyll biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanqing; Tang, Weijiang; Ma, Tingting; Niu, De; Jin, Jing Bo; Wang, Haiyang; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Light and chloroplast function is known to affect the plant immune response; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. We previously demonstrated that two light signaling factors, FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 3 (FHY3) and FAR-RED IMPAIRED RESPONSE 1 (FAR1), regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis and seedling growth via controlling HEMB1 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we reveal that FHY3 and FAR1 are involved in modulating plant immunity. We showed that the fhy3 far1 double null mutant displayed high levels of reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid (SA) and increased resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pathogen infection. Microarray analysis revealed that a large proportion of pathogen-related genes, particularly genes encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain resistant proteins, are highly induced in fhy3 far1. Genetic studies indicated that the defects of fhy3 far1 can be largely rescued by reducing SA signaling or blocking SA accumulation, and by overexpression of HEMB1, which encodes a 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, we found that transgenic plants with reduced expression of HEMB1 exhibit a phenotype similar to fhy3 far1. Taken together, this study demonstrates an important role of FHY3 and FAR1 in regulating plant immunity, through integrating chlorophyll biosynthesis and the SA signaling pathway.

  3. Organic trace mineral supplementation enhances local and systemic innate immune responses and modulates oxidative stress in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, H; Yitbarek, A; Munyaka, P; Alizadeh, M; Cleaver, A; Camelo-Jaimes, G; Wang, P; O, K; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C

    2016-03-01

    The effect of organic trace mineral supplementation on performance, intestinal morphology, immune organ weights (bursa of Fabricius and spleen), expression of innate immune response related genes, blood heterophils/lymphocytes ratio, chemical metabolic panel, natural antibodies (IgG), and oxidative stress of broiler chickens was studied. A total of 1,080 day-old male broilers were assigned to 1 of 3 dietary treatments, which included basal diet with Monensin (control), control diet supplemented with bacitracin methylene disalicylate (BMD), and BMD diet supplemented with organic trace minerals (OTM). No difference in feed conversion ratio was observed among treatments; ileum histomorphological analysis showed a lower crypt depth, higher villi height/crypt depth ratio, and lower villi width in the OTM treatment compared to control. Furthermore, OTM treatment resulted in higher uric acid and lower plasma malondehaldehyde (MDA), indicating lower oxidative stress. Gene expression analysis showed that OTM treatment resulted in up-regulations of TLR2 bin the ileum, and TLR2b, TLR4, and IL-12p35 in the bursa of Fabricius, and down-regulation of TLR2b and TLR4 in the cecal tonsils. In the spleen, OTM treatment resulted in up-regulation of IL-10. In conclusion, OTM supplementation to broiler diets may have beneficial effects on intestinal development, immune system status, and survival by improving ileum histomorphological parameters, modulation of Toll-like receptors and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and decreasing level of MDA, which in conjunction could enhance health status.

  4. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR Modulates Cockroach Allergen-Induced Immune Responses through Active TGFβ1 Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR, a multifunctional regulator that senses and responds to environmental stimuli, plays a role in normal cell development and immune regulation. Recent evidence supports a significant link between environmental exposure and AhR in the development of allergic diseases. We sought to investigate whether AhR plays a role in mediating cockroach allergen-induced allergic immune responses. Methods. AhR expression in human lung fibroblasts from asthmatic and healthy individuals and in cockroach extract (CRE treated human lung fibroblasts (WI-38 was examined. The role of AhR in modulating CRE induced TGFβ1 production was investigated by using AhR agonist, TCDD, antagonist CH122319, and knockdown of AhR. The role of latent TGFβ1 binding protein-1 (LTBP1 in mediating TCDD induced active TGFβ1 release was also examined. Results. AhR expression was higher in airway fibroblasts from asthmatic subjects as compared to healthy controls. AhR in fibroblasts was activated by TCDD with an increased expression of cyp1a1 and cyp1b1. Increased AhR expression was observed in CRE-treated fibroblasts. Importantly, CRE induced TGFβ1 production in fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by TCDD but inhibited by CH122319. Reduced TGFβ1 production was further confirmed in fibroblasts with AhR knockdown. Moreover, AhR knockdown inhibited CRE induced fibroblast differentiation. Furthermore, TCDD induced active TGFβ1 release was significantly inhibited by LTBP1 knockdown. Conclusion. These results provide evidence for the role of AhR in modulating cockroach allergen-induced immune responses through controlling the active TGFβ1 release, suggesting a possible synergistic effect between exposure to allergens and environmental chemicals on the development of allergic diseases.

  5. Modulation of dendritic cell function and immune response by cysteine protease inhibitor from murine nematode parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanxia; Liu, Guiyun; Li, Zhaotao; Chen, Yue; Liu, Yunfeng; Liu, Boyu; Su, Zhong

    2013-04-01

    Modulation and suppression of the immune response of the host by nematode parasites have been reported extensively and the cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI or cystatin) is identified as one of the major immunomodulators. In the present study, we cloned and produced recombinant CPI protein from the murine nematode parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus (rHp-CPI) and investigated its immunomodulatory effects on dendritic cell (DC) function and immune responses in mice. Bone-marrow-derived CD11c(+) DC (BMDC) that were exposed to rHp-CPI during the differentiation stage showed reduced MHC-II molecule expression compared with BMDC that were generated in normal culture conditions. The BMDC generated in the presence of rHp-CPI also exhibited reduced expression of CD40, CD86 and MHC-II molecules and reduced interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α cytokine production when stimulated with Toll-like receptor ligand CpG. Activation of BMDC generated in normal conditions induced by lipopolysaccharide and CpG was also suppressed by rHp-CPI, as shown by reduced co-stimulatory molecule expression and cytokine production. Furthermore, BMDC treated with rHp-CPI before ovalbumin (OVA) antigen pulsing induced a weaker proliferation response and less interferon-γ production of OVA-specific CD4(+) T cells compared with BMDC without rHp-CPI pre-treatment. Adoptive transfer of rHp-CPI-treated and OVA-loaded BMDC to mice induced significantly lower levels of antigen-specific antibody response than the BMDC loaded with antigen alone. These results demonstrated that the CPI from nematode parasites is able to modulate differentiation and activation stages of BMDC. It also interferes with antigen and MHC-II molecule processing and Toll-like receptor signalling pathway, resulting in functionally deficient DC that induce a suboptimum immune response.

  6. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Macrophages to Modulate Host Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Escobar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological agent of gonorrhoea, which is a sexually transmitted disease widespread throughout the world. N. gonorrhoeae does not improve immune response in patients with reinfection, suggesting that gonococcus displays several mechanisms to evade immune response and survive in the host. N. gonorrhoeae is able to suppress the protective immune response at different levels, such as B and T lymphocytes and dendritic cells. In this study, we determined whether N. gonorrhoeae directly conditions the phenotype of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line and its response. We established that gonococcus was effectively phagocytosed by the RAW 264.7 cells and upregulates production of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β1 but not the production of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, indicating that gonococcus induces a shift towards anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Moreover, N. gonorrhoeae did not induce significant upregulation of costimulatory CD86 and MHC class II molecules. We also showed that N. gonorrhoeae infected macrophage cell line fails to elicit proliferative CD4+ response. This implies that macrophage that can phagocytose gonococcus do not display proper antigen-presenting functions. These results indicate that N. gonorrhoeae induces a tolerogenic phenotype in antigen-presenting cells, which seems to be one of the mechanisms to induce evasion of immune response.

  7. Antibiotics modulate intestinal immunity and prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonatal piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preterm birth, bacterial colonization, and formula feeding predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Antibiotics are commonly administered to prevent sepsis in preterm infants, but it is not known whether this affects intestinal immunity and NEC resistance. We hypothesized that broad-spectrum a...

  8. Complement Deposition on Nanoparticles Can Modulate Immune Responses by Macrophage, B and T Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pondman, K.M.; Tsolaki, A.G.; Paudyal, B.; Shamij, M.H.; Switzer, A.; Pathan, A.A.; Abozaid, S.M.; Haken, ten B.; Stenbeck, G.; Sim, R.B.; Kishore, U.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles are attractive drug delivery vehicles for targeted organ-specific as well as systemic therapy. However, their interaction with the immune system offers an intriguing challenge to the success of nanotherapeutics in vivo. Recently, we showed that pristine and derivatised carbon nanotubes

  9. On the modulation of innate immunity by plant-parasitic cyst nematodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes are major agricultural pests worldwide. These obligate endoparasites invade the roots of host plants where they transform cells near the vascular cylinder into a permanent feeding site. Plants possess a multilayered innate immune system consisting of different types of

  10. Modulation of CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated immune stimulation by locked nucleic acid (LNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollmer, Jörg; Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Uhlmann, Eugen

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is an RNA derivative that when introduced into oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN), mediates high efficacy and stability. CpG ODNs are potent immune stimulators and are recognized by toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9). Some phosphorothioate antisense ODNs bearing CpG dinucleotides have...

  11. Differential adaptation of Candida albicans in vivo modulates immune recognition by dectin-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marakalala, M.J.; Vautier, S.; Potrykus, J.; Walker, L.A.; Shepardson, K.M.; Hopke, A.; Mora-Montes, H.M.; Kerrigan, A.; Netea, M.G.; Murray, G.I.; MacCallum, D.M.; Wheeler, R.; Munro, C.A.; Gow, N.A.; Cramer, R.A.; Brown, A.J.; Brown, G.D.

    2013-01-01

    The beta-glucan receptor Dectin-1 is a member of the C-type lectin family and functions as an innate pattern recognition receptor in antifungal immunity. In both mouse and man, Dectin-1 has been found to play an essential role in controlling infections with Candida albicans, a normally commensal fun

  12. Determinants of DHA status and functional effects on metabolic markers and immune modulation in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsløf, Laurine Bente Schram

    by identifying the involved pathways and genes. The second part of the PhD thesis explores whether functional effects of n-3 LCPUFA on metabolic markers and immune maturation in young children can be supported by polymorphisms in genes involved in the mechanisms (PPARG2, COX2 and NFKB1). Results can be found...

  13. FIBCD1 Modulation of the Epithelial Immune Response Elicited by Chitin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Mark; Schlosser, Anders; Bak-Thomsen, Theresa Helene

    2010-01-01

    -acetylglucosamine carbohydrate, which next to cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer found in nature, eg in fungi and parasites. It was recently demonstrated that chitin induces the accumulation in tissue of IL-4-expressing innate immune cells in vivo and it was suggested that chitin thus could be a recognition element...

  14. Modulation of immune cell functions by the E3 ligase CBL-b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eLutz-Nicoladoni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of immunological tolerance is a critical hallmark of the immune system. Several signaling checkpoints necessary to balance activating and inhibitory input to immune cells have been described so far, among which the E3 ligase Cbl-b appears to be a central player. Cbl-b is expressed in all leukocyte subsets and regulates several signaling pathways in T cells, NK cells, B cells and different types of myeloid cells. In most cases Cbl-b negatively regulates activation signals through antigen or pattern recognition receptors and co-stimulatory molecules. In line with this function, cblb-deficient immune cells display lower activation thresholds and cblb knockout mice spontaneously develop autoimmunity and are highly susceptible to experimental autoimmunity. Interestingly, genetic association studies link cblb-polymorphisms with autoimmunity also in humans. Vice versa, the increased activation potential of cblb-deficient cells renders them more potent to fight against malignancies or infections. Accordingly, several reports have shown that cblb knockout mice reject tumors, which mainly depends on cytotoxic T and NK cells. Thus targeting Cbl-b may be an interesting strategy to enhance anti-cancer immunity. In this review we summarize the findings on the molecular function of Cbl-b in different cell types and illustrate the potential of Cbl-b as target for immunomodulatory therapies.

  15. Modulation of the Intratumoral Immune Landscape by Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus Virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines and immunotherapeutic approaches to cancers with the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells have recently demonstrated preclinical success and entered clinical trials. Despite advances in these approaches and combinatorial therapeutic regimens, depending on the nature of the cancer and the immune and metabolic landscape within the tumor microenvironment, current immunotherapeutic modalities remain inadequate. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated clear evidence of significant, and sometimes dramatic, antitumor activity, and long-term survival effects of a variety of oncolytic viruses (OVs, particularly oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV. Acting as a multifaceted gene therapy vector and potential adjuvant-like regimens, oHSV can carry genes encoding immunostimulatory molecules in its genome. The oncolytic effect of oHSV and the inflammatory response that the virus stimulates provide a one-two punch at attacking tumors. However, mechanisms underlying oHSV-induced restoration of intratumoral immunosuppression demand extensive research in order to further improve its therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we discuss the current OV-based therapy, with a focus on the unique aspects of oHSV-initiated antiviral and antitumor immune responses, arising from virus-mediated immunological cell death to intratumoral innate and adaptive immunity.

  16. The gut microbiota as a modulator of innate immunity during melioidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; Birnie, Emma; Weehuizen, Tassili A.F.; Scicluna, Brendon P.; Belzer, Clara; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Roelofs, Joris J.T.H.; Vos, de Alex F.; Poll, van der Tom; Budding, Andries E.; Wiersinga, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Melioidosis, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an emerging cause of pneumonia-derived sepsis in the tropics. The gut microbiota supports local mucosal immunity and is increasingly recognized as a protective mediator in host defenses against systemic

  17. Immune Regulator MCPIP1 Modulates TET Expression during Early Neocortical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MCPIP1 is a recently identified immune regulator that plays critical roles in preventing immune disorders, and is also present in the brain. Currently an unresolved question remains as to how MCPIP1 performs its non-immune functions in normal brain development. Here, we report that MCPIP1 is abundant in neural progenitor cells (NPCs and newborn neurons during the early stages of neurogenesis. The suppression of MCPIP1 expression impairs normal neuronal differentiation, cell-cycle exit, and concomitant NPC proliferation. MCPIP1 is important for maintenance of the NPC pool. Notably, we demonstrate that MCPIP1 reduces TET (TET1/TET2/TET3 levels and then decreases 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels. Furthermore, the MCPIP1 interaction with TETs is involved in neurogenesis and in establishing the proper number of NPCs in vivo. Collectively, our findings not only demonstrate that MCPIP1 plays an important role in early cortical neurogenesis but also reveal an unexpected link between neocortical development, immune regulators, and epigenetic modification.

  18. Dietary tryptophan and methionine as modulators of European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) immune status and inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marina; Azeredo, Rita; Díaz-Rosales, Patricia; Afonso, António; Peres, Helena; Oliva-Teles, Aires; Costas, Benjamín

    2015-02-01

    Amino acids regulate key metabolic pathways important to immune responses and their nutritional supply may increase synthesis of immune-related proteins. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of tryptophan and methionine on European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) cellular and humoral status. The immunomodulatory effects of tryptophan and methionine during an inflammatory insult was also evaluated after intraperitoneal injection with inactivated Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (Phdp). A practical isonitrogenous (45% crude protein) and isolipidic (16% crude fat) diets was formulated to include fish meal and a blend of plant feedstuffs as protein sources and fish oil as the main lipid source (CRL diet). Two other diets were formulated similar to the control but including L-tryptophan or L-methionine at ×2 the requirement level (diets TRP and MET, respectively). European seabass weighing 275 g were fed the experimental diets for a period of 15 days before being sampled (trial 1). Then, fish were subjected to a peritoneal inflammation by intraperitoneally injecting UV killed Phdp (10(6) colony forming units ml(-1)) and sampled following 4 and 24 h post-injection (trial 2). Fish injected with a saline solution served as control. The haematological profile, peripheral cell dynamics and several plasma immune parameters were determined in trials 1 and 2, whereas cell migration to the inflammatory focus was also determined in trial 2. MET positively affected European seabass immune status by improving the peripheral leucocyte response, complement activity and bactericidal capacity, a stronger cellular recruitment to the inflammatory focus, and higher plasma peroxidase and bactericidal activities. TRP also seemed to improve immunostimulation, as there was a trend to augment both cell-mediated immunity and humoral capacity. However, TRP failed to improve an inflammatory response, verified by a decrease in blood phagocyte numbers

  19. Checklist of Helminth parasites of Amphibians from South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campião, Karla Magalhães; Morais, Drausio Honorio; Dias, Olívia Tavares; Aguiar, Aline; Toledo, Gislayne De Melo; Tavares, Luiz Eduardo Roland; Da Silva, Reinaldo José

    2014-07-30

    Parasitological studies on helminths of amphibians in South America have increased in the past few years. Here, we present a list with summarized data published on helminths of South American amphibians from 1925 to 2012, including a list of helminth parasites, host species, and geographic records. We found 194 reports of helminths parasitizing 185 amphibian species from eleven countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Equador, French Guyana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela. Helminth biodiversity includes 278 parasite species of the groups Acanthocephala, Nematoda, Cestoda, Monogenea and Trematoda. A list of helminth parasite species per host, and references are also presented. This contribution aims to document the biodiversity of helminth parasites in South American amphibians, as well as identify gaps in our knowledge, which in turn may guide subsequent studies. 

  20. Modulation of immune tolerance with a Chinese traditional prescription inhibits allergic rhinitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Qiang Xie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Allergic diseases substantially affect human health and social economy. The pathogenesis is to be further understood. The effect of current therapeutic remedies on allergic diseases is not satisfactory. Aims : This study aimed to inhibit allergic rhinitis in a mouse model with a Chinese traditional medical prescription, Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang. Material and Methods : A mouse AR model was developed with ovalbumin (OVA plus adjuvant alum. The AR clinical symptoms and immune pathology in the nasal mucosa were assessed with the AR mouse model. Some mice were treated with Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang via gavage-fed. The immune tolerance status in the nasal mucosa was evaluated by counting the numbers of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC and regulatory T cells (Treg. Results : After exposure to the specific antigen, OVA, the sensitized mice had AR-like symptoms including nasal itch and sneeze. The frequency of mast cells, levels of IgE/IL-4 in nasal mucosa was markedly higher in sensitized mice than naïve controls; while the levels of integration alphavbeta6 (avb6, the number of tolerogenic DCs and Tregs in nasal mucosa were significantly lower than naïve control mice. The AR-like symptoms and immune pathology and immune tolerance status in the AR nasal mucosa were substantially improved by administration with Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang. Conclusions : The immune tolerance status is impaired in the AR nasal mucosa that can be improved by administering with Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang.

  1. Immunological reactions caused by helminthes and diagnosis of parasites using different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEDIA VASJARI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Helminthes are one of the causer agents of the type I reactions of hypersensitivity. In this article will review the findings of recent human studies of the association between helminth parasite infections and allergy and discuss their potential relevance to public health. The parasitic worms are an important risk factor for anaphylaxy reaction, but this could be explained by an enhanced ability of atopics to produce IgE. The human immune response to helminth infections is associated with elevated levels of IgE, tissue eosinophilia and mastocytosis. The involvement of immunologic mechanisms in the pathogenesis which are caused by worms in the gastro-intestinal tract are associated with anaphylaxy response. For this study, faeces were collected primary in children aged 1-15 years old, because the worms are most frequent in these ages. Through the coproscopic method were analyzed as biological materials, the feces of 300 children for the presence of protozoa’s eggs, helminthes larva, trophosoids, cists, etc. We have taken the photo of the positive cases. The analysis have been done in the Parasitological Laboratory of the Institute of Public Health, Tirana through the method of concentration with floatation in sulphat zinc; the permanent color as Ziehln-Neelsen stain, Giemsa stain, Blu-metilen, etc. We have used the color methods and blood striche to diagnose the eosiniphilia presence. To determine the IgE are used the EIA kits. The level of the eosinophyle and IgE in the blood is performed in 152 individes who had been positive cases by helminths.

  2. Stress-Immune-Growth Interactions: Cortisol Modulates Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and JAK/STAT Pathway in Rainbow Trout Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju M Philip

    Full Text Available Chronic stress is a major factor in the poor growth and immune performance of salmonids in aquaculture. However, the molecular mechanisms linking stress effects to growth and immune dysfunction is poorly understood. The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS, a family of genes involved in the inhibition of JAK/STAT pathway, negatively regulates growth hormone and cytokine signaling, but their role in fish is unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that cortisol modulation of SOCS gene expression is a key molecular mechanism leading to growth and immune suppression in response to stress in fish. Exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss liver slices to cortisol, mimicking stress level, upregulated SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 mRNA abundance and this response was abolished by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed the presence of putative glucocorticoid response elements in rainbow trout SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 promoters. Prior cortisol treatment suppressed acute growth hormone (GH-stimulated IGF-1 mRNA abundance in trout liver and this involved a reduction in STAT5 phosphorylation and lower total JAK2 protein expression. Prior cortisol treatment also suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced IL-6 but not IL-8 transcript levels; the former but not the latter cytokine expression is via JAK/STAT phosphorylation. LPS treatment reduced GH signaling, but this was associated with the downregulation of GH receptors and not due to the upregulation of SOCS transcript levels by this endotoxin. Collectively, our results suggest that upregulation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 transcript levels by cortisol, and the associated reduction in JAK/STAT signaling pathway, may be a novel mechanism leading to growth reduction and immune suppression during stress in trout.

  3. Immune response to Lactobacillus plantarum expressing Borrelia burgdorferi OspA is modulated by the lipid modification of the antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz del Rio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the past decade there has been increasing interest in the use of lactic acid bacteria as mucosal delivery vehicles for vaccine antigens, microbicides and therapeutics. We investigated the mechanism by which a mucosal vaccine based in recombinant lactic acid bacteria breaks the immunological tolerance of the gut in order to elicit a protective immune response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed how the lipid modification of OspA affects the localization of the antigen in our delivery vehicle using a number of biochemistry techniques. Furthermore, we examined how OspA-expressing L. plantarum breaks the oral tolerance of the gut by stimulating human intestinal epithelial cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte derived dendritic cells and measuring cytokine production. We show that the leader peptide of OspA targets the protein to the cell envelope of L. plantarum, and it is responsible for protein export across the membrane. Mutation of the lipidation site in OspA redirects protein localization within the cell envelope. Further, we show that lipidated-OspA-expressing L. plantarum does not induce secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it breaks oral tolerance of the gut via Th1/Th2 cell mediated immunity, as shown by the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines by human dendritic cells, and by the production of IgG2a and IgG1 antibodies, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Lipid modification of OspA expressed in L. plantarum modulates the immune response to this antigen through a Th1/Th2 immune response.

  4. Improved eye-fixation detection using polarization-modulated retinal birefringence scanning, immune to corneal birefringence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved method for remote eye-fixation detection, using a polarization-modulated approach to retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), without the need for individual calibration or separate background measurements and essentially independent of corneal birefringence. Polarization-modulated RBS detects polarization changes generated in modulated polarized light passing through a unique pattern of nerve fibers identifying and defining the retinal region where fixation occurs (the fovea). A proof-of-concept demonstration in human eyes suggests that polarization-modulated RBS has the potential to reliably detect true foveal fixation on a specified point with an accuracy of at least ± 0.75°, and that it can be applied to the general population, including individuals with sub-optimal eyes and young children, where early diagnosis of visual problems can be critical. As could be employed in an eye-controlled display or in other devices, polarization-modulated RBS also enables and paves the way for new and reliable eye-fixation-evoked human-machine interfaces.

  5. Decision making on helminths in cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charlier, Johannes; Waele, De Valérie; Ducheyne, Els; Voort, van der Mariska; Vande Velde, Fiona; Claerebout, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infections of cattle affect productivity in all classes of stock, and are amongst the most important production-limiting diseases of grazing ruminants. Over the last decade, there has been a shift in focus in the diagnosis of these infections from merely detecting presence/absence of inf

  6. Medicinal plants effectiveness against helminths of cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-02-28

    Feb 28, 2015 ... However, the toxic effects of these chemicals on ... electric blender, disinfected with 95% ethanol. Extraction of ... helminthic effects of leaves of the plants were evaluated ... Number of distorted ova/adult per field x 100. Number ...

  7. Host immune responses to a viral immune modulating protein: immunogenicity of viral interleukin-10 in rhesus cytomegalovirus-infected rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan K Eberhardt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Considerable evidence has accumulated that multiple viruses, bacteria, and protozoa manipulate interleukin-10 (IL-10-mediated signaling through the IL-10 receptor (IL-10R in ways that could enable establishment of a persistent microbial infection. This suggests that inhibition of pathogen targeting of IL-10/IL-10R signaling could prevent microbial persistence. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV and rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV express a viral interleukin-10 (cmvIL-10 and rhcmvIL-10, respectively with comparable immune modulating properties in vitro to that of their host's cellular IL-10 (cIL-10. A prior study noted that rhcmvIL-10 alters innate and adaptive immunity to RhCMV in vivo, consistent with a central role for rhcmvIL-10 during acute virus-host interactions. Since cmvIL-10 and rhcmvIL-10 are extremely divergent from the cIL-10 of their respective hosts, vaccine-mediated neutralization of their function could inhibit establishment of viral persistence without inhibition of cIL-10. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As a prelude to evaluating cmvIL-10-based vaccines in humans, the rhesus macaque model of HCMV was used to interrogate peripheral and mucosal immune responses to rhcmvIL-10 in RhCMV-infected animals. ELISA were used to detect rhcmvIL-10-binding antibodies in plasma and saliva, and an IL-12-based bioassay was used to quantify plasma antibodies that neutralized rhcmvIL-10 function. rhcmvIL-10 is highly immunogenic during RhCMV infection, stimulating high avidity rhcmvIL-10-binding antibodies in the plasma of all infected animals. Most infected animals also exhibited plasma antibodies that partially neutralized rhcmvIL-10 function but did not cross-neutralize the function of rhesus cIL-10. Notably, minimally detectable rhcmvIL-10-binding antibodies were detected in saliva. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that rhcmvIL-10, as a surrogate for cmvIL-10, is a viable vaccine candidate because (1 it is highly immunogenic during natural Rh

  8. Group 2 innate lymphoid cell proportions are diminished in young helminth infected children and restored by curative anti-helminthic treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Nausch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Group 2 Innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s are innate cells that produce the TH2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13. The importance of these cells has recently been demonstrated in experimental models of parasitic diseases but there is a paucity of data on ILC2s in the context of human parasitic infections and in particular of the blood dwelling parasite Schistosoma haematobium.In this case-control study human peripheral blood ILC2s were analysed in relation to infection with the helminth parasite Schistosoma haematobium. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 36 S. haematobium infected and 36 age and sex matched uninfected children were analysed for frequencies of ILC2s identified as Lin-CD45+CD127+CD294+CD161+. ILC2s were significantly lower particularly in infected children aged 6-9 years compared to healthy participants. Curative anti-helminthic treatment resulted in an increase in levels of the activating factor TSLP and restoration of ILC2 levels.This study demonstrates that ILC2s are diminished in young helminth infected children and restored by removal of the parasites by treatment, indicating a previously undescribed association between a human parasitic infection and ILC2s and suggesting a role of ILC2s before the establishment of protective acquired immunity in human schistosomiasis.

  9. Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cell Proportions Are Diminished in Young Helminth Infected Children and Restored by Curative Anti-helminthic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nausch, Norman; Appleby, Laura J.; Sparks, Alexandra M.; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Mutapi, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Background Group 2 Innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are innate cells that produce the TH2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13. The importance of these cells has recently been demonstrated in experimental models of parasitic diseases but there is a paucity of data on ILC2s in the context of human parasitic infections and in particular of the blood dwelling parasite Schistosoma haematobium. Methodology/Principal Findings In this case-control study human peripheral blood ILC2s were analysed in relation to infection with the helminth parasite Schistosoma haematobium. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 36 S. haematobium infected and 36 age and sex matched uninfected children were analysed for frequencies of ILC2s identified as Lin-CD45+CD127+CD294+CD161+. ILC2s were significantly lower particularly in infected children aged 6–9 years compared to healthy participants. Curative anti-helminthic treatment resulted in an increase in levels of the activating factor TSLP and restoration of ILC2 levels. Conclusion This study demonstrates that ILC2s are diminished in young helminth infected children and restored by removal of the parasites by treatment, indicating a previously undescribed association between a human parasitic infection and ILC2s and suggesting a role of ILC2s before the establishment of protective acquired immunity in human schistosomiasis. PMID:25799270

  10. Modulation of human humoral immune response through orally administered bovine colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, F; Tuomola, E; Arvilommi, H; Salminen, S

    2001-08-01

    Eighteen healthy volunteers were randomized into two treatment groups and consumed liquid prepackaged bovine colostrum whey and placebo for 7 days. On days 1, 3 and 5, an attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21a oral vaccine was given to all subjects to mimic an enteropathogenic infection. The circulating antibody secreting cells and the expression of phagocytosis receptors of the subjects before and after oral immunization were measured with the ELISPOT assay and flow cytometry. All subjects responded well to the vaccine. No significant differences were observed in ELISPOT values for IgA, IgG, IgM, Fcgamma and CR receptor expression on neutrophils and monocytes between the two groups. There was a trend towards greater increase in specific IgA among the subjects receiving their vaccine with bovine colostrum. These results suggest that bovine colostrum may possess some potential to enhance human special immune responses.

  11. Advanced Strategies in Immune Modulation of Cancer Using Lipid-Based Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahy, Shoshy; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Landesman-Milo, Dalit; Ng, Brandon D.; Peer, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy has a great potential in advancing cancer treatment, especially in light of recent discoveries and therapeutic interventions that lead to complete response in specific subgroups of melanoma patients. By using the body’s own immune system, it is possible not only to specifically target and eliminate cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed but also to elicit long-term protective response. Despite the promise, current immunotherapy is limited and fails in addressing all tumor types. This is probably due to the fact that a single treatment strategy is not sufficient in overcoming the complex antitumor immunity. The use of nanoparticle-based system for immunotherapy is a promising strategy that can simultaneously target multiple pathways with the same kinetics to enhance antitumor response. Here, we will highlight the recent advances in the field of cancer immunotherapy that utilize lipid-based nanoparticles as delivery vehicles and address the ongoing challenges and potential opportunities. PMID:28220118

  12. Sodium restriction modulates innate immunity and prevents cardiac remodeling in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover, Bernard; Reynes, Christelle; Rugale, Caroline; Reboul, Cyril; Jeanson, Laura; Tournier, Michel; Lajoix, Anne Dominique; Desmetz, Caroline

    2017-02-27

    In the view of the relationships between excessive sodium intake, immunity and target organ damage, we hypothesized that reduction in dietary sodium would be beneficial in the prevention of cardiac alterations through a restrained local immunity response in a rat model of metabolic syndrome. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a 60% fructose diet with either a normal sodium (0.64% NaCl) or a low sodium content (<0.01% NaCl) for 8weeks. After 4weeks, rats were infused or not with angiotensin II (200ng.kg(-1).min(-1), sc) for 4weeks. Tail-cuff blood pressure was determined in conscious rats. Heart and left ventricle weight, cardiomyocyte size, and cardiac fibrosis were evaluated. We performed a transcriptomic analysis in order to identify differentially regulated cardiac mRNAs between normal and low sodium diets. We validated those results using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Angiotensin II-induced blood pressure rise was blunted (~ 50%) in the low-sodium fed rats while cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were prevented. Transcriptomic analysis revealed 66 differentially regulated genes including 13 downregulated genes under the low sodium diet and implicated in the innate immune response. This was confirmed by reduced cardiac macrophages infiltration under the low sodium diet. Dietary sodium restriction prevents structural alterations of the heart of rats with fructose-induced insulin resistance and angiotensin II-hypertension. The reduction of cardiac inflammation and macrophage infiltration suggests that innate immunity has an important role in the beneficial effect of sodium restriction on cardiac remodeling.

  13. Biomimetic structural engineering of P22 virus-like particles for catalysis and immune modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Benjamin

    Within biology molecules are arranged in hierarchical structures that coordinate and control the many processes that allow for complex organisms to exist. Proteins and other functional macromolecules are often studied outside their natural nanostructural context because it remains difficult to create controlled arrangements of proteins at this size scale. Viruses are elegantly simple nano-systems that exist at the interface of living organisms and non-living biological machines. Studied and viewed primarily as pathogens to be combatted, viruses have emerged as models of structural efficiency at the nanoscale and have spurred the development of biomimetic nanoparticle systems. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are noninfectious protein cages derived from viruses or other cage-forming systems. VLPs provide incredibly regular scaffolds for building at the nanoscale. In this work I have utilized the VLP derived from the bacteriophage P22 as a platform for the organization of enzymes, antigens, and immune-stimulating proteins inside and outside the capsid through purely genetic means. In the case of enzymes, encapsulation of a two-enzyme pathway has led to the development of metabolic nanoparticle catalysts and an expanded understanding of the control that structure exerts on metabolic flux. These same structural elements applied to the delivery of protein subunit antigens directed at cytotoxic T cell immunity result in drastically enhanced antigen processing and lasting immunological memory. Lastly, presentation of immune-stimulating proteins from the Tumor Necrosis Factor Super Family on the surface of the P22 VLP enhances the cell signaling efficiency of these compounds 50-fold and provides strategies for the application of these proteins as immune modulatory oncology therapeutics. In all of these cases, the reintroduction of nanostructure to these protein systems, reminiscent of their natural environment, has led to both new technologies and a better understanding of the

  14. Immune System Modulation with LOFU And HIFU Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, C.; Huagang, Z.; Chen, W.; Carlosn, R.; Sanghvi, N. T.

    2011-09-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) results in instantaneous coagulative tissue necrosis. In contrast, "low" energy focused ultrasound (LOFU) induces membrane perturbation while maintaining cell viability. This report explores the tumor immunomodulatory roles of LOFU and HIFU combination treatment. We hypothesized that administration of repeated cycles of LOFU, followed by HIFU would release tumor-derived peptide-heat shock protein complexes in the blood and induce systemic tumor-specific immune response that would enhance tumor control of both local and systemic disease.

  15. Prebiotics modulate immune responses in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhana, Vijaya; Broadway, Mary M; Bruce, Matthew P; Lowenthal, John W; Geier, Mark S; Hughes, Robert J; Bean, Andrew G D

    2009-07-01

    The recent European Union ban on the prophylactic use of in-feed antibiotics has escalated the search for alternatives for use within the poultry industry. When evaluating the efficacy of potential antibiotic alternatives on bird health and productivity, it is important to analyze the competence of the immune cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), because it is routinely involved in the surveillance of colonizing microbes as well as in interacting with the ingested feed antigens. Therefore, we studied the effect of the prebiotics mannan-oligosaccharide (MOS) and fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) on the phenotypic and functional competence of immune cells in cecal tonsil (CT), which is a major GALT. Day-old Cobb 500 male broilers were randomized to 4 groups. Control chickens were fed the basal diet only. Chickens in experimental groups received 0.05 g/kg zinc bacitracin or 5 g/kg of either FOS or MOS in addition to basal diet. At the end of 25 d, our comparison of the experimental groups with controls revealed that the addition of prebiotics to diet resulted in a significant reduction in the proportion of B cells and in mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes in CT. Furthermore, FOS treatment significantly enhanced the IgM and IgG antibody titers in plasma. These findings emphasize the need for the analyses of the gut immune function following treatment with novel feed additives. The knowledge obtained from such analyses may aid in understanding the mechanisms underlying the immune competence of the birds, which needs consideration when selecting and optimizing new feed additives instead of antibiotics for poultry production.

  16. The Role of Helminth Infection and Environment in the Development of Allergy: A Prospective Study of Newly-Arrived Ethiopian Immigrants in Israel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Stein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infection may be protective against allergy and account for the low prevalence of allergy in developing countries. We studied prospectively the prevalence of allergy in Ethiopian immigrants with heavy helminth infection on arrival in Israel, and again after a year of adjustment to an urban industrialized setting, to explore the roles of helminth infection, changed environment and background immunity on the manifestations of allergy. 126 newly arrived Ethiopian immigrants were studied at baseline and 115 after a year of follow up in Israel. Allergic symptoms, Skin prick tests (SPT, Tuberculin (PPD skin tests, stool and blood samples were obtained for determining parasites, blood IgE and eosinophil levels, respectively. Anti-helminthic therapy was offered to the entire infected individuals, but only 50/108 (46.3% took the medication. At baseline, there was a significant negative association between helminth infection and allergy, 4/18 (22.2% of uninfected participants were allergic compared to 7/108 (6.5% of helminth-infected participants (p = 0.028, as well as between helminth infection and SPT reactivity, 12/18 (66.6% of uninfected participants compared to 43/108 (39.8% of helminth-infected participants (p = 0.033. After one year, a significant general increase in allergy and SPT was observed. While only 11/126 (8.7% were allergic at baseline, 30/115 (26.1% became allergic at follow-up (p<0.0001, and while 55/126 (43.7% were SPT+ at baseline, 79/115 (68.7% became SPT+ at follow-up (p<0.001. A twofold increase in allergen sensitization was also observed after one year in Israel, particularly for dust mites, grasses and olive tree (p<0.001. These results show that: a Helminth infection is significantly associated with low allergy and low SPT reactivity; b One year after immigration to Israel, allergy and SPT reactivity increased significantly in all immigrants; c Higher increases in positive SPT and allergy were observed after a year in

  17. Effects of soybean oligosaccharides on intestinal microbial communities and immune modulation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soybean oligosaccharides (SBOSs are potential prebiotics that may be used to improve immune function. Here, we investigated the effects of intragastric administration of SBOSs in mice to determine the effects on autochthonous intestinal microbial communities and immunological parameters. Results E: After 22-day administration, 4.0 g kg body weight (BW−1 SBOSs significantly enhanced the proliferation of bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB as compared to the control. This dose of SBOSs also significantly increased numbers of enterococci and decreased numbers of Clostridium perfringens. Treatment with 4.0 g kg BW−1 SBOSs also significantly increased the percentage of T-lymphocytes and lymphocyte proliferation as compared to the control, suggesting that SBOSs promoted cellular immunity in mice. Additionally, 4.0 g kg BW−1 SBOSs induced significant differences in hemolysin production, natural killer (NK cell activity, phagocytic activity, cytokine production, and immunoglobulin levels compared to the control. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that intragastric administration of SBOSs at a dose of 4.0 g kg BW−1 improved the numbers of beneficial intestinal microbes and enhanced immunological function of mice. Therefore, these data supported that SBOSs may have applications as a prebiotic to improve immune responses in humans. Further studies are warranted.

  18. Chitosan nanoparticles: A positive modulator of innate immune responses in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Swarnendu; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Dasgupta, Adhiraj; Sarkar, Joy; Panda, Koustubh; Acharya, Krishnendu

    2015-10-01

    The immunomodulatory role of the natural biopolymer, chitosan, has already been demonstrated in plants, whilst its nanoparticles have only been examined for biomedical applications. In our present study, we have investigated the possible ability and mechanism of chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) to induce and augment immune responses in plants. CNP-treatment of leaves produced significant improvement in the plant’s innate immune response through induction of defense enzyme activity, upregulation of defense related genes including that of several antioxidant enzymes as well as elevation of the levels of total phenolics. It is also possible that the extracellular localization of CNP may also play a role in the observed upregulation of defense response in plants. Nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule in plant defense, was also observed to increase following CNP treatment. However, such CNP-mediated immuno-stimulation was significantly mitigated when NO production was inhibited, indicating a possible role of NO in such immune induction. Taken together, our results suggest that CNP may be used as a more effective phytosanitary or disease control agent compared to natural chitosan for sustainable organic cultivation.

  19. HI-6 modulates immunization efficacy in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2013-11-01

    HI-6 is used as an antidote to nerve agents. It can also act as an antagonist to acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) including the nicotinic receptor, α 7 nAChR which is involved in regulating the immune response through macrophages. This experiment investigated the efficacy of HI-6 to regulate the immune response. Laboratory BALB/c mice received HI-6 and/or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) as an antigen. Antibody production was investigated after either 21 or 65 days when either single or repeated dose of antigen was applied. We confirmed that HI-6 significantly improved vaccination efficacy when KLH was given in a dose of 1mg/kg. The effect was dose dependent. A combination of HI-6 and KLH produced a vaccination of almost the same efficacy as that for Freund's complete adjuvant. The findings point at the suitability of HI-6 for improving vaccination efficacy at the level of immunity regulation by the nervous system.

  20. Modulation of antioxidant defense and immune response in zebra fish (Danio rerio) using dietary sodium propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Roghieh; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Kavandi, Morteza

    2016-12-01

    The present study explores the effect of dietary sodium propionate on mucosal immune response and expression of antioxidant enzyme genes in zebra fish (Danio rerio). Six hundred healthy zebra fish (0.42 ± 0.06 g) supplied, randomly stocked in 12 aquariums and fed on basal diets supplemented with different levels of sodium propionate [0 (control), 5, 10 and 20 g kg(-1)] for 8 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, mucosal immune parameters (TNF-α, IL-1β, Lyz), antioxidant enzyme (SOD, CAT) as well as heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene expression were measured. The results revealed feeding on sodium propionate significantly up-regulated inflammatory response genes (TNF-α, IL-1β, Lyz) in a dose-dependent manner (P fish fed the basal diet and deceased with elevation of sodium propionate levels in the diet. These results showed beneficial effects of dietary sodium propionate on mucosal immune response as well as the antioxidant defense of zebra fish.

  1. Complement modulation of T cell immune responses during homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Elizabeth V; Tenner, Andrea J

    2014-11-01

    The complement system is an ancient and critical effector mechanism of the innate immune system as it senses, kills, and clears infectious and/or dangerous particles and alerts the immune system to the presence of the infection and/or danger. Interestingly, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated a clear role for complement in the adaptive immune system as well. Of note, a number of recent studies have identified previously unknown roles for complement proteins, receptors, and regulators in T cell function. Here, we will review recent data demonstrating the influence of complement proteins C1q, C3b/iC3b, C3a (and C3aR), and C5a (and C5aR) and complement regulators DAF (CD55) and CD46 (MCP) on T cell function during homeostasis and disease. Although new concepts are beginning to emerge in the field of complement regulation of T cell function, future experiments should focus on whether complement is interacting directly with the T cell or is having an indirect effect on T cell function via APCs, the cytokine milieu, or downstream complement activation products. Importantly, the identification of the pivotal molecular pathways in the human systems will be beneficial in the translation of concepts derived from model systems to therapeutic targeting for treatment of human disorders.

  2. Sex hormones modulate the immune response to Plasmodium berghei ANKA in CBA/Ca mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta-Herrera, Martha; Mosqueda-Romo, Néstor Aarón; Nava-Castro, Karen Elizabeth; Morales-Rodríguez, Ana Laura; Buendía-González, Fidel Orlando; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Susceptibility to malaria differs between females and males, and this sexual dimorphism may have important implications for the effects of vaccines and drugs. However, little is known about the mechanisms mediating these sexual differences. Because the main differences between sexes are dictated by sex hormones, we studied the effect of gonadal steroids on immune responses to malaria in CBA/Ca mice. We decreased sex hormones levels by gonadectomy and evaluated the splenic index and the cells involved in the immune response, including T cells (CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+) and NK(+)), B cells and macrophages (Mac-3(+)) in the spleens of female and male mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. In addition, we measured antibody and cytokine levels in blood. Gonadectomy increased T(+) and B(+) splenic cells in both sexes but increased Mac-3(+) cells only in male mice. By contrast, gonadectomy decreased the NK(+) cell population only in male mice. In general, female mice developed higher antibody levels than males. Contrary to our expectations, gonadectomy increased the synthesis of IgG1, IgG2b, IgG3, and total IgG in female mice, indicating negative regulation of antibody production by female sex hormones. Gonadectomy increased the synthesis of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) only in female mice, suggesting that female sex hormones have anti-inflammatory properties. This work demonstrates that the levels of sex hormones affect the immune response and should be considered when designing malaria vaccines.

  3. Modulation of the immune response by the cholera-like enterotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Andrea; Williams, Neil A

    2004-01-01

    Cholera toxins and heat labile enterotoxin from E. coli differ from most soluble proteins in eliciting systemic immunity both against themselves and unrelated admixed antigens, rather than tolerance following administration to a mucosal surface. Several reports have also demonstrated preferential induction of Th2-type responses when these molecules are used as adjuvants. Conversely, these proteins and their non-toxic derivatives, including the B sub-units are also able prevent and alleviate autoimmune diseases in naïve and systemically immune hosts demonstrating wide-ranging effects on the immune system. The recent observation that amelioration of autoimmune disease is associated with the generation of regulatory T cells which inhibit pathogenic Th1 responses may also help to consolidate these two apparently contradictory outcomes of exposure to the cholera-like enterotoxins. Furthermore, the observation that EtxB is able to alleviate autoimmune disease in the absence of conjugation to autoantigen highlights its potential for use in the clinical setting where the target antigen is often unknown. Direct effects on T cells, B cells and APC have been demonstrated in vitro which have provided insights into how these molecules may elicit these diverse effects. Further investigation is required for elucidation of the mechanisms of action of adjuvanticity and tolerance induction by these molecules to realise their potential for use in vaccines and therapies for autoimmune disease in humans.

  4. Critical role of fatty acid metabolism in ILC2-mediated barrier protection during malnutrition and helminth infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Christoph; Harrison, Oliver J; Schmitt, Vanessa; Pelletier, Martin; Spencer, Sean P; Urban, Joseph F; Ploch, Michelle; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Siegel, Richard M; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2016-07-25

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) play an important role in many immune processes, including control of infections, inflammation, and tissue repair. To date, little is known about the metabolism of ILC and whether these cells can metabolically adapt in response to environmental signals. Here we show that type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), important mediators of barrier immunity, predominantly depend on fatty acid (FA) metabolism during helminth infection. Further, in situations where an essential nutrient, such as vitamin A, is limited, ILC2 sustain their function and selectively maintain interleukin 13 (IL-13) production via increased acquisition and utilization of FA. Together, these results reveal that ILC2 preferentially use FAs to maintain their function in the context of helminth infection or malnutrition and propose that enhanced FA usage and FA-dependent IL-13 production by ILC2 could represent a host adaptation to maintain barrier immunity under dietary restriction.

  5. Immune regulation during parasitic infections : from bench to field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, Linda Judith

    2013-01-01

    Helminth parasites are able to induce immune regulation in their host. Suppression of the host immune system is beneficial for both the parasite, by inhibiting anti-parasite immunity, and for the host, by preventing tissue damage due to excessive inflammation. There are indications that in countrie

  6. THP-1 cell line: an in vitro cell model for immune-modulation approach : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chanput, W.; Mes, J.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    THP-1 is a human leukemia monocytic cell line, which has been extensively used to study monocyte/macrophage functions, mechanisms, signaling pathways, and nutrient and drug transport. This cell line has become a common model to estimate modulation of monocyte and macrophage activities. This review a

  7. The helminth Trichuris suis suppresses TLR4-induced inflammatory responses in human macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottow, M. K.; Klaver, E. J.; van der Pouw Kraan, T. C. T. M.

    2014-01-01

    -CSF)-differentiated) macrophages. Interestingly, we here show that T. suis SPs potently skew inflammatory macrophages into a more anti-inflammatory state in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent manner, and less effects are seen when stimulating macrophages with TLR2 or -3 ligands. Gene microarray analysis of GM......Recent clinical trials in patients with inflammatory diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have shown the beneficial effects of probiotic helminth administration, although the underlying mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Potential cellular targets may...... include innate immune cells that propagate inflammation in these diseases, like pro-inflammatory macrophages. We here investigated the effects of the helminth Trichuris suis soluble products (SPs) on the phenotype and function of human inflammatory (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM...

  8. Selective modulation of follicle-stimulating hormone signaling pathways with enhancing equine chorionic gonadotropin/antibody immune complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbi, Vanessa; Decourtye, Jérémy; Piketty, Vincent; Durand, Guillaume; Reiter, Eric; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2010-06-01

    The injection of equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG) in dairy goats induces the production of anti-eCG antibodies (Abs) in some females. We have previously shown that Abs negatively modulate the LH and FSH-like bioactivities of eCG, in most cases, compromising fertility in treated females. Surprisingly, we found out that some anti-eCG Abs improved fertility and prolificity of the treated females, in vivo. These Abs, when complexed with eCG, enhanced LH and FSH ability to induce steroidogenesis on specific target cells, in vitro. In the present study, we analyzed the impact of three eCG/anti-eCG Ab-enhancing complexes on two transduction mechanisms triggered by the FSH receptor: guanine nucleotide-binding protein alphaS-subunit/cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) and beta-arrestin-dependent pathways, respectively. In all cases, significant enhancing effects were observed on ERK phosphorylation compared with eCG alone. However, cAMP production and PKA activation induced by eCG could be differently modulated by Abs. By using a pharmacological inhibitor of PKA and small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of endogenous beta-arrestin 1 and 2, we demonstrated that signaling bias was induced and was clearly dependent on the complexed Ab. Together, our data show that eCG/anti-eCG Ab-enhancing complexes can differentially modulate cAMP/PKA and beta-arrestin pathways as a function of the complexed Ab. We hypothesize that enhancing Abs may change the eCG conformation, the immune complex acquiring new "biased" pharmacological properties ultimately leading to the physiological effects observed in vivo. The modulation of ligand pharmacological properties by Abs opens promising research avenues towards the optimization of glycoprotein hormone biological activities and, more generally, the development of new therapeutics.

  9. Modulation of the immune response to Listeria monocytogenes by benzene inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, G J; Snyder, C A

    1985-09-30

    Benzene is a potent bone marrow toxicant. While all blood cell types are targets for benzene poisoning, lymphocytes are particularly sensitive. The immunotoxic consequences of benzene or its metabolites have been demonstrated in a number of in vitro studies; however, little data exist regarding the effects of benzene on host resistance to infectious agents. This investigation examined the effects of benzene on murine resistance to an infectious agent, Listeria monocytogenes. Four concentrations of benzene were employed, 10, 30, 100, and 300 ppm. To determine recovery from the effects of benzene, two exposure regimens were employed: 5 days prior to infection (preexposure), or 5 days prior to and 7 days during infection (continuous exposure). Appropriate air controls were maintained. Splenic bacterial counts and immune responsive cell populations were determined from mice killed at Days 1, 4, and 7 of infection. Preexposure to benzene produced increased bacterial numbers at Day 4 of the infection only at the highest benzene concentration (300 ppm). In contrast, continuous exposure produced increased bacterial numbers at Day 4 of infection at all but the lowest benzene concentration (10 ppm). Bacteria counts were not increased in any benzene-treated group at Day 1 or Day 7 of infection. The increased bacterial numbers at Day 4 suggest an effect on cell-mediated immune responses. Both T and B lymphocytes were particularly sensitive to benzene exhibiting reductions at all concentrations greater than or equal to 30 ppm for both exposure regimens. Esterase-positive cells, however, were relatively resistant to benzenes effects. The results point to a benzene-induced delay in the immune response to L. monocytogenes.

  10. Salmonella-host interactions - modulation of the host innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eHurley

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica (S. enterica are Gram-negative bacteria that can invade a broad range of hosts causing both acute and chronic infections. This phenotype is related to its ability to replicate and persist within non-phagocytic host epithelial cells as well as phagocytic dendritic cells and macrophages of the innate immune system.Infection with S. enterica manifests itself through a broad range of clinical symptoms and can result in asymptomatic carriage, gastroenteritis, systemic disease such as typhoid fever and in severe cases, death (Gunn et al. 2014. Exposure to S. enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi exhibits clinical symptoms including diarrhoea, fatigue, fever and temperature fluctuations. Other serovars such as the non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS, of which there are over 2,500, are commonly contracted as, but not limited to, food-borne sources causing gastrointestinal symptoms, which include diarrhoea and vomiting.The availability of complete genome sequences for many S. enterica serovars has facilitated research into the genetic determinants of virulence for this pathogen. This work has led to the identification of important bacterial components, including flagella, type III secretion systems, lipopolysaccharides and Salmonella pathogenicity islands, all of which support the intracellular life cycle of S. enterica. Studies focusing on the host-pathogen interaction have provided insights into receptor activation of the innate immune system. Therefore, characterising the host-S. enterica interaction is critical to understand the pathogenicity of the bacteria in a clinically relevant context. This review outlines salmonellosis and the clinical manifestations between typhoidal and NTS infections as well as discussing the host immune response to infection and the models that are being used to elucidate the mechanisms involved on Salmonella pathogenicity.

  11. Salmonella-host interactions - modulation of the host innate immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Daniel; McCusker, Matthew P; Fanning, Séamus; Martins, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) are Gram-negative bacteria that can invade a broad range of hosts causing both acute and chronic infections. This phenotype is related to its ability to replicate and persist within non-phagocytic host epithelial cells as well as phagocytic dendritic cells and macrophages of the innate immune system. Infection with S. enterica manifests itself through a broad range of clinical symptoms and can result in asymptomatic carriage, gastroenteritis, systemic disease such as typhoid fever and in severe cases, death (1). Exposure to S. enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi exhibits clinical symptoms including diarrhea, fatigue, fever, and temperature fluctuations. Other serovars such as the non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS), of which there are over 2,500, are commonly contracted as, but not limited to, food-borne sources causing gastrointestinal symptoms, which include diarrhea and vomiting. The availability of complete genome sequences for many S. enterica serovars has facilitated research into the genetic determinants of virulence for this pathogen. This work has led to the identification of important bacterial components, including flagella, type III secretion systems, lipopolysaccharides, and Salmonella pathogenicity islands, all of which support the intracellular life cycle of S. enterica. Studies focusing on the host-pathogen interaction have provided insights into receptor activation of the innate immune system. Therefore, characterizing the host-S. enterica interaction is critical to understand the pathogenicity of the bacteria in a clinically relevant context. This review outlines salmonellosis and the clinical manifestations between typhoidal and NTS infections as well as discussing the host immune response to infection and the models that are being used to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Salmonella pathogenicity.

  12. Trichomonas vaginalis Lipophosphoglycan Exploits Binding to Galectin-1 and -3 to Modulate Epithelial Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichorova, Raina N; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Fashemi, Titilayo; Foley, Evan; Ryan, Stanthia; Beatty, Noah; Dawood, Hassan; Hayes, Gary R; St-Pierre, Guillaume; Sato, Sachiko; Singh, Bibhuti N

    2016-01-08

    Trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection caused by the vaginotropic extracellular protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. The infection is recurrent, with no lasting immunity, often asymptomatic, and linked to pregnancy complications and risk of viral infection. The molecular mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite are poorly understood. We demonstrate that galectin-1 and -3 are expressed by the human cervical and vaginal epithelial cells and act as pathogen-recognition receptors for the ceramide phosphoinositol glycan core (CPI-GC) of the dominant surface protozoan lipophosphoglycan (LPG). We used an in vitro model with siRNA galectin knockdown epithelial clones, recombinant galectins, clinical Trichomonas isolates, and mutant protozoan derivatives to dissect the function of galectin-1 and -3 in the context of Trichomonas infection. Galectin-1 suppressed chemokines that facilitate recruitment of phagocytes, which can eliminate extracellular protozoa (IL-8) or bridge innate to adaptive immunity (MIP-3α and RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)). Silencing galectin-1 increased and adding exogenous galectin-1 suppressed chemokine responses to Trichomonas or CPI-GC/LPG. In contrast, silencing galectin-3 reduced IL-8 response to LPG. Live Trichomonas depleted the extracellular levels of galectin-3. Clinical isolates and mutant Trichomonas CPI-GC that had reduced affinity to galectin-3 but maintained affinity to galectin-1 suppressed chemokine expression. Thus via CPI-GC binding, Trichomonas is capable of regulating galectin bioavailability and function to the benefit of its parasitic survival. These findings suggest novel approaches to control trichomoniasis and warrant further studies of galectin-binding diversity among clinical isolates as a possible source for symptom disparity in parasitic infections.

  13. Aqualase, a yeast-based in-feed probiotic, modulates intestinal microbiota, immunity and growth of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adel, Milad; Lazado, Carlo Cabacang; Safari, Reza;

    2016-01-01

    performance parameters were significantly improved following probiotic administration specifically at inclusion rate 1.5% and above. Taken together, the results revealed that Aqualase is a promising yeast-based probiotic for rainbow trout with the capability of modulating the intestinal microbiota, immunity......). Probiotics were incorporated in the diets at three different inclusion levels (1%, 1.5% and 2%) and administered to the fish for a period of 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, intestinal total viable aerobic bacterial count was significantly higher in fish group that received 2% in-feed probiotics....... In addition, a significant increase in at least 11% in intestinal lactic acid bacteria population was observed in all probiotic-fed groups. Total protein level and lysozyme activity in skin mucus were significantly elevated following probiotic feeding. Inhibitory potential of skin mucus against fish pathogens...

  14. Balancing Innate Immunity and Inflammatory State via Modulation of Neutrophil Function: A Novel Strategy to Fight Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoshu Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis and SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome belong to a severe disease complex characterized by infection and/or a whole-body inflammatory state. There is a growing body of evidence that neutrophils are actively involved in sepsis and are responsible for both release of cytokines and phagocytosis of pathogens. The neutrophil level is mainly regulated by G-CSF, a cytokine and drug, which is widely used in the septic patient with neutropenia. This review will briefly summarize the role of neutrophils and the therapeutic effect of G-CSF in sepsis. We further suggest that targeting neutrophil function to modulate the balance between innate immunity and inflammatory injury could be a worthwhile therapeutic strategy for sepsis.

  15. Antibiotics modulate intestinal immunity and prevent necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael L.; Thymann, Thomas; Cilieborg, Malene Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    5 (0/11 vs. 11/13, P digestive enzyme activities (+53–73%), and goblet cell densities (+110%) and lower myeloperoxidase (−51%) and colonic microbial density (105 vs. 1010 colony-forming units, all P ... strong downregulation of genes related to inflammation and innate immune response to microbiota and marked upregulation of genes related to amino acid metabolism, in particular threonine, glucose transport systems, and cell cycle in 5-day-old ANTI pigs. In a follow-up experiment, 5 days of antibiotics...

  16. Modulation of the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during malaria/M. tuberculosis co-infection

    OpenAIRE

    Chukwuanukwu, Rebecca C.; Charles C. Onyenekwe; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Flynn, Robin J.; Singh, Sonali; Amilo, Grace I.; Agbakoba, Nneka R.; Okoye, Jude O.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality on a global scale. The African region has 24% of the world's TB cases. TB overlaps with other infectious diseases such as malaria and HIV, which are also highly prevalent in the African region. TB is a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients and co-infection with HIV and TB has been described as a syndemic. In view of the overlapping epidemiology of these diseases, it is important to understand the dynamics of the immune ...

  17. Wound Healing Effect of Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water on Cutaneous Wounds in Hairless Mice via Immune-Redox Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hae Sun; Fadriquela, Ailyn; Sajo, Ma Easter Joy; Bajgai, Johny; Ara, Jesmin; Kim, Cheol Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Oh, Jin Rok; Shim, Kwang Yong; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2017-01-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water is an innovative sanitizer having a wide-spectrum of applications in food industry, and healthcare industry but little is known on its effect and mechanism in wound healing. The study was conducted to identify the effect and mechanism of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) on cutaneous wounds in hairless mice. SAEW (pH: 5-6.5, oxidation reduction potential: 800 mV, chlorine concentration: 25 ppm) was prepared through electrolysis of water and was applied to the wounds of hairless mice three times a day for seven days. Wound size, immune response and oxidative stress were explored and compared to conventional agents such as Betadine and alcohol. We found that SAEW-treated group showed the highest wound reduction percentage (phealing. In line, SAEW treatment decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant, and tumor necrosis factor-α] in serum. Other hallmarks of wound healing, matrixmetalloproteinases (MMP)1 and MMP9 were also upregulated. Collectively, our study indicates that SAEW is effective in wound healing of hairless mice via immune-redox modulation, and heals better/faster than conventional agents.

  18. Nanomedicine targeting the tumor microenvironment: Therapeutic strategies to inhibit angiogenesis, remodel matrix, and modulate immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Siegler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been given to the tumor microenvironment (TME, which includes cellular and structural components such as fibroblasts, immune cells, vasculature, and extracellular matrix (ECM that surround tumor sites. These components contribute to tumor growth and metastasis and are one reason why traditional chemotherapy often is insufficient to eradicate the tumor completely. Newer treatments that target aspects of the TME, such as antiangiogenic and immunostimulatory therapies, have seen limited clinical success despite promising preclinical results. This can be attributed to a number of reasons, including a lack of drug penetration deeper into the necrotic tumor core, nonspecific delivery, rapid clearance from serum, or toxic side effects at high doses. Nanoparticles offer a potential solution to all of these obstacles, and many recent studies have shown encouraging results using nanomedicine to target TME vasculature, ECM, and immune response. While few of these platforms have made it to clinical trials to date, these strategies are relatively new and may offer a way to improve the effects of anticancer therapies.

  19. Modulation of antibody-mediated immune response by probiotics in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Hamid R; Gong, Jianhua; Gyles, Carlton L; Hayes, M Anthony; Sanei, Babak; Parvizi, Payvand; Gisavi, Haris; Chambers, James R; Sharif, Shayan

    2005-12-01

    Probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum, have been shown to enhance antibody responses in mammals. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a probiotic product containing the above bacteria in addition to Streptococcus faecalis on the induction of the chicken antibody response to various antigens, both systemically and in the gut. The birds received probiotics via oral gavage and subsequently were immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to evaluate antibody responses in serum or with tetanus toxoid (TT) to measure the mucosal antibody response in gut contents. Control groups received phosphate-buffered saline. Overall, BSA and SRBC induced a detectable antibody response as early as week 1 postimmunization (p.i.), which lasted until week 3 p.i. Probiotic-treated birds had significantly (P probiotics. However, treatment with probiotics did not enhance the serum IgM and IgG antibody responses to BSA. Immunization with TT resulted in the presence of specific IgA and IgG antibody responses in the gut. Again, treatment with probiotics did not change the level or duration of the antibody response in the gut. In conclusion, probiotics enhance the systemic antibody response to some antigens in chickens, but it remains to be seen whether probiotics have an effect on the generation of the mucosal antibody response.

  20. Efficacy of an Immune Modulator in Experimental Chlamydia trachomatis Infection of the Female Genital Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to determine if vaginal application of the immune response modifier imiquimod (Aldara cream, 3M Pharmaceuticals, St Paul, Minn would alter the course and/or outcome of female genital tract infection with a human isolate of Chlamydia trachomatis in a murine model. Methods. Groups of CF-1 mice were treated with Aldara on three different schedules: (1 ongoing beginning 5 days prior to and continuing through day 5 of infection; (2 a single prophylactic dose 2 hours prior to infection; and (3 therapeutic from day 4 to day 14 of infection. Mice were infected vaginally with a serovar D strain of C trachomatis, and monitored by culture to determine the level of shedding and duration of infection. Results. We observed a significant reduction in both duration of infection and the level of shedding during the acute phase in mice treated on an ongoing basis commencing 5 days prior to infection. There was no effect with respect to the other regimens. Conclusion. These results demonstrate that ongoing Aldara treatment has efficacy and may enhance local innate immunity which reduces the duration of subsequent infection with human isolates of C trachomatis in a murine model of female genital tract infection.

  1. Capsaicin Modulates the Immune Cross Talk Between Human Mononuclears and Cells from Two Colon Carcinoma Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Hanna; Djaldetti, Meir

    2017-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent alkaloid of the chili peppers, has gained a worldwide reputation. In addition to its culinary assets, capsaicin possesses analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and even carcinopreventive properties. Considering the linkage between chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis, the aim of the study was to evaluate the role of capsaicin in the immune interplay between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and HT-29 or RKO cells from human colon carcinoma lines. PBMCs were incubated for 24 hours with either HT-29 or RKO cells and concentrations of capsaicin ranging between 10 and 200 µM. Subsequently, the generation of the following cytokines was examined: tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-1ra, and IL-10. Capsaicin caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of colon cancer cells proliferation but had no effect on PBMC viability. 200 µM of capsaicin suppressed the production of all cytokines tested. At lower concentrations, the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-1ra was inhibited concentration-dependently, whereas that of IL-6 was stimulated. Capsaicin causes a concentration-dependent alteration of the immune balance between PBMC and colon carcinoma cells expressed as an inhibited generation of inflammatory cytokines. These findings indicate the existence of an additional immunomodulatory mechanism by which this alkaloid may prevent tumor development.

  2. Plasmid DNA Vaccine Co-Immunisation Modulates Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses Induced by Intranasal Inoculation in Mice.

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    Deborah F L King

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will likely require induction of both mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses. We investigated whether intramuscular (IM delivery of electroporated plasmid DNA vaccine and simultaneous protein vaccinations by intranasal (IN and IM routes could be combined to induce mucosal and systemic cellular and humoral immune responses to a model HIV-1 CN54 gp140 antigen in mice.Co-immunisation of DNA with intranasal protein successfully elicited both serum and vaginal IgG and IgA responses, whereas DNA and IM protein co-delivery did not induce systemic or mucosal IgA responses. Cellular IFNγ responses were preserved in co-immunisation protocols compared to protein-only vaccination groups. The addition of DNA to IN protein vaccination reduced the strong Th2 bias observed with IN protein vaccination alone. Luminex analysis also revealed that co-immunisation with DNA and IN protein induced expression of cytokines that promote B-cell function, generation of TFH cells and CCR5 ligands that can reduce HIV infectivity.These data suggest that while IN inoculation alone elicits both cellular and humoral responses, co-administration with homologous DNA vaccination can tailor these towards a more balanced Th1/Th2 phenotype modulating the cellular cytokine profile while eliciting high-levels of antigen-specific antibody. This work provides insights on how to generate differential immune responses within the same vaccination visit, and supports co-immunisation with DNA and protein by a mucosal route as a potential delivery strategy for HIV vaccines.

  3. Characterization of Sm14 related components in different helminths by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting analysis

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    Nilton Thaumaturgo

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Sm14 was the first fatty acid-binding protein homologue identified in helminths. Thereafter, members of the same family were identified in several helminth species, with high aminoacid sequence homology between them. In addition, immune crossprotection was also reported against Fasciola hepatica infection, in animals previously immunized with the Schistosoma mansoni vaccine candidate, r-Sm14. In the present study, data on preliminary sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting analysis of nine different helminth extracts focusing the identification of Sm14 related proteins, is reported. Out of these, three extracts - Ascaris suum (males and females, Echinostoma paraensei, and Taenia saginata - presented components that comigrated with Sm14 in SDS-PAGE, and that were recognized by anti-rSm14 policlonal serum, in Western blotting tests.

  4. Modulating sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling with DOP or FTY720 alleviates vascular and immune defects in mouse sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Weigel, Cynthia; Reimann, Christina-Maria; Gräler, Markus H

    2016-12-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to pathogens and a leading cause of hospital related mortality worldwide. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) regulates multiple cellular processes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis, including antigen presentation, lymphocyte egress, and maintenance of vascular integrity. We thus explored the impact of manipulating S1P signaling in experimental polymicrobial sepsis in mice. Administration of 4-deoxypyridoxine (DOP), an inhibitor of the S1P-degrading enzyme S1P-lyase, or of the sphingosine analog FTY720 that serves as an S1P receptor agonist after phosphorylation ameliorated morbidity, improved recovery from sepsis in surviving mice, and reduced sepsis-elicited hypothermia and body weight loss. Treated mice developed lymphopenia, leading to an accumulation of lymphocytes in peripheral lymph nodes, and reduced bacterial burden in liver, but not in blood. Sepsis-induced upregulation of mRNA expression of cytokines in spleen remained unchanged, but reduction of IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, and IL-10 in plasma was evident. DOP and FTY720 treatment significantly reduced levels of Evans blue leakage from blood into liver and lung, decreased hematocrit values, and lowered plasma levels of VEGF-A in septic mice. Collectively, our results indicate that modulation of S1P signaling showed a protective phenotype in experimental sepsis by modulating vascular and immune functions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Flavonols modulate the effector functions of healthy individuals' immune complex-stimulated neutrophils: a therapeutic perspective for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Everton O L; Kabeya, Luciana M; Figueiredo-Rinhel, Andréa S G; Marchi, Larissa F; Andrade, Micássio F; Piatesi, Fabiana; Paoliello-Paschoalato, Adriana B; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C S; Lucisano-Valim, Yara M

    2014-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients usually exhibit immune complex (IC) deposition and increased neutrophil activation in the joint. In this study, we assessed how four flavonols (galangin, kaempferol, quercetin, and myricetin) modulate the effector functions of healthy individuals' and active RA patients' IC-stimulated neutrophils. We measured superoxide anion and total reactive oxygen species production using lucigenin (CL-luc)- and luminol (CL-lum)-enhanced chemiluminescence assays, respectively. Galangin, kaempferol, and quercetin inhibited CL-lum to the same degree (mean IC50=2.5 μM). At 2.5 μM, quercetin and galangin suppressed nearly 65% CL-lum of active RA patients' neutrophils. Quercetin inhibited CL-luc the most effectively (IC50=1.71±0.36 μM). The four flavonols diminished myeloperoxidase activity, but they did not decrease NADPH oxidase activity, phagocytosis, microbial killing, or cell viability of neutrophils. The ability of the flavonols to scavenge hypochlorous acid and chloramines, but not H2O2, depended on the hydroxylation degree of the flavonol B-ring. Therefore, at physiologically relevant concentrations, the flavonols partially inhibited the oxidative metabolism of IC-stimulated neutrophils without affecting the other investigated effector functions. Using these compounds to modulate IC-mediated neutrophil activation is a promising safe therapeutic strategy to control inflammation in active RA patients.

  6. MUC1 modulates gastric epithelial immune response to bacteria or inflammatory stimuli

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    Shofyatul Y. Triyana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cell surface mucin glycoproteins are expressed on the mucosal surface. One of these cell surface mucins is mucin-1 (MUC1, which plays a role as a physical barrier and limits inflammation. However, its functional role in modulating responses to pathogens, particularly with respect to intracellular signaling, needs to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the modulation of responses of human gastric epithelial cells by MUC1 to common mucosal pathogens and inflammatory stimuli. METHODS Human gastric epithelial cell lines (MKN7 were co-cultured with Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni. In order to investigate the effect of MUC1 expression on C. jejuni-induced cytokine production, MKN7 cells were transfected with 1:1 small interfering RNA (siRNA to knock down the MUC1 gene using MUC1 targeting siRNA or non targeting siRNA as a control. The read out of the experiment was interleukin (IL-8 concentration as a result of the inflammation process. This cytokine concentration was measured using ELISA and compared between the two groups. RESULTS This study demonstrated that by using siRNA transfection, knockdown of MUC1 expression in MKN7 human gastric epithelial cells suppressed IL-8 production at the early phase of incubation, but promoted an increase in IL-8 production at the late phase, in response to C. jejuni. CONCLUSION Knockdown of the MUC1 gene in MKN7 cells reduced IL-8 levels both in the cells with and without exposure to C. jejuni. This study provides direction for exploration of the intracelular mechanisms by which cell surface mucins modulates inflammation in the response of gastrointestinal epithelial cells to pathogens or other inflammatory stimuli.

  7. MUC1 modulates gastric epithelial immune response to bacteria or inflammatory stimuli

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    Shofyatul Y. Triyana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Cell surface mucin glycoproteins are expressed on the mucosal surface. One of these cell surface mucins is mucin-1 (MUC1, which plays a role as a physical barrier and limits inflammation. However, its functional role in modulating responses to pathogens, particularly with respect to intracellular signaling, needs to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the modulation of responses of human gastric epithelial cells by MUC1 to common mucosal pathogens and inflammatory stimuli. Methods Human gastric epithelial cell lines (MKN7 were co-cultured with Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni. In order to investigate the effect of MUC1 expression on C. jejuni-induced cytokine production, MKN7 cells were transfected with 1:1 small interfering RNA (siRNA to knock down the MUC1 gene using MUC1 targeting siRNA or non targeting siRNA as a control. The read out of the experiment was interleukin (IL-8 concentration as a result of the inflammation process. This cytokine concentration was measured using ELISA and compared between the two groups. Results This study demonstrated that by using siRNA transfection, knockdown of MUC1 expression in MKN7 human gastric epithelial cells suppressed IL-8 production at the early phase of incubation, but promoted an increase in IL-8 production at the late phase, in response to C. jejuni. Conclusion Knockdown of the MUC1 gene in MKN7 cells reduced IL-8 levels both in the cells with and without exposure to C. jejuni. This study provides direction for exploration of the intracelular mechanisms by which cell surface mucins modulates inflammation in the response of gastrointestinal epithelial cells to pathogens or other inflammatory stimuli.

  8. Immune modulation enables a specialist insect to benefit from antibacterial withanolides in its host plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Andrea; Vogel, Heiko; Pauchet, Yannick; Pauls, Gerhard; Kunert, Grit; Groot, Astrid T.; Boland, Wilhelm; Heckel, David G.; Heidel-Fischer, Hanna M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel plant chemical defenses and counter adaptations by herbivorous insect could continually drive speciation, producing more insect specialists than generalists. One approach to test this hypothesis is to compare closely related generalist and specialist species to reveal the associated costs and benefits of these different adaptive strategies. We use the specialized moth Heliothis subflexa, which feeds exclusively on plants in the genus Physalis, and its close generalist relative H. virescens. Specialization on Physalis plants necessitates the ability to tolerate withanolides, the secondary metabolites of Physalis species that are known to have feeding deterrent and immune inhibiting properties for other insects. Here we find that only H. subflexa benefits from the antibacterial properties of withanolides, and thereby gains a higher tolerance of the pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. We argue that the specialization in H. subflexa has been guided to a large extent by a unique role of plant chemistry on ecological immunology. PMID:27561781

  9. Processing of whey modulates proliferative and immune functions in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per Torp; Li, Yanqi

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is often subjected to heat treatment during industrial processing, resulting in protein denaturation and loss of protein bioactivity. We hypothesized that WPC samples subjected to different degrees of thermal processing are associated with different levels...... from acid whey or low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey. Following acid activation (to activate growth factors), low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey induced higher IL-8 levels in IEC compared with standard WPC from sweet whey. In conclusion, higher levels of bioactive proteins in low-heat-treated WPC...... of bioactive proteins and effects on proliferation and immune response in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The results showed that low-heat-treated WPC had elevated levels of lactoferrin and transforming growth factor-β2 compared with that of standard WPC. The level of aggregates depended on the source...

  10. Determinants of DHA status and functional effects on metabolic markers and immune modulation in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsløf, Laurine Bente Schram

    intake and other potential determinants in infancy and childhood. The first part of the PhD thesis describes several potential determinants of infant and young child DHA status including genetic variation in FADS, breastfeeding and fish intake. Results can be found in Paper 1. Evidence for effects of n-3...... LCPUFA on metabolic markers such as glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in young children is limited. No studies have explored whether polymorphisms of genes encoding proteins involved in the mechanisms behind the effect (such as PPARG2 and COX2) can support the findings of diet studies...... by identifying the involved pathways and genes. The second part of the PhD thesis explores whether functional effects of n-3 LCPUFA on metabolic markers and immune maturation in young children can be supported by polymorphisms in genes involved in the mechanisms (PPARG2, COX2 and NFKB1). Results can be found...

  11. Bovine colostrum modulates immune activation cascades in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenny, Marcel; Pedersen, Ninfa R; Hidayat, Budi J

    2010-01-01

    factors and has a long history of use in traditional medicine. In an approach to evaluate the effects of bovine colostrum (BC) on the T-cell/macrophage interplay, we investigated and compared the capacity of BC containing low and high amounts of lactose and lactoferrin to modulate tryptophan degradation...... of lactose present in BC seems to diminish the activity of BC in our test system, since BC with higher amounts of lactose attenuated the stimulatory as well as the suppressive activity of BC....

  12. Enterococcus faecalis Glycolipids Modulate Lipoprotein-Content of the Bacterial Cell Membrane and Host Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Andreas; Sava, Irina G.; Wobser, Dominique; Bao, Yinyin; Hese, Katrin; Broszat, Melanie; Henneke, Philipp; Becher, Dörte; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of the cell membrane composition of E. faecalis on its recognition by the host immune system. To this end, we employed an E. faecalis deletion mutant (ΔbgsA) that does not synthesize the major cell membrane glycolipid diglycosyl-diacylglycerol (DGlcDAG). Proteomic analysis revealed that 13 of a total of 21 upregulated surface-associated proteins of E. faecalis ΔbgsA were lipoproteins. This led to a total lipoprotein content in the cell membrane of 35.8% in ΔbgsA compared to only 9.4% in wild-type bacteria. Increased lipoprotein content strongly affected the recognition of ΔbgsA by mouse macrophages in vitro with an increased stimulation of TNF-α production by heat-fixed bacteria and secreted antigens. Inactivation of the prolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (lgt) in ΔbgsA abrogated TNF-α induction by a ΔbgsA_lgt double mutant indicating that lipoproteins mediate increased activation of mouse macrophages by ΔbgsA. Heat-fixed ΔbgsA bacteria, culture supernatant, or cell membrane lipid extract activated transfected HEK cells in a TLR2-dependent fashion; the same was not true of wild-type bacteria. In mice infected intraperitoneally with a sublethal dose of E. faecalis we observed a 70% greater mortality in mice infected with ΔbgsA compared with wild-type-infected mice. Increased mortality due to ΔbgsA infection was associated with elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-2. In summary, our results provide evidence that an E. faecalis mutant lacking its major bilayer forming glycolipid DGlcDAG upregulates lipoprotein expression leading to increased activation of the host innate immune system and virulence in vivo. PMID:26172831

  13. Bifidobacterium longum CECT 7347 modulates immune responses in a gliadin-induced enteropathy animal model.

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    José Moisés Laparra

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten proteins (gliadin that involves innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we hypothesise that the administration of Bifidobacterium longum CECT 7347, previously selected for reducing gliadin immunotoxic effects in vitro, could exert protective effects in an animal model of gliadin-induced enteropathy. The effects of this bacterium were evaluated in newborn rats fed gliadin alone or sensitised with interferon (IFN-γ and fed gliadin. Jejunal tissue sections were collected for histological, NFκB mRNA expression and cytokine production analyses. Leukocyte populations and T-cell subsets were analysed in peripheral blood samples. The possible translocation of the bacterium to different organs was determined by plate counting and the composition of the colonic microbiota was quantified by real-time PCR. Feeding gliadin alone reduced enterocyte height and peripheral CD4+ cells, but increased CD4+/Foxp3+ T and CD8+ cells, while the simultaneous administration of B. longum CECT 7347 exerted opposite effects. Animals sensitised with IFN-γ and fed gliadin showed high cellular infiltration, reduced villi width and enterocyte height. Sensitised animals also exhibited increased NFκB mRNA expression and TNF-α production in tissue sections. B. longum CECT 7347 administration increased NFκB expression and IL-10, but reduced TNF-α, production in the enteropathy model. In sensitised gliadin-fed animals, CD4+, CD4+/Foxp3+ and CD8+ T cells increased, whereas the administration of B. longum CECT 7347 reduced CD4+ and CD4+/Foxp3+ cell populations and increased CD8+ T cell populations. The bifidobacterial strain administered represented between 75-95% of the total bifidobacteria isolated from all treated groups, and translocation to organs was not detected. These findings indicate that B. longum attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines and the CD4+ T-cell mediated immune response in

  14. Cloned, CD117 selected human amniotic fluid stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response.

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    Emily C Moorefield

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid stem (AFS cells are broadly multipotent, can be expanded extensively in culture, are not tumorigenic and can be readily cryopreserved for cell banking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC show immunomodulatory activity and secrete a wide spectrum of cytokines and chemokines that suppress inflammatory responses, block mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR and other immune reactions, and have proven therapeutic against conditions such as graft-versus-host disease. AFS cells resemble MSCs in many respects including surface marker expression and differentiation potential. We therefore hypothesized that AFS cells may exhibit similar immunomodulatory capabilities. We present data to demonstrate that direct contact with AFS cells inhibits lymphocyte activation. In addition, we show that cell-free supernatants derived from AFS cells primed with total blood monocytes or IL-1β, a cytokine released by monocytes and essential in mediation of the inflammatory response, also inhibited lymphocyte activation. Further investigation of AFS cell-free supernatants by protein array revealed secretion of multiple factors in common with MSCs that are known to be involved in immune regulation including growth related oncogene (GRO and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP family members as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6. AFS cells activated by PBMCs released several additional cytokines as compared to BM-MSCs, including macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α, MIP-1α and Activin. AFS cells also released higher levels of MCP-1 and lower levels of MCP-2 compared to BM-MSCs in response to IL-1β activation. This suggests that there may be some AFS-specific mechanisms of inhibition of lymphocyte activation. Our results indicate that AFS cells are able to suppress inflammatory responses in vitro and that soluble factors are an essential component in the communication between lymphocytes and AFS cells. Their extensive self-renewal capacity, possibility for banking and

  15. Autonomic nervous system modulation affects the inflammatory immune response in mice with acute Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marcus Paulo Ribeiro; Rocha, Aletheia Moraes; de Oliveira, Lucas Felipe; de Cuba, Marília Beatriz; de Oliveira Loss, Igor; Castellano, Lucio Roberto; Silva, Marcus Vinicius; Machado, Juliana Reis; Nascentes, Gabriel Antonio Nogueira; Paiva, Luciano Henrique; Savino, Wilson; Junior, Virmondes Rodrigues; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Prado, Vania Ferreira; Prado, Marco Antonio Maximo; Silva, Eliane Lages; Montano, Nicola; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; Dias da Silva, Valdo Jose

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of changes to the autonomic nervous system in mice during the acute phase of Chagas disease, which is an infection caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The following types of mice were inoculated with T. cruzi (CHG): wild-type (WT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter knockdown (KDVAChT) C57BL/6j mice; wild-type non-treated (NT) FVB mice; FVB mice treated with pyridostigmine bromide (PYR) or salbutamol (SALB); and β(2)-adrenergic receptor knockout (KOβ2) FVB mice. During infection and at 18-21 days after infection (acute phase), the survival curves, parasitaemia, electrocardiograms, heart rate variability, autonomic tonus and histopathology of the animals were evaluated. Negative control groups were matched for age, genetic background and treatment. The KDVAChT-CHG mice exhibited a significant shift in the electrocardiographic, autonomic and histopathological profiles towards a greater inflammatory immune response that was associated with a reduction in blood and tissue parasitism. In contrast, the CHG-PYR mice manifested reduced myocardial inflammation and lower blood and tissue parasitism. Similar results were observed in CHG-SALB animals. Unexpectedly, the KOβ2-CHG mice exhibited less myocardial inflammation and higher blood and tissue parasitism, which were associated with reduced mortality. These findings could have been due to the increase in vagal tone observed in the KOβ2 mice, which rendered them more similar to the CHG-PYR animals. In conclusion, our results indicate a marked immunomodulatory role for the parasympathetic and sympathetic autonomic nervous systems, which inhibit both the inflammatory immune response and parasite clearance during the acute phase of experimental Chagas heart disease in mice.

  16. Modulation of innate immune response by the vagus nerve in experimental hepatic amebiasis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Jaimes, Mercedes D; García-Lorenzana, Mario; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin H; Quintanar-Stephano, Andrés; Ávila-Blanco, Manuel E; García-Agueda, Carlos E; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system has a crucial role in immunomodulation of the vagus nerve, its structure provides a pathogen detection system, and a negative feedback to the immune system after the pathogenic agent has been eliminated. Amebiasis is a disease caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, considered the third leading cause of death in the world. The rats are used as a natural resistance model to amoebic liver infection. The aim of this study is to analyze the interaction of Entamoeba histolytica with neutrophils, macrophages, and NK cells in livers of intact and vagotomized rats. Six groups were studied (n = 4): Intact (I), Intact + amoeba (IA), Sham (S), Sham + amoeba (SA), Vagotomized (V) and Vagotomized + amoeba (VA). Animals were sacrificed at 8 h post-inoculation of E. histolytica. Then, livers were obtained and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. Tissue liver slides were stained with H-E, PAS and Masson. The best development time for E. histolytica infection was at 8 h. Amoeba was identified with a monoclonal anti-220 kDa E. histolytica lectin. Neutrophils (N) were identified with rabbit anti-human neutrophil myeloperoxidase, macrophages (Mɸ) with anti-CD68 antibody and NK cells (NK) with anti-NK. Stomachs weight and liver glycogen were higher in V. Collagen increased in VA, whereas vascular and neutrophilic areas were decreased. There were fewer N, Mɸ, NK around the amoeba in the following order IA > SA > VA (p < 0.05 between IA and VA). In conclusion, these results suggest that the absence of parasympathetic innervation affects the participation of neutrophils, macrophages and NK cells in the innate immune response, apparently by parasympathetic inhibition on the cellular functions and probably for participation in sympathetic activity.

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

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    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  18. Dietary L-glutamine supplementation modulates microbial community and activates innate immunity in the mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenkai; Duan, Jielin; Yin, Jie; Liu, Gang; Cao, Zhong; Xiong, Xia; Chen, Shuai; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine effects of dietary supplementation with 1 % L-glutamine for 14 days on the abundance of intestinal bacteria and the activation of intestinal innate immunity in mice. The measured variables included (1) the abundance of Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus and Bifidobacterium in the lumen of the small intestine; (2) the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs), pro-inflammatory cytokines, and antibacterial substances secreted by Paneth cells and goblet cells in the jejunum, ileum and colon; and (3) the activation of TLR4-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and phosphoinositide-3-kinases (PI3K)/PI3K-protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways in the jejunum and ileum. In the jejunum, glutamine supplementation decreased the abundance of Firmicutes, while increased mRNA levels for antibacterial substances in association with the activation of NF-κB and PI3K-Akt pathways. In the ileum, glutamine supplementation induced a shift in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio in favor of Bacteroidetes, and enhanced mRNA levels for Tlr4, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and antibacterial substances participating in NF-κB and JNK signaling pathways. These results indicate that the effects of glutamine on the intestine vary with its segments and compartments. Collectively, dietary glutamine supplementation of mice beneficially alters intestinal bacterial community and activates the innate immunity in the small intestine through NF-κB, MAPK and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways.

  19. Immune modulation of cardiac repair and regeneration: the art of mending broken hearts

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    Ivana Zlatanova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of immune cells is amongst the earliest responses that manifest in the cardiac tissue after injury. Both innate and adaptive immunity coordinate distinct and mutually non-exclusive events governing cardiac repair including elimination of the cellular debris, compensatory growth of the remaining cardiac tissue, activation of resident or circulating precursor cells, quantitative and qualitative modifications of the vascular network and formation of a fibrotic scar. The present review summarizes the mounting evidence suggesting that the inflammatory response also guides the regenerative process following cardiac damage. In particular, recent literature has reinforced the central role of monocytes/macrophages in poising the refreshment of cardiomyocytes in myocardial infarction- or apical resection-induced cardiac insult. Macrophages dictate cardiac myocyte renewal through stimulation of pre-existing cardiomyocyte proliferation and/or neovascularization. Nevertheless, substantial efforts are required to identify the nature of these macrophage-derived factors as well as the molecular mechanisms engendered by the distinct subsets of macrophages pertaining in the cardiac tissue. Among the growing inflammatory intermediaries that have been recognized as essential player in heart regeneration, we will focus on the role of interleukin-6 and interleukin-13. Finally, it is likely that within the mayhem of the injured cardiac tissue, additional types of inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils, will enter the dance to ignite and refresh the broken heart. However, the protective and detrimental inflammatory pathways have been mainly deciphered in animal models. Future research should be focused on understanding the cellular effectors and molecular signals regulating inflammation in human heart to pave the way for the development of factual therapies targeting the inflammatory compartment in cardiac diseases.

  20. Modulation of the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during malaria/M. tuberculosis co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuanukwu, R C; Onyenekwe, C C; Martinez-Pomares, L; Flynn, R; Singh, S; Amilo, G I; Agbakoba, N R; Okoye, J O

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality on a global scale. The African region has 24% of the world's TB cases. TB overlaps with other infectious diseases such as malaria and HIV, which are also highly prevalent in the African region. TB is a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients and co-infection with HIV and TB has been described as a syndemic. In view of the overlapping epidemiology of these diseases, it is important to understand the dynamics of the immune response to TB in the context of co-infection. We investigated the cytokine response to purified protein derivative (PPD) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from TB patients co-infected with HIV or malaria and compared it to that of malaria- and HIV-free TB patients. A total of 231 subjects were recruited for this study and classified into six groups; untreated TB-positive, TB positive subjects on TB drugs, TB- and HIV-positive, TB- and malaria-positive, latent TB and apparently healthy control subjects. Our results demonstrate maintenance of interferon (IFN)-γ production in HIV and malaria co-infected TB patients in spite of lower CD4 counts in the HIV-infected cohort. Malaria co-infection caused an increase in the production of the T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in PPD-stimulated cultures. These results suggest that malaria co-infection diverts immune response against M. tuberculosis towards a Th-2/anti-inflammatory response which might have important consequences for disease progression.

  1. The Use of Recombinant Feline Interferon Omega Therapy as an Immune-Modulator in Cats Naturally Infected with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Oliveira Leal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are well-known cytokines that, among their main functions, are key components of the host immune response against viral infections. Due to its immune modulation properties, they are commonly used in the therapeutic approach of various retroviral infections, namely human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV. In HIV infection, it has been shown that IFN therapy limits early viral replication, particularly useful on post-exposure prophylaxis. In veterinary medicine, recombinant feline interferon omega (rFeIFN-ω was the first interferon licensed for use in cats. Several studies have recently shown that this compound seems to stimulate the innate immunity, decreasing clinical signs and co-infections in naturally FIV-infected cats. More than summarizing the main conclusions about rFeIFN-ω in cats, this review emphasizes the immune-modulation properties of IFN therapy, opening new perspectives for its use in retroviral infections. Either in FIV-infected cats or in HIV individuals, type I IFNs seem to induce an innate immune-modulation and should not be overlooked as a therapeutic option in retroviral infections.

  2. Common angiotensin receptor blockers may directly modulate the immune system via VDR, PPAR and CCR2b

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    Lee Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been indications that common Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs may be exerting anti-inflammatory actions by directly modulating the immune system. We decided to use molecular modelling to rapidly assess which of the potential targets might justify the expense of detailed laboratory validation. We first studied the VDR nuclear receptor, which is activated by the secosteroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. This receptor mediates the expression of regulators as ubiquitous as GnRH (Gonadatrophin hormone releasing hormone and the Parathyroid Hormone (PTH. Additionally we examined Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARgamma, which affects the function of phagocytic cells, and the C-CChemokine Receptor, type 2b, (CCR2b, which recruits monocytes to the site of inflammatory immune challenge. Results Telmisartan was predicted to strongly antagonize (Ki≈0.04nmol the VDR. The ARBs Olmesartan, Irbesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈10 nmol are likely to be useful VDR antagonists at typical in-vivo concentrations. Candesartan (Ki≈30 nmol and Losartan (Ki≈70 nmol may also usefully inhibit the VDR. Telmisartan is a strong modulator of PPARgamma (Ki≈0.3 nmol, while Losartan (Ki≈3 nmol, Irbesartan (Ki≈6 nmol, Olmesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈12 nmol also seem likely to have significant PPAR modulatory activity. Olmesartan andIrbesartan (Ki≈9 nmol additionally act as antagonists of a theoretical modelof CCR2b. Initial validation of this CCR2b model was performed, and a proposed model for the AngiotensinII Type1 receptor (AT2R1 has been presented. Conclusion Molecular modeling has proven valuable to generate testable hypotheses concerning receptor/ligand binding and is an important tool in drug design. ARBs were designed to act as antagonists for AT2R1, and it was not surprising to discover their affinity for the structurally similar CCR2b. However, this study also found evidence that ARBs modulate the

  3. Protective Yeasts Control V. anguillarum Pathogenicity and Modulate the Innate Immune Response of Challenged Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruffo, Mario; Navarrete, Natalie C.; Salgado, Oscar A.; Faúndez, Nelly B.; Gajardo, Miguel C.; Feijóo, Carmen G.; Reyes-Jara, Angélica; García, Katherine; Navarrete, Paola

    2016-01-01

    We investigated mechanisms involved in the protection of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae by two probiotic candidate yeasts, Debaryomyces hansenii 97 (Dh97) and Yarrowia lypolitica 242 (Yl242), against a Vibrio anguillarum challenge. We determined the effect of different yeast concentrations (104–107 CFU/mL) to: (i) protect larvae from the challenge, (ii) reduce the in vivo pathogen concentration and (iii) modulate the innate immune response of the host. To evaluate the role of zebrafish microbiota in protection, the experiments were performed in conventionally raised and germ-free larvae. In vitro co-aggregation assays were performed to determine a direct yeast-pathogen interaction. Results showed that both yeasts significantly increased the survival rate of conventionally raised larvae challenged with V. anguillarum. The concentration of yeasts in larvae tended to increase with yeast inoculum, which was more pronounced for Dh97. Better protection was observed with Dh97 at a concentration of 106 CFU/mL compared to 104 CFU/mL. In germ-free conditions V. anguillarum reached higher concentrations in larvae and provoked significantly more mortality than in conventional conditions, revealing the protective role of the host microbiota. Interestingly, yeasts were equally (Dh97) or more effective (Yl242) in protecting germ-free than conventionally-raised larvae, showing that protection can be exerted only by yeasts and is not necessarily related to modulation of the host microbiota. Although none of the yeasts co-aggregated with V. anguillarum, they were able to reduce its proliferation in conventionally raised larvae, reduce initial pathogen concentration in germ-free larvae and prevent the upregulation of key components of the inflammatory/anti-inflammatory response (il1b, tnfa, c3, mpx, and il10, respectively). These results show that protection by yeasts of zebrafish larvae challenged with V. anguillarum relates to an in vivo anti-pathogen effect, the modulation of

  4. Cardiopulmonary helminths in foxes from the Pyrenees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Castañé, Ignasi; Ortuño, Anna; Marco, Ignasi; Castellà, Joaquim

    2015-12-01

    The present survey was carried out to investigate the prevalence of cardiopulmonary helminths in red foxes in Pyrenees area and to evaluate the role of foxes in the eco-epidemiology of these nematodes. Hearts and entire respiratory tracts were obtained from 87 foxes from Vall d'Aran region, Pyrenees, Catalonia, north-eastern Spain. The cardiopulmonary tracts were dissected, flushed and examined for nematodes using sedimented flushing water. Of the 87 examined foxes, 53 (61%) were positive for cardiopulmonary helminths. The identified nematodes were Crenosoma vulpis (44.8%), Eucoleus aerophilus (29.9%) and Angiostrongylus vasorum (3.4%). Statistical differences were observed only on comparing age and C.vulpis prevalence, with young foxes being more infected than adults. The high prevalence of cardiopulmonary nematodes suggested that red foxes may play an important role in their transmission and maintenance in the studied area.

  5. The structure of cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 highlights structural Ig-fold versatility for receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemčovičová, Ivana [La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK 84505 Bratislava (Slovakia); Zajonc, Dirk M., E-mail: dzajonc@liai.org [La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The crystal structure of Human cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 was solved at 3.25 Å resolution. Here, a detailed analysis of its intimate dimerization interface and the biophysical properties of its receptor (TRAIL-R2 and CD155) binding interactions are presented. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of the innate immune system as they rapidly detect and destroy infected cells. To avoid immune recognition and to allow long-term persistence in the host, Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved a number of genes to evade or inhibit immune effector pathways. In particular, UL141 can inhibit cell-surface expression of both the NK cell-activating ligand CD155 as well as the TRAIL death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). The crystal structure of unliganded HCMV UL141 refined to 3.25 Å resolution allowed analysis of its head-to-tail dimerization interface. A ‘dimerization-deficient’ mutant of UL141 (ddUL141) was further designed, which retained the ability to bind to TRAIL-R2 or CD155 while losing the ability to cross-link two receptor monomers. Structural comparison of unliganded UL141 with UL141 bound to TRAIL-R2 further identified a mobile loop that makes intimate contacts with TRAIL-R2 upon receptor engagement. Superposition of the Ig-like domain of UL141 on the CD155 ligand T-cell immunoreceptor with Ig and ITIM domains (TIGIT) revealed that UL141 can potentially engage CD155 similar to TIGIT by using the C′C′′ and GF loops. Further mutations in the TIGIT binding site of CD155 (Q63R and F128R) abrogated UL141 binding, suggesting that the Ig-like domain of UL141 is a viral mimic of TIGIT, as it targets the same binding site on CD155 using similar ‘lock-and-key’ interactions. Sequence alignment of the UL141 gene and its orthologues also showed conservation in this highly hydrophobic (L/A)X{sub 6}G ‘lock’ motif for CD155 binding as well as conservation of the TRAIL-R2 binding patches, suggesting that these host

  6. Noise-immunity processing of digital multilevel pulse-amplitude modulation signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Makarenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The main properties and features of spectral-effective multi-level pulse amplitude modulation digital signals at coherent reception are presented. It is shown that the phase locked loop circuit (PLL circuit used in the receiver is able to work at SNR > 5 dB.Object of the paper. We propose a new scheme of noise compensator at an intermediate frequency, allowing us to obtain increasing of SNR on 15–25 dB when error of PLL is equal zero. The noise compensator has the gain 8–18 dB at error of PLL = 33° that is able to work at SNR = 5 dB. As result, we can obtain a required SNR for determined BER in systems with multi-level PAM.Conclusions. This technical solution makes a spectrally-efficient system using multi-level amplitude modulation is also energy efficient, forward-looking and competitive. The power transmitters of cell phones and radio relay lines of mobile communication systems can be reduced by 10 times or at the same transmitter power improvement the quality of communication or range is presented.

  7. Molecular Diagnostics for Soil-Transmitted Helminths

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Elise M.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) (e.g., Strongyloides stercoralis, Trichuris trichiura, Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, and Ascaris lumbricoides) has relied on often-insensitive microscopy techniques. Over the past several years, there has been an effort to use molecular diagnostics, particularly quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), to detect intestinal pathogens. While some platforms have been approved by regulatory bodies (e.g., Food and ...

  8. Helminth infections, allergic disorders and immune responses : studies in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuni, Sitti

    2006-01-01

    The studies present in this thesis fall into two broad areas: the first focusing on filarial infection, Ig (immunoglobulin)E levels and risk factors for infection, while the second deals with the possible associations between nematode infection and allergy. Compared to ELISA, RAST is superior in det

  9. Immuno-regulatory function of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase through modulation of innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe-Sadat Poormasjedi-Meibod

    Full Text Available Successful long-term treatment of type-1 diabetes mainly relies on replacement of β-cells via islet transplantation. Donor shortage is one of the main obstacles preventing transplantation from becoming the treatment of choice. Although animal organs could be an alternative source for transplantation, common immunosuppressive treatments demonstrate low efficacy in preventing xenorejection. Immunoprotective effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO on T-cell mediated allorejection has been extensively studied. Our studies revealed that IDO expression by fibroblasts, induced apoptosis in T-cells while not affecting non-immune cell survival/function. Since macrophages play a pivotal role in xenograft rejection, herein we investigated the effect of IDO-induced tryptophan deficiency/kynurenine accumulation on macrophage function/survival. Moreover, we evaluated the local immunosuppressive effect of IDO on islet-xenograft protection. Our results indicated that IDO expression by bystander fibroblasts significantly reduced the viability of primary macrophages via apoptosis induction. Treatment of peritoneal macrophages by IDO-expressing fibroblast conditioned medium significantly reduced their proinflammatory activity through inhibition of iNOS expression. To determine whether IDO-induced tryptophan starvation or kynurenine accumulation is responsible for macrophage apoptosis and inhibition of their proinflammatory activity, Raw264.7 cell viability and proinflammatory responses were evaluated in tryptophan deficient medium or in the presence of kynurenine. Tryptophan deficiency, but not kynurenine accumulation, reduced Raw264.7 cell viability and suppressed their proinflammatory activity. Next a three-dimensional islet-xenograft was engineered by embedding rat islets within either control or IDO-expressing fibroblast-populated collagen matrix. Islets morphology and immune cell infiltration were then studied in the xenografts transplanted into the C57

  10. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor-1 Antagonists as Modulators of Innate Immune Cell Function

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    A. J. Theron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs are produced predominantly by cells of the innate immune system, especially basophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Notwithstanding potent bronchoconstrictor activity, cysLTs are also proinflammatory consequent to their autocrine and paracrine interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors expressed not only on the aforementioned cell types, but also on Th2 lymphocytes, as well as structural cells, and to a lesser extent neutrophils and CD8+ cells. Recognition of the involvement of cysLTs in the immunopathogenesis of various types of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, especially bronchial asthma, prompted the development of selective cysLT receptor-1 (cysLTR1 antagonists, specifically montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast. More recently these agents have also been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory activities, distinct from cysLTR1 antagonism, which appear to be particularly effective in targeting neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Underlying mechanisms include interference with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, 5′-lipoxygenase, and the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B. These and other secondary anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the commonly used cysLTR1 antagonists are the major focus of the current review, which also includes a comparison of the anti-inflammatory effects of montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast on human neutrophils in vitro, as well as an overview of both the current clinical applications of these agents and potential future applications based on preclinical and early clinical studies.

  11. Modulating Innate and Adaptive Immunity by (R)-Roscovitine: Potential Therapeutic Opportunity in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J; Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G; Hery-Arnaud, Geneviève; Le Berre, Rozenn; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Nowak, Emmanuel; Gueganton, Laetitia; Dorothée, Guillaume; Prochazkova, Michaela; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B; Gray, Robert D; Rossi, Adriano G; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Norez, Caroline; Becq, Frédéric; Ravel, Denis; Mottier, Dominique; Rault, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    (R)-Roscovitine, a pharmacological inhibitor of kinases, is currently in phase II clinical trial as a drug candidate for the treatment of cancers, Cushing's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. We here review the data that support the investigation of (R)-roscovitine as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF). (R)-Roscovitine displays four independent properties that may favorably combine against CF: (1) it partially protects F508del-CFTR from proteolytic degradation and favors its trafficking to the plasma membrane; (2) by increasing membrane targeting of the TRPC6 ion channel, it rescues acidification in phagolysosomes of CF alveolar macrophages (which show abnormally high pH) and consequently restores their bactericidal activity; (3) its effects on neutrophils (induction of apoptosis), eosinophils (inhibition of degranulation/induction of apoptosis) and lymphocytes (modification of the Th17/Treg balance in favor of the differentiation of anti-inflammatory lymphocytes and reduced production of various interleukins, notably IL-17A) contribute to the resolution of inflammation and restoration of innate immunity, and (4) roscovitine displays analgesic properties in animal pain models. The fact that (R)-roscovitine has undergone extensive preclinical safety/pharmacology studies, and phase I and II clinical trials in cancer patients, encourages its repurposing as a CF drug candidate. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Cationic amino acid transporter-2 regulates immunity by modulating arginase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Thompson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Cationic amino acid transporters (CAT are important regulators of NOS2 and ARG1 activity because they regulate L-arginine availability. However, their role in the development of Th1/Th2 effector functions following infection has not been investigated. Here we dissect the function of CAT2 by studying two infectious disease models characterized by the development of polarized Th1 or Th2-type responses. We show that CAT2(-/- mice are significantly more susceptible to the Th1-inducing pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Although T. gondii infected CAT2(-/- mice developed stronger IFN-gamma responses, nitric oxide (NO production was significantly impaired, which contributed to their enhanced susceptibility. In contrast, CAT2(-/- mice infected with the Th2-inducing pathogen Schistosoma mansoni displayed no change in susceptibility to infection, although they succumbed to schistosomiasis at an accelerated rate. Granuloma formation and fibrosis, pathological features regulated by Th2 cytokines, were also exacerbated even though their Th2 response was reduced. Finally, while IL-13 blockade was highly efficacious in wild-type mice, the development of fibrosis in CAT2(-/- mice was largely IL-13-independent. Instead, the exacerbated pathology was associated with increased arginase activity in fibroblasts and alternatively activated macrophages, both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, by controlling NOS2 and arginase activity, CAT2 functions as a potent regulator of immunity.

  13. Foxp3+ T cells inhibit antitumor immune memory modulated by mTOR inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanping; Sparwasser, Tim; Figlin, Robert; Kim, Hyung L

    2014-04-15

    Inhibition of mTOR signaling enhances antitumor memory lymphocytes. However, pharmacologic mTOR inhibition also enhances regulatory T-cell (Treg) activity. To counter this effect, Treg control was added to mTOR inhibition in preclinical models. Tregs were controlled with CD4-depleting antibodies because CD4 depletion has high translational potential and already has a well-established safety profile in patients. The antitumor activity of the combination therapy was CD8 dependent and controlled growth of syngeneic tumors even when an adoptive immunotherapy was not used. Lymphocytes resulting from the combination therapy could be transferred into naïve mice to inhibit aggressive growth of lung metastases. The combination therapy enhanced CD8 memory formation as determined by memory markers and functional studies of immune recall. Removal of FoxP3-expressing T lymphocytes was the mechanism underlying immunologic memory formation following CD4 depletion. This was confirmed using transgenic DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells) mice to specifically remove Foxp3(+) T cells. It was further confirmed with reciprocal studies where stimulation of immunologic memory because of CD4 depletion was completely neutralized by adoptively transferring tumor-specific Foxp3(+) T cells. Also contributing to tumor control, Tregs that eventually recovered following CD4 depletion were less immunosuppressive. These results provide a rationale for further study of mTOR inhibition and CD4 depletion in patients. ©2014 AACR.

  14. Melatonin Modulates the Immune System Response and Inflammation in Diabetic Rats Experimentally-Induced by Alloxan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkanlar, S; Kara, A; Sengul, E; Simsek, N; Karadeniz, A; Kurt, N

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease, which causes an increase in the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and also proliferation of monocyte chemotactic protein. In the present study, the potential effects of melatonin on proinflammatory cytokines, hematological values, and lymphoid tissues were investigated in diabetic rats. In the study, 36 male rats were randomly divided into 4 groups as follows: Control, Mel (melatonin), DM, and DM-Mel. For 15 days, an isotonic saline solution was given to the Control and DM groups; melatonin was administered to the Mel and DM-Mel groups intraperitoneally. At the end of the study, all animals were sacrificed by drawing the blood from their hearts under deep anesthesia. Samples of the spleen, thymus, and lymph nodes were fixed in 10% formaldehyde for histologic analysis. Increases in proinflammatory serum cytokine concentrations, mast cells, and total white blood cell counts as well as tissue destruction in the lymphoid organs were determined in the DM group via biochemical, hematological, and histologic analyses. However, the findings for the DM-Mel group revealed decreases in serum IL-1β concentration and mast cell densities, and destructions in lymphoid tissues by the melatonin administration. The present study suggests that melatonin treatment may control immune system regulation and inhibit the production of proinflammatory cytokines and tissue mast cell accumulation by preventing the destruction of lymphoid organs in the diabetic process.

  15. Modulating Innate Immunity Improves Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Replication in Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

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    Xiaoling Zhou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocytes (hESC-Heps were investigated for their ability to support hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and replication. hESC-Heps were capable of supporting the full viral life cycle, including the release of infectious virions. Although supportive, hESC-Hep viral infection levels were not as great as those observed in Huh7 cells. We reasoned that innate immune responses in hESC-Heps may lead to the low level of infection and replication. Upon further investigation, we identified a strong type III interferon response in hESC-Heps that was triggered by HCV. Interestingly, specific inhibition of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway led to an increase in HCV infection and replication in hESC-Heps. Of note, the interferon response was not evident in Huh7 cells. In summary, we have established a robust cell-based system that allows the in-depth study of virus-host interactions in vitro.

  16. Modulation of innate immune responses by influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies used for prophylaxis.

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    Catherine Rinaldi

    Full Text Available In the event of a novel influenza A virus pandemic, prophylaxis mediated by antibodies provides an adjunct control option to vaccines and antivirals. This strategy is particularly pertinent to unvaccinated populations at risk during the lag time to produce and distribute an effective vaccine. Therefore, development of effective prophylactic therapies is of high importance. Although previous approaches have used systemic delivery of monoclonal antibodies or convalescent sera, available supply is a serious limitation. Here, we have investigated intranasal delivery of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal IgG antibodies for their efficacy against homologous influenza virus challenge in a mouse model. Both influenza-specific IgG and F(ab'2 reduced clinical scores, body weight loss and lung viral loads in mice treated 1 hour before virus exposure. Full protection from disease was also observed when antibody was delivered up to 3 days prior to virus infection. Furthermore, effective prophylaxis was independent of a strong innate immune response. This strategy presents a further option for prophylactic intervention against influenza A virus using ruminants to generate a bulk supply that could potentially be used in a pandemic setting, to slow virus transmission and reduce morbidity associated with a high cytokine phenotype.

  17. Probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici modulates both localised intestinal- and peripheral-immunity in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standen, B T; Rawling, M D; Davies, S J; Castex, M; Foey, A; Gioacchini, G; Carnevali, O; Merrifield, D L

    2013-10-01

    The application of probiotics in aquaculture has received concerted research efforts but the localised intestinal immunological response of fish to probiotic bacteria is poorly understood. Therefore, a study was conducted to evaluate the probiotic effect of Pediococcus acidilactici on Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) with specific emphasis on intestinal health and probiotic levels as well as system level responses such as growth performance, feed utilization and haemato-immunological parameters under non-challenged conditions. Fish (9.19 ± 0.04 g) were fed either a control diet or a P. acidilactici supplemented diet (at 2.81 × 10(6) CFU g(-)(1)) for six weeks. At the end of the study the probiotic was observed to populate the intestine, accounting for ca. 3% (1.59 × 10(5) CFU g(-)(1)) of the cultivable intestinal bacterial load. Real-time PCR indicated that the probiotic treatment may potentiate the immune-responsiveness of the intestine as up-regulation of the gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα was observed in the probiotic fed fish (P 0.05).

  18. Polyphenols from red wine are potent modulators of innate and adaptive immune responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2010-08-01

    It is well known that the consumption of dietary polyphenols leads to beneficial effects for human health as in the case of prevention and/or attenuation of cardiovascular, inflammatory, neurodegenerative and neoplastic diseases. This review summarizes the role of polyphenols from red wine in the immune function. In particular, using healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we have demonstrated the in vitro ability of Negroamaro, an Italian red wine, to induce the release of nitric oxide and both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, thus leading to the maintenance of the immmune homeostasis in the host. All these effects were abrogated by deprivation of polyphenols from red wine samples. We have also provided evidence that Negromaro polyphenols are able to activate extracellular regulated kinase and p38 kinase and switch off the NF-kappaB pathway via an increased expression with time of the IkappaBalpha phosphorylated form. These mechanisms may represent key molecular events leading to inhibition of the pro-inflammatory cascade and atherogenesis. In conclusion, according to the current literature and our own data, moderate consumption of red wine seems to be protective for the host in the prevention of several diseases, even including aged-related diseases by virtue of its immunomodulating properties.

  19. Immune Modulation of Recombinant OmpA against Brucella abortus 544 Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simborio, Hannah Leah Tadeja; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Min, Wongi; Lee, Hu Jang; Lee, Jin Ju; Chang, Hong Hee; Kim, Suk

    2016-03-01

    Brucellosis affects a wide range of host species, including humans and many livestock animals. Chronic infections of the disease make antibiotic treatment costly, and the current vaccine used in livestock has not been approved for human use. This study investigated the possible use of the Brucella abortus outer membrane protein A (OmpA) as a candidate subunit vaccine in an infected mouse model. The ompA gene was cloned and overexpressed, and the recombinant OmpA (rOmpA) protein fused to maltose binding protein (MBP) was purified in Escherichia coli. Immunogenicity was verified through western blotting, and mice were immunized and challenged to evaluate its protective effect. Mice treated with rOmpA exhibited induced humoral and host cell-mediated responses, with a significant increase in immunoglobulin G (IgG1 and IgG2a) and cytokine levels, especially TNF-α and IL-12, compared with the control groups treated with either MBP or PBS. In conclusion, rOmpA should be highly considered as a future subunit vaccine for brucellosis, and further studies regarding rOmpA and its protective ability are suggested.

  20. FIBCD1 Modulation of the Epithelial Immune Response Elicited by Chitin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Mark; Schlosser, Anders; Bak-Thomsen, Theresa Helene

    2010-01-01

    Background: FIBCD1 is a type II transmembrane protein located on the brush border of intestinal epithelial cells. FIBCD1 binds specifically to acetylated compounds such as chitin through the C-terminal fibrinogen-related domain. Chitin is a highly acetylated homopolymeric b-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine ......Background: FIBCD1 is a type II transmembrane protein located on the brush border of intestinal epithelial cells. FIBCD1 binds specifically to acetylated compounds such as chitin through the C-terminal fibrinogen-related domain. Chitin is a highly acetylated homopolymeric b-1,4-N......-acetylglucosamine carbohydrate, which next to cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer found in nature, eg in fungi and parasites. It was recently demonstrated that chitin induces the accumulation in tissue of IL-4-expressing innate immune cells in vivo and it was suggested that chitin thus could be a recognition element...... of NF-jB signalling and downstream synthesis of mucosal epithelial-derived cytokines, TSLP and IL-33, which shapes the local accumulation and activation of Th2 responses. Results: Initial experiments have focused on the establishment of stable FIBCD1 overexpression in HEK293, HCT-116 and A549 epithelial...

  1. The in Vitro Immune-Modulating Properties of a Sweat Gland-Derived Antimicrobial Peptide Dermcidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Echo; Qiang, Xiaoling; Li, Jianhua; Zhu, Shu; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal barriers of the skin serve as the first layer of defense by limiting the access of many pathogens to the blood circulation. In addition, human skin also contains sweat glands that can secrete a wide array of antimicrobial peptides to restrain the growth of various microbes. In the case of microbial infection, macrophages and monocytes constitute the first line of defense by producing a wide array of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This process is triggered either by pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (such as bacterial endotoxin) or damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (such as HMGB1). In light of our findings that a sweat gland-derived antimicrobial peptide, dermcidin, affected both pathogen-associated molecular pattern and damage-associated molecular pattern-induced cytokines/chemokines by macrophages/monocytes, we propose that dermcidin may play an important role in the regulation of the innate immune responses to infection and injury. Future investigations are warranted to further test this understudied hypothesis in both preclinical and clinical settings.

  2. Protozoan and helminth infections in pregnancy. Short-term and long-term implications of transmission of infection from mother to foetus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Eskild

    2007-01-01

    studies the impaired immune response was present as much as two decades after birth. Data from chronic viral infections like Rubella, cytomegalovirus and hepatitis B also show that congenital or perinatal infections may result in a life-long inability to control the infections. Studies of both helminth...

  3. UVB-induced immune suppression and infection with Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, F.P.; Lewis, F.A. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). School of Medicine]|[Biomedical Research Inst., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Irradiation with ultraviolet B (UVB, 290-320 nm) causes a systematic immunosuppression of cell-mediated immunity. The question of whether UV immunosuppression modulates the course of infectious diseases is important because UVB levels in sunlight are sufficient to predict significant UV-induced immunosuppression at most latitudes. We have investigated the effect of immunosuppressive doses of UVB on the disease caused by the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated once or three times weekly over 60-80 days with UV from a bank of FS40 sunlamps. Each UV treatment consisted of an immunosuppressive UV dose, as determined by suppression of contact hypersensitivity to trinitrochlorobenzene, corresponding to about 15-30 min of noonday tropical sunlight exposure under ideal clear sky conditions. Cumulative UV doses were between 80 and 170 kJ/m{sup 2}. Worm and egg burdens, liver granuloma diameters and liver fibrosis showed minimal changes (< 20%) compared with parameters in unirradiated animals. Ultraviolet irradiation (a total of 55 kJ/m{sup 2} administered in six treatments) did not impair the resistance to rechallenge conferred by vaccination with {sup 60}Co-irradiated cercariae. We have observed a dichotomy between UV immnosuppression and both disease and vaccination in this helminth infection, in contrast to the effects of UVB shown in other infectious diseases. (author).

  4. Immune modulation and increased neurotrophic factor production in multiple sclerosis patients treated with testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giesser Barbara S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system with a pronounced neurodegenerative component. It has been suggested that novel treatment options are needed that target both aspects of the disease. Evidence from basic and clinical studies suggests that testosterone has an immunomodulatory as well as a potential neuroprotective effect that could be beneficial in MS. Methods Ten male MS patients were treated with 10 g of gel containing 100 mg of testosterone in a cross-over design (6 month observation period followed by 12 months of treatment. Blood samples were obtained at three-month intervals during the observation and the treatment period. Isolated blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs were used to examine lymphocyte subpopulation composition by flow cytometry and ex vivo protein production of cytokines (IL-2, IFNγ, TNFα, IL-17, IL-10, IL-12p40, TGFβ1 and growth factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor BDNF, platelet-derived growth factor PDGF-BB, nerve growth factor NGF, and ciliary neurotrophic factor CNTF. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH skin recall tests were obtained before and during treatment as an in vivo functional immune measure. Results Testosterone treatment significantly reduced DTH recall responses and induced a shift in peripheral lymphocyte composition by decreasing CD4+ T cell percentage and increasing NK cells. In addition, PBMC production of IL-2 was significantly decreased while TGFβ1 production was increased. Furthermore, PBMCs obtained during the treatment period produced significantly more BDNF and PDGF-BB. Conclusion These results are consistent with an immunomodulatory effect of testosterone treatment in MS. In addition, increased production of BDNF and PDGF-BB suggests a potential neuroprotective effect. Trial Registration NCT00405353 http://www.clinicaltrials.gov

  5. Dectin-1 agonist curdlan modulates innate immunity to Aspergillus fumigatus in human corneal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Cheng; Zhu; Gui-Qiu; Zhao; Jing; Lin; Li-Ting; Hu; Qiang; Xu; Xu-Dong; Peng; Xue; Wang; Sheng; Qiu

    2015-01-01

    · AIM: To explore the immunomodulatory effects of curdlan on innate immune responses against Aspergillus fumigatus(A. fumigatus) in cultured human corneal epithelial cells(HCECs), and whether C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1 mediates the immunomodulatory effects of curdlan.·METHODS: The HCECs were stimulated by curdlan in different concentrations(50, 100, 200, 400 μg/m L) for various time. Then HCECs pretreated with or without laminarin(Dectin-1 blocker, 0.3 mg/m L) and curdlan were stimulated by A. fumigatus hyphae. The m RNA and protein production of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)and interleukin-6(IL-6) were determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The protein level of Dectin-1 was measured by Western blot.· RESULTS: Curdlan stimulated m RNA expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in a dose and time dependent manner in HCECs. Curdlan pretreatment before A. fumigatus hyphae stimulation significantly enhanced the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 at m RNA and protein levels compared with A. fumigatus hyphae stimulation group(P <0.05).Both curdlan and A. fumigatus hyphae up-regulated Dectin-1 protein expression in HCECs, and Dectin-1expression was elevated to 1.5- to 2-fold by curdlan pretreatment followed hyphae stimulation. The Dectin-1blocker laminarin suppressed the m RNA expression and protein production of TNF-α and IL-6 induced by curdlan and hyphae(P <0.05).· CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrated that curdlan pretreatment enhanced the inflammatory response induced by A. fumigatus hyphae in HCECs.Dectin-1 is essential for the immunomodulatory effectsof curdlan. Curdlan may have high clinical application values in fungal keratitis treatment.

  6. Immune-modulating effects of bevacizumab in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, EC; Misso, G; Pastina, P; Costantini, S; Vanni, F; Gandolfo, C; Botta, C; Capone, F; Lombardi, A; Pirtoli, L; Tassone, P; Ulivieri, C; Tagliaferri, P; Cusi, MG; Caraglia, M; Correale, P

    2016-01-01

    The mPEBev is an anticancer regimen which combines a chemotherapy doublet, based on cisplatin and oral etoposide (mPE), with bevacizumab (mPEBev), a mAb targeting the vasculo-endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In previous studies, this regimen showed powerful anti-angiogenetic effects and significant antitumor activity in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) patients. We also recorded the best benefit in patients exhibiting low-systemic inflammatory profile at baseline. On these bases, we hypothesized that mPEBev antitumor activity could be partially related to bevacizumab-associated immunological effects. For this reason, we performed an immunological monitoring in 59 out of 120 stage IIIb-IV NSCLC patients enrolled in the BEVA2007 phase II trial, who received fractioned cisplatin (30 mg/sqm days 1-3q21) and oral etoposide (50 mg, days 1-15q21) (mPE doublet) ±bevacizumab. In this group of patients, 12 received the mPE doublet alone and 47 the doublet in combination with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on the day 3q21; mPEBev regimen). Blood cell counts, serum analysis, multiplex cytokine assay and immunocytofluorimetric analysis, performed on baseline and post-treatment on blood samples from these patients, revealed that bevacizumab addition to the doublet decreased levels of pro-angiogenic (VEGF, Angiostatin-1 and Follistatin) and inflammatory cytokines (interferon (IFN)γ, IL4 and IL17), improved in vivo and in vitro cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) response and promoted dendritic cell activation. These results suggest that the mPEBev regimen improve the micro-environmental conditions for an efficient antigen-specific CTL response, making it a feasible candidate regimen to be assessed in combination with immune-checkpoint inhibitors in NSCLC patients.

  7. Dectin-1 agonist curdlan modulates innate immunity to Aspergillus fumigatus in human corneal epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Cheng Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the immunomodulatory effects of curdlan on innate immune responses against Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus in cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs, and whether C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1 mediates the immunomodulatory effects of curdlan.METHODS:The HCECs were stimulated by curdlan in different concentrations (50, 100, 200, 400 μg/mL for various time. Then HCECs pretreated with or without laminarin (Dectin-1 blocker, 0.3 mg/mL and curdlan were stimulated by A. fumigatus hyphae. The mRNA and protein production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were determined by real-timequantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The protein level of Dectin-1 was measured by Western blot.RESULTS: Curdlan stimulated mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-6 in a dose and time dependent manner in HCECs. Curdlan pretreatment before A. fumigatus hyphae stimulation significantly enhanced the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 at mRNA and protein levels compared with A. fumigatus hyphae stimulation group (P<0.05. Both curdlan and A. fumigatus hyphae up-regulated Dectin-1 protein expression in HCECs, and Dectin-1 expression was elevated to 1.5- to 2-fold by curdlan pretreatment followed hyphaestimulation. The Dectin-1 blocker laminarin suppressed the mRNA expression and protein production of TNF-α and IL-6 induced by curdlan and hyphae (P<0.05.CONCLUSION:These findings demonstrated that curdlan pretreatment enhanced the inflammatory response induced by A. fumigatus hyphae in HCECs. Dectin-1 is essential for the immunomodulatory effects of curdlan. Curdlan may have high clinical application values in fungal keratitis treatment.

  8. Modulation of cellular and humoral immune responses to anHIV-1 DNA vaccine by interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 DNA immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永涛; 王福祥; 孙永年; 徐哲; 王临旭; 刘娟; 白雪帆; 黄长形

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-18 (IL-18)DNA immunization on immune response induced by HIV-1 DNA vaccine and to explore new strategies for therapeutic HIV DNA vaccine.Methods: The recombinant expression vector pCI-neoGAG was constructed by inserting HIV Gag gene into the eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo. Balb/c mice were immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone or co-immunized with the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18. Anti-HIV antibody and IFN-γ were tested by ELISA, and splenocytes were isolated for detecting antigen-specific lymphoproliferative responses and specific CTL response by MTT assay and LDH assay respectively. Results: The antiHIV antibody titers of mice co-immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 were lower than that of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone( P < 0.01). In contrast, the IFN-γ level of mice co-immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 was higher than that of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG alone ( P <0.01). Furthermore, compared with mice injected with pCI-neoGAG alone, the specific CTL cytotoxity activity and antigenspecific lymphoproliferative responses of mice immunized with pCI-neoGAG and the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 were significantly enhanced respectively ( P < 0.01). Conclusion: The DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 together with HIV DNA vaccine may enhance specific Th-1 responses and cellular immune response elicited in mice. Hence, the DNA encoding for IL-12 or IL-18 are promising immune adjuvants for HIV-1 DNA vaccine.

  9. Immune modulation mediated by cryptococcal laccase promotes pulmonary growth and brain dissemination of virulent Cryptococcus neoformans in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafeng Qiu

    Full Text Available C. neoformans is a leading cause of fatal mycosis linked to CNS dissemination. Laccase, encoded by the LAC1 gene, is an important virulence factor implicated in brain dissemination yet little is known about the mechanism(s accounting for this observation. Here, we investigated whether the presence or absence of laccase altered the local immune response in the lungs by comparing infections with the highly virulent strain, H99 (which expresses laccase and mutant strain of H99 deficient in laccase (lac1Δ in a mouse model of pulmonary infection. We found that LAC1 gene deletion decreased the pulmonary fungal burden and abolished CNS dissemination at weeks 2 and 3. Furthermore, LAC1 deletion lead to: 1 diminished pulmonary eosinophilia; 2 increased accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; 3 increased Th1 and Th17 cytokines yet decreased Th2 cytokines; and 4 lung macrophage shifting of the lung macrophage phenotype from M2- towards M1-type activation. Next, we used adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells isolated from pulmonary lymph nodes of mice infected with either lac1Δ or H99 to evaluate the role of laccase-induced immunomodulation on CNS dissemination. We found that in comparison to PBS treated mice, adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells isolated from lac1Δ-infected mice decreased CNS dissemination, while those isolated from H99-infected mice increased CNS dissemination. Collectively, our findings reveal that immune modulation away from Th1/Th17 responses and towards Th2 responses represents a novel mechanism through which laccase can contribute to cryptococcal virulence. Furthermore, our data support the hypothesis that laccase-induced changes in polarization of CD4+ T cells contribute to CNS dissemination.

  10. Lanthionine Synthetase C-Like 2 Modulates Immune Responses to Influenza Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Andrew; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Tubau-Juni, Nuria; Zoccoli-Rodriguez, Victoria; Lu, Pinyi; Godfrey, Victoria; Kale, Shiv; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Broad-based, host-targeted therapeutics have the potential to ameliorate viral infections without inducing antiviral resistance. We identified lanthionine synthetase C-like 2 (LANCL2) as a new therapeutic target for immunoinflammatory diseases. To examine the therapeutic efficacy of oral NSC61610 administration on influenza, we infected C57BL/6 mice with influenza A H1N1pdm virus and evaluated influenza-related mortality, lung inflammatory profiles, and pulmonary histopathology. Oral treatment with NSC61610 ameliorates influenza virus infection by down-modulating pulmonary inflammation through the downregulation of TNF-α and MCP-1 and reduction in the infiltration of neutrophils. NSC61610 treatment increases IL10-producing CD8+ T cells and macrophages in the lungs during the resolution phase of disease. The loss of LANCL2 or neutralization of IL-10 in mice infected with influenza virus abrogates the ability of NSC61610 to accelerate recovery and induce IL-10-mediated regulatory responses. These studies validate that oral treatment with NSC61610 ameliorates morbidity and mortality and accelerates recovery during influenza virus infection through a mechanism mediated by activation of LANCL2 and subsequent induction of IL-10 responses by CD8+ T cells and macrophages in the lungs.

  11. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Plays a Critical Role in Mediating Protection against the Helminth Parasite Taenia crassiceps

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; Rosas, Lucia E.; David, John R; Bojalil, Rafael; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the role of endogenous migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in regulation of immune response during murine cysticercosis caused by the helminth parasite Taenia crassiceps, we analyzed the course of T. crassiceps infection in MIF−/− BALB/c mice. MIF−/− mice were highly susceptible to T. crassiceps and developed significantly higher parasite loads compared to similarly infected MIF+/+ mice. Throughout the course of infection, Taenia crassiceps soluble antigen-stimulated spleen cells f...

  12. Immunological interactions between 2 common pathogens, Th1-inducing protozoan Toxoplasma gondii and the Th2-inducing helminth Fasciola hepatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M D Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nature of the immune response to infection is dependent on the type of infecting organism. Intracellular organisms such as Toxoplasma gondii stimulate a Th1-driven response associated with production of IL-12, IFN-gamma, nitric oxide and IgG2a antibodies and classical activation of macrophages. In contrast, extracellular helminths such as Fasciola hepatica induce Th2 responses characterised by the production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IgG1 antibodies and alternative activation of macrophages. As co-infections with these types of parasites commonly exist in the field it is relevant to examine how the various facets of the immune responses induced by each may influence or counter-regulate that of the other. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Regardless, of whether F. hepatica infection preceded or succeeded T. gondii infection, there was little impact on the production of the Th1 cytokines IL-12, IFN-gamma or on the development of classically-activated macrophages induced by T. gondii. By contrast, the production of helminth-specific Th2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-5, was suppressed by infection with T. gondii. Additionally, the recruitment and alternative activation of macrophages by F. hepatica was blocked or reversed by subsequent infection with T. gondii. The clinical symptoms of toxoplasmosis and the survival rate of infected mice were not significantly altered by the helminth. CONCLUSIONS: Despite previous studies showing that F. hepatica suppressed the classical activation of macrophages and the Th1-driven responses of mice to bystander microbial infection, as well as reduced their ability to reject these, here we found that the potent immune responses to T. gondii were capable of suppressing the responses to helminth infection. Clearly, the outcome of particular infections in polyparasitoses depends on the means and potency by which each pathogen controls the immune response.

  13. Helminth 2-Cys peroxiredoxin drives Th2 responses through a mechanism involving alternatively activated macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Sheila; Stack, Colin M.; O'Neill, Sandra M.; Sayed, Ahmed A.; Williams, David L.; Dalton, John P.

    2008-01-01

    During helminth infections, alternatively activated macrophages (AAMacs) are key to promoting Th2 responses and suppressing Th1-driven inflammatory pathology. Th2 cytokines IL-4 and/or IL-13 are believed to be important in the induction and activation of AAMacs. Using murine models for the helminth infections caused by Fasciola hepatica (Fh) and Schistosoma mansoni (Sm), we show that a secreted antioxidant, peroxiredoxin (Prx), induces alternative activation of macrophages. These activated, Ym1-expressing macrophages enhanced the secretion of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 from naive CD4+ T cells. Administration of recombinant FhPrx and SmPrx to wild-type and IL-4−/− and IL-13−/− mice induced the production of AAMacs. In addition, Prx stimulated the expression of markers of AAMacs (particularly, Ym1) in vitro, and therefore can act independently of IL-4/IL-13 signaling. The immunomodulatory property of Prx is not due to its antioxidant activity, as an inactive recombinant variant with active site Cys residues replaced by Gly could also induce AAMacs and Th2 responses. Immunization of mice with recombinant Prx or passive transfer of anti-Prx antibodies prior to infection with Fh not only blocked the induction of AAMacs but also the development of parasite-specific Th2 responses. We propose that Prx activates macrophages as an initial step in the induction of Th2 responses by helminth parasites and is thereby a novel pathogen-associated molecular pattern.—Donnelly, S., Stack, C. M., O'Neill, S. M., Sayed, A. A., Williams, D. L., Dalton, J. P. Helminth 2-Cys peroxiredoxin drives Th2 responses through a mechanism involving alternatively activated macrophages. PMID:18708590

  14. Vaccines expressing the innate immune modulator EAT-2 elicit potent effector memory T lymphocyte responses despite pre-existing vaccine immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser Ali; Seregin, Sergey S; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Rastall, David P W; Liu, Chyong-Jy J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The mixed results from recent vaccine clinical trials targeting HIV-1 justify the need to enhance the potency of HIV-1 vaccine platforms in general. Use of first-generation recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) platforms failed to protect vaccinees from HIV-1 infection. One hypothesis is that the rAd5-based vaccine failed due to the presence of pre-existing Ad5 immunity in many vaccines. We recently confirmed that EAT-2-expressing rAd5 vectors uniquely activate the innate immune system and improve cellular immune responses against rAd5-expressed Ags, inclusive of HIV/Gag. In this study, we report that use of the rAd5-EAT-2 vaccine can also induce potent cellular immune responses to HIV-1 Ags despite the presence of Ad5-specific immunity. Compared to controls expressing a mutant SH2 domain form of EAT-2, Ad5 immune mice vaccinated with an rAd5-wild-type EAT-2 HIV/Gag-specific vaccine formulation significantly facilitated the induction of several arms of the innate immune system. These responses positively correlated with an improved ability of the vaccine to induce stronger effector memory T cell-biased, cellular immune responses to a coexpressed Ag despite pre-existing anti-Ad5 immunity. Moreover, inclusion of EAT-2 in the vaccine mixture improves the generation of polyfunctional cytolytic CD8(+) T cell responses as characterized by enhanced production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, cytotoxic degranulation, and increased in vivo cytolytic activity. These data suggest a new approach whereby inclusion of EAT-2 expression in stringent human vaccination applications can provide a more effective vaccine against HIV-1 specifically in Ad5 immune subjects.

  15. Proton irradiation impacts age-driven modulations of cancer progression influenced by immune system transcriptome modifications from splenic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wage, Justin; Ma, Lili; Peluso, Michael; Lamont, Clare; Evens, Andrew M; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Beheshti, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host, with additional impact due to irradiation. Proton irradiation of tumors induces biological modulations including inhibition of angiogenic and immune factors critical to 'hallmark' processes impacting tumor development. Proton irradiation has also provided promising results for proton therapy in cancer due to targeting advantages. Additionally, protons may contribute to the carcinogenesis risk from space travel (due to the high proportion of high-energy protons in space radiation). Through a systems biology approach, we investigated how host tissue (i.e. splenic tissue) of tumor-bearing mice was altered with age, with or without whole-body proton exposure. Transcriptome analysis was performed on splenic tissue from adolescent (68-day) versus old (736-day) C57BL/6 male mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells with or without three fractionations of 0.5 Gy (1-GeV) proton irradiation. Global transcriptome analysis indicated that proton irradiation of adolescent hosts caused significant signaling changes within splenic tissues that support carcinogenesis within the mice, as compared with older subjects. Increases in cell cycling and immunosuppression in irradiated adolescent hosts with CDK2, MCM7, CD74 and RUVBL2 indicated these were the key genes involved in the regulatory changes in the host environment response (i.e. the spleen). Collectively, these results suggest that a significant biological component of proton irradiation is modulated by host age through promotion of carcinogenesis in adolescence and resistance to immunosuppression, carcinogenesis and genetic perturbation associated with advancing age. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  16. Saccharomyces boulardii and Bacillus subtilis B10 modulate TLRs mediated signaling to induce immunity by chicken BMDCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Imran Rashid; Hussain, Altaf; Li, Ya Li; Zhang, Xiaoping; Xu, Xin; Long, Mao Yu; You, Dong Yu; Li, Wei Fen

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a critical role to activate immune response. They may be targeted for immunomodulation by microbes, including probiotics. In this study, chicken bone marrow dendrite cells (chi-BMDCs) were stimulated with lipopolysachride (LPS), Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb), Bacillus subtilis B10 (Bs), co-culture of Sb + Bs and phosphate buffer saline (PBS) as a control group (Ctr) at 3, 6, and 12 h intervals. Results revealed that treatment groups modulated the phenotype and biological functions of chi-BMDCs. Scan electron microscopy showed attachment of probiotics on the surface of chi-BMDCs. Additionally transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed efficiently engulfing and degradation of probiotics. Gene expression levels of MHC-II, CD40, CD80 and CD86 up-regulated in stimulated groups. Furthermore, toll-like receptors TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and chicken specific TLR15 expressions were improved and downstream associated factors MyD88, TRAF6, TAB1, and NFκ-B mRNA levels increased in all treatment groups as compared to control. Surprisingly, NFκ-B response was noted significant higher in LPS treatment among all groups. Moreover, IL-1β, IL-17, IL-4, TGF-β, and IL-10 production levels were found higher, and lower concentration of INF-γ and IL-8 were observed in Sb, Bs, and Sb + Bs treatment groups. In contrast, LPS groups showed prominent increase in IL-12, INF-γ, and IL-8 concentration levels as compared to control group. Altogether, these results emphasize a potentially important role of Saccharomyces boulardii and Bacillus subtilis B10 in modulating immunological functions of chi-BMDCs by targeting specific toll like receptors (TLRs) and associated factors. The role of probiotics on chi-BMDCs functionality in a non-mammalian species have been presented for the first time. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Gamma-Irradiated Bacille Calmette-Guérin Vaccination Does Not Modulate the Innate Immune Response during Experimental Human Endotoxemia in Adult Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda A. C. Hamers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine exerts nonspecific immunostimulatory effects and may therefore represent a novel therapeutic option to treat sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. We investigated whether BCG vaccination modulates the systemic innate immune response in humans in vivo during experimental endotoxemia. We used inactivated gamma-irradiated BCG vaccine because of the potential risk of disseminated disease with the live vaccine in immunoparalyzed patients. In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study, healthy male volunteers were vaccinated with gamma-irradiated BCG (n=10 or placebo (n=10 and received 1 ng/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS intravenously on day 5 after vaccination to assess the in vivo immune response. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with various related and unrelated pathogens 5, 8 to 10, and 25 to 35 days after vaccination to assess ex vivo immune responses. BCG vaccination resulted in a scar in 90% of vaccinated subjects. LPS administration elicited a profound systemic immune response, characterized by increased levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, hemodynamic changes, and flu-like symptoms. However, BCG modulated neither this in vivo immune response, nor ex vivo leukocyte responses at any time point. In conclusion, gamma-irradiated BCG is unlikely to represent an effective treatment option to restore immunocompetence in patients with sepsis-induced immunoparalysis. This trial is registered with NCT02085590.

  18. The Gut-Liver-Lung Axis. Modulation of the Innate Immune Response and Its Possible Role in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert P; Hopkins, Raewyn J; Marsland, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that a diet high in fiber is associated with better lung function and reduced risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The mechanism for this benefit remains unknown, but, as fiber is not absorbed by the gut, this finding suggests that the gut may play an active role in pathogenic pathways underlying COPD. There is a growing awareness that aberrant activity of the innate immune system, characterized by increased neutrophil and macrophage activation, may contribute to the development or progression of COPD. Innate immunity is modulated in large part by the liver, where hepatic cells function in immune surveillance of the portal circulation, as well as providing a rich source of systemic inflammatory cytokines and immune mediators (notably, IL-6 and C-reactive protein). We believe that the beneficial effect of dietary fiber on lung function is through modulation of innate immunity and subsequent attenuation of the pulmonary response to inflammatory stimuli, most apparent in current or former smokers. We propose that the "gut-liver-lung axis" may play a modifying role in the pathogenesis of COPD. In this review, we summarize lines of evidence that include animal models, large prospective observational studies, and clinical trials, supporting the hypothesis that the gut-liver-lung axis plays an integral part in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of COPD.

  19. Immune-protective effect of echinococcosis on colitis experimental model is dependent of down regulation of TNF-α and NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelifi, Lila; Soufli, Imene; Labsi, Moussa; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2017-02-01

    Hydatid disease (echinococcosis) is a chronic, endemic helminthic disease caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus. This disease is endemic in many parts of the world, such as the Mediterranean area, and in particular in Algeria. Helminth parasites have developed complex strategies to modulate the immune responses of their hosts through versatile immune-regulatory mechanisms. These mechanisms may regulate immune responses associated with inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). the goal of this study was to investigate the effect of Echinococcus granulosus infection on the development of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Our results demonstrated that E. granulosus infection significantly improved the clinical symptoms and histological scores observed during DSS-induced colitis, and also maintained mucus production by goblet cells. Interestingly, this infection reduced Nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production and attenuated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression in colonic tissues. Collectively, our data support the hygiene hypothesis and indicate that prior infection with E. granulosus can effectively protect mice from DSS-induced colitis by enhancing immune-regulatory mechanisms.

  20. Modulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in active and latent tuberculosis by coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Jaganathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-12-01

    Helminth infections are known to induce modulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB). However, the role of helminth infections in modulating systemic cytokine responses in active and latent tuberculosis (LTB) is not known. To define the systemic cytokine levels in helminth-TB coinfection, we measured the circulating plasma levels of Type 1, Type 2, Type 17, other pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in individuals with active TB (ATB) with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection by multiplex ELISA. Similarly, we also measured the same cytokine levels in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant Ss infection in a cross-sectional study. Our data reveal that individuals with ATB or LTB and coexistent Ss infection have significantly lower levels of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2) and Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines compared to those without Ss infection. In contrast, those with ATB and LTB with Ss infection have significantly higher levels of the regulatory cytokines (IL-10 and TGFβ), and those with LTB and Ss infection also have significantly higher levels of Type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13) as well. Finally, those with LTB (but not ATB) exhibit significantly lower levels of other pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNα, IFNβ, IL-6, IL-12 and GM-CSF). Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the systemic cytokine responses in ATB and LTB and indicate that coincident helminth infections might influence pathogenesis of TB infection and disease.

  1. Oral Recombinant Feline Interferon-Omega as an alternative immune modulation therapy in FIV positive cats: clinical and laboratory evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, S; Leal, R O; McGahie, D; Sepúlveda, N; Duarte, A; Niza, M M R E; Tavares, L

    2014-02-01

    Recombinant-Feline Interferon-Omega (rFeIFN-ω) is an immune-modulator licensed for use subcutaneously in Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV) therapy. Despite oral protocols have been suggested, little is known about such use in FIV-infected cats. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical improvement, laboratory findings, concurrent viral excretion and acute phase proteins (APPs) in naturally FIV-infected cats under oral rFeIFN-ω therapy (0.1 MU/cat rFeIFN-ω PO, SID, 90 days). 11 FIV-positive cats were treated with oral rFeIFN-ω (PO Group). Results were compared to previous data from 7 FIV-positive cats treated with the subcutaneous licensed protocol (SC Group). Initial clinical scores were similar in both groups. Independently of the protocol, rFeIFN-ω induced a significant clinical improvement of treated cats. Concurrent viral excretion and APP's variation were not significant in the PO Group. Oral rFeIFN-ω can be an effective alternative therapy for FIV-infected cats, being also an option for treatment follow-up in cats submitted to the licensed protocol.

  2. Biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis in Colletotrichum graminicola is required for modulation of immune responses of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarouki, Emad; Schafferer, Lukas; Ye, Fanghua; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Haas, Hubertus; Deising, Holger B

    2014-04-01

    The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola synthesizes one intracellular and three secreted siderophores. eGFP fusions with the key siderophore biosynthesis gene, SID1, encoding l-ornithine-N(5) -monooxygenase, suggested that siderophore biosynthesis is rigorously downregulated specifically during biotrophic development. In order to investigate the role of siderophores during vegetative development and pathogenesis, SID1, which is required for synthesis of all siderophores, and the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene NPS6, synthesizing secreted siderophores, were deleted. Mutant analyses revealed that siderophores are required for vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, ROS tolerance, and cell wall integrity. Δsid1 and Δnps6 mutants were hampered in formation of melanized appressoria and impaired in virulence. In agreement with biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis, Δsid1 and Δnps6 strains were not affected in biotrophic development, but spread of necrotrophic hyphae was reduced. To address the question why siderophore biosynthesis is specifically downregulated in biotrophic hyphae, maize leaves were infiltrated with siderophores. Siderophore infiltration alone did not induce defence responses, but formation of biotrophic hyphae in siderophore-infiltrated leaves caused dramatically increased ROS formation and transcriptional activation of genes encoding defence-related peroxidases and PR proteins. These data suggest that fungal siderophores modulate the plant immune system. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Helminth immunoregulation and regulatory B cells%调节性B细胞与蠕虫免疫调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡雪莉

    2013-01-01

    蠕虫感染过程中免疫系统的各种免疫细胞和免疫分子之间可以通过相互作用、相互制约使机体对蠕虫抗原产生最适应的应答,从而发挥免疫调节作用.研究发现,在蠕虫诱导的免疫调节过程中,IL-10是核心细胞因子,这些IL-10可能由调节性T细胞和调节性B细胞分泌.其中调节性T细胞在蠕虫感染中的研究较多,但有实验表明调节性T细胞的减少有时不会影响宿主的免疫反应.近年来越来越多的研究表明调节性B细胞在自身免疫病、慢性炎症、肿瘤及寄生虫感染等疾病中发挥着重要的作用.本中主要综述了蠕虫感染过程中宿主的免疫调控以及调节性B细胞所发挥的免疫调节功能.%A host produces the best response to helminth antigens through the interaction and restriction of various types of immune cells and immune molecules during the process of helminth infection. Thus, immune cells and immune molecules play an immunoregulatory role. Many studies indicated that IL-10 is a key cytokine in the immune regulation process induced by helminths. IL-10 can be secreted by regulatory T cells (Tregs) and regulatory B cells (Bregs). Many studies have examined the role of Tregs, but some studies have indicated that a decrease in Tregs may sometimes not affect the immune response of the host. Over the past few years, studies have increasingly indicated that Bregs has an important effect on autoimmune disease, chronic inflammation, tumors, and infection by helminths. This review mainly discusses immunoregulation in the host and the role of Bregs in the event of an infection by helminths.

  4. Helminth infection, fecundity, and age of first pregnancy in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Aaron D; Tamayo, Marilyne A; Beheim, Bret; Trumble, Benjamin C; Stieglitz, Jonathan; Hooper, Paul L; Martin, Melanie; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2015-11-20

    Infection with intestinal helminths results in immunological changes that influence co-infections, and might influence fecundity by inducing immunological states affecting conception and pregnancy. We investigated associations between intestinal helminths and fertility in women, using 9 years of longitudinal data from 986 Bolivian forager-horticulturalists, experiencing natural fertility and 70% helminth prevalence. We found that different species of helminth are associated with contrasting effects on fecundity. Infection with roundworm (Ascaris lumbricoides) is associated with earlier first births and shortened interbirth intervals, whereas infection with hookworm is associated with delayed first pregnancy and extended interbirth intervals. Thus, helminths may have important effects on human fertility that reflect physiological and immunological consequences of infection.

  5. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  6. Host immunity shapes the impact of climate changes on the dynamics of parasite infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignatti, Andrea; Boag, Brian; Cattadori, Isabella M

    2016-03-15

    Global climate change is predicted to alter the distribution and dynamics of soil-transmitted helminth infections, and yet host immunity can also influence the impact of warming on host-parasite interactions and mitigate the long-term effects. We used time-series data from two helminth species of a natural herbivore and investigated the contribution of climate change and immunity on the long-term and seasonal dynamics of infection. We provide evidence that climate warming increases the availability of infective stages of both helminth species and the proportional increase in the intensity of infection for the helminth not regulated by immunity. In contrast, there is no significant long-term positive trend in the intensity for the immune-controlled helminth, as immunity reduces the net outcome of climate on parasite dynamics. Even so, hosts experienced higher infections of this helminth at an earlier age during critical months in the warmer years. Immunity can alleviate the expected long-term effect of climate on parasite infections but can also shift the seasonal peak of infection toward the younger individuals.

  7. Wild skylarks seasonally modulate energy budgets but maintain energetically costly inflammatory immune responses throughout the annual cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegemann, A.; Matson, K.D.; Versteegh, M.A.; Tieleman, B.I.

    2012-01-01

    A central hypothesis of ecological immunology is that immune defences are traded off against competing physiological and behavioural processes. During energetically demanding periods, birds are predicted to switch from expensive inflammatory responses to less costly immune responses. Acute phase res

  8. Wild Skylarks Seasonally Modulate Energy Budgets but Maintain Energetically Costly Inflammatory Immune Responses throughout the Annual Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegemann, Arne; Matson, Kevin D.; Versteegh, Maaike A.; Tieleman, B. Irene

    2012-01-01

    A central hypothesis of ecological immunology is that immune defences are traded off against competing physiological and behavioural processes. During energetically demanding periods, birds are predicted to switch from expensive inflammatory responses to less costly immune responses. Acute phase res

  9. Helminth parasites of conventionally mantained laboratory mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Magalhães Pinto

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of intestinal parasites present in the SwissWebster, C57B1/6 and DBA/2 mice strains from different animal houses was identified and prevalences compared. Three parasites were observed during the course ofthis study, namely the cestode. Vampirolepis nana (Siebold, 1852 Spasskii, 1954(=Hymenolepis nana and the nematodes Aspiculuris tetraptera (Nitzsch, 1821 Schulz, 1924 and Syphacia obvelata (Rudolphi, 1802 Seurat, 1916. The scope of thisinvestigation has been widened to also include morphometric data on the parasites, to further simplify their identification, since the presence of helminths in laboratory animals is regarded as a restricting factor for the proper attainment of experimental protocols.

  10. Helminths parasites of whales in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís C. Muniz-Pereira

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three species of whale Balaenoptera borealis Lesson, 1828, B. physalus (Linnaeus, 1758 and Physeter catodon Linnaeus, 1758 captured in the Brazilian coast were necropsied for helminths. Balaenoptera borealis and B. physalus were infected by Crassicauda crassicauda (Nematoda, Tetrameridae and Ogmogaster antarcticus (Digenea: Notocotylidae, which are referred for the first time in Brazil. Balaenoptera borealis was also infected by Lecithodesmus goliath (Digenea, Campulidae and Bolbosoma turbinella (Acanthocephala, Polymorphidae. Physeter catodon was infected by Anisakis physeteris (Nematoda, Anisakidae, which is a new record to this host in Brazilian waters.

  11. Modulation of the innate immune responses in the striped snakehead murrel, Channa striata upon experimental infection with live and heat killed Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kalaivani Priyadarshini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that the innate immune mechanisms in fish serve as the first line of defence against wide variety of pathogens. In most of the situations, innate responses get induced and enhanced after the pathogen invasion. It would be interesting to look into the inducibility of various innate immune mechanisms and the level of enhancement after infection with the pathogen. Hence, in the present investigation, modulation of the innate immune responses in the striped snakehead murrel, Channa striata on experimental challenge with either live virulent or heat killed Aeromonas hydrophila at a dose of 1× 107 CFU mL-1 were measured. Most of the non-specific (both humoral and cellular immune responses tested were substantially induced or enhanced in both the experimental groups in comparison with the unchallenged control group. Significant increase in the lysozyme, total peroxidase, antiprotease and respiratory burst activities were observed after the pathogen challenge. Thus, most of the innate non-specific immune responses are inducible though they are constitutive of fish immune system exhibiting a basal level of activity even in the absence of pathogen challenge.

  12. Modulation of systemic and intestinal immune response by interleukin-2 therapy in gastrointestinal surgical oncology. Personal experience in the context of current knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespoli, Luca; Uggeri, Fabio; Romano, Fabrizio; Nespoli, Angelo; Brivo, Fernando; Fumagalli, Luca; Sargenti, Manuela; Uggeri, Franco; Gianotti, Luca

    2012-03-01

    Interactions between host and malignant tumor is currently under intensive investigation. The immune system seems to have a key role in cancer development and spread. Novel strategies to actively modulate the immune system have been proposed to improve the outcome of disease in patients with neoplasms. Our experience with systemic immunomodulation by interleukin-2 (IL-2) focused on both systemic and local immunity in surgical gastrointestinal cancer. Preoperative IL-2 subcutaneous injection was effective in counteracting postoperative immunosuppression, with a reduction of serum levels of IL-6 and the maintenance of preoperative levels of IL-12, a higher number of circulating total lymphocytes, and CD3(+) and CD4(+) T-cells, and a smaller decrease in circulating mature and immature dendritic cells (DCs), as well as a reduction in postoperative serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. At the intestinal level, in patients with colorectal cancer, preoperative administration of IL-2 affected both phenotype and function of resident dendritic cells and T-cells, skewing local immunity toward a more immunogenic one. Our data showed that immunomodulation by IL-2 was effective in counteracting the systemic postoperative immune suppression related to surgical stress. IL-2 was also active at a local level on intestinal immunity, affecting both phenotype and function of resident T-cells and DCs. Future studies will encompass the possibility of reaching more adequate intratumoral IL-2 concentrations by direct intralesional injection to maximize immunostimulatory effects and minimize adverse effects.

  13. This Gut Ain't Big Enough for Both of Us. Or Is It? Helminth-Microbiota Interactions in Veterinary Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peachey, Laura E; Jenkins, Timothy P; Cantacessi, Cinzia

    2017-08-01

    Gastrointestinal helminth parasites share their habitat with a myriad of other organisms, that is, the commensal microbiota. Increasing evidence, particularly in humans and rodent models of helminth infection, points towards a multitude of interactions occurring between parasites and the gut microbiota, with a profound impact on both host immunity and metabolic potential. Despite this information, the exploration of the effects that parasite infections exert on populations of commensal gut microbes of veterinary species is a field of research in its infancy. In this article, we summarise studies that have contributed to current knowledge of helminth-microbiota interactions in species of veterinary interest, and identify possible avenues for future research in this area, which could include the exploitation of such relationships to improve parasite control and delay or prevent the development of anthelmintic resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14(+) monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity.

  15. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14+ monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity. PMID:28138327

  16. Successful reduction of high-sustained anti-idursulfase antibody titers by immune modulation therapy in a patient with severe mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine H. Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 6 year old boy with severe MPS II undergoing immune modulation therapy due to high IgG antibody titers to IV idursulfase and no significant decline in urinary GAG levels since initiating enzyme replacement therapy. He has complete deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase activity due to a submicroscopic deletion of the X chromosome involving the entire I2S gene but not including in the fragile X locus. At 19 months of age, IV idursulfase therapy at the recommended dose of 0.5 mg/kg/week was initiated and then increased to 1.0 mg/kg/week after no observed clinical improvement and no decline in urine GAG level. After one year of ERT at the increased dose, he had no significant decline in urinary GAG excretion and increase of anti-idursulfase IgG antibody titers to 102,000 with complete neutralizing antibodies. In light of the evidence of lack of efficacy of idursulfase therapy, the patient was started