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Sample records for helium-cooled pebble bed

  1. Methodology for accident analyses of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled pebble bed blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotov, Dobromir, E-mail: dobromir.panayotov@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona E-08019 (Spain); Grief, Andrew [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Merrill, Brad J.; Humrickhouse, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael; Murgatroyd, Julian T.; Owen, Simon [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Poitevin, Yves [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Josep Pla, 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona E-08019 (Spain); Peers, Karen; Lyons, Alex; Heaton, Adam; Scott, Richard [Amec Foster Wheeler, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford WA16 8QZ, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Test Blanket Systems (TBS) DEMO breeding blankets (BB) safety demonstration. • Comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena. • Development of accident analysis specifications (AAS) via the use of phenomena identification and ranking tables (PIRT). • PIRT application to identify required physical models for BB accidents analysis, code assessment and selection. • Development of MELCOR and RELAP5 codes TBS models. • Qualification of the models via comparison with finite element calculations, code-tocode comparisons, and sensitivity studies. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. The methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCPB TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.

  2. Normal and Accidental Scenarios Analyses with MELCOR 1.8.2 and MELCOR 2.1 for the DEMO Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gonfiotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As for Light Water Reactors (LWRs, one of the most challenging accidents for the future DEMOnstration power plant is the Loss of Coolant Accident, which can trigger the pressurization of the confinement structures and components. Hence, careful analyses have to be executed to demonstrate that the confinement barriers are able to withstand the pressure peak within design limits and the residual cooling capabilities of the Primary Heat Transfer System are sufficient to remove the decay heat. To do so, severe accident codes, as MELCOR, can be employed. In detail, the MELCOR code has been developed to cope also with fusion reactors, but unfortunately, these fusion versions are based on the old 1.8.x source code. On the contrary, for LWRs, the newest 2.1.x versions are continuously updated. Thanks to the new features introduced in these latest 2.1.x versions, the main phenomena occurring in the helium-cooled blanket concepts of DEMO can be simulated in a basic manner. For this purpose, several analyses during normal and accidental DEMO conditions have been executed. The aim of these analyses is to compare the results obtained with MELCOR 1.8.2 and MELCOR 2.1 in order to highlight the differences among the results of the main thermal-hydraulic parameters.

  3. Modularity of the MIT Pebble Bed Reactor for use by the commercial power industry

    OpenAIRE

    Hanlon-Hyssong, Jaime E.

    2008-01-01

    CIVINS (Civilian Institutions) Thesis document Approved for public release, distribution unlimited The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor is a small high temperature helium cooled reactor that is being considered for both electric power and hydrogen production. Pebble bed reactors are being developed in South Africa, China and the US. To make smaller 120 Mwe reactors economically competitive with larger 1500 Mwe traditional light water reactors changes in the way these plants are built are ...

  4. Measurements of the purge helium pressure drop across pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Sena, Ali, E-mail: ali.abou-sena@kit.edu; Arbeiter, Frederik; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Schlindwein, Georg

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The objective is to measure the purge helium pressure drop across various HCPB-relevant pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles. • The purge helium pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter from one run to another. • At the same superficial velocity, the pressure drop is directly proportional to the helium inlet pressure. • The Ergun's equation can successfully model the purge helium pressure drop for the HCPB-relevant pebble beds. • The measured values of the purge helium pressure drop for the lithium orthosilicate pebble bed will support the design of the purge gas system for the HCPB breeder units. - Abstract: The lithium orthosilicate pebble beds of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket are purged by helium to transport the produced tritium to the tritium extraction system. The pressure drop of the purge helium has a direct impact on the required pumping power and is a limiting factor for the purge mass flow. Therefore, the objective of this study is to measure the helium pressure drop across various HCPB-relevant pebble beds packed with lithium orthosilicate and glass pebbles. The pebble bed was formed by packing the pebbles into a stainless steel cylinder (ID = 30 mm and L = 120 mm); then it was integrated into a gas loop that has four variable-speed side-channel compressors to regulate the helium mass flow. The static pressure was measured at two locations (100 mm apart) along the pebble bed and at inlet and outlet of the pebble bed. The results demonstrated that: (i) the pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter, (ii) for the same superficial velocity, the pressure drop is directly proportional to the inlet pressure, and (iii) predictions of Ergun's equation agree well with the experimental results. The measured pressure drop for the lithium orthosilicate pebble bed will support the design of the purge gas system for the HCPB.

  5. Pebble-bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-11-01

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This report presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to

  6. Discrete element modelling of pebble packing in pebble bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikkanen, Heikki, E-mail: heikki.suikkanen@lut.fi; Ritvanen, Jouni, E-mail: jouni.ritvanen@lut.fi; Jalali, Payman, E-mail: payman.jalali@lut.fi; Kyrki-Rajamäki, Riitta, E-mail: riitta.kyrki-rajamaki@lut.fi

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A discrete element method code is developed for pebble bed reactor analyses. • Methods are established to extract packing information at various spatial scales. • Packing simulations inside annular core geometry are done varying input parameters. • The restitution coefficient has the strongest effect on the resulting packing density. • Detailed analyses reveal local densification especially near the walls. - Abstract: It is important to understand the packing characteristics and behaviour of the randomly packed pebble bed to further analyse the reactor physical and thermal-hydraulic behaviour and to design a safe and economically feasible pebble bed reactor. The objective of this work was to establish methods to model and analyse the pebble packing in detail to provide useful tools and data for further analyses. Discrete element method (DEM) is a well acknowledged method for analysing granular materials, such as the fuel pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. In this work, a DEM computer code was written specifically for pebble bed analyses. Analysis methods were established to extract data at various spatial scales from the pebble beds resulting from the DEM simulations. A comparison with available experimental data was performed to validate the DEM implementation. To test the code implementation in full-scale reactor calculations, DEM packing simulations were done in annular geometry with 450,000 pebbles. Effects of the initial packing configuration, friction and restitution coefficients and pebble size distribution to the resulting pebble bed were investigated. The packing simulations revealed that from the investigated parameters the restitution coefficient had the largest effect on the resulting average packing density while other parameters had smaller effects. Detailed local packing density analysis of pebble beds with different average densities revealed local variations especially strong in the regions near the walls. The implemented DEM

  7. PEBBLES: A COMPUTER CODE FOR MODELING PACKING, FLOW AND RECIRCULATIONOF PEBBLES IN A PEBBLE BED REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2006-10-01

    A comprehensive, high fidelity model for pebble flow has been developed and embodied in the PEBBLES computer code. In this paper, a description of the physical artifacts included in the model is presented and some results from using the computer code for predicting the features of pebble flow and packing in a realistic pebble bed reactor design are shown. The sensitivity of models to various physical parameters is also discussed.

  8. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  9. Pebble bed packing in prismatic containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, Joerg, E-mail: reimann-langhans@web.de [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Abou-Sena, Ali [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Nippen, Rainer [KBHF GmbH, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Tafforeau, Paul [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The essential part of ceramic breeder blankets is pebble beds. • The packing factor for blanket relevant cavities must be known. • Tomography experiments revealed details of packing arrangements. • Packing experiments confirm that reference packing factors will be achieved. -- Abstract: New analyses of previous tomography investigations show in detail void fraction fluctuations close to walls generated by regular pebble arrangements. Local packing factors within the pebble bed were determined for characteristic zones. These results are very helpful for the interpretation of the packing experiments performed with spherical pebbles in different kinds of Plexiglas containers dominated by flat walls. The packing factors for single-size pebbles in the containers with a piston on top are fairly independent of bed height unless the height to diameter ratio becomes less than 10. For the closed rectangular containers, the development of structured packings is rendered more difficult. However, for blanket relevant bed heights, both for orthosilicate and beryllium pebbles, the packing factors obtained which agree well with previously obtained reference values.

  10. Simulations of flow behavior of fuel particles in a conceptual helium-cooled spout fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Shuyan; Li Xiang [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lu Huilin [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: huilin@hit.edu.cn; Bouillard, Jacques [INERIS, Parc Technologique Alata, BP2, Verneuil-en-Halatte 60550 (France); Sun Qiaoqun; Wang Shuai [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2009-01-15

    Hydrodynamics of helium and fuel particles are simulated in a conceptual helium-cooled spout fluidized bed nuclear reactor. The conceptual reactor consists of an axis-symmetric column with a sharp cone inside which the fuel particles are fluidized by helium. An isothermal gas-solid two-fluid flow model is presented. The kinetic-frictional constitutive model for dense assemblies of solids is incorporated. The kinetic stress is modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow, while the friction stress is from the normal frictional stress model proposed by (Johnson, P.C., Nott, P., Jackson, R., 1990. Frictional-collisional equations of motion for particulate flows and their application to chutes. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 210, 501-535). Detailed spatial/temporal concentration and velocity profiles have been obtained in a conceptual spout fluidized bed nuclear reactor. The influence of inlet spouting jet velocity and conical angles on flow behavior of fluid and fuel particles is analyzed. The numerical simulations show that the unique mixing ability of the spout fluidized bed nuclear reactor gives rise, as expected, to uniform particle distributions. This uniformity enhances the heat transfer and therefore the power produced by the reactor.

  11. A scaled experimental study of control blade insertion dynamics in Pebble-Bed Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buster, Grant C., E-mail: grant.buster@gmail.com; Laufer, Michael R.; Peterson, Per F.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • A granular dynamics scaling methodology is discussed. • Control blade insertion in a representative pebble-bed core is experimentally studied. • Control blade insertion forces and pebble displacements are experimentally measured. • X-ray tomography techniques are used to observe pebble displacement distributions. - Abstract: Direct control element insertion into a pebble-bed reactor core is proposed as a viable control system in molten-salt-cooled pebble-bed reactors. Unlike helium-cooled pebble-bed reactors, this reactor type uses spherical fuel elements with near-neutral buoyancy in the molten-salt coolant, thus reducing contact forces on the fuel elements. This study uses the X-ray Pebble Bed Recirculation Experiment facility to measure the force required to insert a control element directly into a scaled pebble-bed. The required control element insertion force, and therefore the contact force on fuel elements, is measured to be well below recommended limits. Additionally, X-ray tomography is used to observe how the direct insertion of a control element physically displaces spherical fuel elements. The tomography results further support the viability of direct control element insertion into molten-salt-cooled pebble-bed reactor cores.

  12. Multiscale Analysis of Pebble Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Gougar; Woo Yoon; Abderrafi Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    – The PEBBED code was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for design and analysis of pebble-bed high temperature reactors. The diffusion-depletion-pebble-mixing algorithm of the original PEBBED code was enhanced through coupling with the THERMIX-KONVEK code for thermal fluid analysis and by the COMBINE code for online cross section generation. The COMBINE code solves the B-1 or B-3 approximations to the transport equation for neutron slowing down and resonance interactions in a homogeneous medium with simple corrections for shadowing and thermal self-shielding. The number densities of materials within specified regions of the core are averaged and transferred to COMBINE from PEBBED for updating during the burnup iteration. The simple treatment of self-shielding in previous versions of COMBINE led to inaccurate results for cross sections and unsatisfactory core performance calculations. A new version of COMBINE has been developed that treats all levels of heterogeneity using the 1D transport code ANISN. In a 3-stage calculation, slowing down is performed in 167 groups for each homogeneous subregion (kernel, particle layers, graphite shell, control rod absorber annulus, etc.) Particles in a local average pebble are homogenized using ANISN then passed to the next (pebble) stage. A 1D transport solution is again performed over the pebble geometry and the homogenized pebble cross sections are passed to a 1-d radial model of a wedge of the pebble bed core. This wedge may also include homogeneous reflector regions and a control rod region composed of annuli of different absorbing regions. Radial leakage effects are therefore captured with discrete ordinates transport while axial and azimuthal effects are captured with a transverse buckling term. In this paper, results of various PBR models will be compared with comparable models from literature. Performance of the code will be assessed.

  13. Studi Optimasi Moderasi Neutron Dalam Teras Htr Pebble Bed

    OpenAIRE

    Zuhair, Zuhair; Suwoto, Suwoto; Irianto, Ign. Djoko

    2010-01-01

    STUDY ON OPTIMIZING NEUTRON MODERATION IN HTR PEBBLE-BED CORE. In HTR pebble bed, the neutron moderation is strongly influenced by the ratio of the fuel pebbles (F) and the moderator pebbles (M) contained in the reactor core. Optimum moderation can be achieved by adjusting the ratio F/M, but the combination of the pebble with the ratio of F/M more than 1:1 in pebble bed reactor core raises a problem in the calculation. This paper discusses a method to solve this problem. Optimizing neutron mo...

  14. Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in lifting pipe of pebble-bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke; Su, Jiageng [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Zhou, Hongbo [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Chinergy Co., LTD., Beijing 100193 (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 10084 (China); Yu, Suyun, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 10084 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative determination of abrasion rate of graphite pebbles in different lifting velocities. • Abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in helium, air and nitrogen. • In helium, intensive collisions caused by oscillatory motion result in more graphite dust production. - Abstract: A pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (pebble-bed HTR) uses a helium coolant, graphite core structure, and spherical fuel elements. The pebble-bed design enables on-line refueling, avoiding refueling shutdowns. During circulation process, the pebbles are lifted pneumatically via a stainless steel lifting pipe and reinserted into the reactor. Inevitably, the movement of the fuel elements as they recirculate in the reactor produces graphite dust. Mechanical wear is the primary source of graphite dust production. Specifically, the sources are mechanisms of pebble–pebble contact, pebble–wall (structural graphite) contact, and fuel handling (pebble–metal abrasion). The key contribution to graphite dust production is from the fuel handling system, particularly from the lifting pipe. During pneumatic lift, graphite pebbles undergo multiple collisions with the stainless steel lifting pipe, thereby causing abrasion of the graphite pebbles and producing graphite dust. The present work explored the abrasion behavior of graphite pebble in the lifting pipe by measuring the abrasion rate at different lifting velocities. The abrasion rate of the graphite pebble in helium was found much higher than those in air and nitrogen. This gas environment effect could be explained by either tribology behavior or dynamic behavior. Friction testing excluded the possibility of tribology reason. The dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble was captured by analysis of the audio waveforms during pneumatic lift. The analysis results revealed unique dynamic behavior of the graphite pebble in helium. Oscillation and consequently intensive collisions occur during pneumatic lift, causing

  15. Comparative studies for two different orientations of pebble bed in an HCCB blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paritosh, CHAUDHURI; Chandan, DANANI; E, RAJENDRAKUMAR

    2017-12-01

    The Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) program in ITER is one of the major steps in its fusion reactor program towards DEMO and the future fusion power reactor vision. Research and development (R&D) is focused on two types of breeding blanket concepts: lead–lithium ceramic breeder (LLCB) and helium-cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) blanket systems for the DEMO reactor. As part of the ITER-TBM program, the LLCB concept will be tested in one-half of ITER port no. 2, whose materials and technologies will be tested during ITER operation. The HCCB concept is a variant of the solid breeder blanket, which is presently part of our domestic R&D program for DEMO relevant technology development. In the HCCB concept Li2TiO3 and beryllium are used as the tritium breeder and neutron multiplier, respectively, in the form of a packed bed having edge-on configuration with reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel as the structural material. In this paper two design schemes, mainly two different orientations of pebble beds, are discussed. In the current concept (case-1), the ceramic breeder beds are kept horizontal in the toroidal–radial direction. Due to gravity, the pebbles may settle down at the bottom and create a finite gap between the pebbles and the top cooling plate, which will affect the heat transfer between them. In the alternate design concept (case-2), the pebble bed is vertically (poloidal–radial) orientated where the side plates act as cooling plates instead of top and bottom plates. These two design variants are analyzed analytically and 2D thermal-hydraulic simulation studies are carried out with ANSYS, using the heat loads obtained from neutronic calculations. Based on the analysis the performance is compared and details of the thermal and radiative heat transfer studies are also discussed in this paper.

  16. A Pebble Bed Reactor cross section methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Nathanael H. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering/Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States); Ougouag, Abderrafi M. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3885 (United States); Rahnema, Farzad [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering/Medical Physics Programs, George W. Woodruff School, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States)], E-mail: farzad@gatech.edu; Gougar, Hans [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3885 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    A method is presented for the evaluation of microscopic cross sections for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) neutron diffusion computational models during convergence to an equilibrium (asymptotic) fuel cycle. This method considers the isotopics within a core spectral zone and the leakages from such a zone as they arise during reactor operation. The randomness of the spatial distribution of fuel grains within the fuel pebbles and that of the fuel and moderator pebbles within the core, the double heterogeneity of the fuel, and the indeterminate burnup of the spectral zones all pose a unique challenge for the computation of the local microscopic cross sections. As prior knowledge of the equilibrium composition and leakage is not available, it is necessary to repeatedly re-compute the group constants with updated zone information. A method is presented to account for local spectral zone composition and leakage effects without resorting to frequent spectrum code calls. Fine group data are pre-computed for a range of isotopic states. Microscopic cross sections and zone nuclide number densities are used to construct fine group macroscopic cross sections, which, together with fission spectra, flux modulation factors, and zone buckling, are used in the solution of the slowing down balance to generate a new or updated spectrum. The microscopic cross-sections are then re-collapsed with the new spectrum for the local spectral zone. This technique is named the Spectral History Correction (SHC) method. It is found that this method accurately recalculates local broad group microscopic cross sections. Significant improvement in the core eigenvalue, flux, and power peaking factor is observed when the local cross sections are corrected for the effects of the spectral zone composition and leakage in two-dimensional PBR test problems.

  17. Thermo-mechanical screening tests to qualify beryllium pebble beds with non-spherical pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, Joerg, E-mail: joerg.reimann@partner.kit.edu [IKET, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fretz, Benjamin [KBHF GmbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pupeschi, Simone [IAM, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • In present ceramic breeder blankets, pebble-shaped beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier. • Spherical pebbles are considered as the candidate material, however, non-spherical particles are of economic interest. • Thermo-mechanical pebble bed data do merely exist for non-spherical beryllium grades. • Uniaxial compression tests (UCTs), combined with the Hot Wire Technique (HWT) were used to measure the stress–strain relations and the thermal conductivity. • A small experimental set-up had to be used and a detailed 3D modelling was of prime importance. • Compared to spherical pebble beds, non-spherical pebble beds are generally softer and mainly the thermal conductivity is lower. - Abstract: In present ceramic breeder blankets, pebble-shaped beryllium is used as a neutron multiplier. Fairly spherical pebbles are considered as a candidate material, however, non-spherical particles are of economic interest because production costs are much lower. Yet, thermo-mechanical pebble bed data do merely exist for these beryllium grades, and the blanket relevant potential of these grades cannot be judged. Screening experiments were performed with three different grades of non-spherical beryllium pebbles, produced by different companies, accompanied by experiments with the reference beryllium pebble beds. Uniaxial compression tests (UCTs), combined with the Hot Wire Technique (HWT), were performed to measure both the stress–strain relation and the thermal conductivity, k, at different stress levels. Because of the limited amounts of the non-spherical materials, the experimental set-ups were small and a detailed 3D modelling was of prime importance in order to prove that the used design was appropriate. Compared to the pebble beds consisting of spherical pebbles, non-spherical pebble beds are generally softer (smaller stress for a given strain), and, mainly as a consequence of this, for a given strain value, the thermal conductivity is lower. This

  18. Experimental and computational investigation of flow of pebbles in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khane, Vaibhav B.

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a 4th generation nuclear reactor which is conceptually similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBR core, nuclear fuel in the form of pebbles moves slowly under the influence of gravity. Due to the dynamic nature of the core, a thorough understanding about slow and dense granular flow of pebbles is required from both a reactor safety and performance evaluation point of view. In this dissertation, a new integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a PBR has been performed. Continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking flow of pebbles in a PBR, is designed and developed. Experimental investigation of the flow of pebbles in a mimicked test reactor was carried out for the first time using non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) and residence time distribution (RTD) techniques to measure the pebble trajectory, velocity, overall/zonal residence times, flow patterns etc. The tracer trajectory length and overall/zonal residence time is found to increase with change in pebble's initial seeding position from the center towards the wall of the test reactor. Overall and zonal average velocities of pebbles are found to decrease from the center towards the wall. Discrete element method (DEM) based simulations of test reactor geometry were also carried out using commercial code EDEM(TM) and simulation results were validated using the obtained benchmark experimental data. In addition, EDEM(TM) based parametric sensitivity study of interaction properties was carried out which suggests that static friction characteristics play an important role from a packed/pebble beds structural characterization point of view. To make the RPT technique viable for practical applications and to enhance its accuracy, a novel and dynamic technique for RPT calibration was designed and developed. Preliminary feasibility results suggest that it can be implemented as a non

  19. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and

  20. Thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor cores. [PEBBLE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    The pebble bed reactor's cylindrical core volume contains a random bed of small, spherical fuel-moderator elements. These graphite spheres, containing a central region of dispersed coated-particle fissile and fertile material, are cooled by high pressure helium flowing through the connected interstitial voids. A mathematical model and numerical solution technique have been developed which allow calculation of macroscopic values of thermal-hydraulic variables in an axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor core. The computer program PEBBLE is based on a mathematical model which treats the bed macroscopically as a generating, conducting porous medium. The steady-state model uses a nonlinear Forchheimer-type relation between the coolant pressure gradient and mass flux, with newly derived coefficients for the linear and quadratic resistance terms. The remaining equations in the model make use of mass continuity, and thermal energy balances for the solid and fluid phases.

  1. Development and applications of methodologies for the neutronic design of the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratoni, Massimiliano

    This study investigated the neutronic characteristics of the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), a novel nuclear reactor concept that combines liquid salt (7LiF-BeF2---flibe) cooling and TRISO coated-particle fuel technology. The use of flibe enables operation at high power density and atmospheric pressure and improves passive decay-heat removal capabilities, but flibe, unlike conventional helium coolant, is not transparent to neutrons. The flibe occupies 40% of the PB-AHTR core volume and absorbs ˜8% of the neutrons, but also acts as an effective neutron moderator. Two novel methodologies were developed for calculating the time dependent and equilibrium core composition: (1) a simplified single pebble model that is relatively fast; (2) a full 3D core model that is accurate and flexible but computationally intensive. A parametric analysis was performed spanning a wide range of fuel kernel diameters and graphite-to-heavy metal atom ratios to determine the attainable burnup and reactivity coefficients. Using 10% enriched uranium ˜130 GWd/tHM burnup was found to be attainable, when the graphite-to-heavy metal atom ratio (C/HM) is in the range of 300 to 400. At this or smaller C/HM ratio all reactivity coefficients examined---coolant temperature, coolant small and full void, fuel temperature, and moderator temperature, were found to be negative. The PB-AHTR performance was compared to that of alternative options for HTRs, including the helium-cooled pebble-bed reactor and prismatic fuel reactors, both gas-cooled and flibe-cooled. The attainable burnup of all designs was found to be similar. The PB-AHTR generates at least 30% more energy per pebble than the He-cooled pebble-bed reactor. Compared to LWRs the PB-AHTR requires 30% less natural uranium and 20% less separative work per unit of electricity generated. For deep burn TRU fuel made from recycled LWR spent fuel, it was found that in a single pass through the core ˜66% of the TRU can be

  2. Initial prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rostamian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the computational simulation of contact zones between pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. In this type of reactor, the potential for graphite dust generation from frictional contact of graphite pebbles and the subsequent transport of dust and fission products can cause significant safety issues at very high temperatures around 900 °C in HTRs. The present simulation is an initial attempt to quantify the amount of nuclear grade graphite dust produced within a very high temperature reactor.

  3. Pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR). Programme status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, D.R. [ESKOM, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    1998-09-01

    ESKOM is the South African state electricity utility, with an installed capacity of 38,397 MW at the end of 1996 (98% of all national generating assets). It is largely coal based with a small proportion (5%) nuclear. The current nuclear power plant (Koeberg) has two PWR units of 965 MW (gross). As part of ESKOM`s long term planning process investigations are made into new power generation options. The option of further LWR was investigated extensively in the late 1980s and rejected due to the cost penalty compared to ESKOM`s coal fired options. In 1993 ESKOM reconsidered the nuclear option (specifically for load centres away from coal fields) and again discounted LWRs. Further investigation was done and two key nuclear issues where identified. These are cost and public acceptance. It was considered that both of these were driven by the safety issues related to potential accidents. It was seen that the only way to obtain competitive costs with nuclear power was to remove the potential (however remote) for accidents with significant offsite consequences. The only reactor type that was seen to have this was the small HTR, using coated particle fuel. This design was then investigated in much greater detail and the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) concept design was undertaken. The reason for the level of detail in the concept design was to ensure that the safety arguments were valid and that the costing could be effectively done. The key requirements for such a programme are seen to be: Adequate technology level in the local industry; Limited (compared to USA/EU/Japan) anti-nuclear movement; Large enough utility to provide backing for the project; Non-prescriptive Licensing regime; and Cost structure for power generation that excludes current nuclear technology. All these are seen to be met in the South African situation with ESKOM being well placed, both in terms of its size and legal position as well as the high regard it is held in

  4. Progress in the development of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lulewicz, J.D.; Roux, N. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1998-03-01

    Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles are being developed as ceramic breeder for the European Helium-cooled pebble bed DEMO blanket concept. Status is given of the fabrication work, and of the properties characteristics determination. (author)

  5. performance evaluation of a pebble bed solar crop dryer abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    build up on the open air sun dried products. This indicates that drying under solar crop dryer offers high quality products and is time saving than the open-air sun drying. Keywords: pebble bed, solar, storage, crop dryer. 1.0 Introduction. Food drying is a major processing activity, which involves dehydration of moisture.

  6. performance evaluation of a pebble bed solar crop dryer abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    The design, development and test performance evaluation of an integrated of passive solar energy crop drying system was undertaken. The solar crop dryer consists of an imbedded pebble bed solar heat storage unit/solar collector and crop drying chamber measuring 67 cm x 110 cm x 21cm and 50 cm x 90 cm ...

  7. Localization of the hot spots in a pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leisheng; Lee, Wooram; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR) is a candidate reactor type for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is one of the Generation-IV reactor types. The HTGR design concept exhibits excellent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core which gives a large thermal inertia in an accident such as loss of coolant. The conclusions are made and may contribute to a better design of a PBR core and a closer inspection of the local hot spots to avoid destruction of pebbles from happening. Thermal field of a PBR core is investigated in this study. Specifically, experiments on measuring the pebbles' surface temperature are performed. It is found that the upper pebble has an overall higher temperature profile than the other pebbles and the stagnation zone under does not increase its surface's temperature. In addition, the temperature profile of the side pebble shows a concave form and it keeps decreasing from the contact point to the vertex in the lower pebble. Lastly, the maximum temperature difference among these points is 5.83 deg. C. These findings above are validated by CFX simulations under two different turbulence models (k-e, SST) and two contact areas (diameter of 6mm and 3.5mm). By contrasting the temperature variation trends of all simulation cases, it is concluded that SST turbulence model with 20% intensity shows a better agreement with the experiment result, nevertheless, slightly deviation is also found in terms of total temperature difference and the peak appears in position 17-19 in experiments.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of aerosol deposition in pebble beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhosi, Margaret Msongi

    2007-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor is a high temperature gas cooled reactor which uses helium gas as a coolant. The reactor uses spherical graphite pebbles as fuel. The fuel design is inherently resistant to the release of the radioactive material up to high temperatures; therefore, the plant can withstand a broad spectrum of accidents with limited release of radionuclides to the environment. Despite safety features of the concepts, these reactors still contain large inventories of radioactive materials. The transport of most of the radioactive materials in an accident occurs in the form of aerosol particles. In this dissertation, the limits of applicability of existing computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT to the prediction of aerosol transport have been explored. The code was run using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models to determine the effects of different turbulence models on the prediction of aerosol particle deposition. Analyses were performed for up to three unit cells in the orthorhombic configuration. For low flow conditions representing natural circulation driven flow, the laminar flow model was used and the results were compared with existing experimental data for packed beds. The results compares well with experimental data in the low flow regime. For conditions corresponding to normal operating of the reactor, analyses were performed using the standard k-ɛ turbulence model. From the inertial deposition results, a correlation that can be used to estimate the deposition of aerosol particles within pebble beds given inlet flow conditions has been developed. These results were converted into a dimensionless form as a function of a modified Stokes number. Based on results obtained in the laminar regime and for individual pebbles, the correlation developed for the inertial impaction component of deposition is believed to be credible. The form of the correlation developed also allows these results to be applied to pebble beds of different

  9. Development of Chinese HTR-PM pebble bed equivalent conductivity test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Cheng; Yang, Xingtuan; Jiang, Shengyao [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology

    2016-01-15

    The first two 250-MWt high-temperature reactor pebble bed modules (HTR-PM) have been installing at the Shidaowan plant in Shandong Province, China. The values of the effective thermal conductivity of the pebble bed core are essential parameters for the design. For their determination, Tsinghua University in China has proposed a full-scale heat transfer experiment to conduct comprehensive thermal transfer tests in packed pebble bed and to determine the effective thermal conductivity.

  10. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle optimization using particle swarm algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavron, Barak, E-mail: btavron@bgu.ac.il [Planning, Development and Technology Division, Israel Electric Corporation Ltd., P.O. Box 10, Haifa 31000 (Israel); Shwageraus, Eugene, E-mail: es607@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Particle swarm method has been developed for fuel cycle optimization of PBR reactor. • Results show uranium utilization low sensitivity to fuel and core design parameters. • Multi-zone fuel loading pattern leads to a small improvement in uranium utilization. • Thorium mixes with highly enriched uranium yields the best uranium utilization. - Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) features, such as robust thermo-mechanical fuel design and on-line continuous fueling, facilitate wide range of fuel cycle alternatives. A range off fuel pebble types, containing different amounts of fertile or fissile fuel material, may be loaded into the reactor core. Several fuel loading zones may be used since radial mixing of the pebbles was shown to be limited. This radial separation suggests the possibility to implement the “seed-blanket” concept for the utilization of fertile fuels such as thorium, and for enhancing reactor fuel utilization. In this study, the particle-swarm meta-heuristic evolutionary optimization method (PSO) has been used to find optimal fuel cycle design which yields the highest natural uranium utilization. The PSO method is known for solving efficiently complex problems with non-linear objective function, continuous or discrete parameters and complex constrains. The VSOP system of codes has been used for PBR fuel utilization calculations and MATLAB script has been used to implement the PSO algorithm. Optimization of PBR natural uranium utilization (NUU) has been carried out for 3000 MWth High Temperature Reactor design (HTR) operating on the Once Trough Then Out (OTTO) fuel management scheme, and for 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) operating on the multi-pass (MEDUL) fuel management scheme. Results showed only a modest improvement in the NUU (<5%) over reference designs. Investigation of thorium fuel cases showed that the use of HEU in combination with thorium results in the most favorable reactor performance in terms of

  11. Granular flow in pebble-bed nuclear reactors: Scaling, dust generation, and stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, Chris H., E-mail: chr@seas.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Mathematics, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dehbi, Abdel, E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lind, Terttaliisa, E-mail: terttaliisa.lind@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Güntay, Salih, E-mail: salih.guentay@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The scaling properties of granular flow in pebble-bed reactors have been analyzed. • Simulations in a full-size reactor are compared to those scaled down by 3:1 and 6:1. • For some features, the scaled-down behavior is complex due to pebble packing effects. • Pebble stresses and dust generation due to pebble wear are analyzed in detail. • Approximate scaling laws for pebble stress and wear are developed. - Abstract: In experimental prototypes of pebble-bed reactors, significant quantities of graphite dust have been observed due to rubbing between pebbles as they flow through the core. At the typical operating conditions in these reactors, which feature high temperatures, pressures, and a helium atmosphere, limited data is available on the frictional properties of the pebble surfaces, and as a result, a conceptual design of a scaled-down version of a pebble-bed reactor has been proposed to investigate this issue in detail. However, this raises general questions about how the granular flow in a scaled facility will emulate that in a full-size reactor. To address this, simulations of granular flow in pebble-bed reactors using the discrete-element method (DEM) have been carried out in a full-size geometry (using 440,000 pebbles) and compared to those in geometries scaled down by factors of 3:1 and 6:1. Differences in velocity profiles, pebble ordering, pebble wear, and stresses are examined, and the effect of friction is discussed. The results show complex behavior due to discrete pebble packing effects, although several simple scaling rules can be derived.

  12. Influence of gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of ceramic breeder pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Weijing [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Pupeschi, Simone [Institute for Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Hanaor, Dorian [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science and Technologies, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Gan, Yixiang, E-mail: yixiang.gan@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • This study explicitly demonstrates the influence of the gas pressure on the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds. • The gas pressure influence is shown to correlated to the pebble size. • The effective thermal conductivity is linked to thermal-mechanical properties of pebbles and packing structure. - Abstract: Lithium ceramics have been considered as tritium breeder materials in many proposed designs of fusion breeding blankets. Heat generated in breeder pebble beds due to nuclear breeding reaction must be removed by means of actively cooled plates while generated tritiums is recovered by purge gas slowly flowing through beds. Therefore, the effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds that is one of the governing parameters determining heat transport phenomenon needs to be addressed with respect to mechanical status of beds and purge gas pressure. In this study, a numerical framework combining finite element simulation and a semi-empirical correlation of gas gap conduction is proposed to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The purge gas pressure is found to vary the effective thermal conductivity, in particular with the presence of various sized gaps in pebble beds. Random packing of pebble beds is taken into account by an approximated correlation considering the packing factor and coordination number of pebble beds. The model prediction is compared with experimental observation from different sources showing a quantitative agreement with the measurement.

  13. Pebble Bed Reactor: core physics and fuel cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Worley, B.A.

    1979-10-01

    The Pebble Bed Reactor is a gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor that is continuously fueled with small spherical fuel elements. The projected performance was studied over a broad range of reactor applicability. Calculations were done for a burner on a throwaway cycle, a converter with recycle, a prebreeder and breeder. The thorium fuel cycle was considered using low, medium (denatured), and highly enriched uranium. The base calculations were carried out for electrical energy generation in a 1200 MW/sub e/ plant. A steady-state, continuous-fueling model was developed and one- and two-dimensional calculations were used to characterize performance. Treating a single point in time effects considerable savings in computer time as opposed to following a long reactor history, permitting evaluation of reactor performance over a broad range of design parameters and operating modes.

  14. Application of a model to investigate the effective thermal conductivity of randomly packed fusion pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    In our precious study, a prediction model, which calculates the effective thermal conductivity k{sub eff} of mono-sized pebble beds, has been developed and validated. Based on this model, here the effects of these influencing factors such as pebble size, thermal radiation, contact area, filling gas, gas flow, gas pressure, etc. on the k{sub eff} of randomly packed fusion pebble beds are studied and analyzed. The pebble beds investigated include Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}O, Be and BeO pebble beds. In the current study, many important and meaningful conclusions are derived and some of them are similar to the existing research results. Particularly, some critters that under which conditions the effect of some influencing factors can be neglected or should be considered are also presented.

  15. Pore Scale Thermal Hydraulics Investigations of Molten Salt Cooled Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactor with BCC and FCC Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Song

    2014-01-01

    CFD results and empirical correlations’ predictions of pressure drop and local Nusselt numbers. Local pebble surface temperature distributions in several default conditions are investigated. Thermal removal capacities of molten salt are confirmed in the case of nominal condition; the pebble surface temperature under the condition of local power distortion shows the tolerance of pebble in extreme neutron dose exposure. The numerical experiments of local pebble insufficient cooling indicate that in the molten salt cooled pebble bed reactor, the pebble surface temperature is not very sensitive to loss of partial coolant. The methods and results of this paper would be useful for optimum designs and safety analysis of molten salt cooled pebble bed reactors.

  16. Positron emission tomography in pebble beds. Part 1: Liquid particle deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, T., E-mail: t.barth@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Ludwig, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Kulenkampff, J.; Gründig, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Franke, K. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmacy (IRP), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lippmann-Pipke, J. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE), Permoserstraße 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Hampel, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics (IFD), Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, AREVA Endowed Chair of Imaging Techniques in Energy and Process Engineering, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Particle deposition in a pebble bed was recorded by positron emission tomography. • The particles were radioactively labelled and their spatial distribution was recorded. • Particle deposition was mainly driven by particle inertia and turbulent dispersion. • Particle deposits form hot spots on the upstream face of the single pebbles. - Abstract: Accidental scenarios such as the depressurisation of the primary circuit of high temperature gas cooled pebble bed reactors may lead to the release of fission products via the discharge of radioactive graphite dust. For a detailed source term assessment in such accident scenarios knowledge of the flow mechanics of dust transport in complex coolant circuit components, like pebble beds, recuperator structures and pipe systems is necessary. In this article an experimental study of aerosol deposition in a pebble bed is described. We investigated the deposition of radiolabelled liquid aerosol particles in a scaled pebble bed in an air-driven small-scale aerosol flow test facility under isothermal ambient conditions. The aerosol particles were generated by means of a condensational aerosol generator with potassium-fluoride (KF) condensation nuclei. Particle concentration measurements upstream and downstream of the pebble bed were performed by isokinetic sampling and particle counting. The results agree with typical deposition curves for turbulent and inertia driven particle deposition. Furthermore, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed to visualize and measure particle deposition distributions in the pebble bed. Results of a selected deposition experiment with moderately large particles (d{sub aero} = 3.5 μm, Re{sup ′}{sub pb}=2200) show that the deposited particles are located in the vicinity of the upstream stagnation points of the pebbles. These findings support the thesis that inertia driven particle deposition is predominating.

  17. Fission Product Transport and Source Terms in HTRs: Experience from AVR Pebble Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Moormann

    2008-01-01

    Fission products deposited in the coolant circuit outside of the active core play a dominant role in source term estimations for advanced small pebble bed HTRs, particularly in design basis accidents (DBA). The deposited fission products may be released in depressurization accidents because present pebble bed HTR concepts abstain from a gas tight containment. Contamination of the circuit also hinders maintenance work. Experiments, performed from 1972 to 88 on the AVR, an experimental ...

  18. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  19. Behavior of beryllium pebbles under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle-Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik; Baldwin, D.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Greenwood, L.R.; Kawamura, H.; Oliver, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium pebbles are being considered in fusion reactor blanket designs as neutron multiplier. An example is the European `Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket.` Several forms of beryllium pebbles are commercially available but little is known about these forms in response to fast neutron irradiation. Commercially available beryllium pebbles have been irradiated to approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 390degC. Pebbles 1-mm in diameter manufactured by Brush Wellman, USA and by Nippon Gaishi Company, Japan, and 3-mm pebbles manufactured by Brush Wellman were included. All were irradiated in the below-core area of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in Idaho Falls, USA, in molybdenum alloy capsules containing helium. Post-irradiation results are presented on density change measurements, tritium release by assay, stepped-temperature anneal, and thermal ramp desorption tests, and helium release by assay and stepped-temperature anneal measurements, for Be pebbles from two manufacturing methods, and with two specimen diameters. The experimental results on density change and tritium and helium release are compared with the predictions of the code ANFIBE. (author)

  20. CFD study on the supercritical carbon dioxide cooled pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Dali, E-mail: ydlmitd@outlook.com; Peng, Minjun; Wang, Zhongyi

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • An innovation concept of supercritical carbon dioxide cooled pebble bed reactor is proposed. • Body-centered cuboid (BCCa) arrangement is adopted for the pebbles. • S-CO{sub 2} would be a good candidate coolant for using in pebble bed reactor. - Abstract: The thermal hydraulic study of using supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}), a superior fluid state brayton cycle medium, in pebble bed type nuclear reactor is assessed through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. Preliminary concept design of this S-CO{sub 2} cooled pebble bed reactor (PBR) is implemented by the well-known KTA heat transfer correlation and Ergun pressure drop equation. Eddy viscosity transport turbulence model is adopted and verified by KTA calculated results. Distributions of the temperature, velocity, pressure and Nusselt (Nu) number of the coolant near the surface of the middle spherical fuel element are obtained and analyzed. The conclusion of the assessment is that S-CO{sub 2} would be a good candidate coolant for using in pebble bed reactor due primarily to its good heat transfer characteristic and large mass density, which could lead to achieve lower pressure drop and higher power density.

  1. Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

    2009-10-01

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next

  2. STUDI PEMODELAN DAN PERHITUNGAN TRANSPORT MONTE CARLO DALAM TERAS HTR PEBBLE BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair .

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Konsep sistem energi VHTR baik yang berbahan bakar pebble (VHTR pebble bed maupun blok prismatik (VHTR prismatik menarik perhatian fisikawan reaktor nuklir. Salah satu kelebihan teknologi bahan bakar bola adalah menawarkan terobosan teknologi pengisian bahan bakar tanpa harus menghentikan produksi listrik. Selain itu, partikel bahan bakar pebble dengan kernel uranium oksida (UO2 atau uranium oksikarbida (UCO yang dibalut TRISO dan pelapisan silikon karbida (SiC dianggap sebagai opsi utama dengan pertimbangan performa tinggi pada burn-up bahan bakar dan temperatur tinggi. Makalah ini mendiskusikan pemodelan dan perhitungan transport Monte Carlo dalam teras HTR pebble bed. HTR pebble bed adalah reaktor berpendingin gas temperatur tinggi dan bermoderator grafit dengan kemampuan kogenerasi. Perhitungan dikerjakan dengan program MCNP5 pada temperatur 1200 K. Pustaka data nuklir energi kontinu ENDF/B-V dan ENDF/B-VI dimanfaatkan untuk melengkapi analisis. Hasil perhitungan secara keseluruhan menunjukkan konsistensi dengan nilai keff yang hampir sama untuk pustaka data nuklir yang digunakan. Pustaka ENDF/B-VI (66c selalu memproduksi keff lebih besar dibandingkan ENDF/B-V (50c maupun ENDF/B-VI (60c dengan bias kurang dari 0,25%. Kisi BCC memprediksi keff hampir selalu lebih kecil daripada kisi lainnya, khususnya FCC. Nilai keff kisi BCC lebih dekat dengan kisi FCC dengan bias kurang dari 0,19% sedangkan dengan kisi SH bias perhitungannya kurang dari 0,22%. Fraksi packing yang sedikit berbeda (BCC= 61%, SH= 60,459% tidak membuat bias perhitungan menjadi berbeda jauh. Estimasi keff ketiga model kisi menyimpulkan bahwa model BCC lebih bisa diadopsi dalam perhitungan HTR pebble bed dibandingkan model FCC dan SH. Verifikasi hasil estimasi ini perlu dilakukan dengan simulasi Monte Carlo atau bahkan program deterministik lainnya guna optimisasi perhitungan teras reaktor temperatur tinggi.   Kata-kunci: kernel, TRISO, bahan bakar pebble, HTR pebble bed

  3. Pebble bed structures in the vicinity of concave and convex walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, Joerg, E-mail: reimann-langhans@web.de [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Brun, Emmanuel [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Garching (Germany); Ferrero, Claudio [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Vicente, Jérôme [Polytech Marseille, Marseille (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed tomography experiments were performed to study the packing structure close to concave and convex walls. • A model for arbitrary container geometries is proposed to predict the inner packing factor based on the known total packing factor. • The results are important for the design of ceramic breeder blankets. • The results are relevant for models describing the thermo-mechanical interaction of pebble beds with the blanket structure. - Abstract: Computed tomography experiments were performed with mostly spherical particles in containers with concave, plane and convex walls. Regular pebble packings exist also close to convex cylindrical walls even if the cylinder-to-pebble diameter ratio is about 1, characteristic of thermocouples within the pebble bed. A model for arbitrary container shapes is proposed which predicts the inner packing factor based on the known total packing factor. With increasing vibration efficiency the total packing factor rises because the zones with structured packing increase. Depending on container dimensions, a structured packing can occur in the total pebble bed. Large packing factors are desirable, however, these pebble beds can probably no longer be considered as isotropic with respect to thermo-mechanic properties.

  4. Experimental investigation of pebble flow dynamics using radioactive particle tracking technique in a scaled-down Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khane, Vaibhav; Said, I.A.; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H., E-mail: aldahhanm@mst.edu

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Pebble Flow fields at Pebble Bed Modular Reactor was investigated. • Radioactive Particle Tracking (RPT) technique has been used. • Plug flow type velocity profile is suggested at upper cylindrical region. - Abstract: The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a type of very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) that is conceptually very similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBMR core, nuclear fuel is in the form of pebbles and moves slowly under the influence of gravity. In this work, an integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a scaled-down cold flow PBMR was performed. A continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking the flow of pebbles in a PBMR was designed and developed. An experimental investigation of pebble flow dynamics in a scaled down test reactor was carried out using a non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) technique that used a cobalt-60 based tracer to mimic pebbles in terms of shape, size and density. A cross-correlation based position reconstruction algorithm and RPT calibration data were used to obtain results about Lagrangian trajectories, the velocity field, and residence time distributions. The RPT technique results a serve as a benchmark data for assessing contact force models used in the discrete element method (DEM) simulations.

  5. Effect of a flow-corrective insert on the flow pattern in a pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu; Gui, Nan; Yang, Xingtuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tu, Jiyuan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); School of Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne 3083, VIC (Australia); Jiang, Shengyao, E-mail: shengyaojiang@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Effect of an insert on improving flow uniformity and eliminating stagnant zone is studied. • Three values concerned with the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence are used. • Outlet diameter is a critical parameter that determines balancing mechanism of the insert. • Height/location is varied to let the insert work in unbalanced region and avoid adverse effect. - Abstract: A flow-corrective insert is adopted in the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) to improve flow performance of the pebble flow for the first time. 3D discrete element method (DEM) modeling is employed to study this slow and dense granular flow. It is verified that locating a properly designed insert in the bed can help transform unsatisfactory flow field to the preferred flow pattern for pebble bed reactors. Three characteristic values on the stagnant zone, radial uniformity and flow sequence of pebble flow are defined to evaluate uniformity of the overall flow field quantitatively. The results demonstrate that the pebble bed equipped with an insert performs better than normal beds from all these three aspects. Moreover, based on numerical experiments, several universal tips for insert design on height, location and outlet diameter are suggested.

  6. DEM-CFD simulation of purge gas flow in a solid breeder pebble bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Li, Zhenghong [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Guo, Haibing [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Minyou [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Huang, Hongwen, E-mail: inpclane@sina.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Solid tritium breeding blanket applying pebble bed concept is promising for fusion reactors. Tritium bred in the pebble bed is purged out by inert gas. The flow characteristics of the purge gas are important for the tritium transport from the solid breeder materials. In this study, a randomly packed pebble bed was generated by Discrete Element Method (DEM) and verified by radial porosity distribution. The flow parameters of the purge gas in channels were solved by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The results show that the normalized velocity magnitudes have the same damped oscillating patterns with radial porosity distribution. Besides, the bypass flow near the wall cannot be ignored in this model, and it has a slight increase with inlet velocity. Furthermore, higher purging efficiency becomes with higher inlet velocity and especially higher in near wall region.

  7. Thermo-mechanical characterization of ceramic pebbles for breeding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Frano, Rosa, E-mail: rosa.lofrano@ing.unipi.it; Aquaro, Donato; Scaletti, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental activities to characterize the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. • Compression tests of pebbles. • Experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of pebbles bed at different temperatures. • Experimental test with/without compression load. - Abstract: An open issue for fusion power reactor is to design a suitable breeding blanket capable to produce the necessary quantity of the tritium and to transfer the energy of the nuclear fusion reaction to the coolant. The envisaged solution called Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeding blanket foresees the use of lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) or lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) pebble beds. The thermal mechanical properties of the candidate pebble bed materials are presently extensively investigated because they are critical for the feasibility and performances of the numerous conceptual designs which use a solid breeder. This study is aimed at the investigation of mechanical properties of the lithium orthosilicate and at the characterization of the main chemical, physical and thermo-mechanical properties taking into account the production technology. In doing that at the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI) of the University of Pisa adequate experiments were carried out. The obtained results may contribute to characterize the material of the pebbles and to optimize the design of the envisaged fusion breeding blankets.

  8. The importance of the AVR pebble-bed reactor for the future of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, P. [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor AVR GmbH, Postfach 1160, 52412 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The AVR pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) at Juelich (Germany)) operated from 1967 to 1988 and was certainly the most important HTGR project of the past. The reactor was the mass test bed for all development steps of HTGR pebble fuel. Some early fuel charges failed under high temperature conditions and contaminated the reactor. An accurate pebble measurement (Cs 137) allowed to clean the core from unwanted pebbles after 1981. The coolant activity went down and remained very low for the remaining reactor operation. A melt-wire experiment in 1986 revealed max. coolant temperatures of >1280 deg. C and fuel temperatures of >1350 deg. C, explained by under-estimated bypasses. The fuel still in the core achieved high burn-ups and showed under the extreme temperature conditions excellent fission product retention. Thus, the AVR operation qualified the HTGR fuel, and an average discharge burn-up of 112% fifa revealed an excellent fuel economy of the pebble-bed reactor. Furthermore, the AVR operation offers many meaningful data for code-to-experiment comparisons. (authors)

  9. Measurement of the thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient of a binary bed of beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donne, M.D.; Piazza, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Goraieb, A.; Sordon, G.

    1998-01-01

    The four ITER partners propose to use binary beryllium pebble bed as neutron multiplier. Recently this solution has been adopted for the ITER blanket as well. In order to study the heat transfer in the blanket the effective thermal conductivity and the wall heat transfer coefficient of the bed have to be known. Therefore at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe heat transfer experiments have been performed with a binary bed of beryllium pebbles and the results have been correlated expressing thermal conductivity and wall heat transfer coefficients as a function of temperature in the bed and of the difference between the thermal expansion of the bed and of that of the confinement walls. The comparison of the obtained correlations with the data available from the literature show a quite good agreement. (author)

  10. Breeding zone models of DEMO ceramic helium cooled blanket test module for testing in IVV-2M reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, V.; Kiryiak, L.; Lopatkin, A.; Marachev, A.; Muratov, V.; Strebkov, Yr. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise ' ' Dollezhal Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Davydov, D.; Kapyshev, V.; Kazennov, Yr.; Tebus, V. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise ' ' A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-06-01

    The goal of DEMO ceramic helium cooled blanket test module (CHC BTM) is to demonstrate a breeding capability that would lead to tritium self-sufficiency in ITER reactor and to extract a high-grade heat suitable for electricity generation. Experimental validation of all the adopted design solutions is main important problem at design and calculation works carrying out in order to develop the CHC BTM. One important task for breeding zones feasibility validation is in-pile tests. Two models were developed and fabricated for testing in the fission IVV-2M reactor. Breeding zone is based on poloidal BIT-conception. The models structural material is ferrito-martensitic steel. Breeder material is lithium orthosilicate in pebble beds and pellet forms. Multiplier material is beryllium in pebble beds and porosity forms. The cooling is provided by helium at 10 MPa. The tritium produced in the breeder material is purged by the helium flow at 0.1-0.2 MPa. Designs of model description and experimental channel, results of neutronic and thermo-hydraulic calculations are presented in the paper. (orig.)

  11. Optimized core design and fuel management of a pebble-bed type nuclear reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The core design of a pebble-bed type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is optimized, aiming for an increase of the coolant outlet temperature to 1000 C, while retaining its inherent safety features. The VHTR has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the

  12. Experimental study and analysis of the purge gas pressure drop across the pebble beds for the fusion HCPB blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Sena, Ali, E-mail: ali.abou-sena@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Arbeiter, Frederik; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Rey, Jörg; Schlindwein, Georg [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► The pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter. ► The pressure drop slightly increases with increasing the packing factor. ► The pressure drop is directly proportional to pebble bed length and inlet pressure. ► Predictions of Ergun equation agree well with the measured values of pressure drop. ► The filters resistance has a small contribution to the total pressure drop. -- Abstract: The lithium ceramic and beryllium pebble beds of the breeder units (BU), in the fusion breeding blanket, are purged by helium to extract the bred tritium. Therefore, the objective of this study is to support the design of the BU purge gas system by studying the effect of pebbles diameter, packing factor, pebble bed length, and flow inlet pressure on the purge gas pressure drop. The pebble bed was formed by packing glass pebbles in a rectangular container (56 mm × 206 mm × 396 mm) and was integrated into a gas loop to be purged by helium at BU-relevant pressures (1.1–3.8 bar). To determine the pressure drop across the pebble bed, the static pressure was measured at four locations along the pebble bed as well as at the inlet and outlet locations. The results show: (i) the pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter and slightly increases with increasing the packing factor, (ii) for a constant inlet flow velocity, the pressure drop is directly proportional to the pebble bed length and inlet pressure, and (iii) predictions of Ergun's equation agree well with the experimental values of the pressure drop.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Particle Flow Motion in a Two-Dimensional Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor with Discrete Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modular pebble-bed nuclear reactor (MPBNR technology is promising due to its attractive features such as high fuel performance and inherent safety. Particle motion of fuel and graphite pebbles is highly associated with the performance of pebbled-bed modular nuclear reactor. To understand the mechanism of pebble’s motion in the reactor, we numerically studied the influence of number ratio of fuel and graphite pebbles, funnel angle of the reactor, height of guide ring on the distribution of pebble position, and velocity by means of discrete element method (DEM in a two-dimensional MPBNR. Velocity distributions at different areas of the reactor as well as mixing characteristics of fuel and graphite pebbles were investigated. Both fuel and graphite pebbles moved downward, and a uniform motion was formed in the column zone, while pebbles motion in the cone zone was accelerated due to the decrease of the cross sectional flow area. The number ratio of fuel and graphite pebbles and the height of guide ring had a minor influence on the velocity distribution of pebbles, while the variation of funnel angle had an obvious impact on the velocity distribution. Simulated results agreed well with the work in the literature.

  14. Axial Dispersion and Back-mixing of Gas Phase in Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Al-Musafir

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide attended of pebble bed reactors (PBRs, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the complex flow pattern. In this work, the non-ideal flow behavior of the gas phase which is used for cooling has been investigated experimentally in a 0.3 m diameter pebble bed. The extent of mixing and dispersion of the gas phase has been qualified. The effect of gas velocity on the axial dispersion has been investigated with range from 0.05 to 0.6 m/s covering both the laminar and turbulent flow regimes. Glass bead particles of 1.2 cm diameter and 2.5 gm/cm3 which is randomly and closely packed have been used to mimic the pebbles. An advanced gas tracer technique was applied to measure the residence time distribution (RTD of gas phase using impulse tracer. The axial dispersion coefficients of gas phase in the studied pebble bed have been estimated using the axial dispersion model (ADM. It was found that the flow pattern of the gas phase deviates from plug flow depending on the superficial gas velocity. The results showed that the dispersion of the gas reduces as the gas velocity and Reynolds numbers increased.

  15. Helium-cooled high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Experience with several helium cooled reactors has been favorable, and two commercial plants are now operating. Both of these units are of the High Temperature Graphite Gas Cooled concept, one in the United States and the other in the Federal Republic of Germany. The initial helium charge for a reactor of the 1000 MW(e) size is modest, approx.15,000 kg.

  16. Some Movement Mechanisms and Characteristics in Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pebblebed-type high temperature gas-cooled reactor is considered to be one of the promising solutions for generation IV advanced reactors, and the two-region arranged reactor core can enhance its advantages by flattening neutron flux. However, this application is held back by the existence of mixing zone between central and peripheral regions, which results from pebbles’ dispersion motions. In this study, experiments have been carried out to study the dispersion phenomenon, and the variation of dispersion region and radial distribution of pebbles in the specifically shaped flow field are shown. Most importantly, the standard deviation of pebbles’ radial positions in dispersion region, as a quantitative index to describe the size of dispersion region, is gotten through statistical analysis. Besides, discrete element method has been utilized to analyze the parameter influence on dispersion region, and this practice offers some strategies to eliminate or reduce mixing zone in practical reactors.

  17. Fission Product Transport and Source Terms in HTRs: Experience from AVR Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Moormann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission products deposited in the coolant circuit outside of the active core play a dominant role in source term estimations for advanced small pebble bed HTRs, particularly in design basis accidents (DBA. The deposited fission products may be released in depressurization accidents because present pebble bed HTR concepts abstain from a gas tight containment. Contamination of the circuit also hinders maintenance work. Experiments, performed from 1972 to 88 on the AVR, an experimental pebble bed HTR, allow for a deeper insight into fission product transport behavior. The activity deposition per coolant pass was lower than expected and was influenced by fission product chemistry and by presence of carbonaceous dust. The latter lead also to inconsistencies between Cs plate out experiments in laboratory and in AVR. The deposition behavior of Ag was in line with present models. Dust as activity carrier is of safety relevance because of its mobility and of its sorption capability for fission products. All metal surfaces in pebble bed reactors were covered by a carbonaceous dust layer. Dust in AVR was produced by abrasion in amounts of about 5 kg/y. Additional dust sources in AVR were ours oil ingress and peeling of fuel element surfaces due to an air ingress. Dust has a size of about 1  m, consists mainly of graphite, is partly remobilized by flow perturbations, and deposits with time constants of 1 to 2 hours. In future reactors, an efficient filtering via a gas tight containment is required because accidents with fast depressurizations induce dust mobilization. Enhanced core temperatures in normal operation as in AVR and broken fuel pebbles have to be considered, as inflammable dust concentrations in the gas phase.

  18. Investigation of effective thermal conductivity for pebble beds by one-way coupled CFD-DEM method for CFETR WCCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Chen, Youhua [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Huang, Kai [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A CFD-DEM coupled numerical model is built based on the prototypical blanket pebble bed. • The numerical model can be applied to simulate heat transfer of a pebble bed and estimate effective thermal conductivity. • The numerical model agrees well with the theoretical SZB model. • Effective thermal conductivity of pebble beds for WCCB is estimated by the current model. - Abstract: The mono-sized beryllium pebble bed and the multi-sized Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}/Be{sub 12}Ti mixed pebble bed are the main schemes for the Water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket (WCCB) of China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). And the effective thermal conductivity (k{sub eff}) of the pebble beds is important to characterize the thermal performance of WCCB. In this study, a one-way coupled CFD-DEM method was employed to simulate heat transfer and estimate k{sub eff}. The geometric topology of a prototypical blanket pebble bed was produced by the discrete element method (DEM). Based on the geometric topology, the temperature distribution and the k{sub eff} were obtained by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The current numerical model presented a good performance to calculate k{sub eff} of the beryllium pebble bed, and according to the modeling of the Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}/Be{sub 12}Ti mixed pebble bed, k{sub eff} was estimated with values ranged between 2.0 and 4.0 W/(m∙K).

  19. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  20. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  1. Electrical behaviour of ceramic breeder blankets in pebble form after γ-radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4 ceramics in from of pebble bed is the European candidate for ITER testing HCPB (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed breeding modules. The breeder function and the shielding role of this material, represent the areas upon which attention is focused. Electrical measurements are proposed for monitoring the modification created by ionizing radiation and at the same time provide information on lithium movement in this ceramic structure. The electrical tests are performed on pebbles fabricated by Spray-dryer method before and after gamma-irradiation through a 60Co source to a fluence of 4.8 Gy/s till a total dose of 5 ∗ 105 Gy. The introduction of thermal annealing treatments during the electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements points out the recombination effect of the temperature on the γ-induced defects.

  2. Medium voltage direct current (MVDC) converter for pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) / Hendrik de Villiers Pretorius

    OpenAIRE

    Pretorius, Hendrik de Villiers

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear and renewable energy systems will probably be used more and more extensively in future due to high environmental demands regarding pollution and exhaustion of the world's gas and coal reserves. Because most types of renewable energy systems do not supply electric power at line frequency and voltage a converter is used to connect these sources to the existing power system. The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a nuclear power plant currently using a 50 Hz synchrono...

  3. Analysis of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Model for the Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    S. Yamoah; E.H.K. Akaho; Nana G.A. Ayensu; M. Asamoah

    2012-01-01

    The pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is a promising option for next generation reactor technology and has the potential to provide high efficiency and cost effective electricity generation. The reactor unit heat transfer poses a challenge due to the complexity associated with the thermalflow design. Therefore to reliably simulate the flow and heat transport of the pebble bed modular reactor necessitates a heat transfer model that deals with radiation as well as ther...

  4. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  5. Analysis of granular flow in a pebble-bed nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycroft, Chris H; Grest, Gary S; Landry, James W; Bazant, Martin Z

    2006-08-01

    Pebble-bed nuclear reactor technology, which is currently being revived around the world, raises fundamental questions about dense granular flow in silos. A typical reactor core is composed of graphite fuel pebbles, which drain very slowly in a continuous refueling process. Pebble flow is poorly understood and not easily accessible to experiments, and yet it has a major impact on reactor physics. To address this problem, we perform full-scale, discrete-element simulations in realistic geometries, with up to 440,000 frictional, viscoelastic 6-cm-diam spheres draining in a cylindrical vessel of diameter 3.5m and height 10 m with bottom funnels angled at 30 degrees or 60 degrees. We also simulate a bidisperse core with a dynamic central column of smaller graphite moderator pebbles and show that little mixing occurs down to a 1:2 diameter ratio. We analyze the mean velocity, diffusion and mixing, local ordering and porosity (from Voronoi volumes), the residence-time distribution, and the effects of wall friction and discuss implications for reactor design and the basic physics of granular flow.

  6. A simulation of a pebble bed reactor core by the MCNP-4C computer code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhshayesh Moshkbar Khalil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of energy is a major crisis of our century; the irregular increase of fossil fuel costs has forced us to search for novel, cheaper, and safer sources of energy. Pebble bed reactors - an advanced new generation of reactors with specific advantages in safety and cost - might turn out to be the desired candidate for the role. The calculation of the critical height of a pebble bed reactor at room temperature, while using the MCNP-4C computer code, is the main goal of this paper. In order to reduce the MCNP computing time compared to the previously proposed schemes, we have devised a new simulation scheme. Different arrangements of kernels in fuel pebble simulations were investigated and the best arrangement to decrease the MCNP execution time (while keeping the accuracy of the results, chosen. The neutron flux distribution and control rods worth, as well as their shadowing effects, have also been considered in this paper. All calculations done for the HTR-10 reactor core are in good agreement with experimental results.

  7. Mechanical performance of irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Dalle-Donne, M.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    For the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket, which is one of the two reference concepts studied within the European Fusion Technology Programme, the neutron multiplier consists of a mixed bed of about 2 and 0.1-0.2 mm diameter beryllium pebbles. Beryllium has no structural function in the blanket, however microstructural and mechanical properties are important, as they might influence the material behavior under neutron irradiation. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating it. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from these irradiation experiments, emphasizing the effects of irradiation of essential material properties and trying to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The microstructure, the porosity distribution, the impurity content, the behavior under compression loads and the compatibility of the beryllium pebbles with lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) during the in-pile irradiation are presented and critically discussed. Qualitative information on ductility and creep obtained by hardness-type measurements are also supplied. (author)

  8. Evaluation of helium cooling for fusion divertors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    The divertors of future fusion reactors will have a power throughput of several hundred MW. The peak heat flux on the diverter surface is estimated to be 5 to 15 MW/m{sup 2} at an average heat flux of 2 MW/m{sup 2}. The divertors have a requirement of both minimum temperature (100{degrees}C) and maximum temperature. The minimum temperature is dictated by the requirement to reduce the absorption of plasma, and the maximum temperature is determined by the thermo-mechanical properties of the plasma facing materials. Coolants that have been considered for fusion reactors are water, liquid metals and helium. Helium cooling has been shown to be very attractive from safety and other considerations. Helium is chemically and neutronically inert and is suitable for power conversion. The challenges associated with helium cooling are: (1) Manifold sizes; (2) Pumping power; and (3) Leak prevention. In this paper the first two of the above design issues are addressed. A variety of heat transfer enhancement techniques are considered to demonstrate that the manifold sizes and the pumping power can be reduced to acceptable levels. A helium-cooled diverter module was designed and fabricated by GA for steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. This module was recently tested at Sandia National Laboratories. At an inlet pressure of 4 MPa, the module was tested at a steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m{sup 2}. The pumping power required was less than 1% of the power removed. These results verified the design prediction.

  9. HTR-proteus pebble bed experimental program core 4: random packing with a 1:1 moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sterbentz, James W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snoj, Luka [Jozef Stefan Inst. (IJS), Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor [Jozef Stefan Inst. (IJS), Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koberl, Oliver [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  10. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  11. Detection system for location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongbing, E-mail: liuhb07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); Du, Dong, E-mail: dudong@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, An; Chang, Baohua; Han, Zandong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education P. R. China, Beijing 100084 (China); He, Ayada [Shanghai Electric Power Generation Group Shanghai Generator Works, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A detection system for locations of pebbles transported in pipes is introduced. • The detection system is based on vibration signal processing, which is original. • The characteristics of the vibration signals of the pipe are analyzed. • The experiment shows that the detection results are accurate. • The research provides an important basis for the design of the reactor. - Abstract: Pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors have many advantages such as inherent safety, high efficiency, etc., and have been considered as a candidate for Generation IV nuclear reactors. During the operation of the reactor, there are thousands of fuel pebbles transported in the pipes outside the core by gravity and helium flow. The pattern of the pipes which consist of straight and arc sections is very complex. When a fuel pebble is transported, it will constantly collide with the pipes, especially in the arc sections. The collisions will lead to the vibration of the pipes. This paper aims to provide a detection system for the location of fuel pebbles transported in pipes in a pebble-bed reactor based on vibration signal processing. Before the reactor is running, the system acquires the vibration signals of several key sections by sensors. Then the frequency characteristics of the signals are obtained by joint time–frequency analysis. When the reactor is running, the system detects the signals and processes them based on their frequency characteristics in real time. According to the results of the processing, the system can correctly judge whether the fuel pebble has passed through the section and records the time of the passing. The experiment validates the accuracy and reliability of the detection results. In this way, the operational condition of the reactor can be monitored so that the normal running of the reactor can be ensured. Additionally, the detection data are of great significance to the evaluation and optimization of the reactor performance

  12. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  13. Feasibility of Thorium Fuel Cycles in a Very High Temperature Pebble-Bed Hybrid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Rodriguez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy presents key challenges to be successful as a sustainable energy source. Currently, the viability of the use thorium-based fuel cycles in an innovative nuclear energy generation system is being investigated in order to solve these key challenges. In this work, the feasibility of three thorium-based fuel cycles (232Th-233U, 232Th-239Pu, and 232Th-U in a hybrid system formed by a Very High Temperature Pebble-Bed Reactor (VHTR and two Pebble-Bed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs was evaluated using parameters related to the neutronic behavior such as nuclear fuel breeding, minor actinide stockpile, the energetic contribution of each fissile isotope, and the radiotoxicity of the long lived wastes. These parameters were used to compare the fuel cycles using the well-known MCNPX ver. 2.6e computational code. The results obtained confirm that the 232Th-233U fuel cycle is the best cycle for minimizing the production of plutonium isotopes and minor actinides. Moreover, the inclusion of the second stage in the ADSs demonstrated the possibility of extending the burnup cycle duration and reducing the radiotoxicity of the discharged fuel from the VHTR.

  14. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  15. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  16. Pebble bed modular reactor safeguards: developing new approaches and implementing safeguards by design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Brian David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beddingfield, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durst, Philip [INL; Bean, Robert [INL

    2010-01-01

    The design of the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) does not fit or seem appropriate to the IAEA safeguards approach under the categories of light water reactor (LWR), on-load refueled reactor (OLR, i.e. CANDU), or Other (prismatic HTGR) because the fuel is in a bulk form, rather than discrete items. Because the nuclear fuel is a collection of nuclear material inserted in tennis-ball sized spheres containing structural and moderating material and a PBMR core will contain a bulk load on the order of 500,000 spheres, it could be classified as a 'Bulk-Fuel Reactor.' Hence, the IAEA should develop unique safeguards criteria. In a multi-lab DOE study, it was found that an optimized blend of: (i) developing techniques to verify the plutonium content in spent fuel pebbles, (ii) improving burn-up computer codes for PBMR spent fuel to provide better understanding of the core and spent fuel makeup, and (iii) utilizing bulk verification techniques for PBMR spent fuel storage bins should be combined with the historic IAEA and South African approaches of containment and surveillance to verify and maintain continuity of knowledge of PBMR fuel. For all of these techniques to work the design of the reactor will need to accommodate safeguards and material accountancy measures to a far greater extent than has thus far been the case. The implementation of Safeguards-by-Design as the PBMR design progresses provides an approach to meets these safeguards and accountancy needs.

  17. Safeguards Challenges for Pebble-Bed Reactors (PBRs):Peoples Republic of China (PRC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    The Peoples Republic of China (PRC) is operating the HTR-10 pebble-bed reactor (PBR) and is in the process of building a prototype PBR plant with two modular reactors (250-MW(t) per reactor) feeding steam to a single turbine-generator. It is likely to be the first modular hightemperature reactor to be ready for commercial deployment in the world because it is a highpriority project for the PRC. The plant design features multiple modular reactors feeding steam to a single turbine generator where the number of modules determines the plant output. The design and commercialization strategy are based on PRC strengths: (1) a rapidly growing electric market that will support low-cost mass production of modular reactor units and (2) a balance of plant system based on economics of scale that uses the same mass-produced turbine-generator systems used in PRC coal plants. If successful, in addition to supplying the PRC market, this strategy could enable China to be the leading exporter of nuclear reactors to developing countries. The modular characteristics of the reactor match much of the need elsewhere in the world. PBRs have major safety advantages and a radically different fuel. The fuel, not the plant systems, is the primary safety system to prevent and mitigate the release of radionuclides under accident conditions. The fuel consists of small (6-cm) pebbles (spheres) containing coatedparticle fuel in a graphitized carbon matrix. The fuel loading per pebble is small (~9 grams of low-enriched uranium) and hundreds of thousands of pebbles are required to fuel a nuclear plant. The uranium concentration in the fuel is an order of magnitude less than in traditional nuclear fuels. These characteristics make the fuel significantly less attractive for illicit use (weapons production or dirty bomb); but, its unusual physical form may require changes in the tools used for safeguards. This report describes PBRs, what is different, and the safeguards challenges. A series of

  18. Preliminary Safeguards Assessment for the Pebble-Bed Fluoride High-Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR) Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disser, Jay; Arthur, Edward; Lambert, Janine

    2016-09-01

    This report examines a preliminary design for a pebble bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (PB-FHR) concept, assessing it from an international safeguards perspective. Safeguards features are defined, in a preliminary fashion, and suggestions are made for addressing further nuclear materials accountancy needs.

  19. Storage built pebble bed for greenhouse use; Acumulador tipo lecho para uso en invernaderos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bistoni, S.; Iriarte, A.; Saravia, L.

    2004-07-01

    To heat greenhouses during the night it is necessary to use storage systems. Our region shows high radiation levels, even in winter, so during the day stored energy inside of a greenhouse is more than necessary. If the excess of energy is stored up, it can be used during the night when it is necessary. In this paper the performance of a storage built with plastic bottles with water inside them are studied and it is compared with a pebble bed. A model and its solution using the electric- thermal analogy are presented. The results show that it is feasible and economic to build a storage like the proposed. It is important to mention that the simulation is very simple because of the computational program used. (Author)

  20. Computational Model for the Neutronic Simulation of Pebble Bed Reactor’s Core Using MCNPX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rosales

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Very high temperature reactor (VHTR designs offer promising performance characteristics; they can provide sustainable energy, improved proliferation resistance, inherent safety, and high temperature heat supply. These designs also promise operation to high burnup and large margins to fuel failure with excellent fission product retention via the TRISO fuel design. The pebble bed reactor (PBR is a design of gas cooled high temperature reactor, candidate for Generation IV of Nuclear Energy Systems. This paper describes the features of a detailed geometric computational model for PBR whole core analysis using the MCNPX code. The validation of the model was carried out using the HTR-10 benchmark. Results were compared with experimental data and calculations of other authors. In addition, sensitivity analysis of several parameters that could have influenced the results and the accuracy of model was made.

  1. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report: German Pebble Bed Reactor design and technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    This report describes and evaluates several gas-cooled reactor plant concepts under development within the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The concepts, based upon the use of a proven Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) fuel element design, include nuclear heat generation for chemical processes and electrical power generation. Processes under consideration for the nuclear process heat plant (PNP) include hydrogasification of coal, steam gasification of coal, combined process, and long-distance chemical heat transportation. The electric plant emphasized in the report is the steam turbine cycle (HTR-K), although the gas turbine cycle (HHT) is also discussed. The study is a detailed description and evaluation of the nuclear portion of the various plants. The general conclusions are that the PBR technology is sound and that the HTR-K and PNP plant concepts appear to be achievable through appropriate continuing development programs, most of which are either under way or planned.

  2. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes (1000 and 3000 MW(t)) and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950/sup 0/C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG.

  3. A safety re-evaluation of the AVR pebble bed reactor operation and its consequences for future HTR concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moormann, R.

    2008-06-15

    The AVR pebble bed reactor (46 MW{sub th}) was operated 1967-88 at coolant outlet temperatures up to 990 C. A principle difference of pebble bed HTRs as AVR to conventional reactors is the continuous movement of fuel element pebbles through the core which complicates thermohydraulic, nuclear and safety estimations. Also because of a lack of other experience AVR operation is still a relevant basis for future pebble bed HTRs and thus requires careful examination. This paper deals mainly with some insufficiently published unresolved safety problems of AVR operation and of pebble bed HTRs but skips the widely known advantageous features of pebble bed HTRs. The AVR primary circuit is heavily contaminated with metallic fission products (Sr-90, Cs-137) which create problems in current dismantling. The amount of this contamination is not exactly known, but the evaluation of fission product deposition experiments indicates that the end of life contamination reached several percent of a single core inventory, which is some orders of magnitude more than precalculated and far more than in large LWRs. A major fraction of this contamination is bound on graphitic dust and thus partly mobile in depressurization accidents, which has to be considered in safety analyses of future reactors. A re-evaluation of the AVR contamination is performed here in order to quantify consequences for future HTRs (400 MW{sub th}). It leads to the conclusion that the AVR contamination was mainly caused by inadmissible high core temperatures, increasing fission product release rates, and not - as presumed in the past - by inadequate fuel quality only. The high AVR core temperatures were detected not earlier than one year before final AVR shut-down, because a pebble bed core cannot yet be equipped with instruments. The maximum core temperatures are still unknown but were more than 200 K higher than calculated. Further, azimuthal temperature differences at the active core margin of up to 200 K were

  4. Supplemental Report on Nuclear Safeguards Considerations for the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, David Lewis [ORNL; Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL

    2010-05-01

    Recent reports by Department of Energy National Laboratories have discussed safeguards considerations for the low enriched uranium (LEU) fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the need for bulk accountancy of the plutonium in used fuel. These reports fail to account effectively for the degree of plutonium dilution in the graphitized-carbon pebbles that is sufficient to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) 'provisional' guidelines for termination of safeguards on 'measured discards.' The thrust of this finding is not to terminate safeguards but to limit the need for specific accountancy of plutonium in stored used fuel. While the residual uranium in the used fuel may not be judged sufficiently diluted to meet the IAEA provisional guidelines for termination of safeguards, the estimated quantities of {sup 232}U and {sup 236}U in the used fuel at the target burn-up of {approx}91 GWD/MT exceed specification limits for reprocessed uranium (ASTM C787) and will require extensive blending with either natural uranium or uranium enrichment tails to dilute the {sup 236}U content to fall within specification thus making the PBMR used fuel less desirable for commercial reprocessing and reuse than that from light water reactors. Also the PBMR specific activity of reprocessed uranium isotopic mixture and its A{sub 2} values for effective dose limit if released in a dispersible form during a transportation accident are more limiting than the equivalent values for light water reactor spent fuel at 55 GWD/MT without accounting for the presence of the principal carry-over fission product ({sup 99}Tc) and any possible plutonium contamination that may be present from attempted covert reprocessing. Thus, the potentially recoverable uranium from PBMR used fuel carries reactivity penalties and radiological penalties likely greater than those for reprocessed uranium from light water reactors. These factors impact the economics of

  5. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of thorium fuel in a Pebble-Bed Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (PB-FHR is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative Flibe (2LiF-BeF2 salt Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (TRC. Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO coated particle system for increasing fuel loading and decreasing excessive moderation. To analyze the neutronic characteristics, an equilibrium calculation method of thorium fuel self-sustainability is developed. We have compared two refueling schemes (mixing flow pattern and directional flow pattern and two kinds of reflector materials (SiC and graphite. This method found that the feasible region of breeding and negative Flibe TRC is between 20 vol% and 62 vol% fuel loading in the fuel. A discharge burnup could be achieved up to about 200 MWd/kgHM. The case with directional flow pattern and SiC reflector showed superior burnup characteristics but the worst radial power peak factor, while the case with mixing flow pattern and SiC reflector, which was the best tradeoff between discharge burnup and radial power peak factor, could provide burnup of 140 MWd/kgHM and about 1.4 radial power peak factor with 50 vol% dispersion fuel. In addition, Flibe salt displays good neutron properties as a coolant of quasi-fast reactors due to the strong 9Be(n,2n reaction and low neutron absorption of 6Li (even at 1000 ppm in fast spectrum. Preliminary thermal hydraulic calculation shows good safety margin. The greatest challenge of this reactor may be the decades irradiation time of the pebble fuel.

  6. Simulation in CFD of a Pebble Bed: Advanced high temperature reactor core using OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Pamela M.; Su, Jian, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Numerical simulations of a Pebble Bed nuclear reactor core are presented using the multi-physics tool-kit OpenFOAM. The HTR-PM is modeled using the porous media approach, accounting both for viscous and inertial effects through the Darcy and Forchheimer model. Initially, cylindrical 2D and 3D simulations are compared, in order to evaluate their differences and decide if the 2D simulations carry enough of the sought information, considering the savings in computational costs. The porous medium is considered to be isotropic, with the whole length of the packed bed occupied homogeneously with the spherical fuel elements. Steady-state simulations for normal equilibrium operation are performed, using a semi sine function of the power density along the vertical axis as the source term for the energy balance equation.Total pressure drop is calculated and compared with that obtained from literature for a similar case. At a second stage, transient simulations are performed, where relevant parameters are calculated and compared to those of the literature. (author)

  7. Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part I: Pebble Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-03-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept [ ] focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor (LWR) fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into tri-isotopic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400) [ ]. Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (FY) (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking, and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. Regarding the coated particle performance, the FY 2009 investigations showed that no

  8. Heat Transfer in Pebble-Bed Nuclear Reactor Cores Cooled by Fluoride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddar, Lakshana Ravindranath

    With electricity demand predicted to rise by more than 50% within the next 20 years and a burgeoning world population requiring reliable emissions-free base-load electricity, can we design advanced nuclear reactors to help meet this challenge? At the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR) are currently being investigated. FHRs are designed with better safety and economic characteristics than conventional light water reactors (LWR) currently in operation. These reactors operate at high temperature and low pressure making them more efficient and safer than LWRs. The pebble-bed FHR (PB-FHR) variant includes an annular nuclear reactor core that is filled with randomly packed pebble fuel. It is crucial to characterize the heat transfer within this unique geometry as this informs the safety limits of the reactor. The work presented in this dissertation focused on furthering the understanding of heat transfer in pebble-bed nuclear reactor cores using fluoride salts as a coolant. This was done through experimental, analytical and computational techniques. A complex nuclear system with a coolant that has never previously been in commercial use requires experimental data that can directly inform aspects of its design. It is important to isolate heat transfer phenomena in order to understand the underlying physics in the context of the PB-FHR, as well as to make decisions about further experimental work that needs to be done in support of developing the PB-FHR. Certain organic oils can simulate the heat transfer behaviour of the fluoride salt if relevant non-dimensional parameters are matched. The advantage of this method is that experiments can be done at a much lower temperature and at a smaller geometric scale compared to FHRs, thereby lowering costs. In this dissertation, experiments were designed and performed to collect data demonstrating similitude. The limitations of these experiments were also elucidated by

  9. Engineering studies to support a liquid sodium cooled pebble bed target/blanket for an accelerator breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, K.C.; Malenfant, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary calculations on using a liquid sodium cooled pebble bed of thorium metal for the target and blanket of a particle accelerator to convert fertile material to fissile have indicated the concept has considerable merit. Fuel management is simple and continuous on-line feed is effected. Additional features include excellent heat transfer, low pressure drop, minimization of structures and enhanced safety. Promising features strongly suggest that the work be continued to further refine the studies. Although specific to the target and blanket of the accelerator breeder concept, the work is readily extended to a high efficiency liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor employing a pebble bed as the fuel. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of a Pebble Bed HTGR Loss of Cooling Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Very High Temperature Reactor Methods Development group at the Idaho National Laboratory identified the need for a defensible and systematic uncertainty and sensitivity approach in 2009. This paper summarizes the results of an uncertainty and sensitivity quantification investigation performed with the SUSA code, utilizing the International Atomic Energy Agency CRP 5 Pebble Bed Modular Reactor benchmark and the INL code suite PEBBED-THERMIX. Eight model input parameters were selected for inclusion in this study, and after the input parameters variations and probability density functions were specified, a total of 800 steady state and depressurized loss of forced cooling (DLOFC transient PEBBED-THERMIX calculations were performed. The six data sets were statistically analyzed to determine the 5% and 95% DLOFC peak fuel temperature tolerance intervals with 95% confidence levels. It was found that the uncertainties in the decay heat and graphite thermal conductivities were the most significant contributors to the propagated DLOFC peak fuel temperature uncertainty. No significant differences were observed between the results of Simple Random Sampling (SRS or Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS data sets, and use of uniform or normal input parameter distributions also did not lead to any significant differences between these data sets.

  11. The Optimization of Radiation Protection in the Design of the High Temperature Reactor-Pebble-Bed Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of radiation protection is an important task in both the design and operation of a nuclear power plant. Although this topic has been considerably investigated for pressurized water reactors, there are very few public reports on it for pebble-bed reactors. This paper proposes a routine that jointly optimizes the system design and radiation protection of High Temperature Reactor-Pebble-Bed Module (HTR-PM towards the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA principle. A systematic framework is also established for the optimization of radiation protection for pebble-bed reactors. Typical calculations for the radiation protection of radioactivity-related systems are presented to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of the optimization routine, which achieve 23.3%~90.6% reduction of either dose rate or shielding or both of them. The annual collective doses of different systems are reduced through iterative optimization of the dose rates, designs, maintenance procedures, and work durations and compared against the previous estimates. The comparison demonstrates that the annual collective dose of HTR-PM is reduced from 0.490 man-Sv/a before optimization to 0.445 man-Sv/a after optimization, which complies with the requirements of the Chinese regulatory guide and proves the effectiveness of the proposed routine and framework.

  12. Flow characteristics analysis of purge gas in unitary pebble beds by CFD simulation coupled with DEM geometry model for fusion blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Youhua [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chen, Lei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Luo, Guangnan [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A unitary pebble bed was built to analyze the flow characteristics of purge gas based on DEM-CFD method. • Flow characteristics between particles were clearly displayed. • Porosity distribution, velocity field distribution, pressure field distribution, pressure drop and the wall effects on velocity distribution were studied. - Abstract: Helium is used as the purge gas to sweep tritium out when it flows through the lithium ceramic and beryllium pebble beds in solid breeder blanket for fusion reactor. The flow characteristics of the purge gas will dominate the tritium sweep capability and tritium recovery system design. In this paper, a computational model for the unitary pebble bed was conducted using DEM-CFD method to study the purge gas flow characteristics in the bed, which include porosity distribution between pebbles, velocity field distribution, pressure field distribution, pressure drop as well as the wall effects on velocity distribution. Pebble bed porosity and velocity distribution with great fluctuations were found in the near-wall region and detailed flow characteristics between pebbles were displayed clearly. The results show that the numerical simulation model has an error with about 11% for estimating pressure drop when compared with the Ergun equation.

  13. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  14. Gas Reactor International Cooperative program. Pebble bed reactor plant: screening evaluation. Volume 2. Conceptual balance of plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW(t) Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. This volume describes the conceptual balance-of-plant (BOP) design and was prepared by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The major emphasis of the BOP study was a preliminary design of an overall plant to provide a basis for future studies.

  15. Optimization of mass-production conditions for tritium breeder pebbles based on slurry droplet wetting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yi-Hyun, E-mail: yhpark@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyung-Mi; Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon; Lee, Young-Min [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Jin; Danish, Rehan; Lim, Chul-Hwan; Jo, Yong-Dae [IVT Co., Ltd., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • An automatic dispensing system was developed to improve uniformity and production rate of breeder pebbles. • The production rate of this system for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble was estimated at 50 kg/year. • The optimization of dispensing and sintering conditions for the mass-production of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble was conducted. • Integrity of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble was able to be ensured during mass-production process, especially during batch process. - Abstract: Lithium metatitanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) is being considered as tritium breeding material for solid-type breeding blanket, which are used in pebble-bed form. The total amount of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles in Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) is approximately 80 kg. Furthermore, DEMO reactor requires a great deal of breeder pebbles. Therefore, the development of mass-production system for breeder pebbles is necessary. The slurry droplet wetting method was adopted in the mass-production process for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles, which had been developed in Korea. In this method, an automatic slurry dispensing system is one of the key apparatuses because the uniformity of pebbles and production rate are able to be improved. The system was successfully manufactured, which was consisted of a dispensing unit for instillation of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} slurry, a glycerin bath for hardening of droplets, and an automatic maintaining unit for constant distance between syringe needle and glycerin surface. The production rate of this system for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebble was estimated at 50 kg/year. In this study, it was investigated that the effect of dispensing and sintering conditions on the mass-production of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles.

  16. Evaluation of radiation heat transfer in porous medial: Application for a pebble bed modular reactor cooled by CO2 gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi-Ali Kamel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the contribution of radiation heat transfer in the cooling of a pebble bed modular reactor. The mathematical model, developed for a porous medium, is based on a set of equations applied to an annular geometry. Previous major works dealing with the subject have considered the forced convection mode and often did not take into account the radiation heat transfer. In this work, only free convection and radiation heat transfer are considered. This can occur during the removal of residual heat after shutdown or during an emergency situation. In order to derive the governing equations of radiation heat transfer, a steady-state in an isotropic and emissive porous medium (CO2 is considered. The obtained system of equations is written in a dimensionless form and then solved. In order to evaluate the effect of radiation heat transfer on the total heat removed, an analytical method for solving the system of equations is used. The results allow quantifying both radiation and free convection heat transfer. For the studied situation, they show that, in a pebble bed modular reactor, more than 70% of heat is removed by radiation heat transfer when CO2 is used as the coolant gas.

  17. Physical Analysis of the Initial Core and Running-In Phase for Pebble-Bed Reactor HTR-PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pebble-bed reactor HTR-PM is being built in China and is planned to be critical in one or two years. At present, one emphasis of engineering design is to determine the fuel management scheme of the initial core and running-in phase. There are many possible schemes, and many factors need to be considered in the process of scheme evaluation and analysis. Based on the experience from the constructed or designed pebble-bed reactors, the fuel enrichment and the ratio of fuel spheres to graphite spheres are important. In this paper, some relevant physical considerations of the initial core and running-in phase of HTR-PM are given. Then a typical scheme of the initial core and running-in phase is proposed and simulated with VSOP code, and some key physical parameters, such as the maximum power per fuel sphere, the maximum fuel temperature, the refueling rate, and the discharge burnup, are calculated. Results of the physical parameters all satisfy the relevant design requirements, which means the proposed scheme is safe and reliable and can provide support for the fuel management of HTR-PM in the future.

  18. STUDI DESAIN DOWN SCALE TERAS REAKTOR DAN BAHAN BAKAR PLTN JENIS PEBBLE BED MODULAR REACTOR – HTR 100 MWe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slamet Parmanto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Telah dilakukan penelitian terhadap teras reaktor Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR dengan daya 100 Mwe berbahan bakar UO2. Reaktor ini menggunakan moderator grafit dan helium sebagai pendingin. Studi down scale dilakukan tanpa mengubah geometri teras maupun geometri bahan bakar. Parameter yang dianalisis adalah kritikalitas teras, reaktivitas lebih, koefisien reaktivitas temperatur bahan bakar, moderator dan pendingin serta nilai ekonomis bahan bakar. Dari penelitian ini diharapkan diperoleh desain bahan bakar yang bernilai ekonomis dan memiliki fitur keselamatan melekat. Penelitian dilakukan dengan menggunakan program SRAC 2003. Hasil yang diperoleh adalah desain bahan bakar UO2 berbentuk pebble dengan pengkayaan 10% U235 dan 90 ppm racun dapat bakar Gd2O3. Nilai faktor multipilkasi effektif keff pada beginning of life (BOL adalah 1,01115 dan menjadi 1,00588 setelah 2658 hari operasi reaktor (EOL. Koefisien reaktivitas temperatur total diperoleh sebesar - 3,25900E-05 ∆k/k/K saat BOL dan -1,10615E-04 ∆k/k/K saat end of life (EOL. Reaktor ini memenuhi karakteristik keselamatan melekat ditandai dengan nilai koefisien reaktivitas temperatur yang negatif. Kata kunci: PBMR, desain bahan bakar, faktor multipilkasi effektif, reaktivitas lebih, koefisien reaktivitas temperatur.   Research of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR 100 MWe which used UO2 fuel has been done. This reactor uses graphite as moderator and helium as coolant. Down scale studies performed without changing the core and fuel geometry. The parameter being analyzed were core criticality, excess reactivity, fuel, moderator, coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, and fuel economy. This research is expected to obtain the design that has fuel economy and inherent safety features. In this research, we have employed SRAC 2003 code. The calculation show that the UO2 pebble fuel design with 10% enrichment of U235 and 90 ppm burnable poison of Gd2O3 results in the effective multiplication

  19. HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program cores 9 & 10: columnar hexagonal point-on-point packing with a 1:1 moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  20. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  1. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  2. One-dimensional modeling of radial heat removal during depressurized heatup transients in modular pebble-bed and prismatic high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, M.G.

    1984-07-01

    A one-dimensional computational model was developed to evaluate the heat removal capabilities of both prismatic-core and pebble-bed modular HTGRs during depressurized heatup transients. A correlation was incorporated to calculate the temperature- and neutron-fluence-dependent thermal conductivity of graphite. The modified Zehner-Schluender model was used to determine the effective thermal conductivity of a pebble bed, accounting for both conduction and radiation. Studies were performed for prismatic-core and pebble-bed modular HTGRs, and the results were compared to analyses performed by GA and GR, respectively. For the particular modular reactor design studied, the prismatic HTGR peak temperature was 2152.2/sup 0/C at 38 hours following the transient initiation, and the pebble-bed peak temperature was 1647.8/sup 0/C at 26 hours. These results compared favorably with those of GA and GE, with only slight differences caused by neglecting axial heat transfer in a one-dimensional radial model. This study found that the magnitude of the initial power density had a greater effect on the temperature excursion than did the initial temperature.

  3. Experimental Study and Computational Simulations of Key Pebble Bed Thermo-mechanics Issues for Design and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Potirniche, Gabriel; Cogliati, Joshua; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08

    An experimental and computational study, consisting of modeling and simulation (M&S), of key thermal-mechanical issues affecting the design and safety of pebble-bed (PB) reactors was conducted. The objective was to broaden understanding and experimentally validate thermal-mechanic phenomena of nuclear grade graphite, specifically, spheres in frictional contact as anticipated in the bed under reactor relevant pressures and temperatures. The contact generates graphite dust particulates that can subsequently be transported into the flowing gaseous coolent. Under postulated depressurization transients and with the potential for leaked fission products to be adsorbed onto graphite 'dust', there is the potential for fission products to escape from the primary volume. This is a design safety concern. Furthermore, earlier safety assessment identified the distinct possibility for the dispersed dust to combust in contact with air if sufficient conditions are met. Both of these phenomena were noted as important to design review and containing uncertainty to warrant study. The team designed and conducted two separate effects tests to study and benchmark the potential dust-generation rate, as well as study the conditions under which a dust explosion may occure in a standardized, instrumented explosion chamber.

  4. Gas Reactor International Cooperative program. Pebble bed reactor plant: screening evaluation. Volume 3. Appendix A. Equipment list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW(t) Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. Volume 1 reports the overall plant and reactor system and was prepared by the General Electric Company. Core scoping studies were performed which evaluated the effects of annular and cylindrical core configurations, radial blanket zones, burnup, and ball heavy metal loadings. The reactor system, including the PCRV, was investigated for both the annular and cylindrical core configurations. Volume 3 is an Appendix containing the equipment list for the plant and was also prepared by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. It tabulates the major components of the plant and describes each in terms of quantity, type, orientation, etc., to provide a basis for cost estimation.

  5. Design of a helium-cooled molten salt fusion breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Fulton, F.J.; Huegel, F.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Sherwood, A.E.; Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Wong, C.P.C.; DeVan, J.H.

    1985-02-01

    A new conceptual blanket design for a fusion reactor produces fissile material for fission power plants. Fission is suppressed by using beryllium, rather than uranium, to multiply neutrons and also by minimizing the fissile inventory. The molten-salt breeding media (LiF + BeF/sub 2/ + TghF/sub 4/) is circulated through the blanket and on to the online processing system where /sup 233/U and tritium are continuously removed. Helium cools the blanket including the steel pipes containing the molten salt. Austenitic steel was chosen because of its ease of fabrication, adequate radiation-damage lifetime, and low corrosion rate by molten salt. We estimate the breeder, having 3000 MW of fusion power, produces 6400 kg of /sup 233/U per year, which is enough to provide make up for 20 GWe of LWR per year (or 14 LWR plants of 4440 MWt) or twice that many HTGRs or CANDUs. Safety is enhanced because the afterheat is low and the blanket materials do not react with air or water. The fusion breeder based on a pre-MARS tandem mirror is estimated to cost $4.9B or 2.35 times an LWR of the same power. The estimated present value cost of the /sup 2/anumber/sup 3/U produced is $40/g if utility financed or $16/g if government financed.

  6. Helium-Cooled Refractory Alloys First Wall and Blanket Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Nygren, R.E.; Baxi, C.B.; Fogarty, P.; Ghoniem, N.; Khater, H.; McCarthy, K.; Merrill, B.; Nelson, B.; Reis, E.E.; Sharafat, S.; Schleicher, R.; Sze, D.K.; Ulrickson, M.; Willms, S.; Youssef, M.; Zinkel, S.

    1999-08-01

    Under the APEX program the He-cooled system design task is to evaluate and recommend high power density refractory alloy first wall and blanket designs and to recommend and initiate tests to address critical issues. We completed the preliminary design of a helium-cooled, W-5Re alloy, lithium breeder design and the results are reported in this paper. Many areas of the design were assessed, including material selection, helium impurity control, and mechanical, nuclear and thermal hydraulics design, and waste disposal, tritium and safety design. System study results show that at a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) gross thermal efficiency of 57.5%, a superconducting coil tokamak reactor, with an aspect ratio of 4, and an output power of 2 GWe, can be projected to have a cost of electricity at 54.6 mill/kWh. Critical issues were identified and we plan to continue the design on some of the critical issues during the next phase of the APEX design study.

  7. Water-ingress analysis for the 200 MWe pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Yanhua, E-mail: zhengyh@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shi Lei; Wang Yan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Water ingress into the primary circuit is generally recognized as one of the severe accidents with potential hazard to the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor adopting steam-turbine cycle, which will cause a positive reactivity introduction, as well as the chemical corrosion of graphite fuel elements and reflector structure material. Besides, increase of the primary pressure may result in the opening of the safety valves, consequently leading the release of radioactive isotopes and flammable water gas. The analysis of such a kind of important and particular accident is significant to verify the inherent safety characteristics of the modular HTR plants. Based on the preliminary design of the 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM), the design basis accident of a double-ended guillotine break of one heating tube and the beyond design basis accident of a large break of the main steam collection plate have been analyzed by using TINTE code, which is a special transient analysis program for high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Some safety relevant concerns, such as the fuel temperature, the primary loop pressure, the graphite corrosion, the water gas releasing amount, as well as the natural convection influence on the condition of failing to close the blower flaps, have been studied in detail. The calculation results indicate that even under some severe hypothetical postulates, the HTR-PM is able to keep the inherent safeties of the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor and has a relatively good natural plant response, which will not result in environmental radiation hazard.

  8. Helium-cooled molten-salt fusion breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Fulton, F.J.; Huegel, F.; Neef, W.S. Jr.; Sherwood, A.E.; Berwald, D.H.; Whitley, R.H.; Wong, C.P.C.; Devan, J.H.

    1984-12-01

    We present a new conceptual design for a fusion reactor blanket that is intended to produce fissile material for fission power plants. Fast fission is suppressed by using beryllium instead of uranium to multiply neutrons. Thermal fission is suppressed by minimizing the fissile inventory. The molten-salt breeding medium (LiF + BeF/sub 2/ + ThF/sub 4/) is circulated through the blanket and to the on-line processing system where /sup 233/U and tritium are continuously removed. Helium cools the blanket and the austenitic steel tubes that contain the molten salt. Austenitic steel was chosen because of its ease of fabrication, adequate radiation-damage lifetime, and low corrosion by molten salt. We estimate that a breeder having 3000 MW of fusion power will produce 6500 kg of /sup 233/U per year. This amount is enough to provide makeup for 20 GWe of light-water reactors per year or twice that many high-temperature gas-cooled reactors or Canadian heavy-water reactors. Safety is enhanced because the afterheat is low and blanket materials do not react with air or water. The fusion breeder based on a pre-MARS tandem mirror is estimated to cost $4.9B or 2.35 times a light-water reactor of the same power. The estimated cost of the /sup 233/U produced is $40/g for fusion plants costing 2.35 times that of a light-water reactor if utility owned or $16/g if government owned.

  9. Helium-Cooled Black Shroud for Subscale Cryogenic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, James; Jackson, Michael; DiPirro, Michael; Francis, John

    2011-01-01

    This shroud provides a deep-space simulating environment for testing scaled-down models of passively cooling systems for spaceflight optics and instruments. It is used inside a liquid-nitrogen- cooled vacuum chamber, and it is cooled by liquid helium to 5 K. It has an inside geometry of approximately 1.6 m diameter by 0.45 m tall. The inside surfaces of its top and sidewalls have a thermal absorptivity greater than 0.96. The bottom wall has a large central opening that is easily customized to allow a specific test item to extend through it. This enables testing of scale models of realistic passive cooling configurations that feature a very large temperature drop between the deepspace-facing cooled side and the Sun/Earth-facing warm side. This shroud has an innovative thermal closeout of the bottom wall, so that a test sample can have a hot (room temperature) side outside of the shroud, and a cold side inside the shroud. The combination of this closeout and the very black walls keeps radiated heat from the sample s warm end from entering the shroud, reflecting off the walls and heating the sample s cold end. The shroud includes 12 vertical rectangular sheet-copper side panels that are oriented in a circular pattern. Using tabs bent off from their edges, these side panels are bolted to each other and to a steel support ring on which they rest. The removable shroud top is a large copper sheet that rests on, and is bolted to, the support ring when the shroud is closed. The support ring stands on four fiberglass tube legs, which isolate it thermally from the vacuum chamber bottom. The insides of the cooper top and side panels are completely covered with 25- mm-thick aluminum honeycomb panels. This honeycomb is painted black before it is epoxied to the copper surfaces. A spiral-shaped copper tube, clamped at many different locations to the outside of the top copper plate, serves as part of the liquid helium cooling loop. Another copper tube, plumbed in a series to the

  10. A methodology to investigate the contribution of conduction and radiation heat transfer to the effective thermal conductivity of packed graphite pebble beds, including the wall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Beer, M., E-mail: maritz.db@gmail.com [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Du Toit, C.G., E-mail: Jat.DuToit@nwu.ac.za [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, North-West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Rousseau, P.G., E-mail: pieter.rousseau@uct.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The radiation and conduction components of the effective thermal conductivity are separated. • Near-wall effects have a notable influence on the effective thermal conductivity. • Effective thermal conductivity is a function of the macro temperature gradient. • The effective thermal conductivity profile shows a characteristic trend. • The trend is a result of the interplay between conduction and radiation. - Abstract: The effective thermal conductivity represents the overall heat transfer characteristics of a packed bed of spheres and must be considered in the analysis and design of pebble bed gas-cooled reactors. During depressurized loss of forced cooling conditions the dominant heat transfer mechanisms for the passive removal of decay heat are radiation and conduction. Predicting the value of the effective thermal conductivity is complex since it inter alia depends on the temperature level and temperature gradient through the bed, as well as the pebble packing structure. The effect of the altered packing structure in the wall region must therefore also be considered. Being able to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction allows a better understanding of the underlying phenomena and the characteristics of the resultant effective thermal conductivity. This paper introduces a purpose-designed test facility and accompanying methodology that combines physical measurements with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to separate the contributions of radiation and conduction heat transfer, including the wall effects. Preliminary results obtained with the methodology offer important insights into the trends observed in the experimental results and provide a better understanding of the interplay between the underlying heat transfer phenomena.

  11. Quantitative analysis of uncertainty from pebble flow in HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hao, E-mail: haochen.heu@163.com [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China); Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET), Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Fu, Li; Jiong, Guo; Ximing, Sun; Lidong, Wang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET), Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • An uncertainty and sensitivity analysis model for pebble flow has been built. • Experiment and random walk theory are used to identify uncertainty of pebble flow. • Effects of pebble flow to the core parameters are identified by sensitivity analysis. • Uncertainty of core parameters due to pebble flow is quantified for the first time. - Abstract: In pebble bed HTR, along the deterministic average flow lines, randomness exists in the flow of pebbles, which is not possible to simulate with the current reactor design codes for HTR, such as VSOP, due to the limitation of current computer capability. In order to study how the randomness of pebble flow will affect the key parameters in HTR, a new pebble flow model was set up, which has been successfully transplanted into the VSOP code. In the new pebble flow model, mixing coefficients were introduced into the fixed flow line to simulate the randomness of pebble flow. Numerical simulation and pebble flow experiments were facilitated to determine the mixing coefficients. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to achieve the conclusion that the key parameters of pebble bed HTR are not sensitive to the randomness in pebble flow. The uncertainty of maximum power density and power distribution caused by the randomness in pebble flow is very small, especially for the “multi-pass” scheme of fuel circulation adopted in the pebble bed HTR.

  12. Pitted pebbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuenen, Ph.H.

    1942-01-01

    As early as 1863 Sorby proved that pitted pebbles are the result of solution at the points of mutual contact in a conglomerate. As cause he suggested solution under pressure in saturated, stagnant groundwater by what has afterwards been designated Riecke’s principle. By the examination of polished

  13. Influence of power level and fuel type on safety and economy of the simplified pebble bed HTR concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Heek, A.I.; Kuijper, J.C.; De Haas, J.B.M. [Netheerlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    For three different power levels, 20, 40 and 150 MWth, the PAP-HTR has been studied. This is an HTR Module concept that has been simplified in such a way that the continuously defuelling system has been eliminated and no defuelling takes place during a period of several years. Two core heatup scenarios have been simulated. It has been shown that in all cases the maximum fuel pebble temperature remains below 1600C, the temperature above which fuel degradation would start to occur, also after the reactor has gone critical again and the power level has been stabilized by itself. Fuel and gas temperature distributions are compared as well. The maximum pebble temperature before recriticality is higher for the loss of coolant (LOCA) scenario than for the loss of flow (LOFA) case, but the equilibrium maximum temperature after recriticality turns out to be higher for the pressurized case, because of the higher equilibrium power level. The equilibrium power level is a much smaller fraction of the nominal power level for the large 150 MWth system than for the smaller systems, due to the lower rate of cooling down of the large system after initiation of the accident. Therefore the equilibrium maximum temperature stays within acceptable limits for the large system too. The effects of the use of thorium fuel on the core height and waste radiotoxicity have been compared with the case of uranium fuel. Although it is widely believed that burnt thorium fuel would be cleaner than spent uranium fuel in terms of radiotoxicity, this did not appear to be more pronounced for this reactor concept than for e.g. PWRs. The relationship of power level and energy price is obvious for this power range. The use of thorium with highly enriched uranium could bring an additional economical advantage because of the lower core height needed for the same power level as the uranium case. With thorium a higher burnup can be attained, through which fuel pebbles can be added at a slower rate. The size of

  14. HTR-Proteus Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 5,6,7,&8: Columnar Hexagonal Point-on-Point Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sterbentz, James W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Snoj, Luka [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lengar, Igor [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Koberl, Oliver [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  15. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 5, 6, 7, & 8: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:2 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  16. Limits of helium cooling in fusion reactor first walls and blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, C.W.; Bampton, M.C.C.; Aase, D.T.; Sutey, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    This study explores the practical limits of helium cooling in a simple geometry unconstrained by a particular conceptual design. Specifically, the configuration was chosen to be an externally heated straight tube considering both uniform heating and heating of half the external parimeter. Both thermal hydraulic and structural limits to the heat flux have been investigated. Curves are presented to show the heat flux and tube length which simultaneously attain both a well temperature and pressure drop/pumping power limit for a range of diameters from 0.05 to 8.0 inches and pressures from 50 to 5000 psia. Tube wall stress limits on heat flux are also shown for the same range of pressure and diameter. These results should serve as an aid in planning more complex concepts as well as evaluating helium cooling in this specific configuration.

  17. Thermal Performance of a Dual-Channel, Helium-Cooled, Tungsten Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    YOUCHISON,DENNIS L.; NORTH,MART T.

    2000-11-22

    Helium-cooled, refractory heat exchangers are now under consideration for first wall and divertor applications. These refractory devices take advantage of high temperature operation with large delta-Ts to effectively handle high heat fluxes. The high temperature helium can then be used in a gas turbine for high-efficiency power conversion. Over the last five years, heat removal with helium was shown to increase dramatically by using porous metal to provide a very large effective surface area for heat transfer in a small volume. Last year, the thermal performance of a bare-copper, dual-channel, helium-cooled, porous metal divertor mock-up was evaluated on the 30 kW Electron Beam Test System at Sandia National Laboratories. The module survived a maximum absorbed heat flux of 34.6 MW/m{sup 2} and reached a maximum surface temperature of 593 C for uniform power loading of 3 kW absorbed on a 2-cm{sup 2} area. An impressive 10 kW of power was absorbed on an area of 24 cm{sup 2}. Recently, a similar dual-module, helium-cooled heat exchanger made almost entirely of tungsten was designed and fabricated by Thermacore, Inc. and tested at Sandia. A complete flow test of each channel was performed to determine the actual pressure drop characteristics. Each channel was equipped with delta-P transducers and platinum RTDs for independent calorimetry. One mass flow meter monitored the total flow to the heat exchanger, while a second monitored flow in only one of the channels. The thermal response of each tungsten module was obtained for heat fluxes in excess of 5 MW/m{sup 2} using 50 C helium at 4 MPa. Fatigue cycles were also performed to assess the fracture toughness of the tungsten modules. A description of the module design and new results on flow instabilities are also presented.

  18. Modelling of HTR (High Temperature Reactor Pebble-Bed 10 MW to Determine Criticality as A Variations of Enrichment and Radius of the Fuel (Kernel With the Monte Carlo Code MCNP4C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammam Oktajianto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas-cooled nuclear reactor is a Generation IV reactor which has been receiving significant attention due to many desired characteristics such as inherent safety, modularity, relatively low cost, short construction period, and easy financing. High temperature reactor (HTR pebble-bed as one of type of gas-cooled reactor concept is getting attention. In HTR pebble-bed design, radius and enrichment of the fuel kernel are the key parameter that can be chosen freely to determine the desired value of criticality. This paper models HTR pebble-bed 10 MW and determines an effective of enrichment and radius of the fuel (Kernel to get criticality value of reactor. The TRISO particle coated fuel particle which was modelled explicitly and distributed in the fuelled region of the fuel pebbles using a Simple-Cubic (SC lattice. The pebble-bed balls and moderator balls distributed in the core zone using a Body-Centred Cubic lattice with assumption of a fresh fuel by the fuel enrichment was 7-17% at 1% range and the size of the fuel radius was 175-300 µm at 25 µm ranges. The geometrical model of the full reactor is obtained by using lattice and universe facilities provided by MCNP4C. The details of model are discussed with necessary simplifications. Criticality calculations were conducted by Monte Carlo transport code MCNP4C and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI. From calculation results can be concluded that an effective of enrichment and radius of fuel (Kernel to achieve a critical condition was the enrichment of 15-17% at a radius of 200 µm, the enrichment of 13-17% at a radius of 225 µm, the enrichments of 12-15% at radius of 250 µm, the enrichments of 11-14% at a radius of 275 µm and the enrichment of 10-13% at a radius of 300 µm, so that the effective of enrichments and radii of fuel (Kernel can be considered in the HTR 10 MW. Keywords—MCNP4C, HTR, enrichment, radius, criticality 

  19. Preliminary neutronics design and analysis of helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Zhongliang; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn; Chen, Chong; Li, Min; Zhou, Guangming

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Neutronics design of a helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR was presented. • The breeding zones parallel to FW and perpendicular to FW were optimized. • A series of neutronics analyses for the proposed blanket were shown. - Abstract: Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a test tokamak reactor being designed in China to bridge the gap between ITER and future fusion power plant. Tritium self-sufficiency is one of the most important issues for CFETR and the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) is recommended not less than 1.2. As one of the candidates, a helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR superconducting tokamak option was proposed. In the concept, radial arranged U-shaped breeding zones are adopted for higher TBR and simpler structure. In this work, three-dimensional neutronics design and analysis of the blanket were performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code MCNP with IAEA data library FENDL-2.1. Tritium breeding capability of the proposed blanket was assessed and the breeding zones parallel to first wall (FW) and perpendicular to FW were optimized. Meanwhile, the nuclear heating analysis and shielding performance were also presented for later thermal and structural analysis. The results showed that the blanket could well meet the tritium self-sufficiency target and the neutron shield could satisfy the design requirements.

  20. Options for a high heat flux enabled helium cooled first wall for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeiter, Frederik, E-mail: f.arbe@kit.edu; Chen, Yuming; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Klein, Christine; Neuberger, Heiko; Ruck, Sebastian; Schlindwein, Georg; Schwab, Florian; Weth, Axel von der

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Design challenges for helium cooled first wall reviewed and otimization approaches explored. • Application of enhanced heat transfer surfaces to the First Wall cooling channels. • Demonstrated a design point for 1 MW/m{sup 2} with temperatures <550 °C and acceptable stresses. • Feasibility of several manufacturing processes for ribbed surfaces is shown. - Abstract: Helium is considered as coolant in the plasma facing first wall of several blanket concepts for DEMO fusion reactors, due to the favorable properties of flexible temperature range, chemical inertness, no activation, comparatively low effort to remove tritium from the gas and no chemical corrosion. Existing blanket designs have shown the ability to use helium cooled first walls with heat flux densities of 0.5 MW/m{sup 2}. Average steady state heat loads coming from the plasma for current EU DEMO concepts are expected in the range of 0.3 MW/m{sup 2}. The definition of peak values is still ongoing and depends on the chosen first wall shape, magnetic configuration and assumptions on the fraction of radiated power and power fall off lengths in the scrape off layer of the plasma. Peak steady state values could reach and excess 1 MW/m{sup 2}. Higher short-term transient loads are expected. Design optimization approaches including heat transfer enhancement, local heat transfer tuning and shape optimization of the channel cross section are discussed. Design points to enable a helium cooled first wall capable to sustain heat flux densities of 1 MW/m{sup 2} at an average shell temperature lower than 500 °C are developed based on experimentally validated heat transfer coefficients of structured channel surfaces. The required pumping power is in the range of 3–5% of the collected thermal power. The FEM stress analyses show code-acceptable stress intensities. Several manufacturing methods enabling the application of the suggested heat transfer enhanced first wall channels are explored. An

  1. Design, fabrication, and testing of a helium-cooled module for the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxi, C.B.; Smith, J.P.; Youchison, D.

    1994-08-01

    The International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) will have a single-null divertor with total power flow of 200 MW and a peak heat flux of about 5 MW/m{sup 2}. The reference coolant for the divertor is water. However, helium is a viable alternative and offers advantages from safety considerations, such as excellent radiation stability and chemical inertness. In order to prove the feasibility of helium cooling at ITER relevant heat flux conditions, General Atomics designed, fabricated, and tested a helium-cooled divertor module. The module was made from dispersion strengthened copper, with a heat flux surface 25 mm wide and 80 mm long, designed for twice the ITER divertor heat flux. Different techniques were examined to enhance the heat transfer, which in turn reduced the flow and pumping power required to cool the module. It was concluded that an extended surface was the most practical solution. An optimization study was performed to find the best extended surface parameters. The optimum extended surface geometry consisted of fins: 10 mm high, 0.4 mm thick with a 1 mm pitch. It was estimated to require a pumping power of 150 W to remove 20 kW of power. This is more than an order of magnitude reduction in pumping power requirement, compared to smooth surface. The module was fabricated by electric discharge machining (EDM) process. The testing was carried out at SNLA during August 1993. The testing confirmed the design calculations. The peak heat flux during the test was 10 MW/m{sup 2} applied over a surface area of 20 cm{sup 2}. The pumping power calculated from flow rate and pressure drop measurement was about 160 W, which was less than 1% of the power removed. It is planned to test the module to higher temperature limits and higher heat fluxes during coming months. As a result of this effort we conclude that helium cooling of the ITER divertor is feasible without requiring a very large helium pressure or a large pumping power.

  2. Updated conceptual design of helium cooling ceramic blanket for HCCB-DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Suhao [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Cao, Qixiang; Wu, Xinghua; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guoshu [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Feng, Kaiming, E-mail: fengkm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An updated design of Helium Cooled Ceramic breeder Blanket (HCCB) for HCCB-DEMO is proposed in this paper. • The Breeder Unit is transformed to TBM-like sub-modules, with double “banana” shape tritium breeder. Each sub-module is inserted in space formed by Stiffen Grids (SGs). • The performance analysis is performed based on the R&D development of material, fabrication technology and safety assessment in CN ITER TBM program. • Hot spots will be located at the FW bend side. - Abstract: The basic definition of the HCCB-DEMO plant and preliminary blanket designed by Southwestern Institution of Physics was proposed in 2009. The DEMO fusion power is 2550 MW and electric power is 800 MW. Based on development of R&D in breeding blanket, a conceptual design of helium cooled blanket with ceramic breeder in HCCB-DEMO was presented. The main design features of the HCCB-DEMO blanket were: (1) CLF-1 structure materials, Be multiplier and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} breeder; (2) neutronic wall load is 2.3 MW/m{sup 2} and surface heat flux is 0.43 MW/m{sup 2} (2) TBR ≈ 1.15; (3) geometry of breeding units is ITER TBM-like segmentation; (4)Pressure of helium is 8 MPa and inlet/outlet temperature is 300/500 °C. On the basis of these design, some important analytical results are presented in aspects of (i) neutronic behavior of the blanket; (ii) design of 3D structure and thermal-hydraulic lay-out for breeding blanket module; (iii) structural-mechanical behavior of the blanket under pressurization. All of these assessments proved current stucture fulfill the design requirements.

  3. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurinskiy, P., E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Rolli, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Tritium release properties and characteristics of microstructure of beryllium pebbles having different sizes of grains were studied. • Fine-grained beryllium pebbles showed the best ability to release tritium compared to pebbles from another charges. • Be pebbles with the grain sizes exceeding 100 μm contain a great number of small pores and inclusions presumably referring to the history of material fabrication. • The sizes of grains are one of a key characteristic of microstructure which influences the parameters of tritium release. - Abstract: Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the design of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by NGK Insulators Ltd., Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles from Russian Federation and USA are also available and the possibility of their large-scale fabrication is under study. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Materion Corporation, USA.

  4. Coupling a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle to a Helium-Cooled Reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, Bobby [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pasch, James Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kruizenga, Alan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Walker, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the thermodynamics of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) recompression closed Brayton cycle (RCBC) coupled to a Helium-cooled nuclear reactor. The baseline reactor design for the study is the AREVA High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Using the AREVA HTGR nominal operating parameters, an initial thermodynamic study was performed using Sandia's deterministic RCBC analysis program. Utilizing the output of the RCBC thermodynamic analysis, preliminary values of reactor power and of Helium flow rate through the reactor were calculated in Sandia's HelCO2 code. Some research regarding materials requirements was then conducted to determine aspects of corrosion related to both Helium and to sCO2 , as well as some mechanical considerations for pressures and temperatures that will be seen by the piping and other components. This analysis resulted in a list of materials-related research items that need to be conducted in the future. A short assessment of dry heat rejection advantages of sCO2> Brayton cycles was also included. This assessment lists some items that should be investigated in the future to better understand how sCO2 Brayton cycles and nuclear can maximally contribute to optimizing the water efficiency of carbon free power generation

  5. A robust helium-cooled shield/blanket design for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. P. C.; Bourque, R. F.; Baxi, C. B.; Colleraine, A. P.; Grunloh, H. J.; Letchenberg, T.; Leuer, J. A.; Reis, E. E.; Redler, K.; Will, R.

    1993-11-01

    General Atomics Fusion and Reactor Groups have completed a helium-cooled, conceptual shield/blanket design for ITER. The configuration selected is a pressurized tubes design embedded in radially oriented plates. This plate can be made from ferritic steel or from V-alloy. Helium leakage to the plasma chamber is eliminated by conservative, redundant design and proper quality control and inspection programs. High helium pressure at 18 MPa is used to reduce pressure drop and enhance heat transfer. This high gas pressure is believed practical when confined in small diameter tubes. Ample industrial experience exists for safe high gas pressure operations. Inboard shield design is highlighted in this study since the allowable void fraction is more limited. Lithium is used as the thermal contacting medium and for tritium breeding; its safety concerns are minimized by a modular, low inventory design that requires no circulation of the liquid metal for the purpose of heat removal. This design is robust, conservative, reliable, and meets all design goals and requirements. It can also be built with present-day technology.

  6. Conceptual design of the blanket mechanical attachment for the helium-cooled lithium-lead reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, G. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association for Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Branas, B. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association for Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: beatriz.branas@ciemat.es; Lucas, J. [Elytt Energy, Po Castellana 114, 3, 7 28046 Madrid (Spain); Doncel, J.; Medrano, M.; Garcia, A. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association for Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Giancarli, L. [CEA/Saclay, DEN/CPT, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ibarra, A. [EURATOM-CIEMAT Association for Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Li Puma, A. [CEA/Saclay, DEN/CPT, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Maisonnier, D.; Sardain, P. [EFDA-Close Support Unit Garching, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    The conceptual design of a new type of fusion reactor based on the helium-cooled lithium-lead (HCLL) blanket has been performed within the European Power Plant Conceptual Studies. As part of this activity, a new attachment system suitable for the HCLL blanket modules had to be developed. This attachment is composed of two parts. The first one is the connection between module and the first part of a shield, called high temperature shield, which operates at a temperature around 500 deg. C, close to that of the blanket module. This connection must be made at the lateral walls, in order to avoid openings through the first wall and breeding zone thus avoiding complex design and fabrication issues of the module. The second connection is the one between the high temperature shield and a second shield called low temperature shield, which has a temperature during reactor operation around 150 deg. C. The design of this connection is complex because it must allow the large differential thermal expansion (up to 30 mm) between the two components. Design proposals for both connections are presented, together with the results of finite element mechanical analyses which demonstrate the feasibility to support the blanket and shield modules during normal and accidental operation conditions.

  7. Forced Two-Phase Helium Cooling Scheme for the Mu2e Transport Solenoid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatkowski, G. [Fermilab; Cheban, S. [Fermilab; Dhanaraj, N. [Fermilab; Evbota, D. [Fermilab; Lopes, M. [Fermilab; Nicol, T. [Fermilab; Sanders, R. [Fermilab; Schmitt, R. [Fermilab; Voirin, E. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid (TS) is an S-shaped magnet formed by two separate but similar magnets, TS-u and TS-d. Each magnet is quarter-toroid shaped with a centerline radius of approximately 3 m utilizing a helium cooling loop consisting of 25 to 27 horizontal-axis rings connected in series. This cooling loop configuration has been deemed adequate for cooling via forced single phase liquid helium; however it presents major challenges to forced two-phase flow such as “garden hose” pressure drop, concerns of flow separation from tube walls, difficulty of calculation, etc. Even with these disadvantages, forced two-phase flow has certain inherent advantages which make it a more attractive option than forced single phase flow. It is for this reason that the use of forced two-phase flow was studied for the TS magnets. This paper will describe the analysis using helium-specific pressure drop correlations, conservative engineering approach, helium properties calculated and updated at over fifty points, and how the results compared with those in literature. Based on the findings, the use of forced-two phase helium is determined to be feasible for steady-state cooling of the TS solenoids

  8. Design of the helium cooled lithium lead breeding blanket in CEA: from TBM to DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, G.; Aubert, J.; Forest, L.; Jaboulay, J.-C.; Li Puma, A.; Boccaccini, L. V.

    2017-04-01

    The helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL) blanket concept was originally developed in CEA at the beginning of 2000: it is one of the two European blanket concepts to be tested in ITER in the form of a test blanket module (TBM) and one of the four blanket concepts currently being considered for the DEMOnstration reactor that will follow ITER. The TBM is a highly optimized component for the ITER environment that will provide crucial information for the development of the DEMO blanket, but its design needs to be adapted to the DEMO reactor. With respect to the TBM design, reduction of the steel content in the breeding zone (BZ) is sought in order to maximize tritium breeding reactions. Different options are being studied, with the potential of reaching tritium breeding ratio (TBR) values up to 1.21. At the same time, the design of the back supporting structure (BSS), which is a DEMO specific component that has to support the blanket modules inside the vacuum vessel (VV), is ongoing with the aim of maximizing the shielding power and minimizing pumping power. This implies a re-engineering of the modules’ attachment system. Design changes however, will have an impact on the manufacturing and assembly sequences that are being developed for the HCLL-TBM. Due to the differences in joint configurations, thicknesses to be welded, heat dissipation and the various technical constraints related to the accessibility of the welding tools and implementation of non-destructive examination (NDE), the manufacturing procedure should be adapted and optimized for DEMO design. Laser welding instead of TIG could be an option to reduce distortions. The time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) technique is being investigated for NDE. Finally, essential information expected from the HCLL-TBM program that will be needed to finalize the DEMO design is discussed.

  9. Preliminary electromagnetic analysis of Helium Cooled Solid Blanket for CFETR by MAXWELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Cheng; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A FEM model of the blanket and magnetic system was built. • Electromagnetic forces and moments of the typical blanket for ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic materials were computed and analyzed. • Maxwell forces and Lorentz forces were computed and compared. • Eddy current in the blanket was analyzed under MD condition. - Abstract: A Helium Cooled Solid Blanket (HCSB) for CFETR (Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor) was designed by USTC. The structural and thermal-hydraulic analysis has been carried out, while electromagnetic analysis was not carefully researched. In this paper, a FEM (finite element method) model of the HCSB was developed and electromagnetic forces as well as moments was computed by a FEM software called MAXWELL integrated in ANSYS Workbench. In the geometrical model, flow channels and small connecting parts were neglected because of the extreme complication and the reasonable conservative assumption by neglecting these circumstantial details. As for electromagnetic (EM) analysis, Lorentz forces due to eddy currents caused by main disruption and Maxwell forces due to the magnetization of RAFM steel (i.e. EUROFER97) were computed. Since the unavailability of the details of the plasma in CFETR, when disruptions happen, the condition where a linear current quench of main disruption occurs was assumed. The maximum magnitude of the electromagnetic forces was 356.45 kN and the maximum value of the coupled electromagnetic moments was 1899.40 N m around the radial direction. It is feasible to couple electromagnetic analysis, structural analysis and thermal-hydraulic analysis in the future since MAXWELL has good channels to exchange data between different analytic parts.

  10. Electromagnetic analysis of the Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngmin, E-mail: ymlee@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Duck Young [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Korean helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module set (TBM-set) will be installed at equatorial port #18 of Vacuum Vessel in ITER in order to test the breeding blanket performance for forthcoming fusion power plant. Since ITER tokamak has a set of electromagnetic coils (Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field and Toroidal Field coil set) around Vacuum Vessel, the HCCR TBM-set, the TBM and associated shield, is greatly influenced by magnetic field generated by these coils. In the case of fast transient electromagnetic events such as major disruption, vertical displacement event or magnet fast discharge, magnetic field and induced eddy current results in huge electromagnetic load, known as Lorentz load, on the HCCR TBM-set. In addition, the TBM-set experiences electromagnetic load due to magnetization of the structural material not only during the fast transient events but also during normal operation since the HCCR TBM adopts Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel as a structural material. This is known as Maxwell load which includes Lorentz load as well as load due to magnetization of structure material. This paper presents electromagnetic analysis results for the HCCR TBM-set. For analysis, a 20° sector finite model was constructed considering ITER configuration such as Vacuum Vessel, ITER shield blankets, Central Solenoid, Poloidal Field, Toroidal Field coil set as well as the HCCR TBM-set. Three major disruptions (operational event, likely event and highly unlikely event) were selected for analysis based on the load specifications. ANSYS-EMAG was used as a calculation tool. The results of EM analysis will be used as input data for the structural analysis.

  11. "Smart pebble" designs for sediment transport monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Alexakis, Athanasios; Pavlovskis, Edgars

    2015-04-01

    Sediment transport, due to primarily the action of water, wind and ice, is one of the most significant geomorphic processes responsible for shaping Earth's surface. It involves entrainment of sediment grains in rivers and estuaries due to the violently fluctuating hydrodynamic forces near the bed. Here an instrumented particle, namely a "smart pebble", is developed to investigate the exact flow conditions under which individual grains may be entrained from the surface of a gravel bed. This could lead in developing a better understanding of the processes involved, focusing on the response of the particle during a variety of flow entrainment events. The "smart pebble" is a particle instrumented with MEMS sensors appropriate for capturing the hydrodynamic forces a coarse particle might experience during its entrainment from the river bed. A 3-axial gyroscope and accelerometer registers data to a memory card via a microcontroller, embedded in a 3D-printed waterproof hollow spherical particle. The instrumented board is appropriately fit and centred into the shell of the pebble, so as to achieve a nearly uniform distribution of the mass which could otherwise bias its motion. The "smart pebble" is powered by an independent power to ensure autonomy and sufficiently long periods of operation appropriate for deployment in the field. Post-processing and analysis of the acquired data is currently performed offline, using scientific programming software. The performance of the instrumented particle is validated, conducting a series of calibration experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions.

  12. Status on DEMO Helium Cooled Lithium Lead breeding blanket thermo-mechanical analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, J., E-mail: julien.aubert@cea.fr [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aiello, G.; Jaboulay, J.-C. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kiss, B. [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary); Morin, A. [CEA-Saclay, DEN, DM2S, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • CEA with the support of Wigner-RCP and IPP-CR, is in charge of the design of the HCLL blanket for DEMO. The DEMO HCLL breeding blanket design capitalizes on the experience acquired on the HCLL Test Blanket Module designed for ITER. Design improvements are being implemented to adapt the design to DEMO specifications and performance objectives. • Thermal and mechanical analyses have been carried out in order to justify the design of the HCLL breeding blanket showing promising results for tie rods modules’ attachments system and relatively good behavior of the box in case of LOCA when comparing to RCC-MRx criteria. • CFD thermal analyses on generic breeding unit have enabled the consolidation of the results obtained with previous FEM design analyses. - Abstract: The EUROfusion Consortium develops a design of a fusion power demonstrator (DEMO) in the framework of the European “Horizon 2020” innovation and research program. One of the key components in the fusion reactor is the breeding blanket surrounding the plasma, ensuring tritium self-sufficiency, heat removal for conversion into electricity, and neutron shielding. The Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) blanket is one of the concepts which is investigated for DEMO. It is made of a Eurofer structure and uses the eutectic liquid lithium–lead as tritium breeder and neutron multiplier, and helium gas as coolant. Within the EUROfusion organization, CEA with the support of Wigner-RCP and IPP-CR, is in charge of the design of the HCLL blanket for DEMO. This paper presents the status of the thermal and mechanical analyses carried out on the HCLL breeding blanket in order to justify the design. CFD thermal analyses on generic breeding unit including stiffening plates and cooling plates have been performed with ANSYS in order to consolidate results obtained with previous FEM design analyses. Moreover in order to expand the justification of the HCLL Breeding blanket design, the most loaded area of

  13. "Smart pebble" design for environmental monitoring applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Pavlovskis, Edgars

    2014-05-01

    Sediment transport, due to primarily the action of water, wind and ice, is one of the most significant geomorphic processes responsible for shaping Earth's surface. It involves entrainment of sediment grains in rivers and estuaries due to the violently fluctuating hydrodynamic forces near the bed. Here an instrumented particle, namely a "smart pebble", is developed to investigate the exact flow conditions under which individual grains may be entrained from the surface of a gravel bed. This could lead in developing a better understanding of the processes involved, while focusing on the response of the particle during a variety of flow entrainment events. The "smart pebble" is a particle instrumented with MEMS sensors appropriate for capturing the hydrodynamic forces a coarse particle might experience during its entrainment from the river bed. A 3-axial gyroscope and accelerometer registers data to a memory card via a microcontroller, embedded in a 3D-printed waterproof hollow spherical particle. The instrumented board is appropriately fit and centred into the shell of the pebble, so as to achieve a nearly uniform distribution of the mass which could otherwise bias its motion. The "smart pebble" is powered by an independent power to ensure autonomy and sufficiently long periods of operation appropriate for deployment in the field. Post-processing and analysis of the acquired data is currently performed offline, using scientific programming software. The performance of the instrumented particle is validated, conducting a series of calibration experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions. "Smart pebble" allows for a wider range of environmental sensors (e.g. for environmental/pollutant monitoring) to be incorporated so as to extend the range of its application, enabling accurate environmental monitoring which is required to ensure infrastructure resilience and preservation of ecological health.

  14. PEBBLES Operation and Theory Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua J. Cogliati

    2010-09-01

    The PEBBLES manual describes the PEBBLES code. The PEBBLES code is a computer program designed to simulation the motion, packing and vibration of spheres that undergo various mechanical forces including gravitation, Hooke’s law force and various friction forces. The frictional forces include true static friction that allows non-zero angles of repose. Each pebble is individually simulated using the distinct element method.

  15. PEBBLES Operation and Theory Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua J. Cogliati

    2011-02-01

    The PEBBLES manual describes the PEBBLES code. The PEBBLES code is a computer program designed to simulation the motion, packing and vibration of spheres that undergo various mechanical forces including gravitation, Hooke’s law force and various friction forces. The frictional forces include true static friction that allows non-zero angles of repose. Each pebble is individually simulated using the distinct element method.

  16. Research on the Computed Tomography Pebble Flow Detecting System for HTR-PM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pebble dynamics is important for the safe operation of pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactors and is a complicated problem of great concern. To investigate it more authentically, a computed tomography pebble flow detecting (CT-PFD system has been constructed, in which a three-dimensional model is simulated according to the ratio of 1 : 5 with the core of HTR-PM. A multislice helical CT is utilized to acquire the reconstructed cross-sectional images of simulated pebbles, among which special tracer pebbles are designed to indicate pebble flow. Tracer pebbles can be recognized from many other background pebbles because of their heavy kernels that can be resolved in CT images. The detecting principle and design parameters of the system were demonstrated by a verification experiment on an existing CT system in this paper. Algorithms to automatically locate the three-dimensional coordinates of tracer pebbles and to rebuild the trajectory of each tracer pebble were presented and verified. The proposed pebble-detecting and tracking technique described in this paper will be implemented in the near future.

  17. Breeding blanket design and systems integration for a helium-cooled lithium-lead fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Puma, A. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)]. E-mail: alipuma@cea.fr; Berton, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Branas, B. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Buehler, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Doncel, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Fischer, U. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Farabolini, W. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Giancarli, L. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Maisonnier, D. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pereslavtsev, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Raboin, S. [CEA Cadarache, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Salavy, J.-F. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Sardain, P. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Szczepanski, J. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Ward, D. [UKAEA, Culham Science Center, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15

    This paper describes the work performed for the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) reactor model AB, a 'near-term' fusion power reactor based on limited extrapolations from today knowledge on technology and plasma physic assumption, featuring a helium-cooled lithium lead (HCLL) blanket concept and a He cooled divertor. The main design rational and characteristics of the PPCS model AB as well as the main assumption and achieved results are reported. The reactor is able to supply to the grid a net electrical power of 1.5 GW{sub e} for a fusion power of 4.2 GW{sub th} and features a major radius of 9.56 m. A tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of 1.13 will assure the tritium self sufficiency.

  18. Monte Carlo criticality calculation for Pebble-type HTR-PROTEUS core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Chul; Shin, Chang Ho; Han, Chi Young; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Soon Young [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Jae Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    These days, pebble-bed and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs are once again in vogue in connection with hydrogen production. In this study, as a part of establishing Monte Carlo computation system for HTGR core analysis, some criticality calculations for pebble-type HTGR were carried out using MCNP code. Firstly, the pebble-bed cores of HTR-PROTEUS critical facility in Swiss were selected for the benchmark model, and, after the detailed MCNP modeling of the whole facility, criticality calculations were performed. It was also investigated the homogenization effect of TRISO fuel on criticality.

  19. The reprocessing of advanced mixed lithium orthosilicate/metatitanate tritium breeder pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leys, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.leys@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany); Bergfeldt, Thomas; Kolb, Matthias H.H.; Knitter, Regina [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany); Goraieb, Aniceto A. [Karlsruhe Beryllium Handling Facility, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, 76344 (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • The recycling of advanced breeder pebbles without a deterioration of the material properties is possible using a melt-based process. • The only accumulation of impurities upon reprocessing, results from the platinum crucible alloy used for processing. • It is possible to replenish burnt-up lithium by additions of LiOH·H{sub 2}O to the melt during reprocessing. - Abstract: The recycling of tritium breeding materials will be necessary for any future use of nuclear fusion energy due to economical as well as ecological considerations. In the case of the solid breeder blanket concept, the ceramic pebble beds that are intended for the generation of tritium will eventually need to be restored due to depleted lithium levels as well as due to fractured pebbles, which will cause a deterioration of the pebble bed properties. It is proposed that the pebbles, which are fabricated using a melt-based process, are recycled using the same initial process, by replenishing the lithium levels and reforming the pebbles at the same time. To prove this recycling scheme, advanced ceramic pebbles were fabricated and then re-melted multiple times to prove that the reprocessing did not have any negative effect on the pebble properties and secondly, pebbles were produced with a simulated lithium burn-up and subsequently replenished by additions of LiOH to the melt. It was shown that the re-melting and lithium re-enrichment had no effect on the pebble properties, demonstrating that a melt-based process is suitable for recycling used breeder pebbles.

  20. Reconstructing the transport history of pebbles on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Tímea; Domokos, Gábor; Grotzinger, John P.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of remarkably rounded pebbles by the rover Curiosity, within an exhumed alluvial fan complex in Gale Crater, presents some of the most compelling evidence yet for sustained fluvial activity on Mars. While rounding is known to result from abrasion by inter-particle collisions, geologic interpretations of sediment shape have been qualitative. Here we show how quantitative information on the transport distance of river pebbles can be extracted from their shape alone, using a combination of theory, laboratory experiments and terrestrial field data. We determine that the Martian basalt pebbles have been carried tens of kilometres from their source, by bed-load transport on an alluvial fan. In contrast, angular clasts strewn about the surface of the Curiosity traverse are indicative of later emplacement by rock fragmentation processes. The proposed method for decoding transport history from particle shape provides a new tool for terrestrial and planetary sedimentology. PMID:26460507

  1. Initial assessment of environmental effects on SiC/SiC composites in helium-cooled nuclear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2013-09-01

    This report summarized the information available in the literature on the chemical reactivity of SiC/SiC composites and of their components in contact with the helium coolant used in HTGR, VHTR and GFR designs. In normal operation conditions, ultra-high purity helium will have chemically controlled impurities (water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, hydrogen) that will create a slightly oxidizing gas environment. Little is known from direct experiments on the reactivity of third generation (nuclear grade) SiC/SiC composites in contact with low concentrations of water or oxygen in inert gas, at high temperature. However, there is ample information about the oxidation in dry and moist air of SiC/SiC composites at high temperatures. This information is reviewed first in the next chapters. The emphasis is places on the improvement in material oxidation, thermal, and mechanical properties during three stages of development of SiC fibers and at least two stages of development of the fiber/matrix interphase. The chemical stability of SiC/SiC composites in contact with oxygen or steam at temperatures that may develop in off-normal reactor conditions supports the conclusion that most advanced composites (also known as nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites) have the chemical resistance that would allow them maintain mechanical properties at temperatures up to 1200 1300 oC in the extreme conditions of an air or water ingress accident scenario. Further research is needed to assess the long-term stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in inert gas (helium) in presence of very low concentrations (traces) of water and oxygen at the temperatures of normal operation of helium-cooled reactors. Another aspect that needs to be investigated is the effect of fast neutron irradiation on the oxidation stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in normal operation conditions.

  2. Assessment of tritiated activities in the radwaste generated from ITER Chinese helium cooled ceramic breeding test blanket module system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chang An, E-mail: chenchangan@caep.cn; Liu, Lingbo; Wang, Bo; Xiang, Xin; Yao, Yong; Song, Jiangfeng

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Approaches were developed for calculation/evaluation of tritium activities in the materials and components of a TBM system, with tritium permeation being considered for the first time. • Almost all tritiated materials and components were considered in CNHCCB TBM system including the TBM set, connection pipes, and the ancillary tritium handling systems. • Tritium activity data in HCCB TBM system were updated. Some of which in directly tritium contacted components are to be 2 or 4 magnitudes higher than the original neutron transmutation calculations. • The radwaste amount from both operation and decommission of HCCB TBM system was evaluated. - Abstract: Chinese Helium Cooled Ceramic Breeding Test blanket Module (CNHCCB TBM) will be tested in the ITER machine for the feasibility of in pile tritium production for a future magnetic confinement fusion reactor. The tritium inventories/retentions in the material/components were evaluated and updated mainly based on the tritium diffusion/permeation theory and the analysis of some reported data. Tritiated activities rank from less than 10 Bq g{sup −1} to 10{sup 9} Bq g{sup −1} for the different materials or components, which are generally higher than those from the previous neutron transmutation calculation. The amounts of tritiated radwaste were also estimated according to the operation, decommission, maintenance and replacement strategies, which vary from several tens of kilograms to tons in the different operation phases. The data can be used both for the tritium radiological safety evaluation and radwaste management of CNHCCB TBM set and its ancillary systems.

  3. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  4. Mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles at blanket relevant temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurinskiy, Petr, E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials—Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rolli, Rolf [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials—Materials Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kim, Jae-Hwan; Nakamichi, Masaru [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Fusion Institute, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Oaza-Obuchi-Aza-Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aoori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Mechanical behavior of two kinds of Be–Ti pebbles in the temperature range of 400–800 °C was investigated. • It was experimentally shown that Be-7 at.%Ti pebbles have the enhanced ductile properties compared to Be-7.7 at.%Ti pebbles. • Brittle failure of both kinds of Be–Ti pebbles was observed by testing at 400 °C using the constant loading with 150 N. - Abstract: Mechanical performance of beryllium-based materials is a matter of a great interest from the point of view of their use as neutron multipliers of the tritium breeding blankets. The compression strains which can occur in beryllium pebble beds under blanket working conditions will lead to deformation or even failure of individual pebbles [1,2] (Reimann et al. 2002; Ishitsuka and Kawamura, 1995). Mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles having chemical contents of Be-7.0 at.% Ti and Be-7.7 at.%Ti was investigated in the temperature range of 400–800 °C. Constant loads varying from 10 up to 150 N were applied uniaxially. It was shown that Be–Ti pebbles compared to pure beryllium pebbles possess much lower ductility, although their strength properties exceed corresponding characteristics of pure beryllium. Also, the influence of titanium content on mechanical behavior of Be–Ti pebbles was investigated. Specific features of deformation of pure beryllium and Be–Ti pebbles having different titanium contents at blanket operation temperatures are discussed.

  5. Year One Summary of X-energy Pebble Fuel Development at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McMurray, Jake W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunt, Rodney D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jolly, Brian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trammell, Michael P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Daniel R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blamer, Brandon J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reif, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Howard T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Concepts X-energy (ARC-Xe) Pebble Fuel Development project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has successfully completed its first year, having made excellent progress in accomplishing programmatic objectives. The primary focus of research at ORNL in support of X-energy has been the training of X-energy fuel fabrication engineers and the establishment of US pebble fuel production capabilities able to supply the Xe-100 pebble-bed reactor. These efforts have been strongly supported by particle fuel fabrication and characterization expertise present at ORNL from the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program.

  6. Formation of pebble-pile planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg Jansson, Karl; Johansen, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Asteroids and Kuiper belt objects are remnant planetesimals from the epoch of planet formation. The first stage of planet formation is the accumulation of dust and ice grains into mm- and cm-sized pebbles. These pebbles can clump together through the streaming instability and form gravitationally bound pebble clouds. Pebbles inside such a cloud will undergo mutual collisions, dissipating energy into heat. As the cloud loses energy, it gradually contracts towards solid density. We model this process and investigate two important properties of the collapse: (i) the collapse timescale and (ii) the temporal evolution of the pebble size distribution. Our numerical model of the pebble cloud is zero-dimensional and treats collisions with a statistical method. We find that planetesimals with radii larger than ~100 km collapse on the free-fall timescale of ~25 years. Lower-mass clouds have longer pebble collision timescales and collapse much more slowly, with collapse times of a few hundred years for 10 km scale planetesimals and a few thousand years for 1 km scale planetesimals. The mass of the pebble cloud also determines the interior structure of the resulting planetesimal. The pebble collision speeds in low-mass clouds are below the threshold for fragmentation, forming pebble-pile planetesimals consisting of the primordial pebbles from the protoplanetary disk. Planetesimals above 100 km in radius, on the other hand, consist of mixtures of dust (pebble fragments) and pebbles which have undergone substantial collisions with dust and other pebbles. The Rosetta mission to the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and the New Horizons mission to Pluto will provide valuable information about the structure of planetesimals in the solar system. Our model predicts that 67P is a pebble-pile planetesimal consisting of primordial pebbles from the solar nebula, while the pebbles in the cloud which contracted to form Pluto must have been ground down substantially during the collapse.

  7. Preliminary accident analysis of Loss of Off-Site Power and In-Box LOCA for the CFETR helium cooled solid breeder blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Qiang; Cui, Shijie [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Lab. of Advanced Nuclear Energy and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Tian, Wenxi, E-mail: wxtian@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Lab. of Advanced Nuclear Energy and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Dalin; Su, G.H. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China); Shaanxi Key Lab. of Advanced Nuclear Energy and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The CFETR HCSB blanket has been investigated using RELAP5. • Loss of Off-Site Power is investigated. • The parametric analyses during In-Box LOCA are investigated. • The HCSB blanket for CFETR is designed with sufficient decay heat removal capability. - Abstract: As one of three candidate tritium breeding blanket concepts for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR), a conceptual structure of helium cooled solid breeder (HCSB) blanket was recently proposed. In this paper, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic and safety analyses of the typical outboard equatorial blanket module (No.12) have been carried out using RELAP5/Mod3.4 code. Two design basis accidents are investigated based on the steady-state initialization, including Loss of Off-Site Power and In-Box Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). The differences between circulator coast down and circulator rotor locked under Loss of Off-Site Power are compared. Regarding the In-Box LOCA, the influences of different break sizes and locations are thoroughly analyzed based on a relatively accurate modeling method of the heat structures in sub-modules. The analysis results show that the blanket and the combined helium cooling system (HCS) are designed with sufficient decay heat removal capability for both accidents, which can preliminarily verify the feasibility of the conceptual design. The research work can also provide an important reference for parameter optimization of the blanket and its HCS in the next stage.

  8. Numerical research on the neutronic/thermal-hydraulic/mechanical coupling characteristics of the optimized helium cooled solid breeder blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Shijie; Zhang, Dalin, E-mail: dlzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Cheng, Jie; Tian, Wenxi; Su, G.H.

    2017-01-15

    As one of the candidate tritium breeding blankets for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR), a conceptual structure of the helium cooled solid breeder blanket has recently been proposed. The neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical characteristics of the blanket directly affect its tritium breeding and safety performance. Therefore, neutronic/thermal-hydraulic/mechanical coupling analyses are of vital importance for a reliable blanket design. In this work, first, three-dimensional neutronics analysis and optimization of the typical outboard equatorial blanket module (No. 12) were performed for the comprehensive optimal scheme. Then, thermal and fluid dynamic analyses of the scheme under both normal and critical conditions were performed and coupled with the previous neutronic calculation results. With thermal-hydraulic boundaries, thermo-mechanical analyses of the structure materials under normal, critical and blanket over-pressurization conditions were carried out. In addition, several parametric sensitivity studies were also conducted to investigate the influences of the main parameters on the blanket temperature distributions. In this paper, the coupled analyses verify the reasonability of the optimized conceptual design preliminarily and can provide an important reference for the further analysis and optimization design of the CFETR helium cooled solid breeder blanket.

  9. A smoother pebble mathematical explorations

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Donald C

    2003-01-01

    Introduction. I. BRIDGING THE GAP. 1. The Ancient Fractions. 2. Greek Gifts. 3. The Music of the Ratios. II. THE SHAPE OF THINGS. 4. Tubeland. 5. The Calculating Eye. III. THE GREAT ART. 6. Algebra Rules. 7. The Root of the Problem. 8. Symmetry Without Fear. 9. The Magic Mirror. IV. A SMOOTHER PEBBLE. 10. On the Shoulders of Giants. 11. Six-Minute Calculus. 12. Roller-Coaster Science. Glossary. References. Index

  10. Thermal-hydraulics of helium cooled First Wall channels and scoping investigations on performance improvement by application of ribs and mixing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeiter, Frederik, E-mail: frederik.arbeiter@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, Christian [EUROfusion – Programme Management Unit, Garching (Germany); Chen, Yuming; Ilić, Milica; Schwab, Florian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sieglin, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Wenninger, Ronald [EUROfusion – Programme Management Unit, Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Existing first wall designs and expected plasma heat loads are reviewed. • Heat transfer enhancement methods are investigated by CFD. • The results for heat transfer and friction are given, compared and explained. • Relations for needed pumping power and gained thermal heat are shown. • A range for the maximum permissible heat loads from the plasma is estimated. - Abstract: The first wall (FW) of DEMO is a component with high thermal loads. The cooling of the FW has to comply with the material's upper and lower temperature limits and requirements from stress assessment, like low temperature gradients. Also, the cooling has to be integrated into the balance-of-plant, in a sense to deliver exergy to the power cycle and require a limited pumping power for coolant circulation. This paper deals with the basics of FW cooling and proposes optimization approaches. The effectiveness of several heat transfer enhancement techniques is investigated for the use in helium cooled FW designs for DEMO. Among these are wall-mounted ribs, large scale mixing devices and modified hydraulic diameter. Their performance is assessed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are compared. Based on the results, an extrapolation to high heat fluxes is tried to estimate the higher limits of cooling capabilities.

  11. Neutronics - thermal-hydraulics coupling: application to the helium-cooled fast reactor; Couplage neutronique - thermohydraulique: application au reacteur a neutrons rapides refroidi a l'helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaiana, F.

    2009-11-15

    This thesis focuses on the study of interactions between neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics. Neutron-kinetics allow to calculate the power in a nuclear reactor and the temperature evolution of materials where this power is deposited is known thanks to thermal-hydraulics. Moreover, when the temperatures evolve, the densities and cross sections change. These two disciplines are thus coupled. The first part of this work corresponds to the study and development of a method which allows to simulate transients in nuclear reactors and especially with a Monte-Carlo code for neutron-kinetics. An algorithm for the resolution of the neutron transport equation has been established and validated with a benchmark. In thermal-hydraulics, a porous media approach, based on another thesis, is considered. This gives the opportunity to solve the equations on the whole core without unconscionable computation time. Finally, a theoretical study has been performed on the statistical uncertainties which result from the use of a Monte-Carlo code and which spread from the reactivity to the power and from the power to the temperatures. The second part deals with the study of a misplaced control rod withdrawing in a GFR (helium-cooled fast reactor), a fourth generation reactor. Some models allowing to calculate neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics in the core (which contains assemblies built up with fuel plates) were defined. In thermal-hydraulics, a model for the core based on the porous media approach and a fuel plate homogenization model have been set up. A similar homogenization model has been studied for neutron-kinetics. Finally, the control rod withdrawing transient where we can observe the power raising and the stabilisation by thermal feedback has been performed with the Monte-Carlo code Tripoli for neutron-kinetics and the code Trio-U for thermal-hydraulics. (author)

  12. A Pebble-Bed Breed-and-Burn Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The primary objective of this project is to use three-dimensional fuel shuffling in order to reduce the minimum peak radiation damage of ~550 dpa present Breed-and-Burn (B&B) fast nuclear reactor cores designs (they feature 2-D fuel shuffling) call for to as close as possible to the presently accepted value of 200 dpa thereby enabling earlier commercialization of B&B reactors which could make substantial contribution to energy sustainability and economic stability without need for fuel recycling. Another objective is increasing the average discharge burnup for the same peak discharge burnup thereby (1) increasing the fuel utilization of 2-D shuffled B&B reactors and (2) reducing the reprocessing capacity required to support a given capacity of FRs that are to recycle fuel.

  13. Neturonic performance of two European breeder-inside-tube (BIT) blankets for demo: The helium cooled ceramic LiAlO{sub 2} with be multiplier and the water cooled liquid Li17Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrizzi, L.; Rado, V. [Centro Ricerche Energia Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1994-12-31

    In the European Community (EC) Test Blanket programme a selection is foreseen, by 1995 of two blanket designs among those under investigation which can be divided in two groups: those using a solid ceramic breeder, all of them helium cooled and with Be neutron multiplier and those using the Ll{sub 17}-Pb liquid metal breeder which could be self or water cooled, depending on the proposal. The design studies have been carried out according to the latest DEMONET specification (2200 MW fusion power, 20000 hours irradiation full power). The present study concerns the most recent neutronic analyses of the two blankets design in which there is ENEA contribution. Both are based on a BIT concept with poloidal running breeding elements which follow the first wall curvature: (1) the helium cooled ceramic BIT with {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} breeder material (75% Ll{sup 6} enriched) and Be as neutron multiplier, which has been studied by ENEA since a long time and from 1990, jointly developed with CEA; (2) the water cooled liquid Li{sub 17}Pb (90% Ll{sup 6} enriched) inside cylindrical breeder modules which was originally proposed by JRC Ispra and now it is jointly developed CEA and ENEA.

  14. Experimental abrasion of pebbles I. Wet sandblasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuenen, Ph.H.

    1955-01-01

    Pebbles of various kinds were subjected to abrasion by a sand-laden current of water. The loss in weight resulting from the action of coarse and fine sand at different velocities was measured. There proved to be no abrasion below a velocity of 70 cm per second. At a bottom velocity of this amount

  15. Experiments on the formation of windworn Pebbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuenen, Ph.H.

    1928-01-01

    The influence of the wind laden with sand in modelling pebbles is believed by some authors to be only that of polishing the surface, by others of rounding off bits of stone that already possessed edges and corners, or again by others of wearing any fragment either rounded or angular into definite

  16. Deer leather: analysis of the microstructure affecting pebble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Hannah C; Sizeland, Katie H; Cooper, Sue M; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2017-08-01

    Deer leather has a characteristic pattern, referred to as 'pebble', which is accorded such importance that a lack of it renders a leather defective. Synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), ultrasonic imaging, scanning electron microscopy, and tear tests were used to investigate the structural characteristics of well-pebbled and poorly pebbled cervine leathers. Poorly pebbled leather has a less open structure in the upper grain region than well-pebbled leather. The orientation index (OI) of leather with a poor pebble is less than that of the well-pebbled leather, particularly in the corium. The tear strength is also less for the poorly pebbled leather. The differences in structure between well- and poorly pebbled cervine leathers are not the same as the structural differences between tight and loose bovine leathers, to which they are sometimes compared. On the contrary, good pebble may reflect an internal structure similar to that of looseness. It is hoped that methods to prevent a reduction in pebbling during the processing of cervine leather may be developed by applying this knowledge of cervine leather's structural characteristics. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Testing of a "smart-pebble" for measuring particle transport statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsikoudis, Vasileios; Avgeris, Loukas; Valyrakis, Manousos

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents preliminary results from novel experiments aiming to assess coarse sediment transport statistics for a range of transport conditions, via the use of an innovative "smart-pebble" device. This device is a waterproof sphere, which has 7 cm diameter and is equipped with a number of sensors that provide information about the velocity, acceleration and positioning of the "smart-pebble" within the flow field. A series of specifically designed experiments are carried out to monitor the entrainment of a "smart-pebble" for fully developed, uniform, turbulent flow conditions over a hydraulically rough bed. Specifically, the bed surface is configured to three sections, each of them consisting of well packed glass beads of slightly increasing size at the downstream direction. The first section has a streamwise length of L1=150 cm and beads size of D1=15 mm, the second section has a length of L2=85 cm and beads size of D2=22 mm, and the third bed section has a length of L3=55 cm and beads size of D3=25.4 mm. Two cameras monitor the area of interest to provide additional information regarding the "smart-pebble" movement. Three-dimensional flow measurements are obtained with the aid of an acoustic Doppler velocimeter along a measurement grid to assess the flow forcing field. A wide range of flow rates near and above the threshold of entrainment is tested, while using four distinct densities for the "smart-pebble", which can affect its transport speed and total momentum. The acquired data are analyzed to derive Lagrangian transport statistics and the implications of such an important experiment for the transport of particles by rolling are discussed. The flow conditions for the initiation of motion, particle accelerations and equilibrium particle velocities (translating into transport rates), statistics of particle impact and its motion, can be extracted from the acquired data, which can be further compared to develop meaningful insights for sediment transport

  18. Investigating coarse sediment particles transport using PTV and "smart-pebbles" instrumented with inertial sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Farhadi, Hamed

    2017-04-01

    This study, reports on the analysis of appropriately designed fluvial experiments investigating the transport of coarse bed material using two approaches: particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to extract bulk transport parameters and inertia sensor data (via the use of "smart-pebbles") to obtain refined statistics for the transport of the particle. The purpose of this study is to provide further insight on the use of technologies (optical techniques and inertial sensors) that are complementary one to another, towards producing improved estimates of bedload transport in natural rivers. The experiments are conducted in the Water Engineering Lab at the University of Glasgow on a tilting recirculating flume with 90 cm width. Ten different discharges have been implemented in this study. A couple of fake beds, made of well-packed beads of three different sizes have been set up in the flume. The particle motion is captured by two high-speed commercial cameras, responsible for recording the top view covering the full length of the fake beds over which the "smart-pebble" is allowed to be transported. "Smart-pebbles" of four different densities are initially located at the upstream end of the configuration, fully exposed to the instream flow. These are instrumented with appropriate inertial sensors that allow recording the particle's motion, in the Langrangian frame, in high resolution. Specifically, the "smart-pebble" employ a tri-axial gyroscope, magnetometer and accelerometer, which are utilized to obtain minute linear and angular displacements in high frequency (up to 200Hz). However, these are not enough to accurately reconstruct the full trajectory of the particles rolling downstream. To that goal optical methods are used. In particular, by using particle tracking velocimetry data and image processing techniques, the location, orientation and velocities of the "smart-pebble" are derived. Specific consideration is given to appropriately preprocess the obtained video, as

  19. Neutronic performance of two European breeder-inside-tube (BIT) blankets for DEMO: the helium-cooled ceramic LiAlO{sub 2} with Be multiplier and the water-cooled liquid Li{sub 17}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrizzi, L. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Rado, V. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy)

    1995-03-01

    In support of ENEA activity in the European Community Test Programme, neutron analysis has been performed on the two latest blanket designs: helium-cooled ceramic breeder-inside-tube (BIT) (with LiAlO{sub 2} and Be multiplier) and water-cooled liquid Li{sub 17}Pb in cylindrical modules (CM). The powerful MCNP Monte Carlo code was used (version 4.2). A detailed and accurate description of the geometrical model has been performed by inserting the main reactor details and avoiding breeder material dilution inside the modules. The tritium breeding ratio (TBR) performance is low for the solid breeder BIT blanket (with 10 ports 1.011) due mainly to low blanket coverage near the exhaust duct, and this solution should be revised. The CM Li{sub 17}Pb blanket reaches a sufficient TBR (1.059, with ports) to rely on tritium self-sufficiency. Shielding properties, with respect to the toroidal field coils, have been estimated in a simplified model by means of the ANISN code, supplied with a nuclear data library consistent with that used by MCNP. The analysis suggests that a careful shield thickness/composition design should be used to ensure the shielding capability of the whole blanket plus shield system. (orig.).

  20. Reconstructing the transport history of pebbles on Mars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Szabó, Tímea; Domokos, Gábor; Grotzinger, John P; Jerolmack, Douglas J

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we show how quantitative information on the transport distance of river pebbles can be extracted from their shape alone, using a combination of theory, laboratory experiments and terrestrial field data...

  1. Bacillus endolithicus sp. nov., isolated from pebbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parag, B; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2015-12-01

    Strain JC267T was isolated from pebbles collected from Pingleshwar beach, Gujarat, India. Cells are Gram-stain-positive, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile rods forming sub-terminal endospores in swollen ellipsoidal to oval sporangia. Strain JC267T contains anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, iso-C14 : 0, iso-C16 : 0, C16 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0 as major (>5 %) cellular fatty acids. Polar lipids include phosphatidylglycerol, phospholipids (PL1-3), glycolipids (GL1-2) and an unidentified lipid. Cell-wall amino acids are composed of diagnostic meso-diaminopimelic acid, dl-alanine and a small amount of d-glutamic acid. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain JC267T is 45.5 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain JC267T showed highest sequence similarities of Bacillus when subjected to EzTaxon-e blast analysis. The reassociation values based on DNA-DNA hybridization of strain JC267T with Bacillus halosaccharovorans IBRC-M 10095T and Bacillus niabensis JCM 16399T were 26 ± 1 % and 34 ± 3 %, respectively. Based on taxonomic data obtained using a polyphasic approach, strain JC267T represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus endolithicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JC267T ( = IBRC-M 10914T = KCTC 33579T).

  2. Letters initiating Clean Water Act 404(c) review of mining at Pebble deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correspondence between EPA and the Pebble Limited Partnership and the State of Alaska initiating review under section 404(c) of the Clean Water Act of potential adverse environmental effects associated with mining the Pebble deposit in southwest Alaska.

  3. Conceptual study of ferromagnetic pebbles for heat exhaust in fusion reactors with short power decay length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gierse

    2015-03-01

    The key results of this study are that very high heat fluxes are accessible in the operation space of ferromagnetic pebbles, that ferromagnetic pebbles are compatible with tokamak operation and current divertor designs, that the heat removal capability of ferromagnetic pebbles increases as λq decreases and, finally, that for fusion relevant values of q∥ pebble diameters below 100 μm are required.

  4. A novel reusable nanocomposite for complete removal of dyes, heavy metals and microbial load from water based on nanocellulose and silver nano-embedded pebbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman; Kardam, Abhishek; Gera, Meeta; Jain, V K

    2015-01-01

    The present work proposed a nanocellulose (NC)-silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) embedded pebbles-based composite material as a novel reusable cost-effective water purification device for complete removal of dyes, heavy metals and microbes. NC was prepared using acid hydrolysis of cellulose. The AgNPs were generated in situ using glucose and embedded within the porous concrete pebbles by the technique of inter-diffusion of ion, providing a very strong binding of nanoparticles within the porous pebbles and thus preventing any nanomaterials leaching. Fabrication of a continual running water purifier was achieved by making different layering of NC and Ag nano-embedded pebbles in a glass column. The water purifier exhibited not only excellent dye and heavy metal adsorption capacity, but also long-term antibacterial activity against pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacterial strains. The adsorption mainly occurred through electrostatic interaction and pore diffusion also contributed to the process. The bed column purifier has shown 99.48% Pb(II) and 98.30% Cr(III) removal efficiency along with 99% decontamination of microbial load at an optimum working pH of 6.0. The high adsorption capacity and reusability, with complete removal of dyes, heavy metals and Escherichia coli from the simulated contaminated water of composite material, will provide new opportunities to develop a cost-effective and eco-friendly water purifier for commercial application.

  5. Evolution of migrating protoplanets heated by pebble accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrenko, Ondrej; Broz, Miroslav; Lambrechts, Michiel

    2017-10-01

    We study the interactions in a protoplanetary system consisting of a gas disk, a pebble disk and embedded low-mass protoplanets. The hydrodynamic simulations are performed using a new code based on 2D FARGO (Masset 2000) which we call FARGO_THORIN (http://sirrah.troja.mff.cuni.cz/~chrenko/). The code treats the hydrodynamics of gas and pebbles within a two-fluid approximation, accounts for the heating and cooling processes in the gaseous component (including heating due to pebble accretion) and propagates the planets in 3D using a high-order integration scheme (IAS15; Rein & Spiegel 2015). Our aim is to investigate how pebble accretion alters the orbital evolution of protoplanets undergoing Type-I migration.First, we demonstrate that pebble accretion can heat the protoplanets so that their luminosity induces the heating torque (Benítez-Llambay et al. 2015) and the hot-trail effect (Chrenko et al. 2017; Eklund & Masset 2017). The heating torque is always positive and alters the migration rates and directions profoundly, thus changing the position of planet traps and deserts. The hot-trail effect, on the other hand, pumps the eccentricity of initially circular orbits up to e ~ h. After becoming eccentric, the protoplanets exhibit reduced probability of resonant locking during the migration and moreover, their close encounters become more frequent and provide more opportunities for scattering or merger events. The mergers can be massive enough to become giant planet cores. We discuss the importance of the excited eccentricities and violent orbital evolution for the extrasolar planet population synthesis. Finally, we present an extended model with flux-mean opacities caused by a coupled disk of coagulating dust grains with a realistic size distribution. The aim of this model is to constrain possible pathways of migrating planets towards the inner rim of the protoplanetary disk.

  6. Tritium permeation reduction through the HCPB steam generator by in-situ oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perujo, A [E.C. Joint Research Centre-Ispra Site, Institute for advanced Materials, Ispra (Italy); Feuerstein, H.; Reimann, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The permeation through the steam generator of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket concept can be strongly reduced by natural oxides formed on the INCOLOY 800 tubes. This paper presents the results of different experiments with different deuterium to humidity ratios. All experiments show that INCOLOY 800 readily oxidizes and that permeation reduction factors of at least 100 are easily obtained for blanket conditions. (authors)

  7. Solution based synthesis of mixed phase materials in the Li2TiO3 - Li4SiO4 system

    OpenAIRE

    Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Gan, Yixiang; Kamlah, Marc; Knitter, Regina

    2014-01-01

    As candidate tritium breeder materials for use in the ITER helium cooled pebble bed, ceramic multiphasic compounds lying in the region of the quasi-binary lithium metatitanate- lithium orthosilicate system may exhibit mechanical and physical advantages relative to single phase materials. Here we present an organometallic solution-based synthesis procedure for the low-temperature fabrication of compounds in the Li2TiO3 - Li4SiO4 region and investigate phase stability and transformations throug...

  8. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    OpenAIRE

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids - flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF) - from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate i...

  9. Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgman, L.E.; Sever, C.; Quimby, W.F.; Andrew, M.E.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming.

  10. Atmospheric signatures of giant exoplanet formation by pebble accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Eriksson, Linn

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric chemical abundances of giant planets lead to important constraints on planetary formation and migration. Studies have shown that giant planets that migrate through the protoplanetary disc can accrete substantial amounts of oxygen-rich planetesimals, leading to supersolar metallicities in the envelope and solar or subsolar C/O ratios. Pebble accretion has been demonstrated to play an important role in core accretion and to have growth rates that are consistent with planetary migration. The high pebble accretion rates allow planetary cores to start their growth beyond 10 au and subsequently migrate to cold (≳1 au), warm (˜0.1-1 au) or hot (≲0.1 au) orbits. In this work we investigate how the formation of giant planets via pebble accretion influences their atmospheric chemical compositions. We find that under the standard pebble accretion scenario, where the core is isolated from the envelope, the resulting metallicities (O/H and C/H ratios) are subsolar, while the C/O ratios are supersolar. Planets that migrate through the disc to become hot Jupiters accrete substantial amounts of water vapour, but still acquire slightly subsolar O/H and supersolar C/O of 0.7-0.8. The metallicity can be substantially subsolar (˜0.2-0.5 × solar) and the C/O can even approach 1.0 if the planet accretes its envelope mostly beyond the CO2 ice line, i.e. cold Jupiters or hot Jupiters that form far out and migrate in by scattering. Allowing for core erosion yields significantly supersolar metallicities and solar or subsolar C/O, which can also be achieved by other means, e.g. photoevaporation and late-stage planetesimal accretion.

  11. Pebble orientation on large, experimental debris-flow deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Replicable, pronounced orientation of discoid pebbles (??? 8 mm) embedded on surfaces of large (??? 10 m3) experimental debris-flow deposits reveals that strongly aligned, imbricate fabric can develop rapidly over short distances in mass flows. Pebble long axes aligned subparallel to deposit margins as well as subparallel to margins of surge waves arrested within the deposits. Pebble alignment exhibited modes both parallel to (a(p)), and normal to (a(t)), the primary flow direction; intermediate axes dipped preferentially inward from surge-wave margins (b(i) orientation). Repetitive development of margin-parallel, imbricate fabric distributed across deposit surfaces provides compelling evidence that deposits formed dominantly through progressive incremental accretion rather than through simple en masse emplacement. Pronounced fabric along deposit and arrested surge-wave margins reflects significant grain interaction along flow margins. This sedimentological evidence for significant marginal grain interaction complements theoretical analyses (Iverson, 1997) and other experimental data (Major, 1996: Iverson, 1997) that indicate that resistance along flow margins is an important factor affecting debris-flow deposition. The fabric on the experimental deposits demonstrates that debris flows can develop strongly imbricate particle orientation that mimics fabric developed during fluvial deposition. Particle shape and local stress fields appear to have more control over fabric development than does general depositional process. Other criteria in addition to particle orientation are needed to discriminate mass flow from fluvial gravel deposits and to unravel depositional history. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tritium release from EXOTIC-7 orthosilicate pebbles. Effect of burnup and contact with beryllium during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-03-01

    EXOTIC-7 was the first in-pile test with {sup 6}Li-enriched (50%) lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles and with DEMO representative Li-burnup. Post irradiation examinations of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} have been performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), mainly to investigate the tritium release kinetics as well as the effect of Li-burnup and/or contact with beryllium during irradiation. The release rate of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from pure Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} bed of capsule 28.1-1 is characterized by a broad main peak at about 400degC and by a smaller peak at about 800degC, and that from the mixed beds of capsule 28.2 and 26.2-1 shows again these two peaks, but most of the tritium is now released from the 800degC peak. This shift of release from low to high temperature may be due to the higher Li-burnup and/or due to contact with Be during irradiation. Due to the very difficult interpretation of the in-situ tritium release data, residence times have been estimated on the basis of the out-of-pile tests. The residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.1-1 irradiated at 10% Li-burnup agrees quite well with that of the same material irradiated at Li-burnup lower than 3% in the EXOTIC-6 experiment. In spite of the observed shift in the release peaks from low to high temperature, also the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 26.2-1 irradiated at 13% Li-burnup agrees quite well with the data from EXOTIC-6 experiment. On the other hand, the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.2 (Li-burnup 18%) is about a factor 1.7-3.8 higher than that for caps. 26.2-1. Based on these data on can conclude that up to 13% Li-burnup neither the contact with beryllium nor the Li-burnup have a detrimental effect on the tritium release of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, but at 18% Li-burnup the residence time is increased by about a factor three. (J.P.N.)

  13. Planet population synthesis driven by pebble accretion in cluster environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndugu, N.; Bitsch, B.; Jurua, E.

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of protoplanetary discs embedded in stellar clusters depends on the age and the stellar density in which they are embedded. Stellar clusters of young age and high stellar surface density destroy protoplanetary discs by external photoevaporation and stellar encounters. Here, we consider the effect of background heating from newly formed stellar clusters on the structure of protoplanetary discs and how it affects the formation of planets in these discs. Our planet formation model is built on the core accretion scenario, where we take the reduction of the core growth time-scale due to pebble accretion into account. We synthesize planet populations that we compare to observations obtained by radial velocity measurements. The giant planets in our simulations migrate over large distances due to the fast type-II migration regime induced by a high disc viscosity (α = 5.4 × 10-3). Cold Jupiters (rp > 1 au) originate preferably from the outer disc, due to the large-scale planetary migration, while hot Jupiters (rp population of isolated stars host a significant amount of giant planets even at low metallicity, in contradiction to observations where giant planets are preferably found around high metallicity stars, indicating that pebble accretion is very efficient in the standard pebble accretion framework. On the other hand, discs around stars embedded in cluster environments hardly form any giant planets at low metallicity in agreement with observations, where these changes originate from the increased temperature in the outer parts of the disc, which prolongs the core accretion time-scale of the planet. We therefore conclude that the outer disc structure and the planet's formation location determines the giant planet occurrence rate and the formation efficiency of cold and hot Jupiters.

  14. Production of various sizes and some properties of beryllium pebbles by the rotating electrode method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwadachi, T.; Sakamoto, N.; Nishida, K. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan); Kawamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The particle size distribution of beryllium pebbles produced by the rotating electrode method was investigated. Particle size depends on some physical properties and process parameters, which can practicaly be controlled by varying electrode angular velocities. The average particle sizes produced were expressed by the hyperbolic function with electrode angular velocity. Particles within the range of 0.3 and 2.0 mm in diameter are readily produced by the rotating electrode method while those of 0.2 mm in diameter are also fabricable. Sphericity and surface roughness were good in each size of pebble. Grain sizes of the pebbles are 17 {mu} m in 0.25 mm diameter pebbles and 260 {mu} m in 1.8 mm diameter pebbles. (author)

  15. Pebble Accretion at the Origin of Water in Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnet, Thomas; Mousis, Olivier; Vernazza, Pierre

    2017-08-01

    Despite the fact that the observed gradient in water content among the Galilean satellites is globally consistent with a formation in a circum-Jovian disk on both sides of the snowline, the mechanisms that led to a low water mass fraction in Europa (˜8%) are not yet understood. Here, we present new modeling results of solids transport in the circum-Jovian disk accounting for aerodynamic drag, turbulent diffusion, surface temperature evolution, and sublimation of water ice. We find that the water mass fraction of pebbles (e.g., solids with sizes of 10-2-1 m) as they drift inward is globally consistent with the current water content of the Galilean system. This opens the possibility that each satellite could have formed through pebble accretion within a delimited region whose boundaries were defined by the position of the snowline. This further implies that the migration of the forming satellites was tied to the evolution of the snowline so that Europa fully accreted from partially dehydrated material in the region just inside of the snowline.

  16. Conceptual Design Studies of a Passively Safe Thorium Breeder Pebble Bed Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wols, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are expected to play an important role in the worldwide electricity production in the coming decades, since they provide an economically attractive, reliable and low-carbon source of electricity with plenty of resources available for at least the coming hundreds of years.

  17. Fabrication of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles by a freeze drying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Jin, E-mail: lee@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Mokpo National University, Muan 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Min-Woo [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Mokpo National University, Muan 534-729 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles were successfully fabricated by using a freeze drying process. The Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} slurry was prepared using a commercial powder of particle size 0.5–1.5 μm and the pebble pre-form was prepared by dropping the slurry into liquid nitrogen through a syringe needle. The droplets were rapidly frozen, changing their morphology to spherical pebbles. The frozen pebbles were dried at −10 °C in vacuum. To make crack-free pebbles, some glycerin was employed in the slurry, and long drying time and a low vacuum condition were applied in the freeze drying process. In the process, the solid content in the slurry influenced the spheroidicity of the pebble green body. The dried pebbles were sintered at 1200 °C in an air atmosphere. The sintered pebbles showed almost 40% shrinkage. The sintered pebbles revealed a porous microstructure with a uniform pore distribution and the sintered pebbles were crushed under an average load of 50 N in a compressive strength test. In the present study, a freeze drying process for fabrication of spherical Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles is introduced. The processing parameters, such as solid content in the slurry and the conditions of freeze drying and sintering, are also examined.

  18. Origin of the tertiary red beds in the Northern part of the Duero Basin (Spain), II. Composition and genesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mabesoone, J.M.

    1961-01-01

    In this second paper the red beds outcropping in the northern part of the Duero basin have been treated regarding their mineral and pebble composition, chemical parameters, and surface textures of quartz sand grains, taking as basis the results reported in the first paper. These deposits originate

  19. Pebble fabrication and tritium release properties of an advanced tritium breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: hoshino.tsuyoshi@jaea.go.jp [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuch, Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Edao, Yuki [Tritium Technology Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata, Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kawamura, Yoshinori [Blanket Technology Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [BA Project Coordination Group, Department of Fusion Power Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuch, Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} with excess Li (Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y}) pebble as an advanced tritium breeders was fabricated using emulsion method. • Grain size of Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles was controlled to be less than 5 μm. • Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles exhibited good tritium release properties similar to that of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles. - Abstract: Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} with excess Li (Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y}) has been developed as an advanced tritium breeder. With respect to the tritium release characteristics of the blanket, the optimum grain size after sintering was less than 5 μm. Therefore, an emulsion method was developed to fabricate pebbles with this target grain size. The predominant factor affecting grain growth was assumed to be the presence of binder in the gel particles; this remaining binder was hypothesized to react with the excess Li, thereby generating Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, which promotes grain growth. To inhibit the generation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, calcined Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles were sintered under vacuum and subsequently under a 1% H{sub 2}–He atmosphere. The average grain size of the sintered Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles was less than 5 μm. Furthermore, the tritium release properties of Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles were evaluated, and deuterium–tritium (DT) neutron irradiation experiments were performed at the Fusion Neutronics Source facility in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. To remove the tritium produced by neutron irradiation, 1% H{sub 2}–He purge gas was passed through the Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles. The Li{sub 2+x}TiO{sub 3+y} pebbles exhibited good tritium release properties, similar to those of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles. In particular, the released amount of tritiated hydrogen gas for easier tritium handling was greater than the released amount of tritiated water.

  20. Neutronic performance of two european breeder-inside tube (BIT) blankets for DEMO: Helium-cooled ceramic LiAlO{sub 2} with Be multiplier and water-cooled liquid Li17Pb 2103. international symposium on fusion nuclear technologies (ISFNT-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrizzi, L.; Rado, V. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy)

    1994-11-01

    In support of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) activity in the European Community Test Programme, a neutronic analysis has been performed on the two latest blanket design relative to helium-cooled ceramic BIT (breeder-inside-tube) (with LiAIO{sub 2} and Be multiplier) and the water-cooled liquid Li17Pb in cylindrical modules. At this scope the powerful MCNP Monte Carlo code has been used (version 4). A detailed and accurate description of the geometrical model has been performed inserting the main reactor details and avoiding breeder material dilution inside the modules. TBR performance is low for the solid breeder BIT (with 10 ports 1.011) due mainly to low blanket coverage near the exhaust duct and this solution should be revised. CM Li17Pb blanket reaches sufficient TBR (1.059, with ports) to rely on tritium self-sufficiency. Shielding properties, with respect to the toroidal field coils, have been estimated in a simplified model by means of the ANISN code, supplied with nuclear data library coherent with the one used by MCNP. The analysis suggests a careful shield thickness/composition design to be confident on the shielding capability of the whole blanket and shield system.

  1. Pellet bed reactor concept for nuclear electric propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Morley, Nicholas J.; Juhasz, Albert

    1993-01-01

    For Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) applications, gas cooled nuclear reactors with dynamic energy conversion systems offer high specific power and low total mass. This paper describes the Pellet Bed Reactor (PeBR) concept for potential NEP missions to Mars. The helium cooled, 75-80 MWt PeBR, consists of a single annular fuel region filled with a randomly packed bed of spherical fuel pellets, is designed for multiple starts, and offers unique safety and operation features. Each fuel pellet, about 8-10 mm in diameter, is composed of hundreds of TRISO type fuel microspheres embedded in a graphite matrix for a full retention of fission products. To eliminate the likelihood of a single-point failure, the annular core of the PeBR is divided into three 120° sectors. Each sector is self contained and separate and capable of operating and being cooled on its own and in cooperation with either one or two other sectors. Each sector is coupled to a separate, 5 MWe Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion unit and is subcritical for safe handling and launching. In the event of a failure of the cooling system of a core sector, the reactor power level may be reduced, allowing adjacent sectors to convect the heat away using their own cooling system, thus maintaining reactor operation. Also, due to the absence of an internal core structure in the PeBR core, fueling of the reactor can easily be performed either at the launch facility or in orbit, and refueling can be accomplished in orbit as needed to extend the power system lifetime

  2. Effect on the tritium breeding ratio for a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A., E-mail: albert.garcia.hp@gmail.com [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Dies, J. [Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-12-10

    The paper reports results of MCNP-5 calculations to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) when integrating a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna in the blanket of DEMO fusion power reactor. The calculations consider different parameters such as the ICRF covering ratio and the type of breeding blanket including the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) and the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) concepts. For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidally at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m, the reduction of the TBR is −0.349% for the HCPB blanket and −0.532% for the HCLL blanket. The distributed ICRF antenna is thus shown to have only a marginal effect on the TBR of the DEMO reactor.

  3. Annual report of the Association EURATOM/Cea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, Ph.; Le Vagueres, F

    2002-07-01

    This annual report presents research activities, which have been performed in 2002 by the French EURATOM-Cea association in the frame of the European technology program. The first section describes EFDA (European fusion development agreement) activities and related developments carried out by the association. The second one is dedicated to the underlying technology program and finally the third one presents the inertial confinement fusion activities. In each section the tasks are sorted out according to the EFDA main fields: physics (heating and current drive, remote participation, diagnostics), vessel/in-vessel (vessel/blanket, plasma facing components, remote handling), magnet, tritium breeding and materials (water cooled lithium lead blanket, helium cooled pebble bed blanket, helium cooled lithium lead blanket, reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, advanced materials, neutron source, fuel cycle), safety and environment, system studies (power plant conceptual studies, socio-economic studies) and JET technology activities. The EURATOM-Cea association is involved in all these studies.

  4. Fabrication of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles by a selective laser sintering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qilai [State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Yue [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Liu, Kai [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xue, Lihong, E-mail: xuelh@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yan, Youwei [State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Selective laser sintering (SLS) is employed to fabricate ceramic pebbles. • Quantities and diameter of the pebbles could be easily controlled by adjusting the model of pebbles. • All the pebbles could be prepared at a time within several minutes. • The Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles sintered at 1100 °C show a notable crush load of 43 N. - Abstract: Lithium titanate, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, is an important tritium breeding material for deuterium (D)–tritium (T) fusion reactor. In test blanket module (TBM) design of China, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} is considered as one candidate material of tritium breeders. In this study, selective laser sintering (SLS) technology was introduced to fabricate Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} ceramic pebbles. This fabrication process is computer assisted and has a high level of flexibility. Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} powder with a particle size of 1–3 μm was used as the raw material, whilst epoxy resin E06 was adopted as a binder. Green Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles with certain strengths were successfully prepared via SLS. Density of the green pebbles was subsequently increased by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) process. Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles with a diameter of about 2 mm were obtained after high temperature sintering. Density of the pebbles reaches 80% of theoretical density (TD) with a comparable crush load of 43 N. This computer assisted approach provides a new efficient route for the production of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} ceramic pebbles.

  5. Study of the fracture behavior of mortar and concretes with crushed rock or pebble aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to compare the fracture energy of mortar and concretes produced with crushed rock and pebble aggregates using zero, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of aggregates mixed with standard mortar and applying the wedge splitting method to achieve stable crack propagation. The samples were cast in a special mold and cured for 28 days, after which they were subjected to crack propagation tests by the wedge splitting method to determine the fracture energies of the mortar and concrete. The concretes showed higher fracture energy than the mortar, and the concretes containing crushed rock showed higher resistance to crack propagation than all the compositions containing pebbles. The fracture energy varied from 38 to 55 J.m-2. A comparison of the number of aggregates that separated from the two concrete matrices with the highest fracture energies indicated that the concrete containing pebbles crumbled more easily and was therefore less resistant to crack propagation.

  6. 3D Nondestructive Visualization and Evaluation of TRISO Particles Distribution in HTGR Fuel Pebbles Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonuniform distribution of tristructural isotropic (TRISO particles within a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR pebble may lead to excessive thermal gradients and nonuniform thermal expansion during operation. If the particles are closely clustered, local hotspots may form, leading to excessive stresses on particle layers and an increased probability of particle failure. Although X-ray digital radiography (DR is currently used to evaluate the TRISO distributions in pebbles, X-ray DR projection images are two-dimensional in nature, which would potentially miss some details for 3D evaluation. This paper proposes a method of 3D visualization and evaluation of the TRISO distribution in HTGR pebbles using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT: first, a pebble is scanned on our high-resolution CBCT, and 2D cross-sectional images are reconstructed; secondly, all cross-sectional images are restructured to form the 3D model of the pebble; then, volume rendering is applied to segment and display the TRISO particles in 3D for visualization and distribution evaluation. For method validation, several pebbles were scanned and the 3D distributions of the TRISO particles within the pebbles were produced. Experiment results show that the proposed method provides more 3D than DR, which will facilitate pebble fabrication research and production quality control.

  7. Origin of the water content of Europa : Evidence for pebble accretion ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnet, T.; Mousis, O.; Vernazza, P.

    2017-09-01

    Despite the fact that the observed gradient in water content among the Galilean satellites is globally consistent with a formation in a circum-Jovian disk on both sides of the snowline, the mechanisms that led to a low water mass fraction in Europa (˜8%) are not yet understood. Here we show that the water mass fraction of pebbles, as they drift inward, is globally consistent with the current water content of the Galilean system. This opens the possibility that each satellite could have formed through pebble accretion within a delimited region whose boundaries were defined by the position of the snowline.

  8. Pebble pile-up and planetesimal formation at the snow line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazkowska, J.

    2017-09-01

    The planetesimal formation stage represents a major gap in our understanding of planet formation process. Because of this, the late-stage planet accretion models typically make arbitrary assumptions about planetesimals and pebbles distribution, while the state-of-the-art dust evolution models predict no or little planetesimal formation. With this contribution, I present a step toward bridging the gap between the early and late stages of planet formation by models that connect dust coagulation and planetesimal formation. With the aid of evaporation, outward diffusion, and re-condensation of water vapor, pile-up of large pebbles is formed outside of the snow line that facilitates planetesimal formation by streaming instability.

  9. geoPebble: Combined Seismic, Acoustic, and GPS Sensor with Wireless Communications for Glaciological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandakrishnan, S.; Burkett, P. G.; Long, B.

    2009-12-01

    Glaciologist and geophysicists study many dynamic processes in glaciated environments such as sliding, crevasse formation, and water flow. These processes generate signals that can be interpreted for fundamental parameters needed for numerical models of glacier and ice sheet flow. These signals include microearthquakes beneath glaciers and ice streams during stick-slip processes; seismically identifiable harmonic tremors associated with subglacial water flow; supraglacial lake drainage which can produce rapid uplift of the 1 m/hr. In addition, researchers use active seismic experiments to determine bed properties such as roughness and lubrication. Currently, each process requires different instrumentation and/or different field equipment to collect the data such as a GPS receiver for displacement, a passive seismic instrument for microearthquakes, and a multichannel seismic recorder for active seismic experiments. We report on the development of an instrument specifically designed for observing dynamic glaciated environments in a single platform, reducing the need for multiple field systems and reducing the cost considerably. The geoPebble wireless seismic acquisition system, designed and built at the Pennsylvania State University, comprises 4 channels of 24-bit seismic and acoustic digitizing, an L1 GPS engine, onboard data storage and an 802.15 ZigBee radio. Three of the four ADC channels are intended to be used with a 3 component seismic sensor. The fourth channel is a dedicated to an audio frequency microphone. The 1 Hz L1 GPS system is capable of horizontal position accuracy to better than 10 cm when post-processed against L1/L2 stations within 10 km. Onboard storage is achieved with a Secure Digital card where volumes now exceed 32 GB. The ZigBee radio is capable of forming a mesh network which reduces transmit and receive power requirements while maintaing communication throughout the array and provides state-of-health information as well as sufficient data

  10. Fusion technology annual report of the association EURATOM/CEA 1998; Technologie de la fusion Rapport annuel 1998 Association EURATOM/CEA 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, P.; Le vagueres, F

    1998-07-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works carried out in the frame of the european program of fusion technology, during 1998. The presented activities are: plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety (short and long term), european blanket project (long term) with water cooled lithium lead and helium cooled pebble bed blanket, materials for fusion power plant, socio-economic research on fusion, plasma facing components, fuel cycle, inertial confinement. (A.L.B.)

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

  12. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

    2004-09-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

  13. Supercritical Helium Cooling of the LHC Beam Screens

    CERN Document Server

    Hatchadourian, E; Tavian, L

    1998-01-01

    The cold mass of the LHC superconducting magnets, operating in pressurised superfluid helium at 1.9 K, must be shielded from the dynamic heat loads induced by the circulating particle beams, by means of beam screens maintained at higher temperature. The beam screens are cooled between 5 and 20 K by forced flow of weakly supercritical helium, a solution which avoids two-phase flow in the long, narr ow cooling channels, but still presents a potential risk of thermohydraulic instabilities. This problem has been studied by theoretical modelling and experiments performed on a full-scale dedicated te st loop.

  14. The impact of ellipsoidal particle shape on pebble breakage in gravel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuitz, Christoph; Exner, Ulrike; Frehner, Marcel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2012-09-01

    We have studied the influence of particle shape and consequently loading configuration on the breakage load of fluvial pebbles. Unfortunately, physical strength tests on pebbles, i.e., point-load tests, can only be conducted under one specific stable loading configuration. Therefore, the physical uniaxial strength tests performed in this study were extended by a two-dimensional finite-element stress analysis, which is capable of investigating those scenarios that are not possible in physical tests. Breakage load, equivalent to that measured in unidirectional physical tests, was determined from the results of the stress analysis by a maximum tensile stress-based failure criterion. Using this assumption, allows the determination of breakage load for a range of different kind of synthetic loading configurations and its comparison with the natural breakage load distribution of the physical strength tests. The results of numerical modelling indicated that the configuration that required the least breakage load corresponded with the minor principal axis of the ellipsoidal pebbles. In addition, most of the simulated gravel-hosted loading configurations exceeded the natural breakage load distribution of fluvial pebbles obtained from the physical strength tests.

  15. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  16. Tritium and helium release from beryllium pebbles neutron-irradiated up to 230appm tritium and 3000appm helium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Chakin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of tritium and helium release from beryllium pebbles with diameters of 0.5 and 1mm after high-dose neutron irradiation at temperatures of 686–968K was performed. The release rate always has a single peak, and the peak temperatures at heating rates of 0.017K/s and 0.117K/s lie in the range of 1100–1350K for both tritium and helium release. The total tritium release from 1mm pebbles decreases considerably by increasing the irradiation temperature. The total tritium release from 0.5mm pebbles is less than that from 1mm pebbles and remains constant regardless of the irradiation temperature. At high irradiation temperatures, open channels are formed which contribute to the enhanced tritium release.

  17. Effects of external energetic factors on tritium release from the EXOTIC 8-3/13 neutron-irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiliks, Juris [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Boulevard 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia); Vitins, Aigars [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Boulevard 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia)], E-mail: aigars.vitins@lu.lv; Kizane, Gunta; Tilika, Vija; Kolodinska, Elina; Kaleja, Sarmite; Lescinskis, Bronislavs [Laboratory of Radiation Chemistry of Solids, Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda Boulevard 4, LV-1010 Riga (Latvia)

    2009-06-15

    Tritium release from samples of 9-13 mg of the EXOTIC 8-3/13 neutron-irradiated beryllium pebbles under the separate and simultaneous action of temperature 490-770 K, 5 MeV fast-electron radiation 14 MGy h{sup -1} for 3 h and magnetic field (MF) of 1.7 T was investigated. The pebbles were found to be very dissimilar with respect to their total tritium content-2.5-9 MBq g{sup -1}. The batch contained also some coarse agglomerates of the pebbles containing 10-19 MBq g{sup -1} of tritium having also a high tritium release. For the pebbles having the total tritium 2.5-5.3 MBq g{sup -1}, the electron radiation for 3 h caused the fractional tritium release 17-26% (B = 0) and 21-29% (B = 1.7 T), the temperature of the pebbles being <550 K. The annealing of the pebbles at the temperature ramp at 5 K/min to 553 K and at 553 K for 3 h caused the fractional tritium release 10-19% (B = 0) and 14% (B = 1.7 T). For the pebbles having the total tritium 3.6-5.8 MBq g{sup -1}, the annealing of the pebbles at the temperature ramp at 5 K/min to 770 K and at 770 K for 1 h caused the fractional tritium release 17-24% (B = 0) and 25% (B = 1.7 T), but with the simultaneous additional action of the electron radiation for 3 h the fractional tritium release was 24-42% (B = 0) and 32-37% (B = 1.7 T)

  18. EBSD characterization of pre-Cambrian deformations in conglomerate pebbles (Sierra de la Demanda, Northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puelles, Pablo; Ábalos, Benito; Fernández-Armas, Sergio

    2010-05-01

    Pre-Cambrian and unconformable earliest Cambrian rocks from the Sierra de la Demanda (N Spain) exhibit field and microstructural relationships that attest to orogenic events recorded by concealed basement rocks. Neoproterozoic foliated slates ("Anguiano Schists") crop out under up to 300 m thick, unfoliated quartz-rich conglomerates ("Anguiano Conglomerates") and quartzites which are stratigraphically ca. 600 m below the oldest, paleontologically dated, pre-trilobitic Cambrian layers (likely older than 520 Ma). The Anguiano Conglomerates contain mm to cm grainsized well-rounded pebbles of various types including monocrystalline quartz, detrital zircon and tourmaline-bearing sandstones, black cherts and metamorphic poly-crystalline quartz aggregates. The undeformed matrix is made of much smaller (diagenetically overgrown) monocrystaline quartz grains and minor amounts of accesory zircon, tourmaline and mica. Black chert pebbles exhibit microstructural evidence of brittle deformation (microfaults and thin veins of syntaxial fibrous quartz). These and the fine-grained sandstone pebbles can also exhibit ductile deformations (microfolds with thickened hinges and axial planar continuous foliations), too. Polycrystalline quartz pebbles exhibit a variety of microstructures that resulted from syn-metamorphic ductile deformations. These are recognisable under the petrographic microscope and include continuous foliations, quartz shape fabrics, various types of subgrain or recrystallized new grain microtextures, and lattice preferred orientations (LPOs). Conventional characterization of quartz fabrics (after oriented structural sections) is challenged in conglomerate pebble thin sections by the difficulty of unraveling in them the complete structural reference framework provided by foliation (whose trace can be unraveled) and lineation orientation (which cannot be directly identified). Quartz in various metamorphic polycrystalline pebbles was studied with the Electron Back

  19. Studies on crude oil removal from pebbles by the application of biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wen-xiang; Xia, Yan; Li, Jin-cheng; Zhang, Dan-feng; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Xin-ping

    2015-02-15

    Oil residues along shorelines are hard to remove after an oil spill. The effect of biodiesel to eliminate crude oil from pebbles alone and in combination with petroleum degrading bacteria was investigated in simulated systems. Adding biodiesel made oil detach from pebbles and formed oil-biodiesel mixtures, most of which remained on top of seawater. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal efficiency increased with biodiesel quantities but the magnitude of augment decreased gradually. When used with petroleum degrading bacteria, the addition of biodiesel (BD), nutrients (NUT) and BD+NUT increased the dehydrogenase activity and decreased the biodegradation half lives. When BD and NUT were replenished at the same time, the TPH removal efficiency was 7.4% higher compared to the total improvement of efficiency when BD and NUT was added separately, indicating an additive effect of biodiesel and nutrients on oil biodegradation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modeling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; de Caro, M S; Caro, A

    2009-03-16

    Concept designs for the laser-initiated fusion/fission engine (LIFE) include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a safe and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermomechanical behavior under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence/fast flux on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling, which we estimate to be at least 16 months if uncoated and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed.

  1. Alexa Fluor 488 as an iron sensing molecule and its application in PEBBLE nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, James P; Kopelman, Raoul

    2005-04-01

    Molecular Probes' Alexa Fluor dyes are generally used for biological labeling because of their ideal fluorescent properties, but here we detail Alexa Fluor 488's nanomolar sensitivity to free iron. Furthermore, the dye has been encapsulated into a polymer nanosphere by a microemulsion method, producing <100 nm particles. These nanosensors, PEBBLEs (Probe Encapsulated By Biologically Localized Embedding) have micromolar sensitivity and are non-responsive to other metal ions of biological interest.

  2. Characterisation and radiolysis of modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with noble metal impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Zariņš, A.; Valtenbergs, O.

    2017-01-01

    Li4SiO4 pebbles during the melt-based process, due to the corrosion of Pt-Rh and Pt-Au alloy crucible components. In this study, the surface microstructure, chemical and phase composition of the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with different contents of the noble metals was analysed. The influence......Modified lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide (TiO2) are suggested as an alternative tritium breeding ceramic for the European solid breeder test blanket module. The noble metals – platinum (Pt), gold (Au) and rhodium (Rh), can be introduced into the modified...... of the noble metals on the radiolysis was evaluated after irradiation with accelerated electrons (E = 5 MeV), up to 12 MGy absorbed dose at 300–345 K in a dry argon atmosphere. Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, it was determined that the noble metals (up to 300 ppm) do not significantly...

  3. Mechanical properties and tritium release behavior of neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Terai, T.; Tanaka, S. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    Beryllium pebbles are expected as a neutron multiplier of a fusion reactor blanket. Mechanical properties and tritium release behaviors of the neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles were tested as a post irradiation examination (PIE). Two kinds of beryllium specimens (diameter:1 mm, grain size: about 0.5 mm), which were fabricated by the rotating electrode method (REM) and by the Mg reduction method (MRM), were irradiated with a total fast neutron fluence of 1.6 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) at 673, 773 and 873 K. The estimated helium concentration and dpa value were about 1 x 10{sup 3} appmHe and 10 dpa, respectively. Compression tests were carried out at the room temperature in the Beryllium PIE facility of JMTR (Japan materials testing reactor) hot laboratory. Compression speed was 0.2 mm/min in ten tests for each specimen. From the results of compression test, no significant difference in the compression strength was observed between two kinds of beryllium pebbles. Additionally, it was clear that not only helium concentration but also dpa value was an important factor on the mechanical properties, because the compression strength of the high dpa specimens (10 dpa) was smaller than that of the low dpa specimens (6 dpa) with similar helium concentration (about 1 x 10{sup 3} appmHe). Also, the tritium release experiment will be carried out for these specimens, and results will be presented in this workshop. (orig.)

  4. Thermal decomposition of expanded polystyrene in a pebble bed reactor to get higher liquid fraction yield at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, R S; Gopinath, S; Razdan, P; Delattre, C; Nirmala, G S; Natarajan, R

    2008-11-01

    Expanded polystyrene is one of the polymers produced in large quantities due to its versatile application in different fields. This polymer is one of the most intractable components in municipal solid waste. Disposal of polymeric material by pyrolysis or catalytic cracking yields valuable hydrocarbon fuels or monomers. Literature reports different types of reactors and arrangements that have uniform temperatures during pyrolysis and catalytic cracking. The present study focuses on reducing the temperature to maximize the quantity of styrene monomer in the liquid product. A bench scale reactor has been developed to recover the styrene monomer and other valuable chemicals. Experiments were carried under partial oxidation and vacuum conditions in the temperature range of 300-500 degrees C. In the pyrolysis optimization studies, the best atmospheric condition was determined to be vacuum, the pyrolysis temperature should be 500 degrees C, yield of liquid product obtained was 91.7% and yield of styrene obtained was 85.5%. In the characterization studies, distillation and IR spectroscopy experiments were carried out. The remaining of the liquid product comprises of benzene, ethyl benzene, and styrene dimers and trimers.

  5. Preparation, performances and reaction mechanism of the Li{sub 4+x}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}O{sub 4} pebbles for advanced tritium breeders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Maoqiao; Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@126.com; Zhang, Yun; Li, Guangbin; Dong, Jinquan; Wang, Zimeng

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Two alternative lithium sources were used for fabricating Li{sub 4+x}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}O{sub 4} pebbles. • The Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} chemical reaction had three stages. • The LiAlO{sub 2} can not be incorporated into the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. • Solid solutions Li{sub 4+x}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}O{sub 4} can be fabricated from Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and Li{sub 5}AlO{sub 4}. • The optimal x value was 0.1. - Abstract: The interstitial solid solution Li{sub 4+x}Si{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O{sub 4} (x > 0) pebbles have been considered as potential candidates for the next generation of advanced tritium breeders. In this paper, Li{sub 4+x}Si{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3) pebbles were fabricated by a graphite bed method using two alternative raw materials (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and Li{sub 5}AlO{sub 4}). The reaction process of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated by thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), which can be divided into two steps. LiAlO{sub 2} would be formed inevitably in the first step (400–700 °C) during the calcination process of the Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} raw materials, and it can hardly be incorporated into Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, resulting biphasic Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}-LiAlO{sub 2} pebbles. The interstitial solid solution Li{sub 4+x}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}O{sub 4} pebbles can be fabricated by the graphite bed method using Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} and Li{sub 5}AlO{sub 4} as raw materials. The Al replacement increased the grain growth of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. The optimal x values seemed to be 0.1. Crush load and density of the Li{sub 4.1}Al{sub 0.1}Si{sub 0.9}O{sub 4} pebbles reached 48.2 N and 86.4% TD, respectively.

  6. Eccentricity excitation and merging of planetary embryos heated by pebble accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrenko, O.; Brož, M.; Lambrechts, M.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Planetary embryos can continue to grow by pebble accretion until they become giant planet cores. Simultaneously, these embryos mutually interact and also migrate due to torques arising from the protoplanetary disk. Aims: Our aim is to study how pebble accretion alters the orbital evolution of embryos undergoing Type-I migration. In particular, we try to determine whether or not the embryos establish resonant chains, and if so, whether or not these chains are prone to instabilities. Further, we investigate the possibility that giant planet cores form through embryo merging which can be more rapid than pebble accretion alone. Methods: For the first time, we perform self-consistent global-scale radiative hydrodynamic simulations of a two-fluid protoplanetary disk consisting of gas and pebbles, the latter being accreted by embedded embryos. Accretion heating, along with other radiative processes, is accounted for to correctly model the Type-I migration. Results: We track the evolution of four super-Earth-like embryos, initially located in a region where the disk structure allows for a convergent migration. Generally, embryo merging is facilitated by rapidly increasing embryo masses and breaks the otherwise oligarchic growth. Moreover, we find that the orbital eccentricity of each embryo is considerably excited (≃0.03) due to the presence of an asymmetric under-dense lobe of gas - a so-called "hot trail" - produced by accretion heating of the embryo's vicinity. Eccentric orbits lead the embryos to frequent close encounters and make resonant locking more difficult. Conclusions: Embryo merging typically produces one massive core (≳10 ME) in our simulations, orbiting near 10 AU. Pebble accretion is naturally accompanied by the occurrence of eccentric orbits which should be considered in future efforts to explain the structure of exoplanetary systems. The code is publicly available at http://sirrah.troja.mff.cuni.cz/ chrenko/, and also at the CDS via anonymous

  7. Finalization of the conceptual design of the auxiliary circuits for the European test blanket systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiello, A., E-mail: antonio.aiello@enea.it [ENEA UTIS – C.R. Brasimone, Bacino del Brasimone, I-40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy); Ghidersa, B.E. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) – Institut für Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik (INR), D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Utili, M. [ENEA UTIS – C.R. Brasimone, Bacino del Brasimone, I-40032 Camugnano, BO (Italy); Vala, L. [Sustainable Energy (SUSEN), Technological Experimental Circuits, Centrum vyzkumu Rez s.r.o. (CV Rez), Hlavni c.p. 130, CZ-250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Ilkei, T. [Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest H-1525 (Hungary); Di Gironimo, G.; Mozzillo, R.; Tarallo, A. [CREATE/University of Naples Federico II, Department of Industrial Engineering, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy); Ricapito, I.; Calderoni, P. [TBM& MD Project, Fusion for Energy, EU Commission, Carrer J. Pla, 2, Building B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    In view of the ITER conceptual design review, the design of the ancillary systems of the European test blanket systems presented in [1] has been updated and made consistent with the ITER requirements for the present design phase. Europe is developing two concepts of TBM, the helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL) and the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) one, having in common the cooling media, pressurized helium at 8 MPa [2]. TBS, namely helium cooling system (HCS), coolant purification system (CPS), lead lithium loop and tritium extraction/removal system (TES–TRS) have the purpose to cool down the TBM and to remove tritium to be driven to TEP from breeder and coolant. These systems are placed in port cell 16 (PC#16), chemical and volume control system (CVCS) area and tritium building. Starting from the pre-conceptual design developed in the past, more mature technical interfaces with the ITER facility have been consolidated and iterative design activities were performed to comply with design requirements/specifications requested by IO to conclude the conceptual design phase. In this paper the present status of design of the TBS is presented together with the preliminary integration in ITER areas.

  8. Bed disturbance patterns in two mediterranean impounded rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobera, Gemma; López-Tarazón, José A.; Vericat, Damià; Batalla, Ramon J.; Andrés-Doménech, Ignacio; Millán-Romero, Pedro; Vallés, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    ) characterisation of grain size distribution by means of pebble counts and bulk samples; 4) bed mobility by tracers (i.e. painted bed areas and tagged particles using radiofrequency techniques).

  9. KüFA safety testing of HTR fuel pebbles irradiated in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O., E-mail: oliver.seeger@rwth-aachen.de [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurie, M., E-mail: mathias.laurie@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Abjani, A. El; Ejton, J.; Boudaud, D.; Freis, D.; Carbol, P.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Safety of Irradiated Nuclear Materials Unit, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fütterer, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Energy and Transport (IET), Nuclear Reactor Integrity Assessment and Knowledge Management Unit, PO Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Allelein, H.-J. [Lehrstuhl für Reaktorsicherheit und -technik an der RWTH Aachen, Kackertstraße 9, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The Cold Finger Apparatus (KühlFinger-Apparatur—KüFA) in operation at JRC-ITU is designed to experimentally scrutinize the effects of Depressurization LOss of Forced Circulation (D-LOFC) accident scenarios on irradiated High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles. Up to 1600 °C, the reference maximum temperature for these accidents, high-quality German HTR fuel pebbles have already demonstrated a small fission product release. This paper discusses and compares the releases obtained from KüFA-testing the pebbles HFR-K5/3 and HFR-EU1/3, which were both irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten. We present the time-dependent fractional release of the volatile fission product {sup 137}Cs as well as the fission gas {sup 85}Kr for both pebbles. For HFR-EU1/3 the isotopes {sup 134}Cs and {sup 154}Eu as well as the shorter-lived {sup 110m}Ag have also been measured. A detailed description of the experimental setup and its accuracy is given. The data for the recently tested pebbles is discussed in the context of previous results.

  10. The Role of Pebble Fragmentation in Planetesimal Formation. I. Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari Syed, M.; Blum, J.; Wahlberg Jansson, K.; Johansen, A.

    2017-01-01

    Previous work on protoplanetary dust growth shows a halt at centimeter sizes owing to the occurrence of bouncing at velocities of ≳0.1 m s-1 and fragmentation at velocities ≳1 m s-1. To overcome these barriers, spatial concentration of centimeter-sized dust pebbles and subsequent gravitational collapse have been proposed. However, numerical investigations have shown that dust aggregates may undergo fragmentation during the gravitational collapse phase. This fragmentation in turn changes the size distribution of the solids and thus must be taken into account in order to understand the properties of the planetesimals that form. To explore the fate of dust pebbles undergoing fragmenting collisions, we conducted laboratory experiments on dust-aggregate collisions with a focus on establishing a collision model for this stage of planetesimal formation. In our experiments, we analyzed collisions of dust aggregates with masses between 0.7 and 91 g mass ratios between target and projectile from 1 to 126 at a fixed porosity of 65%, within the velocity range of 1.5-8.7 m s-1, at low atmospheric pressure of ˜10-3 mbar, and in free-fall conditions. We derived the mass of the largest fragment, the fragment size/mass distribution, and the efficiency of mass transfer as a function of collision velocity and projectile/target aggregate size. Moreover, we give recipes for an easy-to-use fragmentation and mass-transfer model for further use in modeling work. In a companion paper, we use the experimental findings and the derived dust-aggregate collision model to investigate the fate of dust pebbles during gravitational collapse.

  11. Turbulent energy dissipation rate in a tilting flume with a highly rough bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscarella, F.; Servidio, S.; Ferraro, D.; Carbone, V.; Gaudio, R.

    2017-08-01

    Turbulent flows on highly rough beds, such as those occurring in natural watercourses, represent a longstanding and fascinating problem of hydraulics, motivating in the past few decades huge research on new models of turbulence. In this work, laboratory experiments are presented on a stream flowing on a heterogeneous pebble bed with varying slope. The analysis of the flow speed puts in evidence a clear inertial range, where the Kolmogorov 4/5-law for the streamwise velocity spatial increments holds. The law is used for a systematic estimation of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate 𝜖 , here measured for three different bed slopes and hence for three different shear Reynolds numbers. The experiments presented here suggest that small scale turbulence has properties similar to the classical picture of homogeneous universal turbulence invoked by the Kolmogorov theory.

  12. Introduction to Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Agency Search Search Bed Bugs Contact Us Share Introduction to Bed Bugs Photo credit: CDC/ CDC-DPDx; ... and Guidance Regulations About EPA EPA Administrator Current Leadership Organization Chart Staff Directory Planning, Budget and Results ...

  13. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updates Practice Hospital Bed Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Hospital Bed Entrapment Zones An ... the side edge of the head or foot board 7. between the head or foot board and ...

  14. Surface energy equation for heat transfer process in a pebble fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [Área de Ingeniería en Recursos Energéticos, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, México, DF 09340 (Mexico); Castillo-Jiménez, V. [Área de Ingeniería en Recursos Energéticos, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, México, DF 09340 (Mexico); Herranz-Puebla, L.E. [División de Fisión Nuclear, Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vázquez-Rodríguez, R. [Área de Ingeniería en Recursos Energéticos, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, México, DF 09340 (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Steady and transient behaviors of the interfacial heat transfer in a fuel element. • Non-local averaging volume method for deriving the surface energy equation. • The method captures significant physical phenomena of the interfacial heat transfer. • Closure relationships are proposed in order to obtain the temperatures distribution. • The derived average equation represents an upscaling regarding the local description. - Abstract: In this paper the surface energy equation for the heat transfer process (HT) between the mixture of fuel (TRISO particles and graphite matrix) and coating in a fuel pebble is derived. The fuel pebble can be treated as a heterogeneous region (mixture of microspheres and graphite) interacting thermally with the homogeneous region (the coating or cladding). These two regions are separated by a boundary region where the properties and behavior differ from those of the adjoining regions. The methodology applied for deriving the surface energy equation is based on the classical theory on interfacial transport phenomena. The surface energy equation derived in this work is an average equation that represents an upscaling respect to the local description. The regions around the surface where changes in the physical phenomena are important are of the order of microns, in contrast with interfacial mass transfer between phases that may be several molecular diameters. The numerical analysis regarding the application of surface energy equation is presented in this work.

  15. Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collaborative Strategy on Bed Bugs was developed by the Federal Bed Bug Workgroup to clarify the federal role in bed bug control and highlight ways that government, community, academia and private industry can work together on bed bug issues.

  16. Density improvement of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles fabricated by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Fuchinoue, K.; Sawada, H.; Watarumi, K.

    1998-03-01

    Lithium titanate (Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) has attracted the attention of many researchers from a point of tritium recovery at low temperature, chemical stability, etc.. The application of small Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} sphere has been proposed in some designs of fusion blanket. On the other hand, the wet process is most advantageous as the fabrication method of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles from a point of mass production, and of reprocessing necessary for effective use of resources and reduction of radioactive wastes. In the preliminary fabrication test, density of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles was about 40%T.D.. Therefore, in this study, density improvement tests and preliminary characterization of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles by wet process were performed, noting the aging condition and sintering condition in the fabrication process of the gel-spheres. This study yielded Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles in target range of 80-85%T.D.. (author)

  17. Characterization of PEBBLEs as a Tool for Real-Time Measurement of Dictyostelium discoideum Endosomal pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett Moding

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of intracellular ion concentration change is important for understanding the cellular mechanisms for communication. Recently developed nanosensors, (Photonic Explorers for Biomedical use with Biologically Localized Embedding PEBBLEs, have a number of advantages for measuring ions in cells over established methods using microelectrodes, unbound fluorescent dyes, or NMR. PEBBLE sensors have been shown to work in principle for measuring dynamic ion changes, but few in vivo applications have been demonstrated. We modified the protocol for the fabrication of pH sensing PEBBLEs and developed a protocol for the utilization of these sensors for the monitoring of dynamic pH changes in the endosomes of slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum (D. discoideum. Oregon Green 514-CdSe Quantum Dot PEBBLEs were used to measure real-time pH inside D. discoideum endosomes during cAMP stimulation. Endosomal pH was shown to decrease during cAMP signaling, demonstrating a movement of protons into the endosomes of D. discoideum amoebae.

  18. 3.3 CM JVLA OBSERVATIONS OF TRANSITIONAL DISKS: SEARCHING FOR CENTIMETER PEBBLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina, E-mail: lzapata@crya.unam.mx [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2017-01-10

    We present sensitive (rms-noises ∼4–25 μ Jy) and high angular resolution (∼1″–2″) 8.9 GHz (3.3 cm) Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of 10 presumed transitional disks associated with young low-mass stars. We report the detection of radio continuum emission in 5 out of the 10 objects (RXJ1615, UX Tau A, LkCa15, RXJ1633, and SR 24s). In the case of LkCa15, the centimeter emission is extended, and has a similar morphology to that of the transitional disk observed at millimeter wavelengths with an inner depression. For these five detections, we construct the spectral energy distributions from the centimeter to submillimeter wavelengths, and find that they can be well fitted with a single (RXJ1633 and UX Tau A) or a two-component power law (LkCa15, RXJ1615, and SR 24s). For the cases where a single power law fits the data well, the centimeter emission is likely produced by optically thin dust with large grains (i.e., centimeter-size pebbles) present in the transitional disks. For the cases where a double power law fits the data, the centimeter emission might be produced by the combination of photoevaporation and a free–free jet. We conclude that RXJ1633 and UX Tau A are excellent examples of transitional disks where the structure of the emission from centimeter/millimeter pebbles can be studied. In the other cases, some other physical emitting mechanisms are also important in the centimeter regime.

  19. 3.3 CM JVLA Observations of Transitional Disks: Searching for Centimeter Pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina

    2017-01-01

    We present sensitive (rms-noises ˜4-25 μJy) and high angular resolution (˜1″-2″) 8.9 GHz (3.3 cm) Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of 10 presumed transitional disks associated with young low-mass stars. We report the detection of radio continuum emission in 5 out of the 10 objects (RXJ1615, UX Tau A, LkCa15, RXJ1633, and SR 24s). In the case of LkCa15, the centimeter emission is extended, and has a similar morphology to that of the transitional disk observed at millimeter wavelengths with an inner depression. For these five detections, we construct the spectral energy distributions from the centimeter to submillimeter wavelengths, and find that they can be well fitted with a single (RXJ1633 and UX Tau A) or a two-component power law (LkCa15, RXJ1615, and SR 24s). For the cases where a single power law fits the data well, the centimeter emission is likely produced by optically thin dust with large grains (i.e., centimeter-size pebbles) present in the transitional disks. For the cases where a double power law fits the data, the centimeter emission might be produced by the combination of photoevaporation and a free-free jet. We conclude that RXJ1633 and UX Tau A are excellent examples of transitional disks where the structure of the emission from centimeter/millimeter pebbles can be studied. In the other cases, some other physical emitting mechanisms are also important in the centimeter regime.

  20. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  1. Bed Bugs FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Bed Bugs Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Biology Resources for Health Professionals Publications Additional Resources Get Email Updates To receive email updates about this page, enter ...

  2. Recovery and recycling of lithium value from spent lithium titanate (Li2TiO3) pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, D.

    2013-09-01

    In the first generation fusion reactors the fusion of deuterium (D) and tritium (T) is considered to produce energy to meet the future energy demand. Deuterium is available in nature whereas, tritium is not. Lithium-6 (Li6) isotope has the ability to produce tritium in the n, α nuclear reaction with neutrons. Thus lithium-based ceramics enriched by Li6 isotope are considered for the tritium generation for its use in future fusion reactors. Lithium titanate is one such Li-based ceramic material being considered for its some attractive properties viz., high thermal and chemical stability, high thermal conductivity, and low tritium solubility. It is reported in the literature, that the burn up of these pebbles in the fusion reactor will be limited to only 15-17 atomic percentage. At the end of life, the pebbles will contain more than 45% unused Li6 isotope. Due to the high cost of enriched Li6 and the waste disposal considerations, it is necessary to recover the unused Li from the spent lithium titanate pebbles. Till date, only the feasibilities of different processes are reported, but no process details are available. Experiments were carried out for the recovery of Li from simulated Li2TiO3 pebbles and to reuse of lithium in lithium titanate pebble fabrication. The details of the experiments and results are discussed in this paper. Simulated lithium titanate (Li2TiO3) pebbles. The objective of the study is to develop a process which can be used to recover lithium value form the spent Li2TiO3 pebbles from future fusion reactor. The Li2TiO3 pebbles used in the study were synthesized and fabricated by the solid state reaction process developed by Mandal et al. described in details somewhere else [1,2]. Spherical Li2TiO3 pebbles of size 1.0 mm were used and the properties of the Li2TiO3 pebbles used in the study are shown in Table 1. Hydrochloric acid (HCl), of 99.8% purity, purchased from Merck and Loba Chemicals, Mumbai, India. To leach lithium from Li2TiO3

  3. USGS exploration geochemistry studies at the Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, Alaska-pdf of presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Kelley, Karen D.; Fey, David L.; Giles, Stuart A.; Minsley, Burke J.; Smith, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    From 2007 through 2010, scientists in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have been conducting exploration-oriented geochemical and geophysical studies in the region surrounding the giant Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit in southwestern Alaska. The Cretaceous Pebble deposit is concealed under tundra, glacial till, and Tertiary cover rocks, and is undisturbed except for numerous exploration drill holes. These USGS studies are part of a nation-wide research project on evaluating and detecting concealed mineral resources. This report focuses on exploration geochemistry and comprises illustrations and associated notes that were presented as a case study in a workshop on this topic. The workshop, organized by L.G. Closs and R. Glanzman, is called 'Geochemistry in Mineral Exploration and Development,' presented by the Society of Economic Geologists at a technical conference entitled 'The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Integrative Exploration and New Discoveries,' held at Keystone, Colorado, October 2-5, 2010.

  4. Geochemical Data for Samples Collected in 2007 Near the Concealed Pebble Porphyry Cu-Au-Mo Deposit, Southwest Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, David L.; Granitto, Matthew; Giles, Stuart A.; Smith, Steven M.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Kelley, Karen D.

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began an exploration geochemical research study over the Pebble porphyry copper-gold-molydenum (Cu-Au-Mo) deposit in southwest Alaska. The Pebble deposit is extremely large and is almost entirely concealed by tundra, glacial deposits, and post-Cretaceous volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks. The deposit is presently being explored by Northern Dynasty Minerals, Ltd., and Anglo-American LLC. The USGS undertakes unbiased, broad-scale mineral resource assessments of government lands to provide Congress and citizens with information on national mineral endowment. Research on known deposits is also done to refine and better constrain methods and deposit models for the mineral resource assessments. The Pebble deposit was chosen for this study because it is concealed by surficial cover rocks, it is relatively undisturbed (except for exploration company drill holes), it is a large mineral system, and it is fairly well constrained at depth by the drill hole geology and geochemistry. The goals of the USGS study are (1) to determine whether the concealed deposit can be detected with surface samples, (2) to better understand the processes of metal migration from the deposit to the surface, and (3) to test and develop methods for assessing mineral resources in similar concealed terrains. This report presents analytical results for geochemical samples collected in 2007 from the Pebble deposit and surrounding environs. The analytical data are presented digitally both as an integrated Microsoft 2003 Access? database and as Microsoft 2003 Excel? files. The Pebble deposit is located in southwestern Alaska on state lands about 30 km (18 mi) northwest of the village of Illiamna and 320 km (200 mi) southwest of Anchorage (fig. 1). Elevations in the Pebble area range from 287 m (940 ft) at Frying Pan Lake just south of the deposit to 1146 m (3760 ft) on Kaskanak Mountain about 5 km (5 mi) to the west. The deposit is in an area of

  5. Tapered bed bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  6. Bed Bugs - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bed Bugs URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bedbugs.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  7. Experimental and numerical studies on penetration of shaped charge into concrete and pebble layered targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on penetrating into concrete and pebble layered targets were performed by shaped charge with different cone angles, liner wall thicknesses, length to diameter ratios and charge diameters at different standoffs. Based on the experimental data, the influence of shaped charge’s structural parameters on crater diameter, hole diameter, crater depth and penetration depth was analyzed in detail. Meanwhile, formation and penetration processes of all shaped charges were simulated by AUTODYN software for investigating the more intrinsic mechanisms, in which the numerical models are the same as those set up in the experiments. The results obtained in this paper indicate that there are obvious differences between jetting projectile charge (JPC and explosively formed projectile (EFP in penetrating into multi-layer targets. For the same charge diameter, the values of hole diameter formed by EFP were much larger than JPC. However, for the same standoff, the penetration depth caused by JCP were larger than EFP. The interfacial effect exists in the penetration progress of JPC.

  8. Applying Pebble-Rotating Game to enhance the robustness of DHTs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyong Ren

    Full Text Available Distributed hash tables (DHTs are usually used in the open networking environment, where they are vulnerable to Sybil attacks. Pebble-Rotating Game (PRG mixes the nodes of the honest and the adversarial randomly, and can resist the Sybil attack efficiently. However, the adversary may have some tricks to corrupt the rule of PRG. This paper proposes a set of mechanisms to make the rule of PRG be obliged to obey. A new joining node must ask the Certificate Authority (CA for its signature and certificate, which records the complete process on how a node joins the network and obtains the legitimacy of the node. Then, to prevent the adversary from accumulating identifiers, any node can make use of the latest certificate to judge whether one identifier is expired with the help of the replacement property of RPG. This paper analyzes in details the number of expired certificates which are needed to store in every node, and gives asymptotic solution of this problem. The analysis and simulations show that the mean number of the certificates stored in each node are [Formula: see text], where n is the size of the network.

  9. Current design of the European TBM systems and implications on DEMO breeding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricapito; Calderoni, P. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Aiello, A. [ENEA, Bacino del Brasimone, I-40032 Camugnano, Bo (Italy); Ghidersa, B. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Poitevin, Y.; Pacheco, J. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Description of the Helium Cooling Systems of HCLL and HCPB-TBS after the Conceptual Design Review. • Description of the PbLi loop of HCLL-TBS after the Conceptual Design Review. • Description of the possible ROX (Return of Experience) from design and operation of the Test Blanket Systems. • Discussion on the DEBO relevancy of the main technologies adopted in the Helium Cooling Systems and PbLi loop. - Abstract: Europe is committed in developing the design of the two Test Blanket Systems (TBS) based on HCLL (Helium Cooled Lithium Lead) and HCPB (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed) breeding blanket (BB) concepts. The complexity of the TBS design comes not only from the innovative fabrication technologies and materials adopted for Test Blanket Modules (TBM) but also from the requirements and functions that the TBM ancillary systems have to satisfy and implement. Indeed, the main TBM ancillary systems, namely the Helium Cooling System, the Coolant Purification System and Tritium Extraction System, all belonging to the Safety Important Class (SIC), have to implement fundamental functions, like the transport of the surface and volumetric heat from the TBM to the heat sink, the extraction and processing of the tritium generated in the TBM, the confinement of radioactive inventory, the support to the investment protection and safety functions. On top of the full compliance with the ITER safety principles, the design of the TBM systems is focused on providing high operational reliability and availability not to jeopardize ITER program and, at the same time, also a good operational flexibility to make possible the achievement of the main TBM scientific objectives. This paper gives an overview of the design status of the HCLL and HCPB-TBM (ancillary) systems, updated to the conclusion of the conceptual design phase (CDR). The most relevant technologies, the still open points, the main issues related to the integration in ITER and last relevant results from the on

  10. Estimation of graphite dust production in ITER TBM using finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji-Ho, E-mail: jhkang@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daekeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daekeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young; Lee, Youngmin; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148, Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust production was estimated for the Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector. • Wear amount was calculated by Archard model using finite element analysis results. • Life time estimation of graphite dust production was done. - Abstract: In this study, an estimation method of graphite dust production in the pebble-bed type reflector region of the Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project using Finite Element Method (FEM) was proposed and the total amount of dust production was calculated. A unit-cell model of uniformly arranged pebbles was defined with thermal and mechanical loadings. A commercial FEM program, Abaqus V6.10, was used to model and solve the stress field under multiple contact constraints between pebbles in the unit-cell. Resultant normal contact forces and slip distances on the contact points were applied into the Archard adhesive wear model to calculate the amount of graphite dust. The Finite Element (FE) analysis was repeated at 27 unit-cell locations chosen to form an interpolated dust density function for the entire region of the reflector. The dust production calculation was extended to the life time of the HCCR and the total graphite dust production was estimated to 0.279 g at the end of the life time with the maximum graphite dust density of 0.149 μg/mm{sup 3}. The dust explosion could be a safety issue with the calculated dust density level and it requires that an appropriate maintenance to remove sufficient amount of graphite dust regularly to prevent the possibility of dust explosion.

  11. Precambrian uranium-bearing quartz-pebble conglomerates: exploration model and United States resource potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, R.S.; Karlstrom, K.E.

    1979-11-01

    Uranium has been discovered in fluvial quartz-pebble conglomerates in most of the Precambrian shield areas of the world, including the Canadian, African, South American, Indian, Baltic, and Australian shields. Occurrences in these and other areas are shown. Two of these occurrences, the Huronian supergroup of Canada and the Witwatersrand deposit of South Africa contain 20 to 30 percent of the planet's known uranium reserves. Thus it is critical that we understand the origin of these deposits and develop exploration models that can aid in finding new deposits. Inasmuch as these uranium-bearing conglomerates are confined almost entirely to rocks of Precambrian age, Part I of this review begins with a discussion of Precambrian geology as it applies to the conglomerates. This is followed by a discussion of genetic concepts, a discussion of unresolved problems, and finally a suggested exploration model. Part II summarizes known and potential occurrences of Precambrian fossil placers in the world and evaluates them in terms of the suggested exploration model. Part III discusses the potential for important Precambrian fossil-placer uranium deposits in the United States and includes suggestions that may be helpful in establishing an exploration program in this country. Part III also brings together new (1975-1978) data on uranium occurrences in the Precambrian of the Wyoming Province. Part IV is a complete bibliography of Precambrian fossil placers, divided according to geographical areas. In total, this paper is designed to be a comprehensive review of Precambrian uranium-bearing fossil placers which will be of use to uranium explorationists and to students of Precambrian geology.

  12. Revision of the Western Australian pebble-mimic dragon species-group (Tympanocryptis cephalus: Reptilia: Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Paul; Kealley, Luke; Shoo, Luke P; Melville, Jane

    2015-11-03

    Recent work on species complexes of the pebble-mimic dragons of the Australian genus Tympanocryptis has greatly clarified evolutionary relationships among taxa and also indicated that species diversity has been severely underestimated. Here we provide a morphological and molecular appraisal of variation in the T. cephalus species-group and find evidence for recognizing five species-level lineages from Western Australia. Four species-level lineages are strongly supported with a combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA Bayesian analysis (a fifth population from the Gascoyne region lacked tissue samples). Morphologically, we found subtle, yet consistent, differences among the populations in scalation, color and pattern. True T. cephalus Günther is restricted to the coastal Pilbara region and characterized by five dark blotches on the dorsum, keeled ventrals, and other characters. Two other lineages within the Pilbara, from the Hamersley range and Fortescue/northern Pilbara region, differed from T. cephalus senso stricto by possessing a more elongate body and a plain dorsum. Furthermore, the Hamersley lineage differed from the Fortescue lineage by possessing slightly more reddish coloration and feeble keeling on the snout. Although there are few specimens and no tissue samples available for the Gascoyne population, these individuals are larger, have rugose scales on the snout, and possess scattered enlarged tubercles with three large blotches on the dorsum. The name T. cephalus gigas Mitchell is available for this population. The most widespread lineage, and the one best represented in collections and in field guides, occurs throughout central Western Australia. These Goldfield populations are characterized by a protruding snout, narrow rostral, and uniform reddish-brown coloration, often with a dark wash. Based on the genetic and morphological differences, we redescribe T. cephalus, resurrect and elevate T. gigas to a full species and designate a neotype for this taxon

  13. Relative performance of three stream bed stability indices as indicators of stream health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnierz, Paul C; Holbrook, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Bed stability is an important stream habitat attribute because it affects geomorphology and biotic communities. Natural resource managers desire indices of bed stability that can be used under a wide range of geomorphic conditions, are biologically meaningful, and are easily incorporated into sampling protocols. To eliminate potential bias due to presence of instream wood and increase precision of stability values, we modified a stream bed instability index (ISI) to include measurements of bankfull depth (dbf) and median particle diameter (D50) only in riffles and increased the pebble count to decrease variability (i.e., increase precision) in D50.The new riffle-based instability index (RISI) was compared to two established indices: ISI and the riffle stability index (RSI). RISI and ISI were strongly associated with each other but neither was closely associated with RSI. RISI and ISI were closely associated with both a diatom- and two macrovertebrate-based stream health indices, but RSI was only weakly associated with the macroinvertebrate indices. Unexpectedly, precision of D50 did not differ between RISI and ISI. Results suggest that RISI is a viable alternative to both ISI and RSI for evaluating bed stability in multiple stream types. With few data requirements and a simple protocol, RISI may also better conform to riffle-based sampling methods used by some water quality practitioners.

  14. Fluidized bed coal desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindram, M.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted on two high volatile bituminous coals in a bench scale batch fluidized bed reactor. Chemical pretreatment and posttreatment of coals were tried as a means of enhancing desulfurization. Sequential chlorination and dechlorination cum hydrodesulfurization under modest conditions relative to the water slurry process were found to result in substantial sulfur reductions of about 80%. Sulfur forms as well as proximate and ultimate analyses of the processed coals are included. These studies indicate that a fluidized bed reactor process has considerable potential for being developed into a simple and economic process for coal desulfurization.

  15. Bed bug deterrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Kenneth F

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent study in BMC Biology has determined that the immature stage of the bed bug (the nymph signals its reproductive status to adult males using pheromones and thus avoids the trauma associated with copulation in this species. The success of this nymphal strategy of deterrence is instructive. Against the background of increasing problems with bed bugs, this research raises the question whether pheromones might be used to control them. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/121

  16. Additives affecting properties of β-Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles in a modified indirect wet chemistry process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Cheng-Long, E-mail: johnyucl@aliyun.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi' an 710021 (China); Research Laboratory of Hydrothermal Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Liu, Wei; Yang, Long-Tao; Wang, Dao-Yi; Wu, Kang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi' an 710021 (China); Zhang, Zeng-Ping [Key Laboratory for Special Area Highway Engineering of Ministry of Education, Chang' an University, Xi' an 710064 (China); Wang, Xiu-Feng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi' an 710021 (China); Yanagisawa, Kazumichi [Research Laboratory of Hydrothermal Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Lithium metatitanate (β-Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}) pebbles were fabricated via the modified indirect wet chemistry method. Effect of varied additives, as polyvinyl alcohol, glycerol, and agar on the properties evolution was investigated. The highest density is obtained by adding 2 wt% (weight percent) polyvinyl alcohol, 3 wt% glycerol, and 3 wt% agar, respectively. β-Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles with relative sintered density of 92.4%T.D. (Theoretical Density), the ratio of the intensity of diffraction peak (002) to that of (−133) of about 2.93, about 1.58 mm in diameter, a better sphericity of 1.02, the particle size of 5–6 μm, and the well-developed surface layered structure are successfully fabricated with 3 wt% glycerol. Glycerol is beneficial to improving the properties by other fabrication method as well. - Highlights: • Polyvinyl alcohol, glycerol, and agar were used to prepare β-Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles. • Properties of the β-Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles were governed by the additives. • Glycerol is beneficial to improving the properties of β-Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles.

  17. Pebble fabrication of super advanced tritium breeders using a solid solution of Li2+xTiO3+y with Li2ZrO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hoshino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lithium titanate with excess lithium (Li2+xTiO3+y is one of the most promising candidates among advanced tritium breeders for demonstration power plant reactors because of its good tritium release characteristics. However, the tritium breeding ratio (TBR of Li2+xTiO3+y is smaller than that of e.g., Li2O or Li8TiO6 because of its lower Li density. Therefore, new Li-containing ceramic composites with both high stability and high Li density have been developed. Thus, this study focused on the development of a solid solution with a new characteristic. The solid-solution pebbles of Li2+xTiO3+y with Li2ZrO3 (Li2+x(Ti,ZrO3+y, designated as LTZO, were fabricated by an emulsion method. The X-ray diffraction patterns of sintered LTZO pebbles are approximately the same as those of Li2+xTiO3+y pebbles, and no peaks attributable to Li2ZrO3 are observed. These results demonstrate that LTZO pebbles are not a two-phase material but rather a solid solution. Furthermore, LTZO pebbles were easily sintered under air. Thus, the LTZO solid solution is a candidate breeder material for super advanced (SA tritium breeders.

  18. Bed Bug Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn the truth about bed bugs, such as how easy they are to see with the naked eye, their preferred habitat, whether they transmit diseases, their public health effects, and whether pesticides are the best way to deal with an infestation.

  19. The Spatial Distribution of Bed Sediment on Fluvial System: A Mini Review of the Aceh Meandering River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irham

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic interactions of hydrological and geomorphological processes in the fluvial system result in accumulated deposit on the bed because the capacity to carry sediment has been exceeded. The bed load of the Aceh fluvial system is primarily generated by mechanical weathering resulting in boulders, pebbles, and sand, which roll or bounce along the river bed forming temporary deposits as bars on the insides of meander bends, as a result of a loss of transport energy in the system. This dynamic controls the style and range of deposits in the Aceh River. This study focuses on the spatial distribution of bed-load transport of the Aceh River. Understanding the spatial distribution of deposits facilitates the reconstruction of the changes in controlling factors during accumulation of deposits. One of the methods can be done by sieve analysis of sediment, where the method illuminates the distribution of sediment changes associated with channel morphology under different flow regimes. Hence, the purpose of this mini review is to investigate how the sediment along the river meander spatially dispersed. The results demonstrate that channel deposits in the Aceh River are formed from four different type of materials: pebble deposited along upstream left bank; sand located on the upstream, downstream, and along meander belts; and silt and clay located along the cut bank of meander bends. Because of different depositional pattern, the distribution of the sediment along the river can be used as a surrogate to identify bank stability, as well as to predict critical geometry for meander bend initiation

  20. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  1. The oxidation kinetics of Incoloy 800 and its deuterium permeation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perujo, A. E-mail: adolfo.perujo@jrc.it; Reimann, J.; Feuerstein, H.; Mancinelli, B

    2000-12-01

    Tritium permeation through the steam generator of the Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket (HCPB) concept can be strongly reduced by natural oxides formed on the Incoloy 800 tubes. This paper presents the results of different experiments with various deuterium to humidity ratios (p{sub H{sub 2}}{sub O}/p{sub D{sub 2}} from 300 vppm to 30%). All experiments show that Incoloy 800 readily oxidizes and that permeation reduction factors (PRF) of at least 100 are easily obtained for typical blanket conditions. The measured PRF values are explained in terms of the type and thickness of the oxides on the Incoloy surface. The observed reduction in permeation is very favorable for the design of the HCPB blanket system in order to reduce the amount of hydrogen needed for isotope swamping and hence, reducing the size of the tritium extraction system.

  2. Geological analysis of aeromagnetic data from southwestern Alaska: implications for exploration in the area of the Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric D.; Hitzman, Murray W.; Monecke, Thomas; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Shah, Anjana K.; Kelley, Karen D.

    2013-01-01

    Aeromagnetic data are used to better understand the geology and mineral resources near the Late Cretaceous Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit in southwestern Alaska. The reduced-to-pole (RTP) transformation of regional-scale aeromagnetic data shows that the Pebble deposit is within a cluster of magnetic anomaly highs. Similar to Pebble, the Iliamna, Kijik, and Neacola porphyry copper occurrences are in magnetic highs that trend northeast along the crustal-scale Lake Clark fault. A high-amplitude, short- to moderate-wavelength anomaly is centered over the Kemuk occurrence, an Alaska-type ultramafic complex. Similar anomalies are found west and north of Kemuk. A moderate-amplitude, moderate-wavelength magnetic low surrounded by a moderate-amplitude, short-wavelength magnetic high is associated with the gold-bearing Shotgun intrusive complex. The RTP transformation of the district-scale aeromagnetic data acquired over Pebble permits differentiation of a variety of Jurassic to Tertiary magmatic rock suites. Jurassic-Cretaceous basalt and gabbro units and Late Cretaceous biotite pyroxenite and granodiorite rocks produce magnetic highs. Tertiary basalt units also produce magnetic highs, but appear to be volumetrically minor. Eocene monzonite units have associated magnetic lows. The RTP data do not suggest a magnetite-rich hydrothermal system at the Pebble deposit. The 10-km upward continuation transformation of the regional-scale data shows a linear northeast trend of magnetic anomaly highs. These anomalies are spatially correlated with Late Cretaceous igneous rocks and in the Pebble district are centered over the granodiorite rocks genetically related to porphyry copper systems. The spacing of these anomalies is similar to patterns shown by the numerous porphyry copper deposits in northern Chile. These anomalies are interpreted to reflect a Late Cretaceous magmatic arc that is favorable for additional discoveries of Late Cretaceous porphyry copper systems in southwestern

  3. The aluminum phosphate zone in the Peace River area, land-pebble phosphate field, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathcart, James B.

    1953-01-01

    The Peace River area, comprising T. 30 and 31 S., R. 24 and 25 E., contains a thicker and more persistent aluminum phosphate zone, and one that is higher in P2O5 and uranium content than is known elsewhere in the land-pebble phosphate district. This report has been prepared to bring together all of the information on the aluminum phosphate zone in the area where the first plant to treat this material will probably be located. The area may be divided into three physiographic units, (1) the ridge, (2) the flatwoods, and (3) the valley. Maps showing distribution and grade of the aluminum phosphate zone indicate that the zone is thin or absent in the ridge unit, thickest and most persistent, and of the best grade in P2O5 and uranium in the flatwoods unit, and absent or very low in grade in the valley unit. Maps of thickness and of chemical composition show that even in favorable areas there are places where the aluminum phosphate zone is missing or of questionable economic importance. The distribution maps also show that areas of high P2O5 and high uranium content coincide closely. Areas containing thick aluminum phosphate material usually have high uranium and P2O5 contents. It is estimated that an average of 13,000 tons per day of aluminum phosphate material might be mined from this area. This figure is based on the probable amount of time, per year, that mining would be in favorable ground. When all mines in the area are in favorable ground, the tonnage per day might be about 23,000 tons. Tonnages of aluminum phosphate material have been computed for about 36 percent of the area of T. 30 S., R. 25 E., and for 18 percent of the area of T. 31 S., R. 25 E. The total inferred tonnage is about 150,000,000 short tons, with an average grade of 0.012 percent U3O8.

  4. Safeguards-by-Design: Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Pebble Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Casey Durst; Mark Schanfein

    2012-08-01

    The following is a guidance document from a series prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), to assist facility designers and operators in implementing international Safeguards-by-Design (SBD). SBD has two main objectives: (1) to avoid costly and time consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear fuel cycle facilities and (2) to make the implementation of international safeguards more effective and efficient at such facilities. In the long term, the attainment of these goals would save industry and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) time, money, and resources and be mutually beneficial. This particular safeguards guidance document focuses on pebble fuel high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). The purpose of the IAEA safeguards system is to provide credible assurance to the international community that nuclear material and other specified items are not diverted from peaceful nuclear uses. The safeguards system consists of the IAEA’s statutory authority to establish safeguards; safeguards rights and obligations in safeguards agreements and additional protocols; and technical measures implemented pursuant to those agreements. Of foremost importance is the international safeguards agreement between the country and the IAEA, concluded pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). According to a 1992 IAEA Board of Governors decision, countries must: notify the IAEA of a decision to construct a new nuclear facility as soon as such decision is taken; provide design information on such facilities as the designs develop; and provide detailed design information based on construction plans at least 180 days prior to the start of construction, and on "as-built" designs at least 180 days before the first receipt of nuclear material. Ultimately, the design information will be captured in an IAEA Design Information

  5. VA National Bed Control System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA National Bed Control System records the levels of operating, unavailable and authorized beds at each VAMC, and it tracks requests for changes in these levels....

  6. Neutronics requirements for a DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion Consortium , Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Villari, R. [ENEA UT-FUS C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Discussion and specification of neutronic requirements for a DEMO power plant. • TBR uncertainties are reviewed/discussed and design margins are elaborated. • Limits are given for radiation loads to super-conducting magnets and steel structural components. • Available DEMO results are compared to recommended limits and TBR design target. - Abstract: This paper addresses the neutronic requirements a DEMO fusion power plant needs to fulfil for a reliable and safe operation. The major requirement is to ensure Tritium self-sufficiency taking into account the various uncertainties and plant-internal losses that occur during DEMO operation. A further major requirement is to ensure sufficient protection of the superconducting magnets against the radiation penetrating in-vessel components and vessel. Reliable criteria for the radiation loads need to be defined and verified to ensure the reliable operation of the magnets over the lifetime of DEMO. Other issues include radiation induced effects on structural materials such as the accumulated displacement damage, the generation of gases such as helium which may deteriorate the material performance. The paper discusses these issues and their impact on design options for DEMO taking into account results obtained in the frame of European Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) 2013 programme activities with DEMO models employing the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB), the helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL), and the water-cooled (WCLL) blanket concepts.

  7. Feasibility study of a neutron activation system for EU test blanket systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Kuo, E-mail: kuo.tian@kit.edu [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Calderoni, Pattrick [Fusion for Energy(F4E), Barcelona (Spain); Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Klix, Axel [Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • This paper summarizes the technical baseline and preliminary design of EU TBM Neutron Activation System, briefly describes the key components, and outlines the major integration challenges. - Abstract: The Neutron Activation System (NAS) for the EU Helium Cooled Lithium Lead (HCLL) and Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) is an instrument that is proposed to determine the absolute neutron fluence and absolute neutron flux with information on the neutron spectrum in selected positions of the corresponding Test Blanket Modules (TBMs). In the NAS activation probes are exposed to the ITER neutron flux for periods ranging from several tens of seconds up to a full plasma pulse length, and the induced gamma activities are subsequently measured. The NAS is composed of a pneumatic transfer system and a counting station. The pneumatic transfer system includes irradiation ends in TBMs, transfer pipes, return gas pipes, a transfer station with a distributor (carousel), and a pressurized gas driving system, while the counting station consists of gamma ray detectors, signal processing electronic devices, and data analyzing software for neutron source strength evaluation. In this paper, a brief description on the proposed TBM NAS as well as the key components is presented, and the integration challenges of TBM NAS are outlined.

  8. Production and engineering application of C60 high-performance pump pebble concrete containing ultra-fine fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y.L. [Changsha Univ. of Science and Technology, Changsha (China). College of Highway Engineering; Ma, B.G. [Wuhan Univ. of Technology, Wuhan (China). Key Laboratory for Silicate Materials Science and Engineering

    2008-08-15

    Ultra-fine fly ash (UFA) is commonly used as an additive to concrete in the place of Portland cement due to its durability, and the environmental benefits associated with recycling waste materials. This study examined the workability, mechanical properties, and durability of a 30 per cent UFA addition to pump pebble concrete with a C60 strength grade. The concrete was designed for use in the reinforced concrete short columns of an underground structure at a power plant in China. River pebbles were used as a coarse aggregate for the pump concrete. Ordinary Portland cement and class F UFA were used in the concrete mixes. Sulphonated naphthalene superplasticizers were used to reduce water demands for the materials. River sand was used as a fine aggregate. Slump and slump losses estimated for the UFA concrete were studied in a laboratory. Results showed that slump and slump losses after 1 hour with the UFA concrete were 254 and 590 mm, and 205, and 405 mm, respectively. Compressive strength tests met requirements for C60 strength grade concretes. Tests conducted to measure resistance-chloride ion penetrability showed that penetration rates for the UFA concrete were excellent due to the concrete's particle size distribution; pozzolanic reaction; changes in pore solution chemistry; and more refined capillary pores. Dry shrinkage rates were reduced with the application of UFA, and crack resistance rates were also improved. It was concluded that the use of UFA resulted in significant cost savings. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs.

  9. Sol–gel followed by urea–acetone spherodization for preparation of lithium titanate ceramics pebbles and preliminary characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, S.K., E-mail: sk.sinha@bitmesra.ac.in [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology, Patna 800014 (India); Yadav, S. [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology, Patna 800014 (India); Raole, P.M. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Lithium titanate ceramics pebbles were prepared by chemical method of sol. gel followed by urea-aceton spherodization technique. Lithium titanate having monoclinic phase was obtained. Laser flash method was used to study thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the ceramics. At near 472 K the average value of diffusivity was around 0.0052 cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} while the specific heat capacity was 3101.3 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} while the same two parameters had values of 0.0041 cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} and 3894.4 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} at a temperature 1050 K. The crush strength of pebble was measured on Universal Testing Machine (UTM) and was found as 37.08 N. The density was measured and found to be 2.8 g/cc (81.63% of TD of value 3.43 g/cc).

  10. Bed Prism Spectacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2018-01-01

    We only became aware of the existence of bed prism spectacles when a student brought them to the classroom and asked us about how they work. The device proved to be a fertile source of curiosity among the students, and, to be properly understood, it required us to develop a comparison between reflection in a typical mirror and total internal reflection in a prism. In this article we explain the physics behind this unfamiliar device, supported by geometrical optics principles.

  11. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  12. Porphyry Cu indicator minerals in till as an exploration tool: Example from the giant pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Karen D.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Lang, J.; Smith, Steven M.; Fey, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Porphyry Cu indicator minerals are mineral species in clastic sediments that indicate the presence of mineralization and hydrothermal alteration associated with porphyry Cu and associated skarn deposits. Porphyry Cu indicator minerals recovered from shallow till samples near the giant Pebble Cu-Au-Mo porphyry deposit in SW Alaska, USA, include apatite, andradite garnet, Mn-epidote, visible gold, jarosite, pyrite, and cinnabar. Sulphide minerals other than pyrite are absent from till, most likely due to the oxidation of the till. The distribution of till samples with abundant apatite and cinnabar suggest sources other than the Pebble deposit. With three exceptions, all till samples up-ice of the Pebble deposit contain 40grains/10kg) are in close proximity to smaller porphyry and skarn occurrences in the region. The distribution of Mn-epidote closely mimics the distribution of garnet in the till samples and further supports the interpretation that these minerals most likely reflect skarns associated with the porphyry deposits. All but two till samples, including those up-ice from the deposit, contain some gold grains. However, tills immediately west and down-ice of Pebble contain more abundant gold grains, and the overall number of grains decreases in the down-ice direction. Furthermore, all samples in the immediate vicinity of Pebble contain more than 65% pristine and modified grains compared to mostly re-shaped grains in distal samples. The pristine gold in till reflects short transport distances and/or liberation of gold during in-situ weathering of transported chalcopyrite grains. Jarosite is also abundant (1-2 500 grains/10kg) in samples adjacent to and up to 7 km down-ice from the deposit. Most jarosite grains are rounded and preliminary Ar/Ar dates suggest the jarosite formed prior to glaciation and it implies that a supergene cap existed over Pebble West. Assuming this interpretation is accurate, it suggests a shallow level of erosion of the Pebble deposit by

  13. Three-dimensional distribution of igneous rocks near the Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit in southwestern Alaska: constraints from regional-scale aeromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric D.; Zhou, Wei; Li, Yaoguo; Hitzman, Murray W.; Monecke, Thomas; Lang, James R.; Kelley, Karen D.

    2014-01-01

    Aeromagnetic data helped us to understand the 3D distribution of plutonic rocks near the Pebble porphyry copper deposit in southwestern Alaska, USA. Magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that rocks in the Pebble district are more magnetic than rocks of comparable compositions in the Pike Creek–Stuyahok Hills volcano-plutonic complex. The reduced-to-pole transformation of the aeromagnetic data demonstrated that the older rocks in the Pebble district produce strong magnetic anomaly highs. The tilt derivative transformation highlighted northeast-trending lineaments attributed to Tertiary volcanic rocks. Multiscale edge detection delineated near-surface magnetic sources that are mostly outward dipping and coalesce at depth in the Pebble district. The total horizontal gradient of the 10-km upward-continued magnetic data showed an oval, deep magnetic contact along which porphyry deposits occur. Forward and inverse magnetic modeling showed that the magnetic rocks in the Pebble district extend to depths greater than 9 km. Magnetic inversion was constrained by a near-surface, 3D geologic model that is attributed with measured magnetic susceptibilities from various rock types in the region. The inversion results indicated that several near-surface magnetic sources with moderate susceptibilities converge with depth into magnetic bodies with higher susceptibilities. This deep magnetic source appeared to rise toward the surface in several areas. An isosurface value of 0.02 SI was used to depict the magnetic contact between outcropping granodiorite and nonmagnetic sedimentary host rocks. The contact was shown to be outward dipping. At depths around 5 km, nearly the entire model exceeded the isosurface value indicating the limits of nonmagnetic host material. The inversion results showed the presence of a relatively deep, northeast-trending magnetic low that parallels lineaments mapped by the tilt derivative. This deep low represents a strand of the Lake Clark fault.

  14. EBSD microfabric study of pre-Cambrian deformations recorded in quartz pebbles from the Sierra de la Demanda (N Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ábalos, B.; Puelles, P.; Fernández-Armas, S.; Sarrionandia, F.

    2011-04-01

    We describe a new method for the reorientation of lattice preferred orientation data in the absence of a pre-constrained kinematic reference frame. The method enables us to present conventional quartz fabric diagrams after measurements taken from rock sections with a general orientation with respect to foliation and lineation. A microstructural and Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) study of quartz pebbles in early Cambrian conglomerates following this method permit us to recognize a variety of fabrics that resulted from syn-metamorphic ductile deformation under variable temperatures up to 650 °C. The likely source area of the conglomerates was a Proterozoic basement. Candidates for source rock correlations include Neoproterozoic units similar to those outcropping in the northern Iberian Massif, Neoproterozoic medium- to high-grade metamorphic rocks as those outcropping in SW Iberia, or a Neoarchean to Mesoproterozoic concealed basement.

  15. CFD simulation of particle deposition on an array of spheres using an Euler/Lagrange approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehbi, A., E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Martin, S., E-mail: simon.martin@ec-lyon.f [Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et d' Acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 69130 Ecully (France)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > We use CFD to simulate particulate deposition around arrays of spheres and compare results with experimental data. > The Continuous Random Walk (CRW) is employed to supply fluctuating fluid velocity components. > Model predictions of particle deposition rates are generally within the scatter of the data. - Abstract: The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is being considered as a promising concept to produce electricity or process heat with high efficiencies and unique safety features. The PBMR is a high-temperature, helium-cooled, graphite moderated reactor. The fuel elements consist of 6 cm diameter spherical graphite 'pebbles' containing each thousands of uranium dioxide microspheres. As the pebbles continually rub against one another in the core, a significant quantity of graphite dust can be released in the reactor coolant system. These dust particles, which contain some amounts of fission products, are transported and deposited on pebbles as well as primary circuit surfaces. It is therefore of great safety interest to develop and benchmark numerical approaches for predicting deposition of dust particles in the various locations of the PBMR primary circuit. In this investigation, we use the ANSYS-Fluent CFD code to simulate particulate flows around linear arrays of spheres and compare deposition rates against experiments. It is found that the Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) combined with the Continuous Random Walk (CRW) to supply fluctuating velocity components predicts deposition rates that are generally within the scatter of the data. The methodology developed here can therefore be used to predict to first order the graphite dust deposition rates on pebbles in PBMR-type reactors.

  16. Study of Transient Heat Transport Mechanisms in Superfluid Helium Cooled Rutherford-Cables

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2100615

    The Large Hadron Collider leverages superconducting magnets to focus the particle beam or keep it in its circular track. These superconducting magnets are composed of NbTi-cables with a special insulation that allows superfluid helium to enter and cool the superconducting cable. Loss mechanisms, e.g. continuous random loss of particles escaping the collimation system heating up the magnets. Hence, a local temperature increase can occur and lead to a quench of the magnets when the superconductor warms up above the critical temperature. A detailed knowledge about the temperature increases in the superconducting cable (Rutherford type) ensures a secure operation of the LHC. A sample of the Rutherford cable has been instrumented with temperature sensors. Experiments with this sample have been performed within this study to investigate the cooling performance of the helium in the cable due to heat deposition. The experiment uses a superconducting coil, placed in a cryostat, to couple with the magnetic field loss m...

  17. Effectiveness of Bed Bug Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before EPA allows a bed bug claim on a label, the product must be supported by data showing it will kill bed bugs when applied according to the label. Also consider factors such as extent of infestation, site preparation, and insect life stages.

  18. The impact of feeding Cyprinids on river bed sediment structures and grain entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pledger, A.; Rice, S. P.; Millett, J.

    2012-04-01

    In gravel-bed rivers, between bed-mobilising flood events, surface sediment particles are rearranged by moderate flows, generally into more stable "water-worked" positions characterised by structures of various types, including imbrication and pebble clusters. This surface layer of structured, relatively coarse particles moderates the availability of finer sub-surface sediment and the transfer of mobile material from upstream. The work reported here is focused on understanding how benthic feeding fish (Cyprinids and Salmonids) dismantle surface structures, making particles less stable and potentially rendering vulnerable sub-surface material more mobile. An increase in available, transportable sediment has implications for sediment transport fluxes, reach-scale sediment loads, channel morphology and aquatic habitat. However, almost nothing is known about the impacts of feeding fish on bed sediment structures, entrainment and sediment fluxes. A series of flume experiments will quantify the effects of six different species of fish on sediment structure and grain entrainment. The experiments will consider 1) topographic variations between pre- and post-feeding substrates using DEMs interpolated from laser scans and 2) differences in sediment entrainment from water-worked substrates exposed to feeding fish and control substrates, without fish. Using interpolated DEMs, a variety of structural parameters will be extracted (e.g. imbrication indices) to quantify the impact of each species whilst feeding. Underwater videography techniques will be used to establish entrainment thresholds and transport rates under low critical shear stresses. A second set of flume experiments are planned using a large outdoor flume to investigate the effects of feeding Barbel Barbus barbus on surface structure, to assess how disturbance and sediment mobility vary as a function of species size and shoal density. A final set of field experiments will consider the large-scale, geomorphological

  19. Survey of HTR related research at IRI, Delft, Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Wallerbos, E.J.M.; Van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.; Van Dam, H. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute IRI, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Tuerkcan, E. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    High temperature helium-cooled reactors have a large potential for inherent safety. Therefore, several projects on HTR research are being carried out or were carried out at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute (IRI) of the Delft University of Technology in Delft, Netherlands. As part of a larger research programme measurements of core reactivity, reactivity worth of safety rods and of small samples being oscillated in the reactor core were carried out at the PROTEUS facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute at Villigen, Switzerland. Together with other partners in the Netherlands a small inherently safe co-generation plant with a pebble-bed HTR core was designed and analysed. It was verified that such a reactor can operate continuously for 10 years by adding continuously fuel pebbles until the maximum available core height is reached. As a new, innovative, inherently safe reactor type the design of a fluidized-bed reactor with coated fuel particles on a helium gas stream is discussed and results are shown for the analysis of inherent criticality safety under varying coolant flow rates. IRI is also taking part in the new IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme, which involves participation in the start-up experiments of the Japanese HTTR and carrying out calculations for the core physics benchmark test. 11 refs.

  20. Scale analysis of decay heat removal system between HTR-10 and HTR-PM reactors under accidental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, Thiago D.; Alvim, Antonio C.M. [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Lapa, Celso M.F., E-mail: thiagodbtr@gmail.com, E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.br, E-mail: alvim@nuclear.ufrj.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test module (HTR-10) is a graphite-moderated and helium-cooled pebble bed reactor prototype that was designed to demonstrate the technical and safety feasibility of this type of reactor project under normal and accidental conditions. In addition, one of the systems responsible for ensuring the safe operation of this type of reactor is the passive decay heat removal system (DHRS), which operates using passive heat removal processes. A demonstration of the heat removal capacity of the DHRS under accidental conditions was analyzed based on a benchmark problem for design-based accidents on an HTR-10, i.e., the pressurized loss of forced cooling (PLOFC) described in technical reports produced by the International Atomic Energy Agency. In fact, the HTR-10 is also a proof-of-concept reactor for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed module (HTR-PM), which generates approximately 25 times more heat than the HTR-10, with a thermal power of 250 MW, thereby requiring a DHRS with a higher system capacity. Thus, because an HTR-10 is a prototype reactor for an HTR-PM, a scaling analysis of the heat transfer process from the reactor to the DHRS was carried out between the HTR-10 and HTR-PM systems to verify the distortions of scale and the differences between the main dimensionless numbers from the two projects. (author)

  1. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopes in surficial materials at the Pebble Porphyry Cu-Au-Mo Deposit, Southwestern Alaska: can the mineralizing fingerprint be detected through cover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Kelley, Karen D.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Forni, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The Cretaceous Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit is covered by tundra and glacigenic sediments. Pb-Sr-Nd measurements were done on sediments and soils to establish baseline conditions prior to the onset of mining operations and contribute to the development of exploration methods for concealed base metal deposits of this type. Pebble rocks have a moderate range for 206Pb/204Pb = 18.574 to 18.874, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.484 to 15.526, and 208,Pb/204Pb = 38.053 to 38.266. Mineralized granodiorite shows a modest spread in 87Sr/86Sr (0.704354–0.707621) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512639–0.512750). Age-corrected (89 Ma) values for the granodiorite yield relatively unradiogenic Pb (e.g., 207Pb/204Pb 87Sr/86Sr, and positive values of ɛNd (1.00–4.52) that attest to a major contribution of mantle-derived source rocks. Pond sediments and soils have similar Pb isotope signatures and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd values that resemble the mineralized granodiorites. Glacial events have obscured the recognition of isotope signatures of mineralized rocks in the sediments and soils. Baseline radiogenic isotope compositions, prior to the onset of mining operations, reflect natural erosion, transport and deposition of heterogeneous till sheets that included debris from barren rocks, mineralized granodiorite and sulfides from the Pebble deposit, and other country rocks that pre- and postdate the mineralization events. Isotopic variations suggest that natural weathering of the deposit is generally reflected in these surficial materials. The isotope data provide geochemical constraints to glimpse through the extensive cover and together with other geochemical observations provide a vector to concealed mineralized rocks genetically linked with the Pebble deposit.

  2. Grain growth behavior of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles fabricated by agar method for tritium breeder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Maoqiao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chaofu; Liu, Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Yu, Yonghong [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing, 100872 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Grain sizes of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} were adjusted by different silicon sources. • Grain growth exponent of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} was about 3. • Grain growth activation energy of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} was about 125.54 kJ/mol. • Grain growth of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebble was controlled by vapor transport. - Abstract: The Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} tritium breeding pebbles will be filled in the blanket and used for 2 years or more at high temperatures, which would increase the grain size and affect tritium release. Hence, grain sizes of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles fabricated by agar method were investigated, and two kinds of different silicon sources (crystal and amorphous SiO{sub 2}) with different particle sizes were used. The particle size of SiO{sub 2} could affect grain size and density of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebble. And the isothermal sintering was carried out to study the grain growth kinetics of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. The grain growth exponent (n) and the activation energy (Q) were calculated by the phenomenological kinetic equation. The calculated n values were 4.10, 3.98, 3.34 and 2.96, and corresponding Q values were 152.15, 147.99, 125.54 and 110.58 kJ/mol, respectively. At the higher sintering temperatures (950 and 1000 °C), the grain growth of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} was controlled by vapor transport.

  3. Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program : Facility Location Evaluation for Pebble Springs-Marion 500-KV Line Study Area 75-B.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1974-10-22

    Proposed is construction of an approximately 160 mile long, 500-kV, double-circuit transmission line from the proposed Pebble Springs Substation located southeast of Arlington, Oregon, to the existing Marion Substation, 11 miles west of Maupin, Oregon. Development is also proposed of a major switching complex, Pebble Springs Substation, near Arlington, Oregon. Depending on the final route chosen, from 45 to 71 miles of parallel, 9 to 42 miles of new, and 74 miles of existing right-of-way will be required. New access road requirements will range from 45 to 90 miles. Land use affected by the proposed facilities includes 800 to 855 acres of forestland removed from timber production. In addition, 50 miles of cropland, primarily wheat, and approximately 35 miles of grassland will be crossed. Disturbance to wildlife during construction will occur and habitat associated with the above land uses will be eliminated. Soil erosion and siltation, primarily during and immediately after construction will also occur. Visual impacts will occur near several highways, lakes, rivers, and recreation areas. Disturbances to nearby residents will occur during construction. An additional 45 acres of rangeland will be required for the proposed Pebble Springs Substation.

  4. Sea bed mapping and inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The conference has 24 presentations on the topics: Sea bed mapping, inspection, positioning, hydrography, marine archaeology, remote operation vehicles and computerized simulation technologies, oil field activities and plans, technological experiences and problems. (tk)

  5. Top Ten Bed Bug Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... full year without tearing. 5. Regularly wash and heat-dry your bed sheets, blankets, bedspreads and any clothing ... and very high temperatures are necessary for successful heat treatment. Black plastic bags in the sun might work ...

  6. Torsion testing of bed joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg; Pedersen, Carsten Mørk

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple test method for determining the torsion strength of a single bed joint between two bricks and presents results from testing using this test method. The setup for the torsion test is well defined, require minimal preparation of the test specimen and the test can...... be carried out directly in a normal testing machine. The torsion strength is believed to be the most important parameter in out-of-plane resistance of masonry walls subjected to bending about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints. The paper also contains a few test results from bending of small walls about...... an axis perpendicular to the bed joints, which indicate the close connection between these results and results from torsion tests. These characteristics make the torsion strength well suited to act as substitute parameter for the bending strength of masonry about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints....

  7. Print a Bed Bug Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sets of business card-sized lists of tips for prevention of bed bug infestations, one for general use around home, the other for travelers. Print a single card or a page of cards for distribution.

  8. Annular core liquid-salt cooled reactor with multiple fuel and blanket zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Per F.

    2013-05-14

    A liquid fluoride salt cooled, high temperature reactor having a reactor vessel with a pebble-bed reactor core. The reactor core comprises a pebble injection inlet located at a bottom end of the reactor core and a pebble defueling outlet located at a top end of the reactor core, an inner reflector, outer reflector, and an annular pebble-bed region disposed in between the inner reflector and outer reflector. The annular pebble-bed region comprises an annular channel configured for receiving pebble fuel at the pebble injection inlet, the pebble fuel comprising a combination of seed and blanket pebbles having a density lower than the coolant such that the pebbles have positive buoyancy and migrate upward in said annular pebble-bed region toward the defueling outlet. The annular pebble-bed region comprises alternating radial layers of seed pebbles and blanket pebbles.

  9. 49 CFR 236.336 - Locking bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking bed. 236.336 Section 236.336 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Instructions § 236.336 Locking bed. The various parts of the locking bed, locking bed supports, and tappet stop...

  10. Wandering gravel-bed rivers and high-constructive stable channel sandy fluvial systems in the Ross River area, Yukon Territory, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrel G.F. Long

    2011-07-01

    Gravel-dominated strata, inter-bedded with, and overlying coal-bearing units, are interpreted as deposits of wandering gravel-bed rivers, with sinuosity approaching 1.4. In most exposures they appear to be dominated by massive and thin planar-bedded granule to small pebble conglomerates, which would traditionally be interpreted as sheet-flood or longitudinal bar deposits of a high-gradient braided stream or alluvial fan. Architectural analysis of exposures in an open-pit shows that the predominance of flat bedding is an artefact of the geometry of the roadside exposures. In the pit the conglomerates are dominated by large scale cross stratification on a scale of 1–5.5 m. These appear to have developed as downstream and lateral accretion elements on side-bars and on in-channel bars in water depths of 2–12 m. Stacking of strata on domed 3rd order surfaces suggests development of longitudinal in-channel bar complexes similar to those observed in parts of the modern Rhône River system. Mudstone preserved in some of the channels reflects intervals of channel abandonment or avulsion. Minimum channel width is from 70 to 450 m.

  11. Staged cascade fluidized bed combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Joseph N.; De Lucia, David E.; Jackson, William M.; Porter, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid bed combustor comprising a plurality of fluidized bed stages interconnected by downcomers providing controlled solids transfer from stage to stage. Each stage is formed from a number of heat transfer tubes carried by a multiapertured web which passes fluidizing air to upper stages. The combustor cross section is tapered inwardly from the middle towards the top and bottom ends. Sorbent materials, as well as non-volatile solid fuels, are added to the top stages of the combustor, and volatile solid fuels are added at an intermediate stage.

  12. Better backs by better beds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, Kim; Fabricius, Rasmus N; Bendix, Tom

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A "randomized"/stratified, single-blinded, parallel-group study. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate 3 structurally different mattresses relative influence on patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In several advertisements, it is proclaimed that certain...... using the probably most relevant "worst case" data. There were no relevant difference between the effects of the water bed and the foam bed. CONCLUSION: The Waterbed and foam mattress' did influence back symptoms, function and sleep more positively as apposed to the hard mattress, but the differences...

  13. Nuclear maintenance strategy and first steps for preliminary maintenance plan of the EU HCLL & HCPB Test Blanket Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galabert, Jose, E-mail: jose.galabert@f4e.europa.eu [F4E Fusion for Energy, EU Domestic Agency, c/Josep Pla, 2. B3, 08019, Barcelona (Spain); Hopper, Dave [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, WA3 6GN (United Kingdom); Neviere, Jean-Cristophe [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90046, 13067, St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Nodwell, David [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Pascal, Romain [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90046, 13067, St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Poitevin, Yves; Ricapito, Italo [F4E Fusion for Energy, EU Domestic Agency, c/Josep Pla, 2. B3, 08019, Barcelona (Spain); White, Gareth [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear maintenance strategy for the two European (EU) Test Blanket Systems (TBS): i/. Helium Cooled Lead Lithium (HCLL) and ii/. Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB). • Preliminary identification of maintenance tasks for most relevant components of the EU HCLL & HCPB TBS. • Preliminary feasibility analysis for hands-on maintenance tasks of some relevant components of the European Test Blanket Systems. • Design recommendations for enhancement of the European Test Blanket Systems maintainability. - Abstract: This paper gives an overview of nuclear maintenance strategy to be followed for the European HCLL & HCPB Test Blanket Systems (TBS) to be installed in ITER. One of the several core documents to prepare in view of their licensing is their respective ‘Maintenance Plan’. This document is fundamental for ensuring sound performance and safety of the TBS during ITER’s operational phase and shall include, amongst others, relevant information on: maintenance organization, preventive and corrective maintenance task procedures, condition monitoring for key components, maintenance work planning, and a spare parts plan, just to mention some of the key topics. In compliance with the ITER Plant Maintenance policy, first steps have been taken aimed at defining nuclear maintenance strategy for some of the most relevant HCLL & HCPB TBS components, conducted by F4E in collaboration with industry. After a brief recall of maintenance strategy of the TBM Program (PBS-56), this paper analyses main features of EU HCLL & HCPB TBS maintainability and identifies, at their conceptual design phase, a preliminary list of maintenance tasks to be developed for their most representative components. In addition, the paper also presents the first nuclear maintenance studies conducted for replacement of the Q{sub 2} Getter Beds, identifying some design recommendations for their sound maintainability.

  14. Thermodynamics of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvani, C.; Casadio, S. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy); Johnson, C.

    1998-03-01

    The chemical interaction of He or He+0.1%H{sub 2} purge gases with Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles has been examined as a function temperature and partial pressure of water vapor by Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) measurements. The experimental conditions were selected to be representative of those envisaged occurring in the HCPB (Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed) blanket. At constant partial pressure of moisture, water adsorption on Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} decreases with increasing temperature up to 973K. Above that temperature water absorption increases due of the increasing water solubility of lithium hydroxide with temperature. Using these data, thermodynamic calculations have been carried out to evaluate the behavior of lithium orthosilicate in a moisture-containing environment. The evaluation was done over the 773 to 1173K temperature range. In general, the behavior of lithium orthosilicate was similar to earlier studies on lithium oxide except that the orthosilicate is not as strong in its deviations from ideality as the oxide. (author)

  15. Post irradiation characterization of beryllium and beryllides after high temperature irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production in HIDOBE-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, A.V., E-mail: fedorov@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, Petten, 1755 ZG (Netherlands); Til, S. van; Stijkel, M.P. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, Petten, 1755 ZG (Netherlands); Nakamichi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/ Josep Pla, n° 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Titanium beryllides are considered as advanced candidate material for neutron multiplier for the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) and/or the water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) breeder blankets. In the HIDOBE-01 (HIgh DOse irradiation of BEryllium) experiment, beryllium and beryllide pellets with 5 at% and 7 at% Ti are irradiated at four different target temperatures (T{sub irr}): 425 °C, 525 °C, 650 °C and 750 °C up to the dose corresponding to 3000 appm He production in beryllium. The pellets were supplied by JAEA. During post irradiation examinations the critical properties of volumetric swelling and tritium retention were studied. Both titanium beryllide grades show significantly less swelling than the beryllium grade, with the difference increasing with the irradiation temperature. The irradiation induced swelling was studied by using direct dimensions. Both beryllide grades showed much less swelling as compare to the reference beryllium grade. Densities of the grades were studied by Archimedean immersion and by He-pycnometry, giving indications of porosity formation. While both beryllide grades show no significant reduction in density at all irradiation temperatures, the beryllium density falls steeply at higher T{sub irr}. Finally, the tritium release and retention were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Beryllium shows the same strong tritium retention as earlier observed in studies on beryllium pebbles, while the tritium inventory of the beryllides is significantly less, already at the lowest T{sub irr} of 425 °C.

  16. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolodosky, A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fratoni, M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Lithium is often the preferred choice as breeder and coolant in fusion blankets as it offers excellent heat transfer and corrosion properties, and most importantly, it has a very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and exacerbates plant safety concerns. For this reason, over the years numerous blanket concepts have been proposed with the scope of reducing concerns associated with lithium. The European helium cooled pebble bed breeding blanket (HCPB) physically confines lithium within ceramic pebbles. The pebbles reside within a low activation martensitic ferritic steel structure and are cooled by helium. The blanket is composed of the tritium breeding lithium ceramic pebbles and neutron multiplying beryllium pebbles. Other blanket designs utilize lead to lower chemical reactivity; LiPb alone can serve as a breeder, coolant, neutron multiplier, and tritium carrier. Blankets employing LiPb coolants alongside silicon carbide structural components can achieve high plant efficiency, low afterheat, and low operation pressures. This alloy can also be used alongside of helium such as in the dual-coolant lead-lithium concept (DCLL); helium is utilized to cool the first wall and structural components made up of low-activation ferritic steel, whereas lithium-lead (LiPb) acts as a self-cooled breeder in the inner channels of the blanket. The helium-cooled steel and lead-lithium alloy are separated by flow channel inserts (usually made out of silicon carbide) which thermally insulate the self-cooled breeder region from the helium cooled steel walls. This creates a LiPb breeder with a much higher exit temperature than the steel which increases the power cycle efficiency and also lowers the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop [6]. Molten salt blankets with a mixture of lithium, beryllium, and fluorides (FLiBe) offer good tritium breeding

  17. How to Find Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find and correctly identify an infestation early before it becomes widespread. Look for rusty or reddish stains and pinpoint dark spots on bed sheets or mattresses, and search for bugs near the piping, seams and tags of the mattress and box spring.

  18. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  19. Char binder for fluidized beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borio, Richard W.; Accortt, Joseph I.

    1981-01-01

    An arrangement that utilizes agglomerating coal as a binder to bond coal fines and recycled char into an agglomerate mass that will have suitable retention time when introduced into a fluidized bed 14 for combustion. The simultaneous use of coal for a primary fuel and as a binder effects significant savings in the elimination of non-essential materials and processing steps.

  20. Nd isotopic anatomy of a pebble conglomerate from the Murihiku terrane of New Zealand: Record of a varied provenance along the Mesozoic Gondwanaland margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Carol D.; Mortimer, Nick; Goles, Gordon G.

    2005-12-01

    The Murihiku terrane is a volcano-sedimentary terrane of Late Permian to Early Cretaceous age that forms part of a collage of accreted terranes in the Eastern Province of New Zealand. These terranes record a history of deposition along the Gondwanaland margin, and include terranes of oceanic character (e.g. Brook Street terrane) and terranes dominated by continental detritus (e.g. Torlesse terrane). The Murihiku terrane is of particular interest because it is relatively large, one of the least structurally deformed terranes, and preserves a long (˜120 m.y) record of sedimentation. Previous studies have suggested that the Murihiku terrane preserves a record of change in provenance from predominantly mafic, juvenile sources to dominantly felsic volcanic sources in Middle to Late Triassic time interpreted as containing contributions from Precambrian continental crust, and modest amounts of detritus supplied directly from this old crust [Frost, C.D., Coombs, D.S., 1989. Nd isotope character of New Zealand sediments: Implications for terrane concepts and crustal evolution. American Journal of Science 289, 744-770.; Roser, B.P., Coombs, D.S., Korsch, R.J., Campbell, J.D., 2002. Whole-rock geochemical variations and evolution of the arc-derived Murihiku Terrane, New Zealand. Geological Magazine 139, 665-685.]. We present Nd isotopic data from a Late Triassic (Rhetian; Otapirian local stage; 200-206 Ma) roundstone cobble conglomerate from near Gore, South Island, New Zealand. The sandstone matrix of this conglomerate has an initial ɛNd of + 3.0 and Sm/Nd of 0.219, values that are intermediate between the more radiogenic Nd isotopic and higher Sm / Nd ratios of older Murihiku siltstones and less radiogenic, lower Sm / Nd, younger siltstones. Clasts within this matrix are mainly volcanic: we analyzed basaltic-andesite, andesite and dacite pebbles along with a volcanogenic sandstone pebble and hypabyssal quartz diorite clast. These pebbles have initial ɛNd between + 3

  1. The NASA Bed Rest Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Bradley; Meck, Janice

    2005-01-01

    NASA s National Vision for Space Exploration includes human travel beyond low earth orbit and the ultimate safe return of the crews. Crucial to fulfilling the vision is the successful and timely development of countermeasures for the adverse physiological effects on human systems caused by long term exposure to the microgravity environment. Limited access to in-flight resources for the foreseeable future increases NASA s reliance on ground-based analogs to simulate these effects of microgravity. The primary analog for human based research will be head-down bed rest. By this approach NASA will be able to evaluate countermeasures in large sample sizes, perform preliminary evaluations of proposed in-flight protocols and assess the utility of individual or combined strategies before flight resources are requested. In response to this critical need, NASA has created the Bed Rest Project at the Johnson Space Center. The Project establishes the infrastructure and processes to provide a long term capability for standardized domestic bed rest studies and countermeasure development. The Bed Rest Project design takes a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, integrated approach that reduces the resource overhead of one investigator for one campaign. In addition to integrating studies operationally relevant for exploration, the Project addresses other new Vision objectives, namely: 1) interagency cooperation with the NIH allows for Clinical Research Center (CRC) facility sharing to the benefit of both agencies, 2) collaboration with our International Partners expands countermeasure development opportunities for foreign and domestic investigators as well as promotes consistency in approach and results, 3) to the greatest degree possible, the Project also advances research by clinicians and academia alike to encourage return to earth benefits. This paper will describe the Project s top level goals, organization and relationship to other Exploration Vision Projects, implementation

  2. A comprehensive study of noble gases and nitrogen in "Hypatia", a diamond-rich pebble from SW Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avice, Guillaume; Meier, Matthias M. M.; Marty, Bernard; Wieler, Rainer; Kramers, Jan D.; Langenhorst, Falko; Cartigny, Pierre; Maden, Colin; Zimmermann, Laurent; Andreoli, Marco A. G.

    2015-12-01

    This is a follow-up study of a work by Kramers et al. (2013) on a very unusual diamond-rich rock fragment found in the area of south west Egypt in the south-western side of the Libyan Desert Glass strewn field. This pebble, called Hypatia, is composed of almost pure carbon. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that Hypatia is mainly made of defect-rich diamond containing lonsdaleite and multiple deformation bands. These characteristics are compatible with an impact origin on Earth and/or in space. We also analyzed concentrations and isotopic compositions of all five noble gases and nitrogen in several ∼mg sized Hypatia samples. These data confirm the conclusion by Kramers et al. (2013) that Hypatia is extra-terrestrial. The sample is relatively rich in trapped noble gases with an isotopic composition being close to the Q component found in many types of meteorites. 40Ar/36Ar ratios in individual steps are as low as 0.4 ± 0.3. Cosmic-ray produced ;cosmogenic; 21Ne is present in concentrations corresponding to a nominal cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age of roughly 0.1 Myr if produced in a typical meter-sized meteoroid. Such an atypically low nominal CRE age suggests high shielding in a considerably larger body. In addition to the Xe-Q composition, an excess of radiogenic 129Xe (from the decay of short-lived radioactive 129I) is observed (129Xe /132Xe = 1.18 + / - 0.03). Two isotopically distinct N components are present, an isotopically heavy component (δ15N ∼ + 20 ‰) released at low temperatures and a major isotopically light component (δ15N ∼ - 110 ‰) at higher temperatures. This disequilibrium in N suggests that the diamonds in Hypatia were formed in space rather than upon impact on Earth (δN15atm = 0 ‰). All our data are broadly consistent with concentrations and isotopic compositions of noble gases in at least three different types of carbon-rich meteoritic materials: carbon-rich veins in ureilites

  3. Tritium breeding mock-up experiments containing lithium titanate ceramic pebbles and lead irradiated with DT neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakhar, Shrichand; Abhangi, M.; Tiwari, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India); Makwana, R. [Department of Physics, MS University, Vadodara (India); Chaudhari, V.; Swami, H.L.; Danani, C.; Rao, C.V.S.; Basu, T.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India); Mandal, D.; Bhade, Sonali; Kolekar, R.V.; Reddy, P.J. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bhattacharyay, R.; Chaudhuri, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Breeding benchmark experiment on LLCB TBM in ITER was performed. • Nuclear responses measured are TPR and reaction rate of {sup 115}In(n, n′){sup 115m}In reaction. • Measured responses are compared with calculations by MCNP and FENDL 2.1 library. • TPR measurements agree with calculations in the estimated error bar. • Measured {sup 115}In(n, n′){sup 115m}In reaction rates are underestimated by the calculations. - Abstract: Experiments were conducted with breeding blanket mock-up consisting of two layers of breeder material lithium titanate pebbles and three layers of pure lead as neutron multiplier. The radial dimensions of breeder, neutron multiplier and structural material layers are similar to the current design of the Indian Lead–Lithium cooled Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) blanket. The mock-up assembly was irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons from DT neutron generator. The local tritium production rates (TPR) from {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li in breeder layers were measured with the help of two different compositions of Li isotopes (60.69% {sup 6}Li and 7.54% {sup 6}Li) in Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Tritium production in the multiplication layers were also measured with above mentioned two types of pellets to compare the experimental tritium production with calculations. TPR from {sup 6}Li at one location in the breeder layer was also measured by direct online measurement of tritons from {sup 6}Li(n, t){sup 4}He reaction using silicon surface barrier detector and {sup 6}Li to triton converter. Additional verification of neutron spectra (E{sub n} > 0.35 MeV) in the mock-up zones were obtained by measuring {sup 115}In(n, n′){sup 115m}In reaction rate and comparing it with calculated values in all five layers of mock-up. All the measured nuclear responses were compared with transport calculations using code MCNP with FENDL2.1 and FENDL3.0 cross-section libraries. The average C/E ratio for tritium production in enriched Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} pellets was 1

  4. Pulling a patient up in bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moving a patient in bed ... takes at least 2 people to safely move a patient up in bed. Friction from rubbing can ... A slide sheet is the best way to prevent friction. If you do not have one, you ...

  5. Protecting Your Home from Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your home: Inspect the luggage rack in your hotel room for bed bugs. Check secondhand furniture, beds, ... Administrator Current Leadership Organization Chart Staff Directory Planning, Budget and Results Jobs and Internships Headquarters Offices Regional ...

  6. Videos, Webinars, Blogs Related to Bed Bugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    These tools provide practical insight on issues such as integrated pest management (IPM) for schools, bed bug bites, how carpet beetles can help, bed bugs as hitchhikers, and preventing and controlling infestations.

  7. A 2D hydrodynamic-sedimentological model for gravel-bed rivers. Part I: theory and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Kaless

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel 2D-depth average model especially developed for gravel-bed rivers, named Lican-Leufú (Lican=pebble and Leufu=river, in Mapuche’s language, the native inhabitants of Central Patagonia, Argentina. The model consists of three components: a hydrodynamic, a sedimentological, and a morphological model. The flow of water is described by the depth-averaged Reynolds equations for unsteady, free-surface, shallow water flows. It includes the standard k-e model for turbulence closure. Sediment transport can be divided in different size classes (sand-gravel mixture and the equilibrium approach is used for Exner’s equation. The amour layer is also included in the structure of the model and the surface grain size distribution is also allowed to evolve. The model simulates bank slides that enable channel widening. Models predictions were tested against a flume experiment where a static armour layer was developed under conditions of sediment starvations and general good agreements were found: the model predicted adequately the sediment transport, grain size of transported material, final armour grain size distribution and bed elevation.

  8. Review of acute cancer beds.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Evans, D S

    2012-01-01

    A review of admissions to cancer services at University Hospital Galway (UHG) was undertaken to assess the appropriateness of hospital usage. All cancer specialty patients admitted from 26-28 May 2009 were reviewed (n = 82). Chi square tests, Exact tests, and One-way ANOVA were utilised to analyse key issues emerging from the data. Fifty (61%) were classified as emergencies. Twenty three (67%) occupied a designated cancer bed with 24 (30%) in outlying non-oncology wards. The mean length of stay was 29.3 days. Possible alternatives to admission were identified for 15 (19%) patients. There was no evidence of discharge planning for 50 (60%) admissions. There is considerable potential to make more appropriate utilisation of UHG for cancer patients, particularly in terms of reducing bed days and length of stay and the proportion of emergency cancer admissions, and further developing integrated systems of discharge planning.

  9. Incipient motion of gravel and coal beds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Shields parameter, particle Froude number, non-dimensional particle diameter and non-dimensional flow depth. Equations of critical bed shear stress for the initial movement of gravel and coal beds were obtained using experimental data. The method of application of critical bed shear stress equations is also mentioned.

  10. Scaling of pressurized fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guralnik, S.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1994-10-01

    The project has two primary objectives. The first is to verify a set of hydrodynamic scaling relationships for commercial pressurized fluidized bed combustors (PFBC). The second objective is to investigate solids mixing in pressurized bubbling fluidized beds. American Electric Power`s (AEP) Tidd combined-cycle demonstration plant will provide time-varying pressure drop data to serve as the basis for the scaling verification. The verification will involve demonstrating that a properly scaled cold model and the Tidd PFBC exhibit hydrodynamically similar behavior. An important issue in PFBC design is the spacing of fuel feed ports. The feed spacing is dictated by the fuel distribution and the mixing characteristics within the bed. After completing the scaling verification, the cold model will be used to study the characteristics of PFBCs. A thermal tracer technique will be utilized to study mixing both near the fuel feed region and in the far field. The results allow the coal feed and distributor to be designed for optimal heating.

  11. Natural gas in coal beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, A.I.; Voytov, G.I.

    1983-01-01

    The special importance is noted of the problem of computing and careful use of the energy raw material, coal, oil and natural gases. An examination is made of the mechanism for the formation of carboniferous gases in the beds with the use of the model of coal macromolecule. A schematic section is presented for the coal field and plan for vertical gas zonality. The change in chemical composition of the natural gases with depth is governed by the countermovement of the natural gases: from top to bottom the gases of the earth's atmosphere move, mainly oxygenand nitrogen, from bottom to top, the gases of metamorphic and deep origin. Constant isotope composition of the carbon in the fossil coals is noted. The distribution of the quanitity deltaC/sup 13/ of carbon in the fossil coals of the Donets basin is illustrated. The gas content of the coal beds and gas reserves are discussed. The flowsheet is shown for the unit for degasification of the coal bed before the cleaning face.

  12. Agglomeration-Free Distributor for Fluidized Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, F.; Sinica, A.; Levenspiel, O.

    1986-01-01

    New gas distributor for fluidized beds prevents hot particles from reacting on it and forming hard crust. In reduction of iron ore in fluidized bed, ore particles do not sinter on distributor and perhaps clog it or otherwise interfere with gas flow. Distributor also relatively cool. In fluidized-bed production of silicon, inflowing silane does not decompose until within bed of hot silicon particles and deposits on them. Plates of spiral distributor arranged to direct incoming gas into spiral flow. Turbulence in flow reduces frequency of contact between fluidized-bed particles and distributor.

  13. Effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio due to a distributed ICRF antenna in a DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A., E-mail: albert.garcia.hp@gmail.com [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Dies, J. [Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    This thesis reports results of MCNP-5 calculations, with the nuclear data library FENDL-2.1, to assess the effect on the Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) due to a distributed Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) antenna integrated in the blanket of a DEMO fusion power reactor. A preliminary design of the antenna with a reference configuration of the DEMO reactor was used together with a parametric analysis for different parameters that strongly affect the TBR. These are the type of breeding blanket (Helium Cooled Pebble Bed, Helium Cooled Lithium Lead and Water Cooled Lithium Lead), the covering ratio of the straps of the antenna (the ratio between the surface of all the straps and the projected surface of the antenna slot: 0.49, 0.72 and 0.94), the antenna radial thickness (20 cm and 40 cm), the thickness of the straps (2 cm, 4 cm and a double layer of 0.2 cm plus 2.5 cm with the composition of the First Wall), and finally the poloidal position of the antenna (0°, which is the equatorial port, 40° and 90°, which is the upper port). For an antenna with a full toroidal circumference of 360°, located poloidaly at 40° with a poloidal extension of 1 m and a total First Wall surface of 67 m{sup 2}, the reduction of the TBR is −0.35% for a HCPB blanket concept, −0.53% for a HCLL blanket concept and −0.51% for a WCLL blanket concept. In all cases covered by the parametric analysis, the loss of TBR remains below 0.61%. Such a distributed ICRF antenna has thus only a marginal effect on the TBR for a DEMO reactor.

  14. MICROTURBULENCE IN GRAVEL BED STREAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, T.; Tsakiris, A. G.; Kramer, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    The overarching objective of this investigation was to evaluate the role of relative submergence on the formation and evolution of cluster microforms in gravel bed streams and its implications to bedload transport. Secondary objectives of this research included (1) a detailed analysis of mean flow measurements around a clast; and (2) a selected number of experimental runs where the mean flow characteristics are linked together with the bed micro-topography observations around a clast. It is hypothesized that the relative submergence is an important parameter in defining the feedback processes between the flow and clasts, which governs the flow patterns around the clasts, thus directly affecting the depositional patterns of the incoming sediments. To examine the validity of the hypothesis and meet the objectives of this research, 19 detailed experimental runs were conducted in a tilting, water recirculating laboratory flume under well-controlled conditions. A fixed array of clast-obstacles were placed atop a well-packed bed with uniform size glass beads. During the runs, multifractional spherical particles were fed upstream of the clast section at a predetermined rate. State-of-the-art techniques/instruments, such as imaging analysis software, Large Scale Particle Velocimeter (LSPIV) and an Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) were employed to provide unique quantitative measurements for bedload fluxes, clast/clusters geomorphic patterns, and mean flow characteristics in the vicinity of the clusters. Different flow patterns were recorded for the high relative submergence (HRS) and low relative submergence (LRS) experimental runs. The ADV measurements provided improved insight about the governing flow mechanisms for the HRS runs. These mechanisms were described with flow upwelling at the center of the flume and downwelling occurring along the flume walls. Flow downwelling corresponded to an increase in the free surface velocity. Additionally, the visual observations

  15. Designing a CR Test bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Buthler, Jakob Lindbjerg; Tonelli, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    , the software is most of the times open source and ready to use for third party users. Even though the software solution developers claim complete easiness in the development of custom applications, in reality there are a number of practical hardware and software issues that research groups need to face, before...... they are up and running in generating results. With this chapter we would like to provide a tutorial guide, based on direct experience, on how to enter in the world of test bed-based research, providing both insight on the issues encountered in every day development, and practical solutions. Finally...

  16. Calculations of Bed-Material Transport, Chetco River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S.; Wallick, R.; Cannon, C.; O'Connor, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Chetco River drains 914 square kilometers of the Klamath Mountains in far southwestern Oregon. The lower 18 kilometers of the river are flanked by large and abundant gravel bars, which have been commercially mined for aggregate during most of the last century. Increasing concern regarding the impact of this mining on aquatic habitats motivated an assessment of historical channel change and sediment transport rates along this lower reach. A key component of this research was estimating bed-material transport through the application of sediment transport equations at multiple locations along the study reach. Flow hydraulics were estimated with a 1-D hydraulic model constructed in HEC-RAS, using a combination of LiDAR and bathymetric surveys to characterize the valley morphology. Once calibrated to USGS rating curves, low flow water surfaces, and several high flow photos, this model allowed us to calculate energy slopes for a given cross section at a variety of flows. These flow-energy slope pairs, along with cross sections and sediment data collected from surface pebble counts, were then applied to a number of different modern bedload transport equations. This process was facilitated by the Bedload Assessment in Gravel-bedded Streams Excel macro, or BAGS, which allows users to quickly apply multiple transport equations using a single set of inputs (Pitlick et al., 2009). A review of the literature, along with tests of internal consistency and comparisons to direct bedload measurements taken in the winter of 2008-09, led us to choose the Parker (1991) and Wilcock-Crowe (2003) equations as the two most applicable to the Chetco River. Sediment transport-flow curves for both equations were calculated for seven cross sections spanning the study area. For each of these cross sections, we estimated annual transport fluxes using derived transport rating curves in conjunction with unit flow data from a USGS gage at the upstream end of study reach, with data extending back

  17. Bed Sediment Monitoring of Multiple Contiguous Small Dam Removals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galster, J. C.; Wyrick, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Dam removal is crucial for reconnecting river habitats, restoring passage of fish and other aquatic organisms, and restoring the free flow of water and sediment. However, removal of obsolete dams is often resisted due to concerns of releasing sediment and initiating channel instability. Two dams on the Musconetcong River in northern New Jersey have been removed as part of a watershed-wide effort to remove or breach all major obstructions to restore the river to its original free-flowing state. The two dams were consecutively situated 1 kilometer apart and their removals provided an opportunity to study the geomorphic response in the form of bed elevation changes and sediment size through pre- and post-removal monitoring. Initial geomorphic surveys of the riverbed in the vicinity of and between the two dams have shown areas of erosion and deposition. These surveys have established a set of control points along the river channel between the two dams, and confirm the downstream movement of a sediment plume and localized areas of erosion. At the upstream dam, comparisons pre- and post-dam removal surveys show greater than 100 cubic meters of sediment being both eroded and deposited within the site. Most but not all of the erosion occurred around the newly exposed sediment bar upstream of the former dam, where the thalweg has reestablished itself following the dam’s removal. Areas that were excavated during removal have experienced deposition. Most of the deposition occurred downstream and on the left-hand bank. Due to the two low flow culverts in the former dam, a mid-channel sediment bar formed but has subsequently eroded. At the downstream dam site, erosion has removed up to 1.1 m of sediment from the bed in places while depositing up to 0.5 m sediment in others. As sediment from the former impoundment migrated through the project site, areas excavated during the removal became areas of deposition following the removal, and; alternately, areas in the channel

  18. Investigation of Facies Types and Associations of Kuhlan Red Bed Formation in NW Yemen: A New Hypothesis for Origin and Depositional Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Wosabi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Varieties of thirteen facies types were recognized in the Kuhlan Formation represented by red bed siliciclastic sequences of argillaceous sediments. Examination of the Kuhlan stratigraphic column included sequence relationships, lithology, sedimentary characters, structures and petrography of the dominant rock types. These facies types are grouped in three distinct associations of facies. The lower unit A comprises association of facies (Distal turbidites represented by alternates of turbidity sequences including sandstone, siltstone and thick shale beds. These facies types confirm a regressive depositional environment in deep marine shelf conditions. There are three facies types which are identified as massive sandstone, cross-bedded sandstone and pebbly sandstone facies. The middle unit B association of facies (Proximal turbedites represents glaciomarine sequences displaying high lateral and vertical facies changes of glacioturbidite sediment alternates with diamictites and tillite beds. The sequences are affected by eustatic and eustatism of the glacial advance and retreat. This unit B includes eight types of facies. These are identified as; tillite, massive diamictites, stratified diamictites, laminated siltstone/shale, deformed siltstone/mudstone, graded rhythmic siltstone, massive conglomerate and cross-stratified sandy conglomerate facies. The upper unit C association of facies is represented by shallow marine shelf sequences displaying very thick massive and locally cross-bedded sand bar sandstone overlying the laminated siltstone/shale interbeds. The upward gradual changes in mineralogical composition and color confirms the start of marine transgression and later deposited platform Amran Group. Mineralogical composition of Kuhlan sandstone displays impure dirty rocks consisting of more than 30% of argillaceous matrix, 50% of cristobalite and quartz grains, more than 10% of ferruginous cement and 10% of detrital iron oxide grains, potash

  19. Origin of bedded radiolarian cherts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danner, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    Bedded radiolarian cherts range in age from at least Cambrian to Eocene. Siliceous deposits formed in modern seas are not the same and diatoms have become the dominant siliceous contributing organism since the Oligocene. Paper thin and thicker argillaceous layers, rich in alumina, are the commonest sediments interbedded with the radiolarian cherts. Possible origins are (1) rapid accumulation of radiolaria (blooms) with slow accumulation of argillaceous material, (2) rapid accumulation of radiolarian turbidites with slow accumulation of argillaceous material, (3) slow accumulation of radiolaria with rapid accumulation of argillaceous turbidites. It is though that all three origins occur but (1) seems most common. On Cyprus radiolarian chert beds are found in chalk. In these environments the chert appears to form more rapidly than the other rock types but in one sequence of alternating limestone and chert the depositional rate maybe similar. Late Paleozoic and Triassic chert sequences in western North America have formed mostly in more shallow waters than those of the Jurassic and later. Many chert sequences sit on greenstones and are overlain and interfinger upward with greywackes indicating origin in open ocean and transport by sea floor spreading towards sites of turbidite clastic deposition. Other sequences show reappearance of chert upward at several intervals.

  20. Status of the EXOTIC-8 programme and first in-pile results for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Stijkel, M.P. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Conrad, R.

    1998-03-01

    After renewal of the Tritium Measuring Station the HFR is again fully operational for in-pile breeder irradiations. The EXOTIC-8 series has started with first three experiments on June 12, 1997. First in-pile results have been obtained for Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}-pebbles supplied by CEA: preliminary analyses indicate satisfactory in-pile behaviour with fast recovery from transient conditions. Five further experiments have been defined which implies that in the present planning EXOTIC-8 is filled completely up to Fall`98 and 2 of 4 positions are occupied up to Spring`99. P.I.E. results will be obtained from Spring`98 onwards. (J.P.N.)

  1. Wound bed preparation from a clinical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Halim, A. S.; Khoo, T L; Mat Saad, A. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Wound bed preparation has been performed for over two decades, and the concept is well accepted. The ′TIME′ acronym, consisting of tissue debridement, i nfection or inflammation, moisture balance and edge effect, has assisted clinicians systematically in wound assessment and management. While the focus has usually been concentrated around the wound, the evolving concept of wound bed preparation promotes the treatment of the patient as a whole. This article discusses wound bed preparation and ...

  2. Gas filtration in binary fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rincon, J. (Univ. de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain)); Guardiola, J.; Romero, A. (Univ. de Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-12-01

    A systematic experimental study of aerosol filtration in a binary fluidized bed of dielectric material is carried out. Measurements of the collection efficiency when such parameters as gas velocity, bed height, collecting mixture, and column diameter are varied over a wide range have been made. Experimental evidence is given to show that charges generated naturally by triboelectrification of the bed dielectric particles can considerably increase the efficiency of such beds. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a proper choice of the fluidized mixture can significantly improve the performance of such filters.

  3. Fungi solubilisation of low rank coal: performances of stirred tank, fluidised bed and packed bed reactors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oboirien, BO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coal biosolubilisation was investigated in stirred tank reactor, fluidised bed and fixed bed bioreactors with a view to highlight the advantages and shortcomings of each of these reactor configurations. The stirred aerated bioreactor and fluidised...

  4. Metabolic Resistance in Bed Bugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omprakash Mittapalli

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood-feeding insects have evolved resistance to various insecticides (organochlorines, pyrethroids, carbamates, etc. through gene mutations and increased metabolism. Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius are hematophagous ectoparasites that are poised to become one of the major pests in households throughout the United States. Currently, C. lectularius has attained a high global impact status due to its sudden and rampant resurgence. Resistance to pesticides is one factor implicated in this phenomenon. Although much emphasis has been placed on target sensitivity, little to no knowledge is available on the role of key metabolic players (e.g., cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases towards pesticide resistance in C. lectularius. In this review, we discuss different modes of resistance (target sensitivity, penetration resistance, behavioral resistance, and metabolic resistance with more emphasis on metabolic resistance.

  5. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Bank Erosion and Bed Sediment Remobilization With Watershed Sediment Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, L. M.; Miller, A. J.; Welty, C.

    2006-05-01

    Urbanization has altered the hydrologic regime of Valley Creek, a tributary of the Schuylkill River west of Philadelphia, PA. Initial reconnaissance suggested that urban development in the watershed was associated with increased sediment flux through the 3.7 kilometer portion of Valley Creek that runs through Valley Forge National Historical Park before its confluence with the Schuylkill River. A study was conducted between September 2003 and January 2006 to obtain baseline inventories and monitor sediment transport and storage. Field methods included cross-section and bankline surveys after significant storm events (one of which was the second highest discharge on record for Valley Creek; 77.3 m3/s), pebble counts and volumetric barrel samples to measure the particle size distribution of the streambed, the use of a slide hammer to measure depth of the mobile layer, and tracer gravels to determine the sediment particle sizes mobilized as a function of discharge. A suspended sediment station installed at the USGS gage just upstream of the park boundary includes a YSI turbidity optical sensor calibrated to suspended-sediment concentrations collected by an ISCO sampler. Sediment load estimates were compiled based on turbidity data collected at 15-minute intervals between July 2005 and January 2006 and preliminary USGS unit values flow records for the period 1 February 2005-31 January 2006. Suspended sediment yield for the watershed was estimated at 40 tons/km2/yr. This estimate is much lower than originally believed based on sediment yields from nearby watersheds in the region, which range from 66 to 344 tons/km2/yr. Sediment loads from measured bank erosion sites within the park were used to estimate the amount of sediment derived from bank erosion along the channel network upstream of the park boundary. Calculated values range from two-thirds to twice the annual suspended sediment load. Although bank erosion appears to be a potentially dominant source of sediment by

  7. Physician-patient communication in single-bedded versus four-bedded hospital rooms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glind, I. van de; Dulmen, S. van; Goossensen, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether physician-patient communication in multi-bedded rooms differs from communication in single rooms during ward rounds. Methods: Ward rounds in single bedded patient rooms and ward rounds in four bedded rooms were audiotaped and analyzed with an adapted version of MIARS.

  8. Manual for computing bed load transport using BAGS (Bedload Assessment for Gravel-bed Streams) Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Pitlick; Yantao Cui; Peter Wilcock

    2009-01-01

    This manual provides background information and instructions on the use of a spreadsheet-based program for Bedload Assessment in Gravel-bed Streams (BAGS). The program implements six bed load transport equations developed specifically for gravel-bed rivers. Transport capacities are calculated on the basis of field measurements of channel geometry, reach-average slope,...

  9. International Standardization of Bed Rest Standard Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the standardization of bed rest measures. The International Countermeasures Working Group attempted to define and agree internationally on standard measurements for spaceflight based bed rest studies. The group identified the experts amongst several stakeholder agencys. It included information on exercise, muscle, neurological, psychological, bone and cardiovascular measures.

  10. Nail bed injuries and deformities of nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ravindra Bharathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nail bed injuries are common and management of these requires good knowledge of the nail bed anatomy. Proper management of these injuries will ensure good healing and prevent late deformities. When loss occurs it is challenging to reconstruct which can be done by grafts or microsurgical reconstruction to restore aesthetic appearance of fingers.

  11. Nail bed injuries and deformities of nail

    OpenAIRE

    R Ravindra Bharathi; Babu Bajantri

    2011-01-01

    Nail bed injuries are common and management of these requires good knowledge of the nail bed anatomy. Proper management of these injuries will ensure good healing and prevent late deformities. When loss occurs it is challenging to reconstruct which can be done by grafts or microsurgical reconstruction to restore aesthetic appearance of fingers.

  12. Nail bed injuries and deformities of nail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, R. Ravindra; Bajantri, Babu

    2011-01-01

    Nail bed injuries are common and management of these requires good knowledge of the nail bed anatomy. Proper management of these injuries will ensure good healing and prevent late deformities. When loss occurs it is challenging to reconstruct which can be done by grafts or microsurgical reconstruction to restore aesthetic appearance of fingers. PMID:22022029

  13. Hipparions of the Laetolil Beds, Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijer, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Laetolil Beds in Tanzania, 20-30 miles south of Olduvai Gorge, have been extensively sampled by parties under the leadership of Mrs. Dr. Mary D. Leakey, who very kindly sent me Hipparion material collected in 1974, 1975, and 1976. In a restudy of proboscidean material from these beds described

  14. Bed Bugs: Clinical Relevance and Control Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Dominic E.; Peñas, Pablo F.; Russell, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Since the late 1990s, bed bugs of the species Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus have undergone a worldwide resurgence. These bed bugs are blood-sucking insects that readily bite humans. Cutaneous reactions may occur and can start out as small macular lesions that can develop into distinctive wheals of around 5 cm in diameter, which are accompanied by intense itching. Occasionally, bullous eruptions may result. If bed bugs are numerous, the patient can present with widespread urticaria or eythematous rashes. Often, bites occur in lines along the limbs. Over 40 pathogens have been detected in bed bugs, but there is no definitive evidence that they transmit any disease-causing organisms to humans. Anemia may result when bed bugs are numerous, and their allergens can trigger asthmatic reactions. The misuse of chemicals and other technologies for controlling bed bugs has the potential to have a deleterious impact on human health, while the insect itself can be the cause of significant psychological trauma. The control of bed bugs is challenging and should encompass a multidisciplinary approach utilizing nonchemical means of control and the judicious use of insecticides. For accommodation providers, risk management procedures should be implemented to reduce the potential of bed bug infestations. PMID:22232375

  15. Print a Bed Bug Card - (Single Cards)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sets of business-card-sized lists of tips for recognizing bed bugs and the signs of an infestation, including a photo of bed bugs to assist identification. One card is for general use around home or office, the other for travelers.

  16. Peering inside the granular bed: illuminating feedbacks between bed-load transport and bed-structure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssais, M.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    The threshold of motion is perhaps the most important quantity to determine for understanding rates of bed load transport, however it is a moving target. Decades of research show that it changes in space and in time within a river, and is highly variable among different systems; however, these differences are not mechanistically understood. Recent researchers have proposed that the critical Shields stress is strongly dependent on the local configuration of the sediment bed [Frey and Church, 2011]. Critical Shields stress has been observed to change following sediment-transporting flood events in natural rivers [e.g., Turowski et al., 2011], while small-scale laboratory experiments have produced declining bed load transport rates associated with slow bed compaction [Charru et al., 2004]. However, no direct measurements have been made of the evolving bed structure under bed load transport, so the connection between granular controls and the threshold of motion remains uncertain. A perspective we adopt is that granular effects determine the critical Shields stress, while the fluid supplies a distribution of driving stresses. In order to isolate the granular effect, we undertake laminar bed load transport experiments using plastic beads sheared by a viscous oil in a small, annular flume. The fluid and beads are refractive index matched, and the fluid impregnated with a fluorescing powder. When illuminated with a planar laser sheet, we are able to image slices of the granular bed while also tracking the overlying sediment transport. We present the first results showing how bed load transport influences granular packing, and how changes in packing influence the threshold of motion to feed back on bed load transport rates. This effect may account for much of the variability observed in the threshold of motion in natural streams, and by extension offers a plausible explanation for hysteresis in bed load transport rates observed during floods. Charru, F., H. Mouilleron, and

  17. Determination of true bed thickness using folded bed model and borehole data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S.S.; Velasquillo-Martinez, L.G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J.M.; Murillo-Muneton, G. [Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico); Garcia-Hernandez, J. [Petroleos Mexicanos Exploracion y Produccion, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Nieto-Samaniego, A.F. [Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Univ., Veracruz (Mexico). Centro de Geociencias

    2007-11-15

    The actual thickness of a given formation perpendicular to the bedding plane is known as the true bed thickness. Petroleum engineers rely on information regarding true bed thickness, particularly in dipping beds and in deviated holes because reservoir volume and isochore maps depend on these properties and not on the measured thickness. True bed thickness can be estimated from information gathered from well logs such as the dipmeter and borehole images. However, when deviations and dips exceed 10 degrees, corrections are needed. In this paper, a folded bed model was proposed to calculate the true bed thickness in the subsurface utilizing well log data. The value of true bed thickness (t) was shown to depend on the angle and the direction of the dip of the measured formation, as well as the drift angle and azimuth of the borehole. A case study from the Cantarell oil field in the southern Gulf of Mexico, offshore Campeche, was used to test the folded bed method. The model was shown to yield more uniform spatial change of the values of t, compared to the monoclinal bed model that often overestimates the average value of t. The maximum relative deviation of t from the monoclinal bed model reached 22.3 per cent and the maximum absolute deviation of t reached 34.5 m. The key factors that influence the values of t were found to be the bed dip, the dip difference between the top and base of the bed and the deviated angle of the well. The folded bed model yielded fewer changed values of the true bed thickness. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  18. Symbolism of Bed in Euripides' Alcestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Sunčič

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available In the Greek imaginary the concept of bed is associated with various institutions and especially with the feminine. In Eu­ ripides' Alcestis bed represents the place of exchange of material and symbolic va­ lues. The system of reversals of gender roles is materialized in the bed and al­ lows both Alcestis and Admetus to trans­ gress the traditional gender roles. Adme­ tus has to recover his sovereignty and aut­ hority in oikos and in polis though Alce­ stis' bed, whereas with her death in bed Alcestis surpasses the traditional femini­ ne role, obtaining kleos in poems and an inscription on her grave.

  19. Does Bedding Affect the Airway and Allergy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RW Siebers

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Various cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that synthetic bedding is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema while feather bedding seems to be protective. Synthetic bedding items have higher house dust mite allergen levels than feather bedding items. This is possibly the mechanism involved although fungal and bacterial proinflammatory compounds and volatile organic compounds may play a role. In this review we present and discuss the epidemiological evidence and suggest possible mechanisms. Primary intervention studies are required to show whether feather bedding is protective for the development of childhood asthma and allergic diseases while secondary intervention studies are required to potentially reduce symptoms and medication use in subjects with established disease.

  20. Assessment of General Atomics accelerator transmutation of waste concept based on gas-turbine-modular helium cooled reactor technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Taiwo, T. A.; Cahalan, J. E.; Finck, P. J.

    2001-05-08

    An assessment has been performed for an Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept based on the use of the high temperature gas reactor technology. The concept has been proposed by General Atomics for the ATW system. The assessment was jointly conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Los Alamos national laboratory to assess and to define the potential candidates for the ATW system. This report represents the assessment work performed at ANL. The concept uses recycled light water reactor (LWR)-discharge-transuranic extracted from irradiated oxide fuel in a critical and sub-critical accelerator driven gas-cooled transmuter. In this concept, the transmuter operates at 600 MWt first in the critical mode for three cycles and then operates in a subcritical accelerator-driven mode for a single cycle. The transmuter contains both thermal and fast spectrum transmutation zones. The thermal zone is fueled with the TRU oxide material in the form of coated particles, which are mixed with graphite powder, packed into cylindrical compacts, and loaded in hexagonal graphite blocks with cylindrical channels; the fast zone is fueled with TRU-oxide material in the form of coated particles without the graphite powder and the graphite blocks that has been burned in the thermal region for three critical cycles and one additional accelerator-driven cycle. The fuel loaded into the fast zone is irradiated for four additional cycles. This fuel management scheme is intended to achieve a high Pu isotopes consumption in the thermal spectrum zone, and to consume the minor actinides in the fast-spectrum zone. Monte Carlo and deterministic codes have been used to assess the system performance and to determine the feasibility of achieving high TRU consumption levels. The studies revealed the potential for high consumption of Pu-239 (97%), total Pu (71%) and total TRU (64%) in the system. The analyses confirmed the need for burnable absorber for both suppressing the initial excess reactivity and ensuring a negative temperature coefficient under all operating conditions. Additionally, current results suggest that it may be preferable to use a double strata thermal critical system and fast subcritical system to achieve nearly complete destruction of the TRU oxide fuel. The report gives a general description of the system proposed by General Atomics. The major design parameters (degrees of freedom), which can be altered to optimize the system design, and the constraints, which guide the design and the optimization studies are described. The deterministic and the Monte Carlo neutronics codes and models used for the neutronics analysis and assessment are presented. The results of fuel block and whole-core parametric studies performed to understand the physics are given including the effect of various fuel management schemes on the system performance. A point design is described including the system performance results for a single-batch and three-batch loading schemes. The major design issues, which need to be addressed during further studies, are discussed.

  1. Spatio-temporal variation in bed-material load using dune topography collected during a severe flood on the coastal Trinity River, east TX, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    A series of six repeat surveys along 27 kilometers of the coastal Trinity River in east Texas, USA, reveal the temporal and spatial changes in bed material load during and following a historically large flood. The river event was above the National Weather Service flood stage for 55 days at the Liberty USGS station, and had a maximum discharge of about 80,000 cfs. As a community, we are beginning to understand how fluvial geomorphology is influenced by the backwater effect, but we still lack an understanding of how the bed-material transport adjusts to accommodate larger-scale changes in river bend pattern and kinematics. Survey data from this project includes sidescan sonar along the channel centerline, multibeam bathymetry, and channel bed sediment samples. In combination, this data set provides new insight into how and when bed material, primarily medium sand with some pebbles, moves through this region, and how this connects to previously observed changes in channel geometry (including downstream decreases in channel width to depth ratio, bar form volume and surface area, and lateral migration rates of river bends). Preliminary examination of sidescan sonar of two bends within the survey area, one upstream and one downstream, reveal a striking difference in bedform behavior in response to the changing hydrograph. Upstream, bedforms decrease 80% in height and 83% in length and increase in 3-dimensionality throughout the extended peak flow. During the falling limb of the flood these same bedforms increase in size as they become more laterally continuous and straight-crested. Downstream, 3-dimensional bedforms decrease 80% in height and 87% in length throughout the extended peak flow and then remain this size during the falling limb of the flood. This presentation will discuss these results with respect to backwater dynamics, sediment supply and transport, implications for coastal geomorphology as well as sediment delivery into deltaic systems.

  2. Condensation in Nanoporous Packed Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Javed; Molla, Shahnawaz; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-05-10

    In materials with tiny, nanometer-scale pores, liquid condensation is shifted from the bulk saturation pressure observed at larger scales. This effect is called capillary condensation and can block pores, which has major consequences in hydrocarbon production, as well as in fuel cells, catalysis, and powder adhesion. In this study, high pressure nanofluidic condensation studies are performed using propane and carbon dioxide in a colloidal crystal packed bed. Direct visualization allows the extent of condensation to be observed, as well as inference of the pore geometry from Bragg diffraction. We show experimentally that capillary condensation depends on pore geometry and wettability because these factors determine the shape of the menisci that coalesce when pore filling occurs, contrary to the typical assumption that all pore structures can be modeled as cylindrical and perfectly wetting. We also observe capillary condensation at higher pressures than has been done previously, which is important because many applications involving this phenomenon occur well above atmospheric pressure, and there is little, if any, experimental validation of capillary condensation at such pressures, particularly with direct visualization.

  3. Keeping tabs on seagrass beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, D.E.; Sargent, F.J.; Leary, T.J. [Florida Marine Research Institute, St. Petersburg, FL (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Seagrasses form the foundation of complex, fragile communities that include marine and estuarine animals, especially larval and juvenile fish, providing critical shelter and sustenance. Seagrasses also have a role in providing habitat for waterfowl, marine turtles and manimals. In addition, seagrasses improve water quality by stabilizing mobile sediments and converting some pollutants into plant biomass. The issue of propeller scarring or propeller dredging in seagrass beds has received much attention since 1990. The scarring of seagrass results from personal watercraft. Heightened interest has instigated numerous monitoring and mapping projects on propeller scarring and regrowth characteristics within seagrasses. The study areas selected for this paper are located within Tampa Bay, Florida. Specifically, they are Shell Island and Miquel Bay. Spatial monitoring for the extent of seagrass scarring in the Tampa Bay region was conducted in two ways, a regional (general) approach and a site specific (detailed) approach. Regional monitoring assessed the status of seagrass in Tampa Bay and identified {open_quote}hot spots{close_quote}. After identifying {open_quote}hot spots{close_quote}, boat surveys were used to confirm or deny the initial assessment. This poster involves the design of a propeller scarring monitoring program using several methods: Hi8 video, digital cameras, film cameras, and differential GPS combined with Arcview. A pilot program to evaluate the adequacy of these monitoring devices and the recommendation of specific actions in areas of severe propeller scarring will be presented.

  4. Paleontologic and stratigraphic relations of phosphate beds in Upper Cretaceous rocks of the Cordillera Oriental, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Edwin K.; Zambrano O., Francisco; Mojica G., Pedro; Abozaglo M., Jacob; Pachon P., Fernando; Duran R., Raul

    1979-01-01

    Phosphorite crops out in the Cordillera Oriental of the Colombian Andes in rocks of Late Cretaceous age as strata composed mostly of pelletal carbonate fluorapatite. One stratum of Santonian age near the base of the Galembo Member of the La Luna Formation crops out at many places in the Departments of Santander and Norte de Santander and may be of commercial grade. This stratum is more than one meter thick at several places near Lebrija and near Sardinata, farther south it is locally one meter thick or more near the base of the Guadalupe Formation in the Department of Boyaca. Other phosphorite beds are found at higher stratigraphic levels in the Galembo Member and the Guadalupe Formation, and at some places these may be commercial also. A stratigraphically lower phosphorite occurs below the Galembo Member in the Capacho Formation (Cenomanian age) in at least one area near the town of San Andres, Santander. A phosphorite or pebbly phosphate conglomerate derived from erosion of the Galembo Member forms the base of the Umir Shale and the equivalent Colon Shale at many places. Deposition of the apatite took place upon the continental shelf in marine water of presumed moderate depth between the Andean geosyncline and near-shore detrital deposits adjacent to the Guayana shield. Preliminary calculations indicate phosphorite reserves of approximately 315 million metric tons in 9 areas, determined from measurements of thickness, length of the outcrop, and by projecting the reserves to a maximum of 1,000 meters down the dip of the strata into the subsurface. Two mines were producing phosphate rock in 1969; one near Turmeque, Boyaca, and the other near Tesalia, Huila.

  5. Factors Associated With Infant Bed-Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Heere MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bed-sharing is associated with sudden infant death syndrome and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for newborn bed-sharing. Methods: Postpartum mothers from a university maternity service were contacted by phone to complete a survey. Demographic and environmental data were collected; newborn bed-sharing and sleep environment were self-reported. Results: A total of 1261 mothers completed surveys; bed-sharing was reported by 79 mothers (6.3%. Multivariate logistic regression identified referral to a nurse (odds ratio [OR] = 10; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5-30 and sleep location “other” than a crib, bassinet, or Pack and Play (OR = 7.1; 95% CI = 1.9-25.9 as factors associated with an increased risk of bed-sharing; formula feeding (OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.20-0.77 and crib sleeping (OR = 0.49; 95% CI = 0.26-0.86 reduced this risk. Conclusion: Infants with no identifiable places to sleep, significant health issues, and who are breastfed are more likely to bed-share. Interventional studies should be directed at these factors.

  6. Factors Associated With Infant Bed-Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heere, Megan; Moughan, Beth; Alfonsi, Joseph; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Aronoff, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Bed-sharing is associated with sudden infant death syndrome and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for newborn bed-sharing. Methods: Postpartum mothers from a university maternity service were contacted by phone to complete a survey. Demographic and environmental data were collected; newborn bed-sharing and sleep environment were self-reported. Results: A total of 1261 mothers completed surveys; bed-sharing was reported by 79 mothers (6.3%). Multivariate logistic regression identified referral to a nurse (odds ratio [OR] = 10; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5-30) and sleep location "other" than a crib, bassinet, or Pack and Play (OR = 7.1; 95% CI = 1.9-25.9) as factors associated with an increased risk of bed-sharing; formula feeding (OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.20-0.77) and crib sleeping (OR = 0.49; 95% CI = 0.26-0.86) reduced this risk. Conclusion: Infants with no identifiable places to sleep, significant health issues, and who are breastfed are more likely to bed-share. Interventional studies should be directed at these factors.

  7. Fluidized bed adsorption of cephalosporin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicketier, M; Buchholz, K

    2002-02-28

    Fluidized bed adsorption can substantially simplify the recovery of products from fermentation. There are, however, several critical parameters, which have a significant influence on the performance of such systems. This paper presents experimental results on the adsorption of an antibiotic, Cephalosporin C, on macroporous adsorbents of the polystyrene type and on an ion exchanger. Internals (static mixers) were used to control bed expansion and mixing, the range of flow rates could thus be extended significantly. An integrated mathematical model was developed comprising bed expansion, residence time distribution and mixing, adsorption kinetics and equilibria.

  8. Recent advances in fluidized bed drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, N. S.; Zakaria, J. H.; Mohideen Batcha, M. F.

    2017-09-01

    Fluidized bed drying are very well known to yield high heat and mass transfer and hence adopted to many industrial drying processes particularly agricultural products. In this paper, recent advances in fluidized bed drying were reviewed and focus is given to the drying related to the usage of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). It can be seen that usage of modern computational tools such as CFD helps to optimize the fluidized bed dryer design and operation for lower energy consumption and thus better thermal efficiency. Among agricultural products that were reviewed in this paper were oil palm frond, wheat grains, olive pomace, coconut, pepper corn and millet.

  9. Fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Kudjoi, A.; Hippinen, I.; Heinolainen, A.; Suominen, M.; Lu Yong [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Partial gasification processes have been presented as possibilities for future power production. In the processes, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed material) contain unburnt fuel and the fuel conversion is increased by burning this gasification residue either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. In this project, which is a part of European JOULE 2 EXTENSION research programme, the main research objectives are the behaviour of calcium and sulphur compounds in solids and the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residues. (author)

  10. Electrostatic collection efficiency in binary fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, A.; Guardiola, J.; Rincon, J. (Univ. of Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain))

    1992-01-01

    Fluidized beds of binary mixtures have been used to clean air streams containing dust particles in the size range 4.4 to 14 {mu}m. All beds were composed of glass beads and plastic granules mixed at different proportions. The effect on the electrostatic collection efficiency of a number of variables, including type of collecting mixture, bed height, and gas velocity, was examined. To calculate the single collection efficiency from experimental results, an early model proposed by Clift et al. was used. The electrostatic collection efficiency was determined by subtracting the other individual mechanism efficiencies from the single particle collection efficiency.

  11. Gruppebaseret behandling af BED - et faseopdelt behandlingstilbud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laust, Jakob; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Waaddegaard, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Titel: Afrapportering vedr. SATS-puljemidler til behandling og erfaringsopsamling vedr. BED for perioden 1. marts 2013 – 1. maj 2015. Baggrund: Binge Eating Disorder (BED), på dansk tvangsoverspisning, er en udbredt, men overset spiseforstyrrelse med alvorlige psykiske, fysiske og sociale......: Rapporten er lavet på baggrund af kliniske erfaringer, kvalitative og kvantitative data indsamlet i forbindelse med oprettelse af et gruppeterapeutisk behandlingstilbud til patienter med BED. Behandlingen består af to faser. Fase l (primær behandling) hvor der er fokus på behandling af...

  12. Bed Bug Infestations and Control Practices in China: Implications for Fighting the Global Bed Bug Resurgence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlu Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The bed bug resurgence in North America, Europe, and Australia has elicited interest in investigating the causes of the widespread and increasing infestations and in developing more effective control strategies. In order to extend global perspectives on bed bug management, we reviewed bed bug literature in China by searching five Chinese language electronic databases. We also conducted telephone interviews of 68 pest control firms in two cities during March 2011. In addition, we conducted telephone interviews to 68 pest control companies within two cities in March 2011. Two species of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus (F. are known to occur in China. These were common urban pests before the early1980s. Nationwide “Four-Pest Elimination” campaigns (bed bugs being one of the targeted pests were implemented in China from 1960 to the early 1980s. These campaigns succeeded in the elimination of bed bug infestations in most communities. Commonly used bed bug control methods included applications of hot water, sealing of bed bug harborages, physical removal, and applications of residual insecticides (mainly organophosphate sprays or dusts. Although international and domestic travel has increased rapidly in China over the past decade (2000–2010, there have only been sporadic new infestations reported in recent years. During 1999–2009, all documented bed bug infestations were found in group living facilities (military dormitories, worker dormitories, and prisons, hotels, or trains. One city (Shenzhen city near Hong Kong experienced significantly higher number of bed bug infestations. This city is characterized by a high concentration of migratory factory workers. Current bed bug control practices include educating residents, washing, reducing clutter, putting items under the hot sun in summer, and applying insecticides (pyrethroids or organophosphates. There have not been any studies or reports on bed bug insecticide

  13. Modular Electric Propulsion Test Bed Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An all electric aircraft test bed is proposed to provide a dedicated development environment for the rigorous study and advancement of electrically powered aircraft....

  14. Effects Of Exercise During Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, Edmund M.

    1993-01-01

    Pair of reports adds to growing body of knowledge of physical deconditioning caused by prolonged bed rest and effectiveness of various exercise regimens in preserving or restoring fitness. Major objective to determine what regimens to prescribe to astronauts before flight, during prolonged weightlessness, and immediately before returning to Earth. Knowledge also benefits patients confined by illness or injury. First report discusses experiment on effects of two types of periodic, intense, short-duration exercise during bed rest. Experiment also discussed in documents "Effects Of Exercise During Prolonged Bed Rest" (ARC-12190), and "Isotonic And Isokinetic Exercise During Bed Rest" (ARC-12180). Second report reviews knowledge acquired with view toward development of protocols for exercise regimens.

  15. Bed Partner Often Fuels Loved One's Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 166425.html Bed Partner Often Fuels Loved One's Insomnia Well-intentioned tips to encourage better sleep often ... specialists found that when a loved one had insomnia, the partner's suggested solutions -- including watching TV or ...

  16. Modular Electric Propulsion Test Bed Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A hybrid electric aircraft simulation system and test bed is proposed to provide a dedicated development environment for the rigorous study and advancement of hybrid...

  17. Bed Bug Clearinghouse Publications in Other Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    This information is intended to help states, communities, and consumers prevent and control bed bug infestations. These outreach materials are available in Spanish, Chinese, and French; and include action plans based on an IPM approach.

  18. Bed Bugs are Public Health Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a joint statement on the public health impacts of bed bugs, which are blood-sucking ectoparasites (external parasites). EPA also has a pesticide registration notice on this topic.

  19. Coolability of volumetrically heated particle beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Muhammad

    2017-03-22

    In case of a severe nuclear reactor accident, with loss of coolant, a particle bed may be formed from the fragmentation of the molten core in the residual water at different stages of the accident. To avoid further propagation of the accident and maintain the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel, the decay heat of the particle bed must be removed. To better understand the various thermo-hydraulic processes within such heat-generating particle beds, the existing DEBRIS test facility at IKE has been modified to be able to perform novel boiling, dryout and quenching experiments. The essential experimental data includes the pressure gradients measured by 8 differential pressure transducers along the bed height as a function of liquid and vapour superficial velocities, the determination of local dryout heat fluxes for different system pressures as well as the local temperature distribution measured by a set of 51 thermocouples installed inside the particle bed. The experiments were carried out for two different particle beds: a polydispersed particle bed which consisted of stainless steel balls (2 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm diameters) and an irregular particle bed which consisted of a mixture of steel balls (3 mm and 6 mm) and irregularly shaped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Additionally, all experiments were carried out for different flow conditions, such as the reference case of passive 1D top-flooding, 1D bottom flooding (driven by external pumps and different downcomer configurations) and 2D top-/bottom-/lateral flooding with a perforated downcomer. In this work, it has been observed that for both particle beds with downcomer configurations an open downcomer leads to the best coolability (dryout heat flux = 1560 kW/m{sup 2}, polydispersed particle bed, psys = 1 bar) of the particle bed, mainly due to bottom-flow with enhanced natural convection. It has also been shown that a potential lateral flow via a perforation of the downcomer does not bring any further improvements

  20. The effect of vibration on bed voidage behaviors in fluidized beds with large particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Jin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of vibration parameters, operating conditions and material properties on bed voidage were investigated using an optical fiber probe approach in a vibrating fluidized bed with a diameter of 148 mm. Variables studied included frequency (0-282 s-1, amplitude (0 mm-1 mm, bed height (0.1 m-0.4 m as well as four kinds of particles (belonging to Geldart's B and D groups. The axial and radial voidage distribution with vibration is compared with that without vibration, which shows vibration can aid in the fluidization behaviors of particles. For a larger vibration amplitude, the vibration seriously affects bed voidage. The vibration energy can damp out for particle layers with increasing the bed height. According to analysis of experimental data, an empirical correlation for predicting bed voidage, giving good agreement with the experimental data and a deviation within ±15%, was proposed.

  1. Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement, Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program : Facility Location Evaluation for Ashe-Pebble Springs 500-KV Line, Study Area 75-3A.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1975-03-07

    Proposed is construction of an approximately 80-mile long, 500-kV single-circuit transmission line from Ashe Substation in the northeastern portion of the AEC Hanford Reservation to a proposed Pebble Springs Substation near Arlington, Oregon. In the eastern sector of the proposed facility from 49 to 58 miles of new right-of-way would be required depending on the final route chosen and approximately 15 miles of new access road. Land uses which could be affected by the proposed facility include 12 to 26 miles of wheatland, 4 to 10 miles of irrigated cropland, and 22 to 34 miles of rangeland crossed. The western sector would require approximately 25 miles of new right-of-way and 9 to 16 miles of new access road. Disturbance to wildlife during construction will occur, and habitat associated with the above rangeland and agricultural land will be eliminated. Soil erosion and siltation, primarily during and immediately after construction, will also occur. Visual impacts will occur primarily near several highways, recreation areas, and at river crossings particularly the Columbia River where extremely tall towers may be required. Disturbance to nearby residents will occur during construction.

  2. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  3. CFD-DEM study of effect of bed thickness for bubbling fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingwen, Li; Gopalakrishnan, Pradeep; Garg, Rahul; Shahnam, Mehrdad

    2011-10-01

    The effect of bed thickness in rectangular fluidized beds is investigated through the CFD–DEM simulations of small-scale systems. Numerical results are compared for bubbling fluidized beds of various bed thicknesses with respect to particle packing, bed expansion, bubble behavior, solids velocities, and particle kinetic energy. Good two-dimensional (2D) flow behavior is observed in the bed having a thickness of up to 20 particle diameters. However, a strong three-dimensional (3D) flow behavior is observed in beds with a thickness of 40 particle diameters, indicating the transition from 2D flow to 3D flow within the range of 20–40 particle diameters. Comparison of velocity profiles near the walls and at the center of the bed shows significant impact of the front and back walls on the flow hydrodynamics of pseudo-2D fluidized beds. Hence, for quantitative comparison with experiments in pseudo-2D columns, the effect of walls has to be accounted for in numerical simulations.

  4. Phosphorus accummulation in reed bed treatment filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczmarczyk, A.; Baryła, A.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction Constructed wetlands are well known method for alternative wastewater treatment in rural areas in Poland. There are mainly used as a biological treatment step of domestic wastewater. The most popular are subsurface flow constructed wetlands (reed bed systems) with bed filled with site soil (mainly clayey sand or sandy clay). Over 30 such plants with daily flow above 5 m3 per day is operated in Poland. Object and goal of research Many researches have been made on estimation constructed wetlands treatment efficiency, however there are mostly concentrated on inlet outlet concentration compartments. In this study preliminary results of phosphorus accumulation in the bed of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland are presented. Monitored plant treats wastewater from 150 inhabitants in the volume of 14 m3 d-1 at average and is under operation from December 1998. The goal of research was to asses the distribution of phosphorus in the wetland bed after 8 years of treatment of domestic wastewater. Obtained results are shown on the background of organic matter (TOC) distribution. The methods applied The bed of the constructed wetland (30 m width and 33 m length) was divided by net of 20 points. In every point two soil samples, one from the depth of 0-10 cm and one from the depth of 20-30 cm, were collected. The samples were analyzed for organic matter and total phosphorus content. Investigation findings The results showed variation of measured indexes on the length and depth of treatment bed. In generally, the highest accumulation occurred near the inlet zone of wetland. The relation is rather clear in case of organic matter, but in case of phosphorus high contents were also observed at the outlet zone of wetland. Higher organic matter concentrations were observed in deeper layer (20-30 cm) than in upper layer (0-10 cm) of the bed.

  5. Fluidized-bed and packed-bed characteristics of gel beads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zessen, van E.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.; Beeftink, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    A liquid-fluidized bed or packed bed with gel beads is attractive as an immobilized-cell bioreactor. The performance of such bioreactors is influenced by the physical behavior of these beads. Three different but related aspects involving the drag force between particles and liquid were studied for

  6. Application of CaO-Based Bed Material for Dual Fluidized Bed Steam Biomass Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppatz, S.; Pfeifer, C.; Kreuzeder, A.; Soukup, G.; Hofbauer, H.

    Gasification of biomass is a suitable option for decentralized energy supply based on renewable sources in the range of up to 50 MW fuel input. The paper presents the dual fluidized bed (DFB) steam gasification process, which is applied to generate high quality and nitrogen-free product gas. Essential part of the DFB process is the bed material used in the fluidized reactors, which has significant impact on the product gas quality. By the use of catalytically active bed materials the performance of the overall process is increased, since the bed material favors reactions of the steam gasification. In particular, tar reforming reactions are favored. Within the paper, the pilot plant based on the DFB process with 100kW fuel input at Vienna University of Technology, Austria is presented. Actual investigations with focus on CaO-based bed materials (limestone) as well as with natural olivine as bed material were carried out at the pilot plant. The application of CaO-based bed material shows mainly decreased tar content in the product gas in contrast to experiments with olivine as bed material. The paper presents the results of steam gasification experiments with limestone and olivine, whereby the product gas composition as well as the tar content and the tar composition are outlined.

  7. Measurement of powder bed density in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Donmez, A.; Slotwinski, J.; Moylan, S.

    2016-11-01

    Many factors influence the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) processes, resulting in a high degree of variation in process outcomes. Therefore, quantifying these factors and their correlations to process outcomes are important challenges to overcome to enable widespread adoption of emerging AM technologies. In the powder bed fusion AM process, the density of the powder layers in the powder bed is a key influencing factor. This paper introduces a method to determine the powder bed density (PBD) during the powder bed fusion (PBF) process. A complete uncertainty analysis associated with the measurement method was also described. The resulting expanded measurement uncertainty, U PBD (k  =  2), was determined as 0.004 g · cm-3. It was shown that this expanded measurement uncertainty is about three orders of magnitude smaller than the typical powder bed density. This method enables establishing correlations between the changes in PBD and the direction of motion of the powder recoating arm.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.E. Mizia; W.E. Windes; W.R. Corwin; T.D. Burchell; C.E. Duty; Y. Katoh; J.W. Klett; T.E. McGreevy; R.K. Nanstad; W. Ren; P.L. Rittenhouse; L.L. Snead; R.W. Swindeman; D.F. Wlson

    2007-09-01

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 950°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Some of the general and administrative aspects of the R&D Plan include: • Expand American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards in support of the NGNP Materials R&D Program. • Define and develop inspection needs and the procedures for those inspections. • Support selected university materials related R&D activities that would be of direct benefit to the NGNP Project. • Support international materials related collaboration activities through the DOE sponsored Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Materials and Components (M&C) Project Management Board (PMB). • Support document review activities through the Materials Review Committee (MRC) or other suitable forum.

  9. Creep fatigue assessment for EUROFER components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özkan, Furkan, E-mail: oezkan.furkan@partner.kit.edu; Aktaa, Jarir

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Design rules for creep fatigue assessment are developed to EUROFER components. • Creep fatigue assessment tool is developed in FORTRAN code with coupling MAPDL. • Durability of the HCPB-TBM design is discussed under typical fusion reactor loads. - Abstract: Creep-fatigue of test blanket module (TBM) components built from EUROFER is evaluated based on the elastic analysis approach in ASME Boiler Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC). The required allowable number of cycles design fatigue curve and stress-to-rupture curve to estimate the creep-fatigue damage are used from the literature. Local stress, strain and temperature inputs for the analysis of creep-fatigue damage are delivered by the finite element code ANSYS utilizing the Mechanical ANSYS Parametric Design Language (MAPDL). A developed external FORTRAN code used as a post processor is coupled with MAPDL. Influences of different pulse durations (hold-times) and irradiation on creep-fatigue damage for the preliminary design of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Test Blanket Module (HCPB-TBM) are discussed for the First Wall component of the TBM box.

  10. Transient analyses on the cooling channels of the DEMO HCPB blanket concept under accidental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuming, E-mail: Yuming.chen@kit.edu; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Jin, Xue Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • This paper presents transient CFD analyses on the cooling channels of the DEMO HCPB FW for accidental scenarios LOCA and LOFA. • In both LOCA & LOFA, the wall temperature increases quickly to an unacceptable level within seconds. • If the coolant flow rate is maintained at a half of nominal value in case of LOFA (partial LOFA), the wall temperature rises much slower, but will still leads to a damage of structure within minutes. • The simulated heat transfer coefficients were compared with empirical correlations. - Abstract: Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket concept is one of the DEMO (Demonstration Power Plant) blanket concepts running for the final DEMO design selection. In this paper, transient analyses on the cooling channels of the FW are carried out by means of CFD simulations for the selected accidental scenarios loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) and loss-of-flow-accident (LOFA). ANSYS-CFX is used for the simulations. The simulation results help to understand how fast the temperature of the FW can increase and what is the time window that is available until the temperature of the structural material reaches the design limit in order to be able to define a suitable protection strategy for the system. In view of later developments of the models, the heat transfer coefficients calculated with CFD are compared with the values predicted by two widely used correlations for turbulent pipe flows.

  11. Progress in the KIT approach for development of the HCPB TBM stiffening plate feasibility mock up fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Heiko, E-mail: heiko.neuberger@kit.edu [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Institut für Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik (INR) (Germany); Rey, Jörg [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Institut für Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik (INR) (Germany); Materna-Morris, Edeltraud; Bolich, Daniel [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Institut für Angewandte Materialien (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Handl, Thomas [WBHS Wärmebehandlungsservice, Am Hof 5/14, 1010 Wien (Austria); Milker, Torsten [TRUMPF Laser- und Systemtechnik GmbH, Johann-Maus-Straße 2, 71254 Ditzingen (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Sub-component manufacturing and assembly concepts for the fabrication of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Test Blanket Module have been developed since more than one decade in the KIT. In the present design the structure of the HCPB TBM can be sub-divided into three key components: (i) TBM box, (ii) stiffening plates and (iii) the breeder zone. The present fabrication and assembly routines is based on the assumption that each of the aforementioned sub-components can be assembled in parallel and independently before assembling the TBM. Therefore the procedures to fabricate these sub-components can be addressed in independent tasks. This paper shows the results of the KIT/industry collaboration with the final goal to develop a set of preliminary welding procedure specifications (pWPS) for the assembly of the HCPB TBM stiffening plate. Recently a promising set of draft pWPS could be identified in medium scale fabrication experiments. This paper recalls the results of qualification routines according to ISO 15614-11 (RCC-MR Edition 2007, RS 3570) in order to verify the parameters.

  12. Novel Simulated moving bed technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purdue University

    2003-12-30

    Cellulose and hemicellulose from plants and other biomass can be hydrolyzed to produce sugars (i.e. glucose and xylose). Once these sugars are separated from other impurities, they can serve as feedstock in fermentation to produce ethanol (as fuels), lactic acid, or other valuable chemicals. The need for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass has become abundantly clear over the last decade. However, the cost of producing fermentable sugars from biomass hydrolyzate using existing technology is relatively high and has been a major obstacle. The objective of this project is to develop an efficient and economical simulated moving bed (SMB) process to recover fermentable sugars from biomass hydrolyzate. Sulfuric acid can hydrolyze the cellulose and hemicellulose in biomass to sugars, but this process can generate byproducts such as acetic acid, and can lead to further degradation of the xylose to furfural and glucose to hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF). Also, lignin and other compounds in the biomass will degrade to various phenolic compounds. If the concentrations of these compounds exceed certain threshold levels, they will be toxic to the downstream fermentation, and will severely limit the usefulness of the derived sugars. Standard post-hydrolysis processing involves neutralization of sulfuric acid, usually with lime (calcium hydroxide). A study by Wooley et al.showed that the limed hydrolyzate gave a low ethanol yield in fermentation test (20% of theoretical yield compared to 77% of theoretical yield from fermentation of pure sugars). They showed that instead of adding lime, an ion exclusion chromatography process could be used to remove acids, as well as to isolate the sugars from the biomass hydrolyzate. In this project, we investigated the feasibility of developing an economical SMB process based on (1) a polymeric adsorbent, Dowex99, which was used by Wooley et al., (2) a second polymeric adsorbent, poly-4-vinyl pyridine (or PVP in short, Reilly

  13. In-pile testing of HCPB submodules. Feasibility study for the European Blanket project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Bakker, K.; Fokkens, J.H.; Haverkate, B.R.W.; Sciolla, C.M. [ECN Nuclear Research, Petten (Netherlands); Conrad, R. [JRC-IAM, HFR-Unit, Petten (Netherlands)

    1998-02-01

    Full size module systems of the candidate DEMO blanket concepts selected for the European Blanket Project (EBP) will be tested in ITER, presently called Test Blanket modules (TBM). The Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) is one of the two concepts developed in the European Union (EU). This development path consists of several scaling steps, including integral testing of a subsized module at realistic operation conditions. As part of the HCPB development work for the TBMs, ECN performed jointly with JRC/IAM at Petten a feasibility study for irradiation tests of subsized HCPB modules. The first stage of the study was concluded with a report on the conceptual design of an in-pile test of a single submodule with a helium cooling loop. Such test was considered technically feasible, but would require significant project duration and expenditures. Further development of detailed objectives for in-pile tests was recommended, in particular in view of the different parameters for the HCPB-ITM and DEMO-concept. This objective has been modified by the EBP in fall 1997. For the final stage of the study the test objective has been: the in-pile testing of the thermal/mechanical behaviour of the HCPB ceramic breeder beds, while giving lower priority to tritium transport issues (release, permeation). Several configuration options in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, Netherlands, to perform in-pile test of HCPB submodules have been considered. Neutronics analyses along with thermal and structural analyses have been made for selected options and several HFR peripheral in-tank positions. These pre-design analyses show that the whole range of breeder bed power densities and temperature levels, which are relevant to the HCPB DEMO and BTM designs, can be reached with the options presented. The options are all cooled by the reactor coolant flow. The use of an helium loop is not compulsory and is considered as an unnecessary complication with regard to the present test objectives

  14. Analysis of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Takehiko; Shimizu, Tadaaki; Yang, Guilin

    1987-05-20

    Fluidized bed combustors are commercialized as a technology to combust solid fuels with higher efficiency and lower emission and have functions of both combustion and simultaneous desulfurization and NOx reduction with dense phase fluidized beds but it is not so easy to realize these problems. The technology of circulating fluidized bed coal combustion is expected to offer potential break-through of various problems. But the details are not reported so far. Quantitative analysis of present situations was conducted and future problems were shown with officially available informations. This analysis includes the circulating rate and loading of solids, heat recovery and heat transfer rate as a function of loading of solids, the design of cyclones related to high solid concentration within the combustor, sulfur retention with reduced Ca/S ratio and problems related to NOx reduction to be developed in future. (51 refs, 23 figs, 8 tabs)

  15. Fluidized bed selective pyrolysis of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, J.Y.; Cha, C.Y.; Merriam, N.W.

    1992-12-15

    The present invention discloses a process for the pyrolysis of coal which comprises the effective utilization of two zonal inclined fluidized beds, where said zones can be selectively controlled as to temperature and heating rate. The first zonal inclined fluidized bed serves as a dryer for crushed coal and additionally is controlled to selectively pyrolyze said coal producing substantially carbon dioxide for recycle use. The second zonal inclined fluidized bed further pyrolyses the coal to gaseous, liquid and char products under controlled temperature and heating rate zones designed to economically integrate the product mix. The gas and liquid products are recovered from the gaseous effluent stream while the char which remains can be further treated or utilized in a subsequent process step. 9 figs.

  16. Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riaz, M.

    1977-12-01

    The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

  17. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate, E-mail: renkawit@biologie.uni-marburg.de [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  18. Exercise countermeasures for bed-rest deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose for this 30-day bed rest study was to investigate the effects of short-term, high intensity isotonic and isokinetic exercise training on maintenance of working capacity (peak oxygen uptake), muscular strength and endurance, and on orthostatic tolerance, posture and gait. Other data were collected on muscle atrophy, bone mineralization and density, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid-electrolyte balance, muscle intermediary metabolism, and on performance and mood of the subjects. It was concluded that: The subjects maintained a relatively stable mood, high morale, and high esprit de corps throughout the study. Performance improved in nearly all tests in almost all the subjects. Isotonic training, as opposed to isokinetic exercise training, was associated more with decreasing levels of psychological tension, concentration, and motivation; and improvement in the quality of sleep. Working capacity (peak oxygen uptake) was maintained during bed rest with isotonic exercise training; it was not maintained with isokinetic or no exercise training. In general, there was no significant decrease in strength or endurance of arm or leg muscles during bed rest, in spite of some reduction in muscle size (atrophy) of some leg muscles. There was no effect of isotonic exercise training on orthostasis, since tilt-table tolerance was reduced similarly in all three groups following bed rest. Bed rest resulted in significant decreases of postural stability and self-selected step length, stride length, and walking velocity, which were not influenced by either exercise training regimen. Most pre-bed rest responses were restored by the fourth day of recovery.

  19. Atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, E.J.B. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

    2003-07-01

    Fluidization states, bubbling and circulating fluidized beds, and the basics of pressurized fluidized bed combustion are outlined. PFBC demonstration plants, cogeneration, operational units and possible new plants, growth of PFBC capacity, sulphur capture, sulphation, phase composition of ashes, and actual performance in reduction of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are described. Problems occurring during operation show that turbines need to be protected and that hot gas filters degrade and are unreliable. It is concluded that the future of PFBC depends on Asian development and that the technology may be stimulated by stricter pollution controls. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Lake bed classification using acoustic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Karen K.; Li, Xing; Bonde, John; Richards, Carl; Cholwek, Gary

    1998-01-01

    As part of our effort to identify the lake bed surficial substrates using remote sensing data, this work designs pattern classifiers by multivariate statistical methods. Probability distribution of the preprocessed acoustic signal is analyzed first. A confidence region approach is then adopted to improve the design of the existing classifier. A technique for further isolation is proposed which minimizes the expected loss from misclassification. The devices constructed are applicable for real-time lake bed categorization. A mimimax approach is suggested to treat more general cases where the a priori probability distribution of the substrate types is unknown. Comparison of the suggested methods with the traditional likelihood ratio tests is discussed.

  1. Effect of bed particles to combustion of gases in fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Wallen, V.; Etelaeaho, R.; Correia, S. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project was to obtain experimental data on effects of sand particles to the combustion of gases. The effect of the surface area of the particles was tested using different sized particles. The fluidized bed reactor used in these experiments was a stainless-steel tube with an internal diameter of 42 mm surrounded by an electric heater. The test rig was built in the Laboratory of Energy and Process Engineering at Tampere University of Technology. In order to elucidate the possible changes of particle surface, microscopic and porosimetric studies were conducted with both fresh bed particles and used bed particles. These measurements indicate that carbon monoxide significantly reacts with oxygen in the particulate or emulsion phase of a fluidized bed, if the residence time is long enough. The reaction rate depends mainly on temperature, air coefficient, residence time and particle size of the solids. It seems that the combustion enhances if the average particle size increases. Whether this is caused by increased free path length or reduced specific surface area of the bed is yet unknown. The first might be more probable cause because the majority of reactions often took place in the freeboard right above the bed. It was clear that the bed hindered proper combustion in several cases. (orig.)

  2. Loading and Unloading Weaned Pigs: Effects of Bedding Types, Ramp Angle, and Bedding Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Garcia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-slip surfaces during loading and unloading of weaned pigs plays an important role in animal welfare and economics of the pork industry. Currently, the guidelines available only suggest the use of ramps below 20° to load and unload pigs. Three ramp angles (0°, 10° or 20°, five bedding materials (nothing, sand, feed, wood shavings or wheat straw hay, two moistures (dry or wet bedding; >50% moisture over two seasons (>23.9 °C summer, <23.9 °C winter were assessed for slips/falls/vocalizations (n = 6,000 pig observations. “Score” was calculated by the sum of slips, falls, and vocalizations. With the exception of using feed as a bedding, all beddings provided some protection against elevated slips, falls, and vocalizations (P < 0.01. Providing bedding reduced (P < 0.05 scores regardless of whether the bedding was dry or wet. Scores increased as the slope increased (P < 0.01. Provision of bedding, other than feed, at slopes greater than zero, decreased slips, falls and vocalizations. The total time it took to load and unload pigs was

  3. Solution based synthesis of mixed-phase materials in the Li2TiO3-Li4SiO4 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaor, Dorian A. H.; Kolb, Matthias H. H.; Gan, Yixiang; Kamlah, Marc; Knitter, Regina

    2015-01-01

    As candidate tritium breeder materials for use in the ITER helium cooled pebble bed, ceramic multiphasic compounds lying in the region of the quasi-binary lithium metatitanate-lithium orthosilicate system may exhibit mechanical and physical advantages relative to single phase materials. Here we present an organometallic solution-based synthesis procedure for the low-temperature fabrication of compounds in the Li2TiO3-Li4SiO4 region and investigate phase stability and transformations through temperature varied X-ray diffraction and scanning calorimetry. Results demonstrate that the metatitanate and metasilicate phases Li2TiO3 and Li2SiO3 readily crystallise in nanocrystalline form at temperatures below 180 °C. Lithium deficiency in the region of 5% results from Li sublimation from Li4SiO4 and/or from excess Li incorporation in the metatitanate phase and brings about a stoichiometry shift, with product compounds exhibiting mixed lithium orthosilicate/metasilicate content towards the Si rich region and predominantly Li2TiO3 content towards the Ti rich region. Above 1150 °C the transformation of monoclinic to cubic γ-Li2TiO3 disordered solid-solution occurs while the melting of silicate phases indicates a likely monotectic type system with a solidus line in the region 1050-1100 °C. Synthesis procedures involving a lithium chloride precursor are not likely to be a viable option for breeder pebble synthesis as this route was found to yield materials with a more significant Li-deficiency exhibiting the crystallisation of the Li2TiSiO5 phase at intermediate compositions.

  4. Flexible bed allocations for hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, René; Koole, Ger; Roubos, Dennis

    2017-12-01

    Flexibility in the usage of clinical beds is considered to be a key element to efficiently organize critical capacity. However, full flexibility can have some major drawbacks as large systems are more difficult to manage, lack effective care delivery due to absence of focus and require multi-skilled medical teams. In this paper, we identify practical guidelines on how beds should be allocated to provide both flexibility and utilize specialization. Specifically, small scale systems can often benefit from full flexibility. Threshold type of control is then effective to prioritize patient types and to cope with patients having diverse lengths of stay. For large scale systems, we assert that a little flexibility is generally sufficient to take advantage of most of the economies of scale. Bed reservation (earmarking) or, equivalently, organizing a shared ward of overflow, then performs well. The theoretical models and guidelines are illustrated with numerical examples. Moreover, we address a key question stemming from practice: how to distribute a fixed number of hospital beds over the different units?

  5. Fluidized-bed combustion reduces atmospheric pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonke, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Method of reducing sulfur and nitrogen oxides released during combustion of fossil fuels is described. Fuel is burned in fluidized bed of solids with simultaneous feeding of crushed or pulverized limestone to control emission. Process also offers high heat transfer rates and efficient contacting for gas-solid reactions.

  6. Nonlinear flow response of soft hair beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, José; Comtet, Jean; de Langre, Emmanuel; Hosoi, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    We are `hairy' on the inside: beds of passive fibres anchored to a surface and immersed in fluids are prevalent in many biological systems, including intestines, tongues, and blood vessels. These hairs are soft enough to deform in response to stresses from fluid flows. Yet fluid stresses are in turn affected by hair deformation, leading to a coupled elastoviscous problem that is poorly understood. Here we investigate a biomimetic model system of elastomer hair beds subject to shear-driven Stokes flows. We characterize this system with a theoretical model that accounts for the large-deformation flow response of hair beds. Hair bending results in a drag-reducing nonlinearity because the hair tip lowers towards the base, widening the gap through which fluid flows. When hairs are cantilevered at an angle subnormal to the surface, flow against the grain bends hairs away from the base, narrowing the gap. The flow response of angled hair beds is axially asymmetric and amounts to a rectification nonlinearity. We identify an elastoviscous parameter that controls nonlinear behaviour. Our study raises the hypothesis that biological hairy surfaces function to reduce fluid drag. Furthermore, angled hairs may be incorporated in the design of integrated microfluidic components, such as diodes and pumps.

  7. Multiscale modeling of gas-fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoef, Martin Anton; van Sint Annaland, M.; Ye, M.; Andrews, A.T.; Sundaresan, S.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical models of gas-fluidized beds have become an important tool in the design and scale up of gas-solid chemical reactors. However, a single numerical model which includes the solid-solid and solid-fluid interaction in full detail is not feasible for industrial-scale equipment, and for this

  8. Control of fluidized bed tea drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temple, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    Tea is a product made from the leaf of the tea bush by several processes, including drying. The drying stage is the most energy intensive, and has tight performance criteria. This project investigated the options for the control of a fluidized bed tea dryer. The work included establishing

  9. Incipient motion of gravel and coal beds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Wiberg & Smith 1987; Wilcock & Southard 1988; Bridge & Bennett 1992; Wilcock 1992,. 1993; Kuhnle 1993; Patel & Ranga Raju 1999; Dey 1999; Dey et al 1999; Dey & Debnath. 2000). Furthermore, experimental studies with gravel beds were put forward by Bathust et al. (1987) and field studies with gravel and boulder ...

  10. Wound bed preparation from a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Halim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound bed preparation has been performed for over two decades, and the concept is well accepted. The ′TIME′ acronym, consisting of tissue debridement, i nfection or inflammation, moisture balance and edge effect, has assisted clinicians systematically in wound assessment and management. While the focus has usually been concentrated around the wound, the evolving concept of wound bed preparation promotes the treatment of the patient as a whole. This article discusses wound bed preparation and its clinical management components along with the principles of advanced wound care management at the present time. Management of tissue necrosis can be tailored according to the wound and local expertise. It ranges from simple to modern techniques like wet to dry dressing, enzymatic, biological and surgical debridement. Restoration of the bacterial balance is also an important element in managing chronic wounds that are critically colonized. Achieving a balance moist wound will hasten healing and correct biochemical imbalance by removing the excessive enzymes and growth factors. This can be achieved will multitude of dressing materials. The negative pressure wound therapy being one of the great breakthroughs. The progress and understanding on scientific basis of the wound bed preparation over the last two decades are discussed further in this article in the clinical perspectives.

  11. River Bed Sediment Classification Using ADCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Description of physical aquatic habitat in rivers often includes data describing distributions of water depth, velocity and bed material type. Water depth and velocity in streams deeper than about 1 m may be continuously mapped using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat. Herein ...

  12. Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A 30-day 6 deg. head-down bed rest study was conducted to evaluate high-intensity, short-duration, alternating isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regiments designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (acclimation) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (a) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (b) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40%, but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regiments, and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  13. Finite element model of the bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Koňas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of response of bed construction on mentioned mechanical loading with geometry derived from design documentation and selected material combination was realized. In terms of discussed results can be say that chosen geometry (combination of material models is not appropriate. It can be assumed, that stress will exceed strength values in bed side-rail and some failure of cracks can occur. According to the fact that the task does not include free constraints of bed grid and this way probably increases the whole stiffness of construction some solutions present itself for decreasing of carrying-capacity in form of bed side-rail change or adding of supplemental supports to the current construction.As we mentioned above, parametric model is sufficiently complex for realization of optimization analysis of geometry. However, before this analysis extended investigation of verification of mechanical material properties, which are taking into account for installation of construction, definition of complex way of loading and derivation of appropriate failure criterions for wood construction parts should be considered.

  14. Bed roughness experiments in supply limited conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekkers, Matthieu; Tuijnder, Arjan; Ribberink, Jan S.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Parsons, D.R.; Garlan, T.; Best, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable roughness models are of great importance, for example, when predicting water levels in rivers. The currently available roughness models are based on fully mobile bed conditions. However, in rivers where widely graded sediments are present more or less permanent armour layers can develop

  15. Modelling of Devolatilization in Fluidized Bed Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Mette; Lin, Weigang; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the devolatilization process in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. The model is a combination of two submodels: single particle devolatilization and fluid dynamics. The single particle model includes the influence of both chemical kinetics and hea...

  16. Agglomeration in fluidized beds : Detection and counteraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, M.

    2008-01-01

    Fluidized beds comprise a quantity of solid particles that is suspended by an upward flowing gas. They are used for a variety of processes in the chemical industry, such as catalytic reactions, drying, coating and energy conversion. A major problem in industrial practice is the occurrence of

  17. Multi-bed patient room architectural evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Sklavou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leveraging the physical environment’s merits is crucial in healthcare settings towards fostering sustainable healing conditions. In the future, the need to retrofit hospitals already appears more probable than to build new facilities. In Greece, holistic healthcare architecture has significant potential and room to develop. Aim: The architectural research of multi-bed patient room environment. Method: A sample of multi-bed patient rooms of a Greek hospital was studied per architectural documentation and user evaluation survey. Beyond recording the existing situation and user experience, user group differences and the influence of window proximity were studied. The survey sample was based on convenience and comprised 160 patients and 136 visitors. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS 20, using chi-square exact tests of independence. The chosen level of significance was p < 0.05. Results: Architectural documentation showed that the building morphology had a positive impact in patient rooms, with regard to sunlight penetration and view. Further solar daylight control was deemed necessary, to facilitate overall environmental comfort conditions. High spatial density and considerable disadvantages of the middle patient bed, compared to the one bedside the window and the one further in the back of the room, were also ascertained. User groups did not evaluate their surroundings significantly different, with the exception of ease of access to the view. Window proximity influenced both patients and visitors in evaluating ease of access to the view and visual discomfort. Patients were further affected on window size evaluation and visitors on view related aspects. Conclusions: Synergy between building form and function contributes in creating holistic sustainable healing environments. User evaluation can deviate from objective documentation. Patients and visitors experienced the patient room in a similar manner. The middle bed was

  18. Updated Performance Evaluation of the ISS Water Processor Multifiltration Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elizabeth M.; Carter, Layne; Carpenter, Joyce; Orozco, Nicole; Weir, Natalee; Wilson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) produces potable water from a waste stream containing humidity condensate and urine distillate. The primary treatment process is achieved in the Multifiltration Beds, which include adsorbent media and ion exchange resin for the removal of dissolved organic and inorganic contaminants. Two Multifiltration Beds (MF Beds) were replaced on ISS in July 2010 after initial indication of inorganic breakthrough of the first bed and an increasing Total Organic Carbon (TOC) trend in the product water. The first bed was sampled and analyzed Sept 2011 through March 2012. The second MF Bed was sampled and analyzed June 2012 through August 2012. The water resident in the both beds was analyzed for various parameters to evaluate adsorbent loading, performance of the ion exchange resin, microbial activity, and generation of leachates from the ion exchange resin. Portions of the adsorbent media and ion exchange resin were sampled and subsequently desorbed to identify the primary contaminants removed at various points in the bed in addition to microbial analysis. Analysis of the second bed will be compared to results from the first bed to provide a comprehensive overview of how the Multifiltration Beds function on orbit. New data from the second bed supplements the analysis of the first bed (previously reported) and gives a more complete picture of breakthrough compounds, resin breakdown products, microbial activity, and difficult to remove compounds. The results of these investigations and implications to the operation of the WPA on ISS are documented in this paper.

  19. Fluidized Bed Asbestos Sampler Design and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen E. Wright; Barry H. O' Brien

    2007-12-01

    A large number of samples are required to characterize a site contaminated with asbestos from previous mine or other industrial operations. Current methods, such as EPA Region 10’s glovebox method, or the Berman Elutriator method are time consuming and costly primarily because the equipment is difficult to decontaminate between samples. EPA desires a shorter and less costly method for characterizing soil samples for asbestos. The objective of this was to design and test a qualitative asbestos sampler that operates as a fluidized bed. The proposed sampler employs a conical spouted bed to vigorously mix the soil and separate fine particulate including asbestos fibers on filters. The filters are then analyzed using transmission electron microscopy for presence of asbestos. During initial testing of a glass prototype using ASTM 20/30 sand and clay fines as asbestos surrogates, fine particulate adhered to the sides of the glass vessel and the tubing to the collection filter – presumably due to static charge on the fine particulate. This limited the fines recovery to ~5% of the amount added to the sand surrogate. A second prototype was constructed of stainless steel, which improved fines recovery to about 10%. Fines recovery was increased to 15% by either humidifying the inlet air or introducing a voltage probe in the air space above the sample. Since this was not a substantial improvement, testing using the steel prototype proceeded without using these techniques. Final testing of the second prototype using asbestos suggests that the fluidized bed is considerably more sensitive than the Berman elutriator method. Using a sand/tremolite mixture with 0.005% tremolite, the Berman elutriator did not segregate any asbestos structures while the fluidized bed segregated an average of 11.7. The fluidized bed was also able to segregate structures in samples containing asbestos at a 0.0001% concentration, while the Berman elutriator method did not detect any fibers at this

  20. Could You Spot Bed Bugs in A Hotel Room?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... report saying it had bed bugs. "From a hotel industry perspective, it's worrisome that a single online report of bed bugs would cause the majority of travelers to book different accommodations, ... eradicated." Dermatologist Dr. Carrie Kovarik, an associate ...

  1. Pigmented lesions of the nail bed - clinical assessment and biopsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rtshiladze, Michael Alexander; Stretch, Jonathan Raymond; Stewart, David Alexander; Saw, Robyn PM

    2016-01-01

    .... We describe the anatomy of the nail bed to offer a rationale for our technique of nail bed biopsy, and warn of the potential to cause permanent nail dystrophy through other approaches. Discussion...

  2. Prevention and Control of Bed Bugs in Residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and do not impact bed bugs, and a lack of public awareness. In addition to homes and hotels, bed bugs are also found in schools, retail facilities, office buildings, libraries, and other public areas. Back ...

  3. Method of feeding particulate material to a fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borio, Richard W.; Goodstine, Stephen L.

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal spreader type feeder that supplies a mixture of particulate limestone and coal to the top of a fluidized bed reactor having a flow of air upward therethrough. Large particles of particulate matter are distributed over the upper surface of the bed to utilize the natural mixing within the bed, while fine particles are adapted to utilize an independent feeder that separates them from the large particles and injects them into the bed.

  4. Experimental Exploration of Particle-Scale Bed Load Transport and Near-Bed Fluid Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathel, S. L.; Furbish, D. J.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    Bed load sediment particles move as complex motions over the surface of a stream bed, accelerating and decelerating in response to the near-bed turbulence and due to particle-bed interactions. Using high-speed imagery of coarse sand particles on a planer bed surface, we track individual particle motions from start to stop, combined with measurements of near-bed fluid velocities to better characterize the relationship between these properties. These simultaneous measurements provide an initial step towards describing the dynamic relationship between the fluid and particle entrainment on the grain-scale. We start with an Eulerian a priori method wherein we grid the analyzed area and compare the fluid velocity time series to the entrainment time series within each grid space. We progressively increase the size of the grids and monitor the correlation between the two time series. We then use an a posteriori method that focuses on the fluid velocities in the vicinity of entrained particles both at the moment of entrainment and prior to the initiation of motion. We further our analysis of the relationship between particle motions and the near-bed fluid using detailed measurements of particle motions to calibrate estimates of the sediment load using a pixel differencing method. This allows us to examine connections between the fluid and particle activity over many frames rather than over the limited, manually tracked time period. Furthermore, this allows us to empirically define a distribution of particle wait times, or the duration of time between successive entrainment events over a set area, which acts to determine the transport intensity. Preliminary results suggest that there is not a clear correlation between near-bed fluid velocities and particle entrainment. In absence of a correlation we find that (1) we must think more deeply about collective entrainment and how it 'works', and (2) we must consider how the microstructure of the particles on the bed act to set up

  5. Internal Combustion Engines as Fluidized Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavich, Zoe; Taie, Zachary; Menon, Shyam; Beckwith, Walter; Daly, Shane; Halliday, Devin; Hagen, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Using an internal combustion engine as a chemical reactor could provide high throughput, high chemical conversion efficiency, and reactant/product handling benefits. For processes requiring a solid catalyst, the ability to develop a fluidized bed within the engine cylinder would allow efficient processing of large volumes of fluid. This work examines the fluidization behavior of particles in a cylinder of an internal combustion engine at various engine speeds. For 40 micron silica gel particles in a modified Megatech Mark III transparent combustion engine, calculations indicate that a maximum engine speed of about 60.8 RPM would result in fluidization. At higher speeds, the fluidization behavior is expected to deteriorate. Experiments gave qualitative confirmation of the analytical predictions, as a speed of 48 RPM resulted in fluidized behavior, while a speed of 171 RPM did not. The investigation shows that under certain conditions a fluidized bed can be obtained within an engine cylinder. Corresponding Author.

  6. Rock bed storage for cooling. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guyer, E C; Bourne, J G; Paglia, L; Walker, D H

    1978-09-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using night-effect rock bed cooling as a means of building air conditioning has been evaluated for the various climatic regions existing in the United States. The night-effect concept has been found to be a technically viable means of achieving resonable levels of human thermal comfort in wide regions of the country. Use of a night-effect rock bed cooling system may result in excessive humidity in humid northern and northeastern regions while occasional undesirable building temperature extremes may occur in western regions because of practical control difficulties. The night-effect system is not technically feasible in the South Central and Southeast. (MOW)

  7. Modeling an oil shale fluid bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasalos, I.A.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Georgiadou, M.

    1988-02-01

    Oil shale retorting involves heating of solid particles and pyrolysis of the organic matter to produce hydrocarbon liquid shale oil. During the pyrolysis process, part of the organic material remains in the inorganic matrix as coke residue. Combustion of the coke residue can provide the energy necessary for retorting. In this paper the use of a fluid bed combustor to burn the coke residue is examined. The basis for predicting the performance of the fluid bed combustor is the application of the two-phase theory of fluidization. The carbon burning efficiency was calculated as a function of temperature, pressure, and bubble size. For the same conditions, the carbonate decomposition and the associated energy loss were also established. Conditions were found which make feasible complete carbon combustion with minimum carbonate decomposition.

  8. Modeling an oil shale fluid bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasalos, I.A.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Georgiadou, M.

    1985-01-01

    Oil shale retorting involves heating of solid particles and pyrolysis of the organic matter to produce hydrocarbon liquid--shale oil. During the pyrolysis process part of the organic material remains in the inorganic matrix as coke residue. Combustion of the coke residue can provide the energy necessary for retorting. In this paper the use of a fluid bed combustor to burn the coke residue is examined. The basis for predicting the performance of the fluid bed combustor is the application of the two-phase theory of fluidization. The carbon burning efficiency was calculated as a function of temperature, pressure, and bubble size. For the same conditions the carbonate decomposition and the associated energy loss was also established.

  9. Experimental investigation on the changes in bed properties of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomass gasifiers of fixed bed, downdraft type are generally used for driving internal combustion engines. As part of research work, a versatile, throat type, biomass gasifier was developed. The gasifier had facilities for bed temperature measurements, pressure measurements, physical observation, sampling of bed particles, ...

  10. Experimental investigation on the changes in bed properties of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. Biomass gasifiers of fixed bed, downdraft type are generally used for driving internal combustion engines. As part of research work, a versatile, throat type, biomass gasifier was developed. The gasifier had facilities for bed temperature measurements, pressure measurements, physical observation, sampling of bed ...

  11. 21 CFR 880.6060 - Medical disposable bedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6060 Medical disposable bedding. (a) Identification. Medical disposable bedding is a device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical disposable bedding. 880.6060 Section 880...

  12. Estimation of bed protection damage using numerical flow modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoan, N.T.; Booij, R.; Hofland, B.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    The current research is aimed at evaluating the applicability of a numerical flow model to predict bed damage. First, an experimental study was carried out to get more inside into the relation between flow forces acting on a bed and the bed response (damage). The experiments were then used as the

  13. Model for the Evolving Bed Surface around an Offshore Monopile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Peres Akrawi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the bed surface around an offshore monopile. The model has been designed from measured laboratory bed surfaces and is shown to reproduce these satisfactorily for both scouring and backfilling. The local rate of the bed elevation is assumed to satisfy a certain gene...

  14. Numerical modeling of straw combustion in a fixed bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Haosheng; Jensen, Anker; Glarborg, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . The straw combustion processes include moisture evaporation, straw pyrolysis, gas combustion, and char combustion. The model provides detailed information of the structure of the ignition flame front. Simulated gas species concentrations at the bed surface, ignition flame front rate, and bed temperature...... packing condition, and heat capacity of the straw have considerable effects on the model predictions of straw combustion in the fixed bed....

  15. Scale-up of fixed-bed chemical looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Geerdink, P.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2011-01-01

    Fixed-bed chemical looping combustion is currently being studied experimentally with the optimization of systems up to 1 kW. One of the key advantages for using the fixed-bed configuration over fluidized-beds is the flexibility in operating parameters that allows for application of CLC not only to

  16. Modelling of a recycling sludge bed reactor using AQUASIM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    the article, it is herewith pointed out that the term “falling sludge bed reactor” is replaced with “recycling sludge bed reactor”. Modelling of a recycling sludge bed reactor using AQUASIM. NE Ristow1*, K Whittington-Jones2, C Corbett2, P Rose2 and GS Hansford1. 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cape ...

  17. 21 CFR 880.2400 - Bed-patient monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bed-patient monitor. 880.2400 Section 880.2400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.2400 Bed-patient monitor. (a) Identification. A bed-patient monitor is a battery-powered...

  18. Heat Transfer in a Fixed Biomass Char Bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Glarborg, P.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal conductivity model based on the Yagi and Kunii model together with a bed model was developed to describe the thermal conductivity of a straw char bed. The bed model describes the relationship between the distance between particles and the external porosity. To verify the model, thermal ...

  19. MARKETING MIX BY BED OCCUPANCY RATIO (BOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Muhith

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bed Occupancy Ratio (BOR in RSI Arafah Mojosari during the last three years are at under ideal rate and the lowest of the three existing hospitals in the area of Mojosari. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship marketing mix with Bed Occupancy Ratio in RSI Arafah Mojosari. Methods: This research uses analytic methods with crossectional approach. Variables in the study is marketing mix and Bed Occupancy Ratio (BOR. The population in this study were all patients hospitalized in the RSI Arafah Mojosari. Samples amounted 44 respondents taken by the Stratified random sampling technique. Data were collected using the questionnaire and analyzed using Fisher's Exact test. Result: The results obtained more than 50% of respondents (59.1% rate well against the marketing mix is developed by the hospital management and the majority of respondents (79.5% are in the treatment room that has a number BOR is not ideal. Fisher Exact test test results obtained probabililty value=0.02<0.05 so that H0 is rejected, which means there is a relationship marketing mix with the Bed Occupancy Ratio in RSI Arafah Mojosari. Discussion: Hospitals which able to develop the marketing mix very well, can attract consumers to use inpatient services at the hospital, with that BOR value will increase as the increased use of inpatient services. Hospital management must be able to formulate a good marketing mix strategy that hospital marketing objectives can be achieved. Conformity between service quality and service rates must be addressed, otherwise it extent of media promotions can attract patients to inpatient services.

  20. NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

  1. Circulating fluidized bed boilers design and operations

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Prabir

    1991-01-01

    This book provides practicing engineers and students with insight into the design and operation of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. Through a combination of theoretical concepts and practical experience, this book gives the reader a basic understanding of the many aspects of this subject.Important environmental considerations, including solid waste disposal and predicted emissions, are addressed individually in separate chapters. This book places an emphasis on combustion, hydrodynamics, heat transfer, and material issues, and illustrates these concepts with numerous examples of pres

  2. Predicting channel bed topography in hydraulic falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alexander; Yu, Zheng; Kelso, Richard M.; Binder, Benjamin J.

    2015-11-01

    We consider inverse methods for predicting the channel bed topography in experiments of hydraulic falls. Nonlinear solutions and weakly nonlinear approximations from Euler-based models are compared to experimental observations. Accurate predictions are obtained for the maximum height of the topography and its constant horizontal level far downstream using the nonlinear method. The weakly nonlinear approximation is shown only to be a good predictor of the maximum height of the topography. The error in the inverse predictions is examined and discussed.

  3. Direct contact condensation in packed beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yi; Klausner, James F.; Mei, Renwei; Knight, Jessica [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    A diffusion driven desalination process was recently described where a very effective direct contact condenser with a packed bed is used to condense water vapor out of an air/vapor mixture. A laboratory scale direct contact condenser has been fabricated as a twin tower structure with two stages, co-current and countercurrent. Experiments have been operated in each stage with respective saturated air inlet temperatures of 36, 40 and 43{sup o}C. The temperature and humidity data have been collected at the inlet and exit of the packed bed for different water to air mass flow ratios that vary between 0 and 2.5. A one-dimensional model based on conservation principles has been developed, which predicts the variation of temperature, humidity, and condensation rate through the condenser stages. Agreement between the model and experiments is very good. It is observed that the countercurrent flow stage condensation effectiveness is significantly higher than that for the co-current stage. The condensation heat and mass transfer rates were found to decrease when water blockages occur within the packed bed. Using high-speed digital cinematography, it was observed that this problem can occur at any operating condition, and is dependent on the packing surface wetting characteristics. This observation is used to explain the requirement for two different empirical constants, depending on packing diameter, suggested by Onda for the air side mass transfer coefficient correlation. (author)

  4. Modeling of Powder Bed Manufacturing Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindt, H.-W.; Desmaison, O.; Megahed, M.; Peralta, A.; Neumann, J.

    2017-09-01

    Powder bed additive manufacturing offers unmatched capabilities. The deposition resolution achieved is extremely high enabling the production of innovative functional products and materials. Achieving the desired final quality is, however, hampered by many potential defects that have to be managed in due course of the manufacturing process. Defects observed in products manufactured via powder bed fusion have been studied experimentally. In this effort we have relied on experiments reported in the literature and—when experimental data were not sufficient—we have performed additional experiments providing an extended foundation for defect analysis. There is large interest in reducing the effort and cost of additive manufacturing process qualification and certification using integrated computational material engineering. A prerequisite is, however, that numerical methods can indeed capture defects. A multiscale multiphysics platform is developed and applied to predict and explain the origin of several defects that have been observed experimentally during laser-based powder bed fusion processes. The models utilized are briefly introduced. The ability of the models to capture the observed defects is verified. The root cause of the defects is explained by analyzing the numerical results thus confirming the ability of numerical methods to provide a foundation for rapid process qualification.

  5. Piloted Ignition Regimes of Wildland Fuel Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. C.; Simeoni, A.; Colella, F.; Torero, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Pine needle litters, a key fuel in North American and Mediterranean forest systems, are highly porous fuel beds. They provide a source of continuous fuel medium that can be easily ignited and will sustain flame spread in forest fires. This study is a continuation of previous piloted ignition experimentation [1]. Here, focus was drawn to the influence of airflow in a porous fuel bed for three species: Pinus halepensis, Pinus strobus, and Pinus resinosa. Each needle species is characterized by surface-to-volume ratio and density. The tests samples are characterized by the bulk density, porosity and absorptivity. The needles are subjected to an external radiant heat flux using the FM Global Fire Propagation Apparatus. Ignition delay times and surface temperatures were recorded under a range of different test conditions (basket open area, flow conditions and different level of the radiant heat flux). A comparison of the results indicates that the flow condition must be considered for the modeling of such fuel beds. For conditions where the air flow through the sample is blocked a solid like behavior can be observed. The results show that this cannot be granted for open sample baskets. The goal of this study is to understand the effects, cooling and mixing, of airflow through the porous medium on the time to ignition of the sample and aid in the development of new models for characterizing the ignition behavior.

  6. Physical Measurements of Sea Bed Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, V. B.; Pawlak, G.

    2004-12-01

    Physical measurements of sea bed roughness were obtained using a boat-mounted acoustic altimetry system combined with diver-based observations with the goal of resolving scales between 10 and 100cm. The surveyed area extends from the wave breaking zone to a depth of 20 m and is characterized by a highly inhomogeneous sea bed. Theory suggests that these roughness scales play an important role in wave energy dissipation, despite the lack of established parameterizations for these high roughness regimes. This study attempts to address this issue by investigating methods for quantifying roughness and examining the relationships between physical and hydrodynamic roughness. Results show a significant variation of roughness over the study area indicating limitations in defining a single scale for the shallow water region. Various statistical estimators are examined as potential candidates for roughness parameterization schemes, including rms, standard deviation and consecutive angle difference in order to characterize bed morphologies. Wave number spectral analysis is used to highlight the dominant roughness scales. The analysis is directed towards merging the various roughness parameters with wave field observations and numerical wave model output, to produce a roughness map that establishes a link between the physical roughness measurements and hydrodynamic wave friction at the study area.

  7. Reference repository design concept for bedded salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Martin, R.W.

    1980-10-08

    A reference design concept is presented for the subsurface portions of a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. General geologic, geotechnical, hydrologic and geochemical data as well as descriptions of the physical systems are provided for use on generic analyses of the pre- and post-sealing performance of repositories in this geologic medium. The geology of bedded salt deposits and the regional and repository horizon stratigraphy are discussed. Structural features of salt beds including discontinuities and dissolution features are presented and their effect on repository performance is discussed. Seismic hazards and the potential effects of earthquakes on underground repositories are presented. The effect on structural stability and worker safety during construction from hydrocarbon and inorganic gases is described. Geohydrologic considerations including regional hydrology, repository scale hydrology and several hydrological failure modes are presented in detail as well as the hydrological considerations that effect repository design. Operational phase performance is discussed with respect to operations, ventilation system, shaft conveyances, waste handling and retrieval systems and receival rates of nuclear waste. Performance analysis of the post sealing period of a nuclear repository is discussed, and parameters to be used in such an analysis are presented along with regulatory constraints. Some judgements are made regarding hydrologic failure scenarios. Finally, the design and licensing process, consistent with the current licensing procedure is described in a format that can be easily understood.

  8. The Achilles Heel of Red Bed Paleomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, E.; Walker, T.; Patterson, P.

    2004-12-01

    To obtain a paleomagnetic pole position from a group of red bed samples requires the extraction of the single-component `characteristic' remanence (a direction generally considered to be acquired at or within a few hundred years after deposition). The accepted method of extraction of this remanence, which has been in vogue for the last 40 years, involves total thermal demagnetization of the samples in a series of steps. Usually, at some temperature during this procedure, a sample's remanence (as displayed on a vector diagram), will begin to follow a straight-line path to zero intensity. This path direction is identified as that of the `characteristic' remanence of that sample; the temperature of initiation of straight-line decay is designated as the point at which all secondary components have been preferentially removed. The mean 'characteristic' remanence is then obtained from all of the sample `characteristic' directions. The underlying, significant assumption in this technique is that any secondary components reside in grains with lower maximum blocking temperatures than those carrying the `characteristic' remanence. Straight-line decay of remanence to zero, however, can also arise in another, highly plausible, way that has been completely excluded from consideration by red-bed adherents. As a result of long-term remanence acquisition, a sample may contain multiple remanence components that reside in grains of overlapping blocking temperatures. In this case, stepwise thermal demagnetization will produce proportional decay of all components, such that remanence decay will also follow a straight-line path to zero; a `characteristic' remanence component, therefore, cannot be distinguished from the others. During standard red-bed analysis, once straight-line remanence decay begins, the researcher, in reality, loses all ability to distinguish single- from multiple-component behavior. Yet, because of the restriction of the method, he/she will interpret any straight

  9. Fluidized-bed reactors processes and operating conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, John G

    2016-01-01

    The fluidized-bed reactor is the centerpiece of industrial fluidization processes. This book focuses on the design and operation of fluidized beds in many different industrial processes, emphasizing the rationale for choosing fluidized beds for each particular process. The book starts with a brief history of fluidization from its inception in the 1940’s. The authors present both the fluid dynamics of gas-solid fluidized beds and the extensive experimental studies of operating systems and they set them in the context of operating processes that use fluid-bed reactors. Chemical engineering students and postdocs as well as practicing engineers will find great interest in this book.

  10. Bed-To-Wall Heat Transfer in a Supercritical Circulating Fluidised Bed Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to find a correlation for heat transfer to walls in a 1296 t/h supercritical circulating fluidised bed (CFB boiler. The effect of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient in a long active heat transfer surface was discussed, excluding the radiation component. Experiments for four different unit loads (i.e. 100% MCR, 80% MCR, 60% MCR and 40% MCR were conducted at a constant excess air ratio and high level of bed pressure (ca. 6 kPa in each test run. The empirical correlation of the heat transfer coefficient in a large-scale CFB boiler was mainly determined by two key operating parameters, suspension density and bed temperature. Furthermore, data processing was used in order to develop empirical correlation ranges between 3.05 to 5.35 m·s-1 for gas superficial velocity, 0.25 to 0.51 for the ratio of the secondary to the primary air, 1028 to 1137K for bed temperature inside the furnace chamber of a commercial CFB boiler, and 1.20 to 553 kg·m-3 for suspension density. The suspension density was specified on the base of pressure measurements inside the boiler’s combustion chamber using pressure sensors. Pressure measurements were collected at the measuring ports situated on the front wall of the combustion chamber. The obtained correlation of the heat transfer coefficient is in agreement with the data obtained from typical industrial CFB boilers.

  11. Agglomeration of bed material: Influence on efficiency of biofuel fluidized bed boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryabov Georgy A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful design and operation of a fluidized bed combustor requires the ability to control and mitigate ash-related problems. The main ash-related problem of biomass filing boiler is agglomeration. The fluidized bed boiler with steam capacity of 66 t/h (4 MPa, 440 °C was started up at the Arkhangelsk Paper-Pi dp-Plant in 2001. This boiler was manufactured by the Russian companies "Energosofin" and "Belenergomash" and installed instead of the existing boiler with mechanical grate. Some constructional elements and steam drum of existing boiler remained unchanged. The primary air fan was installed past the common air fan, which supply part of the air into 24 secondary airports. First operating period shows that the bed material is expanded and then operator should increase the primary air rate, and the boiler efficiency dramatically decreases. Tills paper presents some results of our investigations of fuel, bed and fly ash chemical compositions and other characteristics. Special experiments were carried out to optimize the bed drain flow rate. The influence of secondly air supply improvement on mixing with the main flow and boiler efficiency are given.

  12. Virtual Design of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesy, Timothy J.; Coker, Robert F.; O'Connor, Brian F.; Knox, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations of six new 4-Bed Molecular Sieve configurations have been performed using a COMSOL (COMSOL Multiphysics - commercial software) model. The preliminary results show that reductions in desiccant bed size and sorbent bed size when compared to the International Space Station configuration are feasible while still yielding a process that handles at least 4.0 kilograms a day CO2. The results also show that changes to the CO2 sorbent are likewise feasible. Decreasing the bed sizes was found to have very little negative effect on the adsorption process; breakthrough of CO2 in the sorbent bed was observed for two of the configurations, but a small degree of CO2 breakthrough is acceptable, and water breakthrough in the desiccant beds was not observed. Both configurations for which CO2 breakthrough was observed still yield relatively high CO2 efficiency, and future investigations will focus on bed size in order to find the optimum configuration.

  13. Liquid-liquid separation using steady-state bed coalescer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šećerov-Sokolović Radmila M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a literature review on the current understanding of liquid-liquid separation that is immensely widespread in practice, highlighting the steady-state bed coalescer being a good solution in various engineering application. Generally, the fibre bed coalescence has proven to be very effective separation method in the industry. Due to the complexity of bed coalescence phenomenon coalescer design and sizing procedure relies on experimental test. This review provides a research overview of the key phenomena essential for the efficient bed coalescence, such as mechanisms of droplet coalescence and emulsion flow through the fibre bed. In addition to this provides an overview of the current knowledge about coalescer´s design properties and variables such as: fluid velocity, fluid flow orientation/flow mode, fibre bed geometry, and bed length. [[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172022

  14. INVESTIGATION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY AND BED PERFORMANCE IN A FLUIDIZED BED BLACK LIQUOR STEAM REFORMER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Whitty

    2003-12-01

    The University of Utah project ''Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer'' (DOE award number DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation for projects to provide technical support for black liquor and biomass gasification. The primary focus of the project is to provide support for a DOE-sponsored demonstration of MTCI's black liquor steam reforming technology at Georgia-Pacific's paper mill in Big Island, Virginia. A more overarching goal is to improve the understanding of phenomena that take place during low temperature black liquor gasification. This is achieved through five complementary technical tasks: (1) construction of a fluidized bed black liquor gasification test system, (2) investigation of bed performance, (3) evaluation of product gas quality, (4) black liquor conversion analysis and modeling and (5) computational modeling of the Big Island gasifier. Four experimental devices have been constructed under this project. The largest facility, which is the heart of the experimental effort, is a pressurized fluidized bed gasification test system. The system is designed to be able to reproduce conditions near the black liquor injectors in the Big Island steam reformer, so the behavior of black liquor pyrolysis and char gasification can be quantified in a representative environment. The gasification test system comprises five subsystems: steam generation and superheating, black liquor feed, fluidized bed reactor, afterburner for syngas combustion and a flue gas cooler/condenser. The three-story system is located at University of Utah's Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility, and all resources there are available to support the research.

  15. The optimal design of the bed structure of bedstand based on ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xudong; Dong, Yu; Ge, Qingkuan; Wang, Song

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic transmission bedstand is one kind of the most commonly used in engineering machinery companies, and the bed structure is the most important part. Based on the original hydraulic transmission bedstand bed structure and the CAE technology, the original bed structure is improved. The optimized bed greatly saves the material of the production bed and improves the seismic performance of the bed. In the end, the performance of the optimized bed was compared with the original bed.

  16. Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Whitty

    2007-06-30

    University of Utah's project entitled 'Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer' (DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation released by the U.S. Department of Energy in December 2001, requesting proposals for projects targeted towards black liquor/biomass gasification technology support research and development. Specifically, the solicitation was seeking projects that would provide technical support for Department of Energy supported black liquor and biomass gasification demonstration projects under development at the time.

  17. A new bed elevation dataset for Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Bamber

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new bed elevation dataset for Greenland derived from a combination of multiple airborne ice thickness surveys undertaken between the 1970s and 2012. Around 420 000 line kilometres of airborne data were used, with roughly 70% of this having been collected since the year 2000, when the last comprehensive compilation was undertaken. The airborne data were combined with satellite-derived elevations for non-glaciated terrain to produce a consistent bed digital elevation model (DEM over the entire island including across the glaciated–ice free boundary. The DEM was extended to the continental margin with the aid of bathymetric data, primarily from a compilation for the Arctic. Ice thickness was determined where an ice shelf exists from a combination of surface elevation and radar soundings. The across-track spacing between flight lines warranted interpolation at 1 km postings for significant sectors of the ice sheet. Grids of ice surface elevation, error estimates for the DEM, ice thickness and data sampling density were also produced alongside a mask of land/ocean/grounded ice/floating ice. Errors in bed elevation range from a minimum of ±10 m to about ±300 m, as a function of distance from an observation and local topographic variability. A comparison with the compilation published in 2001 highlights the improvement in resolution afforded by the new datasets, particularly along the ice sheet margin, where ice velocity is highest and changes in ice dynamics most marked. We estimate that the volume of ice included in our land-ice mask would raise mean sea level by 7.36 m, excluding any solid earth effects that would take place during ice sheet decay.

  18. Housing and bed and board contract

    OpenAIRE

    Veselinović Janko

    2011-01-01

    In this work not only legal nature of catering services is analyzed, but also legal position of parties in it. Catering contract (Housing and Bed and Board Contract) is unnamed in our country and the main source of law for this contract are business practices and usage. A lot of attention is paid to this question. Lack of legal norms for this area is general characteristic for most of the tourism contracts. In this contract its title is also debatable because term 'catering services' is not u...

  19. CFD study of a fluidized bed

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate the momentum exchange between the phases in a bubbling fluidized bed. The momentum exchange can be described by a drag model. Several drag models with different assumptions are developed. The drag models investigated in this work is the Syamlal O’Brien model, the Gidaspow model, Hill Koch Ladd model, the RUC model and an iterative version of the Syamlal O’Brien called the Richardson Zaki model. The models have been derived and studied in detail. S...

  20. Fluidized-Bed Cleaning of Silicon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Naresh K.; Hsu, George C.

    1987-01-01

    Fluidized-bed chemical cleaning process developed to remove metallic impurities from small silicon particles. Particles (250 micrometer in size) utilized as seed material in silane pyrolysis process for production of 1-mm-size silicon. Product silicon (1 mm in size) used as raw material for fabrication of solar cells and other semiconductor devices. Principal cleaning step is wash in mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids, leaching out metals and carrying them away as soluble chlorides. Particles fluidized by cleaning solution to assure good mixing and uniform wetting.

  1. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  2. Endogenous pancreatic polypeptide in different vascular beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Schwartz, Tania; Bülow, J B

    1986-01-01

    The plasma concentration of pancreatic polypeptide (PP-like immunoreactivity) was measured in different vascular beds in order to determine regional kinetics of endogenous PP in fasting, supine subjects with normal or moderately decreased kidney function. Patients with kidney disease (n = 10) had...... concentration (r = 0.70, P less than 0.01). Hepatic venous PP was significantly higher than systemic PP in both controls and patients with kidney disease (P less than 0.001, n = 15). The values were positively correlated (r = 0.98, P less than 0.001; slope = 1.37 +/- 0.05, P less than 0.001), indicating...

  3. Pyrolysis reactor and fluidized bed combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Norman W.

    1981-01-06

    A solid carbonaceous material is pyrolyzed in a descending flow pyrolysis reactor in the presence of a particulate source of heat to yield a particulate carbon containing solid residue. The particulate source of heat is obtained by educting with a gaseous source of oxygen the particulate carbon containing solid residue from a fluidized bed into a first combustion zone coupled to a second combustion zone. A source of oxygen is introduced into the second combustion zone to oxidize carbon monoxide formed in the first combustion zone to heat the solid residue to the temperature of the particulate source of heat.

  4. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-31

    During the fourth quarter of 1990, steady-state performance testing at the Nucla Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) resumed under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. Co-sponsorship of the Demonstration Test Program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was completed on June 15, 1990. From October through December, 1990, Colorado-Ute Electric Association (CUEA) completed a total of 23 steady-state performance tests, 4 dynamic tests, and set operating records during November and December as the result of improved unit operating reliability. Highlight events and achievements during this period of operation are presented.

  5. Spatiotemporal dynamics of a shallow fluidized bed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.; Clark, D. K.

    2000-12-05

    An experimental and theoretical study of the dynamics of an air-fluidized thin granular layer is presented. Near the threshold of instability, the system exhibits critical behavior with remarkably long transient dynamics. Above the threshold of fluidization the system undergoes a Hopf bifurcation as the layer starts to oscillate at a certain frequency due to a feedback between the layer dilation and the airflow rate. Based on our experimental data, we formulate a the simple dynamical model which describes the transition in a shallow fluidized bed.

  6. Hydrocarbonization of coal in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, E.L.; Cochran, H.D. Jr.; Westmoreland, P.R.; Brown, C.H. Jr.; Oswald, G.E.; Miller, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrocarbonization is a relatively simple method of producing oil, substitute natural gas, and devolatilized char from coal. Oil and gas yields have been determined for hydrocarbonization of coal in a 0.10-m-diam fluidized-bed reactor operated at 2170 kPa and at temperatures ranging from 694 to 850 K. Subbituminous coal and bituminous coal that was pretreated with CaO, NaOH, and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ to eliminate agglomeration was used. Oil yields up to 21% (based on moisture- and ash-free coal) were achieved. Data on the composition of the oil, gas, and char products are presented.

  7. Effect of various drying bed on thermodynamic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Motevali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study thermodynamic parameter and energy consumption in drying of two plant dill and mint in three bed drying including fix, semi fix and fluid with using a hot air drying was investigated. Experimental was conducted in three bed drying including fix, semi fix and fluid and four levels temperature (30, 40, 50 and 60 °C. Maximum energy consumption in dill drying at 40 °C and fluid bed to be 16.41 MJ and minimum energy consumption at 30 °C and fix bed to be 2.77 MJ. Also minimum energy consumption in mint drying at 60 °C and fix bed to be 3.64 MJ and maximum energy consumption at 40 °C and fluid bed to be 28.65 MJ. The highest energy, drying and thermal efficiency for both mint and dill was achieved at 60 °C on the fixed bed, whereas the lowest efficiency was at 40 °C and on the fluidized bed. Also the highest power and specific heat consumption for both mint and dill was achieved at 40 °C on the fluid bed, whereas the lowest efficiency was at 30 °C and on the fluidized bed.

  8. Tritium measurement technique using ``in-bed`` calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.E.; Mallory, M.K.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    One of the new technologies that has been introduced to the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the production scale use of metal hydride technology to store, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. For tritium stored in metal hydride storage beds, a unique relationship does not exist between the amount of tritium in the bed and the pressure-volume-temperature properties of the hydride material. Determining the amount of tritium in a hydride bed after desorbing the contents of the bed to a tank and performing pressure, volume, temperature, and composition (PVTC) measurements is not practical due to long desorption/absorption times and the inability to remove tritium ``heels`` from the metal hydride materials under normal processing conditions. To eliminate the need to remove tritium from hydride storage beds for measurement purposes, and ``in-bed`` tritium calorimetric measurement technique has been developed. The steady-state temperature rise of a gas stream flowing through a jacketed metal hydride storage bed is measured and correlated with power input to electric heaters used to simulate the radiolytic power generated by the decay of tritium to {sup 3}He. Temperature rise results for prototype metal hydride storage beds and the effects of using different gases in the bed are shown. Linear regression results shows that for 95% confidence intervals, temperature rise measurements can be obtained in 14 hours and have an accuracy of {plus_minus}1.6% of a tritium filled hydride storage bed.

  9. A note on acoustic measurements of turbulence, suspended sediment, and bed forms in mobile bed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the challenges of hydraulic experimentation is designing experiments that are complex enough to capture relevant processes while retaining the simplicity necessary for useful, accurate measurements. The intricacy of the interactions between turbulent flows and mobile beds in rivers and stream...

  10. Effects of bed-load movement on flow resistance over bed forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the case of steady, uniform flow in rigid boundary channels as well as in alluvial streams, there is a definite ... In the present research work, experimental data have been employed to investigate the effect of bed-load .... different conditions, the modification being varied for different experiment series. Figure 9 presents the ...

  11. Sediment transport primer: estimating bed-material transport in gravel-bed rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Wilcock; John Pitlick; Yantao Cui

    2009-01-01

    This primer accompanies the release of BAGS, software developed to calculate sediment transport rate in gravel-bed rivers. BAGS and other programs facilitate calculation and can reduce some errors, but cannot ensure that calculations are accurate or relevant. This primer was written to help the software user define relevant and tractable problems, select appropriate...

  12. Method of substantially continuously separating two compounds using a moving bed or a simulated moving bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, T.B.; Billiet, H.A.H.; Van der Wielen, L.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of separating a first solute A and a second solute B using (simulated) moving bed chromatography. According to the present invention at least one of a) a feedstream; and b) a desorbent stream comprises an organic solvent. The use of different solvent liquids

  13. MARKETING STRATEGY TO INCREASE BED OCCUPANCY RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwaningsih Purwaningsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A hospital is an institution for health care providing treatment by specialized staff and equipment, more often but not always providing for longer-term patient stays. Today, hospitals are very complex institution, not only survive in dynamic environment but also make a profit based on their services. The aimed of this research was to know marketing mix concept (product, price, place, promotion, people, process and provision of customer service in formulating marketing strategy to increased Bed Occupancy Rate of Obstetric Gynecology Ward 2. Method: The population are health care personnel including midwife, midwife associate, administrator and also client or consumer. The variable were product, price, place, promotion, people, process and provision of customer service. Data were collected by using structured questionnaire. Result: The result showed that product (type of services, infrastructure and facility, relative price, comfortable and safe place, targeted promotion, trained human resources, standard process and provision of customer service are an important aspect to implement strategy marketing to increase Bed Occupancy Rate. Analysis: The result of this study has enlightened the importance of strategy marketing in health care services based on seven principle of marketing mix. Discussion: Implementation of marketing mix in obstetric gynecology ward 2 need to be considered.

  14. Fluidized bed combustion: mixing and pollutant limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckner, B. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1997-10-01

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has been applied commercially during a few decades, and sufficient knowledge is gained to design boilers with sizes of up to several hundreds of megawatt thermal power (MW{sub th}). The knowledge of what goes on inside a large combustion chamber is still limited, however, and this impedes further optimization and efficient solution of problems that might occur. Despite this lack of knowledge the present survey deals with combustion chamber processes and discusses mixing and distribution of fuel and air in the combustion chamber and its importance for sulphur capture and reduction of emissions of nitrogen oxides. It is desirable to present the material in a general way and to cover the entire field of FBC. However, the scarce openly published information deals mostly with coal combustion in atmospheric circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors, and therefore this application will receive most attention, but reference is also made to pressurized combustion and to other fuels than coal. In this context the important work made in the LIEKKI project on the analysis of different fuels and on the influence of pressure should be especially pointed out. (orig.)

  15. Unsaturated railway track-bed materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Yu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Railway track-bed materials are mostly in unsaturated state, and their hydro-mechanical properties depend strongly on their water contents or suctions. In France, problematic soils such as collapsible loess and swelling marl can be origin of instability problems for new lines for high speed trains, while the hydro-mechanical behaviour of interlayer soil formed mainly by interpenetration of ballast and subgrade soil is of concern for conventional lines. In the latter case, the main challenge relies in the large variability of the interlayer soils owing to the variability of natural subgrade soils involved in the railway network. In this paper, a study on interlayer soils is presented, that covers a large spectrum of aspects: geotechnical/geophysical site characterisation, laboratory investigation into the hydraulic behaviour and mechanical behaviour as well as the mud pumping/interlayer creation phenomena, and field monitoring. The combined effect of water content and fines content were emphasized in the laboratory investigation, whilst interaction between atmosphere and track was focused on in the field monitoring. The results show clearly that it is of paramount importance to consider the unsaturated aspect of track-bed materials when analysing the overall behaviour of tracks, in particular when clay is involved in fine fraction.

  16. Tracking channel bed resiliency in forested mountain catchments using high temporal resolution channel bed movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sarah E.; Conklin, Martha H.

    2018-01-01

    This study uses continuous-recording load cell pressure sensors in four, high-elevation (1500-1800 m), Sierra Nevada headwater streams to collect high-temporal-resolution, bedload-movement data for investigating the channel bed movement patterns within these streams for water years 2012-2014. Data show an annual pattern where channel bed material in the thalweg starts to build up in early fall, peaks around peak snow melt, and scours back to baseline levels during hydrograph drawdown and base flow. This pattern is punctuated by disturbance and recovery of channel bed material associated with short-term storm events. A conceptual model, linking sediment sources at the channel margins to patterns of channel bed fill and scour in the thalweg, is proposed building on the results of Martin et al. (2014). The material in the thalweg represents a balance between sediment supply from the channel margins and sporadic, conveyor-belt-like downstream transport in the thalweg. The conceptual model highlights not only the importance of production and transport rates but also that seasonal connectedness between the margins and thalweg is a key sediment control, determining the accumulation rate of sediment stores at the margins and the redistribution of sediment from margins to thalweg that feeds the conveyor belt. Disturbance and recovery cycles are observed at multiple temporal scales; but long term, the channel beds are stable, suggesting that the beds act as short-term storage for sediment but are in equilibrium interannually. The feasibility of use for these sensors in forested mountain stream environments is tested. Despite a high failure rate (50%), load cell pressure sensors show potential for high-temporal-resolution bedload measurements, allowing for the collection of channel bed movement data to move beyond time-integrated change measurements - where many of the subtleties of bedload movement patterns may be missed - to continuous and/or real-time measurements. This

  17. Seaweed beds support more juvenile reef fish than seagrass beds in a south-western Atlantic tropical seascape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggertsen, L.; Ferreira, C. E. L.; Fontoura, L.; Kautsky, N.; Gullström, M.; Berkström, C.

    2017-09-01

    Seascape connectivity is regarded essential for healthy reef fish communities in tropical shallow systems. A number of reef fish species use separate adult and nursery habitats, and hence contribute to nutrient and energy transfer between habitats. Seagrass beds and mangroves often constitute important nursery habitats, with high structural complexity and protection from predation. Here, we investigated if reef fish assemblages in the tropical south-western Atlantic demonstrate ontogenetic habitat connectivity and identify possible nurseries on three reef systems along the eastern Brazilian coast. Fish were surveyed in fore reef, back reef, Halodule wrightii seagrass beds and seaweed beds. Seagrass beds contained lower abundances and species richness of fish than expected, while Sargassum-dominated seaweed beds contained significantly more juveniles than all other habitats (average juvenile fish densities: 32.6 per 40 m2 in Sargassum beds, 11.2 per 40 m2 in back reef, 10.1 per 40 m2 in fore reef, and 5.04 per 40 m2 in seagrass beds), including several species that are found in the reef habitats as adults. Species that in other regions worldwide (e.g. the Caribbean) utilise seagrass beds as nursery habitats were here instead observed in Sargassum beds or back reef habitats. Coral cover was not correlated to adult fish distribution patterns; instead, type of turf was an important variable. Connectivity, and thus pathways of nutrient transfer, seems to function differently in east Brazil compared to many tropical regions. Sargassum-dominated beds might be more important as nurseries for a larger number of fish species than seagrass beds. Due to the low abundance of structurally complex seagrass beds we suggest that seaweed beds might influence adult reef fish abundances, being essential for several keystone species of reef fish in the tropical south-western Atlantic.

  18. Exercise thermoregulation after 14 days of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Reese, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of bed rest and exercise training during bed rest on body temperature and thermoregulatory responses at rest and during exercise are investigated. Seven male subjects underwent three two-week periods of bed rest during which isometric, isotonic, or no exercises were performed, separated by two ambulatory control periods and preceded by a two-week control period, during which they exercised regularly. Rectal and mean skin temperatures and sweating responses were determined during 70-min submaximal supine exercise during the bed rest and recovery periods. Measurements reveal a reduction in basal oral temperature during the control-recovery periods, with a relatively constant level during bed rest periods, and a significant increase in the rectal temperature elavation brought on by exercise following all three bed-rest regimes. It is concluded that the excessive increase in rectal temperature could be influenced by changes in skin heat conductance or the inhibition of sweating.

  19. Shutdown dose rate analysis of European test blanket modules shields in ITER Equatorial Port #16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez, Rafael, E-mail: rjuarez@ind.uned.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Sauvan, Patrick; Perez, Lucia [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Panayotov, Dobromir; Vallory, Joelle; Zmitko, Milan; Poitevin, Yves [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear analysis for European TBMs and shields, in ITER Equatorial Port #16, has been conducted in support of the ‘Concept Design Review’ from ITER. • The objective of the work is the characterization of the Shutdown Dose Rates at Equatorial Port #16 interspace. • The role played by the TBM and TBM shields, the equatorial port gaps and the vacuum vessel permeation, in terms of neutron flux transmission is assessed. • The role played by the TBM, TBM shields, Port Plug Frame, Pipe Forest and the machine in terms of activation is also investigated. - Abstract: ‘Fusion for Energy’ (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). An essential element of the Conceptual Design Review (CDR) of these TBSs is the demonstration of capability of Test Blanket Modules (TBM) and their shields to fulfil their function and comply with the design requirements. One of the TBM shields highly relevant design aspects is the project target for shutdown dose rates (SDDR) in the interspace. We investigated two functions of the TBMs and TBM shields—the neutron flux attenuation along the shields, and the reduction of the activation of the components contributing to SDDR. It is shown that TBMs and TBM shields reduce significantly the neutron flux in the port plug (PP). In terms of neutron flux attenuation, the TBM shield provides sufficient neutron flux reduction, being responsible for 5 × 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2} s at port interspace, while the EPP gaps and BSM gaps are responsible for 5 × 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} s each. When considering closed upper, lower and lateral neighbour equatorial ports (thus, excluding the cross-talk between ports), a SDDR of 121 μSv/h averaged near the port closure flange was obtained, out of which, only 4 μSv/h are due to the activation of TBMs and TBM shields. Maximum SDDR in the range

  20. Methodology for accident analyses of fusion breeder blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobromir Panayotov; Andrew Grief; Brad J. Merrill; Julian T. Murgatroyd; Paul Humrickhouse; Yves Poitevin; Simon Owen; Markus Iseli

    2015-06-01

    'Fusion for Energy' (F4E) develops designs and implements the European Test Blanket Systems (TBS) in ITER - Helium-Cooled Lithium-Lead (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of TBS in ITER and accident analyses are one of its critical segments. A systematic approach to the accident analyses had been acquired under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements and AMEC and INL efforts resulted in the development of a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analyses. It addresses the specificity of the breeding blankets design, materials and phenomena and at the same time is consistent with the one already applied to ITER accident analyses. Methodology consists of several phases. At first the reference scenarios are selected on the base of FMEA studies. In the second place elaboration of the accident analyses specifications we use phenomena identification and ranking tables to identify the requirements to be met by the code(s) and TBS models. Thus the limitations of the codes are identified and possible solutions to be built into the models are proposed. These include among others the loose coupling of different codes or code versions in order to simulate multi-fluid flows and phenomena. The code selection and issue of the accident analyses specifications conclude this second step. Furthermore the breeding blanket and ancillary systems models are built on. In this work challenges met and solutions used in the development of both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes models of HCLL and HCPB TBSs will be shared. To continue the developed models are qualified by comparison with finite elements analyses, by code to code comparison and sensitivity studies. Finally, the qualified models are used for the execution of the accident analyses of specific scenario. When possible the methodology phases will be illustrated in the paper by limited number of tables and

  1. Oxygen/hydrogen technology test bed status update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    An overview is provided of the Hydrogen/Oxygen Technology Test Bed program. The status of the program, the program direction, plans for testing, and plans for technology implementation within the program are delineated. Test Bed goals and objectives are defined and the current status of the Test Bed engine is provided. A test facility status and a summary of the test facility capabilities are given.

  2. Paste drying control in a rotating-distributor fluidized bed

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Hernández, Jesús.

    2016-01-01

    Fluidized beds are used for a wide variety of processes due to its high rates of heat and mass transfer. Due to that, fluidized beds are used for a variety of applications ranging from the gasification or combustion of biomass, to coating and drying processes. All these industrial applications show the main influence of the zone close to the distributor on the bed dynamics. In this way, a non-homogeneous mixing in this zone between dense and gas phases leads to fluidization ...

  3. 76 FR 27882 - Safety Standard for Toddler Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1217 RIN 3041-AC79 Safety Standard for Toddler Beds Correction In rule document 2011...)(6)(iii), 1217.2(c)(6)(iv), and 1217.2(c)(7), which should read: (iii) 8.4.4 Toddler beds that... complete requirements for full-size cribs. (iv) 8.4.5 Any toddler bed that can convert from a full-size...

  4. What Do Pediatricians Tell Parents About Bed-Sharing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2017-08-01

    Background and objectives Despite the risks of bed-sharing, little is known about what pediatricians tell parents about bed-sharing with infants and whether pediatricians provide specific recommendations outlined by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). This study aimed to understand pediatricians' opinions about bed-sharing and the advice pediatricians provide to parents about bed sharing. Methods The study employed a qualitative study design and the conceptual framework of the Theory of Planned Behavior. 24 primary care pediatricians from a variety of practice settings were interviewed about the anticipatory guidance they provide to families whose infants are in the at-risk age group for SIDS. Results Pediatricians' opinions about bed-sharing differed widely both with respect to identifying bed-sharing as a topic they routinely address in anticipatory guidance as well as in what they tell parents about bed sharing. Some strongly and routinely advise against bed-sharing and identify bed-sharing as a clear risk to infants. Others believe bed-sharing to be both safe and useful. A third group allow the content of anticipatory guidance to be driven by parental concerns. Most pediatricians are clearer in their recommendation to place infants supine to sleep than in their recommendation to avoid bed-sharing. Conclusions Overall, there is considerable variation among pediatricians in the advice they provide about bed-sharing, and most advice is not congruent with the AAP recommendations. Additional efforts to educate pediatricians may be necessary to change attitudes and behaviors with respect to anticipatory guidance about safe sleep.

  5. Influence of turbulence on bed load sediment transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Chua, L.; Cheng, N. S.

    2003-01-01

    -bed experiments and the ripple-covered-bed experiments. In the former case, the flow in the presence of the turbulence generator was adjusted so that the mean bed shear stress was the same as in the case without the turbulence generator in order to single out the effect of the external turbulence on the sediment...... transport. In the ripple-covered-bed case, the mean and turbulence quantities of the streamwise component of the velocity were measured, and the Shields parameter, due to skin friction, was determined. The Shields parameter, together with the r.m.s. value of the streamwise velocity fluctuations, were...

  6. The physical impact of ice on an intertidal mussel bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, Jasper; van der Vegt, Maarten; Hoekstra, Piet

    2013-04-01

    We show that cold winters can have major impact on intertidal mussel communities in the Wadden Sea. Observed losses are larger than those caused by wave attacks or predation. These observations were done in the context of the Mosselwad project. Mosselwad studies the stability of mussel beds in the Dutch Wadden Sea with respect to hydrodynamic forcing, predation and other biotic process. The goal is to determine contribution of each process to the destabilization of a mussel bed, which can be used to improve protection and restoration efforts. To achieve this a mussel bed is monitored using a camera system, which makes daily panoramic pictures of the mussel bed. Additionally, four times a year a detailed elevation map of the mussel bed is created using a 3D laserscanner. During first two weeks of February 2012 the monitored bed was covered with ice. After the ice was gone a large decrease in mussel cover near the camera location was revealed. Nearly 30% mussel areal was lost in 2 weeks, while during the rest of the monitoring period little variation in mussel cover was observed. Data from the monitoring campaign were used to investigate 1) the conditions under which the losses occur; 2) the spatial distribution of losses and reallocation of mussels; 3) the recovery of the mussel bed afterwards. Two mechanisms by which ice can damage mussel beds have been put forward. Firstly, drift ice pushed forward by wind ploughs through the mussel bed. Exposed to this mechanism are higher parts of the mussel bed on the wind ward side. Secondly, buoyant forces pick up ice slabs with mussels frozen into it during high-water. This mechanism requires that water puddles remain on the bed during low water and therefore requires muddy sediment. Results show that the largest losses occurred at the higher lying areas at the wind ward side of the bed. Furthermore, large tracks starting at the front of the bed going through the bed were observed. Mussels appear to be piled up at the sides

  7. Virulence of entomopathogenic bacteria in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Jose E; Liang, Dangsheng

    2017-10-24

    Due in part to the development of insecticide resistance, the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has overcome human intervention efforts to make a global resurgence. The failure of chemical pesticides has created a need for novel strategies to combat bed bugs. While a number of insect pests are susceptible to the use of entomopathogenic microbes or microbial-derived toxins, biological control methods have not been thoroughly explored in bed bugs. Here, we tested the virulence of three entomopathogenic bacterial species in C. lectularius to determine their potential for bed bug control. We examined bed bug survival after inoculation with live or heat-killed Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis at varying temperatures. We also analyzed the viability and growth of the same bacteria in infected bed bugs. All three bacterial species were pathogenic to bed bugs. However, the effects of S. marcescens and P. fluorescens were temperature-dependent while the lethality of B. thuringiensis israelensis was not. In addition, bacterial virulence was partly dependent on the route of infection but was not strongly associated with proliferation. Thus, our results suggest multiple possible mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity in the bed bug and indicate that entomopathogenic bacteria, or products derived from them, may have useful applications for bed bug control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bed occupancy monitoring: data processing and clinician user interface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Melanie; Joshi, Vilas; Goubran, Rafik; Knoefel, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Unobtrusive and continuous monitoring of patients, especially at their place of residence, is becoming a significant part of the healthcare model. A variety of sensors are being used to monitor different patient conditions. Bed occupancy monitoring provides clinicians a quantitative measure of bed entry/exit patterns and may provide information relating to sleep quality. This paper presents a bed occupancy monitoring system using a bed pressure mat sensor. A clinical trial was performed involving 8 patients to collect bed occupancy data. The trial period for each patient ranged from 5-10 weeks. This data was analyzed using a participatory design methodology incorporating clinician feedback to obtain bed occupancy parameters. The parameters extracted include the number of bed exits per night, the bed exit weekly average (including minimum and maximum), the time of day of a particular exit, and the amount of uninterrupted bed occupancy per night. The design of a clinical user interface plays a significant role in the acceptance of such patient monitoring systems by clinicians. The clinician user interface proposed in this paper was designed to be intuitive, easy to navigate and not cause information overload. An iterative design methodology was used for the interface design. The interface design is extendible to incorporate data from multiple sensors. This allows the interface to be part of a comprehensive remote patient monitoring system.

  9. Housing and bed and board contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselinović Janko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work not only legal nature of catering services is analyzed, but also legal position of parties in it. Catering contract (Housing and Bed and Board Contract is unnamed in our country and the main source of law for this contract are business practices and usage. A lot of attention is paid to this question. Lack of legal norms for this area is general characteristic for most of the tourism contracts. In this contract its title is also debatable because term 'catering services' is not usually used in practice. Although this contract is unnamed in Comparative Law ,in tourist more developed countries there are more codified business practices from this area and there is more Case Law. Having in mind development of tourist economy adequate legal conditions in tourism contract are expected.

  10. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Raymond E.

    1991-10-01

    Colorado-Ute Electric Association began a study to evaluate options for upgrading and extending the life of its Nucla power station in 1982. Located in southwestern Colorado near the town of Nucla, this station was commissioned in 1959 with a local bituminous coal as its design fuel for three identical stoker-fired units, each rated at 12.6 MW(e). Poor station efficiency, high fuel costs, and spiraling boiler maintenance costs forced the Nucla Station into low priority in the CUEA dispatch order as early as 1981. Among the options CUEA considered was to serve as a host utility to demonstrate Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) technology. The anticipated environmental benefits and apparent attractive economics of a circulating AFBC led to Colorado-Ute's decision to proceed with the design and construction of a demonstration project in 1984 at the Nucla facility.

  11. Fixed bed gasification of solid biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haavisto, I. [Condens Oy, Haemeenlinna (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Fixed bed biomass gasifiers are feasible in the effect range of 100 kW -10 MW. Co-current gasification is available only up to 1 MW for technical reasons. Counter-current gasifiers have been used in Finland and Sweden for 10 years in gasification heating plants, which are a combination of a gasifier and an oil boiler. The plants have proved to have a wide control range, flexible and uncomplicated unmanned operation and an excellent reliability. Counter-current gasifiers can be applied for new heating plants or for converting existing oil and natural gas boilers into using solid fuels. There is a new process development underway, aiming at motor use of the producer gas. The development work involves a new, more flexible cocurrent gasifier and a cleaning step for the counter-current producer gas. (orig.)

  12. Bedded-salt repository analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiffre, M.S.; Kaplan, M.F.; Ensminger, D.A.; Oston, S.G.; Nalbandian, J.Y.

    1980-03-31

    This report contains a description of an analysis of generic nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. This analysis was performed by TASC for inclusion in a major Lawrence Livermore Laboratory report to NRC; this report therefore should be viewed as providing more complete and detailed information about this analysis than was possible to include in the LLL report. The analysis is performed with the NUTRAN computer codes which are described in the report. The model to be analyzed is defined, and the results of a series of possible waste migration scenarios are presented. Several of these scenarios are used as the basis for a sensitivity analysis, and an uncertainty analysis utilizing Monte Carlo techniques is also performed. A new method for defining the consequences to users of a well drilled near the repository is also described, and results are presented based on two of the waste migration scenarios.

  13. On the Hydrodynamics of an Inhomogeneous Fluidized Bed with Vertical Organization of the over-Bed Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsukha, E. A.; Teplitskii, Yu. S.; Borodulya, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the hydrodynamics of the vortex space over a fluidized bed in a chamber of diameter 0.393 m has been carried out. The existence of two regimes associated with the size of the outlet hole has been established: the regime of a swirling air flow without a noticeable sweeping of particles from the bed and the regime with particle entrainment from the bed.

  14. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  15. Fluid bed solids heater. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuit, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    A solids heater which operates at up to 2000 F was designed, fabricated, installed and operated through checkout at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center at Morgantown, West Virginia. The system, designated the 2000 F Fluid Bed Solids Heater (FBSH) uses a fluidized bed to heat limestone to 600 F and aluminium oxide or silicon carbide to 2000 F and discharges heated solids upon demand. The FBSH with added valve handling and pressurization equipment is known as the Valve Hot Solids Test Unit and is intended for use by the US Department of Energy for testing of valves for severe service applications in coal conversion and utilization processes. The FBSH as designed and supplied by Combustion Power Company includes process equipment, controls, the enclosing building and other associated equipment. In the 600 F range of operation it can circulate limestone through two valve test trains simultaneously on a continuous basis. Only one valve test train is used for 2000 F solids and operation in that range is also continuous. Limestone, crushed to minus 5/16 size, is heated, discharged, and recycled at a maximum average rate of 250 lb/min while aluminum oxide or silicon carbide, No. 8 grit, is circulated at rates up to 167 lb/min. The FBSH control system is designed for automatic operation, and capability is included for external computerized data acquisition and/or supervisory control. An operating and maintenance manual and as-built drawings have been submitted. This report describes the FBSH equipment, its design basis, and its operation. It has been prepared and submitted in fulfillment of Contract Number DIAC05-77ET10499.

  16. Fishing with bed nets on Lake Tanganyika: a randomized survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kate A; Byanaku, Aisha; Kubikonse, Augustine; Tshowe, Vincent; Katensi, Said; Lehman, Amy G

    2014-10-07

    Malaria is among the most common causes of death along Lake Tanganyika, a problem which many aid organizations have attempted to combat through the distribution of free mosquito bed nets to high-risk communities. The Lake Tanganyika Floating Health Clinic (LTFHC), a health-based non-governmental organization (NGO), has observed residents of the Lake Tanganyika basin using bed nets to fish small fry near the shoreline, despite a series of laws that prohibit bed net use and other fine-gauge nets for fishing, implemented to protect the near-shore fish ecology. The LTFHC sought to quantify the sources of bed nets and whether they were being used for fishing. The LTFHC conducted a survey of seven lakeside villages in Lagosa Ward, Tanzania. The government has divided each village into two to six pre-existing geographic sub-villages depending on population size. Seven households per sub-village were chosen at random for survey administration. The survey consisted of 23 questions regarding mosquito bed net practices, including the use of bed nets for fishing, as well as questions pertaining to any perceived changes to the fish supply. A total of 196 surveys were administered over a four-week period with a 100% response rate. Over 87% of households surveyed have used a mosquito bed net for fishing at some point. The majority of respondents reported receiving their bed net for free (96.4%), observing "many" residents of their village using bed nets for fishing (97.4%), and noticing a subjective decrease in the fish supply over time (64.9%). The findings of this study raise concerns that the use of free malaria bed nets for fishing is widespread along Lake Tanganyika, and that this dynamic will have an adverse effect on fish ecology. Further studies are indicated to fully define the scope of bed net misuse and the effects of alternative vector control strategies in water-based communities.

  17. Bed net ownership in Kenya: the impact of 3.4 million free bed nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulule John

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In July and September 2006, 3.4 million long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLINs were distributed free in a campaign targeting children 0-59 months old (CU5s in the 46 districts with malaria in Kenya. A survey was conducted one month after the distribution to evaluate who received campaign LLINs, who owned insecticide-treated bed nets and other bed nets received through other channels, and how these nets were being used. The feasibility of a distribution strategy aimed at a high-risk target group to meet bed net ownership and usage targets is evaluated. Methods A stratified, two-stage cluster survey sampled districts and enumeration areas with probability proportional to size. Handheld computers (PDAs with attached global positioning systems (GPS were used to develop the sampling frame, guide interviewers back to chosen households, and collect survey data. Results In targeted areas, 67.5% (95% CI: 64.6, 70.3% of all households with CU5s received campaign LLINs. Including previously owned nets, 74.4% (95% CI: 71.8, 77.0% of all households with CU5s had an ITN. Over half of CU5s (51.7%, 95% CI: 48.8, 54.7% slept under an ITN during the previous evening. Nearly forty percent (39.1% of all households received a campaign net, elevating overall household ownership of ITNs to 50.7% (95% CI: 48.4, 52.9%. Conclusions The campaign was successful in reaching the target population, families with CU5s, the risk group most vulnerable to malaria. Targeted distribution strategies will help Kenya approach indicator targets, but will need to be combined with other strategies to achieve desired population coverage levels.

  18. Design activities toward the achievement of the conceptual phase of the EU-TBM sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallory, J., E-mail: Joelle.vallory@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy—F4E, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Panayotov, D.; Zmitko, M.; Poitevin, Y. [Fusion for Energy—F4E, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Plaza, F.J. Calvo; Sadaba, S.; Gil, A. [Idom, Avda. Monasterio de El Escorial, 4, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-01

    Europe is developing two reference tritium breeder blanket concepts that will be tested in ITER under the form of Test Blanket Modules (TBMs): the helium–cooled lithium–lead (HCLL) which uses the liquid Pb–16Li as both breeder and neutron multiplier and the helium–cooled pebble-bed (HCPB) with lithiated ceramic pebbles as breeder and beryllium pebbles as neutron multiplier. Both concepts are using the EUROFER reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steel as structural material and pressurized helium technology for heat extraction. In view of the conceptual design review, design activities of the TBM sets have been focused on specific areas. The convergence of TBMs design, developed in their pre-conceptual phase by different European Fusion laboratories, has been sought in order to optimize fabrication and maintenance in ITER port #16. The structural strength of the helium back manifold of both TBMs is now based on the HCLL stiffening rod concept proposed in 2010. Through iterations between the nuclear analyses and design, the radiation shield design reaches a good compromise between its shielding performances versus manufacturing. A shield-to-TBM attachment has been implemented which complies with constraints related to thermal expansion under operating conditions and mechanical strength to handle dynamic loads such as major disruptions and seismic event. A full set of thermomechanical, hydraulic and structural analysis of the TBM sets has been carried out. They cover the loads selected as design drivers in the conceptual phase along with exploration of operational domain in terms of helium cooling conditions versus RCC-MRx code criteria compliance. The analysis results show that thermal loads are the main design driver for most of TBM sub-components. Pressure loads are also a design driver for the TBM stiffening grids under in-TBM loss of coolant accident. From the analyses carried out for the shields, the most demanding scenario has been demonstrated to

  19. Activated Carbon Prepared in a Novel Gas Fired Static Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel gas fired static-bed pyrolysis-gasification/activation reactor has been designed. A special feature of the reactor is its rectangular cross-section, having a square groove positioned symmetrically at the bottom part of the reactor, which allows efficient heat transfer into the bed of material being pyrolysed. The reactor is ...

  20. Dynamic transport capacity in gravel-bed river systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. E. Lisle; B. Smith

    2003-01-01

    Abstract - Sediment transport capacity mediates the transfer and storage of bed material between alluvial reservoirs in a drainage system. At intermediate time scales corresponding to the evolution of sediment pulses, conditions governing bed-material transport capacity under the hydrologic regime respond to variations in storage and sediment flux as pulses extend,...

  1. Mobile-bed effects in oscillatory sheet flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Hassan, Wael; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2001-01-01

    Field observations often show a considerable variation in mean grain size along the coastal profile. Under high waves in shallow water, bed ripples are washed out, and sheet flow becomes the dominant transport mode: large amounts of sand are transported in a thin layer close to the bed, i.e., the

  2. Hydrodynamics of multi-phase packed bed micro-reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Márquez Luzardo, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Why to use packed bed micro-reactors for catalyst testing? Miniaturized packed bed reactors have a large surface-to-volume ratio at the reactor and particle level that favors the heat- and mass-transfer processes at all scales (intra-particle, inter-phase and inter-particle or reactor level). If the

  3. Artificial Neural Network Modeling of an Inverse Fluidized Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The application of neural networks to model a laboratory scale inverse fluidized bed reactor has been studied. A Radial Basis Function neural network has been successfully employed for the modeling of the inverse fluidized bed reactor. In the proposed model, the trained neural network represents the kinetics of biological ...

  4. Rehydration ratio of fluid bed-dried vegetables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The goal has been to obtain dry vegetables with 6% to 10% water content and of good rehydration quality. Experimental data. (bed height, gas temperature and velocity, pressure drop over the bed, drying time) have been measured and relevant values have been calculated. The results have shown that drying of ...

  5. Bubble size reduction in a fluidized bed by electric fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn van Willigen, F.; Van Turnhout, J.; Van Ommen, J.R.; Van den Bleek, C.

    2003-01-01

    The reduction of the size of bubbles can improve both selectivity and conversion in gas-solid fluidized beds. Results are reported of the reduction of bubble size by the application of electric fields to uncharged, polarizable particles in fluidized beds. It is shown how average bubble diameters can

  6. Artificial Neural Network Modeling of an Inverse Fluidized Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    modeling of the inverse fluidized bed reactor. In the proposed model, the trained neural network represents the kinetics of biological decomposition of pollutants in the reactor. The neural network has been trained with experimental data obtained from an inverse fluidized bed reactor treating the starch industry wastewater.

  7. Gas cleaning with hot char beds studied by stable isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Ambus, Per

    2014-01-01

    The chemistry taking place in a high temperature char bed used for binding aromatic tar compounds has been studied in detail. 13C labelled tar compounds were used to trace the incorporation into the char bed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and GC-MS. Furthermore, compounds labelled...

  8. The mechanism of char ignition in fluidized bed combustors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemons, R.V.

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge about ignition processes of coal in fluidized beds is of importance for the start-up and dynamic control of these combustors. Initial experiments in a transparent fluidized bed scale model showed the existence of a considerable induction period for the ignition of char, especially at low

  9. Bed-load transportmeter for find sand "Sphinx"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinckers, J.B.; Bijker, E.W.; Schijf, J.B.

    1953-01-01

    A new bed-load transportmeter has been designed particularly for very fine bed material (below 400 micron). The basic conception is the same as for the so-called Delft-bottle used for measuring transport by turbulent suspension. The instrument is of the flow-through type. The flow enters through a

  10. Operation of fixed-bed chemical looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimball, E.; Hamers, H.P.; Cobden, P.D.; Gallucci, F.; Sint Annaland, M. van

    2013-01-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion is an alternative technology for CO2 capture. While most systems utilize dual circulating fluidized-beds, this work shows that fixed-bed Chemical Looping Combustion is a feasible configuration for this technology. The inherent separation of the CO2 from the depleted air

  11. Modeling of Evaporation Losses in Sewage Sludge Drying Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modeling of Evaporation Losses in Sewage Sludge Drying Bed. JI Obianyo, JC Agunwamba. Abstract. A model for evaporation losses in sewage sludge drying bed was derived from first principles. This model was developed based on the reasoning that the rate at which evaporation is taking place is directly proportional to ...

  12. Trends and determinants of time in bed in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubelmann, Cédric; Guessous, Idris; Theler, Jean-Marc; Haba-Rubio, José; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2014-10-15

    There is limited information regarding sleep duration and determinants in Switzerland. We aimed to assess the trends and determinants of time in bed as a proxy for sleep duration in the Swiss canton of Geneva. Data from repeated, independent cross-sectional representative samples of adults (≥ 18 years) of the Geneva population were collected between 2005 and 2011. Self-reported time in bed, education, monthly income, and nationality were assessed by questionnaire. Data from 3,853 participants (50% women, 51.7 ± 10.9 years) were analyzed. No significant trend was observed between 2005 and 2011 regarding time in bed or the prevalence of short (≤ 6 h/day) and long (> 9 h/day) time in bed. Elderly participants reported a longer time in bed (year-adjusted mean ± standard error: 7.67 ± 0.02, 7.82 ± 0.03, and 8.41 ± 0.04 h/day for 35-50, 50-65, and 65+ years, respectively, p 9,500 SFr, respectively, p < 0.001). Multivariable-adjusted polytomous logistic regression showed short and long time in bed to be positively associated with obesity and negatively associated with income. In a Swiss adult population, sleep duration as assessed by time in bed did not change significantly between 2005 and 2011. Both clinical and socioeconomic factors influence time in bed.

  13. Single particle behaviour in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of single particle behaviour in a circulating fluidized bed combustor is described, relating to sulphur capture reactions by limestone under alternate oxidizing and reducing conditions present in a circulating fluidized bed combustor, and to the devolatilization and burn out...

  14. Essential oils as fumigants for bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Petri dish assays, fumigation of a pyrethroid-susceptible strain of bed bugs Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) with various essential oils resulted in mortality that approached or equaled 100%, after 5 days. However, when bed bugs were exposed to the same essential oils in sealed, comme...

  15. Helpless patients' perception of bed-bath in tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: The need to investigate the perceptions of helpless patients to bed bathing by nurses is a very important aspect of quality assurance in nursing care. Aim: To ... Conclusions: Bed bath remains a significant need of helpless patients in hospitals and nearly all of them perceived it as such. This procedure ...

  16. Experimental validation of packed bed chemical-looping combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, S.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical-looping combustion has emerged as a promising alternative technology, intrinsically integrating CO2 capture in power production. A novel reactor concept based on dynamically operated packed beds has been proposed [Noorman, S., van Sint Annaland, M., Kuipers, J.A.M., 2007. Packed bed reactor

  17. Particle motions in oscillatory flow over a smooth bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Lindegård; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates particle motions near the bed in an oscillating tunnel with a smooth bed. Trajectories of a heavy particle were recorded in two dimensions (horizontal and vertical) and in time. The wave boundary layer Reynolds number is Re = 520000. Kinematical quantities such as the prob...

  18. Bed Bug Epidemic: A Challenge to Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnapradipa, Dhitinut; Ritzel, Dale O.; Haramis, Linn D.; Bliss, Kadi R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, reported cases of bed bug infestations in the U.S. and throughout the world have escalated dramatically, posing a global public health problem. Although bed bugs are not known to transmit disease to humans, they pose both direct and indirect public health challenges in terms of health effects, treatment, cost, and resource…

  19. Print a Bed Bug Card - (Page of Cards)

    Science.gov (United States)

    For mass distribution: two sets of business-card-sized lists of tips for recognizing bed bugs and signs of an infestation, including a photo of bed bugs to assist identification. One card is for general use around home or office, the other for travelers.

  20. Predicting fractional bed load transport rates: Application of the Wilcock-Crowe equations to a regulated gravel bed river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeuman, D.; Andrews, E.D.; Kraus, A.; Smith, W.

    2009-01-01

    Bed load samples from four locations in the Trinity River of northern California are analyzed to evaluate the performance of the Wilcock-Crowe bed load transport equations for predicting fractional bed load transport rates. Bed surface particles become smaller and the fraction of sand on the bed increases with distance downstream from Lewiston Dam. The dimensionless reference shear stress for the mean bed particle size (t*rm) is largest near the dam, but varies relatively little between the more downstream locations. The relation between t*rm and the reference shear stresses for other size fractions is constant across all locations. Total bed load transport rates predicted with the Wilcock-Crowe equations are within a factor of 2 of sampled transport rates for 68% of all samples. The Wilcock-Crowe equations nonetheless consistently under-predict the transport of particles larger than 128 mm, frequently by more than an order of magnitude. Accurate prediction of the transport rates of the largest particles is important for models in which the evolution of the surface grain size distribution determines subsequent bed load transport rates. Values of term estimated from bed load samples are up to 50% larger than those predicted with the Wilcock-Crowe equations, and sampled bed load transport approximates equal mobility across a wider range of grain sizes than is implied by the equations. Modifications to theWilcock-Crowe equation for determining t*rm and the hiding function used to scale term to other grain size fractions are proposed to achieve the best fit to observed bed load transport in the Trinity River. Copyright 2009 by the American eophysical Union.

  1. Concentrated poverty and nursing home bed supply in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S C; Andes, S; Tobias, R A

    2001-02-01

    This study explores whether poverty areas of Chicago have fewer nursing home beds and unique staffing patterns. Using 1990 census data and Illinois's 1994 Long-Term Care Facility Survey, census tracts were compared by need for long-term care, bed supply, and nursing home characteristics. While facilities cluster on the north side, and the number of beds follow the elderly, the supply of beds per elderly is actually greater in tracts with high proportions of poverty, disability, and African American residents due, in part, to the predominance of larger facilities. Ironically, economic segregation may work together with Medicaid's policy of serving the poorest to increase the supply of beds to those who might otherwise remain unserved. Nursing homes in the poorest communities have high percentages of Medicaid residents, are larger, and employ fewer staff per resident; homes with a high Medicaid population are more likely to employ LPNs, which may reflect labor supply differences.

  2. Intermittent drying of beans in a spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Carioca beans are a highly nutritious grain, in terms of the amount of protein, iron and potassium as well as carbohydrates and fiber and as a source of vitamins. The moisture content of recently picked beans is too high for good preservation and storage, resulting in the need for drying before packaging. In this work, the drying of Carioca beans in a laboratory scale spouted bed under intermittent conditions of the drying air was experimentally analyzed. Experiments carried out consisted of two types of intermittent regime: intermittence in the spout regime, referred to as spouted/fixed bed and intermittence of the air supply to the bed, called spouted bed/rest. The results were compared to those for bean drying in a spouted bed dryer without intermittence.

  3. Early Archean Spherule Beds-Confirmation of Impact Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukolyukov, A.; Kyte, F. T.; Lugmair, G. W.; Lowe, D. R.; Byerly, G. R.

    2000-01-01

    The oldest record of major impact events on Earth may be a number of early Archean (3.5 to 3.2 Ga) spherule beds that have been identified in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Several field, petrographic, and geochemical criteria distinguish these beds from typical volcanic and clastic sediments. These criteria include the wide geographic distribution of two beds in a variety of depositional environments, the presence of relict quench textures, absence of juvenile volcaniclastic debris within the beds, and extreme enrichment of Ir and other platinum group elements (PGE) as compared to surrounding sediments. Some researchers, however, argued for a terrestrial origin for spherule bed formation, possibly related to volcanism and gold mineralization.

  4. ANALISIS TRANSIEN PADA FIXED BED NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rizaal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Desain teras Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR yang modular memungkinkan pengendalian daya dapat dilakukan dengan mengatur ketinggian suspended core dan laju aliran massa pendingin. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mempelajari perubahan daya termal teras sebagai akibat perubahan laju aliran massa pendingin yang masuk ke teras reaktor dan perubahan ketinggian suspended core serta mempelajari karakteristik keselamatan melekat yang dimiliki FBNR saat terjadi kegagalan pelepasan kalor (loss of heat sink. Keadaan neutronik teras dimodelkan pada kondisi tunak dengan menggunakan paket program Standard Reactor Analysis Code (SRAC untuk memperoleh data fluks neutron, konstanta grup, fraksi neutron kasip, konstanta peluruhan prekursor neutron kasip, dan beberapa parameter teras penting lainnya. Selanjutnya data tersebut digunakan pada perhitungan transien sebagai syarat awal. Analisis transien dilakukan pada tiga kondisi, yaitu saat terjadi penurunan laju aliran massa pendingin, saat terjadi penurunan ketinggian suspended core, dan saat terjadi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor. Hasil yang diperoleh dari penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa penurunan laju aliran massa pendingin sebesar 50%, dari kondisi normal, menyebabkan daya termal teras turun 28% dibanding daya sebelumnya. Penurunan ketinggian suspended core sebesar 30% dari ketinggian normal menyebabkan daya termal teras turun 17% dibanding daya sebelumnya. Sementara untuk kondisi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor, daya termal teras mengalami penurunan sebesar 76%. Dengan demikian, pengendalian daya pada FBNR dapat dilakukan dengan mengatur laju aliran massa pendingin dan ketinggian suspended core, serta keselamatan melekat yang handal pada kondisi kegagalan sistem pelepasan kalor. Kata kunci: FBNR, transien, daya, laju aliran massa, suspended core Modular in design enables Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR power controlled by the adjustment of suspended core and coolant flow rate. The main purposes of this paper

  5. Simulation Facilities and Test Beds for Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlarmann, Bernhard Kl.; Leonard, Arian

    2002-01-01

    Galileo is the European satellite navigation system, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC). The Galileo System, currently under definition phase, will offer seamless global coverage, providing state-of-the-art positioning and timing services. Galileo services will include a standard service targeted at mass market users, an augmented integrity service, providing integrity warnings when fault occur and Public Regulated Services (ensuring a continuity of service for the public users). Other services are under consideration (SAR and integrated communications). Galileo will be interoperable with GPS, and will be complemented by local elements that will enhance the services for specific local users. In the frame of the Galileo definition phase, several system design and simulation facilities and test beds have been defined and developed for the coming phases of the project, respectively they are currently under development. These are mainly the following tools: Galileo Mission Analysis Simulator to design the Space Segment, especially to support constellation design, deployment and replacement. Galileo Service Volume Simulator to analyse the global performance requirements based on a coverage analysis for different service levels and degrades modes. Galileo System Simulation Facility is a sophisticated end-to-end simulation tool to assess the navigation performances for a complete variety of users under different operating conditions and different modes. Galileo Signal Validation Facility to evaluate signal and message structures for Galileo. Galileo System Test Bed (Version 1) to assess and refine the Orbit Determination &Time Synchronisation and Integrity algorithms, through experiments relying on GPS space infrastructure. This paper presents an overview on the so called "G-Facilities" and describes the use of the different system design tools during the project life cycle in order to design the system with respect to

  6. Lithofacies and petrophysical properties of Portland Base Bed and Portland Whit Bed limestone as related to durability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubelaar, C.W.; Engering, S.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Koch, R.; Lorenz, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    This study focuses on the differences in lithofacies and petrophysical properties of Base Bed and Whit Bed Portland limestone and the presumed relationships between these characteristics and the durability of this building stone. As Portland limestone probably will be used as a stone for several

  7. On the dynamics of shallow gravel bed flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Seyed Hossein; Righetti, Maurizio; Wharton, Geraldene; Gurnell, Angela

    2013-04-01

    Flow dynamics on a gravel bed is a popular research subject because of environmental implications and especially in the presence of sediment transport. However, some features of flow dynamics on gravel beds are not completely understood and many questions remain open, especially in the context of the turbulence structure of the flow field and sediment transport. Due to the low submergence characteristics of the flow, the dynamics of the turbulent flow field, especially at the bed region, cannot be regarded as a classical boundary roughness problem, sensu Nikuradse (Nezu and Nakagawa, 1993) due to the strong spatial and temporal variation of the flow field. Over the past decade, in order to properly take into account the spatial heterogeneity, spatial averaging of time averaged values have become common. Besides,recently a trend to understand the role of gravel bed statistical properties, such as structure function of the bed elevation, on the statistics of the near-bed flow has been proposed. Although much research considers gravel beds by spatial averaging and research has been conducted on the effects of bed characteristics on near bed flow and sediment transport, only a few studies consider both together. In the present study, the results of 2D PIV measurement coupled with high accurate measurement of the gravel bed characteristics and the turbulence properties of the low submergence gravel bed flow as related to the bed properties are presented. The double averaging method was used in the analysis. Furthermore, in order to have a better insight into the dynamics of transport processes at the bed, a simple quadrant analysis, based on the Lu and Willmarth method, was implemented (Lu and Willmarth, 1973). Finally, the turbulent integral length scale was calculated both near and far from the gravel bed. The time and double averaged results show an agreement with the previous studies. Moreover, the result of quadrant analysis shows the sweep is dominant between

  8. Aeolian sands in continental red beds of the Middle Buntsandstein (Lower Triassic) at the western margin of the German Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Detlef

    1982-04-01

    Aeolian sands occur widespread in continental red beds of the Middle Buntsandstein (Lower Triassic) at the western margin of the German Basin (Middle Europe), in the Eifel area. Cross-bedded sands were mainly deposited by grainfall on lee-slopes of barchanoid-type dunes in unimodal wind regime in both low-energy and high-energy environments. Occasionally, sets are internally truncated by reactivation surfaces. Crest height of solitary-set dunes varies in the range of some meters. Locally, sequences of cosets, both of tabular-planar and wedge-planar type, capped by flat or gently windward dipping topset beds, represent larger dune complexes of about 10-20 m in height and at least 80-100 m in lateral extent. Horizontal-laminated deposits originated as sand sheets in interdune areas. The dune sands were deposited by trade winds of the northern hemisphere in low palaeolatitude, predominantly by southeasterly and southwesterly trade winds in summer when the intertropical convergence zone was shifted to the north. Aeolian sands built up an extensive dune belt in the Eifel, intersected by braided to anastomosing rivers. Fluviatile incursions or heavy ephemeral rainfall led to aquatic redeposition of aeolian sediments and origin of shallow lakes in interdune depressions. Distribution of aeolian and fluviatile sediments in Karlstal-Schichten is different in the Southern, Western and Northern Eifel. Middle Buntsandstein sequence in the Southern Eifel reflects an evolution of the fluviatile depositional environment also incorporating the occurrence and distribution of aeolian sands. Evolution is characterized by increasing spacing and sinuosity of channels, weakening supply of coarse detritus from the source areas and decreasing braiding of the river systems. Aeolian sands occur in the final phase of this evolution which led from local alluvial fans via cobbly and pebbly braided rivers to sandy braided streams and finally to an intertonguing of aeolian dunes and braided to

  9. ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.E Ayala; V.S. Venkataramani; Javad Abbasian; Rachid B. Slimane; Brett E. Williams; Minoo K. Zarnegar; James R. Wangerow; Andy H. Hill

    2000-03-31

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 C (900-1000 F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.'s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 C (650-1000 F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost

  10. ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM; DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AYALA, R E; VENKATARAMANI, V S

    1998-09-30

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 °C (900-1000 °F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.'s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 °C (650 °F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 °C (650-1000 °F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a

  11. When should governments increase the supply of psychiatric beds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S; Bastiampillai, T; Licinio, J; Fuller, D A; Bidargaddi, N; Sharfstein, S S

    2017-07-11

    Low numbers of hospital-based psychiatric beds create problems for people with severe mental illness (SMI), when they face extended emergency department (ED) waits, higher thresholds for admission to an acute bed, and short revolving-door stays with high rates of rehospitalisation. Limited access to inpatient treatment has been associated with higher suicide risk, premature mortality, homelessness, violent crime and incarceration. Ultimately, people with SMI can be transinstitutionalised to the criminal justice system. In the USA, for example, prisons have replaced mental hospitals as the largest institutions housing people with SMI. There is no international consensus on the safe minimum numbers of acute, forensic and rehabilitation beds needed to reduce these risks. As a consequence, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries have wide variations in the mix of hospital beds with an average of 71 beds per 100 000 population. Policymakers face difficult choices with few studies to guide decisions on supplying beds. The UK Royal College of Psychiatrists offered a policy framework, which was adapted for Australia. The government of the State of South Australia increased the supplies of crisis, acute and forensic beds to meet a mandatory target to safely reduce mental health boarding in the EDs.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 July 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.139.

  12. Agglomeration of biomass fired fluidized bed gasifier and combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mettanant, V.; Basu, P. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Butler, J. [Greenfield Research Inc., Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    As a renewable energy, biomass has the potential to supplement or replace energy produced from fossil fuel resources. However, agglomeration can occur in the fluidized bed boilers and gasifiers used to generate biomass energy. This paper discussed the theoretical and experimental results obtained during an agglomeration study of a biomass-fired fluidized bed gasifier and combustor. The mechanisms of agglomeration were studied as well as influence of various biomass components on bed materials. The study showed that agglomeration is typically caused by the formation of low melting point eutectic mixtures in the bed through a reaction of alkali materials in the fuel with silica bed materials. Agglomeration is also prompted by reactions between alkali species in ash and silica. Beds firing coffee husks, cotton husks, wastes and soy husks have the highest agglomeration problems, while peat, wood, and sewage sludge burn without agglomeration due to their low agglomeration index. The use of alternative bed materials instead of silica sands was recommended. It was concluded that the co-combustion of biomass with coal and other fuels will also prevent agglomerates from forming. 50 refs., 9 tabs., 39 figs.

  13. Performance Evaluation of the ISS Water Processor Multifiltration Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elizabeth M.; Carter, Layne; Wilson, Mark; Cole, Harold; Orozco, Nicole; Snowdon, Doug

    2012-01-01

    The ISS Water Processor Assembly (WPA) produces potable water from a waste stream containing humidity condensate and urine distillate. The primary treatment process is achieved in the Multifiltration Bed, which includes adsorbent media and ion exchange resin for the removal of dissolved organic and inorganic contaminants. The first Multifiltration Bed was replaced on ISS in July 2010 after initial indication of inorganic breakthrough. This bed was returned to ground in July 2011 for an engineering investigation. The water resident in the bed was analyzed for various parameters to evaluate adsorbent loading, performance of the ion exchange resin, microbial activity, and generation of leachates from the ion exchange resin. Portions of the adsorbent media and ion exchange resin were sampled and subsequently desorbed to identify the primary contaminants removed at various points in the bed. In addition, an unused Multifiltration Bed was evaluated after two years in storage to assess the generation of leachates during storage. This assessment was performed to evaluate the possibility that these leachates are impacting performance of the Catalytic Reactor located downstream of the Multifiltration Bed. The results of these investigations and implications to the operation of the WPA on ISS are documented in this paper.

  14. Assessment of Service Life for Regenerative ECLSS Resin Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Dale L.; Keilich, Maria C.; Polis, Peter C.; Yanczura, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) manage and process water at various levels of cleanliness for multiple purposes. The effluent of theWPA and the influent of the OGA require water at very high levels of purity. The bulk of the water purification that occurs in both systems is performed by consumable activated carbon and ion exchange resin beds. Replacement beds must be available on orbit in order to continue the ISS critical processes of water purification and oxygen generation. Various hurdles exist in order to ensure viable spare resin beds. These include the characteristics of resin beds such as: storage environment, shelf life requirements, microbial growth, and variations in the levels and species of contaminants the beds are required to remove. Careful consideration has been given to match water models, bed capacities and spares traffic models to ensure that spares are always viable. The results of these studies and considerations, in particular, how shelf life requirements affect resin bed life management, are documented in this paper.

  15. The epidemiology and genetics of binge eating disorder (BED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    This narrative review provides an overview of the epidemiology of binge eating disorder (BED), highlighting the medical history of this disorder and its entry as an independent condition in the Feeding and Eating Disorders section of the recently published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Estimates of prevalence are provided, as well as recognition that the female to male ratio is lower in BED than in other eating disorders. Evidence is also provided of the most common comorbidities of BED, including mood and anxiety disorders and a range of addiction disorders. In addition, discussion of the viewpoint that BED itself may be an addiction - at least in severe cases - is presented. Although the genetic study of BED is still in its infancy, current research is reviewed with a focus on certain neurotransmitter genes that regulate brain reward mechanisms. To date, a focal point of this research has been on the dopamine and the μ-opioid receptor genes. Preliminary evidence suggests that a predisposing risk factor for BED may be a heightened sensitivity to reward, which could manifest as a strong dopamine signal in the brain's striatal region. Caution is encouraged, however, in the interpretation of current findings, since samples are relatively small in much of the research. To date, no genome-wide association studies have focused exclusively on BED.

  16. The influence of increasing riverbank vegetation density on bed shear stresses and transport of bed material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Valyrakis, Manousos

    2017-04-01

    Riverbank vegetation can significantly influence the hydrodynamics of the river, such as flow velocity and bed shear stress, as well as affecting geomorphic processes across it. The aim of this study is to report preliminary results from extensive set of experiments aiming to better establish the link between flow and solid transport processes at the vicinity of the riverbank. A set of laboratory experiments is conducted in a recirculating flume with a series of acrylic panels mounted on the side of the flume at an angle to simulate the riverbank, and a large number of acrylic rods placed on top of it simulating riparian vegetation. Ten different vegetation configurations are examined, for the range of vegetation densities found in natural river systems. Three of these are configured in linear arrangement; another three of them in staggered; and the other four follow a random configuration at chosen densities. Turbulent flow is measured across the channel using acoustic Doppler velocimetry (ADV) along a dense measurement grid. The measurements covered the whole cross-section of the channel at the main measurement plane, as well as the riverbank region. The results reported include mean streamwise flow velocity and turbulent intensity profiles, bed shear stresses, momentum transfer at the riverbank region. These are associated with transport metrics obtained using an instrumented tracer particle entrained from different release locations (both from the centerline of the main channel and the near bank region). The results show that the flow velocity at the riverbank reduces with increasing densities of riparian vegetation, while they increase at the main channel. Likewise, the bed shear stresses increased at the main channel, and decreased within the vegetated riverbank, which is replicated by the observations from the particle transport experiments.

  17. Heat-transfer characteristics of flowing and stationary particle-bed-type fusion-reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietert, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    The following five appendices are included: (1) physical properties of materials, (2) thermal entrance length Nusselt number variations, (3) stationary particle bed temperature variations, (4) falling bed experimental data and calculations, and (5) stationary bed experimental data and calculations. (MOW)

  18. Development of a novel method for the exploration of the thermal response of superfluid helium cooled superconducting cables to pulse heat loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, Tiemo; Koettig, T.; van Weelderen, R.; Bremer, J.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Management of transient heat deposition in superconducting magnets and its extraction from the aforementioned is becoming increasingly important to bring high energy particle accelerator performance to higher beam energies and intensities. Precise knowledge of transient heat deposition phenomena in

  19. Fine dust filtration using a metal fiber bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Mi; Lee, Young Sup; Jo, Young Min

    2006-08-01

    A bed-type filter composed of thin metal alloy fiber was closely examined with dust capturing in cold and hot runs. The investigation of an individual mechanism across the filter bed indicated that the aerated dust could be initially collected by depth filtration, and after a while, surface filtration dominated the overall dust collection. The present metal fiber bed was comparable to the conventional ceramic filters because of its good collection efficiency with low pressure drop. It also showed potential to be used as a prefilter in a diesel exhaust trapping system.

  20. Pyrolysis of brominated feedstock plastic in a fluidised bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, W.J.; Williams, P.T.

    2006-01-01

    Fire retarded high impact polystyrene has been pyrolysed using a fluidised bed reactor with a sand bed. The yield and composition of the products have been investigated in relation to fluidised bed temperature. The bromine distribution between the products and a detailed analysis of the oils using GC-FID/ECD, GC-MS, FT-ir, and size exclusion chromatography has been carried out. It was found that the majority of the bromine transfers to the pyrolysis oil and the antimony was detected in both t...