WorldWideScience

Sample records for helix structure dynamics

  1. Structural dynamics of a single-stranded RNA–helix junction using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Catherine D.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Many regulatory RNAs contain long single strands (ssRNA) that adjoin secondary structural elements. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to study the dynamic properties of a 12-nucleotide (nt) ssRNA tail derived from the prequeuosine riboswitch linked to the 3′ end of a 48-nt hairpin. Analysis of chemical shifts, NOE connectivity, 13C spin relaxation, and residual dipolar coupling data suggests that the first two residues (A25 and U26) in the ssRNA tail stack onto the adjacent helix and assume an ordered conformation. The following U26-A27 step marks the beginning of an A6-tract and forms an acute pivot point for substantial motions within the tail, which increase toward the terminal end. Despite substantial internal motions, the ssRNA tail adopts, on average, an A-form helical conformation that is coaxial with the helix. Our results reveal a surprising degree of structural and dynamic complexity at the ssRNA–helix junction, which involves a fine balance between order and disorder that may facilitate efficient pseudoknot formation on ligand recognition. PMID:24742933

  2. Rigid multibody simulation of a helix-like structure: the dynamics of bacterial adhesion pili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrisson, Johan; Wiklund, Krister; Servin, Martin; Axner, Ove; Lacoursière, Claude; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    We present a coarse-grained rigid multibody model of a subunit assembled helix-like polymer, e.g., adhesion pili expressed by bacteria, that is capable of describing the polymer's force-extension response. With building blocks representing individual subunits, the model appropriately describes the complex behavior of pili expressed by the gram-negative uropathogenic Escherichia coli bacteria under the action of an external force. Numerical simulations show that the dynamics of the model, which include the effects of both unwinding and rewinding, are in good quantitative agreement with the characteristic force-extension response as observed experimentally for type 1 and P pili. By tuning the model, it is also possible to reproduce the force-extension response in the presence of anti-shaft antibodies, which dramatically changes the mechanical properties. Thus, the model and results in this work give enhanced understanding of how a pilus unwinds under the action of external forces and provide a new perspective of the complex bacterial adhesion processes.

  3. Molecular structure of the collagen triple helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Barbara; Persikov, Anton V

    2005-01-01

    The molecular conformation of the collagen triple helix confers strict amino acid sequence constraints, requiring a (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating pattern and a high content of imino acids. The increasing family of collagens and proteins with collagenous domains shows the collagen triple helix to be a basic motif adaptable to a range of proteins and functions. Its rodlike domain has the potential for various modes of self-association and the capacity to bind receptors, other proteins, GAGs, and nucleic acids. High-resolution crystal structures obtained for collagen model peptides confirm the supercoiled triple helix conformation, and provide new information on hydrogen bonding patterns, hydration, sidechain interactions, and ligand binding. For several peptides, the helix twist was found to be sequence dependent, and such variation in helix twist may serve as recognition features or to orient the triple helix for binding. Mutations in the collagen triple-helix domain lead to a variety of human disorders. The most common mutations are single-base substitutions that lead to the replacement of one Gly residue, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern. A single Gly substitution destabilizes the triple helix through a local disruption in hydrogen bonding and produces a discontinuity in the register of the helix. Molecular information about the collagen triple helix and the effect of mutations will lead to a better understanding of function and pathology.

  4. Molecular dynamics investigations on the effect of D amino acid substitution in a triple-helix structure and the stability of collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punitha, V; Raman, S Sundar; Parthasarathi, R; Subramanian, V; Rao, J Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, T

    2009-07-02

    Studies on the structure and stability of peptides and proteins during l-->d configurational change are certainly important for the designing of peptides with new biological activity and protein engineering. The l-->d amino acid (d AA) changes have been observed in aged proteins such as collagen. Hence, in this study, an attempt has been made to explore the effect of the replacement of l amino acid (l AA) in the model collagen-like peptides with d AA and the origin of structural stability (destability) has been traced using the molecular dynamics (MD) method employing the AMBER force field. Our results reveal that the substitution of d AA produces a large local disruption to the triple-helical structure. Formation of a kink (bulge) at the site of substitution is observed from the detailed analysis of MD trajectory. However, this local perturbation of kinked helix changes the direction of the helices and affects the relative orientation of the respective AA residues for helix-helix interaction, enough to affect the overall stability of the model collagen-like peptide. The destabilization energy per d Ala substitution is 7.87 kcal/mol, which is similar to the value for the Gly-->Ala mutation in collagen. Since the Gly-->Ala mutation is involved in genetic disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), the l-->d configurational change may produce a similar effect on collagen.

  5. The collagen triple-helix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, B; Ramshaw, J A

    1997-03-01

    Recent advances, principally through the study of peptide models, have led to an enhanced understanding of the structure and function of the collagen triple helix. In particular, the first crystal structure has clearly shown the highly ordered hydration network critical for stabilizing both the molecular conformation and the interactions between triple helices. The sequence dependent nature of the conformational features is also under active investigation by NMR and other techniques. The triple-helix motif has now been identified in proteins other than collagens, and it has been established as being important in many specific biological interactions as well as being a structural element. The nature of recognition and the degree of specificity for interactions involving triple helices may differ from globular proteins. Triple-helix binding domains consist of linear sequences along the helix, making them amenable to characterization by simple model peptides. The application of structural techniques to such model peptides can serve to clarify the interactions involved in triple-helix recognition and binding and can help explain the varying impact of different structural alterations found in mutant collagens in diseased states.

  6. Structural alignment of RNA with triple helix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas K F; Yiu, S M

    2012-04-01

    Structural alignment is useful in identifying members of ncRNAs. Existing tools are all based on the secondary structures of the molecules. There is evidence showing that tertiary interactions (the interaction between a single-stranded nucleotide and a base-pair) in triple helix structures are critical in some functions of ncRNAs. In this article, we address the problem of structural alignment of RNAs with the triple helix. We provide a formal definition to capture a simplified model of a triple helix structure, then develop an algorithm of O(mn(3)) time to align a query sequence (of length m) with known triple helix structure with a target sequence (of length n) with an unknown structure. The resulting algorithm is shown to be useful in identifying ncRNA members in a simulated genome.

  7. Folding Dynamics of an α Helix and a β Hairpin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofrichter, James

    1998-03-01

    What processes limit the rate at which proteins fold? In an effort to address this question we have begun to study the dynamics of the formation of loops, α helices and the minimal β structural element, a β hairpin, which must occur on the pathway from random coils to folded proteins. Because these processes occur on time scales of 10-5-10-9 seconds and experimental access to these time scales has been limited, the kinetics of these processes have not been extensively studied. The expectation is that a more complete understanding of the dynamics of these microprocesses will provide constraints on possible mechanisms for the overall folding of more complex structures. We have explored the kinetics of the helix-coil transition of a synthetic, 21-residue peptide: Ac-WAAAH^+(AAARA)_3A-NH2 and of the folding of a 16 residue β hairpin from protein G B1 using the nanosecond temperature jump technique. Both processes were studied by monitoring tryptophan fluorescence. In the helical peptide, the quantum yield of tryptophan decreases as a result of the interaction between tryptophan in position 1 with the protonated histidine in position 5. In the native conformation of the hairpin, it increases because it forms part of a hydrophobic cluster which stabilizes the native conformation (in a peptide in which a dansylated lysine is incorporated at the C-terminus the fluorescence is quenched). At 300 K, the relaxation time for the helix-coil transition is ~ 250 ns and that for the hairpin-coil transition is ~ 2.2 μs, about 10 times slower. The apparent activation energies are 6.8 kcal/mol for the helix and 10 kcal/mol for the hairpin. We have developed simple kinetic models for these processes which incorporate the sequence- and position-dependent properties known from equilibrium studies and the single-sequence approximation. These models provide a remarkably consistent picture of the dynamics, permitting us to extract information on both the microscopic rates for the c

  8. Structural and dynamic study of the tetramerization region of non-erythroid alpha-spectrin: a frayed helix revealed by site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qufei; Fung, L W-M

    2009-01-13

    The N-terminal region of alpha-spectrin is responsible for its association with beta-spectrin in a heterodimer, forming functional tetramers. Non-erythroid alpha-spectrin (alphaII-spectrin) has a significantly higher association affinity for beta-spectrin than the homologous erythroid alpha-spectrin (alphaI-spectrin). We have previously determined the solution structure of the N-terminal region of alphaI-spectrin by NMR methods, but currently no structural information is available for alphaII-spectrin. We have used cysteine scanning, spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods to study the tetramerization region of alphaII-spectrin. EPR data clearly show that, in alphaII-spectrin, the first nine N-terminal residues were unstructured, followed by an irregular helix (helix C'), frayed at the N-terminal end, but rigid at the C-terminal end, which merges into the putative triple-helical structural domain. The region corresponding to the important unstructured junction region linking helix C' to the first structural domain in alphaI-spectrin was clearly structured. On the basis of the published model for aligning helices A', B', and C', important interactions among residues in helix C' of alphaI- and alphaII-spectrin and helices A' and B' of betaI- and betaII-spectrin are identified, suggesting similar coiled coil helical bundling for spectrin I and II in forming tetramers. The differences in affinity are likely due to the differences in the conformation of the junction regions. Equilibrium dissociation constants of spin-labeled alphaII and betaI complexes from ITC measurements indicate that residues 15, 19, 37, and 40 are functionally important residues in alphaII-spectrin. Interestingly, all four corresponding homologous residues in alphaI-spectrin (residues 24, 28, 46, and 49) have been reported to be clinically significant residues involved in hematological diseases.

  9. Hydration dynamics of the collagen triple helix by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melacini, G; Bonvin, A M; Goodman, M; Boelens, R; Kaptein, R

    2000-07-28

    The hydration of the collagen-like Ac-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(6)-NH(2) triple-helical peptide in solution was investigated using an integrated set of high-resolution NMR hydration experiments, including different recently developed exchange-network editing methods. This approach was designed to explore the hydration dynamics in the proximity of labile groups, such as the hydroxyproline hydroxyl group, and revealed that the first shell of hydration in collagen-like triple helices is kinetically labile with upper limits for water molecule residence times in the nanosecond to sub-nanosecond range. This result is consistent with a "hopping" hydration model in which solvent molecules are exchanged in and out of solvation sites at a rate that is not directly correlated to the degree of site localization. The hopping model thus reconciles the dynamic view of hydration revealed by NMR with the previously suggested partially ordered semi-clathrate-like cylinder of hydration. In addition, the nanosecond to sub-nanosecond upper limits for water molecule residence times imply that hydration-dehydration events are not likely to be the rate-limiting step for triple helix self-recognition, complementing previous investigations on water dynamics in collagen fibers. This study has also revealed labile proton features expected to facilitate the characterization of the structure and folding of triple helices in collagen peptides.

  10. Slow Wave Characteristics of Helix Structure with Elliptical Cross Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jian-Xiang; WEI Yan-Yu; GONG Yu-Bin; Fu Cheng-Fang; YUE Ling-Na; WANG Wen-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel helix slow wave structure with an elliptical cross section shielded by an elliptical waveguide.The rf characteristics including dispersion properties,interaction impedance of zero mode in this structure have been studied in detail.The theoretical results reveal that weaker dispersion even abnormal dispersion characteristics is obtained with the increasing eccentricity of the elliptical waveguide,while the interaction impedance is enhanced by enlarging the eccentricity of elliptical helix.

  11. Structure, stability and folding of the alpha-helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, A J; Andrew, C D; Cochran, D A; Hughes, E; Penel, S; Sun, J K; Stapley, B J; Clarke, D T; Jones, G R

    2001-01-01

    Pauling first described the alpha-helix nearly 50 years ago, yet new features of its structure continue to be discovered, using peptide model systems, site-directed mutagenesis, advances in theory, the expansion of the Protein Data Bank and new experimental techniques. Helical peptides in solution form a vast number of structures, including fully helical, fully coiled and partly helical. To interpret peptide results quantitatively it is essential to use a helix/coil model that includes the stabilities of all these conformations. Our models now include terms for helix interiors, capping, side-chain interactions, N-termini and 3(10)-helices. The first three amino acids in a helix (N1, N2 and N3) and the preceding N-cap are unique, as their amide NH groups do not participate in backbone hydrogen bonding. We surveyed their structures in proteins and measured their amino acid preferences. The results are predominantly rationalized by hydrogen bonding to the free NH groups. Stabilizing side-chain-side-chain energies, including hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding and polar/non-polar interactions, were measured accurately in helical peptides. Helices in proteins show a preference for having approximately an integral number of turns so that their N- and C-caps lie on the same side. There are also strong periodic trends in the likelihood of terminating a helix with a Schellman or alpha L C-cap motif. The kinetics of alpha-helix folding have been studied with stopped-flow deep ultraviolet circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation as the light source; this gives a far superior signal-to-noise ratio than a conventional instrument. We find that poly(Glu), poly(Lys) and alanine-based peptides fold in milliseconds, with longer peptides showing a transient overshoot in helix content.

  12. Structure, dynamics, and hydration of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)10, in aqueous media: a chemical equilibrium analysis of triple helix-to-single coil transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Toshiyuki; Minakawa, Ayako; Okuyama, Kenji

    2009-10-29

    The structure, dynamics, and hydration behavior of a collagen model polypeptide, (L-prolyl-L-prolylglycyl)(10) (PPG10), were investigated in pure water and dilute acetic acid over a wide temperature range using broadband dielectric relaxation (DR) techniques that spanned frequencies from 1 kHz to 20 GHz. All samples showed pronounced dielectric dispersion with two major relaxation processes around 3 MHz and 20 GHz. Because DR measurements sensitively probe dipoles and their dynamics, the structures and ionization states of the carboxy and amino termini of aqueous PPG10 were precisely determined from the relaxation times and strengths in the 3 MHz frequency range. In solution, PPG10 formed mixtures of monodisperse rods as triple helices with lengths and diameters of 8.6 and 1.5 nm, respectively, and monomeric random coils with radii of approximately 1.4 nm. Ionization of the C-terminus was suppressed by the addition of acetic acid in both states. The fraction of random coils (f(coil)) was found to be a function of temperature (T) and the concentration of PPG10 (c). At low temperatures, small f(coil) values were found, which increased with temperature to reach f(coil) = 1 at approximately 60 degrees C, irrespective of c. This phenomenon, well-known as a triple helix-to-single coil transition, is discussed on the basis of the chemical reaction, (PPG10)(3) 3PPG10, with an equilibrium constant of K = 3(c/55.6)(2)f(coil)(3)(1 - f(coil))(-1). The standard enthalpy change evaluated from Arrhenius plots (ln K versus T(-1)) was found to change dramatically at the same transition temperature that was previously determined by using optical rotation experiments. The other major DR process, observed at approximately 20 GHz, was assigned to free and hydrated water molecules and used to determine the average hydration number (m) per PPG10. The m values for the triple helix and random coil state at 25 degrees C were evaluated to be m(th) = 60-70 and m(coil) = 250-270. The m

  13. Helix dynamics in LacY: helices II/IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Madej, M. Gregor; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical and biophysical studies based upon crystal structures of both a mutant and wild-type lactose permease from Escherichia coli (LacY) in an inward-facing conformation have led to a model for the symport mechanism in which both sugar- and H+-binding sites are alternatively accessible to either side of the membrane. Previous findings indicate that the face of helix II with Asp68 is important for the conformational changes that occur during turnover. As shown here, replacement of Asp68 at the cytoplasmic end of helix II, particularly with Glu, abolishes active transport, but the mutants retain the ability to bind galactopyranoside. In the x-ray structure, Asp68 and Lys131 (helix IV) lie within ∼4.2 Å of each other. Although a double mutant with Cys replacements at both position 68 and 131 cross-links efficiently, single replacements for Lys131 exhibit very significant transport activity. Site-directed alkylation studies show that sugar binding by the Asp68 mutants causes closure of the cytoplasmic cavity, like wild-type LacY; but strikingly, the probability of opening the periplasmic pathway upon sugar binding is markedly reduced. Taken together with previous mutagenesis and cross-linking studies, the findings lead to a model in which replacement of Asp68 blocks a conformational transition involving helices II and IV that is important for opening the periplasmic cavity. Evidence is also presented suggesting that movements of helices II and IV are coupled functionally with movements in the pseudo-symmetrically paired helices VIII and X. PMID:20043916

  14. Surface simulation synthesis: a new strategy to spy alpha-helix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Nan; Chen, Yu; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2007-09-04

    In key proteins, there are always some alpha-helix structures, which play important role in the structure and functions. Many epitopes lie on the surface of alpha-helix. These epitopes are not easy to be recruited into the vaccine development, because they are conformation dependent epitopes. Can such epitopes on alpha-helix be mimicked synthetically? Our findings undoubtedly validate the feasibility of surface simulation synthesis with short linear peptide to mimic the antigenic side of alpha-helix structure.

  15. Structural determinants of salmon calcitonin bioactivity: the role of the Leu-based amphipathic alpha-helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreotti, Giuseppina; Méndez, Blanca López; Amodeo, Pietro; Morelli, Maria A Castiglione; Nakamuta, Hiromichi; Motta, Andrea

    2006-08-25

    Salmon calcitonin (sCT) forms an amphipathic helix in the region 9-19, with the C-terminal decapeptide interacting with the helix (Amodeo, P., Motta, A., Strazzullo, G., Castiglione Morelli, M. A. (1999) J. Biomol. NMR 13, 161-174). To uncover the structural requirements for the hormone bioactivity, we investigated several sCT analogs. They were designed so as to alter the length of the central helix by removal and/or replacement of flanking residues and by selectively mutating or deleting residues inside the helix. The helix content was assessed by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopies; the receptor binding affinity in human breast cancer cell line T 47D and the in vivo hypocalcemic activity were also evaluated. In particular, by NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations we studied Leu(23),Ala(24)-sCT in which Pro(23) and Arg(24) were replaced by helix inducing residues. Compared with sCT, it assumes a longer amphipathic alpha-helix, with decreased binding affinity and one-fifth of the hypocalcemic activity, therefore supporting the idea of a relationship between a definite helix length and bioactivity. From the analysis of other sCT mutants, we inferred that the correct helix length is located in the 9-19 region and requires long range interactions and the presence of specific regions of residues within the sequence for high binding affinity and hypocalcemic activity. Taken together, the structural and biological data identify well defined structural parameters of the helix for sCT bioactivity.

  16. Water-mediated conformational transitions in nicotinic receptor M2 helix bundles: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Sansom, M S

    1995-12-27

    The ion channel of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is a water-filled pore formed by five M2 helix segments, one from each subunit. Molecular dynamics simulations on bundles of five M2 alpha 7 helices surrounding a central column of water and with caps of water molecules at either end of the pore have been used to explore the effects of intrapore water on helix packing. Interactions of water molecules with the N-terminal polar sidechains lead to a conformational transition from right- to left-handed supercoils during these stimulations. These studies reveal that the pore formed by the bundle of M2 helices is flexible. A structural role is proposed for water molecules in determining the geometry of bundles of isolated pore-forming helices.

  17. Helix-helix interconversion rates of short 13C-labeled helical peptides as measured by dynamic NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubasik, Matthew; Kotz, James; Szabo, Christopher; Furlong, Theresa; Stace, Justin

    2005-06-05

    The rates at which a peptide hexamer and a peptide octamer interconvert between left- and right-handed helical forms in CD2Cl2 solution have been characterized by 13C dynamic NMR (DNMR) spectroscopy. The peptide esters studied are Fmoc-(Aib)n-OtBu (n = 6 and 8), where Fmoc is 9-fluorenylmethyoxycarbonyl and Aib is the strongly helix-forming residue alpha-aminoisobutyric acid. Because the Aib residue is itself achiral, homooligomers of this residue form a 50/50 mixture of enantiomeric 3(10)-helices in solution. It has been demonstrated (R.-P. Hummel, C. Toniolo, and G. Jung, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 1987, Vol. 26, pp. 1150-1152) that oligomers of Aib interconvert on the millisecond timescale. We have performed lineshape analysis of 13C-NMR spectra collected for our peptides enriched with 13C at a single residue. Rate constants for the octamer range from 6 s(-1) at 196 K to about 56,500 s(-1) at 320 K. At all temperatures, the hexamer interconverts about three times faster than the octamer. Eyring plots of the data reveal experimentally indistinguishable DeltaH++ values for the hexamer and octamer of 37.8 +/- 0.6 and 37.6 +/- 0.4 kJ mol(-1) respectively. The difference in the rates of interconversion is dictated by entropic factors. The hexamer and octamer exhibit negative DeltaS++ values of -29.0(-1) +/- 2.5 and -37.3 +/- 1.7 J K(-1) mol(-1), respectively. A mechanism for the helix-helix interconversion is proposed. and calculated DeltaG++ values are compared to the estimate for a decamer undergoing a helix-helix interconversion.

  18. Solution structure of the ETS domain from murine Ets-1: a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif.

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, L W; Petersen, J.M.; Graves, B J; McIntosh, L. P.

    1996-01-01

    Ets-1 is the prototypic member of the ets family of transcription factors. This family is characterized by the conserved ETS domain that mediates specific DNA binding. Using NMR methods, we have determined the structure of a fragment of murine Ets-1 composed of the 85 residue ETS domain and a 25 amino acid extension that ends at its native C-terminus. The ETS domain folds into a helix-turn-helix motif on a four-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet scaffold. This structure places Ets-1 in the win...

  19. Use of Molecular Dynamics Data in Biochemistry Courses: An Amphipathy Scale to Determine Protein [alpha]-Helix Transmembrane Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazze, Fernanda M.; Fuzo, Carlos A.; Degreve, Leo; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to explain the application of an amphipathy scale obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and to demonstrate how it can be useful in the protein structure field. It is shown that this scale is easy to be used with the advantage of revealing domains of transmembrane [alpha]-helix of proteins without the need of…

  20. Use of Molecular Dynamics Data in Biochemistry Courses: An Amphipathy Scale to Determine Protein [alpha]-Helix Transmembrane Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazze, Fernanda M.; Fuzo, Carlos A.; Degreve, Leo; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to explain the application of an amphipathy scale obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and to demonstrate how it can be useful in the protein structure field. It is shown that this scale is easy to be used with the advantage of revealing domains of transmembrane [alpha]-helix of proteins without the need of…

  1. Dynamic headspace time-extended helix liquid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Pin; Chen, Pai-Shan; Huang, Shang-Da

    2009-05-15

    Liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) has been proved to be a fast, inexpensive and effective sample pre-treatment technique for the analyses of pesticides and many other compounds. In this investigation, a new headspace microextraction technique, dynamic headspace time-extended helix liquid-phase microextraction (DHS-TEH-LPME), is presented. In this work, use of a solvent cooling system, permits the temperature of the extraction solvent to be lowered. Lowering the temperature of the extraction solvent not only reduces solvent loss but also extends the feasible extraction time, thereby improving extraction efficiency. Use of a larger volume of the solvent not only extends the feasible extraction time but also, after extraction, leaves a larger volume to be directly injected into the gas chromatography (GC) to increase extraction efficiency and instrument signal. The DHS-TEH-LPME technique was used to extract six organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) from 110ml water samples that had been spiked with the analytes at ng/l levels, and stirred for 60min. The proposed method attained enrichments up to 2121 fold. The effects of extraction solvent identity, sample agitation, extraction time, extraction temperature, and salt concentration on extraction performance were also investigated. The method detection limits (MDLs) varied from 0.2 to 25ng/l. The calibration curves were linear for at least 2 orders of magnitude with R(2)>==0.996. Relative recoveries in river water were more than 86%.

  2. The effect of C-terminal helix on the stability of FF domain studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liling; Cao, Zanxia; Wang, Jihua

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of C-terminal helix on the stability of the FF domain, we studied the native domain FF3-71 from human HYPA/FBP11 and the truncated version FF3-60 with C-terminal helix being deleted by molecular dynamics simulations with GROMACS package and GROMOS 43A1 force field. The results indicated that the structures of truncated version FF3-60 were evident different from those of native partner FF3-71. Compared with FF3-71, the FF3-60 lost some native contacts and exhibited some similar structural characters to those of intermediate state. The C-terminal helix played a major role in stabilizing the FF3-71 domain. To a certain degree, the FF domain had a tendency to form an intermediate state without the C-terminal helix. In our knowledge, this was the first study to examine the role of C-terminal helix of FF domain in detail by molecular dynamics simulations, which was useful to understand the three-state folding mechanism of the small FF domain.

  3. Structural Signatures and Membrane Helix 4 in GLUT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Juan M.; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ru; Shi, Lei; Yang, Hong; De Vivo, Darryl C.

    2008-01-01

    Exon IV of SLC2A1, a multiple facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter gene, is particularly susceptible to mutations that cause GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, a human encephalopathy that results from decreased glucose flux through the blood-brain barrier. Genotyping of 100 patients revealed that in a third of them who harbor missense mutations in the GLUT1 transporter, transmembrane domain 4 (TM4), encoded by SLC2A1 exon IV, contains mutant residues that have the periodicity of one face of a kinked α-helix. Arg-126, located at the amino terminus of TM4, is the locus for most of the mutations followed by other arginine and glycine residues located elsewhere in the transporter but conserved among MFS proteins. The Arg-126 mutants were constructed and assayed for protein expression, targeting, and transport capacity in Xenopus oocytes. The role of charge at position 126, as well as its accessibility, was investigated in R126H by determining its activity as a function of extracellular pH. The results indicate that intracellular charges at the MFS TM2–3 and TM8–9 signature loops and flanking TMs 3, 5, and 6 are critical for the structure of GLUT1 as are TM glycines and that TM4, located at the catalytic core of MFS proteins, forms a helix that surfaces into the extracellular solution where another proton facilitates transport. PMID:18387950

  4. The triple helix model and dynamics of innovation: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Natário, Maria Manuela; Couto, João Pedro Almeida; Almeida, Carlos Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the dynamics of the triple helix model in less favoured regions, examining the role of three spheres: universities, firms, and government. The paper identifies profiles of behavior in terms of triple helix model performance from the firm's perspective and recognizes key factors for successful innovation dynamics in a less favored region of Portugal.

  5. Structure of the Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns, a Long Tilted Amphipathic Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Daniel; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Bürck, Jochen; Wolf, Moritz; Reißer, Sabine; Luy, Burkhard; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Anne S.; Meyers, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Erns is an essential virion glycoprotein with RNase activity that suppresses host cellular innate immune responses upon being partially secreted from the infected cells. Its unusual C-terminus plays multiple roles, as the amphiphilic helix acts as a membrane anchor, as a signal peptidase cleavage site, and as a retention/secretion signal. We analyzed the structure and membrane binding properties of this sequence to gain a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. CD spectroscopy in different setups, as well as Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the helical folding and showed that the helix is accommodated in the amphiphilic region of the lipid bilayer with a slight tilt rather than lying parallel to the surface. This model was confirmed by NMR analyses that also identified a central stretch of 15 residues within the helix that is fully shielded from the aqueous layer, which is C-terminally followed by a putative hairpin structure. These findings explain the strong membrane binding of the protein and provide clues to establishing the Erns membrane contact, processing and secretion. PMID:24586172

  6. The close-packed triple helix as a possible new structural motif for collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    The one-dimensional problem of selecting the triple helix with the highest volume fraction is solved and hence the condition for a helix to be close-packed is obtained. The close-packed triple helix is shown to have a pitch angle of v CP = 43.3°. Contrary to the conventional notion, we suggest...... that close packing form the underlying principle behind the structure of collagen, and the implications of this suggestion are considered. Further, it is shown that the unique zero-twist structure with no strain-twist coupling is practically identical to the close-packed triple helix. Some...

  7. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue)

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  8. Structure of bacteriophage phi29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-22

    The tailed bacteriophage 29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 Å in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure is about 150 Å long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless 29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  9. Self-organization of amphiphilic macromolecules with local helix structure in concentrated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glagolev, M K; Vasilevskaya, V V; Khokhlov, A R

    2012-08-28

    Concentrated solutions of amphiphilic macromolecules with local helical structure were studied by means of molecular dynamic simulations. It is shown that in poor solvent the macromolecules are assembled into wire-like aggregates having complex core-shell structure. The core consists of a hydrophobic backbone of the chains which intertwine around each other. It is protected by the shell of hydrophilic side groups. In racemic mixture of right-hand and left-hand helix macromolecules the wire-like complex is a chain of braid bundles of macromolecules with the same chirality stacking at their ends. The average number of macromolecules in the wire cross-section is close to that of separate bundles observed in dilute solutions of such macromolecules. The effects described here could serve as a simple model of self-organization in solutions of macromolecules with local helical structure.

  10. Right- and left-handed three-helix proteins. I. Experimental and simulation analysis of differences in folding and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyakina, Anna V; Pereyaslavets, Leonid B; Galzitskaya, Oxana V

    2013-09-01

    Despite the large number of publications on three-helix protein folding, there is no study devoted to the influence of handedness on the rate of three-helix protein folding. From the experimental studies, we make a conclusion that the left-handed three-helix proteins fold faster than the right-handed ones. What may explain this difference? An important question arising in this paper is whether the modeling of protein folding can catch the difference between the protein folding rates of proteins with similar structures but with different folding mechanisms. To answer this question, the folding of eight three-helix proteins (four right-handed and four left-handed), which are similar in size, was modeled using the Monte Carlo and dynamic programming methods. The studies allowed us to determine the orders of folding of the secondary-structure elements in these domains and amino acid residues which are important for the folding. The obtained data are in good correlation with each other and with the experimental data. Structural analysis of these proteins demonstrated that the left-handed domains have a lesser number of contacts per residue and a smaller radius of cross section than the right-handed domains. This may be one of the explanations of the observed fact. The same tendency is observed for the large dataset consisting of 332 three-helix proteins (238 right- and 94 left-handed). From our analysis, we found that the left-handed three-helix proteins have some less-dense packing that should result in faster folding for some proteins as compared to the case of right-handed proteins. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Small-signal analysis of a rectangular helix structure traveling-wave-tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Cheng-Fang; Wei Yan-Yu; Duan Zhao-Yun; Wang Wen-Xiang; Gong Yu-Bin

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the properties of traveling wave-beam interaction in a rectangular helix traveling-wave-tube (TWT) for a solid sheet electron beam. The 'hot' dispersion equation is obtained by means of the self-consistent field theory. The small signal analysis, which includes the effects of the beam parameters and slow-wave structure (SWS)parameters, is carried out by theoretical computation. The numerical results show that the bandwidth and the smallsignal gain of the rectangular helix TWT increase as the beam current increases; and the beam voltage not obviously influences the small signal gain. Among different rectangular helix structures, the small-signal gain increases as the width of the rectangular helix SWS increases, however, the bandwidth decreases whether structure parameters a and Lor ψ and L are fixed or not. In addition, a comparison of the small-signal gain of this structure with a conventional round helix is made. The presented analysis will be useful for the design of the TWT with a rectangular helix circuit.

  12. Radio-Frequency Characteristics of a Printed Rectangular Helix Slow-Wave Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Cheng-Fang; WEI Yan-Yu; WANG Wen-Xiang; GONG Yu-Bin

    2008-01-01

    A new type of printed rectangular he/ix slow-wave structure (SWS) is investigated using the field-matching method and the electromagnetic integral equations at the boundaries. The radio-frequency characteristics including the dispersion equation and the coupling impedance for transverse antisymmetric (odd) modes of this structure are analysed. The numerical results agree well with the results obtained by the EM simulation software HFSS. It is shown that the dispersion of the rectangular helix circuit is weakened, the phase velocity is reduced after filling the dielectric materials in the rectangular helix SWS. As a planar slow-wave structure, this structure has potential applications in compact TWTs.

  13. The close-packed triple helix as a possible new structural motif for collagen

    CERN Document Server

    Bohr, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The one-dimensional problem of selecting the triple helix with the highest volume fraction is solved and hence the condition for a helix to be close-packed is obtained. The close-packed triple helix is shown to have a pitch angle of $v_{CP} =43.3 ^\\circ$. Contrary to the conventional notion, we suggest that close packing form the underlying principle behind the structure of collagen, and the implications of this suggestion are considered. Further, it is shown that the unique zero-twist structure with no strain-twist coupling is practically identical to the close-packed triple helix. Some of the difficulties for the current understanding of the structure of collagen are reviewed: The ambiguity in assigning crystal structures for collagen-like peptides, and the failure to satisfactorily calculate circular dichroism spectra. Further, the proposed new geometrical structure for collagen is better packed than both the 10/3 and the 7/2 structure. A feature of the suggested collagen structure is the existence of a ce...

  14. Interactions of H562 in the S5 helix with T618 and S621 in the pore helix are important determinants of hERG1 potassium channel structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees-Miller, James P; Subbotina, Julia O; Guo, Jiqing; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Noskov, Sergei Y; Duff, Henry J

    2009-05-06

    hERG1 is a member of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain family of K(+) channels. Alignment of cyclic nucleotide binding domain channels revealed an evolutionary conserved sequence HwX(A/G)C in the S5 domain. We reasoned that histidine 562 in hERG1 could play an important structure-function role. To explore this role, we created in silica models of the hERG1 pore domain based on the KvAP crystal structure with Rosetta-membrane modeling and molecular-dynamics simulations. Simulations indicate that the H562 residue in the S5 helix spans the gap between the S5 helix and the pore helix, stabilizing the pore domain, and that mutation at the H562 residue leads to a disruption of the hydrogen bonding to T618 and S621, resulting in distortion of the selectivity filter. Analysis of the simulated point mutations at positions 562/618/621 showed that the reciprocal double mutations H562W/T618I would partially restore the orientation of the 562 residue. Matching hydrophobic interactions between mutated W562 residue and I618 partially compensate for the disrupted hydrogen bonding. Complementary in vitro electrophysiological studies confirmed the results of the molecular-dynamics simulations on single mutations at positions 562, 618, and 621. Experimentally, mutations of the H562 to tryptophan produced a functional channel, but with slowed deactivation and shifted V(1/2) of activation. Furthermore, the double mutation T618I/H562W rescued the defects seen in activation, deactivation, and potassium selectivity seen with the H562W mutation. In conclusion, interactions between H562 in the S5 helix and amino acids in the pore helix are important determinants of hERG1 potassium channel function, as confirmed by theory and experiment.

  15. What can triple helix frameworks offer to the analysis of eco-innovation dynamics? Theoretical and methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan; Holgaard, Jette Egelund; Remmen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Bringing environmental concerns into focus of innovation processes will in several cases also expand the numbers of actors involved. Eco-innovation and triple helix are often frameworks applied to analyse how environmental concerns are integrated in the innovation processes and how different...... stakeholder groups are interacting in this connection. Taking the triple helix as the theoretical departure point, this paper discusses the opportunities offered by these triple helix frameworks for analyzing eco-innovation dynamics from both theoretical and practical perspectives. It adds to the debate about...... stakeholder dynamics in eco-innovation processes by using the discourse of a proactive company to argue for the need for, and a conceptual framing of, a fourth actor in the helix of eco-innovation....

  16. Structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strømmen, Einar N

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces to the theory of structural dynamics, with focus on civil engineering structures that may be described by line-like beam or beam-column type of systems, or by a system of rectangular plates. Throughout this book the mathematical presentation contains a classical analytical description as well as a description in a discrete finite element format, covering the mathematical development from basic assumptions to the final equations ready for practical dynamic response predictions. Solutions are presented in time domain as well as in frequency domain. Structural Dynamics starts off at a basic level and step by step brings the reader up to a level where the necessary safety considerations to wind or horizontal ground motion induced dynamic design problems can be performed. The special theory of the tuned mass damper has been given a comprehensive treatment, as this is a theory not fully covered elsewhere. For the same reason a chapter on the problem of moving loads on beams has been included.

  17. Structural insights into the stabilization of MALAT1 noncoding RNA by a bipartite triple helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica A; Bulkley, David; Wang, Jimin; Valenstein, Max L; Yario, Therese A; Steitz, Thomas A; Steitz, Joan A

    2014-07-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a highly abundant nuclear long noncoding RNA that promotes malignancy. A 3'-stem-loop structure is predicted to confer stability by engaging a downstream A-rich tract in a triple helix, similar to the expression and nuclear retention element (ENE) from the KSHV polyadenylated nuclear RNA. The 3.1-Å-resolution crystal structure of the human MALAT1 ENE and A-rich tract reveals a bipartite triple helix containing stacks of five and four U•A-U triples separated by a C+•G-C triplet and C-G doublet, extended by two A-minor interactions. In vivo decay assays indicate that this blunt-ended triple helix, with the 3' nucleotide in a U•A-U triple, inhibits rapid nuclear RNA decay. Interruption of the triple helix by the C-G doublet induces a 'helical reset' that explains why triple-helical stacks longer than six do not occur in nature.

  18. The Mutual Information of University-Industry-Government Relations: An Indicator of the Triple Helix Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2009-01-01

    University-industry-government relations provide a networked infrastructure for knowledge-based innovation systems. This infrastructure organizes the dynamic fluxes locally and the knowledge base remains emergent given these conditions. Whereas the relations between the institutions can be measured as variables, the interacting fluxes generate a probabilistic entropy. The mutual information among the three institutional dimensions provides us with an indicator of this entropy. When this indicator is negative, self-organization can be expected. The self-organizing dynamic may temporarily be stabilized in the overlay of communications among the carrying agencies. The various dynamics of Triple Helix relations at the global and national levels, in different databases, and in different regions of the world, are distinguished by applying this indicator to scientometric and webometric data.

  19. EFFECT OF GEAR WIDTH AND HELIX ANGLE ON FACTOR OF DYNAMIC LOAD OF DOUBLE CIRCULAR ARC HELICAL GEARING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Baolin

    2004-01-01

    Based on theory of mechanical dynamics, meshing characteristic as well as the dynamic model of double circular arc helical gearing, an analysis approach and a computer program have been developed for studying the state of dynamic load and factor of dynamic load of the gearing, the changing situation of dynamic load and dynamic load factor vs some affecting factors such as gear width, helix angle and accuracy grade etc are investigated. A series of conclusions are obtained: ①With the increasing in the values of gear width, the dynamic load factor appears slow decreasing tendency in most region of gear width. ② When the accuracy grades of the gearing are improved, the values of dynamic load factor decrease. ③ The value of dynamic load factor appears a decreasing tendency with the increasing of value of helix angle at the same ratio of critical rotational speed.

  20. Molecular dynamics studies of side chain effect on the beta-1,3-D-glucan triple helix in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okobira, Tadashi; Miyoshi, Kentaro; Uezu, Kazuya; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    beta-1,3-D-glucans have been isolated from fungi as right-handed 6(1) triple helices. They are categorized by the side chains bound to the main triple helix through beta-(1-->6)-D-glycosyl linkage. Indeed, since a glucose-based side chain is water soluble, the presence and frequency of glucose-based side chains give rise to significant variation in the physical properties of the glucan family. Curdlan has no side chains and self-assembles to form an water-insoluble triple helical structure, while schizophyllan, which has a 1,6-D-glucose side chain on every third glucose unit along the main chain, is completely water soluble. A thermal fluctuation in the optical rotatory dispersion is observed for the side chain, indicating probable co-operative interaction between the side chains and water molecules. This paper documents molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution for three models of the beta-1,3-D-glucan series: curdlan (no side chain), schizophyllan (a beta-(1-->6)-D-glycosyl side-chain at every third position), and a hypothetical triple helix with a side chain at every sixth main-chain glucose unit. A decrease was observed in the helical pitch as the population of the side chain increased. Two types of hydrogen bonding via water molecules, the side chain/main chain and the side chain/side chain hydrogen bonding, play an important role in determination of the triple helix conformation. The formation of a one-dimensional cavity of diameter about 3.5 A was observed in the schizophyllan triple helix, while curdlan showed no such cavity. The side chain/side chain hydrogen bonding in schizophyllan and the hypothetical beta-1,3-D-glucan triple helix could cause the tilt of the main-chain glucose residues to the helix.

  1. Predicting loop-helix tertiary structural contacts in RNA pseudoknots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Song; Giedroc, David P; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2010-03-01

    Tertiary interactions between loops and helical stems play critical roles in the biological function of many RNA pseudoknots. However, quantitative predictions for RNA tertiary interactions remain elusive. Here we report a statistical mechanical model for the prediction of noncanonical loop-stem base-pairing interactions in RNA pseudoknots. Central to the model is the evaluation of the conformational entropy for the pseudoknotted folds with defined loop-stem tertiary structural contacts. We develop an RNA virtual bond-based conformational model (Vfold model), which permits a rigorous computation of the conformational entropy for a given fold that contains loop-stem tertiary contacts. With the entropy parameters predicted from the Vfold model and the energy parameters for the tertiary contacts as inserted parameters, we can then predict the RNA folding thermodynamics, from which we can extract the tertiary contact thermodynamic parameters from theory-experimental comparisons. These comparisons reveal a contact enthalpy (DeltaH) of -14 kcal/mol and a contact entropy (DeltaS) of -38 cal/mol/K for a protonated C(+)*(G-C) base triple at pH 7.0, and (DeltaH = -7 kcal/mol, DeltaS = -19 cal/mol/K) for an unprotonated base triple. Tests of the model for a series of pseudoknots show good theory-experiment agreement. Based on the extracted energy parameters for the tertiary structural contacts, the model enables predictions for the structure, stability, and folding pathways for RNA pseudoknots with known or postulated loop-stem tertiary contacts from the nucleotide sequence alone.

  2. Crystal structure of the collagen triple helix model [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi; Mazzarella, Lelio; Zagari, Adriana

    2002-02-01

    The first report of the full-length structure of the collagen-like polypeptide [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3) is given. This structure was obtained from crystals grown in a microgravity environment, which diffracted up to 1.3 A, using synchrotron radiation. The final model, which was refined to an R(factor) of 0.18, is the highest-resolution description of a collagen triple helix reported to date. This structure provides clues regarding a series of aspects related to collagen triple helix structure and assembly. The strict dependence of proline puckering on the position inside the Pro-Pro-Gly triplets and the correlation between backbone and side chain dihedral angles support the propensity-based mechanism of triple helix stabilization/destabilization induced by hydroxyproline. Furthermore, the analysis of [(Pro-Pro-Gly)(10)](3) packing, which is governed by electrostatic interactions, suggests that charges may act as locking features in the axial organization of triple helices in the collagen fibrils.

  3. Flexible Wire-Shaped Supercapacitors in Parallel Double Helix Configuration with Stable Electrochemical Properties under Static/Dynamic Bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Ma, Ying; Li, Huiqiao; Zhai, Tianyou

    2016-02-24

    Wire-shaped flexible supercapacitors (SCs) have aroused much attention due to their small size, light weight, high flexibility, and deformability. However, the previously reported wire-shaped SCs usually involve complex assembly processes, encounter potential structural instabilities, and the influence of dynamic bending on the electrochemical stability of wire-shaped SCs is also not clear. Here, a parallel double helix wire-shaped supercapacitor (PDWS) protocol has been developed with two symmetric titanium@MnO2 fiber electrodes winded on a flexible nylon fiber by a simple and reliable process. The PDWSs show an operate voltage of 0.8 V, a high capacitance of 15.6 mF cm(-2) and an energy density of 1.4 µWh cm(-2) . Due to rational structure design, the PDWSs demonstrate excellent mechanical and electrochemical stability under both static and dynamic deformations. Over 3500 bending cycles, 88.0% of the initial capacitance can still be retained. In terms of dynamic bending, it is found that the cyclic voltammetry curves show periodically fluctuations simultaneously with the bending frequency and the intensity of fluctuation increases with higher bending frequency, while the dynamic capacitance is almost not affected. With extraordinary mechanical flexibility and excellent electrochemical stability, the high performance PDWS is considered to be a promising power source for wearable electronics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A secondary structural transition in the C-helix promotes gating of cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puljung, Michael C; Zagotta, William N

    2013-05-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels bind second messengers like cAMP to a C-terminal domain, consisting of a β-roll, followed by two α-helices (B- and C-helices). We monitored the cAMP-dependent changes in the structure of the C-helix of a C-terminal fragment of HCN2 channels using transition metal ion FRET between fluorophores on the C-helix and metal ions bound between histidine pairs on the same helix. cAMP induced a change in the dimensions of the C-helix and an increase in the metal binding affinity of the histidine pair. cAMP also caused an increase in the distance between a fluorophore on the C-helix and metal ions bound to the B-helix. Stabilizing the C-helix of intact CNGA1 channels by metal binding to a pair of histidines promoted channel opening. These data suggest that ordering of the C-helix is part of the gating conformational change in cyclic nucleotide-regulated channels.

  5. Globular structures of a helix-coil copolymer: Self-consistent treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, C.; Rostiashvili, V. G.; Vilgis, T. A.

    2007-01-01

    A self-consistent-field theory was developed in the grand canonical ensemble formulation to study transitions in a helix-coil multiblock globule. Helical and coil parts are treated as stiff rods and self-avoiding walks of variable lengths correspondingly. The resulting field theory takes, in addition to the conventional Zimm-Bragg, [J. Chem. Phys. 31, 526 (1959)] parameters, also three-dimensional interaction terms into account. The appropriate differential equations which determine the self-consistent fields were solved numerically with finite element method. Three different phase states are found: open chain, amorphous globule, and nematic liquid-crystalline (LC) globule. The LC-globule formation is driven by the interplay between the hydrophobic helical segment attraction and the anisotropic globule surface energy of an entropic nature. The full phase diagram of the helix-coil copolymer was calculated and thoroughly discussed. The suggested theory shows a clear interplay between secondary and tertiary structures in globular homopolypeptides.

  6. A hydrophobic patch surrounding Trp154 in human neuroserpin controls the helix F dynamics with implications in inhibition and aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Farhan; Kaushik, Abhinav; Kapil, Charu; Gupta, Dinesh; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2017-01-01

    Neuroserpin (NS) mediated inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is important for brain development, synapse formation and memory. Aberrations in helix F and β-sheet A movement during inhibition can directly lead to epilepsy or dementia. Conserved W154 residue in a hydrophobic patch between helix F and β-sheet A is ideally placed to control their movement during inhibition. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation on wild type (WT) NS and its two variants (W154A and W154P) demonstrated partial deformation in helix F and conformational differences in strands 1A and 2A only in W154P. A fluorescence and Circular Dichroism (CD) analysis with purified W154 variants revealed a significant red-shift and an increase in α-helical content in W154P as compared to W154A and WT NS. Kinetics of tPA inhibition showed a decline in association rates (ka) for W154A as compared to WT NS with indication of complex formation. Appearance of cleaved without complex formation in W154P indicates that the variant acts as substrate due to conformational misfolding around helix F. Both the variants however showed increased rate of aggregation as compared to WT NS. The hydrophobic patch identified in this study may have importance in helix F dynamics of NS. PMID:28230174

  7. Structural and functional aspects of winged-helix domains at the core of transcription initiation complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Martin; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The winged helix (WH) domain is found in core components of transcription systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It represents a sub-class of the helix-turn-helix motif. The WH domain participates in establishing protein-DNA and protein-protein-interactions. Here, we discuss possible explanations for the enrichment of this motif in transcription systems.

  8. Analysis of Dielectric Loss in a Helix Slow-wave Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Datta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent circuit analysis of a helix slow-wave structure was carried out and closed form expressions were derived for the shunt capacitance and shunt conductance per unit length of the transmission-line equivalent circuit of the structure. These equivalent circuit parameters were interpreted for the dielectric attenuation constant of the slow-wave structure. The analysis was computationally simple and showsed excellent agreement with published results. The analysis was furthered for predicting the dielectric loss in typical C-Ku band and Ka band helical slow-wave structures, and variation of dielectric loss with temperature.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(5, pp.549-552, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1558

  9. Conservation of Three-Dimensional Helix-Loop-Helix Structure through the Vertebrate Lineage Reopens the Cold Case of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Associated Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Sirkin, Daniela I; Lafont, Anne-Gaëlle; Kamech, Nédia; Somoza, Gustavo M; Vissio, Paula G; Dufour, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    GnRH-associated peptide (GAP) is the C-terminal portion of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) preprohormone. Although it was reported in mammals that GAP may act as a prolactin-inhibiting factor and can be co-secreted with GnRH into the hypophyseal portal blood, GAP has been practically out of the research circuit for about 20 years. Comparative studies highlighted the low conservation of GAP primary amino acid sequences among vertebrates, contributing to consider that this peptide only participates in the folding or carrying process of GnRH. Considering that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of a protein may define its function, the aim of this study was to evaluate if GAP sequences and 3D structures are conserved in the vertebrate lineage. GAP sequences from various vertebrates were retrieved from databases. Analysis of primary amino acid sequence identity and similarity, molecular phylogeny, and prediction of 3D structures were performed. Amino acid sequence comparison and phylogeny analyses confirmed the large variation of GAP sequences throughout vertebrate radiation. In contrast, prediction of the 3D structure revealed a striking conservation of the 3D structure of GAP1 (GAP associated with the hypophysiotropic type 1 GnRH), despite low amino acid sequence conservation. This GAP1 peptide presented a typical helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure in all the vertebrate species analyzed. This HLH structure could also be predicted for GAP2 in some but not all vertebrate species and in none of the GAP3 analyzed. These results allowed us to infer that selective pressures have maintained GAP1 HLH structure throughout the vertebrate lineage. The conservation of the HLH motif, known to confer biological activity to various proteins, suggests that GAP1 peptides may exert some hypophysiotropic biological functions across vertebrate radiation.

  10. Structural characterizations of fusion peptide analogs of influenza virus hemagglutinin. Implication of the necessity of a helix-hinge-helix motif in fusion activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun-Hua; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Ding-Kwo; Chen, Chinpan

    2002-06-21

    Infection by enveloped viruses initially involves membrane fusion between viral and host cell membranes. The fusion peptide plays a crucial role in triggering this reaction. To clarify how the fusion peptide exerts this specific function, we carried out biophysical studies of three fusion peptide analogs of influenza virus hemagglutinin HA2, namely E5, G13L, and L17A. E5 exhibits an activity similar to the native fusion peptide, whereas G13L and L17A, which are two point mutants of the E5 analog, possess much less fusion activity. Our CD data showed that the conformations of these three analogs in SDS micelles are pH-dependent, with higher alpha-helical contents at acidic pH. Tryptophan fluorescence emission experiments indicated that these three analogs insert deeper into lipid bilayers at acidic pH. The three-dimensional structure of the E5 analog in SDS micelles at pH 4.0 revealed that two segments, Leu(2)-Glu(11) and Trp(14)-Ile(18), form amphipathic helical conformations, with Gly(12)-Gly(13) forming a hinge. The hydrophobic residues in the N- and C-terminal helices form a hydrophobic cluster. At neutral pH, however, the C-terminal helix of Trp(14)-Ile(18) reduces dramatically, and the hydrophobic core observed at acidic pH is severely disrupted. We suggest that the disruption of the C-terminal helix renders the E5 analog fusion-inactive at neutral pH. Furthermore, the decrease of the hinge and the reduction of fusion activity in G13L reveal the importance of the hinge in fusion activity. Also, the decrease in the C-terminal helix and the reduction of fusion activity in L17A demonstrates the importance of the C-terminal helix in fusion activity. Based on these biophysical studies, we propose a model that illustrates the structural change of the HA2 fusion peptide analog and explains how the analog interacts with the lipid bilayer at different pH values.

  11. Structure and Biophysical Properties of a Triple-Stranded Beta-Helix Comprising the Central Spike of Bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buth, Sergey A; Menin, Laure; Shneider, Mikhail M; Engel, Jürgen; Boudko, Sergei P; Leiman, Petr G

    2015-08-18

    Gene product 5 (gp5) of bacteriophage T4 is a spike-shaped protein that functions to disrupt the membrane of the target cell during phage infection. Its C-terminal domain is a long and slender β-helix that is formed by three polypeptide chains wrapped around a common symmetry axis akin to three interdigitated corkscrews. The folding and biophysical properties of such triple-stranded β-helices, which are topologically related to amyloid fibers, represent an unsolved biophysical problem. Here, we report structural and biophysical characterization of T4 gp5 β-helix and its truncated mutants of different lengths. A soluble fragment that forms a dimer of trimers and that could comprise a minimal self-folding unit has been identified. Surprisingly, the hydrophobic core of the β-helix is small. It is located near the C-terminal end of the β-helix and contains a centrally positioned and hydrated magnesium ion. A large part of the β-helix interior comprises a large elongated cavity that binds palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in an extended conformation suggesting that these molecules might participate in the folding of the complete β-helix.

  12. Structure and Biophysical Properties of a Triple-Stranded Beta-Helix Comprising the Central Spike of Bacteriophage T4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Buth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene product 5 (gp5 of bacteriophage T4 is a spike-shaped protein that functions to disrupt the membrane of the target cell during phage infection. Its C-terminal domain is a long and slender β-helix that is formed by three polypeptide chains wrapped around a common symmetry axis akin to three interdigitated corkscrews. The folding and biophysical properties of such triple-stranded β-helices, which are topologically related to amyloid fibers, represent an unsolved biophysical problem. Here, we report structural and biophysical characterization of T4 gp5 β-helix and its truncated mutants of different lengths. A soluble fragment that forms a dimer of trimers and that could comprise a minimal self-folding unit has been identified. Surprisingly, the hydrophobic core of the β-helix is small. It is located near the C-terminal end of the β-helix and contains a centrally positioned and hydrated magnesium ion. A large part of the β-helix interior comprises a large elongated cavity that binds palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids in an extended conformation suggesting that these molecules might participate in the folding of the complete β-helix.

  13. A Novel Approach for Modeling and Simulation of Helix Twisting Structure Based on Mass-Spring Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongbin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the modeling efficiency and realize the deformation simulation of helix twisting structure, a computer-aided design system based on mass-spring model is developed. The geometry structure of helix twisting structure is presented and mass-spring model is applied in the deformation simulation. Moreover, the key technologies such as coordinate mapping, system render and system architecture are elaborated. Finally, a prototype system is developed with Visual C++ and OpenGL, and the proposed system is proved efficient through a comparison experiment.

  14. Coherent helix vacancy phonon and its ultrafast dynamics waning in topological Dirac semimetal C d3A s2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Wu, Q.; Wu, Y. L.; Zhao, H.; Yi, C. J.; Tian, Y. C.; Liu, H. W.; Shi, Y. G.; Ding, H.; Dai, X.; Richard, P.; Zhao, Jimin

    2017-06-01

    We report an ultrafast lattice dynamics investigation of the topological Dirac semimetal C d3A s2 . A coherent phonon beating among three evenly spaced A1 g optical phonon modes (of frequencies 1.80, 1.96, and 2.11 THz, respectively) is unambiguously observed. The two side modes originate from the counter helixes composing Cd vacancies. Significantly, such helix vacancy-induced phonon (HVP) modes experience prominent extra waning in their ultrafast dynamics as temperature increases, which is immune to the central mode. Above 200 K, the HVP becomes inactive, which may potentially affect the topological properties. Our results in the lattice degree of freedom suggest the indispensable role of temperature in considering topological properties of such quantum materials.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Signaling Helix Coiled-coil Domain of the b1 Subunit of the Soluble guanylyl Cyclase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.; Beuve, A; van den Akker, F

    2010-01-01

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC), and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix) family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGC{beta}1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution. The CC structure of sGC{beta}1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally) active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  16. Crystal structure of the signaling helix coiled-coil domain of the β1 subunit of the soluble guanylyl cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker Focco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC, and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. Results To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGCβ1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 Å resolution. Conclusions The CC structure of sGCβ1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  17. Intermolecular recognition revealed by the complex structure of human CLOCK-BMAL1 basic helix-loop-helix domains with E-box DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zixi Wang; Yaling Wu; Lanfen Li; Xiao-Dong Su

    2013-01-01

    CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) and BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like 1) are both transcription factors of the circadian core loop in mammals.Recently published mouse CLOCK-BMAL1 bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix)-PAS (period-ARNT-single-minded) complex structure sheds light on the mechanism for heterodimer formation,but the structural details of the protein-DNA recognition mechanisms remain elusive.Here we have elucidated the crystal structure of human CLOCK-BMAL1 bHLH domains bound to a canonical E-box DNA.We demonstrate that CLOCK and BMAL1 bHLH domains can be mutually selected,and that hydrogen-bonding networks mediate their E-box recognition.We identified a hydrophobic contact between BMAL1 Ile80 and a fianking thymine nucleotide,suggesting that CLOCK-BMAL1 actually reads 7-bp DNA and not the previously believed 6-bp DNA.To find potential non-canonical E-boxes that could be recognized by CLOCK-BMAL1,we constructed systematic single-nucleotide mutations on the E-box and measured their relevant affinities.We defined two non-canonical E-box patterns with high affinities,AACGTGA and CATGTGA,in which the flanking A7-T7' base pair is indispensable for recognition.These results will help us to identify functional CLOCK-BMAL1-binding sites in vivo and to search for clock-controlled genes.Furthermore,we assessed the inhibitory role of potential phosphorylation sites in bHLH regions.We found that the phospho-mimicking mutation on BMAL1 Ser78 could efficiently block DNA binding as well as abolish normal circadian oscillation in cells.We propose that BMAL1 Ser78 should be a key residue mediating input signal-regulated transcriptional inhibition for external cues to entrain the circadian clock by kinase cascade.

  18. Comparative Study on the Adaptation and Growth Dynamics of the Helix pomatia and Helix aspersa Muller Terrestrial Snails Under Different Feeding Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Toader-Williams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We used Helix pomatia and Helix aspersa species and measure their growth as the snails were approaching the hibernation season. Helix pomatia 2yo shown a decrease in weight while being raised in enclosed parcels of 4sqm the younger Helix pomatia 1yo as well as Helix aspersa Muller demonstrated the ability to adapt relatively fast to the same conditions. We established 5 experimental lots in a Helix pomatia farm, GPS coordinates N46.606040 E23.599950. Control lot contained Taraxacum officinales, Sonchus oleraceus, Equisetum arvense and Atriplex hortensis, wild flora found within the farm. The other lots contained the same plants as the control lot plus different combinations of imported plants from other areals. The H. pomatia 2yo weight decreased in the control lot by a mean of -3.86% while H. aspersa 1yo marked an increase of +16.89% in the same lot during the same period. The lot containing lupinus polyphyllus delivered snails with weight gain of +24.66% for H. pomatia 2yo and an increase of only +1.98% for H. aspersa 1yo. As a contrast, H. pomatia 2yo gained only +7.72% while H. aspersa 1yo gained +28.89%, in the lot containing Lavanda officinalis, Foeniculum vulgare and Hyssopus officinalis among the other plants.

  19. The molecular structure of the left-handed supra-molecular helix of eukaryotic polyribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G; Afonina, Zhanna A; Ménétret, Jean-François; Shirokov, Vladimir A; Spirin, Alexander S; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2014-11-07

    During protein synthesis, several ribosomes bind to a single messenger RNA (mRNA) forming large macromolecular assemblies called polyribosomes. Here we report the detailed molecular structure of a 100 MDa eukaryotic poly-ribosome complex derived from cryo electron tomography, sub-tomogram averaging and pseudo-atomic modelling by crystal structure fitting. The structure allowed the visualization of the three functional parts of the polysome assembly, the central core region that forms a rather compact left-handed supra-molecular helix, and the more open regions that harbour the initiation and termination sites at either ends. The helical region forms a continuous mRNA channel where the mRNA strand bridges neighbouring exit and entry sites of the ribosomes and prevents mRNA looping between ribosomes. This structure provides unprecedented insights into protein- and RNA-mediated inter-ribosome contacts that involve conserved sites through 40S subunits and long protruding RNA expansion segments, suggesting a role in stabilizing the overall polyribosomal assembly.

  20. Similar structures, different characteristics: circular dichroism of metallic helix arrays with single-, double-, and triple-helical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Lin; Lu, Zeqin; Cheng, Yongzhi; Gong, Rongzhou; Zheng, Yu; Duan, Jian

    2013-04-01

    We fabricated three-dimensional metallic helix arrays with single-, double-, and triple-helical structures. The transmission performances with the normal incident angle were measured in the microwave frequency of 12-18 GHz. For the single- and double-helical structures, giant circular dichroism with fairly wide bands is observed in the transmission spectra. However, the triple-helical structure does not exhibit circular dichroism. Based on the phenomenon of circular dichroism, the single- and double-helical structures can be used as broadband circular polarizers in the microwave region, but triple-helical ones cannot. The experiments have a good agreement with our simulation results, which were studied by the finite-difference time domain method.

  1. Fundamentals of structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Roy R

    2006-01-01

    From theory and fundamentals to the latest advances in computational and experimental modal analysis, this is the definitive, updated reference on structural dynamics.This edition updates Professor Craig's classic introduction to structural dynamics, which has been an invaluable resource for practicing engineers and a textbook for undergraduate and graduate courses in vibrations and/or structural dynamics. Along with comprehensive coverage of structural dynamics fundamentals, finite-element-based computational methods, and dynamic testing methods, this Second Edition includes new and e

  2. Structural variation and uniformity among tetraloop-receptor interactions and other loop-helix interactions in RNA crystal structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wu

    Full Text Available Tetraloop-receptor interactions are prevalent structural units in RNAs, and include the GAAA/11-nt and GNRA-minor groove interactions. In this study, we have compiled a set of 78 nonredundant loop-helix interactions from X-ray crystal structures, and examined them for the extent of their sequence and structural variation. Of the 78 interactions in the set, only four were classical GAAA/11-nt motifs, while over half (48 were GNRA-minor groove interactions. The GNRA-minor groove interactions were not a homogeneous set, but were divided into five subclasses. The most predominant subclass is characterized by two triple base pair interactions in the minor groove, flanked by two ribose zipper contacts. This geometry may be considered the "standard" GNRA-minor groove interaction, while the other four subclasses are alternative ways to form interfaces between a minor groove and tetraloop. The remaining 26 structures in the set of 78 have loops interacting with mostly idiosyncratic receptors. Among the entire set, a number of sequence-structure correlations can be identified, which may be used as initial hypotheses in predicting three-dimensional structures from primary sequences. Conversely, other sequence patterns are not predictive; for example, GAAA loop sequences and GG/CC receptors bind to each other with three distinct geometries. Finally, we observe an example of structural evolution in group II introns, in which loop-receptor motifs are substituted for each other while maintaining the larger three-dimensional geometry. Overall, the study gives a more complete view of RNA loop-helix interactions that exist in nature.

  3. [Study of collagen mimetic peptide's triple-helix structure and its thermostability by circular dichroism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Bao; Wang, Jing-Jie; Chen, Hui-Juan; Xiong, Qing-Qing; Liu, Ling-Rong; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, the authors explore the triple-helix conformation and thermal stability of collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) as a function of peptide sequence and/or chain length by circular dichroism(CD). Five CMPs were designed and synthetized varying the number of POG triplets or incorporating an integrin alpha2beta1 binding motif Gly-Phe-Hyp-Gly-Glu-Arg (GFOGER). CD spectroscopy from 260 to 190 nm was recorded to confirm the existence of triple-helix conformation at room temperature, while thermal melting and thermal annealing of triple-helix (thermal unfolding and refolding of triple-helix, respectively) was characterized by monitoring ellipticity at 225 nm as a function of temperature. The results demonstrated that all the CMPs adopted triple-helix conformation, and the thermal stability of the CMPs was enhanced with increasing the number of POG triplets. In contrast to natural collagen, the thermal denaturation processes of CMPs were reversible, i. e. the triple-helix unfolded upon heating while refolded upon cooling. Meanwhile, the phenomenon of "hysteresis" was observed by comparing melting and thermal curves. These findings add new insights to the mechanisms of collagen and CMPs assembly, as well as provide an alternative approach to the fabrication of artificial collagen-likes biomaterials.

  4. Crystal Structures of the Response Regulator DosR from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Suggest a Helix Rearrangement Mechanism for Phosphorylation Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Wu, Meiting; Sherman, David R.; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2008-01-01

    The response regulator DosR is essential for promoting long-term survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under low oxygen conditions in a dormant state and may be responsible for latent tuberculosis in one third of the world’s population. Here we report crystal structures of full-length unphosphorylated DosR at 2.2 Å and its C-terminal DNA-binding domain at 1.7 Å resolution. The full-length DosR structure reveals several features never seen before in other response regulators. The N-terminal domain of the full-length DosR structure has an unexpected (βα)4 topology instead of the canonical (βα)5 fold observed in other response regulators. The linker region adopts a unique conformation which contains two helices forming a four-helix bundle with two helices from another subunit, resulting in dimer formation. The C-terminal domain in the full-length DosR structure displays a novel location of helix α10 which provides Gln199 to interact with the catalytic Asp54 residue of the N-terminal domain. In contrast, the structure of the DosR C-terminal domain alone displays a remarkable unstructured conformation for helix α10 residues different from the well-defined helical conformations in all other known structures, indicating considerable flexibility within the C-terminal domain. Our structures suggest a mode of DosR activation by phosphorylation via a helix rearrangement mechanism. PMID:18353359

  5. Myriad Triple-Helix-Forming Structures in the Transposable Element RNAs of Plants and Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz T. Tycowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ENE (element for nuclear expression is a cis-acting RNA structure that protects viral or cellular noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs from nuclear decay through triple-helix formation with the poly(A tail or 3′-terminal A-rich tract. We expanded the roster of nine known ENEs by bioinformatic identification of ∼200 distinct ENEs that reside in transposable elements (TEs of numerous non-metazoan and one fish species and in four Dicistrovirus genomes. Despite variation within the ENE core, none of the predicted triple-helical stacks exceeds five base triples. Increased accumulation of reporter transcripts in human cells demonstrated functionality for representative ENEs. Location close to the poly(A tail argues that ENEs are active in TE transcripts. Their presence in intronless, but not intron-containing, hAT transposase genes supports the idea that TEs acquired ENEs to counteract the RNA-destabilizing effects of intron loss, a potential evolutionary consequence of TE horizontal transfer in organisms that couple RNA silencing to splicing deficits.

  6. Myriad Triple-Helix-Forming Structures in the Transposable Element RNAs of Plants and Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T; Shu, Mei-Di; Steitz, Joan A

    2016-05-10

    The ENE (element for nuclear expression) is a cis-acting RNA structure that protects viral or cellular noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) from nuclear decay through triple-helix formation with the poly(A) tail or 3'-terminal A-rich tract. We expanded the roster of nine known ENEs by bioinformatic identification of ∼200 distinct ENEs that reside in transposable elements (TEs) of numerous non-metazoan and one fish species and in four Dicistrovirus genomes. Despite variation within the ENE core, none of the predicted triple-helical stacks exceeds five base triples. Increased accumulation of reporter transcripts in human cells demonstrated functionality for representative ENEs. Location close to the poly(A) tail argues that ENEs are active in TE transcripts. Their presence in intronless, but not intron-containing, hAT transposase genes supports the idea that TEs acquired ENEs to counteract the RNA-destabilizing effects of intron loss, a potential evolutionary consequence of TE horizontal transfer in organisms that couple RNA silencing to splicing deficits.

  7. Structural regularities of helicoidally-like biopolymers in the framework of algebraic topology: II. {alpha}-Helix and DNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samoylovich, M. I., E-mail: samoylovich@technomash.ru [Central Research Technological Institute ' Technomash' (Russian Federation); Talis, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The developed apparatus of the 'structural application' of algebraic geometry and topology makes it possible to determine topologically stable helicoidally-like packings of polyhedra (clusters). A packing found is limited by a minimal surface with zero instability index; this surface is set by the Weierstrass representation and corresponds to the bifurcation point. The symmetries of the packings under consideration are determined by four-dimensional polyhedra (polytopes) from a closed sequence, which begins with diamondlike polytope (240). One example of these packings is a packing of tetrahedra, which arises as a result of the multiplication of a peculiar starting aggregation of tetrahedra by a fractional 40/11 axis with an angle of helical rotation of 99 Degree-Sign . The arrangement of atoms in particular positions of this starting aggregation allows one to obtain a model of the {alpha}-helix. This apparatus makes it possible to determine a priori the symmetry parameters of DNA double helices.

  8. Modified helix-like instability structure on imploding z-pinch liners that are pre-imposed with a uniform axial magnetic fielda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, T. J.; Jennings, C. A.; McBride, R. D.; Cuneo, M. E.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Owen, A. C.; Tomlinson, K.; Gomez, M. R.; Hansen, S. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; Jones, M. C.; McKenney, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Stygar, W. A.

    2014-05-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratories Z Facility have, for the first time, studied the implosion dynamics of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) style liners that were pre-imposed with a uniform axial magnetic field. As reported [T. J. Awe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235005 (2013)] when premagnetized with a 7 or 10 T axial field, these liners developed 3D-helix-like hydrodynamic instabilities; such instabilities starkly contrast with the azimuthally correlated magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities that have been consistently observed in many earlier non-premagnetized experiments. The helical structure persisted throughout the implosion, even though the azimuthal drive field greatly exceeded the expected axial field at the liner's outer wall for all but the earliest stages of the experiment. Whether this modified instability structure has practical importance for magneto-inertial fusion concepts depends primarily on whether the modified instability structure is more stable than standard azimuthally correlated MRT instabilities. In this manuscript, we discuss the evolution of the helix-like instability observed on premagnetized liners. While a first principles explanation of this observation remains elusive, recent 3D simulations suggest that if a small amplitude helical perturbation can be seeded on the liner's outer surface, no further influence from the axial field is required for the instability to grow.

  9. Effect of temperature on DNA double helix: An insight from molecular dynamics simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sangeeta Kundu; Sanchita Mukherjee; Dhananjay Bhattacharyya

    2012-07-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA contains various sequence-dependent structural information, which control many cellular processes in life, such as replication, transcription, DNA repair, etc. For the above functions, DNA double helices need to unwind or melt locally, which is different from terminal melting, as often seen in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations or even in many DNA crystal structures. We have carried out detailed MD simulations of DNA double helices of regular oligonucleotide fragments as well as in polymeric constructs with water and charge-neutralizing counter-ions at several different temperatures. We wanted to eliminate the end-effect or terminal melting propensity by employing MD simulation of DNA oligonucleotides in such a manner that gives rise to properties of polymeric DNA of infinite length. The polymeric construct is expected to allow us to see local melting at elevated temperatures. Comparative structural analysis of oligonucleotides and its corresponding virtual polymer at various temperatures ranging from 300 K to 400 K is discussed. The general behaviour, such as volume expansion coefficients of both the simulations show high similarity, indicating polymeric construct, does not give many artificial constraints. Local melting of a polymer, even at elevated temperature, may need a high nucleation energy that was not available in the short (7 ns) simulations. We expected to observe such nucleation followed by cooperative melting of the polymers in longer MD runs. Such simulations of different polymeric sequences would facilitate us to predict probable melting origins in a polymeric DNA.

  10. Asymmetry in the triple helix of collagen-like heterotrimers confirms that external bonds stabilize collagen structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatter, David A; Miles, Christopher A; Bailey, Allen J

    2003-05-23

    Heating and subsequent cooling mixtures of (Pro-Pro-Gly)(10) and (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10) peptides leads to formation of model heterotrimeric collagen helices that can be isolated by HPLC. These heterotrimeric collagen peptide helices are shown to be fundamentally unstable as denaturing then renaturing experiments result in heterotrimeric/homotrimeric mixtures. As the proportion of hydroxyproline-containing chains in the trimers increases, differential scanning calorimetry shows that the helix melting temperatures and denaturation enthalpies increasing non-linearly. Three types of Rich-Crick hydrogen bonds observed by NMR allow modelling of heterotrimeric structures based on published homotrimeric X-ray data. This revealed a small axial movement of (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(10) chains towards the C-terminal of the helix, demonstrating heterotrimeric asymmetry.

  11. Modulating immunogenic properties of HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region by destabilizing six-helix bundle structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Habte, Habtom H.; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W., E-mail: mcho@iastate.edu

    2016-03-15

    The C-terminal alpha-helix of gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER; {sup 671}NWFDITNWLWYIK{sup 683}) encompassing 4E10/10E8 epitopes is an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. We previously reported that gp41-HR1-54Q, a trimeric protein comprised of the MPER in the context of a stable six-helix bundle (6HB), induced strong immune responses against the helix, but antibodies were directed primarily against the non-neutralizing face of the helix. To better target 4E10/10E8 epitopes, we generated four putative fusion intermediates by introducing double point mutations or deletions in the heptad repeat region 1 (HR1) that destabilize 6HB in varying degrees. One variant, HR1-∆10-54K, elicited antibodies in rabbits that targeted W672, I675 and L679, which are critical for 4E10/10E8 recognition. Overall, the results demonstrated that altering structural parameters of 6HB can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER and antibody targeting. Further exploration of this strategy could allow development of immunogens that could lead to induction of 4E10/10E8-like antibodies. - Highlights: • Four gp41 MPER-based immunogens that resemble fusion intermediates were generated. • C-terminal region of MPER that contains 4E10/10E8 epitopes was highly immunogenic. • Altering 6HB structure can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER. • Induced antibodies targeted multiple residues critical for 4E10/10E8 binding. • Development of immunogens based on fusion intermediates is a promising strategy.

  12. Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Structural dynamic testing is performed to verify the survivability of a component or assembly when exposed to vibration stress screening, or a controlled simulation...

  13. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjasetty, Babu A.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56 Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices a4 and a7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix a4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix a4) and Gln130 (helix a7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix a4. This local conformational switch of helix a4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution smallmolecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol.

  14. Basic structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, James C

    2012-01-01

    A concise introduction to structural dynamics and earthquake engineering Basic Structural Dynamics serves as a fundamental introduction to the topic of structural dynamics. Covering single and multiple-degree-of-freedom systems while providing an introduction to earthquake engineering, the book keeps the coverage succinct and on topic at a level that is appropriate for undergraduate and graduate students. Through dozens of worked examples based on actual structures, it also introduces readers to MATLAB, a powerful software for solving both simple and complex structural d

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Oller, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    This book lays the foundation of knowledge that will allow a better understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in structural dynamics.   This work is intended for graduate engineering students who want to expand their knowledge on the dynamic behavior of structures, specifically in the nonlinear field, by presenting the basis of dynamic balance in non‐linear behavior structures due to the material and kinematics mechanical effects.   Particularly, this publication shows the solution of the equation of dynamic equilibrium for structure with nonlinear time‐independent materials (plasticity, damage and frequencies evolution), as well as those time dependent non‐linear behavior materials (viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity). The convergence conditions for the non‐linear dynamic structure solution  are studied, and the theoretical concepts and its programming algorithms are presented.  

  16. The Triple Helix of university-industry-government relations at the country level and Its dynamic evolution under the pressures of globalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.Y. Ye; S.S. Yu; L. Leydesdorff

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the Web of Science (WoS), we analyze the mutual information among university, industry, and government addresses (U-I-G) at the country level for a number of countries. The dynamic evolution of the Triple Helix can thus be compared among developed and developing nations in terms of c

  17. Structural studies of Helix aspersa agglutinin complexed with GalNAc: A lectin that serves as a diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Agnieszka J; Bujacz, Anna; Mak, Paweł; Potempa, Barbara; Niedziela, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Lectins belong to a differentiated group of proteins known to possess sugar-binding properties. Due to this fact, they are interesting research targets in medical diagnostics. Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) is a lectin that recognizes the epitopes containing α-d-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), which is present at the surface of metastatic cancer cells. Although several reports have already described the use of HAA as a diagnostic tool, this protein was not characterized on the molecular level. Here, we present for the first time the structural information about lectin isolated from mucus of Helix aspersa (garden snail). The amino acid sequence of this agglutinin was determined by Edman degradation and tertiary as well as quaternary structure by X-ray crystallography. The high resolution crystal structure (1.38Å) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis provide the detailed information about a large part of the HAA natural glycan chain. The topology of the GalNAc binding cleft and interaction with lectin are very well defined in the structure and fully confirmed by STD HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Together, this provides structural clues regarding HAA specificity and opens possibilities to rational modifications of this important diagnostic tool.

  18. Dynamic tuning of DNA-nanoparticle superlattices by molecular intercalation of double helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Suchetan; Zhang, Yugang; Kumar, Sanat K; Gang, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) assembly using DNA recognition has emerged as a powerful tool for the fabrication of 3D superlattices. In addition to the vast structural diversity, this approach provides an avenue for dynamic 3D NP assembly, which is promising for the modulation of interparticle distances and, hence, for example, for in situ tuning of optical properties. While several approaches have been explored for changing NP separations in the lattices using responsiveness of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA), far less work has been done for the manipulation of most abundant double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) motifs. Here, we present a novel strategy for modulation of interparticle distances in DNA linked 3D self-assembled NP lattices by molecular intercalator. We utilize ethidium bromide (EtBr) as a model intercalator to demonstrate selective and isotropic lattice expansion for three superlattice types (bcc, fcc, and AlB2) due to the intercalation of ds-DNA linking NPs. We further show the reversibility of the lattice parameter using n-butanol as a retrieving agent as well as an increased lattice thermal stability by 12-14 °C due to the inclusion of EtBr. The proposed intercalator-based strategy permits the creation of reconfigurable and thermally stable superlattices, which could lead to tunable and functionally responsive materials.

  19. Structure and regulatory role of the C-terminal winged helix domain of the archaeal minichromosome maintenance complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Szambowska, Anna; Häfner, Sabine; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Gührs, Karl-Heinz; Görlach, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) represents the replicative DNA helicase both in eukaryotes and archaea. Here, we describe the solution structure of the C-terminal domains of the archaeal MCMs of Sulfolobus solfataricus (Sso) and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). Those domains consist of a structurally conserved truncated winged helix (WH) domain lacking the two typical ‘wings’ of canonical WH domains. A less conserved N-terminal extension links this WH module to the MCM AAA+ domain forming the ATPase center. In the Sso MCM this linker contains a short α-helical element. Using Sso MCM mutants, including chimeric constructs containing Mth C-terminal domain elements, we show that the ATPase and helicase activity of the Sso MCM is significantly modulated by the short α-helical linker element and by N-terminal residues of the first α-helix of the truncated WH module. Finally, based on our structural and functional data, we present a docking-derived model of the Sso MCM, which implies an allosteric control of the ATPase center by the C-terminal domain. PMID:25712103

  20. Dynamic term structure models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Meldrum, Andrew

    This paper studies whether dynamic term structure models for US nominal bond yields should enforce the zero lower bound by a quadratic policy rate or a shadow rate specification. We address the question by estimating quadratic term structure models (QTSMs) and shadow rate models with at most four...

  1. Remote Control of the Planar Chirality in Peptide-Bound Metallomacrocycles and Dynamic-to-Static Planar Chirality Control Triggered by Solvent-Induced 3(10)-to-α-Helix Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Fumihiko; Ousaka, Naoki; Yashima, Eiji

    2015-11-23

    The dynamic planar chirality in a peptide-bound Ni(II)-salphen-based macrocycle can be remotely controlled. First, a right-handed (P)-3(10)-helix is induced in the dynamic helical oligopeptides by a chiral amino acid residue far from the macrocyclic framework. The induced planar chirality remains dynamic in chloroform and acetonitrile, but is almost completely locked in fluoroalcohols as a result of the solvent-induced transition of the peptide chains from a 3(10)-helix to a wider α-helix, which freezes the rotation of the pendant peptide units around the macrocycle.

  2. Folding pathways of a helix-turn-helix model protein

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, D

    1997-01-01

    A small model polypeptide represented in atomic detail is folded using Monte Carlo dynamics. The polypeptide is designed to have a native conformation similar to the central part of the helix-turn-helix protein ROP. Starting from a beta-strand conformation or two different loop conformations of the protein glutamine synthetase, six trajectories are generated using the so-called window move in dihedral angle space. This move changes conformations locally and leads to realistic, quasi-continuously evolving trajectories. Four of the six trajectories end in stable native-like conformations. Their folding pathways show a fast initial development of a helix-bend-helix motif, followed by a dynamic behaviour predicted by the diffusion-collision model of Karplus and Weaver. The phenomenology of the pathways is consistent with experimental results.

  3. From curdlan powder to the triple helix gel structure: an attenuated total reflection-infrared study of the gelation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Lafleur, Michel

    2007-04-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to probe the hydration and gelation of curdlan, a linear polysaccharide built from repeating units of (1-->3)-beta-D-glucose. The spectra have been recorded using a temperature-controlled attenuated total reflection (ATR) device. Thermal gelation of curdlan could therefore be followed in situ and in real time. The transformation of the low-set gel, mainly formed with single helices, into a high-set gel, associated with a triple helix structure, could be directly observed. The relative intensities and positions of characteristic absorption bands in the C-O region (1200-850 cm-1) were found to be representative of the gel structure, as they are believed to be sensitive to the helical conformation of the polymer chains. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is shown to be a useful tool for rapid and efficient characterization of curdlan gels.

  4. Molecular thermodynamics of trifluoroethanol-induced helix formation: analysis of the solvation structure and free energy by the 3D-RISM theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio; Kidera, Akinori

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces helical structure in peptides and proteins. The molecular mechanism is, however, still not completely elucidated. In this study, the TFE effects on the solvation structure and on the free energy change associated with the helix-coil transition of a polypeptide are analyzed by using the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) molecular theory of solvation. The theoretical result shows that TFE preferentially solvates at low concentrations around 30 vol% both for the helix and coil structures. However, the characteristic preferential solvation is not as significant in the TFE-induced helix stabilization as generally considered. It is also found that the overall energy contributes to the free energy difference more substantially than the solvation entropy.

  5. Parallel helix bundles and ion channels: molecular modeling via simulated annealing and restrained molecular dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, I. D.; Sankararamakrishnan, R; Smart, O.S.; Sansom, M S

    1994-01-01

    A parallel bundle of transmembrane (TM) alpha-helices surrounding a central pore is present in several classes of ion channel, including the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). We have modeled bundles of hydrophobic and of amphipathic helices using simulated annealing via restrained molecular dynamics. Bundles of Ala20 helices, with N = 4, 5, or 6 helices/bundle were generated. For all three N values the helices formed left-handed coiled coils, with pitches ranging from 160 A (N = 4) to...

  6. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakalidis, Konstantinos

    We study dynamic data structures for different variants of orthogonal range reporting query problems. In particular, we consider (1) the planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given 3-sided rectangle with one....... Dynamic problems like the above arise in various applications of network optimization, VLSI layout design, computer graphics and distributed computing. For the first problem, we present dynamic data structures for internal and external memory that support planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting queries......, and insertions and deletions of points efficiently over an average case sequence of update operations. The external memory data structures find applications in constraint and temporal databases. In particular, we assume that the coordinates of the points are drawn from different probabilistic distributions...

  7. Dynamics of structures

    CERN Document Server

    Paultre, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This book covers structural dynamics from a theoretical and algorithmic approach. It covers systems with both single and multiple degrees-of-freedom. Numerous case studies are given to provide the reader with a deeper insight into the practicalities of the area, and the solutions to these case studies are given in terms of real-time and frequency in both geometric and modal spaces. Emphasis is also given to the subject of seismic loading. The text is based on many lectures on the subject of structural dynamics given at numerous institutions and thus will be an accessible and practical aid to

  8. Structural dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  9. Microfluidic 3D Helix Mixers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgette B. Salieb-Beugelaar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric microfluidic systems are well suited for miniaturized devices with complex functionality, and rapid prototyping methods for 3D microfluidic structures are increasingly used. Mixing at the microscale and performing chemical reactions at the microscale are important applications of such systems and we therefore explored feasibility, mixing characteristics and the ability to control a chemical reaction in helical 3D channels produced by the emerging thread template method. Mixing at the microscale is challenging because channel size reduction for improving solute diffusion comes at the price of a reduced Reynolds number that induces a strictly laminar flow regime and abolishes turbulence that would be desired for improved mixing. Microfluidic 3D helix mixers were rapidly prototyped in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS using low-surface energy polymeric threads, twisted to form 2-channel and 3-channel helices. Structure and flow characteristics were assessed experimentally by microscopy, hydraulic measurements and chromogenic reaction, and were modeled by computational fluid dynamics. We found that helical 3D microfluidic systems produced by thread templating allow rapid prototyping, can be used for mixing and for controlled chemical reaction with two or three reaction partners at the microscale. Compared to the conventional T-shaped microfluidic system used as a control device, enhanced mixing and faster chemical reaction was found to occur due to the combination of diffusive mixing in small channels and flow folding due to the 3D helix shape. Thus, microfluidic 3D helix mixers can be rapidly prototyped using the thread template method and are an attractive and competitive method for fluid mixing and chemical reactions at the microscale.

  10. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakalidis, Konstantinos

    We study dynamic data structures for different variants of orthogonal range reporting query problems. In particular, we consider (1) the planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given 3-sided rectangle with one....... Dynamic problems like the above arise in various applications of network optimization, VLSI layout design, computer graphics and distributed computing. For the first problem, we present dynamic data structures for internal and external memory that support planar orthogonal 3-sided range reporting queries...... unbounded side, (2) the planar orthogonal range maxima reporting problem: given a set of points in the plane, report the points that lie within a given orthogonal range and are not dominated by any other point in the range, and (3) the problem of designing fully persistent B-trees for external memory...

  11. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejlberg-Rasmussen, Casper

    to a given key? The updates we can do are: inserting a new key or deleting a given key. Our dictionary has the working set property, which means that the running time of a query depends on the query distribution. Specifically the time to search for a key depends on when we last searched for it. Our data...... statements about our data structure, which are based on the structure of the underlying problem, that we are trying to solve. We can rely on the properties of the invariants when performing queries, and in return we need to ensure that the invariants remain true after we perform updates. When designing data......In this thesis I will address three dynamic data structure problems using the concept of invariants. The first problem is maintaining a dynamically changing set of keys – a dictionary – where the queries we can ask are: does it contain a given key? and what is the preceding (or succeeding) key...

  12. Dynamic Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejlberg-Rasmussen, Casper

    statements about our data structure, which are based on the structure of the underlying problem, that we are trying to solve. We can rely on the properties of the invariants when performing queries, and in return we need to ensure that the invariants remain true after we perform updates. When designing data......In this thesis I will address three dynamic data structure problems using the concept of invariants. The first problem is maintaining a dynamically changing set of keys – a dictionary – where the queries we can ask are: does it contain a given key? and what is the preceding (or succeeding) key...... to a given key? The updates we can do are: inserting a new key or deleting a given key. Our dictionary has the working set property, which means that the running time of a query depends on the query distribution. Specifically the time to search for a key depends on when we last searched for it. Our data...

  13. Mutations altering a structurally conserved loop-helix-loop region of a viral packaging motor change DNA translocation velocity and processivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, James M; Sippy, Jean; DelToro, Damian; Andrews, Benjamin T; Draper, Bonnie; Rao, Venigalla; Catalano, Carlos E; Feiss, Michael; Smith, Douglas E

    2010-07-30

    Many double-stranded DNA viruses employ ATP-driven motors to translocate their genomes into small, preformed viral capsids against large forces resisting confinement. Here, we show via direct single-molecule measurements that a mutation T194M downstream of the Walker B motif in the phage lambda gpA packaging motor causes an 8-fold reduction in translocation velocity without substantially changing processivity or force dependence, whereas the mutation G212S in the putative C (coupling) motif causes a 3-fold reduction in velocity and a 6-fold reduction in processivity. Meanwhile a T194M pseudorevertant (T194V) showed a near restoration of the wild-type dynamics. Structural comparisons and modeling show that these mutations are in a loop-helix-loop region that positions the key residues of the catalytic motifs, Walker B and C, in the ATPase center and is structurally homologous with analogous regions in chromosome transporters and SF2 RNA helicases. Together with recently published studies of SpoIIIE chromosome transporter and Ded1 RNA helicase mutants, these findings suggest the presence of a structurally conserved region that may be a part of the mechanism that determines motor velocity and processivity in several different types of nucleic acid translocases.

  14. Dynamical Structure of Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksejevs, A

    2013-01-01

    Compton scattering offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamical structure of hadrons over a wide kinematic range, with polarizabilities characterizing the hadron active internal degrees of freedom. We present calculations and detailed analysis of electric and magnetic and the spin-dependent dynamical polarizabilities for the lowest in mass SU(3) octet of baryons. These extensive calculations are made possible by the recent implementation of semi-automatized calculations in chiral perturbation theory which allows evaluating polarizabilities from Compton scattering up to next-to-the-leading order. The dependencies for the range of photon energies covering the majority of the meson photoproduction channels are analyzed.

  15. Structural polymorphism of the major capsid protein of a double-stranded RNA virus: an amphipathic alpha helix as a molecular switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugar, Irene; Luque, Daniel; Oña, Ana; Rodríguez, José F; Carrascosa, José L; Trus, Benes L; Castón, José R

    2005-07-01

    The infectious bursal disease virus T=13 viral particle is composed of two major proteins, VP2 and VP3. Here, we show that the molecular basis of the conformational flexibility of the major capsid protein precursor, pVP2, is an amphipatic alpha helix formed by the sequence GFKDIIRAIR. VP2 containing this alpha helix is able to assemble into the T=13 capsid only when expressed as a chimeric protein with an N-terminal His tag. An amphiphilic alpha helix, which acts as a conformational switch, is thus responsible for the inherent structural polymorphism of VP2. The His tag mimics the VP3 C-terminal region closely and acts as a molecular triggering factor. Using cryo-electron microscopy difference imaging, both polypeptide elements were detected on the capsid inner surface. We propose that electrostatic interactions between these two morphogenic elements are transmitted to VP2 to acquire the competent conformations for capsid assembly.

  16. Structure and dynamics of bacteriophage IKe major coat protein in MPG micelles by solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K A; Farrow, N A; Deber, C M; Kay, L E

    1996-04-23

    The structure and dynamics of the 53-residue filamentous bacteriophage IKe major coat protein in fully protonated myristoyllysophosphatidylglycerol (MPG) micelles were characterized using multinuclear solution NMR spectroscopy. Detergent-solubilized coat protein [sequence: see text] mimics the membrane-bound "assembly intermediate" form of the coat protein which occurs during part of the phage life cycle. NMR studies of the IKe coat protein show that the coat protein is largely alpha-helical, exhibiting a long amphipathic surface. helix (Asn 4 to Ser 26) and a shorter "micelle-spanning" C-terminal helix which begins at TRP 29 and continues at least to Phe 48. Pro 30 likely occurs in the first turn of the C-terminal helix, where it is ideally situated given the hydrogen bonding and steric restrictions imposed by this residue. The similarity of 15N relaxation values (T1, T2, and NOE and 500 MHz and T2 at 600 MHz) among much of the N-terminal helix and all of the TM helix indicates that the N-terminal helix is as closely associated with the micelle as the TM helix. The description of the protein in the micelle is supported by the observation of NOEs between lysolipid protons and protein amide protons between asn 8 and Ser 50. The N-terminal and TM helices exhibit substantial mobility on the microsecond to second time scale, which likely reflects changes in the orientation between the two helices. The overall findings serve to clarify the role of individual residues in the context of a TM alpha-helix and provide an understanding of the secondary structure, dynamics, and aqueous and micellar environments of the coat protein.

  17. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  18. Ion-mediated nucleic acid helix-helix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-07-15

    Salt ions are essential for the folding of nucleic acids. We use the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, which can account for the correlations and fluctuations for the ions bound to the nucleic acids, to investigate the electrostatic free-energy landscape for two parallel nucleic acid helices in the solution of added salt. The theory is based on realistic atomic structures of the helices. In monovalent salt, the helices are predicted to repel each other. For divalent salt, while the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory predicts only the repulsion, the TBI theory predicts an effective attraction between the helices. The helices are predicted to be stabilized at an interhelix distance approximately 26-36 A, and the strength of the attractive force can reach -0.37 k(B)T/bp for helix length in the range of 9-12 bp. Both the stable helix-helix distance and the strength of the attraction are strongly dependent on the salt concentration and ion size. With the increase of the salt concentration, the helix-helix attraction becomes stronger and the most stable helix-helix separation distance becomes smaller. For divalent ions, at very high ion concentration, further addition of ions leads to the weakening of the attraction. Smaller ion size causes stronger helix-helix attraction and stabilizes the helices at a shorter distance. In addition, the TBI model shows that a decrease in the solvent dielectric constant would enhance the ion-mediated attraction. The theoretical findings from the TBI theory agree with the experimental measurements on the osmotic pressure of DNA array as well as the results from the computer simulations.

  19. Dynamic Weighted Data Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    and Bonnie Hampton, who taught me much more than how to play the cello . Finally, for hours of artistic satisfaction, I thank Johannes Brahms, Ludwig...van "j Beethoven, Igor Stravinsky, Glan-Carlo Menotti, and Johann Sebastian Bach . Dynamic Weighted Data Structures Samuel W. Bent This thesis discusses...34I find It a matter of some difficulty to arrange these cards In a manner suited to my needs.’ I glanced at the cards and noticed each was labelled

  20. Structural dynamic modification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sestieri

    2000-06-01

    Vibration and acoustic requirements are becoming increasingly important in the design of mechanical structures, but they are not usually of primary concern in the design process. So the need to vary the structural behaviour to solve noise and vibration problems often occurs at the prototype stage, giving rise to the so-called structural modification problem. In this paper, the direct problem of determing the new response of a system, after some modifications are introduced into the sestem, is analysed using two different databases: the modal database and the frequency response function database. The limitaions of the modal database are discussed. Structural modifications that can be accounted for are lumped masses, springs, dampers and dynamic absorbers.

  1. Dynamic antagonism between phytochromes and PIF family basic helix-loop-helix factors induces selective reciprocal responses to light and shade in a rapidly responsive transcriptional network in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leivar, Pablo; Tepperman, James M; Cohn, Megan M; Monte, Elena; Al-Sady, Bassem; Erickson, Erika; Quail, Peter H

    2012-04-01

    Plants respond to shade-modulated light signals via phytochrome (phy)-induced adaptive changes, termed shade avoidance. To examine the roles of Phytochrome-Interacting basic helix-loop-helix Factors, PIF1, 3, 4, and 5, in relaying such signals to the transcriptional network, we compared the shade-responsive transcriptome profiles of wild-type and quadruple pif (pifq) mutants. We identify a subset of genes, enriched in transcription factor-encoding loci, that respond rapidly to shade, in a PIF-dependent manner, and contain promoter G-box motifs, known to bind PIFs. These genes are potential direct targets of phy-PIF signaling that regulate the primary downstream transcriptional circuitry. A second subset of PIF-dependent, early response genes, lacking G-box motifs, are enriched for auxin-responsive loci, and are thus potentially indirect targets of phy-PIF signaling, mediating the rapid cell expansion induced by shade. Comparing deetiolation- and shade-responsive transcriptomes identifies another subset of G-box-containing genes that reciprocally display rapid repression and induction in response to light and shade signals. These data define a core set of transcriptional and hormonal processes that appear to be dynamically poised to react rapidly to light-environment changes via perturbations in the mutually antagonistic actions of the phys and PIFs. Comparing the responsiveness of the pifq and triple pif mutants to light and shade confirms that the PIFs act with overlapping redundancy on seedling morphogenesis and transcriptional regulation but that each PIF contributes differentially to these responses.

  2. What can triple helix frameworks offer to the analysis of eco-innovation dynamics? Theoretical and methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan; Holgaard, Jette Egelund; Remmen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Bringing environmental concerns into focus of innovation processes will in several cases also expand the numbers of actors involved. Eco-innovation and triple helix are often frameworks applied to analyse how environmental concerns are integrated in the innovation processes and how different...

  3. Defining the transmembrane helix of M2 protein from influenza A by molecular dynamics simulations in a lipid bilayer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrest, LR; Tieleman, DP; Sansom, MSP

    1999-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins containing at least one transmembrane (TM) alpha-helix are believed to account for between 20% and 30% of most genomes. There are several algorithms that accurately predict the number and position of TM helices within,a membrane protein sequence. However, these methods ten

  4. Defining the transmembrane helix of M2 protein from influenza A by molecular dynamics simulations in a lipid bilayer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrest, LR; Tieleman, DP; Sansom, MSP

    Integral membrane proteins containing at least one transmembrane (TM) alpha-helix are believed to account for between 20% and 30% of most genomes. There are several algorithms that accurately predict the number and position of TM helices within,a membrane protein sequence. However, these methods

  5. The close-packed triple helix as a possible new structural motif for collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    than both the 10/3 and the 7/2 structure. A feature of the suggested collagen structure is the existence of a central channel with negatively charged walls. We find support for this structural feature in some of the early x-ray diffraction data of collagen. The central channel of the structure suggests...... the possibility of a one-dimensional proton lattice. This geometry can explain the observed magic angle effect seen in NMR studies of collagen. The central channel also offers the possibility of ion transport and may cast new light on various biological and physical phenomena, including biomineralization....

  6. Global force-torque phase diagram for the DNA double helix: Structural transitions, triple points, and collapsed plectonemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John F.; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2013-12-01

    We present a free energy model for structural transitions of the DNA double helix driven by tensile and torsional stress. Our model is coarse grained and is based on semiflexible polymer descriptions of B-DNA, underwound L-DNA, and highly overwound P-DNA. The statistical-mechanical model of plectonemic supercoiling previously developed for B-DNA is applied to semiflexible polymer models of P- and L-DNA to obtain a model of DNA structural transitions in quantitative accord with experiment. We identify two distinct plectonemic states, one "inflated" by electrostatic repulsion and thermal fluctuations and the other "collapsed," with the two double helices inside the supercoils driven to close contact. We find that supercoiled B and L are stable only in the inflated form, while supercoiled P is always collapsed. We also predict the behavior and experimental signatures of highly underwound "Q"-DNA, the left-handed analog of P-DNA; as for P, supercoiled Q is always collapsed. Overstretched "S"-DNA and strand-separated "stress-melted" DNA are also included in our model, allowing prediction of a global phase diagram for forces up to 1000 pN and torques between ±60 pN nm, or, in terms of linking number density, from σ =-5 to +3.

  7. Global force-torque phase diagram for the DNA double helix: structural transitions, triple points, and collapsed plectonemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John F; Neukirch, Sébastien

    2013-12-01

    We present a free energy model for structural transitions of the DNA double helix driven by tensile and torsional stress. Our model is coarse grained and is based on semiflexible polymer descriptions of B-DNA, underwound L-DNA, and highly overwound P-DNA. The statistical-mechanical model of plectonemic supercoiling previously developed for B-DNA is applied to semiflexible polymer models of P- and L-DNA to obtain a model of DNA structural transitions in quantitative accord with experiment. We identify two distinct plectonemic states, one "inflated" by electrostatic repulsion and thermal fluctuations and the other "collapsed," with the two double helices inside the supercoils driven to close contact. We find that supercoiled B and L are stable only in the inflated form, while supercoiled P is always collapsed. We also predict the behavior and experimental signatures of highly underwound "Q"-DNA, the left-handed analog of P-DNA; as for P, supercoiled Q is always collapsed. Overstretched "S"-DNA and strand-separated "stress-melted" DNA are also included in our model, allowing prediction of a global phase diagram for forces up to 1000 pN and torques between ±60 pN nm, or, in terms of linking number density, from σ=-5 to +3.

  8. Kinked structures of isolated nicotinic receptor M2 helices: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Samsom, M S

    1994-12-01

    The pore-lining M2 helix of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor exhibits a pronounced kink when the corresponding ion channel is in a closed conformation [N. Unwin (1993) Journal of Molecular Biology, Vol. 229, pp. 1101-1124]. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of isolated 22-residue M2 helices in order to identify a possible molecular origin of this kink. In order to sample a wide range of conformational space, a simulated annealing protocol was used to generate five initial M2 helix structures, each of which was subsequently used as the basis of 300 ps MD simulations. Two helix sequences (M2 alpha and M2 delta) were studied in this manner, resulting in a total of ten 300 ps trajectories. Kinked helices present in the trajectories were identified and energy minimized to yield a total of five different stable kinked structures. For comparison, a similar molecular dynamics simulation of a Leu23 helix yielded no stable kinked structures. In four of the five kinked helices, the kink was stabilized by H bonds between the helix backbone and polar side-chain atoms. Comparison with data from the literature on site-directed mutagenesis of M2 residues suggests that such polar side-chain to main-chain H bonds may also contribute to kinking of M2 helices in the intact channel protein.

  9. A model for the [C+-GxC]n triple helix derived from observation of the C+-GxC base triplet in a crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, C M; Trent, J O; Neidle, S

    1997-10-13

    A molecular modelling study on the [C+-GxC]n triple helix is reported. We have observed the C+-GxC base triplet in the crystal structure of an oligonucleotide-drug complex, between the minor-groove drug netropsin and the decanucleotide d(CGCAATTGCG)2. The complex was crystallised at pH 7.0, but the crystal structure, at a resolution of 2.4 A, shows that a terminal cytosine has become protonated and participates in a parallel C+-GxC base triplet. The structure of this triplet and its associated sugar-phosphate backbones have been energy-refined and then used to generate a triple helix. This has characteristics of the B-type family of DNA structures for two strands, with the third, the C+ strand, having backbone conformations closer to the A family.

  10. Ectopic expression of a basic helix-loop-helix gene transactivates parallel pathways of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis. structure, expression analysis, and genetic control of leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase and anthocyanidin reductase genes in Lotus corniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolocci, Francesco; Robbins, Mark P; Madeo, Laura; Arcioni, Sergio; Martens, Stefan; Damiani, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are plant secondary metabolites and are composed primarily of catechin and epicatechin units in higher plant species. Due to the ability of PAs to bind reversibly with plant proteins to improve digestion and reduce bloat, engineering this pathway in leaves is a major goal for forage breeders. Here, we report the cloning and expression analysis of anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase (LAR), two genes encoding enzymes committed to epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis, respectively, in Lotus corniculatus. We show the presence of two LAR gene families (LAR1 and LAR2) and that the steady-state levels of ANR and LAR1 genes correlate with the levels of PAs in leaves of wild-type and transgenic plants. Interestingly, ANR and LAR1, but not LAR2, genes produced active proteins following heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and are affected by the same basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that promotes PA accumulation in cells of palisade and spongy mesophyll. This study provides direct evidence that the same subclass of transcription factors can mediate the expression of the structural genes of both branches of PA biosynthesis.

  11. Structural dynamic modifications via models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Kundra

    2000-06-01

    Structural dynamic modification techniques attempt to reduce dynamic design time and can be implemented beginning with spatial models of structures, dynamic test data or updated models. The models assumed in this discussion are mathematical models, namely mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the equations of motion of a structure. These models are identified/extracted from dynamic test data viz. frequency response functions (FRFs). Alternatively these models could have been obtained by adjusting or updating the finite element model of the structure in the light of the test data. The methods of structural modification for getting desired dynamic characteristics by using modifiers namely mass, beams and tuned absorbers are discussed.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of human serum paraoxonase 1 in DPPC bilayer reveals a critical role of transmembrane helix H1 for HDL association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Rath, Surya Narayan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; Maharana, Jitendra; De, Sachinandan

    2014-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bound mammalian enzyme exhibiting antiatherosclerotic activity. Despite years of research, an accurate model for the binding interaction between PON1 and HDL has not been established. However, it is reported that anchoring of PON1 to HDL is mainly governed by an N-terminal alpha helix H1 and another short helix H2. Here, we studied the molecular association of full-length human PON1 (huPON1) with a HDL-mimetic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results indicate that H1 is the highly dynamic part of huPON1, showing clockwise rotation of up to 30° within the DPPC bilayer. However, without phospholipid molecules, H1 experiences helical distortions, illustrating an incompatible HDL-anchoring conformation. Snorkeling interactions of K3, R18, and R27 together with aromatic locks formed by Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 are highly essential for anchoring of huPON1 to HDL's surface. Molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann solvent-accessible surface area (MM/PBSA) binding free energy calculation revealed that H1 displays greater binding affinity towards lipid molecules compared with H2 and H3, suggesting that H1 is the most probable HDL-binding domain of PON1. Binding free energy decomposition showed that K3, R18, and R27 interact with polar headgroups of DPPC membrane through electrostatic interaction. Moreover, Y187, Y190, W194, and W202 interact with DPPC lipids mainly through van der Waals interaction. Taken together, these results show that the transmembrane helix H1 along with the interfacial positively charged and aromatic resides were crucial for PON1's association with HDL particle. The current study will be useful towards understanding the antiatherosclerotic and bioscavenging properties of this promiscuous enzyme.

  13. The Knowledge-Based Economy and the Triple Helix Model

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2012-01-01

    1. Introduction - the metaphor of a "knowledge-based economy"; 2. The Triple Helix as a model of the knowledge-based economy; 3. Knowledge as a social coordination mechanism; 4. Neo-evolutionary dynamics in a Triple Helix of coordination mechanism; 5. The operation of the knowledge base; 6. The restructuring of knowledge production in a KBE; 7. The KBE and the systems-of-innovation approach; 8. The KBE and neo-evolutionary theories of innovation; 8.1 The construction of the evolving unit; 8.2 User-producer relations in systems of innovation; 8.3 'Mode-2' and the production of scientific knowledge; 8.4 A Triple Helix model of innovations; 9. Empirical studies and simulations using the TH model; 10. The KBE and the measurement; 10.1 The communication of meaning and information; 10.2 The expectation of social structure; 10.3 Configurations in a knowledge-based economy

  14. Triple-helix DNA structural studies using a Love wave acoustic biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, George; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2009-12-15

    The development of sensors for detecting the conformation of surface-attached molecules is an emerging field with significance in the pharmaceutical industry and in drug design. In this work, triplex-forming oligos (TFOs), a separate class of non-natural DNA bending agents that can affect the mechanical properties of DNA through the formation of triple-helical structures of specific conformation and/or flexibility, are used as a model system in combination with an acoustic biosensor to determine molecular geometrical features. In practice, the degree of bending of a specific DNA target caused by a particular TFO was evaluated by measuring the ratio of acoustic energy change over phase change observed during the binding of pre-formed triplex DNA molecules to the device surface. The DNA bending angle derived via acoustic measurements is in excellent agreement with previously reported values using molecular biology techniques. The reported acoustic technique appears quite appealing for the biophysical study of DNA molecules providing rapid qualitative and quantitative information, at the same time holding promise to be developed as a high-throughput method for the evaluation of DNA conformational changes.

  15. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrs, Richard Wood [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by 31P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 Å of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an α-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  16. Structural studies of polypeptides: Mechanism of immunoglobin catalysis and helix propagation in hybrid sequence, disulfide containing peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storrs, R.W.

    1992-08-01

    Catalytic immunoglobin fragments were studied Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy to identify amino acid residues responsible for the catalytic activity. Small, hybrid sequence peptides were analyzed for helix propagation following covalent initiation and for activity related to the protein from which the helical sequence was derived. Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl carbonates and esters by specific immunoglobins is thought to involve charge complementarity. The pK of the transition state analog P-nitrophenyl phosphate bound to the immunoglobin fragment was determined by [sup 31]P-NMR to verify the juxtaposition of a positively charged amino acid to the binding/catalytic site. Optical studies of immunoglobin mediated photoreversal of cis, syn cyclobutane thymine dimers implicated tryptophan as the photosensitizing chromophore. Research shows the chemical environment of a single tryptophan residue is altered upon binding of the thymine dimer. This tryptophan residue was localized to within 20 [Angstrom] of the binding site through the use of a nitroxide paramagnetic species covalently attached to the thymine dimer. A hybrid sequence peptide was synthesized based on the bee venom peptide apamin in which the helical residues of apamin were replaced with those from the recognition helix of the bacteriophage 434 repressor protein. Oxidation of the disufide bonds occured uniformly in the proper 1-11, 3-15 orientation, stabilizing the 434 sequence in an [alpha]-helix. The glycine residue stopped helix propagation. Helix propagation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol mixtures was investigated in a second hybrid sequence peptide using the apamin-derived disulfide scaffold and the S-peptide sequence. The helix-stop signal previously observed was not observed in the NMR NOESY spectrum. Helical connectivities were seen throughout the S-peptide sequence. The apamin/S-peptide hybrid binded to the S-protein (residues 21-166 of ribonuclease A) and reconstituted enzymatic activity.

  17. Structural Dynamics of Maneuvering Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    AD-RI92 376 STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS OF MANEUVERING RIRCRAFT(U) CONRAD I TECHNOLOGIES INC KING OF PRUSSIA PR M M REDDI SEP 97 CTI-8601 NRDC-88014-69...REPORT NO. NADC-8014-60 STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS OF MANEUVERING AIRCRAFT M. Mahadeva Reddi .4 Conrad Technologies, Inc. 650 S. Henderson Rd. D T IQ King of...NO A0 CCESSION NO. R02303001 107601 11. TITLE (Include Security Classfication) (u) STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS OF MANEUVERING AIRCRAFT 12. PERSONAL AUTHORS) M

  18. Helix-packing motifs in membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R F S; DeGrado, W F

    2006-09-12

    The fold of a helical membrane protein is largely determined by interactions between membrane-imbedded helices. To elucidate recurring helix-helix interaction motifs, we dissected the crystallographic structures of membrane proteins into a library of interacting helical pairs. The pairs were clustered according to their three-dimensional similarity (rmsd universe of common transmembrane helix-pairing motifs is relatively simple. The largest cluster, which comprises 29% of the library members, consists of an antiparallel motif with left-handed packing angles, and it is frequently stabilized by packing of small side chains occurring every seven residues in the sequence. Right-handed parallel and antiparallel structures show a similar tendency to segregate small residues to the helix-helix interface but spaced at four-residue intervals. Position-specific sequence propensities were derived for the most populated motifs. These structural and sequential motifs should be quite useful for the design and structural prediction of membrane proteins.

  19. Effect of secondary structure on the potential of mean force for poly-L-lysine in the alpha-Helix and beta-sheet conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, J.J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    2001-10-30

    Because poly-L-lysine (PLL) can exist in the {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet conformation depending on solution preparation and solution conditions, PLL is a suitable candidate to probe the dependence of protein interactions on secondary structure. The osmotic second virial coefficient and weight-average molecular weight are reported from low-angle laser-light scattering measurements for PLL as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet content. Interactions between PLL molecules become more attractive as salt concentration increases due to screening of PLL charge by salt ions and at low salt concentration become more attractive as pH increases due to decreased net charge on PLL. The experimental results show that interactions are stronger for the {beta}-sheet conformation than for the {alpha}-helix conformation. A spherically-symmetric model for the potential of mean force is used to account for specific interactions not described by DLVO theory and to show how differences in secondary structure affect PLL interactions.

  20. Evidence that U2/U6 helix I promotes both catalytic steps of pre-mRNA splicing and rearranges in between these steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefford, Melissa A; Staley, Jonathan P

    2009-07-01

    During pre-mRNA splicing, the spliceosome must configure the substrate, catalyze 5' splice site cleavage, reposition the substrate, and catalyze exon ligation. The highly conserved U2/U6 helix I, which adjoins sequences that define the reactive sites, has been proposed to configure the substrate for 5' splice site cleavage and promote catalysis. However, a role for this helix at either catalytic step has not been tested rigorously and previous observations question its role at the catalytic steps. Through a comprehensive molecular genetic study of U2/U6 helix I, we found that weakening U2/U6 helix I, but not mutually exclusive structures, compromised splicing of a substrate limited at the catalytic step of 5' splice site cleavage, providing the first compelling evidence that this helix indeed configures the substrate during 5' splice site cleavage. Further, mutations that we proved weaken only U2/U6 helix I suppressed a mutation in PRP16, a DEAH-box ATPase required after 5' splice site cleavage, providing persuasive evidence that helix I is destabilized by Prp16p and suggesting that this structure is unwound between the catalytic steps. Lastly, weakening U2/U6 helix I also compromised splicing of a substrate limited at the catalytic step of exon ligation, providing evidence that U2/U6 helix I reforms and functions during exon ligation. Thus, our data provide evidence for a fundamental and apparently dynamic role for U2/U6 helix I during the catalytic stages of splicing.

  1. Square Helix TWT for THz Frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotiranta, Mikko; Krozer, Viktor; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2010-01-01

    A helix slow-wave structure with a square shape has been designed for use in traveling-wave tubes operating at terahertz frequencies. The square shape makes it compatible with microfabrication methods. A 3-D particle-in-cell simulation of a traveling-wave tube with such a helix indicates a gain...

  2. Structure and dynamics of the HIV-1 frameshift element RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Justin T; Garcia-Miranda, Pablo; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Gorelick, Robert J; Butcher, Samuel E; Weeks, Kevin M

    2014-07-08

    The HIV-1 ribosomal frameshift element is highly structured, regulates translation of all virally encoded enzymes, and is a promising therapeutic target. The prior model for this motif contains two helices separated by a three-nucleotide bulge. Modifications to this model were suggested by SHAPE chemical probing of an entire HIV-1 RNA genome. Novel features of the SHAPE-directed model include alternate helical conformations and a larger, more complex structure. These structural elements also support the presence of a secondary frameshift site within the frameshift domain. Here, we use oligonucleotide-directed structure perturbation, probing in the presence of formamide, and in-virion experiments to examine these models. Our data support a model in which the frameshift domain is anchored by a stable helix outside the conventional domain. Less stable helices within the domain can switch from the SHAPE-predicted to the two-helix conformation. Translational frameshifting assays with frameshift domain mutants support a functional role for the interactions predicted by and specific to the SHAPE-directed model. These results reveal that the HIV-1 frameshift domain is a complex, dynamic structure and underscore the importance of analyzing folding in the context of full-length RNAs.

  3. The structure of the XPF-ssDNA complex underscores the distinct roles of the XPF and ERCC1 helix- hairpin-helix domains in ss/ds DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Devashish; Folkers, Gert E; van Dijk, Marc; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf

    2012-04-01

    Human XPF/ERCC1 is a structure-specific DNA endonuclease that nicks the damaged DNA strand at the 5' end during nucleotide excision repair. We determined the structure of the complex of the C-terminal domain of XPF with 10 nt ssDNA. A positively charged region within the second helix of the first HhH motif contacts the ssDNA phosphate backbone. One guanine base is flipped out of register and positioned in a pocket contacting residues from both HhH motifs of XPF. Comparison to other HhH-containing proteins indicates a one-residue deletion in the second HhH motif of XPF that has altered the hairpin conformation, thereby permitting ssDNA interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that ERCC1 in the XPF-ERCC1 heterodimer can bind dsDNA. Combining the two observations gives a model that underscores the asymmetry of the human XPF/ERCC1 heterodimer in binding at an ss/ds DNA junction.

  4. Dynamic testing of cable structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caetano Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the role of dynamic testing in the study of cable structures. In this context, the identification of cable force based on vibration measurements is discussed. Vibration and damping assessment are then introduced as the focus of dynamic monitoring systems, and particular aspects of the structural behaviour under environmental loads are analysed. Diverse application results are presented to support the discussion centred on cable-stayed bridges, roof structures, a guyed mast and a transmission line.

  5. Partial Agonists Activate PPARgamma Using a Helix 12 Independent Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruning, J.B.; Chalmers, M.J.; Prasad, S.; Bushby, S.A.; Kamenecka, T.A.; He, Y.; Nettles, K.W.; Griffin, P.R.

    2009-05-28

    Binding to helix 12 of the ligand-binding domain of PPAR{gamma} is required for full agonist activity. Previously, the degree of stabilization of the activation function 2 (AF-2) surface was thought to correlate with the degree of agonism and transactivation. To examine this mechanism, we probed structural dynamics of PPAR{gamma} with agonists that induced graded transcriptional responses. Here we present crystal structures and amide H/D exchange (HDX) kinetics for six of these complexes. Amide HDX revealed each ligand induced unique changes to the dynamics of the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Full agonists stabilized helix 12, whereas intermediate and partial agonists did not at all, and rather differentially stabilized other regions of the binding pocket. The gradient of PPAR{gamma} transactivation cannot be accounted for solely through changes to the dynamics of AF-2. Thus, our understanding of allosteric signaling must be extended beyond the idea of a dynamic helix 12 acting as a molecular switch.

  6. Symmetry breaking, slow relaxation dynamics, and topological defects at the field-induced helix reorientation in MnSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Chacon, A.; Wagner, M.; Halder, M.; Georgii, R.; Rosch, A.; Pfleiderer, C.; Garst, M.

    2017-01-01

    We report a study of the reorientation of the helimagnetic order in the archetypal cubic chiral magnet MnSi as a function of magnetic field direction. The reorientation process as inferred from small-angle neutron scattering, the magnetization, and the ac susceptibility is in excellent agreement with an effective mean-field theory taking into account the precise symmetries of the crystallographic space group. Depending on the field and temperature history and the direction of the field with respect to the crystalline axes, the helix reorientation may exhibit a crossover, a first-order, or a second-order transition. The magnetization and ac susceptibility provide evidence that the reorientation of helimagnetic domains is associated with large relaxation times exceeding seconds. At the second-order transitions residual Ising symmetries are spontaneously broken at continuous elastic instabilities of the helimagnetic order. In addition, on the time scales explored in our experiments these transitions are hysteretic as a function of field suggesting, within the same theoretical framework, the formation of an abundance of plastic deformations of the helical spin order. These deformations comprise topologically nontrivial disclinations, reminiscent of the skyrmions discovered recently in the same class of materials.

  7. X-ray structure of the T. aquaticus FtsY:GDP complex suggests functional roles for the C-terminal helix of the SRP GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski-Salerno, Joseph; Coon, John S; Focia, Pamela J; Freymann, Douglas M

    2007-03-01

    FtsY and Ffh are structurally similar prokaryotic Signal Recognition Particle GTPases that play an essential role in the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP)-mediated cotranslational targeting of proteins to the membrane. The two GTPases assemble in a GTP-dependent manner to form a heterodimeric SRP targeting complex. We report here the 2.1 A X-ray structure of FtsY from T. aquaticus bound to GDP. The structure of the monomeric protein reveals, unexpectedly, canonical binding interactions for GDP. A comparison of the structures of the monomeric and complexed FtsY NG GTPase domain suggests that it undergoes a conformational change similar to that of Ffh NG during the assembly of the symmetric heterodimeric complex. However, in contrast to Ffh, in which the C-terminal helix shifts independently of the other subdomains, the C-terminal helix and N domain of T. aquaticus FtsY together behave as a rigid body during assembly, suggesting distinct mechanisms by which the interactions of the NG domain "module" are regulated in the context of the two SRP GTPases.

  8. Three complete turns of a 3(10)-helix at atomic resolution: the crystal structure of Z-(Aib)11-OtBu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2003-01-01

    The crystal structure of the synthetic protected oligopeptide Z-(Aib)11-OtBu was determined by x-ray crystallography. The undecapeptide folds in a regular 3(10)-helix with nine consecutive 4 --> 1 hydrogen bonds. At present, this is the largest available structure of a homopeptide (including homopeptides consisting of standard amino acids) and also the longest observed regular 3(10)-helix at atomic resolution. Z-(Aib)11-OtBu crystallizes readily from hot ethanol-water mixture and is one of the crystals in which no solvent molecule is co-crystallized. In the crystal head-to-tail hydrogen bonded columns are formed in the [1 0 1] direction. Each helical column is surrounded by six others, whereby two are packed in parallel and four in antiparallel fashion. Helical columns are packed via apolar crystal contacts. The crystal structure of Z-(Aib)11-OtBu is compared with the crystal structures of Z-(Aib)10-OtBu and Z-(Aib)9-OtBu. The similarities and differences are analysed.

  9. Nucleic acid binding properties of a helix stabilising nucleoid protein from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that condenses DNA into compact structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestina, F; Suryanarayana, T

    1995-12-01

    Helix stabilising nucleoid protein (HSNP-C') from an acidothermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius has been characterised with respect to interaction with nucleic acids by gel retardation assay, binding to nucleic acid columns, fluorescence titrations and electron microscopy. The protein exists in solution as very large multimeric aggregates as indicated by cross-linking studies. The protein binds strongly and co-operatively to double stranded DNA. Electron microscopy of the complexes of the protein with DNA shows compact structures suggesting that the protein condenses DNA.

  10. Structural dynamics in rotating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    Major issues and recent advances in the structural dynamics of rotating systems are summarized. The objectives and benefits of such systems are briefly discussed. Directions for future research are suggested.

  11. Hysteresis in structural dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyi, A., E-mail: aivanyi@morpheus.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); Ivanyi, P., E-mail: peteri@morpheus.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); Ivanyi, M.M., E-mail: ivanyi@uvaterv.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); UVATERV Ltd, Budapest, 1117, Dombovari ut 17, Budapest (Hungary); Ivanyi, M., E-mail: drivanyi@pmmk.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary)

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the Preisach hysteresis model is applied to determine the dynamic behavior of a steel column with mass on the top and loaded by an impulse force. The column is considered as a rigid element, while the fixed end of the column is modeled with a rotational spring of hysterestic characteristic. In the solution of the non-linear dynamical equation of motion the fix-point technique is inserted to the time marching iteration. In the investigation the non-linearity of the rotation spring is modeled with the Preisach hysteresis model. The variation of amplitude and the action time interval of force are changing. The results are plotted in figures.

  12. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-02-22

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)(n) amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher-order structure and function. This study defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing from the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA(1)-Gly-X1-X2, designated G1G interruptions. Residues found within G1G interruptions are predominantly hydrophobic (70%), followed by a significant amount of charged residues (16%), and the Gly-X1-X2 triplets flanking the interruption are atypical. Studies on peptide models indicate the degree of destabilization is much greater when Pro is in the interruption, GP, than when hydrophobic residues (GF, GY) are present, and a rigid Gly-Pro-Hyp tripeptide adjacent to the interruption leads to greater destabilization than a flexible Gly-Ala-Ala sequence. Modeling based on NMR data indicates the Phe residue within a GF interruption is located on the outside of the triple helix. The G1G interruptions resemble a previously studied collagen interruption GPOGAAVMGPO, designated G4G-type, in that both are destabilizing, but allow continuation of rod-like triple helices and maintenance of the single residue stagger throughout the imperfection, with a loss of axial register of the superhelix on both sides. Both kinds of interruptions result in a highly localized perturbation in hydrogen bonding and dihedral angles, but the hydrophobic residue of a G4G interruption packs near the central axis of the superhelix, while the hydrophobic residue of a G1G interruption is located on the triple-helix surface. The different structural consequences of G1G and G4G interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence pattern suggest a physical basis for their differential susceptibility to matrix metalloproteinases in type X collagen.

  13. Prokaryotic transcription regulators: more than just the helix-turn-helix motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Joy L; Brennan, Richard G

    2002-02-01

    Over the past two years, the structures of many prokaryotic transcriptional regulators have been solved, and several of them have revealed the structural mechanism of gene regulation. The crystal structure of BmrR-TPP-DNA reveals a novel mechanism of transcription activation, whereby the drug-bound protein activates the bmr promoter by local DNA unwinding and base pair disruption. Myristoyl-CoA induces FadR by a three-helix pushing mechanism, whereas TetR employs a helical pendulum motion to regulate expression. The structures of AbrB, and DNA complexes of Rob and MuR unveil a novel DNA-binding motif, 'the looped-hinge helix', and new uses of the helix-turn-helix and winged helix motifs in DNA binding.

  14. Rosalind Franklin and the Double Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, Lynne Osman

    2003-03-01

    Although she made essential contributions toward elucidating the structure of DNA, Rosalind Franklin is known to many only as seen through the distorting lens of James Watson's book, The Double Helix.

  15. Dynamic stiffness for thin-walled structures by power series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Bin; LEUNG A.Y.T.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic stiffness method is introduced to analyze thin-walled structures including thin-walled straight beams and spatial twisted helix beam. A dynamic stiffness matrix is formed by using frequency dependent shape functions which are exact solutions of the governing differential equations. With the obtained thin-walled beam dynamic stiffness matrices, the thin-walled frame dynamic stiffness matrix can also be formulated by satisfying the required displacements compatibility and forces equilibrium, a method which is similar to the finite element method (FEM). Then the thin-walled structure natural frequencies can be found by equating the determinant of the system dynamic stiffness matrix to zero. By this way, just one element and several elements can exactly predict many modes of a thin-walled beam and a spatial thin-walled frame, respectively. Several cases are studied and the results are compared with the existing solutions of other methods. The natural frequencies and buckling loads of these thin-walled structures are computed.

  16. Probing and improving student's understanding of protein α-helix structure using targeted assessment and classroom interventions in collaboration with a faculty community of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Villafañe, Sachel M; Lewis, Jennifer E; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of concept inventories and other assessment tools in the molecular life sciences provides instructors with myriad avenues to probe student understanding. For example, although molecular visualization is central to the study of biochemistry, a growing body of evidence suggests that students have substantial limitations in their ability to recognize and interpret basic features of biological macromolecules. In this study, a pre/posttest administered to students at diverse institutions nationwide revealed a robust incorrect idea about the location of the amino acid side chains in the protein α-helix structure. Because this incorrect idea was present even after a semester of biochemistry instruction at a range of institutions, an intervention was necessary. A community of expert biochemistry instructors collaborated to design two active learning classroom activities that systematically examine α-helix structure and function. Several participating faculty used one or both of the activities in their classrooms and some improvement of student understanding of this concept was observed. This study provides a model of how a community of instructors can work together using assessment data to inform targeted changes in instruction with the goal of improving student understanding of fundamental concepts. Copyright © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Biochemical analysis of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, D.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors oligodendrocyte transcription factor 1 (Olig1) and Olig2 are structurally similar and, to a first approximation, coordinately expressed in the developing CNS and postnatal brain. Notwithstanding these similarities, it was apparent from early on

  18. Lymphotactin structural dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Volkman, Brian F.; Liu, Tina Y.; Peterson, Francis C.

    2009-01-01

    Lymphotactin/XCL1, the defining member of the C class of chemokines, undergoes a conformational change that involves the complete restructuring of all stabilizing interactions. Other chemokines are restricted to a single conformation by a pair of conserved disulfide crosslinks, one of which is absent in lymphotactin. This structural interconversion is entirely reversible, and the two-state equilibrium is sensitive to changes in temperature and ionic strength. One species adopts the conserved ...

  19. Foams structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cantat, Isabelle; Graner, François; Pitois, Olivier; Höhler, Reinard; Elias, Florence; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Rouyer, Florence

    2013-01-01

    This book is the first to provide a thorough description of all aspects of the physico-chemical properties of foams. It sets out what is known about their structure, their stability, and their rheology. Engineers, researchers and students will find descriptions of all the key concepts, illustrated by numerous applications, as well as experiments and exercises for the reader. A solutions manual for lecturers is available via the publisher's web site.

  20. Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming (Michigan-Med); (HHMI)

    2011-09-06

    Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

  1. Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefko, George

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 annual report of the Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch reflects the majority of the work performed by the branch staff during the 2002 calendar year. Its purpose is to give a brief review of the branch s technical accomplishments. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch develops innovative computational tools, benchmark experimental data, and solutions to long-term barrier problems in the areas of propulsion aeroelasticity, active and passive damping, engine vibration control, rotor dynamics, magnetic suspension, structural mechanics, probabilistics, smart structures, engine system dynamics, and engine containment. Furthermore, the branch is developing a compact, nonpolluting, bearingless electric machine with electric power supplied by fuel cells for future "more electric" aircraft. An ultra-high-power-density machine that can generate projected power densities of 50 hp/lb or more, in comparison to conventional electric machines, which generate usually 0.2 hp/lb, is under development for application to electric drives for propulsive fans or propellers. In the future, propulsion and power systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures, and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance and economic viability. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch is working to achieve these complex, challenging goals.

  2. Helix 3 acts as a conformational hinge in Class A GPCR activation: An analysis of interhelical interaction energies in crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, Isaias; Dalton, James A R; Giraldo, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    A collection of crystal structures of rhodopsin, β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors in active, intermediate and inactive states were selected for structural and energetic analyses to identify the changes involved in the activation/deactivation of Class A GPCRs. A set of helix interactions exclusive to either inactive or active/intermediate states were identified. The analysis of these interactions distinguished some local conformational changes involved in receptor activation, in particular, a packing between the intracellular domains of transmembrane helices H3 and H7 and a separation between those of H2 and H6. Also, differential movements of the extracellular and intracellular domains of these helices are apparent. Moreover, a segment of residues in helix H3, including residues L/I3.40 to L3.43, is identified as a key component of the activation mechanism, acting as a conformational hinge between extracellular and intracellular regions. Remarkably, the influence on the activation process of some glutamic and aspartic acidic residues and, as a consequence, the influence of variations on local pH is highlighted. Structural hypotheses that arose from the analysis of rhodopsin, β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors were tested on the active and inactive M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor structures and further discussed in the context of the new mechanistic insights provided by the recently determined active and inactive crystal structures of the μ-opioid receptor. Overall, the structural and energetic analyses of the interhelical interactions present in this collection of Class A GPCRs suggests the existence of a common general activation mechanism featuring a chemical space useful for drug discovery exploration.

  3. Dynamic Soil-Structure-Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellezi, Lindita

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate and develop alternative methods of analyzing problems in dynamic soil-structure-interaction. The main focus is the major difficulty posed by such an analysis - the phenomenon of waves which radiate outward from the excited structures towards infinity...... transmitting boundary at the edges of the computational mesh. To start with, an investigation of the main effects of the interaction phenomena is carried out employing a widely used model, considering dynamic stiffness of the unbounded soil as frequency independent. Then a complete description...... represents an attempt to construct a local stiffness for the unbounded soil domain....

  4. Structure of the unique SEFIR domain from human interleukin 17 receptor A reveals a composite ligand-binding site containing a conserved α-helix for Act1 binding and IL-17 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bing [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Liu, Caini; Qian, Wen [Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Han, Yue [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Li, Xiaoxia, E-mail: lix@ccf.org [Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Deng, Junpeng, E-mail: lix@ccf.org [Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Crystal structure of the SEFIR domain from human IL-17 receptor A provides new insights into IL-17 signaling. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) cytokines play a crucial role in mediating inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. A unique intracellular signaling domain termed SEFIR is found within all IL-17 receptors (IL-17Rs) as well as the key adaptor protein Act1. SEFIR-mediated protein–protein interaction is a crucial step in IL-17 cytokine signaling. Here, the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the SEFIR domain of IL-17RA, the most commonly shared receptor for IL-17 cytokine signaling, is reported. The structure includes the complete SEFIR domain and an additional α-helical C-terminal extension, which pack tightly together to form a compact unit. Structural comparison between the SEFIR domains of IL-17RA and IL-17RB reveals substantial differences in protein topology and folding. The uniquely long insertion between strand βC and helix αC in IL-17RA SEFIR is mostly well ordered, displaying a helix (αCC′{sub ins}) and a flexible loop (CC′). The DD′ loop in the IL-17RA SEFIR structure is much shorter; it rotates nearly 90° with respect to the counterpart in the IL-17RB SEFIR structure and shifts about 12 Å to accommodate the αCC′{sub ins} helix without forming any knots. Helix αC was identified as critical for its interaction with Act1 and IL-17-stimulated gene expression. The data suggest that the heterotypic SEFIR–SEFIR association via helix αC is a conserved and signature mechanism specific for IL-17 signaling. The structure also suggests that the downstream motif of IL-17RA SEFIR together with helix αC could provide a composite ligand-binding surface for recruiting Act1 during IL-17 signaling.

  5. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems,

  6. SU-E-T-241: Monte Carlo Simulation Study About the Prediction of Proton-Induced DNA Strand Breakage On the Double Helix Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, J; Park, S; Jeong, J; Jeong, C [National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Y; Lee, S [National Cancer Center in Korea, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); SHIN, D [National Cancer Center, Goyangsi, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Incerti, S [Universite Bordeaux 1, CNRS.IN2P3, Centres d’Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeau, Gradignan, Gradignan (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In particle therapy and radiobiology, the investigation of mechanisms leading to the death of target cancer cells induced by ionising radiation is an active field of research. Recently, several studies based on Monte Carlo simulation codes have been initiated in order to simulate physical interactions of ionising particles at cellular scale and in DNA. Geant4-DNA is the one of them; it is an extension of the general purpose Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit for the simulation of physical interactions at sub-micrometre scale. In this study, we present Geant4-DNA Monte Carlo simulations for the prediction of DNA strand breakage using a geometrical modelling of DNA structure. Methods: For the simulation of DNA strand breakage, we developed a specific DNA geometrical structure. This structure consists of DNA components, such as the deoxynucleotide pairs, the DNA double helix, the nucleosomes and the chromatin fibre. Each component is made of water because the cross sections models currently available in Geant4-DNA for protons apply to liquid water only. Also, at the macroscopic-scale, protons were generated with various energies available for proton therapy at the National Cancer Center, obtained using validated proton beam simulations developed in previous studies. These multi-scale simulations were combined for the validation of Geant4-DNA in radiobiology. Results: In the double helix structure, the deposited energy in a strand allowed to determine direct DNA damage from physical interaction. In other words, the amount of dose and frequency of damage in microscopic geometries was related to direct radiobiological effect. Conclusion: In this report, we calculated the frequency of DNA strand breakage using Geant4- DNA physics processes for liquid water. This study is now on-going in order to develop geometries which use realistic DNA material, instead of liquid water. This will be tested as soon as cross sections for DNA material become available in Geant4

  7. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47. II. The HSP47-binding structural motif in collagens and related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Asada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Homma, Daisuke L; Otaka, Akira; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-04-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) plays an essential role in procollagen biosynthesis. The function of HSP47 relies on its specific interaction with correctly folded triple-helical regions comprised of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and Arg residues at Yaa positions have been shown to be important for this interaction. The amino acid at the Yaa position (Yaa(-3)) in the N-terminal-adjoining triplet containing the critical Arg (defined as Arg(0)) was also suggested to be directly recognized by HSP47 (Koide, T., Asada, S., Takahara, Y., Nishikawa, Y., Nagata, K., and Kitagawa, K. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3432-3438). Based on this finding, we examined the relationship between the structure of Yaa(-3) and HSP47 binding using synthetic collagenous peptides. The results obtained indicated that the structure of Yaa(-3) determined the binding affinity for HSP47. Maximal binding was observed when Yaa(-3) was Thr. Moreover, the required relative spatial arrangement of these key residues in the triple helix was analyzed by taking advantage of heterotrimeric collagen-model peptides, each of which contains one Thr(-3) and one Arg(0). The results revealed that HSP47 recognizes the Yaa(-3) and Arg(0) residues only when they are on the same peptide strand. Taken together, the data obtained led us to define the HSP47-binding structural epitope in the collagen triple helix and also define the HSP47-binding motif in the primary structure. A motif search against human protein database predicted candidate clients for this molecular chaperone. The search result indicated that not all collagen family proteins require the chaperoning by HSP47.

  8. Algebraic Structure of Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-22

    Scholar project report; no. 461 (2017) ALGEBRAIC STRUCTURE OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS by MIDN 1/C James P. Talisse United States Naval Academy Annapolis, MD...based on the structure of algebraic objects associated with it. In this project we study two algebraic objects, centralizers and topological full groups...group completely defines the system up to time reversal. We apply numerical estimates to draw conclusions about the algebraic properties of this group

  9. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  10. Distributed Dynamic Condition Response Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    We present distributed dynamic condition response structures as a declarative process model inspired by the workflow language employed by our industrial partner and conservatively generalizing labelled event structures. The model adds to event structures the possibility to 1) finitely specify...... repeated, possibly infinite behavior, 2) finitely specify fine-grained acceptance conditions for (possibly infinite) runs based on the notion of responses and 3) distribute events via roles. We give a graphical notation inspired by related work by van der Aalst et al and formalize the execution semantics...

  11. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor recognition of endocannabinoids via the lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulations of CB1 transmembrane helix 6 and anandamide in a phospholipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Diane L.; Reggio, Patricia H.

    2006-08-01

    The phospholipid bilayer plays a central role in the lifecycle of the endogenous cannabinoid, N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide, AEA). Therefore, the orientation and location of AEA in the phospholipid bilayer with respect to key membrane associated proteins, is a central issue in understanding the mechanism of endocannabinoid signaling. In this paper, we report a test of the hypothesis that a βXX β motif (formed by beta branching amino acids, V6.43 and I6.46) on the lipid face of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in its inactive state may serve as an initial CB1 interaction site for AEA. Eight 6 ns NAMD2 molecular dynamics simulations of AEA were conducted in a model system composed of CB1 transmembrane helix 6 (TMH6) in a 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayer. In addition, eight 6 ns NAMD2 molecular dynamics simulations of a low CB1 affinity (20:2, n-6) analog of AEA were conducted in the same model system. AEA was found to exhibit a higher incidence of V6.43/I6.46 groove insertion than did the (20:2, n-6) analog. In certain cases, AEA established a high energy of interaction with TMH6 by first associating with the V6.43/I6.46 groove and then molding itself to the lipid face of TMH6 to establish a hydrogen bonding interaction with the exposed backbone carbonyl of P6.50. Based upon these results, we propose that the formation of this hydrogen bonded AEA/TMH6 complex may be the initial step in CB1 recognition of AEA in the lipid bilayer.

  12. Structural Dynamics of the Ribosome

    OpenAIRE

    Korostelev, Andrei; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Noller, Harry F.

    2008-01-01

    Protein synthesis is inherently a dynamic process, requiring both small- and large-scale movements of tRNA and mRNA. It has long been suspected that these movements might be coupled to conformational changes in the ribosome, and in its RNA moieties in particular. Recently, the nature of ribosome structural dynamics has begun to emerge from a combination of approaches, most notably cryo-EM, X-ray crystallography and FRET. Ribosome movement occurs both on a grand scale, as in the intersubunit r...

  13. Development of a Method for Converting a TAK1 Type I Inhibitor into a Type II or c-Helix-Out Inhibitor by Structure-Based Drug Design (SBDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Terushige; Ide, Mitsuaki; Irie, Machiko; Morikami, Kenji; Miura, Takaaki; Nishihara, Masamichi; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method for converting a transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) type I inhibitor into a type II or c-helix-out inhibitor by structure-based drug design (SBDD) to achieve an effective strategy for developing these different types of kinase inhibitor in parallel. TAK1 plays a key role in inflammatory and immune signaling, and is therefore considered to be an attractive molecular target for the treatment of human diseases (inflammatory disease, cancer, etc.). We have already reported novel type I TAK1 inhibitor, so we utilized its X-ray information to design a new chemical class type II and c-helix-out inhibitors. To develop the type II inhibitor, we superimposed the X-ray structure of our reported type I inhibitor onto a type II compound that inhibits multiple kinases, and used SBDD to design a new type II inhibitor. For the TAK1 c-helix-out inhibitor, we utilized the X-ray structure of a b-Raf c-helix-out inhibitor to design compounds, because TAK1 is located close to b-Raf in the Sugen kinase tree, so we considered that TAK1 would, similarly to b-Raf, form a c-helix-out conformation. The X-ray crystal structure of the inhibitors in complex with TAK1 confirmed the binding modes of the compounds we designed. This report is notable for being the first discovery of a c-helix-out inhibitor against TAK1.

  14. Comparison of structure and dynamics of micelle-bound human alpha-synuclein and Parkinson disease variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Tobias S; Bax, Ad

    2005-12-30

    Three point mutations (A30P, E46K, and A53T) as well as gene triplication genetically link the 140-residue protein alpha-synuclein (aS) to the development of Parkinson disease. Here, the structure and dynamics of micelle-bound aS(A30P) and aS(A53T) are described and compared with wild-type aS, in addition to describing the aS-micelle interaction. A53T is sensed only by directly adjacent residues and leaves the backbone structure and dynamics indistinguishable from the wild type. A30P interrupts one helix turn (Val26-Ala29) and destabilizes the preceding one. A shift in helix register following A30P disturbs the canonical succession of polar and hydrophobic residues for at least two turns. The shortened helix-N adopts a slightly higher helical content and is less bent, indicating that strain was present in the micelle-bound helix. In the vicinity of the A30P-induced perturbations, the underlying micelle environment has rearranged, but nevertheless all aS variants maintain similar interrelationships with the micelle. Moreover, aS-micelle immersion correlates well with fast and slow aS backbone dynamics, allowing a rare insight into protein-micelle interplay.

  15. Structural dynamics of potassium-channel gating revealed by single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizhen; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Borschel, William F; Ha, Taekjip; Nichols, Colin G

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography has provided invaluable insights regarding ion-channel selectivity and gating, but to advance understanding to a new level, dynamic views of channel structures within membranes are essential. We labeled tetrameric KirBac1.1 potassium channels with single donor and acceptor fluorophores at different sites and then examined structural dynamics within lipid membranes by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). We found that the extracellular region is structurally rigid in both closed and open states, whereas the N-terminal slide helix undergoes marked conformational fluctuations. The cytoplasmic C-terminal domain fluctuates between two major structural states, both of which become less dynamic and move away from the pore axis and away from the membrane in closed channels. Our results reveal mobile and rigid conformations of functionally relevant KirBac1.1 channel motifs, implying similar dynamics for similar motifs in eukaryotic Kir channels and in cation channels in general.

  16. Structural dynamics of potassium channel gating revealed by single molecule FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschel, William F.; Ha, Taekjip; Nichols, Colin G.

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography has provided invaluable insights to ion channel selectivity and gating, but to advance understanding to a new level, dynamic views of channel structures within membranes are essential. We labeled tetrameric KirBac1.1 potassium channels with single donor and acceptor fluorophores at different sites, and examined structural dynamics within lipid membranes by single molecule FRET. We found that the extracellular region is structurally rigid in both closed and open states, whereas the N-terminal slide helix undergoes marked conformational fluctuations. The cytoplasmic C-terminal domain fluctuates between two major structural states both of which become less dynamic and move away from the pore axis and away from the membrane in closed channels. Our results reveal mobile and rigid conformations of functionally relevant KirBac1.1 channel motifs, implying similar dynamics for similar motifs in eukaryotic Kir channels and for cation channels in general. PMID:26641713

  17. Primary structural dynamics in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Sascha; Liang Wenxi; Zewail, Ahmed H, E-mail: zewail@caltech.edu [Physical Biology Center for Ultrafast Science and Technology, Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The structural dynamics of graphite and graphene are unique, because of the selective coupling between electron and lattice motions and hence the limit on electric and electro-optic properties. Here, we report on the femtosecond probing of graphite films (1-3 nm) using ultrafast electron crystallography in the transmission mode. Two time scales are observed for the dynamics: a 700 fs initial decrease in diffraction intensity due to lattice phonons in optically dark regions of the Brillouin zone, followed by a 12 ps decrease due to phonon thermalization near the {Gamma} and K regions. These results indicate the non-equilibrium distortion of the unit cells at early time and the subsequent role of long-wavelength atomic motions in the thermalization process. Theory and experiment are now in agreement regarding the nature of nuclear motions, but the results suggest that potential change plays a role in the lateral dynamics of the lattice.

  18. Structurally Dynamic Spin Market Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Denis; Kuscsik, Zoltán

    The agent-based model of stock price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. The inherent structure of node agent "brain" is modeled by a recursive neural network with local and global inputs and feedback connections. For specific parametric combination the complex network displays small-world phenomenon combined with scale-free behavior. The identification of a local leader (network hub, agent whose strategies are frequently adapted by its neighbors) is carried out by repeated random walk process through network. The simulations show empirically relevant dynamics of price returns and volatility clustering. The additional emerging aspects of stylized market statistics are Zipfian distributions of fitness.

  19. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47: minimal structural requirement and spatial molecular orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Asada, Shinichi; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-02-10

    The unique folding of procollagens in the endoplasmic reticulum is achieved with the assistance of procollagen-specific molecular chaperones. Heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone that plays an essential role in normal procollagen folding, although its molecular function has not yet been clarified. Recent advances in studies on the binding specificity of HSP47 have revealed that Arg residues at Yaa positions in collagenous Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats are critical for its interactions (Koide, T., Takahara, Y., Asada, S., and Nagata, K. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 6178-6182; Tasab, M., Jenkinson, L., and Bulleid, N. J. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 35007-35012). In the present study, we further examined the client recognition mechanism of HSP47 by taking advantage of systems employing engineered collagen model peptides. First, in vitro binding studies using conformationally constrained collagen-like peptides revealed that HSP47 only recognized correctly folded triple helices and that the interaction with the corresponding single-chain polypeptides was negligible. Second, a binding study using heterotrimeric model clients for HSP47 demonstrated a minimal requirement for the number of Arg residues in the triple helix. Finally, a cross-linking study using photoreactive collagenous peptides provided information about the spatial orientation of an HSP47 molecule in the chaperone-collagen complex. The obtained results led to the development of a new model of HSP47-collagen complexes that differs completely from the previously proposed "flying capstan model" (Dafforn, T. R., Della, M., and Miller, A. D. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 49310-49319).

  20. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-05

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the η(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the FeCH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Control of Collagen Triple Helix Stability by Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Jake, Amanda M; Ngo, Daniel H; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2017-03-10

    The phosphorylation of the collagen triple helix plays an important role in collagen synthesis, assembly, signaling, and immune response, although no reports detailing the effect this modification has on the structure and stability of the triple helix exist. Here we investigate the changes in stability and structure resulting from the phosphorylation of collagen. Additionally, the formation of pairwise interactions between phosphorylated residues and lysine is examined. In all tested cases, phosphorylation increases helix stability. When charged-pair interactions are possible, stabilization via phosphorylation can play a very large role, resulting inasmuch as a 13.0 °C increase in triple helix stability. Two-dimensional NMR and molecular modeling are used to study the local structure of the triple helix. Our results suggest a mechanism of action for phosphorylation in the regulation of collagen and also expand upon our understanding of pairwise amino acid stabilization of the collagen triple helix.

  2. Dynamic Range Majority Data Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Elmasry, Amr; HE, MENG; Munro, J. Ian; Nicholson, Patrick K.

    2011-01-01

    Given a set $P$ of coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range $\\alpha$-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on $P$. More specifically, for a query range $Q$, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an $\\alpha$-fraction of the points contained in $Q$. We present a new data structure for answering range $\\alpha$-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where $\\alpha \\in (0,1)$. Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in $O((\\lg...

  3. Microfibrillar structure of PGG-glucan in aqueous solution as triple-helix aggregates by small angle x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, M; Park, J T; Magee, A S; Conrad, H

    1999-11-01

    The conformation of polysaccharide PGG-Glucan, isolated from yeast cell walls, in aqueous solution was investigated by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and multidetector gel permeation chromatography coupled with postcolumn delivery (GPC/PCD) techniques in comparison with scleroglucan. It was shown that both polysaccharides exhibit a rigid rod-like conformation in aqueous solution by SAXS experiments. The mass per unit length (M/L) and radius (R) of rod cross section of PGG-Glucan were measured to be 6300 daltons/nm and 1.89 nm, while those of scleroglucan are 2300 and 0.83, respectively. Utilizing a GPC/light scattering technique, the average aggregation number of PGG-Glucan is 9, while that of scleroglucan is around 3. From the comparison of the M/L and R of the respective rod cross sections as well as their aggregation number data, it is concluded that PGG-Glucan is composed of triple helices, which tend to aggregate as triplets in solution, whereas scleroglucan is composed of a single triple helix. The aggregation number distribution of PGG-Glucan was found to range from 1 to about 25 determined by GPC/PCD. From the observation of a Debye-Scherrer ring type of peak in the macroscopic scattering cross section of PGG-Glucan by SAXS, the existence of a small amount of ordered clusters of PGG-Glucan can be deduced. The "lattice parameter" of these ordered fasces-like clusters is consistent with the radius of the individual triple-helical rods forming a microfibrillar superstructure. These results indicate that higher aggregated forms of PGG-Glucan containing up to 8 triple helices behave as ordered fasces-like clusters. We conclude that PGG-Glucan is triple-helix aggregates formed by rigid rods stacking together side by side. We propose a molecular structural model for PGG-Glucan conformations.

  4. Helix A Stabilization Precedes Amino-terminal Lobe Activation upon Calcium Binding to Calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baowei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lowry, David [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mayer, M. Uljana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Squier, Thomas C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-08-09

    The structural coupling between opposing domains of CaM was investigated using the conformationally sensitive biarsenical probe 4,5-bis(1,3,2-dithioarsolan-2-yl)-resorufin (ReAsH), which upon binding to an engineered tetracysteine binding motif near the end of helix A (Thr-5 to Phe-19) becomes highly fluorescent. Changes in conformation and dynamics are reflective of the native CaM structure, as there is no change in the 1H-15N HSQC NMR spectrum in comparison to wild-type CaM. We find evidence of a conformational intermediate associated with CaM activation, where calcium occupancy of sites in the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal lobes of CaM differentially affect the fluorescence intensity of bound ReAsH. Insight into the structure of the conformational intermediate is possible from a consideration of calcium-dependent changes in rates of ReAsH binding and helix A mobility, which respectively distinguish secondary structural changes associated with helix A stabilization from the tertiary structural reorganization of the amino-terminal lobe of CaM necessary for high-affinity binding to target proteins. Helix A stabilization is associated with calcium occupancy of sites in the carboxyl-terminal lobe (Kd = 0.36 ± 0.04 μM), which results in a reduction in the rate of ReAsH binding from 4900 M-1 sec-1 to 370 M-1 sec-1. In comparison, tertiary structural changes involving helix A and other structural elements in the amino-terminal lobe requires calcium-occupancy of amino-terminal sites (Kd = 18 ± 3 μM). Observed secondary and tertiary structural changes involving helix A in response to the sequential calcium occupancy of carboxyl- and amino-terminal lobe calcium binding sites suggest an important involvement of helix A in mediating the structural coupling between the opposing domains of CaM. These results are discussed in terms of a model in which carboxyl-terminal lobe calcium activation induces

  5. Dynamic Range Majority Data Structures

    CERN Document Server

    He, Meng; Nicholson, Patrick K

    2011-01-01

    Given a set $P$ of coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range $\\alpha$-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on $P$. More specifically, for a query range $Q$, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an $\\alpha$-fraction of the points contained in $Q$. We present a new data structure for answering range $\\alpha$-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where $\\alpha \\in (0,1)$. Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in $O((\\lg n) / \\alpha)$ time, and updates in $O((\\lg n) / \\alpha)$ amortized time. If the coordinates of the points are integers, then the query time can be improved to $O(\\lg n / (\\alpha \\lg \\lg n) + (\\lg(1/\\alpha))/\\alpha))$. For constant values of $\\alpha$, this improved query time matches an existing lower bound, for any data structure with polylogarithmic update time. We also generalize our data structure to handle sets of points in d-dimensions, for $d \\ge 2$, as well as dynamic arrays, in which each entry is a colour.

  6. Double-helix stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  7. Twelve lectures on structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Preumont, André

    2013-01-01

    This text addresses the modeling of vibrating systems with the perspective of finding the model of minimum complexity which accounts for the physics of the phenomena at play. The first half of the book (Ch.1-6) deals with the dynamics of discrete and continuous mechanical systems; the classical approach emphasizes the use of Lagrange's equations. The second half of the book (Ch.7-12) deals with more advanced topics, rarely encountered in the existing literature: seismic excitation, random vibration (including fatigue), rotor dynamics, vibration isolation and dynamic vibration absorbers; the final chapter is an introduction to active control of vibrations. The first part of this text may be used as a one semester course for 3rd year students in Mechanical, Aerospace or Civil Engineering. The second part of the text is intended for graduate classes. A set of problems is provided at the end of every chapter. The author has a 35 years experience in various aspects of Structural dynamics, both in industry (nuclea...

  8. RESEARCH ON NONLINEAR PROBLEMS IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research on nonlinear problems structural dynamics is briefly summarized. Panel flutter was investigated to make a critical comparison between theory...panel flutter in aerospace vehicles, plausible simplifying assumptions are examined in the light of experimental results. Structural dynamics research

  9. Waardecreatie in triple helix : Recepten voor triple helix samenwerking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.M.; Vries, F. de

    2016-01-01

    Om innovaties in het veiligheidsdomein te realiseren worden triple helix samenwerkingen gezien als een belangrijke motor. Een triple helix samenwerking is een tijdelijk samenwerkingsverband tussen drie of meer organisaties die middelen, risico’s en opbrengsten delen om individuele organisatiedoelen,

  10. Structural dynamic modification using additive damping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B C Nakra

    2000-06-01

    In order to control dynamic response in structures and machines, modofications using additive viscoelastic damping materials are highlighted. The techniques described for analysis include analytical methods for structural elements, FEM and perturbation methods for reanalysis or structural dynamic modifications for complex structures. Optimisation techniques are used for damping effectiveness include multi-parameter optimisatoin techniques and a technique using dynamic sensitivity analysis and structural dynamic modification. These have been applied for optimum dynamic design of structures incorporating viscoelastic damping. Some current trends for vibraton control are also discussed.

  11. Simulation on Mechanical Properties of Triple -helix Artificial Chordae Structure%三螺旋人工腱索结构的力学性能仿真验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常丽南; 宋成利; 沈桐; 梅举; 戴黄栋

    2015-01-01

    Bionic equivalent triple -helix artificial chordae structure was estabilished based on the structure of real heart mitral valve chordae.ABAQUS was applied to simulate the tensile tests.Simulation results were analyzed and compared with real chordae (marginal、basal and strut chordae)tensile properties to vertify feasibility and correctness of model.Results showed that the maximum stress of spiral chordae was consistent with the actual average maximum stress.Besides,force displacement curves of all kinds of chor-dae were basically in accordance with test curves.This proposed triple -helix equivalent model is closer to the real chordae’s proper-ties and can reduce stress concentration on mitral leaflets,which indicating a new direction to the structure improvements of artificial chordae materials and providing reference for finite element researches on soft tissue tensile properties module.%基于真实心脏二尖瓣腱索结构,利用仿生学类比方法提出整体三螺旋人工腱索等效替代模型,应用 ABAQUS 对其进行模拟拉伸测试,并与真实拉伸试验下猪心二尖瓣腱索(边缘腱索、基底腱索与支撑腱索)的力学性能进行对比分析,从而验证此等效模型的可行性与有效性。结果表明:三螺旋人工腱索结构所能承受的最大应力与实际试验中的平均最大应力一致,且相应腱索种类的拉力位移曲线与试验曲线基本相符。本研究提出的三螺旋人工腱索结构接近于真实腱索特性,可缓解二尖瓣膜上应力集中现象,为人工腱索材料的结构改进指明了新方向,同时,仿真过程对有限元模拟生物软组织拉伸性能模块提供了参考价值。

  12. Structure and dynamics of solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtaki, H

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of structural and dynamic properties of solutions have provided a molecular picture of solute-solvent interactions. Although the study of thermodynamic as well as electronic properties of solutions have played a role in the development of research on the rate and mechanism of chemical reactions, such macroscopic and microscopic properties are insufficient for a deeper understanding of fast chemical and biological reactions. In order to fill the gap between the two extremes, it is necessary to know how molecules are arranged in solution and how they change their pos

  13. The vaccinia virus 14-kilodalton (A27L) fusion protein forms a triple coiled-coil structure and interacts with the 21-kilodalton (A17L) virus membrane protein through a C-terminal alpha-helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, M I; Rivas, G; Cregut, D; Serrano, L; Esteban, M

    1998-12-01

    The vaccinia virus 14-kDa protein (encoded by the A27L gene) plays an important role in the biology of the virus, acting in virus-to-cell and cell-to-cell fusions. The protein is located on the surface of the intracellular mature virus form and is essential for both the release of extracellular enveloped virus from the cells and virus spread. Sequence analysis predicts the existence of four regions in this protein: a structureless region from amino acids 1 to 28, a helical region from residues 29 to 37, a triple coiled-coil helical region from residues 44 to 72, and a Leu zipper motif at the C terminus. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and chemical cross-linking studies of the purified wild-type protein and several mutant forms, lacking one or more of the above regions or with point mutations, support the above-described structural division of the 14-kDa protein. The two contiguous cysteine residues at positions 71 and 72 are not responsible for the formation of 14-kDa protein trimers. The location of hydrophobic residues at the a and d positions on a helical wheel and of charged amino acids in adjacent positions, e and g, suggests that the hydrophobic and ionic interactions in the triple coiled-coil helical region are involved in oligomer formation. This conjecture was supported by the construction of a three-helix bundle model and molecular dynamics. Binding assays with purified proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and cytoplasmic extracts from cells infected with a virus that does not produce the 14-kDa protein during infection (VVindA27L) show that the 21-kDa protein (encoded by the A17L gene) is the specific viral binding partner and identify the putative Leu zipper, the predicted third alpha-helix on the C terminus of the 14-kDa protein, as the region involved in protein binding. These findings were confirmed in vivo, following transfection of animal cells with plasmid vectors expressing mutant forms of the 14-kDa protein and

  14. pH jump induced α-helix folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donten M. L.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available pH can be used to impact the folding equilibrium of peptides and proteins. This fact is utilized, similarly to temperature jumps, in pH jump experiments employing laser time-resolved spectroscopy to study the function and structural dynamics of these molecules. Here the application of pH jumps in folding experiments was investigated. Experiments with poly-L-glutamic acid alpha-helix formation shown the critical aspects of pH jump experiments and yielded direct information about the folding kinetics monitored with the amide I IR band.

  15. Dynamic range majority data structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmasry, Amr Ahmed Abd Elmoneim; He, Meng; Munro, J. Ian

    2011-01-01

    Given a set P of n coloured points on the real line, we study the problem of answering range α-majority (or "heavy hitter") queries on P. More specifically, for a query range Q, we want to return each colour that is assigned to more than an α-fraction of the points contained in Q. We present a new...... data structure for answering range α-majority queries on a dynamic set of points, where α ε (0,1). Our data structure uses O(n) space, supports queries in O((lg n)/α) time, and updates in O((lg n)/α) amortized time. If the coordinates of the points are integers, then the query time can be improved to O...

  16. Sierra Structural Dynamics Theory Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Garth M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Sierra/SD provides a massively parallel implementation of structural dynamics finite element analysis, required for high fidelity, validated models used in modal, vibration, static and shock analysis of structural systems. This manual describes the theory behind many of the constructs in Sierra/SD. For a more detailed description of how to use Sierra/SD , we refer the reader to Sierra/SD, User's Notes . Many of the constructs in Sierra/SD are pulled directly from published material. Where possible, these materials are referenced herein. However, certain functions in Sierra/SD are specific to our implementation. We try to be far more complete in those areas. The theory manual was developed from several sources including general notes, a programmer notes manual, the user's notes and of course the material in the open literature. This page intentionally left blank.

  17. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  18. Comparing an Atomic Model or Structure to a Corresponding Cryo-electron Microscopy Image at the Central Axis of a Helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeil, Stephanie; Kovacs, Julio; Wriggers, Willy; He, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional density maps of biological specimens from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) can be interpreted in the form of atomic models that are modeled into the density, or they can be compared to known atomic structures. When the central axis of a helix is detectable in a cryo-EM density map, it is possible to quantify the agreement between this central axis and a central axis calculated from the atomic model or structure. We propose a novel arc-length association method to compare the two axes reliably. This method was applied to 79 helices in simulated density maps and six case studies using cryo-EM maps at 6.4-7.7 Å resolution. The arc-length association method is then compared to three existing measures that evaluate the separation of two helical axes: a two-way distance between point sets, the length difference between two axes, and the individual amino acid detection accuracy. The results show that our proposed method sensitively distinguishes lateral and longitudinal discrepancies between the two axes, which makes the method particularly suitable for the systematic investigation of cryo-EM map-model pairs.

  19. NMR Structure and CD Titration with Metal Cations of Human Prion α2-Helix-Related Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ronga

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The 173–195 segment corresponding to the helix 2 of the C-globular prion protein domain could be one of several “spots” of intrinsic conformational flexibility. In fact, it possesses chameleon conformational behaviour and gathers several disease-associated point mutations. We have performed spectroscopic studies on the wild-type fragment 173–195 and on its D178N mutant dissolved in trifluoroethanol to mimic the in vivo system, both in the presence and in the absence of metal cations. NMR data showed that the structure of the D178N mutant is characterized by two short helices separated by a kink, whereas the wild-type peptide is fully helical. Both peptides retained these structural organizations, as monitored by CD, in the presence of metal cations. NMR spectra were however not in favour of the formation of definite ion-peptide complexes. This agrees with previous evidence that other regions of the prion protein are likely the natural target of metal cation binding.

  20. Conformational flexibility and structural dynamics in GPCR-mediated G protein activation: a perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preininger, Anita M.; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of G proteins and their cognate receptors, both alone and in complex, are becoming increasingly accessible to experimental techniques. Understanding the conformational changes and timelines which govern these changes can lead to new insights into the processes of ligand binding and associated G protein activation. Experimental systems may involve the use of, or otherwise stabilize, non-native environments. This can complicate our understanding of structural and dynamical features of processes such as the ionic lock, Tryptophan toggle, and G protein flexibility. While elements in the receptor’s transmembrane helices and the C-terminal α5 helix of Gα undergo well defined structural changes, regions subject to conformational flexibility may be important in fine-tuning the interactions between activated receptors and G proteins. The pairing of computational and experimental approaches will continue to provide powerful tools to probe the conformation and dynamics of receptor-mediated G protein activation. PMID:23602809

  1. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems, on t

  2. Two distinct conformations of helix 6 observed in antagonist-bound structures of a β1-adrenergic receptor

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor whose inactive state structure was determined using a thermostabilized mutant (β1AR–M23). However, it was not thought to be in a fully inactivated state because there was no salt bridge between Arg139 and Glu285 linking the cytoplasmic ends of transmembrane helices 3 and 6 (the R3.50 - D/E6.30 “ionic lock”). Here we compare eight new structures of β1AR–M23, determined from crystallographically independent molecules in four diff...

  3. The crystal structure of Z-(Aib)10-OH at 0.65 Å resolution: three complete turns of 310-helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2016-02-01

    The synthetic peptide Z-(Aib)10-OH was crystallized from hot methanol by slow evaporation. The crystal used for data collection reflected synchrotron radiation to sub-atomic resolution, where the bonding electron density becomes visible between the non-hydrogen atoms. Crystals belong to the centrosymmetric space group P1. Both molecules in the asymmetric unit form regular 310 -helices. All residues in each molecule possess the same handedness, which is in contrast to all other crystal structure determined to date of longer Aib-homopeptides. These other peptides are C-terminal protected by OtBu or OMe. In these cases, because of the missing ability of the C-terminal protection group to form a hydrogen bond to the residue i-3, the sense of the helix is reversed in the last residue. Here, the C-terminal OH-groups form hydrogen bonds to the residues i-3, in part mediated by water molecules. This makes Z-(Aib)10-OH an Aib-homopeptide with three complete 310-helical turns in spite of the shorter length it has compared with Z-(Aib)11-OtBu, the only homopeptide to date with three complete turns.

  4. Monolayers of a De Novo Designed 4-Alpha-Helix Bundle Carboprotein and Partial Structures on Au(111)-Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Jesper; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Mapping of structure and function of proteins adsorbed on solid surfaces is important in many contexts. Electrochemical techniques based on single-crystal metal surfaces and in situ scanning probe microscopies (SPM) have recently opened new perspectives for mapping at the single-molecule level. D...

  5. Noncanonical structures and their thermodynamics of DNA and RNA under molecular crowding: beyond the Watson-Crick double helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    How does molecular crowding affect the stability of nucleic acid structures inside cells? Water is the major solvent component in living cells, and the properties of water in the highly crowded media inside cells differ from that in buffered solution. As it is difficult to measure the thermodynamic behavior of nucleic acids in cells directly and quantitatively, we recently developed a cell-mimicking system using cosolutes as crowding reagents. The influences of molecular crowding on the structures and thermodynamics of various nucleic acid sequences have been reported. In this chapter, we discuss how the structures and thermodynamic properties of nucleic acids differ under various conditions such as highly crowded environments, compartment environments, and in the presence of ionic liquids, and the major determinants of the crowding effects on nucleic acids are discussed. The effects of molecular crowding on the activities of ribozymes and riboswitches on noncanonical structures of DNA- and RNA-like quadruplexes that play important roles in transcription and translation are also described.

  6. Resolution of structural heterogeneity in dynamic crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhong; Chan, Peter W Y; Moffat, Keith; Pai, Emil F; Royer, William E; Šrajer, Vukica; Yang, Xiaojing

    2013-06-01

    Dynamic behavior of proteins is critical to their function. X-ray crystallography, a powerful yet mostly static technique, faces inherent challenges in acquiring dynamic information despite decades of effort. Dynamic `structural changes' are often indirectly inferred from `structural differences' by comparing related static structures. In contrast, the direct observation of dynamic structural changes requires the initiation of a biochemical reaction or process in a crystal. Both the direct and the indirect approaches share a common challenge in analysis: how to interpret the structural heterogeneity intrinsic to all dynamic processes. This paper presents a real-space approach to this challenge, in which a suite of analytical methods and tools to identify and refine the mixed structural species present in multiple crystallographic data sets have been developed. These methods have been applied to representative scenarios in dynamic crystallography, and reveal structural information that is otherwise difficult to interpret or inaccessible using conventional methods.

  7. Reversible folding/unfolding of small α-helix in explicit solvent investigated by ABEEMσπ/MM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations on the reversible folding/unfolding of small α-helix(short Ala based peptide Ala5) in explicit water solvent in terms of ABEEMσπ/MM.A dynamics analysis shows that the α-helical turn can be preserved up to a period of about 2 ns at 300 K,which supports the conclusions of Margulis et al.The time trajectory of the root mean square deviation between the heavy atoms of the backbone and the helical reference structure indicate that "helix melting and formation occurs rapidly on a time scale of 0.1 ns at 300 K" is not a felicitous conclusion.We first quantificationally concluded that the helix nucleation can maintain 2 ns,1―1.5 ns and 0.8 ns for Ala5 at 300 K,400 K and 500 K,respectively.Furthermore,increasing temperature dose not alter the pathway of folding/unfolding,but change the rate.An analysis of structures in a "transition-state ensemble" shows that helix-to-coil transitions occurs predominantly through breaking of hydrogen bonds at the helix ends(92%),particularly at the C-terminus(50%).Hydrogen bonds’ breaking and formation occurs on a time scale of 0.1 ns.

  8. Structure and mutagenesis of the parainfluenza virus 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase stalk domain reveals a four-helix bundle and the role of the stalk in fusion promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D; Kors, Christopher A; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Lamb, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 Å, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  9. Structure and Mutagenesis of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Stalk Domain Reveals a Four-Helix Bundle and the Role of the Stalk in Fusion Promotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sayantan; Welch, Brett D.; Kors, Christopher A.; Yuan, Ping; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A. (NWU); (Stanford-MED)

    2014-10-02

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires the fusion protein (F) and a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin-neuraminidase [HN], H, or G). The multifunctional HN protein of some paramyxoviruses, besides functioning as the receptor (sialic acid) binding protein (hemagglutinin activity) and the receptor-destroying protein (neuraminidase activity), enhances F activity, presumably by lowering the activation energy required for F to mediate fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Before or upon receptor binding by the HN globular head, F is believed to interact with the HN stalk. Unfortunately, until recently none of the receptor binding protein crystal structures have shown electron density for the stalk domain. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) HN exists as a noncovalent dimer-of-dimers on the surface of cells, linked by a single disulfide bond in the stalk. Here we present the crystal structure of the PIV5-HN stalk domain at a resolution of 2.65 {angstrom}, revealing a four-helix bundle (4HB) with an upper (N-terminal) straight region and a lower (C-terminal) supercoiled part. The hydrophobic core residues are a mix of an 11-mer repeat and a 3- to 4-heptad repeat. To functionally characterize the role of the HN stalk in F interactions and fusion, we designed mutants along the PIV5-HN stalk that are N-glycosylated to physically disrupt F-HN interactions. By extensive study of receptor binding, neuraminidase activity, oligomerization, and fusion-promoting functions of the mutant proteins, we found a correlation between the position of the N-glycosylation mutants on the stalk structure and their neuraminidase activities as well as their abilities to promote fusion.

  10. Structure of the Newcastle disease virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) ectodomain reveals a four-helix bundle stalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ping; Swanson, Kurt A.; Leser, George P.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (Stanford-MED); (NWU)

    2014-10-02

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein plays multiple roles in viral entry and egress, including binding to sialic acid receptors, activating the fusion (F) protein to activate membrane fusion and viral entry, and cleaving sialic acid from carbohydrate chains. HN is an oligomeric integral membrane protein consisting of an N-terminal transmembrane domain, a stalk region, and an enzymatically active neuraminidase (NA) domain. Structures of the HN NA domains have been solved previously; however, the structure of the stalk region has remained elusive. The stalk region contains specificity determinants for F interactions and activation, underlying the requirement for homotypic F and HN interactions in viral entry. Mutations of the Newcastle disease virus HN stalk region have been shown to affect both F activation and NA activities, but a structural basis for understanding these dual affects on HN functions has been lacking. Here, we report the structure of the Newcastle disease virus HN ectodomain, revealing dimers of NA domain dimers flanking the N-terminal stalk domain. The stalk forms a parallel tetrameric coiled-coil bundle (4HB) that allows classification of extensive mutational data, providing insight into the functional roles of the stalk region. Mutations that affect both F activation and NA activities map predominantly to the 4HB hydrophobic core, whereas mutations that affect only F-protein activation map primarily to the 4HB surface. Two of four NA domains interact with the 4HB stalk, and residues at this interface in both the stalk and NA domain have been implicated in HN function.

  11. The crystal structures of the calcium-bound con-G and con-T[K7gamma] dimeric peptides demonstrate a metal-dependent helix-forming motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnudde, Sara E; Prorok, Mary; Dai, Qiuyun; Castellino, Francis J; Geiger, James H

    2007-02-14

    Short peptides that have the ability to form stable alpha-helices in solution are rare, and a number of strategies have been used to produce them, including the use of metal chelation to stabilize folding of the backbone. However, no example exists of a structurally well-defined helix stabilized exclusively through metal ion chelation. Conantokins (con)-G and -T are short peptides that are potent antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels. While con-G exhibits no helicity alone, it undergoes a structural transition to a helical conformation in the presence of a variety of multivalent cations, especially Mg2+ and Ca2+. This complexation also results in antiparallel dimerization of two peptide helices in the presence of Ca2+, but not Mg2+. A con-T variant, con-T[K7gamma], displays very similar behavior. We have solved the crystal structures of both Ca2+/con-G and Ca2+/con-T [K7gamma] at atomic resolution. These structures clearly show the nature of the metal-dependent dimerization and helix formation and surprisingly also show that the con-G dimer interface is completely different from the con-T[K7gamma] interface, even though the metal chelation is similar in the two peptides. This represents a new paradigm in helix stabilization completely independent of the hydrophobic effect, which we define as the "metallo-zipper."

  12. The Influenza A Virus Non-structural Protein NS1 Upregulates The Expression of Collagen Triple Helix Repeat Containing 1 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C; Peng, G; Yi, W; Song, H; Liu, F; Liu, X

    2016-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection induces a strong immune response and regulates the expression of many host proteins. The collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) protein is a secreted protein that exhibits increased expression during the viral infection process. However, the regulatory function of IAV on CTHRC1 expression is obscure. In this study, we investigated the effect of IAV on CTHRC1 expression and its regulatory mechanism. A total of 106 serum specimens from healthy people and 80 serum specimens from patients infected with IAV were collected. The CTHRC1 levels in the sera from the IVA patients and healthy individuals were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the differences were statistically analysed. A549 cells were infected with the IAV or delNS1 virus. Additionally, A549 cells were cotransfected with a eukaryotic non-structural NS1 protein gene expression plasmid and the CTHRC1 gene promoter reporter plasmid (pCTHRC1-Luc), and, the luciferase activities were assessed. The CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. The serum CTHRC1 level was significantly higher in the IAV patients than in the healthy individuals. IAV upregulated the CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression. The non-structural NS1 protein specifically activated CTHRC1 gene promoter activity and upregulated CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression. The activation function had a dose-dependent effect, indicating that influenza virus upregulated CTHRC1 expression through its NS1 protein.

  13. Efficient Fatigue Analysis of Helix Elements in Umbilicals and Flexible Risers: Theory and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Skeie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue analysis of structural components such as helix tensile armors and steel tubes is a critical design issue for dynamic umbilicals and flexible pipes. The basis for assessment of fatigue damage of such elements is the long-term stress cycle distribution at critical locations on the helix elements caused by long-term environmental loading on the system. The long-term stress cycle distribution will hence require global dynamic time domain analysis followed by a detailed cross-sectional analysis in a large number of irregular sea states. An overall computational consistent and efficient fatigue analysis scheme is outlined with due regard of the cross-sectional analysis technique required for fatigue stress calculation with particular attention to the helix elements. The global cross-section is exposed to pure bending, tensile, torsion, and pressure loading. The state of the different cross-section elements is based on the global response. Special emphasis is placed on assessment of friction stresses caused by the stick-slip behavior of helix elements in bending that are of special importance for fatigue life assessments. The described cross-sectional analysis techniques are based on an extensive literature survey and are hence considered to represent industry consensus. The performance of the described calculation scheme is illustrated by case studies.

  14. Structural Effects of L16Q, S20G, and L16Q-S20G Mutations on hlAPP: A Comparative Molecular Dynamics Study%Structural Effects of L16Q, S20G, and L16Q-S20G Mutations on hlAPP: A Comparative Molecular Dynamics Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang, Mian; Yang, Jipeng; Wang, Jianyi; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2012-01-01

    The conformation change picture of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hlAPP) is outlined using molecular dynamics simulation, and the structural influences of L16Q, S20G, and L16Q-S20G mutations on the conformation of hlAPP are analyzed. Particularly, the conformational changes of the amyloidogenic-related regions of residues 15-- 17 and 20--29 are emphasized. Our studies find that, for WT hlAPP, residues 15--17 always maintain a stable a-helix structure, residues 20--25 structurally fluctuate between turn and 5-helix, and residues 26--29 mainly adopt coil and bend structures. The hydrogen bonds between the polar groups of hlAPP, long-rang van der Waals forces between the residues, and hydrophobic interactions between the residues of hlAPP are important driving forces to maintain the secondary structure of hlAPP. The replacement of leucine 16 by glutamine stabilizes the helix structure of residues 15--17 and 20--23 of hlAPP monomer, and the structure of residues 24--29 fluctuates be- tween helix and turn. The relatively stable helix structures of residues 15--17 and 20--29 are supposed to be beneficial for L16Q hlAPP to resist the aggregation as observed in the experiment. The substitution of serine20 by glycinc drives residues 15--17 and 20--29 of hlAPP to transform from helix structure to β-strands or coil structures with higher extension and flexibility, which may promote the aggregation of hlAPP as the experiments reported. These results are significant to understand the aggregation mechanism of hlAPP monomer into the dimer, trimer, oligomers and fibrils associated with the type 2 diabetes at the atomic level.

  15. Dynamic analysis and design of offshore structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekaran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    This book  attempts to provide readers with an overall idea of various types of offshore platform geometries. It covers the various environmental loads encountered by these structures, a detailed description of the fundamentals of structural dynamics in a class-room style, estimate of damping in offshore structures and their applications in the preliminary analysis and design. Basic concepts of structural dynamics are emphasized through simple illustrative examples and exercises. Design methodologies and guidelines, which are FORM based concepts are explained through a few applied example structures. Each chapter also has tutorials and exercises for self-learning. A dedicated chapter on stochastic dynamics will help the students to extend the basic concepts of structural dynamics to this advanced domain of research. Hydrodynamic response of offshore structures with perforated members is one of the recent research applications, which is found to be one of the effective manner of retrofitting offshore structur...

  16. Transforming Static Data Structures to Dynamic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-03

    2C*(N))) f?, (Ps(N)) n (N). The last two Inequalities both follow from the fact that PS grows at least linearly. QED. Maurer and Ottmann [1979...Maurer, H. A. and T. Ottmann C1979]. "Dynamic solutions of decomposable searching problems," Report 33, Institut fur Informationsverabeltung

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation study on zwitterionic structure to maintain the natural behavior of polyalanine13 in aqueous environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are applied to the initial stage of polyalanine13 conformational transition from α-helix to random coil in aqueous environment and the interaction of polyalanine13 with zwitterionic and hydrophobic surfaces respectively in the same condition. The analysis of secondary structure, hydrogen bonds, RMSD, dihedral distribution, and the degree of adsorption are performed. The results show that zwitterionic structure maintains the natural behavior of polyalanine13 in water to a better extent, which should be an indirect proof of the hypothesis of "maintain of normal structure."

  18. Motion Tree Delineates Hierarchical Structure of Protein Dynamics Observed in Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Moritsugu

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics (MD simulations of proteins provide important information to understand their functional mechanisms, which are, however, likely to be hidden behind their complicated motions with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A straightforward and intuitive analysis of protein dynamics observed in MD simulation trajectories is therefore of growing significance with the large increase in both the simulation time and system size. In this study, we propose a novel description of protein motions based on the hierarchical clustering of fluctuations in the inter-atomic distances calculated from an MD trajectory, which constructs a single tree diagram, named a "Motion Tree", to determine a set of rigid-domain pairs hierarchically along with associated inter-domain fluctuations. The method was first applied to the MD trajectory of substrate-free adenylate kinase to clarify the usefulness of the Motion Tree, which illustrated a clear-cut dynamics picture of the inter-domain motions involving the ATP/AMP lid and the core domain together with the associated amplitudes and correlations. The comparison of two Motion Trees calculated from MD simulations of ligand-free and -bound glutamine binding proteins clarified changes in inherent dynamics upon ligand binding appeared in both large domains and a small loop that stabilized ligand molecule. Another application to a huge protein, a multidrug ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter, captured significant increases of fluctuations upon binding a drug molecule observed in both large scale inter-subunit motions and a motion localized at a transmembrane helix, which may be a trigger to the subsequent structural change from inward-open to outward-open states to transport the drug molecule. These applications demonstrated the capabilities of Motion Trees to provide an at-a-glance view of various sizes of functional motions inherent in the complicated MD trajectory.

  19. Predicting protein dynamics from structural ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Copperman, J

    2015-01-01

    The biological properties of proteins are uniquely determined by their structure and dynamics. A protein in solution populates a structural ensemble of metastable configurations around the global fold. From overall rotation to local fluctuations, the dynamics of proteins can cover several orders of magnitude in time scales. We propose a simulation-free coarse-grained approach which utilizes knowledge of the important metastable folded states of the protein to predict the protein dynamics. This approach is based upon the Langevin Equation for Protein Dynamics (LE4PD), a Langevin formalism in the coordinates of the protein backbone. The linear modes of this Langevin formalism organize the fluctuations of the protein, so that more extended dynamical cooperativity relates to increasing energy barriers to mode diffusion. The accuracy of the LE4PD is verified by analyzing the predicted dynamics across a set of seven different proteins for which both relaxation data and NMR solution structures are available. Using e...

  20. Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    34 D FILE COPY AD-A198 053 *.CC Technical Report 1009 Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot "DTIC SELEC T E 0 Alfonso Garcia Reynoso MIT...COVERED Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot technical report G. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUM9ER 7. AUTHO0R(@) S. CONTRACT On GRANT NUMSER...8217 %S S Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot by Alfonso Garcia Reynoso BSME Instituto Tecnol6gico de Veracruz (1967) MSME Instituto Tecnol6gico

  1. Modelling packing interactions in parallel helix bundles: pentameric bundles of nicotinic receptor M2 helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankararamakrishnan, R; Sansom, M S

    1995-11-01

    The transbilayer pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is formed by a pentameric bundle of M2 helices. Models of pentameric bundles of M2 helices have been generated using simulated annealing via restrained molecular dynamics. The influence of: (a) the initial C alpha template; and (b) screening of sidechain electrostatic interactions on the geometry of the resultant M2 helix bundles is explored. Parallel M2 helices, in the absence of sidechain electrostatic interactions, pack in accordance with simple ridges-in-grooves considerations. This results in a helix crossing angle of ca. +12 degrees, corresponding to a left-handed coiled coil structure for the bundle as a whole. Tilting of M2 helices away from the central pore axis at their C-termini and/or inclusion of sidechain electrostatic interactions may perturb such ridges-in-grooves packing. In the most extreme cases right-handed coiled coils are formed. An interplay between inter-helix H-bonding and helix bundle geometry is revealed. The effects of changes in electrostatic screening on the dimensions of the pore mouth are described and the significance of these changes in the context of models for the nAChR pore domain is discussed.

  2. Structurally dynamic spin market networks

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, D

    2007-01-01

    The agent-based model of price dynamics on a directed evolving complex network is suggested and studied by direct simulation. The resulting stationary regime is maintained as a result of the balance between the extremal dynamics, adaptivity of strategic variables and reconnection rules. For some properly selected parametric combination the network displays small-world phenomenon with high mean clustering coefficient and power-law node degree distribution. The mechanism of repeated random walk through network combined with a fitness recognition is proposed and tested to generate modular multi-leader market. The simulations suggest that dynamics of fitness is the slowest process that manifests itself in the volatility clustering of the log-price returns.

  3. Molecular Probing of the HPV-16 E6 Protein Alpha Helix Binding Groove with Small Molecule Inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Rietz

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV HPV E6 protein has emerged as a central oncoprotein in HPV-associated cancers in which sustained expression is required for tumor progression. A majority of the E6 protein interactions within the human proteome use an alpha-helix groove interface for binding. The UBE3A/E6AP HECT domain ubiquitin ligase binds E6 at this helix-groove interface. This enables formation of a trimeric complex with p53, resulting in destruction of this tumor suppressor. While recent x-ray crystal structures are useful, examples of small molecule probes that can modulate protein interactions at this interface are limited. To develop insights useful for potential structure-based design of ligands for HPV E6, a series of 2,6-disubstituted benzopyranones were prepared and tested as competitive antagonists of E6-E6AP helix-groove interactions. These small molecule probes were used in both binding and functional assays to evaluate recognition features of the E6 protein. Evidence for an ionic functional group interaction within the helix groove was implicated by the structure-activity among the highest affinity ligands. The molecular topographies of these protein-ligand interactions were evaluated by comparing the binding and activities of single amino acid E6 mutants with the results of molecular dynamic simulations. A group of arginine residues that form a rim-cap over the E6 helix groove offer compensatory roles in binding and recognition of the small molecule probes. The flexibility and impact on the overall helix-groove shape dictated by these residues offer new insights for structure-based targeting of HPV E6.

  4. Visualizing structural dynamics of thylakoid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Masakazu; Yokono, Makio; Nakano, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    To optimize photosynthesis, light-harvesting antenna proteins regulate light energy dissipation and redistribution in chloroplast thylakoid membranes, which involve dynamic protein reorganization of photosystems I and II. However, direct evidence for such protein reorganization has not been visualized in live cells. Here we demonstrate structural dynamics of thylakoid membranes by live cell imaging in combination with deconvolution. We observed chlorophyll fluorescence in the antibiotics-induced macrochloroplast in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The three-dimensional reconstruction uncovered the fine thylakoid membrane structure in live cells. The time-lapse imaging shows that the entire thylakoid membrane network is structurally stable, but the individual thylakoid membrane structure is flexible in vivo. Our observation indicates that grana serve as a framework to maintain structural integrity of the entire thylakoid membrane network. Both the structural stability and flexibility of thylakoid membranes would be essential for dynamic protein reorganization under fluctuating light environments. PMID:24442007

  5. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information at ...

  6. Understanding Microbial Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    microbial communities: Function, structure and dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to...dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to December 2014. The programme involved over 150...Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge University, UK, from 19th August 2014 – 19th December 2014

  7. Structural Dynamic Behavior of Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thresher, Robert W.; Mirandy, Louis P.; Carne, Thomas G.; Lobitz, Donald W.; James, George H. III

    2009-01-01

    The structural dynamicist s areas of responsibility require interaction with most other members of the wind turbine project team. These responsibilities are to predict structural loads and deflections that will occur over the lifetime of the machine, ensure favorable dynamic responses through appropriate design and operational procedures, evaluate potential design improvements for their impact on dynamic loads and stability, and correlate load and control test data with design predictions. Load prediction has been a major concern in wind turbine designs to date, and it is perhaps the single most important task faced by the structural dynamics engineer. However, even if we were able to predict all loads perfectly, this in itself would not lead to an economic system. Reduction of dynamic loads, not merely a "design to loads" policy, is required to achieve a cost-effective design. The two processes of load prediction and structural design are highly interactive: loads and deflections must be known before designers and stress analysts can perform structural sizing, which in turn influences the loads through changes in stiffness and mass. Structural design identifies "hot spots" (local areas of high stress) that would benefit most from dynamic load alleviation. Convergence of this cycle leads to a turbine structure that is neither under-designed (which may result in structural failure), nor over-designed (which will lead to excessive weight and cost).

  8. Dynamic Response of Embedded Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-15

    1 (202) 767-6963 AFOSR/Nh 00 FORM 1473, 83 APR EDITION OF I JAN 73 IS OBSOLETE. Uwc A ____________ SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE...4. Baker W. E., Westine P. S., Dodge F. T., "Similarity Methods in Engineering Dynamics", Hayden Book Company, Inc., New Jerset, 1978. 5. Bazant , Z...P., "Size Effect in Blunt Fracture: Concrete, Rock, Metal", ASCE, Journal of Engineering Mechanics, Vol. 110, No. 4, April 1984. 6. Bazant , Z. P

  9. Four complete turns of a curved 3₁₀-helix at atomic resolution: the crystal structure of the peptaibol trichovirin I-4A in a polar environment suggests a transition to α-helix for membrane function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Brückner, Hans; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2012-02-01

    The first crystal structure of a member of peptaibol antibiotic subfamily 4, trichovirin I-4A (14 residues), has been determined by direct methods and refined at atomic resolution. The monoclinic unit cell has two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Both molecules assume a 3₁₀ right-handed helical conformation and are significantly bent. The molecules pack loosely along the crystallographic twofold axis, forming two large tunnels between symmetry-related molecules in which no ordered solvent could be located. Carbonyl O atoms which are not involved in intramolecular hydrogen bonding participate in close van der Waals interactions with apolar groups. The necessary amphipathicity for biological activity of peptaibols is not realised in the crystal structure. Hence, a structural change of trichovirin to an α-helical conformation is proposed for membrane integration and efficient water/ion transportation across the lipid bilayer.

  10. The double helix and the 'wronged heroine'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Brenda

    2003-01-23

    In 1962, James Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins received the Nobel prize for the discovery of the structure of DNA. Notably absent from the podium was Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray photographs of DNA contributed directly to the discovery of the double helix. Franklin's premature death, combined with misogynist treatment by the male scientific establishment, cast her as a feminist icon. This myth overshadowed her intellectual strength and independence both as a scientist and as an individual.

  11. 31st IMAC Conference on Structural Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Douglas; Carrella, Alex; Mayes, Randy; Rixen, Daniel; Allen, Matt; Cunha, Alvaro; Catbas, Fikret; Pakzad, Shamim; Racic, Vitomir; Pavic, Aleksandar; Reynolds, Paul; Simmermacher, Todd; Cogan, Scott; Moaveni, Babak; Papadimitriou, Costas; Allemang, Randall; Clerck, James; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wicks, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Topics in Nonlinear Dynamics, Volume 1: Proceedings of the 31st IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics, 2013, the first volume of seven from the Conference, brings together contributions to this important area of research and engineering. The collection presents early findings and case studies on fundamental and applied aspects of Structural Dynamics, including papers on:   Nonlinear Oscillations Nonlinearities In Practice Nonlinear System Identification: Methods Nonlinear System Identification: Friction & Contact Nonlinear Modal Analysis Nonlinear Modeling & Simulation Nonlinear Vibration Absorbers Constructive Utilization of Nonlinearity.

  12. Morphology and structural dynamics of amyloid beta 42 assembly in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Jinsheng He; Shuhan Guo; Jingdong Song; Jianguo Gu; Tao Hong

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid β42 (Aβ42) aggregation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.However, the morphology and structural dynamics in different stages of Aβ42 assembly are not well known.To investigate the dynamic properties of morphological and structural changes in the aggregation process of A(3 in vitro, transmission electron microscopy, western blot analysis and circular dichroism were used to observe the changes in morphology, immunoreactivity and secondary structure during Ap aggregation, respectively.Results demonstrated that at 24 hours following Ap42 aggregation in vitro, the structures of spherical granules from 5 to 10 nm and coils from 20 to 30 nm were visualized by transmission electron microscopy.Different immunoreactivities of the oligomers and fibers were detected by western blot analysis.The dynamic changes of the a-helix to β-sheet were confirmed by circular dichroism spectra.The dynamic properties of the morphological and structural changes in the aggregation process of Aβ42 in vitro were analyzed,which contributed to the identification of stable conditions of Aβ42 oligomer formation.

  13. Modeling of arylamide helix mimetics in the p53 peptide binding site of hDM2 suggests parallel and anti-parallel conformations are both stable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Fuller

    Full Text Available The design of novel α-helix mimetic inhibitors of protein-protein interactions is of interest to pharmaceuticals and chemical genetics researchers as these inhibitors provide a chemical scaffold presenting side chains in the same geometry as an α-helix. This conformational arrangement allows the design of high affinity inhibitors mimicking known peptide sequences binding specific protein substrates. We show that GAFF and AutoDock potentials do not properly capture the conformational preferences of α-helix mimetics based on arylamide oligomers and identify alternate parameters matching solution NMR data and suitable for molecular dynamics simulation of arylamide compounds. Results from both docking and molecular dynamics simulations are consistent with the arylamides binding in the p53 peptide binding pocket. Simulations of arylamides in the p53 binding pocket of hDM2 are consistent with binding, exhibiting similar structural dynamics in the pocket as simulations of known hDM2 binders Nutlin-2 and a benzodiazepinedione compound. Arylamide conformations converge towards the same region of the binding pocket on the 20 ns time scale, and most, though not all dihedrals in the binding pocket are well sampled on this timescale. We show that there are two putative classes of binding modes for arylamide compounds supported equally by the modeling evidence. In the first, the arylamide compound lies parallel to the observed p53 helix. In the second class, not previously identified or proposed, the arylamide compound lies anti-parallel to the p53 helix.

  14. Site-specific unfolding thermodynamics of a helix-turn-helix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amunson, Krista E; Ackels, Loren; Kubelka, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The thermal unfolding of a 40-residue helix-turn-helix subdomain of the P22 viral coat protein was investigated using circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) with site-specific 13C isotopic labeling. Helix-turn-helix is the simplest alpha-helical structural motif that combines both secondary and tertiary structural elements. The CD of individual helical fragments reveals that the P22 subdomain is stabilized by tertiary interhelical interactions. Overall the temperature-dependent CD and FTIR data can be described by a three-state process with a partially folded intermediate. However, the analysis of the site-specific 13C IR signals reveals distinct unfolding thermodynamics for each of the labeled sites. The thermodynamic parameters of the thermal unfolding of each of the labeled segments were obtained using singular value decomposition in combination with target transformation and global fitting. The P22 subdomain unfolds from the N-terminus toward the helical segments near the turn. Our results show that as few as two 13C labeled residues can be detected in a 40 residue protein and provide local, site-specific structural information about protein unfolding, which is not resolved by standard, nonsite-specific spectroscopic probes.

  15. Damping effect of helix-like pili

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymers are vital structures for many living organisms; for a variety of bacteria, adhesion polymers play a crucial role for the initiation of colonization. Some bacteria express, on their surface, attachment organelles (pili) that comprise subunits formed into stiff helix-like structures that possess unique biomechanical properties. These helix-like structures possess a high degree of flexibility that gives the biopolymers a unique extendibility. This has been considered beneficial for piliated bacteria adhering to host surfaces in the presence of a fluid flow. We show in this work that helix-like pili have the ability to act as efficient dampers of force that can, for a limited time, lower the load on the force-mediating adhesin-receptor bond on the tip of an individual pilus. The model presented is applied to bacteria adhering with a single pilus of either of the two most common types expressed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, P or type 1 pili, subjected to realistic flows. The results indicate that ...

  16. Dynamic Analysis of Structures Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, neural networks are considered as the best candidate for fast approximation with arbitrary accuracy in the time consuming problems. Dynamic analysis of structures against earthquake has the time consuming process. We employed two kinds of neural networks: Generalized Regression neural network (GR and Back-Propagation Wavenet neural network (BPW, for approximating of dynamic time history response of frame structures. GR is a traditional radial basis function neural network while BPW categorized as a wavelet neural network. In BPW, sigmoid activation functions of hidden layer neurons are substituted with wavelets and weights training are achieved using Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG algorithm. Comparison the results of BPW with those of GR in the dynamic analysis of eight story steel frame indicates that accuracy of the properly trained BPW was better than that of GR and therefore, BPW can be efficiently used for approximate dynamic analysis of structures.

  17. Midfrequency band dynamics of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, Robert N.; Adams, Douglas S.; Levine, Marie B.

    2004-09-01

    High and low intensity dynamic environments experienced by a spacecraft during launch and on-orbit operations, respectively, induce structural loads and motions, which are difficult to reliably predict. Structural dynamics in low- and mid-frequency bands are sensitive to component interface uncertainty and non-linearity as evidenced in laboratory testing and flight operations. Analytical tools for prediction of linear system response are not necessarily adequate for reliable prediction of mid-frequency band dynamics and analysis of measured laboratory and flight data. A new MATLAB toolbox, designed to address the key challenges of mid-frequency band dynamics, is introduced in this paper. Finite-element models of major subassemblies are defined following rational frequency-wavelength guidelines. For computational efficiency, these subassemblies are described as linear, component mode models. The complete structural system model is composed of component mode subassemblies and linear or non-linear joint descriptions. Computation and display of structural dynamic responses are accomplished employing well-established, stable numerical methods, modern signal processing procedures and descriptive graphical tools. Parametric sensitivity and Monte-Carlo based system identification tools are used to reconcile models with experimental data and investigate the effects of uncertainties. Models and dynamic responses are exported for employment in applications, such as detailed structural integrity and mechanical-optical-control performance analyses.

  18. [Molecular Dynamics of Self-assembling and Rheology of Superhelical Structure of Protofiber of Spider Web].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitan, K V; Orshanskiy, I A

    2015-01-01

    In this study we suggested a dynamics simulation for the formation of protofiber of spider web nanofiber. It was shown that a bundle of parallel polyalanine β-strands of sufficient length is arranged through self-assembly into a stable right-handed super helix. By numerical analysis we investigated the rheological properties and provided in nonlinear regime a generalization of the model of Singer for description of the rheological behaviour of super helix.

  19. Damping mechanisms and models in structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2002-01-01

    Several aspects of damping models for dynamic analysis of structures are investigated. First the causality condition for structural response is used to identify rules for the use of complex-valued frequency dependent material models, illustrated by the shortcomings of the elastic hysteretic model...

  20. The Structure and Dynamics of GRB Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-25

    There are several lines of evidence which suggest that the relativistic outflows in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated into narrow jets. The jet structure has important implications for the true energy release and the event rate of GRBs, and can constrain the mechanism responsible for the acceleration and collimation of the jet. Nevertheless, the jet structure and its dynamics as it sweeps up the external medium and decelerates, are not well understood. In this review I discuss our current understanding of GRB jets, stressing their structure and dynamics.

  1. Structural Variations of Human Glucokinase Glu256Lys in MODY2 Condition Using Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Kumar Yellapu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GK is the predominant hexokinase that acts as glucose sensor and catalyses the formation of Glucose-6-phosphate. The mutations in GK gene influence the affinity for glucose and lead to altered glucose levels in blood causing maturity onset diabetes of the young type 2 (MODY2 condition, which is one of the prominent reasons of type 2 diabetic condition. In view of the importance of mutated GK resulting in hyperglycemic condition, in the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in intact and 256 E-K mutated GK structures and their energy values and conformational variations were correlated. Energy variations were observed in mutated GK (3500 Kcal/mol structure with respect to intact GK (5000 Kcal/mol, and it showed increased γ-turns, decreased β-turns, and more helix-helix interactions that affected substrate binding region where its volume increased from 1089.152 Å2 to 1246.353 Å2. Molecular docking study revealed variation in docking scores (intact = −12.199 and mutated = −8.383 and binding mode of glucose in the active site of mutated GK where the involvement of A53, S54, K56, K256, D262 and Q286 has resulted in poor glucose binding which probably explains the loss of catalytic activity and the consequent prevailing of high glucose levels in MODY2 condition.

  2. Structural Variations of Human Glucokinase Glu256Lys in MODY2 Condition Using Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Kandlapalli, Kalpana; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; Sarma, P V G K; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Glucokinase (GK) is the predominant hexokinase that acts as glucose sensor and catalyses the formation of Glucose-6-phosphate. The mutations in GK gene influence the affinity for glucose and lead to altered glucose levels in blood causing maturity onset diabetes of the young type 2 (MODY2) condition, which is one of the prominent reasons of type 2 diabetic condition. In view of the importance of mutated GK resulting in hyperglycemic condition, in the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in intact and 256 E-K mutated GK structures and their energy values and conformational variations were correlated. Energy variations were observed in mutated GK (3500 Kcal/mol) structure with respect to intact GK (5000 Kcal/mol), and it showed increased γ -turns, decreased β -turns, and more helix-helix interactions that affected substrate binding region where its volume increased from 1089.152 Å(2) to 1246.353 Å(2). Molecular docking study revealed variation in docking scores (intact = -12.199 and mutated = -8.383) and binding mode of glucose in the active site of mutated GK where the involvement of A53, S54, K56, K256, D262 and Q286 has resulted in poor glucose binding which probably explains the loss of catalytic activity and the consequent prevailing of high glucose levels in MODY2 condition.

  3. Structural dynamics of liganded myoglobin.

    OpenAIRE

    Frauenfelder, H; Petsko, G A

    1980-01-01

    X-ray crystallography can reveal the magnitudes and principal directions of the mean-square displacements of every atom in a protein. This structural information is complementary to the temporal information obtainable by spectroscopic techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance. Determination of the temperature dependence of the mean-square displacements makes it possible to separate large conformational motions from simple thermal vibrations. The contribution of crystal lattice disorder to...

  4. On Dynamics of Spinning Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.; Ibrahim, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides details of developments pertaining to vibration analysis of gyroscopic systems, that involves a finite element structural discretization followed by the solution of the resulting matrix eigenvalue problem by a progressive, accelerated simultaneous iteration technique. Thus Coriolis, centrifugal and geometrical stiffness matrices are derived for shell and line elements, followed by the eigensolution details as well as solution of representative problems that demonstrates the efficacy of the currently developed numerical procedures and tools.

  5. Dynamic Study of Bicycle Frame Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, M. S. M.; Nazri, N. A.; Zahari, S. N.; Abdullah, N. A. Z.; Priyandoko, G.

    2016-11-01

    Bicycle frames have to bear variety of loads and it is needed to ensure the frame can withstand dynamic loads to move. This paper focusing on dynamic study for bicycle frame structure with a purpose to avoid the problem regarding loads on the structure and to ensure the structure is safe when multiple loads are applied on it. The main objectives of dynamic study are to find the modal properties using two method; finite element analysis (FEA) and experimental modal analysis (EMA). The correlation between two studies will be obtained using percentage error. Firstly, 3D model of mountain bike frame structure has been draw using computer-aided design (CAD) software and normal mode analysis using MSC Nastran Patran was executed for numerical method meanwhile modal testing using impact hammer was performed for experimental counterpart. From the correlation result, it show that percentage error between FEA and EMA were below 10% due to noise, imperfect experiment setup during perform EMA and imperfect modeling of mountain bike frame structure in CAD software. Small percentage error differences makes both of the method can be applied to obtain the dynamic characteristic of structure. It is essential to determine whether the structure is safe or not. In conclusion, model updating method is required to reduce more percentage error between two results.

  6. Structural Equation Modeling of Travel Choice Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Golob, Thomas F.

    1988-01-01

    This research has two objectives. The first objective is to explore the use of the modeling tool called "latent structural equations" (structural equations with latent variables) in the general field of travel behavior analysis and the more specific field of dynamic analysis of travel behavior. The second objective is to apply a latent structural equation model in order to determine the causal relationships between income, car ownership, and mobility. Many transportation researchers ...

  7. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  8. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu·GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation. PMID:25566871

  9. A conserved P-loop anchor limits the structural dynamics that mediate nucleotide dissociation in EF-Tu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Evan; Girodat, Dylan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The phosphate-binding loop (P-loop) is a conserved sequence motif found in mononucleotide-binding proteins. Little is known about the structural dynamics of this region and its contribution to the observed nucleotide binding properties. Understanding the underlying design principles is of great interest for biomolecular engineering applications. We have used rapid-kinetics measurements in vitro and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in silico to investigate the relationship between GTP-binding properties and P-loop structural dynamics in the universally conserved Elongation Factor (EF) Tu. Analysis of wild type EF-Tu and variants with substitutions at positions in or adjacent to the P-loop revealed a correlation between P-loop flexibility and the entropy of activation for GTP dissociation. The same variants demonstrate more backbone flexibility in two N-terminal amino acids of the P-loop during force-induced EF-Tu.GTP dissociation in Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations. Amino acids Gly18 and His19 are involved in stabilizing the P-loop backbone via interactions with the adjacent helix C. We propose that these P-loop/helix C interactions function as a conserved P-loop anchoring module and identify the presence of P-loop anchors within several GTPases and ATPases suggesting their evolutionary conservation.

  10. Dynamics of localized structures in vector waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-García, E; Colet, P; San Miguel, M; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Hoyuelos, Miguel; Colet, Pere; Miguel, Maxi San

    1999-01-01

    Dynamical properties of topological defects in a twodimensional complex vector field are considered. These objects naturally arise in the study of polarized transverse light waves. Dynamics is modeled by a Vector Complex Ginzburg-Landau Equation with parameter values appropriate for linearly polarized laser emission. Creation and annihilation processes, and selforganization of defects in lattice structures, are described. We find "glassy" configurations dominated by vectorial defects and a melting process associated to topological-charge unbinding.

  11. Spin Dynamics in Confined Magnetic Structures III

    CERN Document Server

    Hillebrands, Burkard

    2006-01-01

    This third volume of Spin Dynamics in Confined Magnetic Structures addresses central aspects of spin-dynamic phenomena, including recent new developments, on a tutorial level. Researchers will find a comprehensive compilation of the current work in the field. Introductory chapters help newcomers to understand the basic concepts. The more advanced chapters give the current state of the art of spin dynamic issues ranging from the femtosecond to the microsecond regime. This volume concentrates on new experimental techniques such as ferromagnetic-resonance-force microscopy and two-photon photoemission, as well as on aspects of precessional switching, spin-wave excitation, vortex dynamics, spin relaxation, domain-wall dynamics in nanowires and their applications to magnetic logic devices. An important chapter is devoted to the presently very hot subject of the spin-transfer torque, combining the physics of electronic transport and micromagnetics. The comprehensive presentation of these developments makes this volu...

  12. Strength of concrete structures under dynamic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpyak, O. G., E-mail: ogkumpyak@yandex.ru; Galyautdinov, Z. R., E-mail: gazr@yandex.ru; Kokorin, D. N., E-mail: kokorindenn@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2, Solyanaya Sq., 634003, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The use of elastic supports is one the efficient methods of decreasing the dynamic loading. The paper describes the influence of elastic supports on the stress-strain state of steel concrete structures exposed to one-time dynamic loading resulting in failure. Oblique bending beams on elastic supports and their elastic, elastoplastic, and elastoplastic consolidation behavior are considered in this paper. For numerical calculations the developed computer program is used based on the finite element method. Research findings prove high efficiency of elastic supports under dynamic loading conditions. The most effective behavior of elastic supports is demonstrated at the elastoplastic stage. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical and experimental results.

  13. Data on diverse roles of helix perturbations in membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Shelar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The various structural variations observed in TM helices of membrane proteins have been deconstructed into 9 distinct types of helix perturbations. These perturbations are defined by the deviation of TM helices from the predominantly observed linear α-helical conformation, to form 310- and π-helices, as well as adopting curved and kinked geometries. The data presented here supplements the article ‘Helix perturbations in Membrane Proteins Assist in Inter-helical Interactions and Optimal Helix Positioning in the Bilayer’ (A. Shelar, M. Bansal, 2016 [1]. This data provides strong evidence for the role of various helix perturbations in influencing backbone torsion angles of helices, mediating inter-helical interactions, oligomer formation and accommodation of hydrophobic residues within the bilayer. The methodology used for creation of various datasets of membrane protein families (Sodium/Calcium exchanger and Heme Copper Oxidase has also been mentioned.

  14. Nonlinear Dynamics of Structures with Material Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, P.; Wagg, D. J.; Pinna, C.; Whear, R.; Briody, C.

    2016-09-01

    Structures usually experience deterioration during their working life. Oxidation, corrosion, UV exposure, and thermo-mechanical fatigue are some of the most well-known mechanisms that cause degradation. The phenomenon gradually changes structural properties and dynamic behaviour over their lifetime, and can be more problematic and challenging in the presence of nonlinearity. In this paper, we study how the dynamic behaviour of a nonlinear system changes as the thermal environment causes certain parameters to vary. To this end, a nonlinear lumped mass modal model is considered and defined under harmonic external force. Temperature dependent material functions, formulated from empirical test data, are added into the model. Using these functions, bifurcation parameters are defined and the corresponding nonlinear responses are observed by numerical continuation. A comparison between the results gives a preliminary insight into how temperature induced properties affects the dynamic response and highlights changes in stability conditions of the structure.

  15. A Dynamic Model for Energy Structure Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Energy structure is a complicated system concerning economic development, natural resources, technological innovation, ecological balance, social progress and many other elements. It is not easy to explain clearly the developmental mechanism of an energy system and the mutual relations between the energy system and its related environments by the traditional methods. It is necessary to develop a suitable dynamic model, which can reflect the dynamic characteristics and the mutual relations of the energy system and its related environments. In this paper, the historical development of China's energy structure was analyzed. A new quantitative analysis model was developed based on system dynamics principles through analysis of energy resources, and the production and consumption of energy in China and comparison with the world. Finally, this model was used to predict China's future energy structures under different conditions.

  16. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information...... at the atomic level about the structural and dynamical features of proteins-with the ability of molecular dynamics simulations to explore a wide range of protein conformations. We illustrate the method for human ubiquitin in solution and find that there is considerable conformational heterogeneity throughout...... the protein structure. The interior atoms of the protein are tightly packed in each individual conformation that contributes to the ensemble but their overall behaviour can be described as having a significant degree of liquid-like character. The protocol is completely general and should lead to significant...

  17. Unifying dynamical and structural stability of equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, Jean-François; Haegeman, Bart

    2016-09-01

    We exhibit a fundamental relationship between measures of dynamical and structural stability of linear dynamical systems-e.g. linearized models in the vicinity of equilibria. We show that dynamical stability, quantified via the response to external perturbations (i.e. perturbation of dynamical variables), coincides with the minimal internal perturbation (i.e. perturbations of interactions between variables) able to render the system unstable. First, by reformulating a result of control theory, we explain that harmonic external perturbations reflect the spectral sensitivity of the Jacobian matrix at the equilibrium, with respect to constant changes of its coefficients. However, for this equivalence to hold, imaginary changes of the Jacobian's coefficients have to be allowed. The connection with dynamical stability is thus lost for real dynamical systems. We show that this issue can be avoided, thus recovering the fundamental link between dynamical and structural stability, by considering stochastic noise as external and internal perturbations. More precisely, we demonstrate that a linear system's response to white-noise perturbations directly reflects the intensity of internal white-noise disturbance that it can accommodate before becoming stochastically unstable.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure and dynamics of the response regulator Sma0114 from Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftic, Sarah R; Garcia, Preston P; White, Emma; Robinson, Victoria L; Gage, Daniel J; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2012-09-04

    Receiver domains control intracellular responses triggered by signal transduction in bacterial two-component systems. Here, we report the solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure and dynamics of Sma0114 from the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the first such characterization of a receiver domain from the HWE-kinase family of two-component systems. The structure of Sma0114 adopts a prototypical α(5)/β(5) Rossman fold but has features that set it apart from other receiver domains. The fourth β-strand of Sma0114 houses a PFxFATGY sequence motif, common to many HWE-kinase-associated receiver domains. This sequence motif in Sma0114 may substitute for the conserved Y-T coupling mechanism, which propagates conformational transitions in the 455 (α4-β5-α5) faces of receiver domains, to prime them for binding downstream effectors once they become activated by phosphorylation. In addition, the fourth α-helix of the consensus 455 face in Sma0114 is replaced with a segment that shows high flexibility on the pico- to nanosecond time scale by (15)N relaxation data. Secondary structure prediction analysis suggests that the absence of helix α4 may be a conserved property of the HWE-kinase-associated family of receiver domains to which Sma0114 belongs. In spite of these differences, Sma0114 has a conserved active site, binds divalent metal ions such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) that are required for phosphorylation, and exhibits micro- to millisecond active-site dynamics similar to those of other receiver domains. Taken together, our results suggest that Sma0114 has a conserved active site but differs from typical receiver domains in the structure of the 455 face that is used to effect signal transduction following activation.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of Helical Protein Fragments Investigated by Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Afshin

    This work addresses the conformation and dynamics of model peptides using spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Experimentally, we investigate the structure and dynamics of peptide fragments taken from coiled coil and three helical bundle motifs of bacterial coat proteins. Theoretically, we use molecular dynamics simulations of isolated helices with explicit water molecules to derive trajectories which reveal features about picosecond dynamics and local unfolding events. The assignment of the ^1H, ^{15}N, and ^ {13}C resonances, secondary structure, backbone dynamics, hydration and other biophysical parameters of a 30 residue recombinant peptide corresponding to an immunogenic site on the coiled coil region of Streptococcus pyogenes 24M protein are reported. Our results suggest that this peptide is a symmetric parallel dimeric alpha-helical coiled coil with local defects within the helix and fraying at the termini. The ^1H and ^ {15}N assignments, the hydration, the overall fold, and other biophysical parameters of a recombinant B domain of Staphylococcal protein A (FB) are reported. Our results indicate FB is a highly stable monomeric three helical bundle. A symmetric two domain construct was used to probe the modular assembly of two B domains. Here, spectroscopic results suggest weak interactions between the two domains. The folding pathway of FB was investigated using amide exchange data of the native protein and peptide models. We propose that the helical hairpin consisting of helices II and III is an on-pathway intermediate in the folding of FB. Two 1 ns molecular dynamics simulations (MD) on two mainly helical peptides--an 18 residue peptide corresponding to a portion of the H helix of myoglobin (MBH) and a 14 residue analogue of the C-peptide of ribonuclease A (CRNA) --were carried out in water using the united atom AMBER/OPLS force-field. In the case of MBH, the initial helical conformation progressively frays to a more disordered structure. A

  20. Structural dynamics of electronic and photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suhir, Ephraim; Steinberg, David S

    2011-01-01

    The proposed book will offer comprehensive and versatile methodologies and recommendations on how to determine dynamic characteristics of typical micro- and opto-electronic structural elements (printed circuit boards, solder joints, heavy devices, etc.) and how to design a viable and reliable structure that would be able to withstand high-level dynamic loading. Particular attention will be given to portable devices and systems designed for operation in harsh environments (such as automotive, aerospace, military, etc.)  In-depth discussion from a mechanical engineer's viewpoint will be conducte

  1. A Classification of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors of Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome sequence of soybean allows an unprecedented opportunity for the discovery of the genes controlling important traits. In particular, the potential functions of regulatory genes are a priority for analysis. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH family of transcription factors is known to be involved in controlling a wide range of systems critical for crop adaptation and quality, including photosynthesis, light signalling, pigment biosynthesis, and seed pod development. Using a hidden Markov model search algorithm, 319 genes with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor domains were identified within the soybean genome sequence. These were classified with respect to their predicted DNA binding potential, intron/exon structure, and the phylogeny of the bHLH domain. Evidence is presented that the vast majority (281 of these 319 soybean bHLH genes are expressed at the mRNA level. Of these soybean bHLH genes, 67% were found to exist in two or more homeologous copies. This dataset provides a framework for future studies on bHLH gene function in soybean. The challenge for future research remains to define functions for the bHLH factors encoded in the soybean genome, which may allow greater flexibility for genetic selection of growth and environmental adaptation in this widely grown crop.

  2. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  3. Multiscale structure in eco-evolutionary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Blake C.

    In a complex system, the individual components are neither so tightly coupled or correlated that they can all be treated as a single unit, nor so uncorrelated that they can be approximated as independent entities. Instead, patterns of interdependency lead to structure at multiple scales of organization. Evolution excels at producing such complex structures. In turn, the existence of these complex interrelationships within a biological system affects the evolutionary dynamics of that system. I present a mathematical formalism for multiscale structure, grounded in information theory, which makes these intuitions quantitative, and I show how dynamics defined in terms of population genetics or evolutionary game theory can lead to multiscale organization. For complex systems, "more is different," and I address this from several perspectives. Spatial host--consumer models demonstrate the importance of the structures which can arise due to dynamical pattern formation. Evolutionary game theory reveals the novel effects which can result from multiplayer games, nonlinear payoffs and ecological stochasticity. Replicator dynamics in an environment with mesoscale structure relates to generalized conditionalization rules in probability theory. The idea of natural selection "acting at multiple levels" has been mathematized in a variety of ways, not all of which are equivalent. We will face down the confusion, using the experience developed over the course of this thesis to clarify the situation.

  4. Hydrophobic pulses predict transmembrane helix irregularities and channel transmembrane units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustres Mireille

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few high-resolution structures of integral membranes proteins are available, as crystallization of such proteins needs yet to overcome too many technical limitations. Nevertheless, prediction of their transmembrane (TM structure by bioinformatics tools provides interesting insights on the topology of these proteins. Methods We describe here how to extract new information from the analysis of hydrophobicity variations or hydrophobic pulses (HPulses in the sequence of integral membrane proteins using the Hydrophobic Pulse Predictor, a new tool we developed for this purpose. To analyze the primary sequence of 70 integral membrane proteins we defined two levels of analysis: G1-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 2 to 6 and G2-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 12 to 16. Results The G2-HPulse analysis of 541 transmembrane helices allowed the definition of the new concept of transmembrane unit (TMU that groups together transmembrane helices and segments with potential adjacent structures. In addition, the G1-HPulse analysis identified helix irregularities that corresponded to kinks, partial helices or unannotated structural events. These irregularities could represent key dynamic elements that are alternatively activated depending on the channel status as illustrated by the crystal structures of the lactose permease in different conformations. Conclusions Our results open a new way in the understanding of transmembrane secondary structures: hydrophobicity through hydrophobic pulses strongly impacts on such embedded structures and is not confined to define the transmembrane status of amino acids.

  5. Polyproline and triple helix motifs in host-pathogen recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Secondary structure elements often mediate protein-protein interactions. Despite their low abundance in folded proteins, polyproline II (PPII) and its variant, the triple helix, are frequently involved in protein-protein interactions, likely due to their peculiar propensity to be solvent-exposed. We here review the role of PPII and triple helix in mediating hostpathogen interactions, with a particular emphasis to the structural aspects of these processes. After a brief description of the basic structural features of these elements, examples of host-pathogen interactions involving these motifs are illustrated. Literature data suggest that the role played by PPII motif in these processes is twofold. Indeed, PPII regions may directly mediate interactions between proteins of the host and the pathogen. Alternatively, PPII may act as structural spacers needed for the correct positioning of the elements needed for adhesion and infectivity. Recent investigations have highlighted that collagen triple helix is also a common target for bacterial adhesins. Although structural data on complexes between adhesins and collagen models are rather limited, experimental and theoretical studies have unveiled some interesting clues of the recognition process. Interestingly, very recent data show that not only is the triple helix used by pathogens as a target in the host-pathogen interaction but it may also act as a bait in these processes since bacterial proteins containing triple helix regions have been shown to interact with host proteins. As both PPII and triple helix expose several main chain non-satisfied hydrogen bond acceptors and donors, both elements are highly solvated. The preservation of the solvation state of both PPII and triple helix upon protein-protein interaction is an emerging aspect that will be here thoroughly discussed.

  6. Structural dynamic of a self-assembling peptide d-EAK16 made of only D-amino acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongli Luo

    Full Text Available We here report systematic study of structural dynamics of a 16-residue self-assembling peptide d-EAK16 made of only D-amino acids. We compare these results with its chiral counterpart L-form, l-EAK16. Circular dichroism was used to follow the structural dynamics under various temperature and pH conditions. At 25 degrees C the d-EAK16 peptide displayed a typical beta-sheet spectrum. Upon increasing the temperature above 70 degrees C, there was a spectrum shift as the 218 nm valley widens toward 210 nm. Above 80 degrees C, the d-EAK16 peptide transformed into a typical alpha-helix CD spectrum without going through a detectable random-coil intermediate. When increasing the temperature from 4 degrees C to 110 degrees C then cooling back from 110 degrees C to 4 degrees C, there was a hysteresis: the secondary structure from beta-sheet to alpha-helix and then from alpha-helix to beta-sheet occurred. d-EAK16 formed an alpha-helical conformation at pH0.76 and pH12 but formed a beta-sheet at neutral pH. The effects of various pH conditions, ionic strength and denaturing agents were also noted. Since D-form peptides are resistant to natural enzyme degradation, such drastic structural changes may be exploited for fabricating molecular sensors to detect minute environmental changes. This provides insight into the behaviors of self-assembling peptides made of D-amino acids and points the way to designing new peptide materials for biomedical engineering and nanobiotechnology.

  7. Dynamic behaviors of pretensioned cable AERORail structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李方元; 吴培峰

    2015-01-01

    The AERORail, a new aerial transport platform, was chosen as the object of this work. Following a review of the literature on static behaviors, model tests on the basic dynamic mechanical characteristics were conducted. A series of 90 tests were completed with different factors, including tension force, vehicle load and vehicle speed. With regard to the proper tension and vehicle load, at a certain speed range, the tension increments of the rail’s cable were proved relatively small. It can be assumed that the change of tension is small and can be reasonably ignored when the tension of an entire span is under a dynamic load. When the tension reaches a certain range, the calculation of the cable track structure using classical cable theory is acceptable. The tests prove that the average maximum dynamic amplification factor of the deflection is small, generally no more than 1.2. However, when the vehicle speed reaches a certain value, the amplified factor will reach 2.0. If the moving loads increase, the dynamic amplification factor of dynamic deflection will also increase. The tension will change the rigidity of the structure and the vibration frequency; furthermore, the resonance speed will change at a certain tension. The vibration is noticeable when vehicles pass through at the resonance speed, and this negative impact on driving comfort requires the right velocity to avoid the resonance. The results demonstrate that more design details are required for the AERORail structure.

  8. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Maria O.; Michael Keller; Douglas Morton; Bruce Cook; Michael Lefsky; Mark Ducey; Scott Saleska; Raimundo Cosme de Oliveira; Juliana Schietti

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered...

  9. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Dynamic Programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing ZHAO; Pei-Ming SONG; Qing FANG; Jian-Hua LUO

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe how a directed graph was constructed and then searched for the optimum path using a dynamic programming approach, based on the secondary structure propensity of the protein short sequence derived from a training data set. The protein secondary structure was thus predicted in this way. The average three-state accuracy of the algorithm used was 76.70%.

  10. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; Lehoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6.

  11. Identifying Community Structures in Dynamic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Alvari, Hamidreza; Sukthankar, Gita; Lakkaraju, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Most real-world social networks are inherently dynamic, composed of communities that are constantly changing in membership. To track these evolving communities, we need dynamic community detection techniques. This article evaluates the performance of a set of game theoretic approaches for identifying communities in dynamic networks. Our method, D-GT (Dynamic Game Theoretic community detection), models each network node as a rational agent who periodically plays a community membership game with its neighbors. During game play, nodes seek to maximize their local utility by joining or leaving the communities of network neighbors. The community structure emerges after the game reaches a Nash equilibrium. Compared to the benchmark community detection methods, D-GT more accurately predicts the number of communities and finds community assignments with a higher normalized mutual information, while retaining a good modularity.

  12. Ultrafast structural dynamics of perovskite superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerner, M.; Korff Schmising, C. von; Zhavoronkov, N.; Elsaesser, T. [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, Berlin (Germany); Bargheer, M. [Universitaet Potsdam, Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Potsdam (Germany); Vrejoiu, I.; Hesse, D.; Alexe, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Femtosecond X-ray diffraction provides direct insight into the ultrafast reversible lattice dynamics of materials with a perovskite structure. Superlattice (SL) structures consisting of a sequence of nanometer-thick layer pairs allow for optically inducing a tailored stress profile that drives the lattice motions and for limiting the influence of strain propagation on the observed dynamics. We demonstrate this concept in a series of diffraction experiments with femtosecond time resolution, giving detailed information on the ultrafast lattice dynamics of ferroelectric and ferromagnetic superlattices. Anharmonically coupled lattice motions in a SrRuO{sub 3}/PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SRO/PZT) SL lead to a switch-off of the electric polarizations on a time scale of the order of 1 ps. Ultrafast magnetostriction of photoexcited SRO layers is demonstrated in a SRO/SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) SL. (orig.)

  13. Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Johannes Mattheus

    2002-01-01

    The thesis "Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere" of J.M. Krijger is a study on the behavior of the solar chromosphere, the thin layer just above the solar surface (photosphere) visible in purple red light during a total solar eclipse. The most important result of this thesis is that the

  14. Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Johannes Mattheus

    2003-01-01

    The thesis "Structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere" of J.M. Krijger is a study on the behavior of the solar chromosphere, the thin layer just above the solar surface (photosphere) visible in purple red light during a total solar eclipse. The most important result of this thesis is that the

  15. The Bridge Helix of RNA Polymerase Acts as a Central Nanomechanical Switchboard for Coordinating Catalysis and Substrate Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert O. J. Weinzierl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of in vitro assembly systems to produce recombinant archaeal RNA polymerases (RNAPs offers one of the most powerful experimental tools for investigating the still relatively poorly understood molecular mechanisms underlying RNAP function. Over the last few years, we pioneered new robot-based high-throughput mutagenesis approaches to study structure/function relationships within various domains surrounding the catalytic center. The Bridge Helix domain, which appears in numerous X-ray structures as a 35-amino-acid-long alpha helix, coordinates the concerted movement of several other domains during catalysis through kinking of two discrete molecular hinges. Mutations affecting these kinking mechanisms have a direct effect on the specific catalytic activity of RNAP and can in some instances more than double it. Molecular dynamics simulations have established themselves as exceptionally useful for providing additional insights and detailed models to explain the underlying structural motions.

  16. De Novo Proteins with Life-Sustaining Functions Are Structurally Dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Grant S; Greisman, Jack B; Hecht, Michael H

    2016-01-29

    Designing and producing novel proteins that fold into stable structures and provide essential biological functions are key goals in synthetic biology. In initial steps toward achieving these goals, we constructed a combinatorial library of de novo proteins designed to fold into 4-helix bundles. As described previously, screening this library for sequences that function in vivo to rescue conditionally lethal mutants of Escherichia coli (auxotrophs) yielded several de novo sequences, termed SynRescue proteins, which rescued four different E. coli auxotrophs. In an effort to understand the structural requirements necessary for auxotroph rescue, we investigated the biophysical properties of the SynRescue proteins, using both computational and experimental approaches. Results from circular dichroism, size-exclusion chromatography, and NMR demonstrate that the SynRescue proteins are α-helical and relatively stable. Surprisingly, however, they do not form well-ordered structures. Instead, they form dynamic structures that fluctuate between monomeric and dimeric states. These findings show that a well-ordered structure is not a prerequisite for life-sustaining functions, and suggests that dynamic structures may have been important in the early evolution of protein function.

  17. A statistically derived parameterization for the collagen triple-helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Jan K; Goh, M Cynthia

    2002-11-01

    The triple-helix is a unique secondary structural motif found primarily within the collagens. In collagen, it is a homo- or hetero-tripeptide with a repeating primary sequence of (Gly-X-Y)(n), displaying characteristic peptide backbone dihedral angles. Studies of bulk collagen fibrils indicate that the triple-helix must be a highly repetitive secondary structure, with very specific constraints. Primary sequence analysis shows that most collagen molecules are primarily triple-helical; however, no high-resolution structure of any entire protein is yet available. Given the drastic morphological differences in self-assembled collagen structures with subtle changes in assembly conditions, a detailed knowledge of the relative locations of charged and sterically bulky residues in collagen is desirable. Its repetitive primary sequence and highly conserved secondary structure make collagen, and the triple-helix in general, an ideal candidate for a general parameterization for prediction of residue locations and for the use of a helical wheel in the prediction of residue orientation. Herein, a statistical analysis of the currently available high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of model triple-helical peptides is performed to produce an experimentally based parameter set for predicting peptide backbone and C(beta) atom locations for the triple-helix. Unlike existing homology models, this allows easy prediction of an entire triple-helix structure based on all existing high-resolution triple-helix structures, rather than only on a single structure or on idealized parameters. Furthermore, regional differences based on the helical propensity of residues may be readily incorporated. The parameter set is validated in terms of the predicted bond lengths, backbone dihedral angles, and interchain hydrogen bonding.

  18. High-resolution structures of collagen-like peptides [(Pro-Pro-Gly)4-Xaa-Yaa-Gly-(Pro-Pro-Gly)4]: implications for triple-helix hydration and Hyp(X) puckering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Kenji; Hongo, Chizuru; Wu, Guanghan; Mizuno, Kazunori; Noguchi, Keiichi; Ebisuzaki, Shutoku; Tanaka, Yuji; Nishino, Norikazu; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2009-05-01

    Structures of (Pro-Pro-Gly)4-Xaa-Yaa-Gly-(Pro-Pro-Gly)4 (ppg9-XYG) where (Xaa, Yaa)=(Pro, Hyp), (Hyp, Pro) or (Hyp, Hyp) were analyzed at high resolution using synchrotron radiation. Molecular and crystal structures of these peptides are very similar to those of the (Pro-Pro-Gly)9 peptide. The results obtained in this study, together with those obtained from related compounds, indicated the puckering propensity of the Hyp in the X position: (1) Hyp(X) residues involved in the Hyp(X):Pro(Y) stacking pairs prefer the down-puckering conformation, as in ppg9-OPG, and ppg9-OOG; (2) Hyp(X) residues involved in the Hyp(X):Hyp(Y) stacking pairs prefer the up-puckering conformation if there is no specific reason to adopt the down-puckering conformation. Water molecules in these peptide crystals are classified into two groups, the 1st and 2nd hydration waters. Water molecules in the 1st hydration group have direct hydrogen bonds with peptide oxygen atoms, whereas those in the 2nd hydration group do not. Compared with globular proteins, the number of water molecules in the 2nd hydration shell of the ppg9-XYG peptides is very large, likely due to the unique rod-like molecular structure of collagen model peptides. In the collagen helix, the amino acid residues in the X and Y positions must protrude outside of the triple helix, which forces even the hydrophobic side chains, such as Pro, to be exposed to the surrounding water molecules. Therefore, most of the waters in the 2nd hydration shell are covering hydrophobic Pro side chains by forming clathrate structures.

  19. Dynamic object management for distributed data structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totty, Brian K.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1992-01-01

    In distributed-memory multiprocessors, remote memory accesses incur larger delays than local accesses. Hence, insightful allocation and access of distributed data can yield substantial performance gains. The authors argue for the use of dynamic data management policies encapsulated within individual distributed data structures. Distributed data structures offer performance, flexibility, abstraction, and system independence. This approach is supported by data from a trace-driven simulation study of parallel scientific benchmarks. Experimental data on memory locality, message count, message volume, and communication delay suggest that data-structure-specific data management is superior to a single, system-imposed policy.

  20. Exploiting Dynamically Propositional Logic Structures in SAT

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jingchao

    2011-01-01

    The 32-bit hwb (hwb-n32 for short) problem is from equivalence checking that arises in combining two circuits computing the hidden weighted bit function. Since 2002, it remains still unsolvable in every SAT competition. This paper focuses on solving problems such as hwb-n32. Generally speaking, modern solvers can detect only XOR, AND, OR and ITE gates. Other non-clausal formulas (propositional logic structures) cannot be detected. To solve the hwb-n32 problem, we extract dynamically some special propositional logic structures, and then use a variant of DPLL-based solvers to solve the subproblem simplified by the extracted structure information. Using the dynamic extraction technique, we solved efficiently the hwb-n32 problem, even some of which were solved within 3000 seconds.

  1. Correlation Measure Equivalence in Dynamic Causal Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    We prove an equivalence transformation between the correlation measure functions of the causally-unbiased quantum gravity space and the causally-biased standard space. The theory of quantum gravity fuses the dynamic (nonfixed) causal structure of general relativity and the quantum uncertainty of quantum mechanics. In a quantum gravity space, the events are causally nonseparable and all time bias vanishes, which makes it no possible to use the standard causally-biased entropy and the correlation measure functions. Since a corrected causally-unbiased entropy function leads to an undefined, obscure mathematical structure, in our approach the correction is made in the data representation of the causally-unbiased space. We prove that the standard causally-biased entropy function with a data correction can be used to identify correlations in dynamic causal structures. As a corollary, all mathematical properties of the causally-biased correlation measure functions are preserved in the causally-unbiased space. The eq...

  2. The Other Double Helix--The Fascinating Chemistry of Starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Robert D.; Tarbet, Bryon J.

    2000-08-01

    Current textbooks deal only briefly with the chemistry of starch. A short review with 21 references is presented, describing the structure of starch and indicating the double helix structure of A-type and B-type starch. The structure of the starch granule is examined, pointing out the existence of growth rings of alternating crystalline and noncrystalline starch, with growing amylopectin molecules extending from the hilum (point of origin) to the surface of the starch granule. The swelling of starch granules in water, above the gelatinization temperature of about 60 °C, is discussed. The process of gelatinization involves unraveling of the starch helix and a manyfold increase in volume of the starch granule as water is imbibed and bound to the unraveled starch polymer by hydrogen bonding. Baking bread or pastries causes unraveling of the starch helix, and the process by which these products become stale corresponds primarily to the re-forming of the starch helix. The importance of this phenomenon in food science is discussed. The absorption of nonpolar linear molecules such as I2, or linear nonpolar portions of molecules such as n-butanol or fats and phospholipids, by the C-type helix of starch is examined. The way in which starch is structurally modified to retard staling is discussed in relation to food technology.

  3. The fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sekara, Vedran; Lehmann, Sune

    2015-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful mathematical framework for analyzing the structure and dynamics of complex systems (1-3). The study of group behavior has deep roots in the social science literature (4,5) and community detection is a central part of modern network science. Network communities have been found to be highly overlapping and organized in a hierarchical structure (6-9). Recent technological advances have provided a toolset for measuring the detailed social dynamics at scale (10,11). In spite of great progress, a quantitative description of the complex temporal behavior of social groups-with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns expressed on the timescale of years-is still absent. Here we uncover a class of fundamental structures embedded within highly dynamic social networks. On the shortest time-scale, we find that social gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. We show that cores represent social contexts (9), with recur...

  4. Soliton structure dynamics in inhomogeneous media

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero, L E; González, J A

    1998-01-01

    We show that soliton interaction with finite-width inhomogeneities can activate a great number of soliton internal modes. We obtain the exact stationary soliton solution in the presence of inhomogeneities and solve exactly the stability problem. We present a Karhunen-Loeve analysis of the soliton structure dynamics as a time-dependent force pumps energy into the traslational mode of the kink. We show the importance of the internal modes of the soliton as they can generate shape chaos for the soliton as well as cases in which the first shape mode leads the dynamics.

  5. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  6. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling in Twin-Helix.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Erdelyi. B., J.A. Maloney

    2011-09-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated optics. Wedge-shaped absorbers immediately followed by short rf cavities are placed into the twin-helix channel. Parametric resonances are induced in both planes using helical quadrupole harmonics. We demonstrate resonant dynamics and cooling with stochastic effects off using GEANT4/G4beamline. We illustrate compensation of spherical aberrations and benchmark COSY Infinity, a powerful tool for aberration analysis and compensation.

  7. An unusual helix turn helix motif in the catalytic core of HIV-1 integrase binds viral DNA and LEDGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayate Merad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrase (IN of the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into host cellular DNA. We identified a bi-helix motif (residues 149-186 in the crystal structure of the catalytic core (CC of the IN-Phe185Lys variant that consists of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices connected by a 3 to 5-residue turn. The motif is embedded in a large array of interactions that stabilize the monomer and the dimer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the conformational and binding properties of the corresponding synthetic peptide. This displays features of the protein motif structure thanks to the mutual intramolecular interactions of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices that maintain the fold. The main properties are the binding to: 1- the processing-attachment site at the LTR (long terminal repeat ends of virus DNA with a K(d (dissociation constant in the sub-micromolar range; 2- the whole IN enzyme; and 3- the IN binding domain (IBD but not the IBD-Asp366Asn variant of LEDGF (lens epidermal derived growth factor lacking the essential Asp366 residue. In our motif, in contrast to the conventional HTH (helix-turn-helix, it is the N terminal helix (alpha(4 which has the role of DNA recognition helix, while the C terminal helix (alpha(5 would rather contribute to the motif stabilization by interactions with the alpha(4 helix. CONCLUSION: The motif, termed HTHi (i, for inverted emerges as a central piece of the IN structure and function. It could therefore represent an attractive target in the search for inhibitors working at the DNA-IN, IN-IN and IN-LEDGF interfaces.

  8. Protein–Mineral Interactions: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Capture Importance of Variations in Mineral Surface Composition and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Amity; Reardon, Patrick N.; Chacon, Stephany S.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Washton, Nancy M.; Kleber, Markus

    2016-06-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations, conventional and metadynamics, were performed to determine the interaction of model protein Gb1 over kaolinite (001), Na+-montmorillonite (001), Ca2+-montmorillonite (001), goethite (100), and Na+-birnessite (001) mineral surfaces. Gb1, a small (56 residue) protein with a well-characterized solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure and having α-helix, four-fold β-sheet, and hydrophobic core features, is used as a model protein to study protein soil mineral interactions and gain insights on structural changes and potential degradation of protein. From our simulations, we observe little change to the hydrated Gb1 structure over the kaolinite, montmorillonite, and goethite surfaces relative to its solvated structure without these mineral surfaces present. Over the Na+-birnessite basal surface, however, the Gb1 structure is highly disturbed as a result of interaction with this birnessite surface. Unraveling of the Gb1 β-sheet at specific turns and a partial unraveling of the α-helix is observed over birnessite, which suggests specific vulnerable residue sites for oxidation or hydrolysis possibly leading to fragmentation.

  9. The Triple Helix of the Organizational Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Contantin BRĂTIANU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the inner triple helix dynamics of the organizationalknowledge. This is a new perspective of the classical view of tacit knowledge– explicit knowledge dyad of the organizational knowledge promoted by Nonaka and hisco-workers. The new perspective is based on the metaphor that organizational knowledge isa "eld rather than a stock, or stocks and flows. It is a complex metaphor using the thermodynamicsprinciples. The organizational knowledge is composed of three different "elds: cognitiveknowledge, emotional knowledge and spiritual knowledge. These "elds are nonuniform,nonhomogeneous and they interact in a dynamic way. Cognitive "eld contains knowledgeabout what is, emotional "eld contains knowledge about how we feel, and the spiritual "eldcontains knowledge about people’s aspirations and life values. This new perspective opens anew opportunity in understanding the challenges for the 21st century management.

  10. Prediction of transmembrane helix orientation in polytopic membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Jie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane proteins compose up to 30% of coding sequences within genomes. However, their structure determination is lagging behind compared with soluble proteins due to the experimental difficulties. Therefore, it is important to develop reliable computational methods to predict structures of membrane proteins. Results We present a method for prediction of the TM helix orientation, which is an essential step in ab initio modeling of membrane proteins. Our method is based on a canonical model of the heptad repeat originally developed for coiled coils. We identify the helical surface patches that interface with lipid molecules at an accuracy of about 88% from the sequence information alone, using an empirical scoring function LIPS (LIPid-facing Surface, which combines lipophilicity and conservation of residues in the helix. We test and discuss results of prediction of helix-lipid interfaces on 162 transmembrane helices from 18 polytopic membrane proteins and present predicted orientations of TM helices in TRPV1 channel. We also apply our method to two structures of homologous cytochrome b6f complexes and find discrepancy in the assignment of TM helices from subunits PetG, PetN and PetL. The results of LIPS calculations and analysis of packing and H-bonding interactions support the helix assignment found in the cytochrome b6f structure from green alga but not the assignment of TM helices in the cyanobacterium b6f structure. Conclusion LIPS calculations can be used for the prediction of helix orientation in ab initio modeling of polytopic membrane proteins. We also show with the example of two cytochrome b6f structures that our method can identify questionable helix assignments in membrane proteins. The LIPS server is available online at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/lab/larisa/lips.html.

  11. Circular dichroism, molecular modeling, and serology indicate that the structural basis of antigenic variation in foot-and-mouth disease virus is [alpha]-helix formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, L.L.; Piatti, P.G.; Newman, J.F.E.; Brown, F. (Plum Island Animal Disease Center, Greenport, NY (United States)); Toth, I.; Gibbons, W.A. (Univ. of London (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-30

    Seven antigenic variants obtained from a single field isolate of foot-and-mouth disease virus, serotype A12, differ only at residues 148 and 153 in the immunodominant loop of viral protein VP1. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the region 141-160 are highly immunogenic. UV circular dichroism shows that (i) in aqueous solution of the peptides are nearly identical, but in 100% trifluoroethanol they display helix-forming properties which correlate well with their serological crossreactivities for anti-peptide sera, and (ii) these properties are insensitive to substitutions at position 153, except for proline, but are highly sensitive to substitutions at position 148. This pattern can be explained by the effects of these substitutions on the amphiphilic character and positions of helices postulated in the region 146-156. Molecular models indicate that residues 147, 148, 150, 151, 153-155, and 157 are most likely to interact with residues of the antibody paratopes. The data are consistent with the existence of an inverse [gamma]-turn around Pro-153, and a [beta]-turn at the cell-attachment site at residues 145-147. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Time Collocation Method for Structural Dynamic Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chen; LUO Tao; YAN Haiqing; GU Xiaohui

    2005-01-01

    In order to achieve highly accurate and efficient numerical calculations of structural dynamics, time collocation method is presented. For a given time interval, the numerical solution of the method is approximated by a polynomial. The polynomial coefficients are evaluated by solving algebraic equation. Once the polynomial coefficients are evaluated, the numerical solutions at any time in the interval can be easily calculated. New formulae are derived for the polynomial coefficients,which are more practical and succinct than those previously given. Two structural dynamic equations are calculated by the proposed method. The numerical solutions are compared with the traditional fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results show that the method proposed is highly accurate and computationally efficient. In addition, an important advantage of the method is the simplicity in software programming.

  13. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  14. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  15. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  16. A Study of the Dynamics of the Heme Pocket and C-helix in CooA upon CO Dissociation Using Time-Resolved Visible and UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otomo, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Haruto; Mizuno, Misao; Kimura, Tetsunari; Kubo, Minoru; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Aono, Shigetoshi; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2016-08-18

    CooA is a CO-sensing transcriptional activator from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum that binds CO at the heme iron. The heme iron in ferrous CooA has two axial ligands: His77 and Pro2. CO displaces Pro2 and induces a conformational change in CooA. The dissociation of CO and/or ligation of the Pro2 residue are believed to trigger structural changes in the protein. Visible time-resolved resonance Raman spectra obtained in this study indicated that the ν(Fe-His) mode, arising from the proximal His77-iron stretch, does not shift until 50 μs after the photodissociation of CO. Ligation of the Pro2 residue to the heme iron was observed around 50 μs after the photodissociation of CO, suggesting that the ν(Fe-His) band exhibits no shift until the ligation of Pro2. UV resonance Raman spectra suggested structural changes in the vicinity of Trp110 in the C-helix upon CO binding, but no or very small spectral changes in the time-resolved UV resonance Raman spectra were observed from 100 ns to 100 μs after the photodissociation of CO. These results strongly suggest that the conformational change of CooA is induced by the ligation of Pro2 to the heme iron.

  17. Evidence supporting the existence of a NUPR1-like family of helix-loop-helix chromatin proteins related to, yet distinct from, AT hook-containing HMG proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Raul; Velez, Gabriel; Lin, Marisa; Lomberk, Gwen; Neira, Jose Luis; Iovanna, Juan

    2014-08-01

    NUPR1, a small chromatin protein, plays a critical role in cancer development, progression, and resistance to therapy. Here, using a combination of structural bioinformatics and molecular modeling methods, we report several novel findings that enhance our understanding of the biochemical function of this protein. We find that NUPR1 has been conserved throughout evolution, and over time it has undergone duplications and transpositions to form other transcriptional regulators. Using threading, homology-based molecular modeling, molecular mechanics calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations, we generated structural models for four of these proteins: NUPR1a, NUPR1b, NUPR2, and the NUPR-like domain of GTF2-I. Comparative analyses of these models combined with extensive linear motif identification reveal that these four proteins, though similar in their propensities for folding, differ in size, surface changes, and sites amenable for posttranslational modification. Lastly, taking NUPR1a as the paradigm for this family, we built models of a NUPR-DNA complex. Additional structural comparisons revealed that NUPR1 defines a new family of small-groove-binding proteins that share structural features with, yet are distinct from, helix-loop-helix AT-hook-containing HMG proteins. These models and inferences should lead to a better understanding of the function of this group of chromatin proteins, which play a critical role in the development of human malignant diseases.

  18. Dynamic active earth pressure on retaining structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepankar Choudhury; Santiram Chatterjee

    2006-12-01

    Earth-retaining structures constitute an important topic of research in civil engineering, more so under earthquake conditions. For the analysis and design of retaining walls in earthquake-prone zones, accurate estimation of dynamic earth pressures is very important. Conventional methods either use pseudo-static approaches of analysis even for dynamic cases or a simple single-degree of freedom model for the retaining wall–soil system. In this paper, a simplified two-degree of freedom mass–spring–dashpot (2-DOF) dynamic model has been proposed to estimate the active earth pressure at the back of the retaining walls for translation modes of wall movement under seismic conditions. The horizontal zone of influence on dynamic earth force on the wall is estimated. Results in terms of displacement, velocity and acceleration-time history are presented for some typical cases, which show the final movement of the wall in terms of wall height, which is required for the design. The non-dimensional design chart proposed in the present study can be used to compute the total dynamic earth force on the wall under different input ground motion and backfill conditions. Finally, the results obtained have been compared with those of the available Scott model and the merits of the present results have been discussed.

  19. On R factors for dynamic structure crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppens, Philip; Kaminski, Radoslaw; Schmøkel, Mette Stokkebro

    2010-01-01

    In studies of dynamic changes in crystals in which induced metastable species may have lifetimes of microseconds or less, refinements are most sensitive if based on the changes induced in the measured intensities. Agreement factors appropriate for such refinements, based on the ratios of the inte...... of the intensities before and after the external perturbation is applied, are discussed and compared with R factors commonly applied in static structure crystallography....

  20. Dynamical Structure of Nuclear Excitation in Continuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun-Lei; ZHANG Huan-Qiao; ZHANG Xi-Zhen

    2005-01-01

    @@ Dynamical structures of collective excitation in continuum are studied by calculating the isoscalar and isovector strength as well as transition density of nuclei near the drip-line such as 28O and 34Ca. It is found that for some excited states in continuum the proton and neutron transition density calculated from isoscalar and isovector excitation at some given energies may be different, which will affect the calculation of the polarization for nuclei with N ≠ Z.

  1. Nonlinear Dynamics and Control of Flexible Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    Freedom," Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, in preparation. 5I I URI Reorts Islam , Saiful and Mircea...Theoretical and Applied Mechanics I S. Islam Civil and Environmental Engineering I 2! I 3 URI Accomplishments 3 -Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos in Flexible...Structures with Symmetry," 31 (1991) 265-285. Islam , S. and M. Grigoriu, "Nonlinear Random Vibration of Pin-Jointed Trusses with Imperfections," in

  2. Flexible joints in structural and multibody dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Bauchau; Han, S.

    2013-01-01

    Flexible joints, sometimes called bushing elements or force elements, are found in all structural and multibody dynamics codes. In their simplest form, flexible joints simply consist of sets of three linear and three torsional springs placed between two nodes of the model. For infinitesimal deformations, the selection of the lumped spring constants is an easy task, which can be based on a numerical simulation of the joint or on experimental measurements. If the joint undergoes finite deformat...

  3. Feature Extraction for Structural Dynamics Model Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [Yokohama University; Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stull, Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam Univesity; Cornwell, Phil [Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology; Figueiredo, Eloi [Universidade Lusófona; Luscher, D. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worden, Keith [University of Sheffield

    2016-01-13

    As structural dynamics becomes increasingly non-modal, stochastic and nonlinear, finite element model-updating technology must adopt the broader notions of model validation and uncertainty quantification. For example, particular re-sampling procedures must be implemented to propagate uncertainty through a forward calculation, and non-modal features must be defined to analyze nonlinear data sets. The latter topic is the focus of this report, but first, some more general comments regarding the concept of model validation will be discussed.

  4. Modal interactions in dynamical and structural systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, A.H.; Balachandran, B. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The authors review theoretical and experimental studies of the influence of modal interactions on the nonlinear response of harmonically excited structural and dynamical systems. In particular, they discuss the response of pendulums, ships, rings, shells, arches, beam structures, surface waves, and the similarities in the qualitative behavior of these systems. The systems are characterized by quadratic nonlinearities which may lead to two-to-one and combination autoparametric resonances. These resonances give rise to a coupling between the modes involved in the resonance leading to nonlinear periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic motions.

  5. Some Modern Problems in Structural Engineering Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Elishakoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review paper deals with two problems in structural engineering dynamics; one is deterministic, the other is of stochastic nature. One problem is linear, the other is nonlinear. Authors have a biased preferential view on these problems because of their active involvement in the discussed research topics. Still, these two problems reflect, at least in a small manner, some developments in this vast and fascinating field. The first part deals with deterministic linear vibrations of double-walled carbon nanotubes either in classical or refined setting; the second part is devoted to the nonlinear random vibrations of structures.

  6. Dynamic ice loads on conical structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Two series of model tests were performed to observe the dynamic ice loads on conical structures.The variable testing parameters include the water line diameter of the model cone and ice parameters.During small water line diameter tests,two-time breaking is found to be the typical failure of ice on steep conical structure,and also be controlled by other factors,such as ice speed and the cone angle.During big water line diameter tests,the ice sheet failed nonsimultaneously around the cone.Several independe...

  7. Triple Helix - in Action?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik; Tellerup, Susanne

    This paper presents a project i-Space about learning and playful applications, which could also document performance. The target group is mentally impaired citizens. The project is used as reference to a discussion on structures within innovation processes. This discussion leads to a discussion o...

  8. Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

    2010-11-08

    This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

  9. Structural dynamic analysis of composite beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, J. K.; Venkatesan, C.; Ramamurti, V.

    1990-12-01

    In the treatment of the structural dynamic problem of composite materials, two alternate types of formulations, based on the elastic modulus and compliance quantities, exist in the literature. The definitions of the various rigidities are observed to differ in these two approaches. Following these two types of formulation, the structural dynamic characteristics of a composite beam are analyzed. The results of the analysis are compared with those available in the literature. Based on the comparison, the influence of the warping function in defining the coupling terms in the modulus approach and also on the natural frequencies of the beam has been identified. It is found from the analysis that, in certain cases, the difference between the results of the two approaches is appreciable. These differences may be attributed to the constraints imposed on the deformation and flexibility of the beam by the choice of the description of the warping behaviour. Finally, the influence of material properties on the structural dynamic characteristics of the beam is studied for different composites for various angles of orthotropy.

  10. Handbook on dynamics of jointed structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Nicoli M.; Lauffer, James P.; Jew, Michael D.; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Gregory, Danny Lynn; Starr, Michael James; Resor, Brian Ray

    2009-07-01

    The problem of understanding and modeling the complicated physics underlying the action and response of the interfaces in typical structures under dynamic loading conditions has occupied researchers for many decades. This handbook presents an integrated approach to the goal of dynamic modeling of typical jointed structures, beginning with a mathematical assessment of experimental or simulation data, development of constitutive models to account for load histories to deformation, establishment of kinematic models coupling to the continuum models, and application of finite element analysis leading to dynamic structural simulation. In addition, formulations are discussed to mitigate the very short simulation time steps that appear to be required in numerical simulation for problems such as this. This handbook satisfies the commitment to DOE that Sandia will develop the technical content and write a Joints Handbook. The content will include: (1) Methods for characterizing the nonlinear stiffness and energy dissipation for typical joints used in mechanical systems and components. (2) The methodology will include practical guidance on experiments, and reduced order models that can be used to characterize joint behavior. (3) Examples for typical bolted and screw joints will be provided.

  11. Physical profile data collected using CTD from the R/V ALPHA HELIX in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics Program (GLOBEC) project, from 17 May 2000 to 26 May 2000 (NODC Accession 0000250)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical profile data were collected from the R/V ALPHA HELIX from May 17, 2000 to May 26, 2000. Data were submitted by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks;...

  12. Controlling Proton Delivery through Catalyst Structural Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Allan Jay P. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; 221 Science Center, State University of New York at Fredonia, Fredonia NY 14063 USA; Ginovska, Bojana [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Kumar, Neeraj [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Hou, Jianbo [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Raugei, Simone [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Helm, Monte L. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Appel, Aaron M. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; Bullock, R. Morris [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA; O' Hagan, Molly [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57 Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-09-27

    The fastest synthetic molecular catalysts for production and oxidation of H2 emulate components of the active site of natural hydrogenases. The role of controlled structural dynamics is recognized as a critical component in the catalytic performance of many enzymes, including hydrogenases, but is largely neglected in the design of synthetic molecular cata-lysts. In this work, the impact of controlling structural dynamics on the rate of production of H2 was studied for a series of [Ni(PPh2NC6H4-R2)2]2+ catalysts including R = n-hexyl, n-decyl, n-tetradecyl, n-octadecyl, phenyl, or cyclohexyl. A strong correlation was observed between the ligand structural dynamics and the rates of electrocatalytic hydrogen production in acetonitrile, acetonitrile-water, and protic ionic liquid-water mixtures. Specifically, the turnover frequencies correlate inversely with the rates of ring inversion of the amine-containing ligand, as this dynamic process dictates the positioning of the proton relay in the second coordination sphere and therefore governs protonation at either catalytically productive or non-productive sites. This study demonstrates that the dynamic processes involved in proton delivery can be controlled through modifications of the outer coordination sphere of the catalyst, similar to the role of the protein architecture in many enzymes. The present work provides new mechanistic insight into the large rate enhancements observed in aqueous protic ionic liquid media for the [Ni(PPh2NR2)]2+ family of catalysts. The incorporation of controlled structural dynamics as a design parameter to modulate proton delivery in molecular catalysts has enabled H2 production rates that are up to three orders of magnitude faster than the [Ni(PPh2NPh2)]2+complex. The observed turnover frequencies are up to 106 s-1 in acetonitrile-water, and over 107 s-1 in protic ionic liquid-water mixtures, with a minimal increase in overpotential. This material is based upon work supported as part of

  13. DYNAMIC CINEMATIC TO A STRUCTURE 2R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Flat structures 2R can solve all the problems posed by all the robotic anthropomorphic structures. The study of the anthropomorphic robots by the use of a flat structure 2R is a much easier method than classical used spatial methods. The paper outlines a method for the determination of dynamic to a robotic structure 2R balanced. 2R plane structures are used in practice only in the form balanced, for which in this paper will be made, initial, the total balance, and then the study cinematico-dynamic will only develop on the model already balanced. Dynamic relations presented then briefly without deduction will be explained and discussed with regard to their application. On the basis of the model presented and following calculations performed can be chosen correctly the two electric motors in the actuator. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  14. NMR-based approach to measure the free energy of transmembrane helix-helix interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineev, Konstantin S; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Usmanova, Dinara R; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the energetic parameters of transmembrane helix-helix interactions is necessary for the establishment of a structure-energy relationship for α-helical membrane domains. A number of techniques have been developed to measure the free energies of dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane α-helices, and all of these have their advantages and drawbacks. In this study we propose a methodology to determine the magnitudes of the free energy of interactions between transmembrane helices in detergent micelles. The suggested approach employs solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the population of the oligomeric states of the transmembrane domains and introduces a new formalism to describe the oligomerization equilibrium, which is based on the assumption that both the dimerization of the transmembrane domains and the dissociation of the dimer can occur only upon the collision of detergent micelles. The technique has three major advantages compared with other existing approaches: it may be used to analyze both weak and relatively strong dimerization/oligomerization processes, it works well for the analysis of complex equilibria, e.g. when monomer, dimer and high-order oligomer populations are simultaneously present in the solution, and it can simultaneously yield both structural and energetic characteristics of the helix-helix interaction under study. The proposed methodology was applied to investigate the oligomerization process of transmembrane domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and allowed the measurement of the free energy of dimerization of both of these objects. In addition the proposed method was able to describe the multi-state oligomerization process of the VEGFR2 transmembrane domain.

  15. Ordered structures of nanoro ds induced by the helixes of semiflexible p olymer chains%半刚性高分子链螺旋结构诱导纳米棒的有序结构∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华昀峰; 张冬; 章林溪

    2015-01-01

    packed hexagonal arrays of NRs are produced. In this paper, by employing the coarse-grained model and molecular dynamics simulation, we explore the structures of nanocomposites in which a small number of NRs bind with semiflexible polymer chain. The morphology of NRs/polymer mixture is greatly affected by the bending energy b of semiflexible polymer and the binding energy D0 between NRs and semiflexible polymer. If the binding energy D0 is less than 1.1kBT , the NRs are almost free and a gas-like phase is observed. For a suitably large value of D0, three completely different morphologies of NRs/polymer mixtures are identified, namely, the side-to-side parallel aggregation of NRs, the end-to-end parallel aggregation of NRs, and the dispersion of NRs. For the flexible polymer chain (i.e., small bending energy b), the side-to-side parallel aggregation structure of NRs and the disordered conformation of adsorbed polymer chain are observed. In general, a typical equilibrium conformation of free flexible polymer chain is random coil, the binding energy between NRs and polymer can lead to the collapse of a random coil for flexible polymer chain, and the NRs aggregate in the manner of the side-to-side parallel to each other because the enthalpy is maximized through sharing the more polymer monomers between neighbor NRs. That is to say, the local aggregation of NRs can be found because the orientational entropy can make the aggregated NRs arrange in the side-to-side parallel manner. In the rigid polymer chain limit (very large bending energy), the rigid polymer chain is stretched and the NRs are well dispersed. As the rigid polymer holds a long persistence length, the NRs can move freely along the stretched polymer chain, and the dispersed conformation of NRs is formed. For the semiflexible polymer chain with a moderate bending energy, the NRs are aggregated in the end-to-end parallel arrangement. Meanwhile, the polymer monomers wrap around those NRs in a well-defined helical

  16. 30th IMAC, A Conference on Structural Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Catbas, FN; Mayes, R; Rixen, D; Griffith, DT; Allemang, R; Clerck, J; Klerk, D; Simmermacher, T; Cogan, S; Chauhan, S; Cunha, A; Racic, V; Reynolds, P; Salyards, K; Adams, D; Kerschen, G; Carrella, A; Voormeeren, SN; Allen, MS; Horta, LG; Barthorpe, R; Niezrecki, C; Blough, JR; Vol.1 Topics on the Dynamics of Civil Structures; Vol.2 Topics in Experimental Dynamics Substructuring and Wind Turbine Dynamics; Vol.3 Topics in Nonlinear Dynamics; Vol.4 Topics in Model Validation and Uncertainty Quantification; Vol.5 Topics in Modal Analysis I; Vol.6 Topics in Modal Analysis II

    2012-01-01

    Topics on the Dynamics of Civil Structures, Volume 1, Proceedings of the 30th IMAC, A Conference and Exposition on Structural Dynamics, 2012, the first volume of six from the Conference, brings together 45 contributions to this important area of research and engineering. The collection presents early findings and case studies on fundamental and applied aspects of Structural Dynamics, including papers on: Human Induced Vibrations Bridge Dynamics Operational Modal Analysis Experimental Techniques and Modeling for Civil Structures System Identification for Civil Structures Method and Technologies for Bridge Monitoring Damage Detection for Civil Structures Structural Modeling Vibration Control Method and Approaches for Civil Structures Modal Testing of Civil Structures.

  17. Dynamic Failure of Composite and Sandwich Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Abrate, Serge; Rajapakse, Yapa D S

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a broad view of the current state of the art regarding the dynamic response of composite and sandwich structures subjected to impacts and explosions. Each chapter combines a thorough assessment of the literature with original contributions made by the authors.  The first section deals with fluid-structure interactions in marine structures.  The first chapter focuses on hull slamming and particularly cases in which the deformation of the structure affects the motion of the fluid during the water entry of flexible hulls. Chapter 2 presents an extensive series of tests underwater and in the air to determine the effects of explosions on composite and sandwich structures.  Full-scale structures were subjected to significant explosive charges, and such results are extremely rare in the open literature.  Chapter 3 describes a simple geometrical theory of diffraction for describing the interaction of an underwater blast wave with submerged structures. The second section addresses the problem of...

  18. Structural optimization for nonlinear dynamic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Suguang; Strachan, B. Scott; Shaw, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    condition, thereby providing a means for tailoring its nonlinear response. The method is applied to the fundamental nonlinear resonance of a clamped–clamped beam and to the coupled mode response of a frame structure, and the results show that one can modify essential normal form coefficients by an order...... resonant behaviour is being used for a variety of applications in sensing and signal conditioning. In this work, we describe a computational method that provides a systematic means for manipulating and optimizing features of nonlinear resonant responses of mechanical structures that are described...... by a single vibrating mode, or by a pair of internally resonant modes. The approach combines techniques from nonlinear dynamics, computational mechanics and optimization, and it allows one to relate the geometric and material properties of structural elements to terms in the normal form for a given resonance...

  19. Dynamics of Correlation Structure in Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maman Abdurachman Djauhari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a correction factor for Jennrich’s statistic is introduced in order to be able not only to test the stability of correlation structure, but also to identify the time windows where the instability occurs. If Jennrich’s statistic is only to test the stability of correlation structure along predetermined non-overlapping time windows, the corrected statistic provides us with the history of correlation structure dynamics from time window to time window. A graphical representation will be provided to visualize that history. This information is necessary to make further analysis about, for example, the change of topological properties of minimal spanning tree. An example using NYSE data will illustrate its advantages.

  20. The structural dynamics of social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Michael W; Park, Jun Won

    2017-08-01

    Individual agency accounts of social class persist in society and even in psychological science despite clear evidence for the role of social structures. This article argues that social class is defined by the structural dynamics of society. Specifically, access to powerful networks, groups, and institutions, and inequalities in wealth and other economic resources shape proximal social environments that influence how individuals express their internal states and motivations. An account of social class that highlights the means by which structures shape and are shaped by individuals guides our understanding of how people move up or down in the social class hierarchy, and provides a framework for interpreting neuroscience studies, experimental paradigms, and approaches that attempt to intervene on social class disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein structural dynamics revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Goo; Kim, Tae Wu; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2015-08-18

    One of the most important questions in biological science is how a protein functions. When a protein performs its function, it undergoes regulated structural transitions. In this regard, to better understand the underlying principle of a protein function, it is desirable to monitor the dynamic evolution of the protein structure in real time. To probe fast and subtle motions of a protein in physiological conditions demands an experimental tool that is not only equipped with superb spatiotemporal resolution but also applicable to samples in solution phase. Time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS), discussed in this Account, fits all of those requirements needed for probing the movements of proteins in aqueous solution. The technique utilizes a pump-probe scheme employing an optical pump pulse to initiate photoreactions of proteins and an X-ray probe pulse to monitor ensuing structural changes. The technical advances in ultrafast lasers and X-ray sources allow us to achieve superb temporal resolution down to femtoseconds. Because X-rays scatter off all atomic pairs in a protein, an X-ray scattering pattern provides information on the global structure of the protein with subangstrom spatial resolution. Importantly, TRXSS is readily applicable to aqueous solution samples of proteins with the aid of theoretical models and therefore is well suited for investigating structural dynamics of protein transitions in physiological conditions. In this Account, we demonstrate that TRXSS can be used to probe real-time structural dynamics of proteins in solution ranging from subtle helix movement to global conformational change. Specifically, we discuss the photoreactions of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) and homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI). For PYP, we revealed the kinetics of structural transitions among four transient intermediates comprising a photocycle and, by applying structural analysis based on ab initio shape reconstruction, showed that the signaling of PYP involves

  2. Dynamic sign structures in visual art and music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeller, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Seemingly static meaning carriers in visual art are considered as aspects of holistic dynamical sign structures.......Seemingly static meaning carriers in visual art are considered as aspects of holistic dynamical sign structures....

  3. Dynamic sign structures in visual art and music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeller, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Seemingly static meaning carriers in visual art are considered as aspects of holistic dynamical sign structures.......Seemingly static meaning carriers in visual art are considered as aspects of holistic dynamical sign structures....

  4. Dynamic structure of dense krypton gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Salacuse, J. J.; Schommers, W.; Ram, J.

    1984-07-01

    We have made molecular-dynamics computer simulations of dense krypton gas (10.6×1027 atoms/m3 and 296 K) using reasonably realistic pair potentials. Comparisons are made with the recent experimental data[P. A. Egelstaff et al., Phys. Rev. A 27, 1106 (1983)] for the dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) over the range 0.4

  5. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A; Norman, Richard A; Scott, Andrew D; Higazi, Daniel R; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S; Breeze, Alexander L

    2015-07-23

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called 'DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a 'DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and 'molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1.

  6. Structural and dynamic insights into the energetics of activation loop rearrangement in FGFR1 kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tobias; Vajpai, Navratna; Phillips, Jonathan J.; Davies, Gareth; Holdgate, Geoffrey A.; Phillips, Chris; Tucker, Julie A.; Norman, Richard A.; Scott, Andrew D.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Lowe, David; Thompson, Gary S.; Breeze, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases differ widely in their propensity to undergo rearrangements of the N-terminal Asp–Phe–Gly (DFG) motif of the activation loop, with some, including FGFR1 kinase, appearing refractory to this so-called ‘DFG flip'. Recent inhibitor-bound structures have unexpectedly revealed FGFR1 for the first time in a ‘DFG-out' state. Here we use conformationally selective inhibitors as chemical probes for interrogation of the structural and dynamic features that appear to govern the DFG flip in FGFR1. Our detailed structural and biophysical insights identify contributions from altered dynamics in distal elements, including the αH helix, towards the outstanding stability of the DFG-out complex with the inhibitor ponatinib. We conclude that the αC-β4 loop and ‘molecular brake' regions together impose a high energy barrier for this conformational rearrangement, and that this may have significance for maintaining autoinhibition in the non-phosphorylated basal state of FGFR1. PMID:26203596

  7. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Lehmann, Sune

    2016-09-06

    Social systems are in a constant state of flux, with dynamics spanning from minute-by-minute changes to patterns present on the timescale of years. Accurate models of social dynamics are important for understanding the spreading of influence or diseases, formation of friendships, and the productivity of teams. Although there has been much progress on understanding complex networks over the past decade, little is known about the regularities governing the microdynamics of social networks. Here, we explore the dynamic social network of a densely-connected population of ∼1,000 individuals and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection unnecessary. Starting from 5-min time slices, we uncover dynamic social structures expressed on multiple timescales. On the hourly timescale, we find that gatherings are fluid, with members coming and going, but organized via a stable core of individuals. Each core represents a social context. Cores exhibit a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision.

  8. The Hierarchical Structure and Dynamics of Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, M A

    2012-01-01

    Contrary to the common view voids have very complex internal structure and dynamics. Here we show how the hierarchy of structures in the density field inside voids is reflected by a similar hierarchy of structures in the velocity field. Voids defined by dense filaments and clusters can de described as simple expanding domains with coherent flows everywhere except at their boundaries. At scales smaller that the void radius the velocity field breaks into expanding sub-domains corresponding to sub- voids. These sub-domains break into even smaller sub-sub domains at smaller scales resulting in a nesting hierarchy of locally expanding domains. The ratio between the magnitude of the velocity field responsible for the expansion of the void and the velocity field defining the sub voids is approximately one order of magnitude. The small-scale components of the velocity field play a minor role in the shaping of the voids but they define the local dynamics directly affecting the processes of galaxy formation and evoluti...

  9. Crystal structure of YwpF from Staphylococcus aureus reveals its architecture comprised of a β-barrel core domain resembling type VI secretion system proteins and a two-helix pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    The ywpF gene (SAV2097) of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Mu50 encodes the YwpF protein, which may play a role in antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the YwpF superfamily from S. aureus at 2.5-Å resolution. The YwpF structure consists of two regions: an N-terminal core β-barrel domain that shows structural similarity to type VI secretion system (T6SS) proteins (e.g., Hcp1, Hcp3, and EvpC) and a C-terminal two-helix pair. Although the monomer structure of S. aureus YwpF resembles those of T6SS proteins, the dimer/tetramer model of S. aureus YwpF is distinct from the functionally important hexameric ring of T6SS proteins. We therefore suggest that the S. aureus YwpF may have a different function compared to T6SS proteins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Maria O.; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas; Cook, Bruce; Lefsky, Michael; Ducey, Mark; Saleska, Scott; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Schietti, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012) at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8 %) as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0 %). On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1). Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10 % of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6 % at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality) and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13 % and 10 %, respectively). At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal (23

  11. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria O Hunter

    Full Text Available Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up, and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012 at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8% as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0%. On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1. Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10% of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6% at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13% and 10%, respectively. At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal

  12. Structural Dynamics of Tropical Moist Forest Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Maria O; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas; Cook, Bruce; Lefsky, Michael; Ducey, Mark; Saleska, Scott; de Oliveira, Raimundo Cosme; Schietti, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Gap phase dynamics are the dominant mode of forest turnover in tropical forests. However, gap processes are infrequently studied at the landscape scale. Airborne lidar data offer detailed information on three-dimensional forest structure, providing a means to characterize fine-scale (1 m) processes in tropical forests over large areas. Lidar-based estimates of forest structure (top down) differ from traditional field measurements (bottom up), and necessitate clear-cut definitions unencumbered by the wisdom of a field observer. We offer a new definition of a forest gap that is driven by forest dynamics and consistent with precise ranging measurements from airborne lidar data and tall, multi-layered tropical forest structure. We used 1000 ha of multi-temporal lidar data (2008, 2012) at two sites, the Tapajos National Forest and Ducke Reserve, to study gap dynamics in the Brazilian Amazon. Here, we identified dynamic gaps as contiguous areas of significant growth, that correspond to areas > 10 m2, with height <10 m. Applying the dynamic definition at both sites, we found over twice as much area in gap at Tapajos National Forest (4.8%) as compared to Ducke Reserve (2.0%). On average, gaps were smaller at Ducke Reserve and closed slightly more rapidly, with estimated height gains of 1.2 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1 at Tapajos. At the Tapajos site, height growth in gap centers was greater than the average height gain in gaps (1.3 m y-1 versus 1.1 m y-1). Rates of height growth between lidar acquisitions reflect the interplay between gap edge mortality, horizontal ingrowth and gap size at the two sites. We estimated that approximately 10% of gap area closed via horizontal ingrowth at Ducke Reserve as opposed to 6% at Tapajos National Forest. Height loss (interpreted as repeat damage and/or mortality) and horizontal ingrowth accounted for similar proportions of gap area at Ducke Reserve (13% and 10%, respectively). At Tapajos, height loss had a much stronger signal (23% versus 6

  13. Structural dynamics of turbo-machines

    CERN Document Server

    Rangwala, AS

    2009-01-01

    The book presents a detailed and comprehensive treatment of structural vibration evaluation of turbo-machines. Starting with the fundamentals of the theory of vibration as related to various aspects of rotating machines, the dynamic analysis procedures of a broad spectrum of turbo-machines is covered. An in-depth procedure for analyzing the torsional and flexural oscillations of the components and of the rotor-bearing system is presented. The latest trends in design and analysis are presented, chief among them: Blade and coupled disk-blade mod

  14. The chemical bond structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1992-01-01

    This inspired book by some of the most influential scientists of our time--including six Nobel laureates--chronicles our emerging understanding of the chemical bond through the last nine decades and into the future. From Pauling's early structural work using x-ray and electron diffraction to Zewail's femtosecond lasers that probe molecular dynamics in real time; from Crick's molecular biology to Rich's molecular recognition, this book explores a rich tradition of scientific heritage and accomplishment. The perspectives given by Pauling, Perutz, Rich, Crick, Porter, Polanyi, Herschbach, Zewail,

  15. Inverse Eigenvalue Problem in Structural Dynamics Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqing Xie; Hua Dai

    2006-01-01

    A kind of inverse eigenvalue problem in structural dynamics design is considered. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The properties of this problem are analyzed, and the existence of the optimum solution is proved. The directional derivative of the objective function is obtained and a necessary condition for a point to be a local minimum point is given. Then a numerical algorithm for solving the problem is presented and a plane-truss problem is discussed to show the applications of the theories and the algorithm.

  16. DNA-like double helix formed by peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittung, P; Nielsen, Peter E.; Buchardt, O;

    1994-01-01

    Although the importance of the nucleobases in the DNA double helix is well understood, the evolutionary significance of the deoxyribose phosphate backbone and the contribution of this chemical entity to the overall helical structure and stability of the double helix is not so clear. Peptide nucleic...... acid (PNA) is a DNA analogue with a backbone consisting of N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine units (Fig. 1) which has been shown to mimic DNA in forming Watson-Crick complementary duplexes with normal DNA. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy we show here that two complementary PNA strands can hybridize to one...

  17. Molten uranium dioxide structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, L B; Benmore, C J; Weber, J K R; Williamson, M A; Tamalonis, A; Hebden, A; Wiencek, T; Alderman, O L G; Guthrie, M; Leibowitz, L; Parise, J B

    2014-11-21

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the major nuclear fuel component of fission power reactors. A key concern during severe accidents is the melting and leakage of radioactive UO2 as it corrodes through its zirconium cladding and steel containment. Yet, the very high temperatures (>3140 kelvin) and chemical reactivity of molten UO2 have prevented structural studies. In this work, we combine laser heating, sample levitation, and synchrotron x-rays to obtain pair distribution function measurements of hot solid and molten UO2. The hot solid shows a substantial increase in oxygen disorder around the lambda transition (2670 K) but negligible U-O coordination change. On melting, the average U-O coordination drops from 8 to 6.7 ± 0.5. Molecular dynamics models refined to this structure predict higher U-U mobility than 8-coordinated melts.

  18. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  19. Alpha- and beta-hemocyanin of Helix pomatia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Jan

    1971-01-01

    This thesis deals with several aspects of the protein structure of Alpha- and Beta -hemocyanin of Helix pomatia. a- and 0-hemocyanin possess a virtually identical amino acid composition; it closely resembles the amino acid com- positions of hemocyanins of other MOLLUSCA and ARTHROPODA. All hemocyani

  20. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE`s environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous.

  1. Structural optimization for nonlinear dynamic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Suguang; Strachan, B Scott; Shaw, Steven W; Jensen, Jakob S

    2015-09-28

    Much is known about the nonlinear resonant response of mechanical systems, but methods for the systematic design of structures that optimize aspects of these responses have received little attention. Progress in this area is particularly important in the area of micro-systems, where nonlinear resonant behaviour is being used for a variety of applications in sensing and signal conditioning. In this work, we describe a computational method that provides a systematic means for manipulating and optimizing features of nonlinear resonant responses of mechanical structures that are described by a single vibrating mode, or by a pair of internally resonant modes. The approach combines techniques from nonlinear dynamics, computational mechanics and optimization, and it allows one to relate the geometric and material properties of structural elements to terms in the normal form for a given resonance condition, thereby providing a means for tailoring its nonlinear response. The method is applied to the fundamental nonlinear resonance of a clamped-clamped beam and to the coupled mode response of a frame structure, and the results show that one can modify essential normal form coefficients by an order of magnitude by relatively simple changes in the shape of these elements. We expect the proposed approach, and its extensions, to be useful for the design of systems used for fundamental studies of nonlinear behaviour as well as for the development of commercial devices that exploit nonlinear behaviour.

  2. Structural and dynamical properties of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab

    Recent years have witnessed a substantial amount of interest within the physics community in the properties of networks. Techniques from statistical physics coupled with the widespread availability of computing resources have facilitated studies ranging from large scale empirical analysis of the worldwide web, social networks, biological systems, to the development of theoretical models and tools to explore the various properties of these systems. Following these developments, in this dissertation, we present and solve for a diverse set of new problems, investigating the structural and dynamical properties of both model and real world networks. We start by defining a new metric to measure the stability of network structure to disruptions, and then using a combination of theory and simulation study its properties in detail on artificially generated networks; we then compare our results to a selection of networks from the real world and find good agreement in most cases. In the following chapter, we propose a mathematical model that mimics the structure of popular file-sharing websites such as Flickr and CiteULike and demonstrate that many of its properties can solved exactly in the limit of large network size. The remaining part of the dissertation primarily focuses on the dynamical properties of networks. We first formulate a model of a network that evolves under the addition and deletion of vertices and edges, and solve for the equilibrium degree distribution for a variety of cases of interest. We then consider networks whose structure can be manipulated by adjusting the rules by which vertices enter and leave the network. We focus in particular on degree distributions and show that, with some mild constraints, it is possible by a suitable choice of rules to arrange for the network to have any degree distribution we desire. In addition we define a simple local algorithm by which appropriate rules can be implemented in practice. Finally, we conclude our

  3. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  4. Finite Element Vibration and Dynamic Response Analysis of Engineering Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mackerle

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography lists references to papers, conference proceedings, and theses/dissertations dealing with finite element vibration and dynamic response analysis of engineering structures that were published from 1994 to 1998. It contains 539 citations. The following types of structures are included: basic structural systems; ground structures; ocean and coastal structures; mobile structures; and containment structures.

  5. Secondary Structure Analysis of Native Cellulose by Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Coarse-Grained Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuai Wu; Hai-yi Zhan; Hong-ming Wang; Yan Ju

    2012-01-01

    The secondary structure of different Ⅰβ cellulose was analyzed by a molecular dynamics simulation with MARTINI coarse-grained force field,where each chain of the cellulose includes 40 D-glucoses units.Calculation gives a satisfied description about the secondary structure of the cellulose.As the chain number increasing,the cellulose becomes the form of a helix,with the diameter of screw growing and spiral rising.Interestingly,the celluloses with chain number N of 4,6,24 and 36 do show right-hand twisting.On the contrast,the celluloses with N of 8,12,16 chains are left-hand twisting.These simulations indicate that the cellulose with chain number larger than 36 will break down to two parts.Besides,the result indicates that 36-chains cellulose model is the most stable among all models.Furthermore,the Lennard-Jones potential determines the secondary structure.In addition,an equation was set up to analyze the twisting structure.

  6. Peptide Targeted by Human Antibodies Associated with HIV Vaccine-Associated Protection Assumes a Dynamic α-Helical Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Lorenzo; Goger, Michael; Battacharya, Shibani; deCamp, Allan C.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Berman, Phillip W.; Cardozo, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The only evidence of vaccine-induced protection from HIV acquisition in humans was obtained in the RV144 HIV vaccine clinical trial. One immune correlate of risk in RV144 was observed to be higher titers of vaccine-induced antibodies (Abs) reacting with a 23-mer non-glycosylated peptide with the same amino acid sequence as a segment in the second variable (V2) loop of the MN strain of HIV. We used NMR to analyze the dynamic 3D structure of this peptide. Distance restraints between spatially proximate inter-residue protons were calculated from NOE cross peak intensities and used to constrain a thorough search of all possible conformations of the peptide. α–helical folding was strongly preferred by part of the peptide. A high-throughput structure prediction of this segment in all circulating HIV strains demonstrated that α–helical conformations are preferred by this segment almost universally across all subtypes. Notably, α–helical conformations of this segment of the V2 loop cluster cross-subtype-conserved amino acids on one face of the helix and the variable amino acid positions on the other in a semblance of an amphipathic α–helix. Accordingly, some Abs that protected against HIV in RV144 may have targeted a specific, conserved α–helical peptide epitope in the V2 loop of HIV’s surface envelope glycoprotein. PMID:28107435

  7. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rhodri M L; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Zhou, Lihong; Roe, S Mark; Korbonits, Márta; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h) mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation), R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE) of TOMM20.

  8. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodri M L Morgan

    Full Text Available Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation, R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE of TOMM20.

  9. Nonparametric inference of network structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    The network structure of complex systems determine their function and serve as evidence for the evolutionary mechanisms that lie behind them. Despite considerable effort in recent years, it remains an open challenge to formulate general descriptions of the large-scale structure of network systems, and how to reliably extract such information from data. Although many approaches have been proposed, few methods attempt to gauge the statistical significance of the uncovered structures, and hence the majority cannot reliably separate actual structure from stochastic fluctuations. Due to the sheer size and high-dimensionality of many networks, this represents a major limitation that prevents meaningful interpretations of the results obtained with such nonstatistical methods. In this talk, I will show how these issues can be tackled in a principled and efficient fashion by formulating appropriate generative models of network structure that can have their parameters inferred from data. By employing a Bayesian description of such models, the inference can be performed in a nonparametric fashion, that does not require any a priori knowledge or ad hoc assumptions about the data. I will show how this approach can be used to perform model comparison, and how hierarchical models yield the most appropriate trade-off between model complexity and quality of fit based on the statistical evidence present in the data. I will also show how this general approach can be elegantly extended to networks with edge attributes, that are embedded in latent spaces, and that change in time. The latter is obtained via a fully dynamic generative network model, based on arbitrary-order Markov chains, that can also be inferred in a nonparametric fashion. Throughout the talk I will illustrate the application of the methods with many empirical networks such as the internet at the autonomous systems level, the global airport network, the network of actors and films, social networks, citations among

  10. Multiple helix ecosystems for sustainable competitiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, João; Farinha, Luís; Fernandes, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the main issues, challenges, opportunities, and trends involving the interactions between academia, industry, government and society. Specifically, it aims to explore how these interactions enhance the ways in which companies deliver products and services in order to achieve sustainable competitiveness in the marketplace. Sustainable competitiveness has been widely discussed by academics and practitioners, considering the importance of protecting the environment while sustaining the economic goals of organizations. The Quintuple Helix innovation model is a framework for facilitating knowledge, innovation and sustainable competitive advantage. It embeds the Triple and the Quadruple Helix models by adding a fifth helix, the “natural environment.” The Triple Helix model focuses on the university-industry-government triad, while the Quadruple adds civil society (the media- and culture-driven public) as a fourth helix. The Quintuple Helix model facilitates research, public policy, and pract...

  11. From Dynamic Condition Response Structures to Büchi Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukkamala, Raghava Rao; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have presented distributed dynamic condition response structures (DCR structures) as a declarative process model conservatively generalizing labelled event structures to allow for finite specifications of repeated, possibly infinite behavior. The key ideas are to split the causality r...

  12. Impact of static and dynamic A-form heterogeneity on the determination of RNA global structural dynamics using NMR residual dipolar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musselman, Catherine [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, Biophysics Research Division, and Program in Bioinformatics (United States); Pitt, Stephen W. [Johnson and Johnson Inc (United States); Gulati, Kush; Foster, Lesley L.; Andricioaei, Ioan; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M. [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, Biophysics Research Division, and Program in Bioinformatics (United States)], E-mail: hashimi@umich.edu

    2006-12-15

    We examined how static and dynamic deviations from the idealized A-form helix propagate into errors in the principal order tensor parameters determined using residual dipolar couplings (rdcs). A 20-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the HIV-1 transactivation response element (TAR) RNA together with a survey of spin relaxation studies of RNA dynamics reveals that pico-to-nanosecond local motions in non-terminal Watson-Crick base-pairs will uniformly attenuate base and sugar one bond rdcs by {approx}7%. Gaussian distributions were generated for base and sugar torsion angles through statistical comparison of 40 RNA X-ray structures solved to <3.0 A resolution. For a typical number ({>=}11) of one bond C-H base and sugar rdcs, these structural deviations together with rdc uncertainty (1.5 Hz) lead to average errors in the magnitude and orientation of the principal axis of order that are <9% and <4 deg., respectively. The errors decrease to <5% and <4 deg. for {>=}17 rdcs. A protocol that allows for estimation of error in A-form order tensors due to both angular deviations and rdc uncertainty (Aform-RDC) is validated using theoretical simulations and used to analyze rdcs measured previously in TAR in the free state and bound to four distinct ligands. Results confirm earlier findings that the two TAR helices undergo large changes in both their mean relative orientation and dynamics upon binding to different targets.

  13. Lagrangian coherent structures and inertial particle dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sudharsan, M; Riley, James J

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigate the dynamics of inertial particles using finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE). In particular, we characterize the attractor and repeller structures underlying preferential concentration of inertial particles in terms of FTLE fields of the underlying carrier fluid. Inertial particles that are heavier than the ambient fluid (aerosols) attract onto ridges of the negative-time fluid FTLE. This negative-time FTLE ridge becomes a repeller for particles that are lighter than the carrier fluid (bubbles). We also examine the inertial FTLE (iFTLE) determined by the trajectories of inertial particles evolved using the Maxey-Riley equations with non-zero Stokes number and density ratio. Finally, we explore the low-pass filtering effect of Stokes number. These ideas are demonstrated on two-dimensional numerical simulations of the unsteady double gyre flow.

  14. Dynamic structural correlation via nonlinear programming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, T.; Ojalvo, I. U.

    1988-01-01

    A solution to the correlation between structural dynamic test results and finite element analyses of the same components is presented in this paper. Basically, the method can be categorized as a Levenberg-Marquardt type Gauss-Newton method which requires only the differences between FE modal analyses and test results and their first derivatives with respect to preassigned design variables. With proper variable normalization and equation scaling, the method has been made numerically better-conditioned and the inclusion of the Levenberg-Marquardt technique overcomes any remaining difficulty encountered in inverting singular or near-singular matrices. An important feature is that each iteration requires only one function evaluation along with the associated design sensitivity analysis and so the procedure is computationally efficient.

  15. Wheat yield dynamics: a structural econometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Afsin; Akdi, Yilmaz; Arslan, Fahrettin

    2007-10-15

    In this study we initially have tried to explore the wheat situation in Turkey, which has a small-open economy and in the member countries of European Union (EU). We have observed that increasing the wheat yield is fundamental to obtain comparative advantage among countries by depressing domestic prices. Also the changing structure of supporting schemes in Turkey makes it necessary to increase its wheat yield level. For this purpose, we have used available data to determine the dynamics of wheat yield by Ordinary Least Square Regression methods. In order to find out whether there is a linear relationship among these series we have checked each series whether they are integrated at the same order or not. Consequently, we have pointed out that fertilizer usage and precipitation level are substantial inputs for producing high wheat yield. Furthermore, in respect for our model, fertilizer usage affects wheat yield more than precipitation level.

  16. Dynamic structure of active nematic shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-11-01

    When a thin film of active, nematic microtubules and kinesin motor clusters is confined on the surface of a vesicle, four +1/2 topological defects oscillate in a periodic manner between tetrahedral and planar arrangements. Here a theoretical description of nematics, coupled to the relevant hydrodynamic equations, is presented here to explain the dynamics of active nematic shells. In extensile microtubule systems, the defects repel each other due to elasticity, and their collective motion leads to closed trajectories along the edges of a cube. That motion is accompanied by oscillations of their velocities, and the emergence and annihilation of vortices. When the activity increases, the system enters a chaotic regime. In contrast, for contractile systems, which are representative of some bacterial suspensions, a hitherto unknown static structure is predicted, where pairs of defects attract each other and flows arise spontaneously.

  17. Structure and dynamics of interphase chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Rosa

    Full Text Available During interphase chromosomes decondense, but fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments reveal the existence of distinct territories occupied by individual chromosomes inside the nuclei of most eukaryotic cells. We use computer simulations to show that the existence and stability of territories is a kinetic effect that can be explained without invoking an underlying nuclear scaffold or protein-mediated interactions between DNA sequences. In particular, we show that the experimentally observed territory shapes and spatial distances between marked chromosome sites for human, Drosophila, and budding yeast chromosomes can be reproduced by a parameter-free minimal model of decondensing chromosomes. Our results suggest that the observed interphase structure and dynamics are due to generic polymer effects: confined Brownian motion conserving the local topological state of long chain molecules and segregation of mutually unentangled chains due to topological constraints.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of ice structural evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Dong Shun-Le

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to study the structural evolution of low density amorphous ice during its compression from one atmosphere to 2.5 GPa. Calculated results show that high density amorphous ice is formed at an intermediate pressure of~1.0GPa; the O-O-O bond angle ranges from 83° to 113°, and the O-H...O bond is bent from 112° to 160°. Very high density amorphous ice is obtained by quenching to 80K and decompressing the ice to ambient pressure from 160 K/1.3 GPa or 160 K/1.7 GPa; and the next-nearest O-O length is found to be 0.310 nm, just 0.035 nm beyond the nearest O-O distance of 0.275 nm.

  19. Solution structure of the octamer motif in immunoglobulin genes via restrained molecular dynamics calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, K; Shafer, R H; Egan, W; James, T L

    1994-01-11

    The solution structure of the DNA decamer d(CATTTGCATC)-d(GATGCAAATG), comprising the octamer motif of immunoglobulin genes, is determined by restrained molecular dynamics (rMD) simulations. The restraint data set includes interproton distances and torsion angles for the deoxyribose sugar ring which were previously obtained by a complete relaxation matrix analysis of the two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (2D NOE) intensities and by the quantitative simulation of cross-peaks in double-quantum-filtered correlated (2QF-COSY) spectra. The influence of torsion angles and the number of experimental distance restraints on the structural refinement has been systematically examined. Omitting part of the experimental NOE-derived distances results in reduced restraint violations and lower R factors but impairs structural convergence in the rMD refinement. Eight separate restrained molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for 20 ps each, starting from either energy-minimized A- or B-DNA. Mutual atomic root-mean-square (rms) differences among the refined structures are well below 1 A and comparable to the rms fluctuations of the atoms about their average position, indicating convergence to essentially identical structures. The average refined structure was subjected to an additional 100 ps of rMD simulations and analyzed in terms of average torsion angles and helical parameters. The B-type duplex exhibits clear sequence-dependent variations in its geometry with a narrow minor groove at the T3.A3 tract and a large positive roll at the subsequent TG.CA step. This is accompanied by a noticeable bend of the global helix axis into the major groove. There is also evidence of significant flexibility of the sugar-phosphate backbone with rapid interconversion among different conformers.

  20. HELIX: The High Energy Light Isotope Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakely, Scott

    This is the lead proposal for a new suborbital program, HELIX (High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment), designed to make measurements of the isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei from ~200 MeV/nuc to ~10 GeV/nuc. Past measurements of this kind have provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information on acceleration and confinement time scales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. The most detailed information currently available comes from the ACE/CRIS mission, but is restricted to energies below a few 100 MeV/nuc. HELIX aims at extending this energy range by over an order of magnitude, where, in most cases, no measurements of any kind exist, and where relativistic time dilation affects the apparent lifetime of radioactive clock nuclei. The HELIX measurements will provide essential information for understanding the propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy. This is crucial for properly interpreting several intriguing anomalies reported in recent cosmic-ray measurements, pertaining to the energy spectra of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei, and to the anomalous rise in the positron fraction at higher energy. HELIX employs a high-precision magnet spectrometer to provide measurements which are not achievable by any current or planned instrument. The superconducting magnet originally used for the HEAT payload in five successful high-altitude flights will be combined with state-of-the-art detectors to measure the charge, time-of-flight, magnetic rigidity, and velocity of cosmic-ray particles with high precision. The instrumentation includes plastic scintillators, silicon-strip detectors repurposed from Fermilab's CDF detector, a high-performance gas drift chamber, and a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter employing aerogel radiators and silicon photomultipliers. To reduce cost and technical risk, the HELIX program will be structured in two stages. The first

  1. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  2. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  3. Multiscale Dynamics of Solar Magnetic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries.We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  4. Use of 1-4 interaction scaling factors to control the conformational equilibrium between α-helix and β-strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2015-02-06

    1-4 interaction scaling factors are used in AMBER forcefields to reduce the exaggeration of short-range repulsion caused by the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential and a nonpolarizable charge model and to obtain better agreements of small-molecule conformational energies with experimental data. However, the effects of these scaling factors on protein secondary structure conformations have not been investigated until now. This article reports the finding that the 1-4 interactions among the protein backbone atoms separated by three consecutive covalent bonds are more repulsive in the α-helix conformation than in two β-strand conformations. Therefore, the 1-4 interaction scaling factors of protein backbone torsions ϕ and ψ control the conformational equilibrium between α-helix and β-strand. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that reducing the ϕ and ψ scaling factors readily converts the α-helix conformation of AcO-(AAQAA)3-NH2 to a β-strand conformation, and the reverse occurs when these scaling factors are increased. These results suggest that the ϕ and ψ scaling factors can be used to generate the α-helix or β-strand conformation in situ and to control the propensities of a forcefield for adopting secondary structure elements.

  5. Universality and diversity of folding mechanics for three-helix bundle proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae Shick; Wallin, Stefan; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2008-01-22

    In this study we evaluate, at full atomic detail, the folding processes of two small helical proteins, the B domain of protein A and the Villin headpiece. Folding kinetics are studied by performing a large number of ab initio Monte Carlo folding simulations using a single transferable all-atom potential. Using these trajectories, we examine the relaxation behavior, secondary structure formation, and transition-state ensembles (TSEs) of the two proteins and compare our results with experimental data and previous computational studies. To obtain a detailed structural information on the folding dynamics viewed as an ensemble process, we perform a clustering analysis procedure based on graph theory. Moreover, rigorous p(fold) analysis is used to obtain representative samples of the TSEs and a good quantitative agreement between experimental and simulated Phi values is obtained for protein A. Phi values for Villin also are obtained and left as predictions to be tested by future experiments. Our analysis shows that the two-helix hairpin is a common partially stable structural motif that gets formed before entering the TSE in the studied proteins. These results together with our earlier study of Engrailed Homeodomain and recent experimental studies provide a comprehensive, atomic-level picture of folding mechanics of three-helix bundle proteins.

  6. Translocation of Biopolymer Chain Through a Nanopore: Coil-Helix Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Fang; WANG Hai-Jun; HONG Xiao-Zhong; BA Xin-Wu

    2008-01-01

    @@ The translocation dynamics of a single biopolymer chain through a nanopore in a membrane is investigated by taking the coil-helix transition into account. Based on the changing of the free energy due to the coil-helix transition, the mean first passage time τ is obtained, and then the corresponding numerical simulations are presented under different conditions. It is shown that the coil helix transition can significantly shorten the translocation time of the biopolymer chain. In addition, we also discuss the scaling behaviour for τ with the chain length N and some related problems.

  7. Dynamics of Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykin, S. Y.; Coster, A. J.; Huba, J.; Ridley, A. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Baker, J. B. H.; Wolf, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) flow structures are narrow ionospheric channels of fast (in excess of 100 m/s) westward drift just outside the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora in the dusk-to-midnight local time sector. Other terms for this phenomenon include subauroral Ion Drift (SAID) events and Polarization Jets. SAPS structures represent a striking departure from the commonly-used two-cell convection pattern. They are thought to arise from the displacement of the downward region-2 Birkeland currents on the dusk side equatorward of the low-latitude boundary of the auroral oval during times of changing high-latitude convection. In this paper, we will use several event simulations with the SAMI3-RCM numerical model (a self-consistent ionosphere-inner magnetosphere model) and RCM-GITM (a self-consistent model of the ionosphere-thermosphere-inner magnetosphere) to analyze the relative roles of changes in the IMF Bz component, ionospheric electron density depletions, and thermospheric modifications in controlling the dynamics of SAPS. Simulation results will be compared to multi-instrument ionospheric observations.

  8. Electronic structure and dynamics of nitrosyl porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, W Robert; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Pavlik, Jeffrey W; Silvernail, Nathan J; Sage, J Timothy

    2010-07-19

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule employed to regulate essential physiological processes. Thus, there is great interest in understanding the interaction of NO with heme, which is found at the active site of many proteins that recognize NO, as well as those involved in its creation and elimination. We summarize what we have learned from investigations of the structure, vibrational properties, and conformational dynamics of NO complexes with ferrous porphyrins, as well as computational investigations in support of these experimental studies. Multitemperature crystallographic data reveal variations in the orientational disorder of the nitrosyl ligand. In some cases, equilibria among NO orientations can be analyzed using the van't Hoff relationship and the free energy and enthalpy of the solid-state transitions evaluated experimentally. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that intrinsic barriers to torsional rotation are smaller than thermal energies at physiological temperatures, and the coincidence of observed NO orientations with minima in molecular mechanics potentials indicates that nonbonded interactions with other chemical groups control the conformational freedom of the bound NO. In favorable cases, reduced disorder at low temperatures exposes subtle structural features including off-axis tilting of the Fe-NO bond and anisotropy of the equatorial Fe-N bonds. We also present the results of nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy measurements on oriented single crystals of [Fe(TPP)(NO)] and [Fe(TPP)(1-MeIm)(NO)]. These describe the anisotropic vibrational motion of iron in five- and six-coordinate heme-NO complexes and reveal vibrations of all Fe-ligand bonds as well as low-frequency molecular distortions associated with the doming of the heme upon ligand binding. A quantitative comparison with predicted frequencies, amplitudes, and directions facilitates identification of the vibrational modes but also suggests that commonly used DFT

  9. A study on the structural features of SELK, an over-expressed protein in hepatocellular carcinoma, by molecular dynamics simulations in a lipid-water system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Andrea; Guariniello, Stefano; Colonna, Giovanni; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Costantini, Susan

    2016-10-20

    Human SELK is a small trans-membrane selenoprotein characterized by a single trans-membrane helix, while the N-terminal region protrudes into the lumen and the long C-terminal domain into the cytoplasm. SELK is over-expressed in some cancers, like hepatocellular carcinoma; however its precise role in cancer development is presently unknown. SELK is involved in promoting the calcium flux, catalyzing palmitoylation reactions and protein degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Therefore, this protein should bind many different proteins like p97/VCP in the supramolecular complex involved in the ER degradation pathway. To study the structural features of SELK in the membrane, we have modeled the protein and then subjected it to molecular dynamics simulations in a lipid-water system. The model shows a N-terminal domain with three β-strands and a short helix, a well-defined trans-membrane helix and a C-terminal domain that lacks a persistent secondary structure and contains long disordered regions. The trajectory analysis during the simulation evidences that: (i) the N-terminal region explores a limited conformational space and is stabilized by intra-peptide H-bonds as well with membrane lipids and water, (ii) the trans-membrane helix was found to be quite stable and (iii) the disordered C-terminal region is stabilized by H-bonds with clustered water molecules as well as by rapidly interchanging intra-peptidic H-bonds, with a structural tendency to compact around the four HUB residues found for this domain. Moreover, N-terminal and C-terminal clusters are distributed differently in the conformational space suggesting that their dynamics are coupled complicatedly through the membrane. Further analyses have shown that the N-terminal has a tendency to pivot around the insertion with the TM-helix through the fluctuations of the three β-strands, which, in turn, show features similar to WW-domains. These results will be useful to study the SELK, SELS and VCP complex

  10. Probing the structural dynamics of the SNARE recycling machine based on coarse-grained modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    Membrane fusion in eukaryotes is driven by the formation of a four-helix bundle by three SNARE proteins. To recycle the SNARE proteins, they must be disassembled by the ATPase NSF and four SNAP proteins which together form a 20S supercomplex. Recently, the first high-resolution structures of the NSF (in both ATP and ADP state) and 20S (in four distinct states termed I, II, IIIa, and IIIb) were solved by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), which have paved the way for structure-driven studies of the SNARE recycling mechanism. To probe the structural dynamics of SNARE disassembly at amino-acid level of details, a systematic coarse-grained modeling based on an elastic network model and related analyses were performed. Our normal mode analysis of NSF, SNARE, and 20S predicted key modes of collective motions that partially account for the observed structural changes, and illuminated how the SNARE complex can be effectively destabilized by untwisting and bending motions of the SNARE complex driven by the amino-terminal domains of NSF in state II. Our flexibility analysis identified regions with high/low flexibility that coincide with key functional sites (such as the NSF-SNAPs-SNARE binding sites). A subset of hotspot residues that control the above collective motions, which will make promising targets for future mutagenesis studies were also identified. Finally, the conformational changes in 20S as induced by the transition of NSF from ATP to ADP state were modeled, and a concerted untwisting motion of SNARE/SNAPs and a sideway flip of two amino-terminal domains were observed. In sum, the findings have offered new structural and dynamic details relevant to the SNARE disassembly mechanism, and will guide future functional studies of the SNARE recycling machinery. Proteins 2016; 84:1055-1066. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Proposal of a new hydrogen-bonding form to maintain curdlan triple helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kentaro; Uezu, Kazuya; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2004-06-01

    Curdlan and other beta-1,3-D-glucans form right-handed triple helices, and it has been believed that the intermolecular H-bond is present at the center of the helix to maintain the structure. In this H-bond model, three secondary OH groups form an inequilateral hexagonal shape perpendicular to the helix axis. This hexagonal form seems to be characteristic for beta-1,3-D-glucans and is widely accepted. We carried out MOPAC and ab initio calculations for the curdlan helix, and we propose a new intermolecular H-bonding model. In our model, the H-bonds are formed between the O2-atoms on different x-y planes along the curdlan helix, hence the H-bonds are not perpendicular to the helix axis. The new H-bonds are connected along the helix, traversing three curdlan chains to make a left-handed helix. Therefore, the H-bonding array leads to a reverse helix of the main chain. According to our MOPAC calculation, this model is more stable than the previous one. We believe that the continuous H-bonding array is stabilized by cooperative phenomena in the polymeric system.

  12. Recombination Dynamics in Quantum Well Semiconductor Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Julie Elizabeth

    Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence as a function of excitation energy density have been observed in order to study recombination dynamics in GaAs/Al(,x)Ga(,1 -x)As quantum well structures. The study of room temperature photoluminescence from the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) -grown multiple quantum well structure and photoluminescence peak energy as a function of tem- perature shows that room temperature recombination at excitation densities above the low 10('16) cm('-3) level is due to free carriers, not excitons. This is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of impurities in quantum wells; data taken at different emission wave- lengths at low temperatures shows that the impurity-related states at photon energies lower than the free exciton peaks luminesce much more slowly than the free exciton states. Results from a similar structure grown by metal -organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are explained by saturation of traps. An unusual increase in decay rate observed tens of nanoseconds after excitation is probably due to carriers falling out of the trap states. Since this is the first study of time-resolved photoluminescence of MOCVD-grown quantum well structures, this unusual behavior may be realted to the MOCVD growth process. Further investigations indi- cate that the traps are not active at low temperatures; they become active at approximately 150 K. The traps are probably associated with the (hetero)interfaces rather than the bulk Al(,x)Ga(,1-x)As material. The 34 K photoluminescence spectrum of this sample revealed a peak shifted down by approximately 36 meV from the main peak. Time-resolved and time-integrated photoluminescence results here show that this peak is not a stimulated phonon emission sideband, but rather is an due to an acceptor impurity, probably carbon. Photo- luminescence for excitation above and below the barrier bandgap shows that carriers are efficiently collected in the wells in both single and multiple

  13. Type VIa β-turn-fused helix N-termini: A novel helix N-cap motif containing cis proline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Rubin; Ganguly, Himal K; Modugula, E K; Basu, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    Helix N-capping motifs often form hydrogen bonds with terminal amide groups which otherwise would be free. Also, without an amide hydrogen, proline (trans) is over-represented at helix N-termini (N1 position) because this naturally removes the need to hydrogen bond one terminal amide. However, the preference of cisPro, vis-à-vis helix N-termini, is not known. We show that cisPro (αR or PPII ) often appears at the N-cap position (N0) of helices. The N-cap cisPro(αR ) is associated with a six-residue sequence motif - X(-2) -X(-1) -cisPro-X(1) -X(2) -X(3) - with preference for Glu/Gln at X(-1) , Phe/Tyr/Trp at X(1) and Ser/Thr at X(3) . The motif, formed by the fusion of a helix and a type VIa β-turn, contains a hydrogen bond between the side chain of X(-1) and the side chain/backbone of X(3) , a α-helical hydrogen bond between X(-2) and X(2) and stacking interaction between cisPro and an aromatic residue at X(1) . NMR experiments on peptides containing the motif and its variants showed that local interactions associated with the motif, as found in folded proteins, were not enough to significantly tilt the cis/trans equilibrium towards cisPro. This suggests that some other evolutionary pressure must select the cisPro motif (over transPro) at helix N-termini. Database analysis showed that >C = O of the pre-cisPro(αR ) residue at the helix N-cap, directed opposite to the N→C helical axis, participates in long-range interactions. We hypothesize that the cisPro(αR ) motif is preferred at helix N-termini because it allows the helix to participate in long-range interactions that may be structurally and functionally important.

  14. Structure-preserving integrators in nonlinear structural dynamics and flexible multibody dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on structure-preserving numerical methods for flexible multibody dynamics, including nonlinear elastodynamics and geometrically exact models for beams and shells. It also deals with the newly emerging class of variational integrators as well as Lie-group integrators. It discusses two alternative approaches to the discretization in space of nonlinear beams and shells. Firstly, geometrically exact formulations, which are typically used in the finite element community and, secondly, the absolute nodal coordinate formulation, which is popular in the multibody dynamics community. Concerning the discretization in time, the energy-momentum method and its energy-decaying variants are discussed. It also addresses a number of issues that have arisen in the wake of the structure-preserving discretization in space. Among them are the parameterization of finite rotations, the incorporation of algebraic constraints and the computer implementation of the various numerical methods. The practical application...

  15. A Formal Framework for P Systems with Dynamic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Rudolf; Pérez Hurtado de Mendoza, Ignacio; Riscos Núñez, Agustín; Verlan, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a formalism/framework able to describe different variants of P systems having a dynamic structure. This framework can be useful for the definition of new variants of P systems with dynamic structure, for the comparison of existing definitions as well as for their extension. We give a precise definition of the formalism and show how existing variants of P systems with dynamic structure can be translated to it.

  16. Universal structural estimator and dynamics approximator for complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Revealing the structure and dynamics of complex networked systems from observed data is of fundamental importance to science, engineering, and society. Is it possible to develop a universal, completely data driven framework to decipher the network structure and different types of dynamical processes on complex networks, regardless of their details? We develop a Markov network based model, sparse dynamical Boltzmann machine (SDBM), as a universal network structural estimator and dynamics approximator. The SDBM attains its topology according to that of the original system and is capable of simulating the original dynamical process. We develop a fully automated method based on compressive sensing and machine learning to find the SDBM. We demonstrate, for a large variety of representative dynamical processes on model and real world complex networks, that the equivalent SDBM can recover the network structure of the original system and predicts its dynamical behavior with high precision.

  17. Kevlar: Transitioning Helix from Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    KEVLAR : TRANSITIONING HELIX FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA APRIL 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...DATES COVERED (From - To) FEB 2013 – NOV 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE KEVLAR : TRANSITIONING HELIX FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...possible exploitation. Our technology, called Kevlar , includes key security technologies are protective transformations and targeted recovery. The

  18. Thioamides in the collagen triple helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Robert W; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T

    2015-06-14

    To probe noncovalent interactions within the collagen triple helix, backbone amides were replaced with a thioamide isostere. This subtle substitution is the first in the collagen backbone that does not compromise thermostability. A triple helix with a thioamide as a hydrogen bond donor was found to be more stable than triple helices assembled from isomeric thiopeptides.

  19. NMR solution structure of the bicoid homeodomain bound to DNA and molecular dynamics simulations of the homeodomain/DNA complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird-Titus, Jamie M.

    The homeodomain is a common DNA recognition motif consisting of three helices and an N-terminal arm that serves as a valuable model for exploring the basis of specific DNA recognition by proteins. Recognition of specific DNA sites, loosely defined by a TAAT core, is dependent on the side-chains of key amino acids in the N-terminal arm and the third "recognition" helix of the homeodomain. While much is known about homeodomain/DNA recognition, key questions concerning the role of individual amino acids and the extent of side-chain, DNA, and water dynamics during recognition remain, often focusing on the dynamic role of position 50 during recognition of the two bases immediately 3' to the 5'-TAAT-3'/3'-ATTA-5' core (ATTANN). The Bicoid homeodomain provides an interesting model system for addressing these and other questions, serving as the only known homeodomain that has a dual role in both transcriptional (DNA-binding) and translational (RNA-binding) control, discriminating between these two functions by a single amino acid, arginine 54. To add to the understanding of both general protein/DNA recognition and to the specific function of the Bicoid transcription factor homeodomain, we have determined the solution structure of the Bicoid homeodomain bound to the consensus duplex B-DNA binding site 5'-TAATCC-3'/3'-ATTAGG-5'. Our structure indicates that the Bicoid homeodomain exhibits variation from other homeodomain structures at the end of helix I, and NMR resonance line broadening of the K50 and R54 side-chains, consistent with side-chain motion and supportive of the adaptive-recognition theory of protein/DNA interactions.

  20. Collagen model peptides: Sequence dependence of triple-helix stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persikov, A V; Ramshaw, J A; Brodsky, B

    2000-01-01

    The triple helix is a specialized protein motif, found in all collagens as well as in noncollagenous proteins involved in host defense. Peptides will adopt a triple-helical conformation if the sequence contains its characteristic features of Gly as every third residue and a high content of Pro and Hyp residues. Such model peptides have proved amenable to structural studies by x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, suitable for thermodynamic and kinetic analysis, and a valuable tool in characterizing the binding activities of the collagen triple helix. A systematic approach to understanding the amino acid sequence dependence of the collagen triple helix has been initiated, based on a set of host-guest peptides of the form, (Gly-Pro-Hyp)(3)-Gly-X-Y-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(4). Comparison of their thermal stabilities has led to a propensity scale for the X and Y positions, and the additivity of contributions of individual residues is now under investigation. The local and global stability of the collagen triple helix is normally modulated by the residues in the X and Y positions, with every third position occupied by Gly in fibril-forming collagens. However, in collagen diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta, a single Gly may be substituted by another residue. Host-guest studies where the Gly is replaced by various amino acids suggest that the identity of the residue in the Gly position affects the degree of destabilization and the clinical severity of the disease.

  1. A catastrophe theory model of the conflict helix, with tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, R J

    1987-10-01

    Macro social field theory has undergone extensive development and testing since the 1960s. One of these has been the articulation of an appropriate conceptual micro model--called the conflict helix--for understanding the process from conflict to cooperation and vice versa. Conflict and cooperation are viewed as distinct equilibria of forces in a social field; the movement between these equilibria is a jump, energized by a gap between social expectations and power, and triggered by some minor event. Quite independently, there also has been much recent application of catastrophe theory to social behavior, but usually without a clear substantive theory and lacking empirical testing. This paper uses catastrophe theory--namely, the butterfly model--mathematically to structure the conflict helix. The social field framework and helix provide the substantive interpretation for the catastrophe theory; and catastrophe theory provides a suitable mathematical model for the conflict helix. The model is tested on the annual conflict and cooperation between India and Pakistan, 1948 to 1973. The results are generally positive and encouraging.

  2. Design and synthesis of DNA four-helix bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangnekar, Abhijit; Gothelf, Kurt V [Department of Chemistry, Centre for DNA Nanotechnology (CDNA) and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); LaBean, Thomas H, E-mail: kvg@chem.au.dk, E-mail: thl@cs.duke.edu [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2011-06-10

    The field of DNA nanotechnology has evolved significantly in the past decade. Researchers have succeeded in synthesizing tile-based structures and using them to form periodic lattices in one, two and three dimensions. Origami-based structures have also been used to create nanoscale structures in two and three dimensions. Design and construction of DNA bundles with fixed circumference has added a new dimension to the field. Here we report the design and synthesis of a DNA four-helix bundle. It was found to be extremely rigid and stable. When several such bundles were assembled using appropriate sticky-ends, they formed micrometre-long filaments. However, when creation of two-dimensional sheet-like arrays of the four-helix bundles was attempted, nanoscale rings were observed instead. The exact reason behind the nanoring formation is yet to be ascertained, but it provides an exciting prospect for making programmable circular nanostructures using DNA.

  3. Phenomenology, Structure, and Dynamic of Psychedelic States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preller, Katrin H; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-12-27

    Classic serotonergic hallucinogens or psychedelics produce an altered states of consciousness (ASC) that is characterized by profound alterations in sensory perception, mood, thought including the perception of reality, and the sense of self. Over the past years, there has been considerable progress in the search for invariant and common features of psychedelic states. In the first part of this review, we outline contemporary approaches to characterize the structure of ASCs by means of three primary etiology-independent dimensions including oceanic boundlessness, anxious ego-dissolution, and visionary restructuralization as well as by 11 lower-order factors, all of which can be reliably measured by the altered state of consciousness questionnaire (APZ-OAV). The second part sheds light on the dynamic nature of psychedelic experiences. Frequently, psychedelic subjects progress through different stages over time and levels of changes along a perception-hallucination continuum of increasing arousal and ego-dissolution. We then review in detail the acute effects of psychedelics on sensory perception, emotion, cognition, creativity, and time perception along with possible neural mechanisms underlying them. The next part of this review outlines the influence of non-pharmacological factors (predictors) on the acute psychedelic experience, such as demographics, genetics, personality, mood, and setting, and also discusses some long-term effects succeeding the acute experience. The last part presents some recent concepts and models attempting to understand different facets of psychedelic states of consciousness from a neuroscientific perspective.

  4. Structured Counseling for Auditory Dynamic Range Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Susan L; Formby, Craig

    2017-02-01

    A structured counseling protocol is described that, when combined with low-level broadband sound therapy from bilateral sound generators, offers audiologists a new tool for facilitating the expansion of the auditory dynamic range (DR) for loudness. The protocol and its content are specifically designed to address and treat problems that impact hearing-impaired persons who, due to their reduced DRs, may be limited in the use and benefit of amplified sound from hearing aids. The reduced DRs may result from elevated audiometric thresholds and/or reduced sound tolerance as documented by lower-than-normal loudness discomfort levels (LDLs). Accordingly, the counseling protocol is appropriate for challenging and difficult-to-fit persons with sensorineural hearing losses who experience loudness recruitment or hyperacusis. Positive treatment outcomes for individuals with the former and latter conditions are highlighted in this issue by incremental shifts (improvements) in LDL and/or categorical loudness judgments, associated reduced complaints of sound intolerance, and functional improvements in daily communication, speech understanding, and quality of life leading to improved hearing aid benefit, satisfaction, and aided sound quality, posttreatment.

  5. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  6. The stability and dynamic behaviour of fluid-loaded structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ECCOMAS Young Investigators Conference 6th GACM Colloquium, July 20–23, 2015, Aachen, Germany The stability and dynamic behaviour of fluid-loaded structures R. Suliman, N. Peake Abstract. The deformation of slender elastic structures due...

  7. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF ALKALI BORATE GLASSES - A MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERHOEF, AH; DENHARTOG, HW

    1995-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of lithium, cesium and mixed alkali (i.e., lithium and cesium) borate glasses have been studied by the molecular dynamics method. The calculations yield glass structures consisting of planar BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedrons with no sixfold ring structures at all

  8. Knottin cyclization: impact on structure and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracy Jérôme

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Present in various species, the knottins (also referred to as inhibitor cystine knots constitute a group of extremely stable miniproteins with a plethora of biological activities. Owing to their small size and their high stability, knottins are considered as excellent leads or scaffolds in drug design. Two knottin families contain macrocyclic compounds, namely the cyclotides and the squash inhibitors. The cyclotide family nearly exclusively contains head-to-tail cyclized members. On the other hand, the squash family predominantly contains linear members. Head-to-tail cyclization is intuitively expected to improve bioactivities by increasing stability and lowering flexibility as well as sensitivity to proteolytic attack. Results In this paper, we report data on solution structure, thermal stability, and flexibility as inferred from NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations of a linear squash inhibitor EETI-II, a circular squash inhibitor MCoTI-II, and a linear analog lin-MCoTI. Strikingly, the head-to-tail linker in cyclic MCoTI-II is by far the most flexible region of all three compounds. Moreover, we show that cyclic and linear squash inhibitors do not display large differences in structure or flexibility in standard conditions, raising the question as to why few squash inhibitors have evolved into cyclic compounds. The simulations revealed however that the cyclization increases resistance to high temperatures by limiting structure unfolding. Conclusion In this work, we show that, in contrast to what could have been intuitively expected, cyclization of squash inhibitors does not provide clear stability or flexibility modification. Overall, our results suggest that, for squash inhibitors in standard conditions, the circularization impact might come from incorporation of an additional loop sequence, that can contribute to the miniprotein specificity and affinity, rather than from an increase in conformational rigidity

  9. Differential stability of the triple helix of (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 in H2O and D2O: thermodynamic and structural explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, C A; Bhatnagar, R S

    1999-12-01

    (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 [(PPG10)], a collagen-like polypeptide, forms a triple-helical, polyproline-II structure in aqueous solution at temperatures somewhat lower than physiological, with a melting temperature of 24.5 degrees C. In this article, we present circular dichroism spectra that demonstrate an increase of the melting temperature with the addition of increasing amounts of D2O to an H2O solution of (PPG)10, with the melting temperature reaching 40 degrees C in pure D2O. A thermodynamic analysis of the data demonstrates that this result is due to an increasing enthalpy of unfolding in D2O vs. H2O. To provide a theoretical explanation for this result, we have used a model for hydration of (PPG)10 that we developed previously, in which inter-chain water bridges are formed between sterically crowded waters and peptide bond carbonyls. Energy minimizations were performed upon this model using hydrogen bond parameters for water, and altered hydrogen bond parameters that reproduced the differences in carbonyl oxygen-water oxygen distances found in small-molecule crystal structures containing oxygen-oxygen hydrogen bonds between organic molecules and H2O or D2O. It was found that using hydrogen bond parameters that reproduced the distance typical of hydrogen bonds to D2O resulted in a significant lowering of the potential energy of hydrated (PPG)10. This lowering of the energy involved energetic terms that were only indirectly related to the altered hydrogen bond parameters, and were therefore not artifactual; the intra-(PPG10) energy, plus the water-(PPG10) van der Waals energy (not including hydrogen bond interactions), were lowered enough to qualitatively account for the lower enthalpy of the triple-helical conformation, relative to the unfolded state, in D2O vs. H2O. This result indicates that the geometry of the carbonyl-D2O hydrogen bonds allows formation of good hydrogen bonds without making as much of an energetic sacrifice from other factors as in the case of

  10. Nucleobase-Modified PNA Suppresses Translation by Forming a Triple Helix with a Hairpin Structure in mRNA In Vitro and in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh, Tamaki; Hnedzko, Dziyana; Rozners, Eriks; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-01-18

    Compounds that bind specifically to double-stranded regions of RNA have potential as regulators of structure-based RNA function; however, sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA is challenging. The modification of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with unnatural nucleobases enables the formation of PNA-RNA triplexes. Herein, we demonstrate that a 9-mer PNA forms a sequence-specific PNA-RNA triplex with a dissociation constant of less than 1 nm at physiological pH. The triplex formed within the 5' untranslated region of an mRNA reduces the protein expression levels both in vitro and in cells. A single triplet mismatch destabilizes the complex, and in this case, no translation suppression is observed. The triplex-forming PNAs are unique and potent compounds that hold promise as inhibitors of cellular functions that are controlled by double-stranded RNAs, such as RNA interference, RNA editing, and RNA localization mediated by protein-RNA interactions.

  11. Structural dynamics and topology of phosphorylated phospholamban homopentamer reveal its role in the regulation of calcium transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Verardi, Raffaello; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) inhibits the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), thereby regulating cardiac diastole. In membranes, PLN assembles into homopentamers that in both the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated states have been proposed to form ion-selective channels. Here, we determined the structure of the phosphorylated pentamer using a combination of solution and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance methods. We found that the pinwheel architecture of the homopentamer is preserved upon phosphorylation, with each monomer having an L-shaped conformation of each monomer. The TM domains form a hydrophobic pore of approximately 24 Å long, and 2 Å in diameter, which is inconsistent with canonical Ca2+ selective channels. Phosphorylation, however, enhances the conformational dynamics of the cytoplasmic region of PLN, causing the partial unwinding of the amphipathic helix. We propose that PLN oligomers act as storage for active monomers, keeping SERCA function within a physiological window. PMID:24207128

  12. Study of the structure and dynamics of complex biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Areejit

    2008-12-01

    In this thesis, we have studied the large scale structure and system level dynamics of certain biological networks using tools from graph theory, computational biology and dynamical systems. We study the structure and dynamics of large scale metabolic networks inside three organisms, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Staphylococcus aureus. We also study the dynamics of the large scale genetic network controlling E. coli metabolism. We have tried to explain the observed system level dynamical properties of these networks in terms of their underlying structure. Our studies of the system level dynamics of these large scale biological networks provide a different perspective on their functioning compared to that obtained from purely structural studies. Our study also leads to some new insights on features such as robustness, fragility and modularity of these large scale biological networks. We also shed light on how different networks inside the cell such as metabolic networks and genetic networks are interrelated to each other.

  13. DYNAMIC DESIGN OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE BLOCK STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Several main steps of internal combustion engine block structure dynamic design,such as model set-up,structure dynamic response analysis,optimizing design and vibration and noise control,are discussed for the type of EQ6100 gasoline engine block.

  14. Structural dynamics branch research and accomplishments for fiscal year 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This publication contains a collection of fiscal year 1987 research highlights from the Structural Dynamics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. Highlights from the branch's four major work areas, Aeroelasticity, Vibration Control, Dynamic Systems, and Computational Structural Methods, are included in the report as well as a complete listing of the FY87 branch publications.

  15. Structural dynamics branch research and accomplishments to FY 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Charles

    1992-12-01

    This publication contains a collection of fiscal year 1992 research highlights from the Structural Dynamics Branch at NASA LeRC. Highlights from the branch's major work areas--Aeroelasticity, Vibration Control, Dynamic Systems, and Computational Structural Methods are included in the report as well as a listing of the fiscal year 1992 branch publications.

  16. Gradient-based optimization in nonlinear structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Suguang

    The intrinsic nonlinearity of mechanical structures can give rise to rich nonlinear dynamics. Recently, nonlinear dynamics of micro-mechanical structures have contributed to developing new Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), for example, atomic force microscope, passive frequency divider, fr...

  17. Challenges in Targeting a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor with Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Amanda L; Meijer, Dimphna H; Guerra, Rachel M; Molenaar, Remco J; Alberta, John A; Bernal, Federico; Bird, Gregory H; Stiles, Charles D; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-11-18

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in organism development and disease by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional activity, whether by bHLH homo- or heterodimerization, is dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions mediated by α-helices. Thus, α-helical decoys have been proposed as potential targeted therapies for pathologic bHLH transcription. Here, we developed a library of stabilized α-helices of OLIG2 (SAH-OLIG2) to test the capacity of hydrocarbon-stapled peptides to disrupt OLIG2 homodimerization, which drives the development and chemoresistance of glioblastoma multiforme, one of the deadliest forms of human brain cancer. Although stapling successfully reinforced the α-helical structure of bHLH constructs of varying length, sequence-specific dissociation of OLIG2 dimers from DNA was not achieved. Re-evaluation of the binding determinants for OLIG2 self-association and stability revealed an unanticipated role of the C-terminal domain. These data highlight potential pitfalls in peptide-based targeting of bHLH transcription factors given the liabilities of their positively charged amino acid sequences and multifactorial binding determinants.

  18. A genome-wide survey on basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in giant panda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwang Dang

    Full Text Available The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca is a critically endangered mammalian species. Studies on functions of regulatory proteins involved in developmental processes would facilitate understanding of specific behavior in giant panda. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins play essential roles in a wide range of developmental processes in higher organisms. bHLH family members have been identified in over 20 organisms, including fruit fly, zebrafish, mouse and human. Our present study identified 107 bHLH family members being encoded in giant panda genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that they belong to 44 bHLH families with 46, 25, 15, 4, 11 and 3 members in group A, B, C, D, E and F, respectively, while the remaining 3 members were assigned into "orphan". Compared to mouse, the giant panda does not encode seven bHLH proteins namely Beta3a, Mesp2, Sclerax, S-Myc, Hes5 (or Hes6, EBF4 and Orphan 1. These results provide useful background information for future studies on structure and function of bHLH proteins in the regulation of giant panda development.

  19. An exploration of alternative visualisations of the basic helix-loop-helix protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoutzias Grigoris D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative representations of biochemical networks emphasise different aspects of the data and contribute to the understanding of complex biological systems. In this study we present a variety of automated methods for visualisation of a protein-protein interaction network, using the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH family of transcription factors as an example. Results Network representations that arrange nodes (proteins according to either continuous or discrete information are investigated, revealing the existence of protein sub-families and the retention of interactions following gene duplication events. Methods of network visualisation in conjunction with a phylogenetic tree are presented, highlighting the evolutionary relationships between proteins, and clarifying the context of network hubs and interaction clusters. Finally, an optimisation technique is used to create a three-dimensional layout of the phylogenetic tree upon which the protein-protein interactions may be projected. Conclusion We show that by incorporating secondary genomic, functional or phylogenetic information into network visualisation, it is possible to move beyond simple layout algorithms based on network topology towards more biologically meaningful representations. These new visualisations can give structure to complex networks and will greatly help in interpreting their evolutionary origins and functional implications. Three open source software packages (InterView, TVi and OptiMage implementing our methods are available.

  20. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-07-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix.

  1. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, W Ying; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J; Slatter, David A; Reid, David G; Wales, David J; Farndale, Richard W; Duer, Melinda J

    2015-07-29

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix.

  2. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  3. Rational design of a triple helix-specific intercalating ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudé, C; Nguyen, C H; Kukreti, S; Janin, Y; Sun, J S; Bisagni, E; Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1998-03-31

    DNA triple helices offer new perspectives toward oligonucleotide-directed gene regulation. However, the poor stability of some of these structures might limit their use under physiological conditions. Specific ligands can intercalate into DNA triple helices and stabilize them. Molecular modeling and thermal denaturation experiments suggest that benzo[f]pyrido[3, 4-b]quinoxaline derivatives intercalate into triple helices by stacking preferentially with the Hoogsteen-paired bases. Based on this model, it was predicted that a benzo[f]quino[3,4-b]quinoxaline derivative, which possesses an additional aromatic ring, could engage additional stacking interactions with the pyrimidine strand of the Watson-Crick double helix upon binding of this pentacyclic ligand to a triplex structure. This compound was synthesized. Thermal denaturation experiments and inhibition of restriction enzyme cleavage show that this new compound can indeed stabilize triple helices with great efficiency and specificity and/or induce triple helix formation under physiological conditions.

  4. Playing with peptides: how to build a supramolecular peptide nanostructure by exploiting helix···helix macrodipole interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, E; Porchetta, A; Scarselli, M; De Crescenzi, M; Formaggio, F; Toniolo, C; Venanzi, M

    2012-02-07

    A novel method to build bicomponent peptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) has been developed, by exploiting helix···helix macrodipole interactions. In this work, a peptide-based self-assembled monolayer composed of two helical peptides was immobilized on a gold surface. Specifically, a pyrene-containing octapeptide, devoid of any sulfur atom (A8Pyr), and a hexapeptide, functionalized at the N-terminus with (S,R) lipoic acid, for binding to gold substrates (SSA4WA) via a Au-S linkage, have been employed. Both peptides investigated attain a helical structure, because they are almost exclusively formed by strongly folding inducer C(α)-tetrasubstituted α-amino acids. We demonstrate that the two peptides generate a stable supramolecular nanostructure (a densely packed bicomponent peptide monolayer), where A8Pyr is incorporated into the SSA4WA palisade by exploiting helix···helix macrodipole interactions. The presence of both peptides on the gold surface was investigated by spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques, while the morphology of the monolayer was analyzed by ultra high-vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy. The composition of the bicomponent SAM on the surface was studied by a combination of electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In particular, the amount of Au-S linkages from the sulfur-containing peptides was quantified from reductive desorption of the peptide-based SAM, while the amount of A8Pyr was estimated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The antiparallel orientation of the A8Pyr and SSA4WA peptide chains minimizes the interaction energy between the helix dipoles, suggesting that this kind of electrostatic phenomenon is the driving force that stabilizes the bicomponent SAM.

  5. Structural dynamics for new launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Joyce; Ryan, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of current studies that will permit more robust designs and reduce the safety hazards of maximum dynamic pressure during launches. Key considerations in the assessment of future operable launch capabilities are the dynamics problems that arise during the initial minutes of transition from the static configuration on the launch pad to the attainment of orbital velocity. Attention is given to a typical attempt to achieve robustness that involves creating a design in which the first bending mode will have a high enough frequency to allow decoupling between the autopilot design and the flexible body dynamics.

  6. Ergodic Theory, Open Dynamics, and Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Christopher; Froyland, Gary

    2014-01-01

    This book is comprised of selected research articles developed from a workshop on Ergodic Theory, Probabilistic Methods and Applications, held in April 2012 at the Banff International Research Station. It contains contributions from world leading experts in ergodic theory, dynamical systems, numerical analysis, fluid dynamics, and networks. The volume will serve as a valuable reference for mathematicians, physicists, engineers, physical oceanographers, atmospheric scientists, biologists, and climate scientists, who currently use, or wish to learn how to use, probabilistic techniques to cope with dynamical models that display open, coherent, or non-equilibrium behavior.

  7. The effects of bolted joints on dynamic response of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, I.; Khalid, A.; Manshoor, B.; Araby, S.; Ghazali, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Joint is an universal fastening technology for structural members; in particular bolted joints are extensively used in mechanical structures due to their simple maintenance and low cost. However, the components of bolted joints are imperative because failure could be catastrophic and endanger lives. Hence, in this study, the effects of bolted joints on vibrating structures are investigated by determining the structural dynamic properties, such as mode shapes, damping ratios and natural frequencies, and these are compared with the monolithic structures (welding). Two approaches of experimental rigs are developed: a beam and a frame where both are subjected to dynamic loading. The analysis reveals the importance of bolted joints in increasing the damping properties and minimizing the vibration magnitude of structures, this indicates the significant influence of bolted joints on the dynamic behaviour of assembled structures. The outcome of this study provides a good model for predicting the experimental variable response in different types of structural joints.

  8. CISM course on exploiting nonlinear behaviour in structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Virgin, Lawrence; Exploiting Nonlinear Behavior in Structural Dynamics

    2012-01-01

    The articles in this volume give an overview and introduction to nonlinear phenomena in structural dynamics. Topics treated are approximate methods for analyzing nonlinear systems (where the level of nonlinearity is assumed to be relatively small), vibration isolation, the mitigation of undesirable torsional vibration in rotating systems utilizing specifically nonlinear features in the dynamics, the vibration of nonlinear structures in which the motion is sufficiently large amplitude and structural systems with control.

  9. Laser fields in dynamically ionized plasma structures for coherent acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of the CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) laser technology, a new scheme for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures has been proposed. By using our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code equipped with ionisation module, we simulate the laser fields dynamics in the periodic structures of different materials. We study how the dynamic ionization influences the field structure.

  10. Intramolecular triple helix as a model for regular polyribonucleotide (CAA)(n).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Alexander V; Spirin, Alexander S

    2009-10-09

    The regular (CAA)(n) polyribonucleotide, as well as the omega leader sequence containing (CAA)-rich core, have recently been shown to form cooperatively melted and compact structures. In this report, we propose a structural model for the (CAA)(n) sequence in which the polyribonucleotide chain is folded upon itself, so that it forms an intramolecular triple helix. The triple helix is stabilized by hydrogen bonding between bases thus forming coplanar triads, and by stacking interactions between the base triads. A distinctive feature of the proposed triple helix is that it does not contain the canonical double-helix elements. The difference from the known triple helices is that Watson-Crick hydrogen bond pairings do not take place in the interactions between the bases within the base triads.

  11. Structure and dynamics of cationic membrane peptides and proteins: Insights from solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mei; Su, Yongchao

    2011-01-01

    Many membrane peptides and protein domains contain functionally important cationic Arg and Lys residues, whose insertion into the hydrophobic interior of the lipid bilayer encounters significant energy barriers. To understand how these cationic molecules overcome the free energy barrier to insert into the lipid membrane, we have used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to determine the membrane-bound topology of these peptides. A versatile array of solid-state NMR experiments now readily yields the conformation, dynamics, orientation, depth of insertion, and site-specific protein–lipid interactions of these molecules. We summarize key findings of several Arg-rich membrane peptides, including β-sheet antimicrobial peptides, unstructured cell-penetrating peptides, and the voltage-sensing helix of voltage-gated potassium channels. Our results indicate the central role of guanidinium-phosphate and guanidinium-water interactions in dictating the structural topology of these cationic molecules in the lipid membrane, which in turn account for the mechanisms of this functionally diverse class of membrane peptides. PMID:21344534

  12. Structural Origins of Nitroxide Side Chain Dynamics on Membrane Protein [alpha]-Helical Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroncke, Brett M.; Horanyi, Peter S.; Columbus, Linda (UV)

    2010-12-07

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in their native, hydrophobic environment is important to understanding how these proteins function. EPR spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) can measure dynamics and structure of membrane proteins in their native lipid environment; however, until now the dynamics measured have been qualitative due to limited knowledge of the nitroxide spin label's intramolecular motion in the hydrophobic environment. Although several studies have elucidated the structural origins of EPR line shapes of water-soluble proteins, EPR spectra of nitroxide spin-labeled proteins in detergents or lipids have characteristic differences from their water-soluble counterparts, suggesting significant differences in the underlying molecular motion of the spin label between the two environments. To elucidate these differences, membrane-exposed {alpha}-helical sites of the leucine transporter, LeuT, from Aquifex aeolicus, were investigated using X-ray crystallography, mutational analysis, nitroxide side chain derivatives, and spectral simulations in order to obtain a motional model of the nitroxide. For each crystal structure, the nitroxide ring of a disulfide-linked spin label side chain (R1) is resolved and makes contacts with hydrophobic residues on the protein surface. The spin label at site I204 on LeuT makes a nontraditional hydrogen bond with the ortho-hydrogen on its nearest neighbor F208, whereas the spin label at site F177 makes multiple van der Waals contacts with a hydrophobic pocket formed with an adjacent helix. These results coupled with the spectral effect of mutating the i {+-} 3, 4 residues suggest that the spin label has a greater affinity for its local protein environment in the low dielectric than on a water-soluble protein surface. The simulations of the EPR spectra presented here suggest the spin label oscillates about the terminal bond nearest the ring while maintaining weak

  13. The triple helix perspective of innovation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.; Zawdie, G.

    2010-01-01

    Alongside the neo-institutional model of networked relations among universities, industries, and governments, the triple helix can be provided with a neo-evolutionary interpretation as three selection environments operating upon one another: markets, organisations and technological opportunities. Ho

  14. Macroscopic control of helix orientation in films dried from cholesteric liquid crystalline cellulose nanocrystal suspensions


    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic ability of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) to self-organize into films and bulk materials with helical order in a cholesteric liquid crystal is scientifically intriguing and potentially important for the production of renewable multifunctional materials with attractive optical properties. A major obstacle, however, has been the lack of control of helix direction, which results in a defect-rich, mosaic-like domain structure. Herein, a method for guiding the helix during film format...

  15. Role of Structural Dynamics at the Receptor G Protein Interface for Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Rose

    Full Text Available GPCRs catalyze GDP/GTP exchange in the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαßγ through displacement of the Gα C-terminal α5 helix, which directly connects the interface of the active receptor (R* to the nucleotide binding pocket of G. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and kinetic analysis of R* catalysed G protein activation have suggested that displacement of α5 starts from an intermediate GDP bound complex (R*•GGDP. To elucidate the structural basis of receptor-catalysed displacement of α5, we modelled the structure of R*•GGDP. A flexible docking protocol yielded an intermediate R*•GGDP complex, with a similar overall arrangement as in the X-ray structure of the nucleotide free complex (R*•Gempty, however with the α5 C-terminus (GαCT forming different polar contacts with R*. Starting molecular dynamics simulations of GαCT bound to R* in the intermediate position, we observe a screw-like motion, which restores the specific interactions of α5 with R* in R*•Gempty. The observed rotation of α5 by 60° is in line with experimental data. Reformation of hydrogen bonds, water expulsion and formation of hydrophobic interactions are driving forces of the α5 displacement. We conclude that the identified interactions between R* and G protein define a structural framework in which the α5 displacement promotes direct transmission of the signal from R* to the GDP binding pocket.

  16. Role of Structural Dynamics at the Receptor G Protein Interface for Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Alexander S; Zachariae, Ulrich; Grubmüller, Helmut; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    GPCRs catalyze GDP/GTP exchange in the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαßγ) through displacement of the Gα C-terminal α5 helix, which directly connects the interface of the active receptor (R*) to the nucleotide binding pocket of G. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and kinetic analysis of R* catalysed G protein activation have suggested that displacement of α5 starts from an intermediate GDP bound complex (R*•GGDP). To elucidate the structural basis of receptor-catalysed displacement of α5, we modelled the structure of R*•GGDP. A flexible docking protocol yielded an intermediate R*•GGDP complex, with a similar overall arrangement as in the X-ray structure of the nucleotide free complex (R*•Gempty), however with the α5 C-terminus (GαCT) forming different polar contacts with R*. Starting molecular dynamics simulations of GαCT bound to R* in the intermediate position, we observe a screw-like motion, which restores the specific interactions of α5 with R* in R*•Gempty. The observed rotation of α5 by 60° is in line with experimental data. Reformation of hydrogen bonds, water expulsion and formation of hydrophobic interactions are driving forces of the α5 displacement. We conclude that the identified interactions between R* and G protein define a structural framework in which the α5 displacement promotes direct transmission of the signal from R* to the GDP binding pocket.

  17. Unascertained Factor Method of Dynamic Characteristic Analysis for Antenna Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zeng-qing; LIANG Zhen-tao; CHEN Jian-jun

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic characteristic analysis model of antenna structures is built, in which the structural physical parameters and geometrical dimensions are all considered as unascertained variables, And a structure dynamic characteristic analysis method based on the unascertained factor method is given. The computational expression of structural characteristic is developed by the mathematics expression of unascertained factor and the principles of unascertained rational numbers arithmetic. An example is given, in which the possible values and confidence degrees of the unascertained structure characteristics are obtained. The calculated results show that the method is feasible and effective.

  18. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, W.; Warren, J.; Horta, L.; Juang, J.; Gibbs, S.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, D.; Lawrence, D.

    2014-06-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  19. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, William K.; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, Samuel C.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, Daniel; Lawrence Dale

    2014-01-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  20. The Sun's interior structure and dynamics, and the solar cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Broomhall, A -M; Howe, R; Norton, A A; Thompson, M J

    2014-01-01

    The Sun's internal structure and dynamics can be studied with helioseismology, which uses the Sun's natural acoustic oscillations to build up a profile of the solar interior. We discuss how solar acoustic oscillations are affected by the Sun's magnetic field. Careful observations of these effects can be inverted to determine the variations in the structure and dynamics of the Sun's interior as the solar cycle progresses. Observed variations in the structure and dynamics can then be used to inform models of the solar dynamo, which are crucial to our understanding of how the Sun's magnetic field is generated and maintained.

  1. Modulation of the oligomerization of myelin proteolipid protein by transmembrane helix interaction motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Derek P; Deber, Charles M

    2010-08-17

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) is a highly hydrophobic 276-residue integral membrane protein that constitutes more than 50% of the total protein in central nervous system myelin. Previous studies have shown that this protein exists in myelin as an oligomer rather than as a monomer, and mutations in PLP that lead to neurological disorders such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and spastic paraplegia type 2 have been reported to affect its normal oligomerization. Here we employ peptide-based and in vivo approaches to examine the role of the TM domain in the formation of PLP quaternary structure through homo-oligomeric helix-helix interactions. Focusing on the TM4 alpha-helix (sequence (239)FIAAFVGAAATLVSLLTFMIAATY(262)), the site of several disease-causing point mutations that involve putative small residue helix-helix interaction motifs in the TM4 sequence, we used SDS-PAGE, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, size-exclusion chromatography, and TOXCAT assays in an Escherichia coli membrane to show that the PLP TM4 helix readily assembles into varying oligomeric states. In addition, through targeted studies of the PLP TM4 alpha-helix with point mutations that selectively eliminate these small residue motifs via substitution of Gly, Ala, or Ser residues with Ile residues, we describe a potential mechanism through which disease-causing point mutations can lead to aberrant PLP assembly. The overall results suggest that TM segments in misfolded PLP monomers that expose and/or create surface-exposed helix-helix interaction sites that are normally masked may have consequences for disease.

  2. The membrane-binding domain of an amphitropic enzyme suppresses catalysis by contact with an amphipathic helix flanking its active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Harris K-H; Taneva, Svetla G; Lee, Jaeyong; Silva, Leslie P; Schriemer, David C; Cornell, Rosemary B

    2013-05-13

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT), the regulatory enzyme in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, is activated by binding membranes using a lipid-induced amphipathic helix (domain M). Domain M functions to silence catalysis when CCT is not membrane engaged. The silencing mechanism is unknown. We used photo-cross-linking and mass spectrometry to identify contacts between domain M and other CCT domains in its soluble form. Each of four sites in domain M forged cross-links to the same set of peptides that flank the active site and overlap at helix αE at the base of the active site. These cross-links were broken in the presence of activating lipid vesicles. Mutagenesis of domain M revealed that multiple hydrophobic residues within a putative auto-inhibitory (AI) motif contribute to the contact with helix αE and silencing. Helix αE was confirmed as the docking site for domain M by deuterium exchange analysis. We compared the dynamics and fold stability of CCT domains by site-directed fluorescence anisotropy and urea denaturation. The results suggest a bipartite structure for domain M: a disordered N-terminal portion and an ordered C-terminal AI motif with an unfolding transition identical with that of helix αE. Reduction in hydrophobicity of the AI motif decreased its order and fold stability, as did deletion of the catalytic domain. These results support a model in which catalytic silencing is mediated by the docking of an amphipathic AI motif onto the amphipathic helices αE. An unstructured leash linking αE with the AI motif may facilitate both the silencing contact and its membrane-triggered disruption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cylindrical Helix Spline Approximation of Spatial Curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method for approximating spatial curves with a G1 cylindrical helix spline within a prescribed tolerance. We deduce the general formulation of a cylindrical helix,which has 11 freedoms. This means that it needs 11 restrictions to determine a cylindrical helix. Given a spatial parametric curve segment, including the start point and the end point of this segment, the tangent and the principal normal of the start point, we can always find a cylindrical segment to interpolate the given direction and position vectors. In order to approximate the known parametric curve within the prescribed tolerance, we adopt the trial method step by step. First, we must ensure the helix segment to interpolate the given two end points and match the principal normal and tangent of the start point, and then, we can keep the deviation between the cylindrical helix segment and the known curve segment within the prescribed tolerance everywhere. After the first segment had been formed, we can construct the next segment. Circularly, we can construct the G1 cylindrical helix spline to approximate the whole spatial parametric curve within the prescribed tolerance. Several examples are also given to show the efficiency of this method.

  4. Triple Helix Formation in a Topologically Controlled DNA Nanosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yutaro; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Endo, Masayuki

    2016-04-11

    In the present study, we demonstrate single-molecule imaging of triple helix formation in DNA nanostructures. The binding of the single-molecule third strand to double-stranded DNA in a DNA origami frame was examined using two different types of triplet base pairs. The target DNA strand and the third strand were incorporated into the DNA frame, and the binding of the third strand was controlled by the formation of Watson-Crick base pairing. Triple helix formation was monitored by observing the structural changes in the incorporated DNA strands. It was also examined using a photocaged third strand wherein the binding of the third strand was directly observed using high-speed atomic force microscopy during photoirradiation. We found that the binding of the third strand could be controlled by regulating duplex formation and the uncaging of the photocaged strands in the designed nanospace.

  5. THE DYNAMICS OF THE MATRICS STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru CONSTANTINESCU

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships organization-suppliers-customers have recently known major changes in the structure of services and have made the organization develop its managerial and professional competencies in order to do projects. The qualified organization is the most trust-worthy in the process of doing a project. The participation of an organization in doing projects depends on a multitude of factors. Out of these factors, the structural organization comes forth, as it represents the variable with the most important impact on a project’s quality, costs and lead time. From the organizational point of view, the matrix structure is frequently chosen for projects. The matrix structure generally coexists with the line structure. The two structures are contrastive. The line structure is based on the unity of command principle and is not open to cooperation and dialogue. The matrix structure encourages cooperation and communication, favours conflict, which is considered here a healthy and essential process. The matrix structure and the line structure claim their right to initiative. Conflict and the multidimensional integration of multiple hierarchies can be negotiated through the concept charisma – mediation, sustained by the matrix structure.

  6. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor = CFD analiza i redukcija modela strujanja za proizvodnju surfaktanta u helix reaktoru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikačević, N.M.; Thielen, L.; Twerda, A.; Hof, P.M.J. van den

    2015-01-01

    Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR) were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Non-reactive flow is simulated

  7. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor = CFD analiza i redukcija modela strujanja za proizvodnju surfaktanta u helix reaktoru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikačević, N.M.; Thielen, L.; Twerda, A.; Hof, P.M.J. van den

    2015-01-01

    Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR) were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Non-reactive flow is

  8. Sensitive dependence of network dynamics on network structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E

    2016-01-01

    The relation between network structure and dynamics is determinant for the behavior of complex systems in numerous domains. An important longstanding problem concerns the properties of the networks that optimize the dynamics with respect to a given performance measure. Here we show that such optimization can lead to sensitive dependence of the dynamics on the structure of the network. Specifically, we demonstrate that the stability of the dynamical state, as determined by the maximum Lyapunov exponent, can exhibit a cusp-like dependence on the number of nodes and links as well as on the size of perturbations applied to the network structure. As mechanisms underlying this sensitivity, we identify discontinuous transitions occurring in the complement of optimal networks and the prevalence of eigenvector degeneracy in these networks. These findings establish a unified characterization of networks optimized for dynamical stability in diffusively coupled systems, which we illustrate using Turing instability in act...

  9. Segmenting Dynamic Human Action via Statistical Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Dare; Andersson, Annika; Saffran, Jenny; Meyer, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Human social, cognitive, and linguistic functioning depends on skills for rapidly processing action. Identifying distinct acts within the dynamic motion flow is one basic component of action processing; for example, skill at segmenting action is foundational to action categorization, verb learning, and comprehension of novel action sequences. Yet…

  10. Electronic-structural dynamics in graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Gierz

    2016-09-01

    meV, a transient enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling constant is observed, providing interesting perspective for experiments that report light-enhanced superconductivity in doped fullerites in which a similar lattice mode was excited. All the studies reviewed here have important implications for applications of graphene in optoelectronic devices and for the dynamical engineering of electronic properties with light.

  11. Dynamic network structure of interhemispheric coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, Karl W; Bassett, Danielle S; Gazzaniga, Michael S

    2012-11-13

    Fifty years ago Gazzaniga and coworkers published a seminal article that discussed the separate roles of the cerebral hemispheres in humans. Today, the study of interhemispheric communication is facilitated by a battery of novel data analysis techniques drawn from across disciplinary boundaries, including dynamic systems theory and network theory. These techniques enable the characterization of dynamic changes in the brain's functional connectivity, thereby providing an unprecedented means of decoding interhemispheric communication. Here, we illustrate the use of these techniques to examine interhemispheric coordination in healthy human participants performing a split visual field experiment in which they process lexical stimuli. We find that interhemispheric coordination is greater when lexical information is introduced to the right hemisphere and must subsequently be transferred to the left hemisphere for language processing than when it is directly introduced to the language-dominant (left) hemisphere. Further, we find that putative functional modules defined by coherent interhemispheric coordination come online in a transient manner, highlighting the underlying dynamic nature of brain communication. Our work illustrates that recently developed dynamic, network-based analysis techniques can provide novel and previously unapproachable insights into the role of interhemispheric coordination in cognition.

  12. Molecular dynamics modeling of structural battery components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verners, O.; Van Duin, A.C.T.; Wagemaker, M.; Simone, A.

    2015-01-01

    A crosslinked polymer based solid electrolyte prototype material –poly(propylene glycol) diacrylate– is studied using the reactive molecular dynamics force field ReaxFF. The focus of the study is the evaluation of the effects of equilibration and added plasticizer (ethylene carbonate) or anion compo

  13. Silver conical helix broadband plasmonic nanoantenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhkhiz, Nader; Moshaii, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The discrete dipole approximation method is used to investigate the optical extinction spectra and the electric field enhancement of Ag conical helix (CH) nanostructures. Based on an expected similarity between the radio frequency response of the antenna with the infrared and the visible response of the nanoantenna, the Ag CH nanostructures were designed as a broadband nanoantenna. It is shown that with engineering the structure parameters of the CH nanostructure the plasmonic response of the nanostructure can be designed for a desirable application. In addition, the change of the substrate material for the nanohelix growth is shown to have infinitesimal effect on the resonance peaks of the conical nanohelix. However, varying the surrounding medium can lead to considerable red-shifting of the plasmonic resonance peaks (up to 230 nm). Calculations of the near field around the helical nanoantenna show that the smaller and the larger sides of the CH are related to the plasmonic resonance peaks at low and high wavelengths, respectively. The calculation result for the extinction spectrum has also been compared with similar experimental data for a 2-pitch Ag conical nanohelix and a relatively good agreement between the numerical calculation and the experiment has been obtained.

  14. Site-directed spectroscopic probes of actomyosin structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David D; Kast, David; Korman, Vicci L

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopy of myosin and actin has entered a golden age. High-resolution crystal structures of isolated actin and myosin have been used to construct detailed models for the dynamic actomyosin interactions that move muscle. Improved protein mutagenesis and expression technologies have facilitated site-directed labeling with fluorescent and spin probes. Spectroscopic instrumentation has achieved impressive advances in sensitivity and resolution. Here we highlight the contributions of site-directed spectroscopic probes to understanding the structural dynamics of myosin II and its actin complexes in solution and muscle fibers. We emphasize studies that probe directly the movements of structural elements within the myosin catalytic and light-chain domains, and changes in the dynamics of both actin and myosin due to their alternating strong and weak interactions in the ATPase cycle. A moving picture emerges in which single biochemical states produce multiple structural states, and transitions between states of order and dynamic disorder power the actomyosin engine.

  15. Structural Dynamics Within and Between Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fombrun, Charles J.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of structure is recast as an instantaneous correspondence between an infrastructure, a sociostructure, and a superstructure--manifestations of collective life juxtaposed through technological solutions, political exchanges, and social interpretations involving organizations. Ultimately, structuring is a dialectical unfolding of…

  16. Contribution of dipole-dipole interactions to the stability of the collagen triple helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Roberto; Berisio, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2008-05-01

    Unveiling sequence-stability and structure-stability relationships is a major goal of protein chemistry and structural biology. Despite the enormous efforts devoted, answers to these issues remain elusive. In principle, collagen represents an ideal system for such investigations due to its simplified sequence and regular structure. However, the definition of the molecular basis of collagen triple helix stability has hitherto proved to be a difficult task. Particularly puzzling is the decoding of the mechanism of triple helix stabilization/destabilization induced by imino acids. Although the propensity-based model, which correlates the propensities of the individual imino acids with the structural requirements of the triple helix, is able to explicate most of the experimental data, it is unable to predict the rather high stability of peptides embedding Gly-Hyp-Hyp triplets. Starting from the available X-ray structures of this polypeptide, we carried out an extensive quantum chemistry analysis of the mutual interactions established by hydroxyproline residues located at the X and Y positions of the Gly-X-Y motif. Our data clearly indicate that the opposing rings of these residues establish significant van der Waals and dipole-dipole interactions that play an important role in triple helix stabilization. These findings suggest that triple helix stabilization can be achieved by distinct structural mechanisms. The interplay of these subtle but recurrent effects dictates the overall stability of this widespread structural motif.

  17. Looking for a Framework for Analyzing Eco-innovation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Looking for a Framework for Analyzing Eco-innovation Dynamics: A Triple Helix Model of Innovation Perspective.......Looking for a Framework for Analyzing Eco-innovation Dynamics: A Triple Helix Model of Innovation Perspective....

  18. Dynamic characteristics of large repetitive framelike structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Hartle, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Using a building block approach and starting with a single element, expressions for the energy of various two-dimensional frametype gridwork configurations are derived. These are then used to develop energy equivalent continua for the gridworks. Equations of motion and associated boundary conditions are obtained for the continua. Some dynamic characteristics of these continua are investigated and compared with corresponding results obtained from finite element codes and also with some available theoretical predictions.

  19. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinta, Tinkara; Kogovšek, Tjaša; Malej, Alenka; Turk, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into possible changes in

  20. Jellyfish modulate bacterial dynamic and community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinkara Tinta

    Full Text Available Jellyfish blooms have increased in coastal areas around the world and the outbreaks have become longer and more frequent over the past few decades. The Mediterranean Sea is among the heavily affected regions and the common bloom-forming taxa are scyphozoans Aurelia aurita s.l., Pelagia noctiluca, and Rhizostoma pulmo. Jellyfish have few natural predators, therefore their carcasses at the termination of a bloom represent an organic-rich substrate that supports rapid bacterial growth, and may have a large impact on the surrounding environment. The focus of this study was to explore whether jellyfish substrate have an impact on bacterial community phylotype selection. We conducted in situ jellyfish-enrichment experiment with three different jellyfish species. Bacterial dynamic together with nutrients were monitored to assess decaying jellyfish-bacteria dynamics. Our results show that jellyfish biomass is characterized by protein rich organic matter, which is highly bioavailable to 'jellyfish-associated' and 'free-living' bacteria, and triggers rapid shifts in bacterial population dynamics and composition. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE analysis, we observed a rapid shift in community composition from unculturable Alphaproteobacteria to culturable species of Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. The results of sequence analyses of bacterial isolates and of total bacterial community determined by culture independent genetic analysis showed the dominance of the Pseudoalteromonadaceae and the Vibrionaceae families. Elevated levels of dissolved proteins, dissolved organic and inorganic nutrient release, bacterial abundance and carbon production as well as ammonium concentrations characterized the degradation process. The biochemical composition of jellyfish species may influence changes in the amount of accumulated dissolved organic and inorganic nutrients. Our results can contribute insights into

  1. Deconvoluting Protein (Unfolding Structural Ensembles Using X-Ray Scattering, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Nasedkin

    Full Text Available The folding and unfolding of protein domains is an apparently cooperative process, but transient intermediates have been detected in some cases. Such (unfolding intermediates are challenging to investigate structurally as they are typically not long-lived and their role in the (unfolding reaction has often been questioned. One of the most well studied (unfolding pathways is that of Drosophila melanogaster Engrailed homeodomain (EnHD: this 61-residue protein forms a three helix bundle in the native state and folds via a helical intermediate. Here we used molecular dynamics simulations to derive sample conformations of EnHD in the native, intermediate, and unfolded states and selected the relevant structural clusters by comparing to small/wide angle X-ray scattering data at four different temperatures. The results are corroborated using residual dipolar couplings determined by NMR spectroscopy. Our results agree well with the previously proposed (unfolding pathway. However, they also suggest that the fully unfolded state is present at a low fraction throughout the investigated temperature interval, and that the (unfolding intermediate is highly populated at the thermal midpoint in line with the view that this intermediate can be regarded to be the denatured state under physiological conditions. Further, the combination of ensemble structural techniques with MD allows for determination of structures and populations of multiple interconverting structures in solution.

  2. Protein dynamics derived from clusters of crystal structures.

    OpenAIRE

    van Aalten, D M; Conn, D A; de Groot, B L; Berendsen, H J; Findlay, J B; Amadei, A

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented to mathematically extract concerted structural transitions in proteins from collections of crystal structures. The "essential dynamics" procedure is used to filter out small-amplitude fluctuations from such a set of structures; the remaining large conformational changes describe motions such as those important for the uptake/release of substrate/ligand and in catalytic reactions. The method is applied to sets of x-ray structures for a number of proteins, and the results ...

  3. Broadband Structural Dynamics: Understanding the Impulse-Response of Structures Across Multiple Length and Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    annual progress in this effort in four research areas: (1) structural health monitoring, (2) experimental structural dynamics , (3) spectral modeling of wave propagation, and (4) wavelet analysis for damage detection.

  4. Challenges in Targeting a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor with Hydrocarbon-Stapled Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, Amanda L; Meijer, Dimphna H; Guerra, Rachel M; Molenaar, Remco J; Alberta, John A; Bernal, Federico; Bird, Gregory H; Stiles, Charles D; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in organism development and disease by regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional activity, whether by bHLH homo- or heterodimerization, is dependent on protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions mediat

  5. The structural and dynamical variables of pentane isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tarika K.; Vaghela, M. V.; Gajjar, P. N.

    2016-05-01

    We derived structural and dynamical properties of pentane isomers: normal pentane, iso-pentane and neo pentane for liquid and gaseous state. We use molecular dynamics simulation to calculate the dynamical properties of pentane isomers for number of particles 729 using the intermolecular potential and force due to Lenard Jones potential. The computations also include mean square displacement and self diffusion co-efficient using Einstein relation. In structural properties, structure factor and phonon frequency are obtaining from P Y Method and Hubbard and Beeby Approach respectively. The Intermolecular potential and self diffusion co-efficient depend on the branching in the structure. The pair correlation function and phonon dispersion curves revels the complex structure of neo-pentane with respect to iso-pentane and n-pentane.

  6. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wei-Hsuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C. The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6

  7. Structure-based control of complex networks with nonlinear dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zañudo, Jorge G T; Albert, Réka

    2016-01-01

    Given the network of interactions underlying a complex system, what can we learn about controlling such a system solely from its structure? Over a century of research in control theory has given us tools to answer this question, which were widely applied in science and engineering. Yet the current tools do not always consider the inherently nonlinear dynamics of real systems and the naturally occurring system states in their definition of "control", a term whose interpretation varies across disciplines. Here we use a new mathematical framework for structure-based control of networks governed by a broad class of nonlinear dynamics that includes the major dynamic models of biological, technological, and social processes. This framework provides realizable node overrides that steer a system towards any of its natural long term dynamic behaviors and which are guaranteed to be effective regardless of the dynamic details and parameters of the underlying system. We use this framework on several real networks, compar...

  8. Dynamic Analysis of Composite Structural System for Looms Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar K. Sevalia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available All the structures subjected to any kind of loads or displacement tends to behave dynamically. Thus the structures are always under continuous loading. The industrial buildings have to support the machineries in motion which are under high degree of vibrations. And so the design of base and the foundations of such structures under vibrations are very important and need to be stable. Problems of dynamics of bases and foundations are to be studied carefully, so as to understand the response characteristics of the power loom industry structure. This is very important from the economic point of view as well as to secure the stability and safety of the structure; dynamic analysis was carried out for Ground + One storey industry load bearing structure using STAAD.Pro software. In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the dynamic analysis of the structure under vibrations caused by reciprocating type machines. This paper makes attempt to study the effects of various structural parameters like Beam Size, Column Size and Storey Height and Wall Thickness variation on Frequency and Displacement of the industrial building which in future will serve as guidelines to the structural engineers and the industry people.

  9. Structural and thermodynamics characters of isolated α-syn12 peptide: long-time temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zanxia Cao; Lei Liu; Ping Wu; Jihua Wang

    2011-01-01

    The structural and thermodynamics characters of α-syn12 (residues 1-12 of the human α-synuclein protein) peptide in aqueous solution were investigated through temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) simulations with the GROMOS 43A1 force field. The two independent T-REMD simulations were completed starting from an initial conformational α-helix and an irregular structure,respectively. Each replica was run for 300ns. The structural and thermodynamics characters were studied based on parameters such as distributions of backbone dihedral angles, free energy surface, stability of folded β-hairpin structure, and favorite conformations. The results showed that the isolated α-syn12 peptide in water adopted four different conformational states: the first state was a β-hairpin ensemble with Turno-6 and four hydrogen bonds, the second state was a β-hairpin ensemble with two turns (Turn9-6 and Turn5-2) and three hydrogen bonds, the third state was a disordered structure with both Turn8-5 and Turn5-2, and the last state was a π-helix ensemble. Meanwhile, we studied the free energy change of α-syn12 peptide from the unfolded state to the β-hairpin state, which was in good agreement with the experiments and molecular dynamics simulations for some other peptides. We also analyzed the driving force of the peptide transition.The results indicated that the driving forces were high solvent exposure of hydrophobic Leu8 and hydrophobic residues in secondary structure. To our knowledge, this was the first report to study the isolated α-syn12 peptide in water by T-REMD.

  10. An investigation of the structural transitions between different forms of DNA using the Adaptively Biased (ABMD) and Steered Molecular Dynamics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Darden, Thomas A.; Sagui, Celeste

    2008-10-01

    Left-handed A-DNA and B-DNA along with right-handed Z-DNA, are believed to be the three main biologically active double-helix structures associated with DNA. The free energy differences associated with the A to B-DNA, and B to Z-DNA transitions in an implicit solvent environment have been investigated using the recently developed Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics (ABMD) method, with the RMSD as the collective variable associated with the former transition, and handedness and radius of gyration as the collective variables associated with the latter. The ABMD method belongs to the general category of umbrella sampling methods with a time-dependent potential, and allows for an accurate estimation of the free energy barriers associated with the transitions. The results are compared to those obtained using the Steered Molecular Dynamics method, and ultimately are used in order to gain insight into the microscopics of the DNA transitions.

  11. Opinion dynamics on a group structured adaptive network

    CERN Document Server

    Gargiulo, F

    2009-01-01

    Many models have been proposed to analyze the evolution of opinion structure due to the interaction of individuals in their social environment. Such models analyze the spreading of ideas both in completely interacting backgrounds and on social networks, where each person has a finite set of interlocutors.Moreover also the investigation on the topological structure of social networks has been object of several analysis, both from the theoretical and the empirical point of view. In this framework a particularly important area of study regards the community structure inside social networks.In this paper we analyze the reciprocal feedback between the opinions of the individuals and the structure of the interpersonal relationships at the level of community structures. For this purpose we define a group based random network and we study how this structure co-evolve with opinion dynamics processes. We observe that the adaptive network structure affects the opinion dynamics process helping the consensus formation. Th...

  12. Cluster structure and dynamics in gels and glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Pastore, Raffaele; Fierro, Anallisa; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Coniglio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical arrest of gels is the consequence of a well defined structural phase transition, leading to the formation of a spanning cluster of bonded particles. The dynamical glass transition, instead, is not accompanied by any clear structural signature. Nevertheless, both transitions are characterized by the emergence of dynamical heterogeneities. Reviewing recent results from numerical simulations, we discuss the behavior of dynamical heterogeneities in different systems and show that a clear connection with the structure exists in the case of gels. The emerging picture may be also relevant for the more elusive case of glasses. We show, as an example, that the relaxation process of a simple glass-forming model can be related to a reverse percolation transition and discuss further perspective in this direction.

  13. Phase Space Structures of k-threshold Sequential Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rani, Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    Sequential dynamical systems (SDS) are used to model a wide range of processes occurring on graphs or networks. The dynamics of such discrete dynamical systems is completely encoded by their phase space, a directed graph whose vertices and edges represent all possible system configurations and transitions between configurations respectively. Direct calculation of the phase space is in most cases a computationally demanding task. However, for some classes of SDS one can extract information on the connected component structure of phase space from the constituent elements of the SDS, such as its base graph and vertex functions. We present a number of novel results about the connected component structure of the phase space for k-threshold dynamical system with binary state spaces. We establish relations between the structure of the components, the threshold value, and the update sequence. Also fixed-point reachability from garden of eden configurations is investigated and upper bounds for the length of paths in t...

  14. The semi-dynamical reflection equation: solutions and structure matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avan, J; Zambon, C [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise (CNRS UMR 8089), Saint-Martin 2 avenue Adolphe Chauvin, 95302 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)], E-mail: avan@u-cergy.fr, E-mail: cristina.zambon@u-cergy.fr

    2008-05-16

    Explicit solutions of the non-constant semi-dynamical reflection equation are constructed, together with suitable parametrizations of their structure matrices. Considering the semi-dynamical reflection equation with rational non-constant Arutyunov-Chekhov-Frolov structure matrices, and a specific meromorphic ansatz, it is found that only two sets of the previously found constant solutions are extendible to the non-constant case. In order to simplify future constructions of spin-chain Hamiltonians, a parametrization procedure is applied explicitly to all elements of the semi-dynamical reflection equation available. Interesting expressions for 'twists' and R-matrices entering the parametrization procedure are found. In particular, some expressions for the R-matrices seem to appear here for the first time. In addition, a new set of consistent structure matrices for the semi-dynamical reflection equation is obtained.

  15. Communication routes in ARID domains between distal residues in helix 5 and the DNA-binding loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Invernizzi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ARID is a DNA-binding domain involved in several transcriptional regulatory processes, including cell-cycle regulation and embryonic development. ARID domains are also targets of the Human Cancer Protein Interaction Network. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms related to conformational changes in the family of ARID domains. Thus, we have examined their structural dynamics to enrich the knowledge on this important family of regulatory proteins. In particular, we used an approach that integrates atomistic simulations and methods inspired by graph theory. To relate these properties to protein function we studied both the free and DNA-bound forms. The interaction with DNA not only stabilizes the conformations of the DNA-binding loops, but also strengthens pre-existing paths in the native ARID ensemble for long-range communication to those loops. Residues in helix 5 are identified as critical mediators for intramolecular communication to the DNA-binding regions. In particular, we identified a distal tyrosine that plays a key role in long-range communication to the DNA-binding loops and that is experimentally known to impair DNA-binding. Mutations at this tyrosine and in other residues of helix 5 are also demonstrated, by our approach, to affect the paths of communication to the DNA-binding loops and alter their native dynamics. Overall, our results are in agreement with a scenario in which ARID domains exist as an ensemble of substates, which are shifted by external perturbation, such as the interaction with DNA. Conformational changes at the DNA-binding loops are transmitted long-range by intramolecular paths, which have their heart in helix 5.

  16. Communication routes in ARID domains between distal residues in helix 5 and the DNA-binding loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Gaetano; Tiberti, Matteo; Lambrughi, Matteo; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Papaleo, Elena

    2014-09-01

    ARID is a DNA-binding domain involved in several transcriptional regulatory processes, including cell-cycle regulation and embryonic development. ARID domains are also targets of the Human Cancer Protein Interaction Network. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms related to conformational changes in the family of ARID domains. Thus, we have examined their structural dynamics to enrich the knowledge on this important family of regulatory proteins. In particular, we used an approach that integrates atomistic simulations and methods inspired by graph theory. To relate these properties to protein function we studied both the free and DNA-bound forms. The interaction with DNA not only stabilizes the conformations of the DNA-binding loops, but also strengthens pre-existing paths in the native ARID ensemble for long-range communication to those loops. Residues in helix 5 are identified as critical mediators for intramolecular communication to the DNA-binding regions. In particular, we identified a distal tyrosine that plays a key role in long-range communication to the DNA-binding loops and that is experimentally known to impair DNA-binding. Mutations at this tyrosine and in other residues of helix 5 are also demonstrated, by our approach, to affect the paths of communication to the DNA-binding loops and alter their native dynamics. Overall, our results are in agreement with a scenario in which ARID domains exist as an ensemble of substates, which are shifted by external perturbation, such as the interaction with DNA. Conformational changes at the DNA-binding loops are transmitted long-range by intramolecular paths, which have their heart in helix 5.

  17. NEW TYPE OF VIBRATION STRUCTURE OF VERTICAL DYNAMIC BALANCING MACHINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Dinggen; Cao Jiguang; Chen Chuanyao; Wang Junwen

    2004-01-01

    A new type of vibration structure of vertical dynamic balancing machine is designed, which is based on the analysis for swing frame of a traditional vertical dynamic balancing machine. The static unbalance and couple unbalance can be separated effectively by using the new machine with the new swing frame. By building the dynamics model, the advantages of the new structure are discussed in detail. The modal and harmonic response are analyzed by using the ANSYS7.0. By comparing the finite element modal analysis with the experimental modal analysis, the natural frequencies and vibration modes are found out. There are many spring boards in the new swing frame. Their stiffness is different and assort with each other. Furthermore, there are three sensors on the measurement points. Therefore, the new dynamic balancing machine can measure the static unbalance and couple unbalance directly, and the influence between them is faint. The new structure has the function of belt-strain compensation to improve the measurement precision. The practical result indicates that the new vertical dynamic balancing machine is suitable for inertial measurement of flying objects, and can overcome the shortcomings of traditional double-plane vertical dynamic balancing machines. The vertical dynamic balancing machine with the new vibration structure can be widely used in the future applications. The modeling and analysis of the new vibration structure provide theoretic instruction and practical experience for designing new type of vertical dynamic balancing machines. Based on the design principles such as stiffness-matching, frequency-adjacence and strain-compensation and so on, various new type of vibration structures can be designed.

  18. Introducing Students to Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthoine, Armelle; Marazzi, Francesco; Tirelli, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The European Laboratory for Structural Assessment (ELSA) is one of the world's main laboratories for seismic studies. Besides its research activities, it also aims to bring applied science closer to the public. This article describes teaching activities based on a demonstration shaking table which is used to introduce the structural dynamics of…

  19. Structure and Dynamics of the VAULT COMPLEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Zon (Arend)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractVaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells. The maincomponent of these 13 MDa structures is the Mr 100,000 major vault protein (MVP).In mammalian cells, about 96 copies of this protein are necessary to form one vaultparticle. Two additional proteins are

  20. Emergence of structured communities through evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtilerman, Elad; Kessler, David A; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2015-10-21

    Species-rich communities, in which many competing species coexist in a single trophic level, are quite frequent in nature, but pose a formidable theoretical challenge. In particular, it is known that complex competitive systems become unstable and unfeasible when the number of species is large. Recently, many studies have attributed the stability of natural communities to the structure of the interspecific interaction network, yet the nature of such structures and the underlying mechanisms responsible for them remain open questions. Here we introduce an evolutionary model, based on the generic Lotka-Volterra competitive framework, from which a stable, structured, diverse community emerges spontaneously. The modular structure of the competition matrix reflects the phylogeny of the community, in agreement with the hierarchial taxonomic classification. Closely related species tend to have stronger niche overlap and weaker fitness differences, as opposed to pairs of species from different modules. The competitive-relatedness hypothesis and the idea of emergent neutrality are discussed in the context of this evolutionary model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxide Interfaces: emergent structure and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Roy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-08-16

    This Final Report describes the scientific accomplishments that have been achieved with support from grant DE-FG02-06ER46273 during the period 6/1/2012– 5/31/2016. The overall goals of this program were focused on the behavior of epitaxial oxide heterostructures at atomic length scales (Ångstroms), and correspondingly short time-scales (fs -ns). The results contributed fundamentally to one of the currently most active frontiers in condensed matter physics research, namely to better understand the intricate relationship between charge, lattice, orbital and spin degrees of freedom that are exhibited by complex oxide heterostructures. The findings also contributed towards an important technological goal which was to achieve a better basic understanding of structural and electronic correlations so that the unusual properties of complex oxides can be exploited for energy-critical applications. Specific research directions included: probing the microscopic behavior of epitaxial interfaces and buried layers; novel materials structures that emerge from ionic and electronic reconfiguration at epitaxial interfaces; ultrahigh-resolution mapping of the atomic structure of heterointerfaces using synchrotron-based x-ray surface scattering, including direct methods of phase retrieval; using ultrafast lasers to study the effects of transient strain on coherent manipulation of multi-ferroic order parameters; and investigating structural ordering and relaxation processes in real-time.

  2. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Soo Hyun [School of Life Sciences, Steitz Center for Structural Biology, and Department of Chemistry, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, ChangJu, E-mail: cchun1130@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Young Jun, E-mail: imyoungjun@jnu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  3. DYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION FOR UNCERTAIN STRUCTURES USING INTERVAL METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChertSub-A-; WuJie; LiuChun

    2003-01-01

    An interval optimization method for the dynamic response of structures with interval parameters is presented. The matrices of structures with interval parameters are given. Combining the interval extension with the perturbation, the method for interval dynamic response analysis is derived. The interval optimization problem is transformed into a corresponding deterministic one. Because the mean values and the uncertainties of the interval parameters can be elected design variables, more information of the optimization results can be obtained by the present method than that obtained by the deterministic one. The present method is implemented for a truss structure. The numerical results show that the method is effective.

  4. International Conference on Structural Nonlinear Dynamics and Diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    CSNDD 2012; CSNDD 2014

    2015-01-01

    This book, which presents the peer-reviewed post-proceedings of CSNDD 2012 and CSNDD 2014, addresses the important role that relevant concepts and tools from nonlinear and complex dynamics could play in present and future engineering applications. It includes 22 chapters contributed by outstanding researchers and covering various aspects of applications, including: structural health monitoring, diagnosis and damage detection, experimental methodologies, active vibration control and smart structures, passive control of structures using nonlinear energy sinks, vibro-impact dynamic MEMS/NEMS/AFM, energy-harvesting materials and structures, and time-delayed feedback control, as well as aspects of deterministic versus stochastic dynamics and control of nonlinear phenomena in physics.  Researchers and engineers interested in the challenges posed and opportunities offered by nonlinearities in the development of passive and active control strategies, energy harvesting, novel design criteria, modeling and characteriz...

  5. The essential tyrosine-containing loop conformation and the role of the C-terminal multi-helix region in eukaryotic phenylalanine ammonia-lyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilbák, Sarolta; Tomin, Anna; Rétey, János; Poppe, László

    2006-03-01

    Besides the post-translationally cyclizing catalytic Ala-Ser-Gly triad, Tyr110 and its equivalents are of the most conserved residues in the active site of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5), histidine ammonia-lyase (HAL, EC 4.3.1.3) and other related enzymes. The Tyr110Phe mutation results in the most pronounced inactivation of PAL indicating the importance of this residue. The recently published X-ray structures of PAL revealed that the Tyr110-loop was either missing (for Rhodospridium toruloides) or far from the active site (for Petroselinum crispum). In bacterial HAL ( approximately 500 amino acids) and plant and fungal PALs ( approximately 710 amino acids), a core PAL/HAL domain ( approximately 480 amino acids) with >or= 30% sequence identity along the different species is common. In plant and fungal PAL a approximately 100-residue long C-terminal multi-helix domain is present. The ancestor bacterial HAL is thermostable and, in all of its known X-ray structures, a Tyr83-loop-in arrangement has been found. Based on the HAL structures, a Tyr110-loop-in conformation of the P. crispum PAL structure was constructed by partial homology modeling, and the static and dynamic behavior of the loop-in/loop-out structures were compared. To study the role of the C-terminal multi-helix domain, Tyr-loop-in/loop-out model structures of two bacterial PALs (Streptomyces maritimus, 523 amino acids and Photorhabdus luminescens, 532 amino acids) lacking this C-terminal domain were also built. Molecular dynamics studies indicated that the Tyr-loop-in conformation was more rigid without the C-terminal multi-helix domain. On this basis it is hypothesized that a role of this C-terminal extension is to decrease the lifetime of eukaryotic PAL by destabilization, which might be important for the rapid responses in the regulation of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis.

  6. Dynamics and control of diseases in networks with community structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Salathé

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of infectious diseases spread via direct person-to-person transmission (such as influenza, smallpox, HIV/AIDS, etc. depends on the underlying host contact network. Human contact networks exhibit strong community structure. Understanding how such community structure affects epidemics may provide insights for preventing the spread of disease between communities by changing the structure of the contact network through pharmaceutical or non-pharmaceutical interventions. We use empirical and simulated networks to investigate the spread of disease in networks with community structure. We find that community structure has a major impact on disease dynamics, and we show that in networks with strong community structure, immunization interventions targeted at individuals bridging communities are more effective than those simply targeting highly connected individuals. Because the structure of relevant contact networks is generally not known, and vaccine supply is often limited, there is great need for efficient vaccination algorithms that do not require full knowledge of the network. We developed an algorithm that acts only on locally available network information and is able to quickly identify targets for successful immunization intervention. The algorithm generally outperforms existing algorithms when vaccine supply is limited, particularly in networks with strong community structure. Understanding the spread of infectious diseases and designing optimal control strategies is a major goal of public health. Social networks show marked patterns of community structure, and our results, based on empirical and simulated data, demonstrate that community structure strongly affects disease dynamics. These results have implications for the design of control strategies.

  7. Dynamic energy absorption characteristics of hollow microlattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Chen, X

    2014-10-01

    Hollow microlattice structures are promising candidates for advanced energy absorption and their characteristics under dynamic crushing are explored. The energy absorption can be significantly enhanced by inertial stabilization, shock wave effect and strain rate hardening effect. In this paper we combine theoretical analysis and comprehensive finite element method simulation to decouple the three effects, and then obtain a simple model to predict the overall dynamic effects of hollow microlattice structures. Inertial stabilization originates from the suppression of sudden crushing of the microlattice and its contribution scales with the crushing speed, v. Shock wave effect comes from the discontinuity across the plastic shock wave front during dynamic loading and its contribution scales with e. The strain rate effect increases the effective yield strength upon dynamic deformation and increases the energy absorption density. A mechanism map is established that illustrates the dominance of these three dynamic effects at a range of crushing speeds. Compared with quasi-static loading, the energy absorption capacity a dynamic loading of 250 m/s can be enhanced by an order of magnitude. The study may shed useful insight on designing and optimizing the energy absorption performance of hollow microlattice structures under various dynamic loads. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Triple helix interactions for eco-innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Roberto Rivas; Riisgaard, Henrik; Remmen, Arne

    Authority with insights from consultants, universities and donnor agencies. The proximity of the science park to the canal, has hitherto not yielded with the creation of a “green cluster”, which could be a precedent to promote eco-innovations. These findings suggest that, Triple Helix interactions...... the role of science parks in promoting eco-innovation. This study uses qualitative data gathered in two units of analysis: Panama Canal Authority and City of Knowledge Science Park. The study examines how Triple Helix interactions have built the regional system of eco-innovation at the Panama Canal...... are not institutionalized but take place through adhoc projects. Further, science parks could become mediators in Triple Helix interactions between industry, universities and governments....

  9. The Hyades distance, structure, dynamics, and age

    CERN Document Server

    Perryman, M A C; Lebreton, Y; Gómez, A; Turon, C; De Strobel, G C; Mermilliod, J C; Robichon, N; Kovalevsky, J; Crifo, F

    1997-01-01

    We use absolute trigonometric parallaxes from the Hipparcos Catalogue to determine individual distances to members of the Hyades cluster, from which the 3-dimensional structure of the cluster can be derived. Inertially-referenced proper motions are used to rediscuss distance determinations based on convergent-point analyses. A combination of parallaxes and proper motions from Hipparcos, and radial velocities from ground-based observations, are used to determine the position and velocity components of candidate members with respect to the cluster centre, providing new information on cluster membership: 13 new candidate members within 20 pc of the cluster centre have been identified. Farther from the cluster centre there is a gradual merging between certain cluster members and field stars, both spatially and kinematically. Within the cluster, the kinematical structure is fully consistent with parallel space motion of the component stars with an internal velocity dispersion of about 0.3 km/s. The spatial structu...

  10. Cosmic Voids: structure, dynamics and galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien

    2009-01-01

    In this review we discuss several aspects of Cosmic Voids. Voids are a major component of the large scale distribution of matter and galaxies in the Universe. They are of instrumental importance for understanding the emergence of the Cosmic Web. Their relatively simple shape and structure makes them into useful tools for extracting the value of a variety cosmic parameters, possibly including even that of the influence of dark energy. Perhaps most promising and challenging is the issue of the galaxies found within their realm. Not only does the pristine environment of voids provide a promising testing ground for assessing the role of environment on the formation and evolution of galaxies, the dearth of dwarf galaxies may even represent a serious challenge to the standard view of cosmic structure formation.

  11. Spatial Dynamic Structures and Mobility in Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Aman, Bogdan

    2011-01-01

    Membrane computing is a well-established and successful research field which belongs to the more general area of molecular computing. Membrane computing aims at defining parallel and non-deterministic computing models, called membrane systems or P Systems, which abstract from the functioning and structure of the cell. A membrane system consists of a spatial structure, a hierarchy of membranes which do not intersect, with a distinguishable membrane called skin surrounding all of them. A membrane without any other membranes inside is elementary, while a non-elementary membrane is a composite membrane. The membranes define demarcations between regions; for each membrane there is a unique associated region. Since we have a one-to-one correspondence, we sometimes use membrane instead of region, and vice-versa. The space outside the skin membrane is called the environment. In this thesis we define and investigate variants of systems of mobile membranes as models for molecular computing and as modelling paradigms fo...

  12. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-08

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  13. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  14. Dynamics-based Nondestructive Structural Monitoring Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    in the practice of non- destructive evaluation ( NDE ) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Guided wave techniques have several advantages over...conventional bulk wave ultrasonic NDE /SHM techniques. Some of these advantages are outlined in Table I. However, in addition to the advantages of...PVDF transducers for SHM applications with controlled guided wave modes and frequencies [7]. Wilcox used EMATs with circular coils in a guided wave

  15. Dynamics-based Nondestructive Structural Monitoring Teclrniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    destructive evaluation ( NDE ) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Guided wave techniques have several advantages over conventional bulk wave...ultrasonic NDE /SHM techniques. Some of these advantages are outlined in Table I. However, in addition to the advantages of guided waves comes an...PVDF transducers for SHM applications with controlled guided wave modes and frequencies [7]. Wilcox used EMATs with circular coils in a guided wave

  16. Structural Optimization of Machine Gun Based on Dynamic Stability Concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-jian; WANG Rui-lin; ZHANG Ben-jun

    2008-01-01

    Improving the firing accuracy is a final goal of structural optimization of machine guns. The main factors which affect the dispersion accuracy of machine gun are analyzed. Based on the concept of dynamic stability, a structural optimization model is built up, and the sensitivity of dispersion accuracy to design variables is analyzed. The optimization results of a type of machine gun show that the method is valid, feasible, and can be used as a guide to the structural optimization of other automatic weapons.

  17. Structural and dynamical insights into the membrane-bound α-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Jain

    Full Text Available Membrane-induced disorder-to-helix transition of α-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, has been implicated in a number of important neuronal functions as well as in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. In order to obtain structural insights of membrane-bound α-synuclein at the residue-specific resolution, we took advantage of the fact that the protein is devoid of tryptophan and incorporated single tryptophan at various residue positions along the sequence. These tryptophans were used as site-specific markers to characterize the structural and dynamical aspects of α-synuclein on the negatively charged small unilamellar lipid vesicles. An array of site-specific fluorescence readouts, such as the spectral-shift, quenching efficiency and anisotropy, allowed us to discern various features of the conformational rearrangements occurring at different locations of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane. In order to define the spatial localization of various regions of the protein near the membrane surface, we utilized a unique and sensitive indicator, namely, red-edge excitation shift (REES, which originates when a fluorophore is located in a highly ordered micro-environment. The extent of REES observed at different residue positions allowed us to directly identify the residues that are localized at the membrane-water interface comprising a thin (∼ 15 Å layer of motionally restrained water molecules and enabled us to construct a dynamic hydration map of the protein. The combination of site-specific fluorescence readouts allowed us to unravel the intriguing molecular details of α-synuclein on the lipid membrane in a direct model-free fashion. Additionally, the combination of methodologies described here are capable of distinguishing subtle but important structural alterations of α-synuclein bound to different negatively charged lipids with varied head-group chemistry. We believe that the structural modulations of α-synuclein on the membrane could

  18. Properties of Soliton-Transported Bio-energy in α-Helix Protein Molecules with Three Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We study numerically the propagating properties of soliton-transported bio-energy excited in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels in the cases of the short-time and long-time motions and its features of collision at temperature T = 0 and biological temperature T = 300 K by the dynamic equations in the improved Davydov theory and fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, respectively. From these simulation experiments we see that the new solitons in the improved model can move without dispersion at a constant speed retaining its shape and energy in the cases of motion of both short-time or T = 0 and long time or T = 300 K and can go through each other without scattering in their collisions. In these cases its lifetime is, at least, 120 ps at 300 K, in which the soliton can travel over about 700 amino acid residues. This result is consistent with analytic result obtained by quantum perturbed theory in this model. In the meanwhile, the influences of structure disorder of α-helix protein molecules, including the inhomogeneous distribution of amino acids with different masses and fluctuations of spring constant, dipole-dipole interaction, exciton-phonon coupling constant and diagonal disorder, on the solitons are also studied by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The results show that the soliton still is very robust against the structure disorders and thermal perturbation of proteins at biological temperature 300 K. Therefore we can conclude that the new soliton in the α-helix protein molecules with three channels is a possible carrier of bio-energy transport and the improved model is possibly a candidate for the mechanism of this transport.

  19. Nonlocalized cluster dynamics and nuclear molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Bo; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Ren, Zhongzhou; Röpke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Tohsaki, Akihiro; Xu, Chang; Yamada, Taiichi

    2013-01-01

    A container picture is proposed for understanding cluster dynamics where the clusters make nonlocalized motion occupying the lowest orbit of the cluster mean-field potential characterized by the size parameter $``B"$ in the THSR (Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-R\\"{o}pke) wave function. The nonlocalized cluster aspects of the inversion-doublet bands in $^{20}$Ne which have been considered as a typical manifestation of localized clustering are discussed. So far unexplained puzzling features of the THSR wave function, namely that after angular-momentum projection for two cluster systems the prolate THSR wave function is almost 100$\\%$ equivalent to an oblate THSR wave function is clarified. It is shown that the true intrinsic two-cluster THSR configuration is nonetheless prolate. The proposal of the container picture is based on the fact that typical cluster systems, 2$\\alpha$, 3$\\alpha$, and $\\alpha$+$^{16}$O, are all well described by a single THSR wave function. It will be shown for the case of linear-chain states w...

  20. Biophysical studies of matrix metalloproteinase/triple-helix complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Gregg B

    2014-01-01

    Several members of the zinc-dependent matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family catalyze collagen degradation. The structures of MMPs, in solution and solid state and in the presence and absence of triple-helical collagen models, have been assessed by NMR spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and X-ray crystallography. Structures observed in solution exhibit flexibility between the MMP catalytic (CAT) and hemopexin-like (HPX) domains, while solid-state structures are relatively compact. Evaluation of the maximum occurrence (MO) of MMP-1 conformations in solution found that, for all the high MO conformations, the CAT and HPX domains are not in tight contact, and the residues of the HPX domain reported to be responsible for the binding to the collagen triple-helix are solvent exposed. A mechanism for collagenolysis has been developed based on analysis of MMP solution structures. Information obtained from solid-state structures has proven valuable for analyzing specific contacts between MMPs and the collagen triple-helix.

  1. Solvent-Directed Switch of a Left-Handed 10/12-Helix into a Right-Handed 12/10-Helix in Mixed β-Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thodupunuri, Prashanth; Katukuri, Sirisha; Ramakrishna, Kallaganti V S; Sharma, Gangavaram V M; Kunwar, Ajit C; Sarma, Akella V S; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg

    2017-02-17

    Present study describes the synthesis and conformational analysis of β-peptides from C-linked carbo-β-amino acids [β-Caa(l)] with a d-lyxo furanoside side chain and β-hGly in 1:1 alternation. NMR and CD investigations on peptides with an (S)-β-Caa(l) monomer at the N-terminus revealed a right-handed 10/12-mixed helix. An unprecedented solvent-directed "switch" both in helical pattern and handedness was observed when the sequence begins with a β-hGly residue instead of a (S)-β-Caa(l) constituent. NMR studies on these peptides in chloroform indicated a left-handed 10/12-helix, while the CD spectrum in methanol inferred a right-handed secondary structure. The NMR data for these peptides in CD3OH showed the presence of a right-handed 12/10-helix. NMR investigations in acetonitrile indicated the coexistence of both helix types. Quantum chemical studies predicted a small energy difference of 0.3 kcal/mol between the two helix types, which may explain the possibility of solvent influence. Examples for a solvent-directed switch of both the H-bonding pattern and the handedness of foldamer helices are rare so far. A comparable solvent effect was not found in the corresponding peptides with (R)-β-Caa(l) residues, where right-handed 12/10-helices are predominating.

  2. Dynamics in Sequence Space for RNA Secondary Structure Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Marco C; Bienert, Stefan; Torda, Andrew E

    2012-10-01

    We have implemented a method for the design of RNA sequences that should fold to arbitrary secondary structures. A popular energy model allows one to take the derivative with respect to composition, which can then be interpreted as a force and used for Newtonian dynamics in sequence space. Combined with a negative design term, one can rapidly sample sequences which are compatible with a desired secondary structure via simulated annealing. Results for 360 structures were compared with those from another nucleic acid design program using measures such as the probability of the target structure and an ensemble-weighted distance to the target structure.

  3. The C-Terminal RpoN Domain of sigma54 Forms an unpredictedHelix-Turn-Helix Motif Similar to domains of sigma70

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doucleff, Michaeleen; Malak, Lawrence T.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-11-01

    The ''{delta}'' subunit of prokaryotic RNA-polymerase allows gene-specific transcription initiation. Two {sigma} families have been identified, {sigma}{sup 70} and {sigma}{sup 54}, which use distinct mechanisms to initiate transcription and share no detectable sequence homology. Although the {sigma}{sup 70}-type factors have been well characterized structurally by x-ray crystallography, no high-resolution structural information is available for the {sigma}{sup 54}-type factors. Here we present the NMR derived structure of the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} from Aquifex aeolicus. This domain (Thr323 to Gly389), which contains the highly conserved RpoN box sequence, consists of a poorly structured N-terminal tail followed by a three-helix bundle, which is surprisingly similar to domains of the {sigma}{sup 70}-type proteins. Residues of the RpoN box, which have previously been shown to be critical for DNA binding, form the second helix of an unpredicted helix-turn-helix motif. This structure's homology with other DNA binding proteins, combined with previous biochemical data, suggest how the C-terminal domain of {sigma}{sup 54} binds to DNA.

  4. Structure and Dynamics of the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Moles, Mariano; Melnick, Jorge

    Here for the first time is a book that treats practically all aspects of modern research in interstellar matter astrophysics. 20 review articles and 40 carefully selected and refereed papers give a thorough overview of the field and convey the flavor of enthusiastic colloquium discussions to the reader. The book includes sections on: - Molecular clouds, star formation and HII regions - Mechanical energy sources - Discs, outflows, jets and HH objects - The Orion Nebula - The extragalactic interstellar medium - Interstellar matter at high galactic latitudes - The structure of the interstellar medium

  5. Structure and dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, K.N.; Bødker, F.; Hansen, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present X-ray and neutron diffraction data illustrating aspects of crystal and magnetic structures of ferromagnetic alpha-Fe and antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles, as well as inelastic neutron scattering studies of the magnetic fluctuations in NiO and in canted antiferromagneti...... alpha-Fe2O3. In the inelastic case we make use of the fact that we can study both the superparamagnetic relaxation and collective magnetic excitations of the whole particle moment at the antiferromagnetic Bragg positions. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Dinucleosomes Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina A. Filenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their population was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed.

  7. Intrinsically disordered proteins: structural and functional dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallin S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Wallin Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada Abstract: The classical view holds that proteins fold into essentially unique three-dimensional structures before becoming biologically active. However, studies over the last several years have provided broad and convincing evidence that some proteins do not adopt a single structure and yet are fully functional. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs have been found to be highly prevalent in many genomes, including human, and play key roles in central cellular processes, such as regulation of transcription and translation, cell cycle, and cell signaling. Moreover, IDPs are overrepresented among proteins implicated in disease, including various cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. Intense efforts, by using both experimental and computational approaches, are consequently under way to uncover the molecular mechanisms that underpin the roles of IDPs in biology and disease. This review provides an introduction to the general biophysical properties of IDPs and discusses some of the recent emerging areas in IDP research, including the roles of IDPs in allosteric regulation, regulatory unfolding, and formation of intracellular membrane-less organelles. In addition, recent attempts at therapeutic targeting of IDPs by small molecules, noting in particular that IDPs represent a potentially important source of new drug targets in light of their central role in protein–protein interaction networks, are also reviewed. Keywords: natively unfolded proteins, unstructured proteins, protein folding, protein–protein interaction, cell regulation, signaling, drug development, inhibitors

  8. Ab initio theory for ultrafast magnetization dynamics with a dynamic band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, B. Y.; Haag, M.; Fähnle, M.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-induced modifications of magnetic materials on very small spatial dimensions and ultrashort timescales are a promising field for novel storage and spintronic devices. Therefore, the contribution of electron-electron spin-flip scattering to the ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnets after an ultrashort laser excitation is investigated. In this work, the dynamical change of the band structure resulting from the change of the magnetization in time is taken into account on an ab initio level. We find a large influence of the dynamical band structure on the magnetization dynamics and we illustrate the thermalization and relaxation process after laser irradiation. Treating the dynamical band structure yields a demagnetization comparable to the experimental one.

  9. Optimization Design of Helix Pitch for Efficiency Enhancement in the Helix Travelling Wave Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Zhao-Yun; GONG Yu-Bin; L(U) Ming-Yi; WEI Yan-Yu; WANG Wen-Xiang

    2008-01-01

    @@ The output section of a helix travelling wave tube usually contains a helix pitch taper for high rf electron efficiency.By keeping the rf field as synchronous as possible with the decelerating electron beam bunches,the rf field can extract much more energy from the beam,and thus the maximum electron efficiency can be realized.Recently,a global simulated annealing algorithm has been employed to design the helix pitch profile so as to improve the electron efficiency as much as possible.From the numerical results,it is concluded that the electron efficiency can be enhanced by about 4%-8%.

  10. Chirality-specific lift forces of helix under shear flows: Helix perpendicular to shear plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Yi

    2017-02-01

    Chiral objects in shear flow experience a chirality-specific lift force. Shear flows past helices in a low Reynolds number regime were studied using slender-body theory. The chirality-specific lift forces in the vorticity direction experienced by helices are dominated by a set of helix geometry parameters: helix radius, pitch length, number of turns, and helix phase angle. Its analytical formula is given. The chirality-specific forces are the physical reasons for the chiral separation of helices in shear flow. Our results are well supported by the latest experimental observations.

  11. Structure and conformational dynamics of scaffolded DNA origami nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Bricker, William P; Ratanalert, Sakul; Bathe, Mark

    2017-06-20

    Synthetic DNA is a highly programmable nanoscale material that can be designed to self-assemble into 3D structures that are fully determined by underlying Watson-Crick base pairing. The double crossover (DX) design motif has demonstrated versatility in synthesizing arbitrary DNA nanoparticles on the 5-100 nm scale for diverse applications in biotechnology. Prior computational investigations of these assemblies include all-atom and coarse-grained modeling, but modeling their conformational dynamics remains challenging due to their long relaxation times and associated computational cost. We apply all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained finite element modeling to DX-based nanoparticles to elucidate their fine-scale and global conformational structure and dynamics. We use our coarse-grained model with a set of secondary structural motifs to predict the equilibrium solution structures of 45 DX-based DNA origami nanoparticles including a tetrahedron, octahedron, icosahedron, cuboctahedron and reinforced cube. Coarse-grained models are compared with 3D cryo-electron microscopy density maps for these five DNA nanoparticles and with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for the tetrahedron and octahedron. Our results elucidate non-intuitive atomic-level structural details of DX-based DNA nanoparticles, and offer a general framework for efficient computational prediction of global and local structural and mechanical properties of DX-based assemblies that are inaccessible to all-atom based models alone. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Unpredictable responses of garden snail (Helix aspersa) populations to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Knight, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the impact of climate change on the population dynamics of the garden snail (Helix aspersa) in the Ecotron controlled environment facility. The experimental series ran for three plant generations, allowing the snails to reproduce. We investigated the isolated and combined effects of eleva

  13. CFD analysis and flow model reduction for surfactant production in helix reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikačević, N.M.; Thielen, L.; Twerda, A.; Hof, P.M.J. van den

    2014-01-01

    Flow pattern analysis in a spiral Helix reactor is conducted, for the application in the commercial surfactant production. Step change response curves (SCR) were obtained from numerical tracer experiments by three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Non-reactive flow is simul

  14. Ab initio lattice dynamics of complex structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    systems in particular. A more detailed analysis of the phonon spectrum has been performed for the compound Mg(BH4)2, where several crystal symmetries have been proposed theoretically and experimentally. By means of an analysis of the instabilities of these structures, a new, stable phase has been......In this thesis, density functional theory is applied in a study of thermodynamic properties of so-called complex metal hydrides, which are promising materials for hydrogen storage applications. Since the unit cells of these crystals can be relatively large with many symmetrically inequivalent...... determined. Aiming at finding scaling relationships between alloy stabilities and computationally inexpensive properties, the stabilities of cation-alloyed metal aluminum hexahydrides have been studied. The analysis shows that charge density symmetries are correlated to the stability. In addition...

  15. Fundamental structures of dynamic social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekara, Vedran; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    and their interactions in the network of real-world person-to-person proximity measured via Bluetooth, as well as their telecommunication networks, online social media contacts, geolocation, and demographic data. These high-resolution data allow us to observe social groups directly, rendering community detection...... a pattern of recurring meetings across weeks and months, each with varying degrees of regularity. Taken together, these findings provide a powerful simplification of the social network, where cores represent fundamental structures expressed with strong temporal and spatial regularity. Using this framework......, we explore the complex interplay between social and geospatial behavior, documenting how the formation of cores is preceded by coordination behavior in the communication networks and demonstrating that social behavior can be predicted with high precision....

  16. Modeling structural dynamic behavior of SSME components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefling, Larry A.; Saxon, J. B.; Prickett, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    FEM studies are presented of the nozzle and the low-pressure fuel-pump inducer designs for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) to analyze the effects of structural vibrations. FEM preprocessing software based on a CAD system is employed to develop a model of the component's sophisticated geometry. The nozzle geometry is also defined by means of the preprocessing technique and subsequently analyzed with respect to time-transient loading. The analysis is conducted with a Cray supercomputer using the SPAR/EAL FEM program. The investigation of the nozzle demonstrates the advantageous use of symmetry in the determination of nozzle response to SSME start-up transients. Plots of time vs strain are developed for gages on the nozzle wall and steerhorn tubing. The results of the inducer modeling are found to be adequate for investigating the component's principle modes, and the nozzle results indicate the suitability of the FEM techniques for optimizing the design of engine components.

  17. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-12-10

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects.

  18. Multiscale simulation of microbe structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin.

  19. Structure and dynamics of core-periphery networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter; Wu, Ling-Yun; Uzzi, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies uncovered important core/periphery network structures characterizing complex sets of cooperative and competitive interactions between network nodes, be they proteins, cells, species or humans. Better characterization of the structure, dynamics and function of core/periphery networks is a key step of our understanding cellular functions, species adaptation, social and market changes. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and dynamics of "traditional" core/periphery networks, rich-clubs, nested, bow-tie and onion networks. Comparing core/periphery structures with network modules, we discriminate between global and local cores. The core/periphery network organization lies in the middle of several extreme properties, such as random/condensed structures, clique/star configurations, network symmetry/asymmetry, network assortativity/disassortativity, as well as network hierarchy/anti-hierarchy. These properties of high complexity together with the large degeneracy of core pathways e...

  20. Dynamics of a bistable Miura-origami structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Ji, Huimin; Wang, K. W.

    2017-05-01

    Origami-inspired structures and materials have shown extraordinary properties and performances originating from the intricate geometries of folding. However, current state of the art studies have mostly focused on static and quasistatic characteristics. This research performs a comprehensive experimental and analytical study on the dynamics of origami folding through investigating a stacked Miura-Ori (SMO) structure with intrinsic bistability. We fabricate and experimentally investigated a bistable SMO prototype with rigid facets and flexible crease lines. Under harmonic base excitation, the SMO exhibits both intrawell and interwell oscillations. Spectrum analyses reveal that the dominant nonlinearities of SMO are quadratic and cubic, which generate rich dynamics including subharmonic and chaotic oscillations. The identified nonlinearities indicate that a third-order polynomial can be employed to approximate the measured force-displacement relationship. Such an approximation is validated via numerical study by qualitatively reproducing the phenomena observed in the experiments. The dynamic characteristics of the bistable SMO resemble those of a Helmholtz-Duffing oscillator (HDO); this suggests the possibility of applying the established tools and insights of HDO to predict origami dynamics. We also show that the bistability of SMO can be programmed within a large design space via tailoring the crease stiffness and initial stress-free configurations. The results of this research offer a wealth of fundamental insights into the dynamics of origami folding, and provide a solid foundation for developing foldable and deployable structures and materials with embedded dynamic functionalities.

  1. Stabilization of structure-preserving power networks with market dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Stegink, Tjerk W; van der Schaft, Arjan J

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of maximizing the social welfare while stabilizing both the physical power network as well as the market dynamics. For the physical power grid a third-order structure-preserving model is considered involving both frequency and voltage dynamics. By applying the primal-dual gradient method to the social welfare problem, a distributed dynamic pricing algorithm in port-Hamiltonian form is obtained. After interconnection with the physical system a closed-loop port-Hamiltonian system of differential-algebraic equations is obtained, whose properties are exploited to prove local asymptotic stability of the optimal points.

  2. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method.

  3. Cluster structure and dynamics in gels and glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, R.; de Candia, A.; Fierro, A.; Pica Ciamarra, M.; Coniglio, A.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamical arrest of gels is the consequence of a well defined structural phase transition, leading to the formation of a spanning cluster of bonded particles. The glass transition, instead, is not accompanied by any clear structural signature. Nevertheless, both transitions are characterized by the emergence of dynamical heterogeneities. Reviewing recent results from numerical simulations, we discuss the behavior of dynamical heterogeneities in different systems and show that a clear connection with the structure exists in the case of gels. The emerging picture may also be relevant for the more elusive case of glasses. We show, as an example, that the relaxation process of a simple glass-forming model can be related to a reverse percolation transition and discuss further perspective in this direction.

  4. Structure and thermodynamics of amylin dimer studied by Hamiltonian-temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand; Wei, Guanghong

    2011-03-31

    The loss of the insulin-producing β-cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans, responsible for type-II diabetes, is associated with islet amyloid deposits. The main component of these deposits is the amyloid fibrils formed by the 37-residue human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP also known as amylin). Although the fibrils are well characterized by cross β structure, the structure of the transient oligomers formed in the early stage of aggregation remains elusive. In this study, we apply the Hamiltonian-temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics to characterize the structure and thermodynamics of a full-length hIAPP dimer in both the presence and the absence of the Cys2-Cys7 disulfide bond. We compare these results with those obtained on the monomeric and dimeric forms of rat IAPP (rIAPP) with a disulfide bridge which differ from the hIAPP by 6 amino acids in the C-terminal region, but it is unable to form fibrils. Using a coarse-grained protein force field (OPEP-the Optimized Potential for Efficient peptide structure Prediction) running for a total of 10-28 μs per system studied, we show that sequences sample α-helical structure in the N-terminal region but that the length of this secondary element is shorter and less stable for the chains without the disulfide bridge (residues 5-16 for hIAPP with the bridge vs 10-16 for hIAPP without the bridge). This α-helix is known to be an important transient stage in the formation of oligomers. In the C-terminal, the amyloidogenic region of hIAPP, β-strands are seen for residues 17-26 and 30-35. On the contrary, no significant β-sheet content in the C-terminal is observed for either the monomeric or the dimeric rIAPP. These numerical results are fully consistent with recent experimental findings that the N-terminal residues are not part of the fibril by forming α-helical structure but rather play a significant role in stabilizing the amyloidogenic region available for the fibrillation.

  5. Exactly Solvable Model for Helix-Coil-Sheet Transitions in Protein Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, John S

    2010-01-01

    In view of the important role helix-sheet transitions play in protein aggregation, we introduce a simple model to study secondary structural transitions of helix-coil-sheet systems using a Potts model starting with an effective Hamiltonian. This energy function depends on four parameters that approximately describe entropic and enthalpic contributions to the stability of a polypeptide in helical and sheet conformations. The sheet structures involve long-range interactions between residues which are far in sequence, but are in contact in real space. Such contacts are included in the Hamiltonian. Using standard statistical mechanical techniques, the partition function is solved exactly using transfer matrices. Based on this model, we study thermodynamic properties of polypeptides, including phase transitions between helix, sheet, and coil structures.

  6. An Aspect of Dynamic Human-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    . Focus is on how modal characteristics of the structure, i.e. its frequency and damping, are influenced by the presence of stationary humans. Vertical vibrations are considered, and particular focus is given the influence of human posture on modal characteristics of the supporting structure. Insight......It is known that humans and structures interact. Humans can cause structures to vibrate, and excessive vibrations may occur if the motion frequency of humans coincides with a resonant frequency of the structural system. It is also known that stationary humans (such as humans sitting or standing...... on the structure) influence the dynamic behaviour and modal characteristics of the structure carrying them, whether being a grandstand, an office floor or similar. However, the interaction between the stationary humans and the structure is generally not well understood, and the paper addresses this interaction...

  7. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. On the influence of hydrated imidazolium-based ionic liquid on protein structure stability: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qiang

    2013-09-01

    The structure stability of three α-helix bundle (the B domain of protein A) in an imidazolium-based ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIM-Cl)) is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Consistent with previous experiments, the present simulation results show that the native structure of the protein is consistently stabilized in BMIM-Cl solutions with different concentrations. It is observed that BMIM+ cations have a strong tendency to accumulate on protein surface whereas Cl- anions are expelled from protein. BMIM+ cations cannot only have electrostatic interactions with the carbonyl groups on backbone and the carboxylate groups on negatively charged side chains, but also have hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of non-polar residues. In the meanwhile, the accumulation of large-size BMIM+ cations on protein surface could remove the surrounding water molecules, reduce the hydrogen bonding from water to protein, and thus stabilize the backbone hydrogen bonds. In summary, the present study could improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the impact of water-miscible ionic liquid on protein structure.

  9. On the dynamics of floating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lannes, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the floating body problem which consists in studying the interaction of surface water waves with a floating body. We propose a new formulation of the water waves problem that can easily be generalized in order to take into account the presence of a floating body. The resulting equations have a compressible-incompressible structure in which the interior pressure exerted by the fluid on the floating body is a Lagrange multiplier that can be determined through the resolution of a $d$-dimensional elliptic equation, where $d$ is the horizontal dimension. In the case where the object is freely floating, we decompose the hydrodynamic force and torque exerted by the fluid on the solid in order to exhibit an added mass effect; in the one dimensional case $d=1$, the computations can be carried out explicitly. We also show that this approach in which the interior pressure appears as a Lagrange multiplier can be implemented on reduced asymptotic models such as the nonlinear shallow water equations an...

  10. Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis, structure, and solution dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.G.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis considers three aspects of organoactinide chemistry. In chapter one, a bidentate phosphine ligand was used to kinetically stabilize complexes of the type Cp/sub 2/MX/sub 2/. Ligand redistribution processes are present throughout the synthetic work, as has often been observed in uranium cyclopentadienyl chemistry. The effects of covalent M-L bonding on the solution and solid state properties of U(III) coordination complexes are considered. In particular, the nature of the more subtle interaction between the metal and the neutral ligand are examined. Using relative basicity data obtained in solution, and solid state structural data (and supplemented by gas phase photoelectron measurements), it is demonstrated that the more electron rich U(III) centers engage in significant U ..-->.. L ..pi..-donation. Trivalent uranium is shown to be capable of acting either as a one- or two-electron reducing agent toward a wide variety of unsaturated organic and inorganic molecules, generating molecular classes unobtainable via traditional synthetic approaches, as well as offering an alternative synthetic approach to molecules accessible via metathesis reactions. Ligand redistribution processes are again observed, but given the information concerning ligand lability, this reactivity pattern is applied to the synthesis of pure materials inaccessible from redox chemistry. 214 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. On Natural Genetic Engineering: Structural Dynamism in Random Boolean Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Larry

    2012-01-01

    This short paper presents an abstract, tunable model of genomic structural change within the cell lifecycle and explores its use with simulated evolution. A well-known Boolean model of genetic regulatory networks is extended to include changes in node connectivity based upon the current cell state, e.g., via transposable elements. The underlying behaviour of the resulting dynamical networks is investigated before their evolvability is explored using a version of the NK model of fitness landscapes. Structural dynamism is found to be selected for in non-stationary environments and subsequently shown capable of providing a mechanism for evolutionary innovation when such reorganizations are inherited.

  12. Helix reactor: great potential for flow chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, P.; Runstraat, A. van den; Roelands, C.P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2009-01-01

    The Helix reactor is highly suited for precise reaction control based on good hydrodynamics. The hydrodynamics are controlled by the Dean vortices, which create excellent heat transfer properties, approach plug flow and avoid turbulence. The flexibility of this reactor has been demonstrated using a

  13. A triple helix-loop-helix/basic helix-loop-helix cascade controls cell elongation downstream of multiple hormonal and environmental signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ming-Yi; Fan, Min; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2012-12-01

    Environmental and endogenous signals, including light, temperature, brassinosteroid (BR), and gibberellin (GA), regulate cell elongation largely by influencing the expression of the paclobutrazol-resistant (PRE) family helix-loop-helix (HLH) factors, which promote cell elongation by interacting antagonistically with another HLH factor, IBH1. However, the molecular mechanism by which PREs and IBH1 regulate gene expression has remained unknown. Here, we show that IBH1 interacts with and inhibits a DNA binding basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, HBI1, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of HBI1 increased hypocotyl and petiole elongation, whereas dominant inactivation of HBI1 and its homologs caused a dwarf phenotype, indicating that HBI1 is a positive regulator of cell elongation. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that HBI1 directly bound to the promoters and activated two EXPANSIN genes encoding cell wall-loosening enzymes; HBI1's DNA binding and transcriptional activities were inhibited by IBH1, but the inhibitory effects of IBH1 were abolished by PRE1. The results indicate that PREs activate the DNA binding bHLH factor HBI1 by sequestering its inhibitor IBH1. Altering each of the three factors affected plant sensitivities to BR, GA, temperature, and light. Our study demonstrates that PREs, IBH1, and HBI1 form a chain of antagonistic switches that regulates cell elongation downstream of multiple external and endogenous signals.

  14. Molecular recognition in helix-loop-helix and helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper domains. Design of repertoires and selection of high affinity ligands for natural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarapica, Roberta; Rosati, Jessica; Cesareni, Gianni; Nasi, Sergio

    2003-04-04

    Helix-loop-helix (HLH) and helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (HLHZip) are dimerization domains that mediate selective pairing among members of a large transcription factor family involved in cell fate determination. To investigate the molecular rules underlying recognition specificity and to isolate molecules interfering with cell proliferation and differentiation control, we assembled two molecular repertoires obtained by directed randomization of the binding surface in these two domains. For this strategy we selected the Heb HLH and Max Zip regions as molecular scaffolds for the randomization process and displayed the two resulting molecular repertoires on lambda phage capsids. By affinity selection, many domains were isolated that bound to the proteins Mad, Rox, MyoD, and Id2 with different levels of affinity. Although several residues along an extended surface within each domain appeared to contribute to dimerization, some key residues critically involved in molecular recognition could be identified. Furthermore, a number of charged residues appeared to act as switch points facilitating partner exchange. By successfully selecting ligands for four of four HLH or HLHZip proteins, we have shown that the repertoires assembled are rather general and possibly contain elements that bind with sufficient affinity to any natural HLH or HLHZip molecule. Thus they represent a valuable source of ligands that could be used as reagents for molecular dissection of functional regulatory pathways.

  15. Helix aspersa Müller in Holland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernhout, J.H.

    1912-01-01

    In „Nachrichtsblatt der Deutschen Malakozool. Gesellsch. 1910, p. 134” Mr. V. Franz (Helgoland) gives a note on the occurrence of Helix aspersa in Holland at Vlissingen. He suggests that the animals have been transported fortuitously to that locality. Now I will not discuss the possibility this havi

  16. A Structural Dynamics Approach to the Simulation of Spacecraft Control/Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A relatively simple approach to the analysis of linear spacecraft control/structure interaction problems is presented. The approach uses a commercially available structural system dynamic analysis package for both controller and plant dynamics, thus obviating the need to transfer data between separate programs. The unilateral coupling between components in the control system block diagram is simulated using sparse matrix stiffness and damping elements available in the structural dynamic code. The approach is illustrated with a series of simple tutorial examples of a rigid spacecraft core with flexible appendages.

  17. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility.

  18. Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions studied by multicanonical algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Okamoto, Y; Okamoto, Yuko; Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions in amino-acid homo-oligomers are studied by the recently proposed multicanonical algorithms. Homo-oligomers of length 10 are considered for three characteristic amino acids, alanine (helix former), valine (helix indifferent), and glycine (helix breaker). For alanine other lengths (15 and 20) are also considered in order to examine the length dependence. From one multicanonical production run with completely random initial conformations, we have obtained the lowest-energy conformations and various thermodynamic quantities (average helicity, Zimm-Bragg $s$ and $\\sigma$ parameters, free energy differences between helix and coil states, etc.) as functions of temperature. The results confirm the fact that alanine is helix-forming, valine is helix-indifferent, and glycine is helix-breaking.

  19. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient computational method for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures is proposed. The application of mixed models simplifies the analytical development and improves the accuracy of the response predictions, and operator splitting allows the reduction of the analysis model of the quasi-symmetric structure to that of the corresponding symmetric structure. The preconditoned conjugate gradient provides a stable and effective technique for generating the unsymmetric response of the structure as the sum of a symmetrized response plus correction modes. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated with the example of a laminated anisotropic shallow shell of quadrilateral planform subjected to uniform normal loading.

  20. Ion-Mediated Nucleic Acid Helix-Helix Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Salt ions are essential for the folding of nucleic acids. We use the tightly bound ion (TBI) model, which can account for the correlations and fluctuations for the ions bound to the nucleic acids, to investigate the electrostatic free-energy landscape for two parallel nucleic acid helices in the solution of added salt. The theory is based on realistic atomic structures of the helices. In monovalent salt, the helices are predicted to repel each other. For divalent salt, while the mean-field Po...