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Sample records for helium bombardment leak

  1. Leak testing using helium leak detector

    Aparicio, G.; Mathot, S.; Munoz, C.; Orlando, O.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the equipment used in the industry and particularly in the nuclear activity need to be, vacuum or pressure tight, for operative and safety requirements. These devices have to satisfy particular regulations in order to be qualified by means of operating licences. One of the most efficient system to ensure leaktightnes is using a helium leak detector with a mass spectrometer. In this paper we show the equipment and the devices employed in fuel rods fabrication for CAREM project, and some typical material defects. Operating system and the sensitivity of this method is also described. (author) [es

  2. Helium leak testing methods in nuclear applications

    Ahmad, Anis

    2004-01-01

    Helium mass-spectrometer leak test is the most sensitive leak test method. It gives very reliable and sensitive test results. In last few years application of helium leak testing has gained more importance due to increased public awareness of safety and environment pollution caused by number of growing chemical and other such industries. Helium leak testing is carried out and specified in most of the critical area applications like nuclear, space, chemical and petrochemical industries

  3. On the helium gas leak test

    Nishikawa, Akira; Ozaki, Susumu

    1975-01-01

    The helium gas leak test (Helium mass spectrometer testing) has a leak detection capacity of the highest level in practical leak tests and is going to be widely applied to high pressure vessels, atomic and vacuum equipments that require high tightness. To establish a standard test procedure several series of experiments were conducted and the results were investigated. The conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) The hood method is quantitatively the most reliable method. The leak rate obtained by tests using 100% helium concentration should be the basis of the other method of test. (2) The integrating method, bell jar method, and vacuum spray method can be considered quantitative when particular conditions are satisfied. (3) The sniffer method is not to be considered quantitive. (4) The leak rate of the hood, integrating, and bell jar methods is approximately proportional to the square of the helium partial pressure. (auth.)

  4. Helium leak testing the Westinghouse LCP coil

    Merritt, P.A.; Attaar, M.H.; Hordubay, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The tests, equipment, and techniques used to check the Westinghouse LCP coil for coolant flow path integrity and helium leakage are unique in terms of test sensitivity and application. This paper will discuss the various types of helium leak testing done on the LCP coil as it enters different stages of manufacture. The emphasis will be on the degree of test sensitivity achieved under shop conditions, and what equipment, techniques and tooling are required to achieve this sensitivity (5.9 x 10 -8 scc/sec). Other topics that will be discussed are helium flow and pressure drop testing which is used to detect any restrictions in the flow paths, and the LCP final acceptance test which is the final leak test performed on the coil prior to its being sent for testing. The overall allowable leak rate for this coil is 5 x 10 -6 scc/sec. A general evaluation of helium leak testing experience are included

  5. Helium leak testing of scanning electron microscope

    Ahmad, Anis; Tripathi, S.K.; Mukherjee, D.

    2015-01-01

    Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is a specialized electron-optical device which is used for imaging of miniscule features on topography of material specimens. Conventional SEMs used finely focused high energy (about 30 KeV) electron beam probes of diameter of about 10nm for imaging of solid conducting specimens. Vacuum of the order of 10"-"5 Torr is prerequisite for conventional Tungsten filament type SEMs. One such SEM was received from one of our laboratory in BARC with a major leak owing to persisting poor vacuum condition despite continuous pumping for several hours. He-Leak Detection of the SEM was carried out at AFD using vacuum spray Technique and various potential leak joints numbering more than fifty were helium leak tested. The major leak was detected in the TMP damper bellow. The part was later replaced and the repeat helium leak testing of the system was carried out using vacuum spray technique. The vacuum in SEM is achieved is better than 10"-"5 torr and system is now working satisfactorily. (author)

  6. A molecular dynamics study of helium bombardments on tungsten nanoparticles

    Li, Min; Hou, Qing; Cui, Jiechao; Wang, Jun

    2018-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the bombardment process of a single helium atom on a tungsten nanoparticle. Helium atoms ranging from 50 eV to 50 keV were injected into tungsten nanoparticles with a diameter in the range of 2-12 nm. The retention and reflection of projectiles and sputtering of nanoparticles were calculated at various times. The results were found to be relative to the nanoparticle size and projectile energy. The projectile energy of 100 eV contributes to the largest retention of helium atoms in tungsten nanoparticles. The most obvious difference in reflection exists in the range of 3-10 keV. Around 66% of sputtering atoms is in forward direction for projectiles with incident energy higher than 10 keV. Moreover, the axial direction of the nanoparticles was demonstrated to influence the bombardment to some degree.

  7. High resistivity in InP by helium bombardment

    Focht, M.W.; Macrander, A.T.; Schwartz, B.; Feldman, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    Helium implants over a fluence range from 10 11 to 10 16 ions/cm 2 , reproducibly form high resistivity regions in both p- and n-type InP. Average resistivities of greater than 10 9 Ω cm for p-type InP and of 10 3 Ω cm for n-type InP are reported. Results are presented of a Monte Carlo simulation of helium bombardment into the compound target InP that yields the mean projected range and the range straggling

  8. New helium sniffing device for locating very fine leaks

    Murakami, Y.; Shimomura, Y.; Abe, T.; Obara, K.

    1984-01-01

    A new helium sniffing method for leak checking large vacuum vessels is described. The low sensitivity problem of the conventional helium sniffing method has been overcome by increasing the gas draw rate from around leaks into the detector up to about 0.1 Pa m 3 /s. The devised system consists of a flexible stainless steel capillary tube 0.6 mm i.d. and 10 m long, a sorption pump using molecular sieve, and a helium leak detector in series. This method is particularly useful for locating very fine leaks down to 10 -11 Pa m 3 /s. Relevant theoretical considerations and experimental results are presented

  9. Nuclear fuel rod helium leak inspection apparatus and method

    Ahmed, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an inspection apparatus for testing nuclear fuel rods for helium leaks. It comprises a test chamber being openable and closable for receiving at least one nuclear fuel rod; means separate from the fuel rod for supplying helium and constantly leaking helium at a predetermined known positive value into the test chamber to constantly provide an atmosphere of helium at the predetermined known positive value in the test chamber; and means for sampling the atmosphere within the chamber and measuring the helium in the atmosphere such that a measured helium value below a preset minimum helium value substantially equal to the predetermined known positive value of the atmosphere of helium being constantly provided in the test chamber indicates a malfunction in the inspection apparatus, above a preset maximum helium value greater than the predetermined known positive in the test chamber indicates the existence of a helium leak from the fuel rod, or between the preset minimum and maximum helium values indicates the absence of a helium leak from the fuel rod

  10. Effect of helium ion bombardment on hydrogen behaviour in stainless steel

    Guseva, M.I.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Gorbatov, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of helium ion bombardment on hydrogen behaviour in 12Kh18N10T stainless steel is investigated. Helium and hydrogen ion bombardment was conducted in the ILU-3 ion accelerator; the fluence and energy made up 10 16 -5x10 17 cm -2 , 30 keV and 10 16 -5x10 18 cm -2 , 10 keV respectively. The method of recoil nuclei was used for determination of helium and hydrogen content. Successive implantation of helium and hydrogen ions into 12Kh18N10T stainless steel results in hydrogen capture by defects formed by helium ions

  11. Helium leak testing of large pressure vessels or subassemblies

    Hopkins, J.S.; Valania, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Specifications for pressure-vessel components [such as the intermediate heat exchangers (IHX)] for service in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor facilities require helium leak testing of pressure boundaries to very exacting standards. The experience of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation (FWEC) in successfully leak-testing the IHX shells and bundle assemblies now installed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at Richland, WA is described. Vessels of a somewhat smaller size for the closed loop heat exchanger system in the Fast Flux Test Facility have also been fabricated and helium leak tested for integrity of the pressure boundary by FWEC. Specifications on future components call for helium leak testing of the tube to tubesheet welds of the intermediate heat exchangers

  12. Helium Leak Test for the PLS Storage Ring Chamber

    Choi, M. H.; Kim, H. J.; Choi, W. C.

    1993-01-01

    The storage ring vacuum system for the Pohang Light Source (PLS) has been designed to maintain the vacuum pressure of 10 1 0 Torr which requires UHV welding to have helium leak rate less than 1x10 1 0 Torr·L/sec. In order to develop new technique (PLS) welding technique), a prototype vacuum chamber has been welded by using Tungsten Inert Gas welding method and all the welded joints have been tested with a non-destructive method, so called helium leak detection, to investigate the vacuum tightness of the weld joints. The test was performed with a detection limit of 1x10 1 0 Torr·L/sec for helium and no detectable leaks were found for all the welded joints. Thus the performance of welding technique is proven to meet the criteria of helium leak rate required in the PLS Storage Ring. Both the principle and the procedure for the helium leak detection are also discussed

  13. Helium leak and chemical impurities control technology in HTTR

    Tochio, Daisuke; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Sakaba, Nariaki

    2014-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has designed and developed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) hydrogen cogeneration system named gas turbine high-temperature reactor (GTHTR300C) as a commercial HTGR. Helium gas is used as the primary coolant in HTGR. Helium gas is easy to leak, and the primary helium leakage should be controlled tightly from the viewpoint of preventing the release of radioactive materials to the environment. Moreover from the viewpoint of preventing the oxidization of graphite and metallic material, the helium coolant chemistry should be controlled tightly. The primary helium leakage and the helium coolant chemistry during the operation is the major factor in the HTGR for commercialization of HTGR system. This paper shows the design concept and the obtained operational experience on the primary helium leakage control and primary helium impurity control in the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) of JAEA. Moreover, the future plan to obtain operational experience of these controls for commercialization of HTGR system is shown. (author)

  14. Process for detecting leak faults using a helium mass spectrometer

    Divet, Claude; Morin, Claude.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a process for detecting very small leak faults putting into communication the outer and inner sides of the wall of a containment, one of these wall sides being in contact with gaseous helium under a pressure of around one torr, the other side being one of the limits of a space pumped down to a residual gas pressure under 10 -3 torr. This space is in communication with the measuring cell of a helium mass spectrometer. This process may be applied to the detection of faults in metal claddings of the fuel rods used in nuclear reactors [fr

  15. The Development of Leak Test Techniques by Means Helium Detector

    Sigit Asmara Santa; Puradwi lsmu Wahyono; Deddy Haryanto; Joko Irianto; Ismu Handoyo

    2003-01-01

    The auxiliary vacuum tube used for helium leak detection has been designed. The aim is to increase measured leak test sensitivity of existing helium leak detection system from the level of 10 -3 ∼10 -5 standard cm 3 /second to 10 -8 ∼10 -10 standard cm 3 /second. The goals of installed auxiliary vacuum tube in the existing leak detection system are used for quality control test product of Fission Product Molybdenum (FPM) capsule and AgInCd safety control rod. The design requirements were established based on both of their quality control test requirement to assure their safety and reliability. The vacuum tube length was designed at least as long as 100 cm with 6 inch diameter and have leakage tightness till as low as 10 10 standard cm 3 /second. The temperature and pressure could be controlled up to 100 o C and negative pressure 10 inch Hg respectively. The vacuum tube was equipped with temperature controller system consisting of covered heater and installed 3 thermocouples which were evenly distributed along the length of tube. Pressure control system controls the inside pressure vacuum tube according to prior setpoint values. Vacuum tube temperature and pressure were controlled using combination of both prior its set-up temperature and pressure. Aluminum disks were installed at the end of covered heater used for cooling system and to protect heat hazard to operator. (author)

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigation of magnetic field related helium leak in helium vessel of a large superconducting magnet

    Bhattachryya, Pranab; Gupta, Anjan Dutta; Dhar, S.; Sarma, P. R.; Mukherjee, Paramita

    2017-06-01

    The helium vessel of the superconducting cyclotron (SCC) at the Variable Energy Cyclotron centre (VECC), Kolkata shows a gradual loss of insulation vacuum from 10-7 mbar to 10-4 mbar with increasing coil current in the magnet. The insulation vacuum restores back to its initial value with the withdrawal of current. The origin of such behavior has been thought to be related to the electromagnetic stress in the magnet. The electromagnetic stress distribution in the median plane of the helium vessel was studied to figure out the possible location of the helium leak. The stress field from the possible location was transferred to a simplified 2D model with different leak geometries to study the changes in conductance with coil current. The leak rate calculated from the changes in the leak geometry was compared with the leak rate calculated from the experimental insulation vacuum degradation behavior to estimate the initial leak shape and size.

  17. The repetitive flaking of Inconel 625 by 100 keV helium bombardment

    Whitton, J.L.; Chen, H.M.; Littmark, U.

    1981-01-01

    Repetitive flaking of Inconel 625 occurs with ion bombardment doses of > than 10 18 100 keV helium ions cm -2 , with up to 39 exfoliations being observed after bombardment with 3 x 10 19 ions cm -2 . The thickness of the flakes, measured by scanning electron microscopy, is some 30% greater than when measured by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) of 1.8 MeV helium ions. These RBS measurements compare well with the thickness of the remaining layers in the resultant craters and to the most probable range of the 100 keV helium. The area of the flakes is dictated by the grain boundaries, and when one flake is ejected, the adjacent grains are prevented from doing so since there now exists an escape route for the injected helium. A strong dose rate dependence is observed; decreasing the beam current from 640 μA cm -2 to 64 μA cm -2 results in a factor 20 fewer flakes being exfoliated (for the same total dose of 3 x 10 19 ions cm -2 ). Successive flakes decrease in area, suggesting that eventually a cratered, but stable, surface will result with the only erosion being by the much less effective mechanism of sputtering. (orig.)

  18. High level helium leak testing methods developed at ICSI Rm. Valcea

    Saros, Gili; Armeanu, Adrian; Saros, Irina; Ciortea, Constantin

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Helium leak detection is one of the most widely used methods of nondestructive testing in use today. In principle two methods are applied for leak testing and localization of leaks, the 'Vacuum method' and the 'Overpressure method'. In case of the 'Vacuum method' the object to be examined for leaks is evacuated and filled instead with Helium. The gas penetrates through any leaks found in the object and is detected by the leak test instrument. In case of the 'Overpressure method' the object to be examined for leaks is filled with Helium, under slight overpressure. The gas escapes through any leaks present and it is detected by a detector probe. This detector probe sometimes called a 'sniffer' acting as a gas sampling probe. Varian 979 Helium Leak Detector has a built-in turbo pump and an externally mounted dry forepump located below the system. The leak detector is configured for the evacuation type leak testing. In this case, the vacuum system under test is evacuated by the leak detector. Helium is then sprayed on the outside of the vacuum system and is pumped into the leak detector if a leak is present. The leak detector is capable to detect leaks down to 10 -9 atm-cc/sec range. The Specton 300E is a strong, rugged leak detector designed to operate in dirty industrial conditions as well as clean research areas. A number of applications are mentioned: - Generators; - Buried Pipelines; - Chemical and power plants; - Vacuum furnace installations; - Heat Exchangers; - Tank Floors; - Nuclear research centers; - Refrigeration installations; - Any type of industrial vacuum system. (authors)

  19. Leak detection in turbo group condensers using helium

    Gomez Cores, C.; Lloret, J.

    1997-01-01

    This method allows a rapid location of leaks (small or not) in the pipelines of a turbo group condenser, before opening the condenser boxes and no need of stooping the turbo group operation. This operation can last two hours maximum depending on the volume of the box or semi box. The technique consists of injecting helium into the water side and detecting it in the steam side, in the outlet of not condensable gases of the ejector. In the same way, probable air inlet to the condenser can be proved (auxiliary systems, turbo group joints to the condenser, etc.) in order to improve the vacuum and/or reduce the quantity of oxygen dissolved in the water of the steam side. (author) [es

  20. Leak detection on the DIII-D tokamak using helium entrainment techniques

    Brooks, N.H.; Baxi, C.; Anderson, P.

    1988-01-01

    The entrainment of helium in a viscous gas flow was utilized to compartmentalize, and then to pinpoint, a leak across the inner skin of the double-walled DIII-D vacuum vessel. Inaccessible from the outside, the leak connected the cooling channels in the wall interspace with the primary vacuum chamber. By entraining helium in the pressurized flow from the single-pass gas circulation system, well-defined portions of the wall were exposed to helium without disassembly of the poorly accessible cooling manifolds. Varying the helium injection point permitted the localization of the leak to a single 30 0 toroidal sector of the vessel. The exact location of the leak was found from inside the vessel by spraying helium on suspect regions, while sweeping the contents of the cooling channels to the foreline of a Varian Contraflow leak detector with a 0.1 Pa m 3 /s flow of nitrogen. Flow speed calculations were used to predict the response time to entrained helium of the actual leak detection setup

  1. Back pressure helium leak testing of fuel elements for Dhruva research reactor

    Dutta, N G; Ahmad, Anis; Kulkarni, P G; Purushotham, D S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Atomic Fuels Div.

    1994-12-31

    Leak tightness specification on fuel elements for reactor use is always very stringent. The fuel element fabricated for Dhruva reactor is specified to be leak-tight up to 1 x 10{sup -8} std. cc/sec. The fuel element consists of natural metallic uranium rod around 12.5 mm diameter and 3 meter long in encased in aluminium tube and seal welded at both ends. Since helium gas is not filled inside the fuel element while doing seal welding, the only way to do helium leak testing of such fuel rods is by back-pressure technique. This paper describes the development of test facility for carrying out such test and discusses the experiences of carrying out helium leak testing by back-pressure technique on more than 700 numbers of fuel rods for Dhruva reactor. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Exfoliation on stainless steel and inconel produced by 0.8-4 MeV helium ion bombardment

    Paszti, F.; Mezey, G.; Pogany, L.; Fried, M.; Manuaba, A.; Kotai, E.; Lohner, T.; Pocs, L.

    1982-11-01

    Trying to outline the energy dependence of surface deformations such as exfoliation and flaking on candidate CTR first-wall materials, stainless steel and two types of inconels were bombarded by 0.8, 1 and 4 MeV helium ions. All the bombarded spots could be characterized by by large exfoliations covering almost the total implanted area. No spontaneous rupture was observed except on one type of inconel where flaking took place right after reaching the critical dose. After mechanical opening of the formations, similar inner morphology was found as in our previous studies on gold. (author)

  3. Liquid to gas leak ratios with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    To predict the leak rates of liquid helium and liquid nitrogen containers at operating conditions we need to know how small leaks (10 -8 to 10 -5 atm-cm 3 air/s), measured at standard conditions, behave when flooded with these cryogens. Two small leaks were measured at ambient conditions (approx.750 Torr and 295 K), at the normal boiling points of LN 2 and LHe, and at elevated pressures above the liquids. The ratios of the leak rates of the liquids at ambient pressure to the gases (G) at ambient pressure and room temperature were: GN 2 (1), LN 2 (18), GHe(1), and LHe(172). The leak rate ratio of LN 2 at elevated pressure was linear with pressure. The leak rate ratio of LHe at elevated pressure was also linear with pressure

  4. Liquid to gas leak ratios with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    To predict the leak rates of liquid helium and liquid nitrogen containers at operating conditions we need to know how small leaks (10 -8 to 10 -5 atm-cm 3 air/s), measured at standard conditions, behave when flooded with these cryogens. Two small leaks were measured at ambient conditions (about 750 Torr and 295 K), at the normal boiling points of LN 2 and LHe, and at elevated pressures above the liquids. The ratios of the leak rates of the liquids at ambient pressure to the gases at ambient pressure and room temperature are presented. The leak rate ratio of LN 2 at elevated pressure was linear with pressure. The leak rate ratio of LHe at elevated pressure was also linear with pressure

  5. Helium Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection: A Method to Quantify Total Measurement Uncertainty

    Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    In applications where leak rates of components or systems are evaluated against a leak rate requirement, the uncertainty of the measured leak rate must be included in the reported result. However, in the helium mass spectrometer leak detection method, the sensitivity, or resolution, of the instrument is often the only component of the total measurement uncertainty noted when reporting results. To address this shortfall, a measurement uncertainty analysis method was developed that includes the leak detector unit's resolution, repeatability, hysteresis, and drift, along with the uncertainty associated with the calibration standard. In a step-wise process, the method identifies the bias and precision components of the calibration standard, the measurement correction factor (K-factor), and the leak detector unit. Together these individual contributions to error are combined and the total measurement uncertainty is determined using the root-sum-square method. It was found that the precision component contributes more to the total uncertainty than the bias component, but the bias component is not insignificant. For helium mass spectrometer leak rate tests where unit sensitivity alone is not enough, a thorough evaluation of the measurement uncertainty such as the one presented herein should be performed and reported along with the leak rate value.

  6. Engineering Sensitivity Improvement of Helium Mass Spectrometer Leak Detection System by Means Global Hard Vacuum Test

    Sigit Asmara Santa

    2006-01-01

    The engineering sensitivity improvement of Helium mass spectrometer leak detection using global hard vacuum test configuration has been done. The purpose of this work is to enhance the sensitivity of the current leak detection of pressurized method (sniffer method) with the sensitivity of 10 -3 ∼ 10 -5 std cm 3 /s, to the global hard vacuum test configuration method which can be achieved of up to 10 -8 std cm 3 /s. The goal of this research and development is to obtain a Helium leak test configuration which is suitable and can be used as routine bases in the quality control tests of FPM capsule and AgInCd safety control rod products. The result is an additional instrumented vacuum tube connected with conventional Helium mass spectrometer. The pressure and temperature of the test object during the leak measurement are simulated by means of a 4.1 kW capacity heater and Helium injection to test object, respectively. The addition of auxiliary mechanical vacuum pump of 2.4 l/s pumping speed which is directly connected to the vacuum tube, will reduce 86 % of evacuation time. The reduction of the measured sensitivity due to the auxiliary mechanical vacuum pump can be overcome by shutting off the pump soon after Helium mass spectrometer reaches its operating pressure condition. (author)

  7. Sensitive helium leak detection in a deuterium atmosphere using a high-resolution quadrupole mass spectrometer

    Hiroki, S.; Abe, T.; Murakami, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In fusion machines, realizing a high-purity plasma is a key to improving the plasma parameters. Thus, leak detection is a necessary part of reducing the leak rate to a tolerable level. However, a conventional helium ( 4 He) leak detector is useless in fusion machines with a deuterium (D 2 ) plasma, because retained D particles on the first walls release D 2 for a long period and the released D 2 interferes with the signals from the leaked 4 He due to the near identical masses of 4.0026 u ( 4 He) and 4.0282 u (D 2 ). A high-resolution quadrupole mass spectrometer (HR-QMS) that we have recently developed, can detect a 4 He + population as small as 10 -4 peak in a D 2 atmosphere. Thus, the HR-QMS has been applied to detect 4 He leaks. To improve the minimum detectable limit of 4 He leak, a differentially pumped HR-QMS analyzer was attached to a chamber of the 4 He leak detector. In conclusion, the improved 4 He leak detector could detect 4 He leaks of the order of 10 -10 Pa · m 3 /s in a D 2 atmosphere. (Author)

  8. Some applications of the Helium Leak Detectors in the nuclear industry

    Psacharopulo, A.

    1985-01-01

    The improved reliability and ease of operation of Helium Mass Spectrometer leak Detectors currently manufactured has dramatically widened the field of applications for these instruments. The authors describe here some applications: 1. Testing power plants steam condensers in operation; 2. Leak checking of underground pressurized cables or pipes. The field of applications of the Helium Leak Detectors is nowadays much larger due to the increased reliability and ease of operation of current instruments. This has allowed their use in several applications where the techniques used in the past were totally insufficient. The major benefits of the helium method are the very high sensitivity (up to 10 -1 std cc/sec, equivalent to 1 cm 3 every 300 years), fast response times, no operator judgement, possibility to adjust the sensitivity of the instrument to the requirements of the parts under test, and absolute selectivity for helium (no response to any other gas). To these benefits there has been recently the addition of better reliability, ease of operation, allowing unskilled operators to perform tests, no need for liquid nitrogen and finally the physical size of some instruments available today means that they can be easily carried around for on-site tests

  9. Remote helium leak test of the DUPIC fuel rod

    Kim, W. K; Kim, S. S.; Lim, S. P.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    DUPIC(Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactor) is one of dry reprocessing fuel cycles to reuse irradiated PWR fuel in CANDU power plant. DUPIC fuel is so radioactive that DUPIC fuel is remotely fabricated at hot cell such as IMEF hot cell in which radiation is shielded and remote operation is possible. In this study, Helium leakage has been tested for the simulated DUPIC fuel rod manufactured by Nd:YAG laser end-cap welding at simulated hot cell. The remote inspection technique has been developed to evaluate the soundness of DUPIC fuel fabricated through new processes. Vacuum chamber has been developed to be remotely operated by manipulators at hot cell. As the result of remote test, Helium leakage of DUPIC fuel rod is around background level, CANDU specification has been satisfied. In the result of the study, remote test has been successfully performed at the simulated hot cell, and the soundness of DUPIC fuel rod welded by Nd:YAG laser has been confirmed

  10. Helium leak testing of superconducting magnets, thermal shields and cryogenic lines of SST -1

    Thankey, P.L.; Joshi, K.S.; Semwal, P.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Khan, Z.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak SST - 1 is under commissioning at Institute for Plasma Research. It comprises of a toroidal doughnut shaped plasma chamber, surrounded by liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets, housed in a cryostat chamber. The cryostat has two cooling circuits, (1) liquid nitrogen cooling circuit operating at 80 K to minimize the radiation heat load on the magnets, and (2) liquid helium cooling circuit to cool magnets and cold mass support structure to 4.5 K. In this paper we describe (a) the leak testing of copper - SS joints, brazing joints, interconnecting joints of the superconducting magnets, and (b) the leak testing of the liquid nitrogen cooling circuit, comprising of the main supply header, the thermal shields, interconnecting pipes, main return header and electrical isolators. All these tests were carried out using both vacuum and sniffer methods. (author)

  11. A new approach for helium backfilling and leak testing seal-welded capsules in a hot cell

    Strasslsund, E.K.; Berger, D.N.

    1992-05-01

    Gamma irradiation sources containing radioactive 137 Cesium Chloride are being produced at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of a Westinghouse Hanford company/Pacific Northwest Laboratory cooperative program. New equipment was developed to leak test the double-encapsulated sources in a hot cell. The equipment, which includes a helium backfill chamber and end cap press , a vacuum chamber, and a helium mass spectrometer, has provided technicians with the capability to detect leaks in sealed sources as small as 1. 0x10 -7 atm cm 3 /S helium

  12. Evaluation of sulfur hexafluoride and helium for steam generator leak location: Final report

    Kassen, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Since the use of sulfur hexafluoride as a tracer for identifying sources of primary to secondary leakage in PWR steam generators appeared to offer significant sensitivity advantages, the thermal stability of sulfur hexafluoride in water was evaluated at steam generator operating temperature. Significant decomposition was observed after 2 to 4 hours at temperature. Key decomposition products were fluoride and sulfide ions. Based on this observation and these limited test results, the use of SF 6 for PWR steam generator leak location can not be recommended at this time. A survey of 15 utilities was conducted in regard to their application experience with the helium tracer-mass spectroscopy technique for steam generator leak location. Although several successful steam generator integrity programs do not include use of this technique, it has proven to be a useful addition to the inspection program at some plants. No corrosion concerns appear to be associated with this technique

  13. Structural changes IN THE Kh20N45M4B nickel alloys and THE Kh16N15M3B steel due to helium ion bombardment

    Kalin, B.A.; Chernikov, U.N.; Chernov, I.I.; Kozhevnikov, O.A.; Shishkin, G.N.; Yakushin, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray structural analysis, and the thermal desorption techniques, the authors carried out a detailed study of the structural and phase changes, defect formation, and helium accumulation in the He + -bombarded 16-15 austenitic steels and 20-45 nickel alloys. Microstructure of the bombarded specimens was studied using the methods of transmission electron microscopy of thin foils in the EVM-100, and EM-301G electron microscopes. Results of x-ray studies on the bombarded specimens are presented. The conducted studies show that bombardment of structural materials with light ions can lead to significant structural damages and changes in the chemical and phase composition of the surface layer. The possible mechanisms of the changes in the chemical and phase composition include selective sputtering and radiation-induced accelerated diffusion of elements in the field of internal lateral stresses developing during the He + implantation process

  14. Hydrogen and helium recycling from stirred liquid lithium under steady state plasma bombardment

    Hirooka, Yoshi, E-mail: hirooka.yoshihiko@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); The Graduate School for Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Zhou, Haishan [The Graduate School for Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ono, Masa [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    For improved core performance via edge plasma-wall boundary control, solid and liquid lithium has been used as a plasma-facing material in a number of confinement experiments over the past several decades. Unfortunately, it is unavoidable that lithium is saturated in the surface region with implanted hydrogenic species as well as oxygen-containing impurities. For steady state operation, a flowing liquid lithium divertor with forced convection would probably be required. In the present work, the effects of liquid stirring to simulate forced convection have been investigated on the behavior of hydrogen and helium recycling from molten lithium at temperatures up to ∼350 °C. Data indicate that liquid stirring reactivates hydrogen pumping via surface de-saturation and/or uncovering impurity films, but can also induce helium release via surface temperature change.

  15. Fast leak of a channel filled with helium at a pressure of 2 bars (channel H5)

    Bauer, E.; Tribolet, J.

    1987-01-01

    The loss of seal of a helium-filled channel opening the entire cross section of the front part leads to a fast leak. The channel fills to the upper generatrix of the leak orifice and part of the helium contained in the channel escapes into the circuit. The pressure drop in the reflector can lead to reactor and main pump shutdown. On the other hand, the Cooling Circuit Shutdown Bar circuit pumps remain in operation. This paper evaluates the consequences of an incident of this nature for the reactor and the surrounding experimental zones

  16. Data on ionization, excitation, dissociation and dissociative ionization of targets by helium ion bombardments, (1)

    Oda, Nobuo; Urakawa, Junji

    1984-03-01

    This report presents a compilation of the experimental data on cross sections for the ionization, excitation, dissociation and dissociative ionization processes of targets in helium ion impacts on atoms and molecules under a single collision condition. These measurements were carried out in the energy range from several keV to 3.5 MeV. A systematic survey has been made on the literatures from 1975 to the end of 1982. A list of references is also given, including relevant papers published before 1975. (author)

  17. A possible mechanism for electron-bombardment-induced loop punching in helium-implanted materials

    Donnelly, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The recently proposed mechanism for the punching of dislocation loops by overpressurized helium bubbles in molybdenum is studied quantitatively. According to this mechanism, under the electron beam of the transmission microscope, He atoms are excited or ionized and the resulting excited species (excited He atoms and free electrons) are responsible for the pressure rise in the gas beyond the threshold for loop punching. In the model, the pressure increase is attributed to a reduction of the effective volume accessible to the gas due to the formation of a cavity around each excited species. The radius of this cavity is evaluated and, also, the excited fraction required to reach the threshold is discussed in terms of excitation life times. (author)

  18. Leak-tightness assessment of demountable joints for the super fluid helium system of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    Brunet, J.C.; Poncet, A.; Trilhe, P.

    1994-01-01

    The future high energy accelerator LHC presently considered at CERN, will make heavy use of demountable cryogenic joints operating at superfluid helium temperatures (1.8 K). These joints will be required for connecting the cryomagnets to their feeding lines, helium safety valves to cold masses, both on their measuring benches and eventually in their final installation set-up. The very large size of the future machine and, consequently, the large number of cryogenic joints imply that their reliability in leak tightness be very high, in particular after extreme loading conditions such as the high helium pressures resulting from superconducting magnet quenches. For these reasons, a test set-up has been especially built at CERN to reproduce these conditions, and to assess the leak tightness reliability of commercially available joints. A description of the facility is presented, together with the first test results

  19. Research and development of a high-temperature helium-leak detection system (joint research). Part 1 survey on leakage events and current leak detection technology

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Nakazawa, Toshio; Kawasaki, Kozo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Urakami, Masao; Saisyu, Sadanori [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    In High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR), the detection of leakage of helium at an early stage is very important for the safety and stability of operations. Since helium is a colourless gas, it is generally difficult to identify the location and the amount of leakage when very little leakage has occurred. The purpose of this R and D is to develop a helium leak detection system for the high temperature environment appropriate to the HTGR. As the first step in the development, this paper describes the result of surveying leakage events at nuclear facilities inside and outside Japan and current gas leakage detection technology to adapt optical-fibre detection technology to HTGRs. (author)

  20. Effects of particle size, helium gas pressure and microparticle dose on the plasma concentration of indomethacin after bombardment of indomethacin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid microspheres using a Helios gun system.

    Uchida, Masaki; Natsume, Hideshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Sugibayashi, Kenji; Morimoto, Yasunori

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the effects of the particle size of indomethacin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid microspheres (IDM-loaded PLA MS), the helium pressure used to accelerate the particles, and the bombardment dose of PLA MS on the plasma concentration of IDM after bombarding with IDM-loaded PLA MS of different particle size ranges, 20-38, 44-53 and 75-100 microm, the abdomen of hairless rats using the Helios gene gun system (Helios gun system). Using larger particles and a higher helium pressure, produced an increase in the plasma IDM concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and resultant F (relative bioavailability with respect to intracutaneous injection) of IDM increased by an amount depending on the particle size and helium pressure. Although a reduction in the bombardment dose led to a decrease in C(max) and AUC, F increased on decreasing the bombardment dose. In addition, a more efficient F was obtained after bombarding with IDM-loaded PLA MS of 75-100 microm in diameter at each low dose in different sites of the abdomen compared with that after bolus bombardment with a high dose (dose equivalent). These results suggest that the bombardment injection of drug-loaded microspheres by the Helios gun system is a very useful tool for delivering a variety of drugs in powder form into the skin and systemic circulation.

  1. Mockup experiments to investigate the leak rate correlation between mercury and helium for the mercury target system of J-PARC

    Haga, Katsuhiro; Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Wakui, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    Checking the seal performance of the mercury piping network is very important for the mercury target system operation of J-PARC, and the test method for leaks using the pressure change measurement is preferable for this purpose because it can be carried out easily and precisely by measuring the pressure change, and it is free from the risk of mercury contamination. The piping network is pressurized by helium gas. Thus, the correlation between the helium leak rate and mercury leak flow rate was investigated experimentally by carrying out leak tests for helium and mercury with an identical mockup flange model. The results showed that the mercury leak flow rates of the experimental data were lower than those of the estimated value by 64% on average. It was also found that the threshold of the helium leak rate at which good seal performance for mercury can be obtained exists between 2.18 x 10 -4 and 1.01 x 10 -2 Pa.m 3 /s. This fact confirmed the sufficient safety margin of the mercury target system against the mercury leak, where 1 x 10 -6 Pa.m 3 /s was adopted as the seal performance criterion. (author)

  2. Evaluation of design, leak monitoring, dnd NDEA strategies to assure PBMR Helium pressure boundary reliability - HTR2008-58037

    Fleming, K. N.; Smit, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the reliability and integrity management (RIM) strategies that have been applied in the design of the PBMR passive metallic components for the helium pressure boundary (HPB) to meet reliability targets and to evaluate what combination of strategies are needed to meet the targets. The strategies considered include deterministic design strategies to reduce or eliminate the potential for specific damage mechanisms, use of an on-line leak monitoring system and associated design provisions that provide a high degree of leak detection reliability, and periodic nondestructive examinations combined with repair and replacement strategies to reduce the probability that degradation would lead to pipe ruptures. The PBMR RIM program for passive metallic piping components uses a leak-before-break philosophy. A Markov model developed for use in LWR risk-informed in-service inspection evaluations was applied to investigate the impact of alternative RIM strategies and plant age assumptions on the pipe rupture frequencies as a function of rupture size. Some key results of this investigation are presented in this paper. (authors)

  3. Easy method enhancing the sensitivity of a helium mass-spectrometer leak detector

    Firpo, G.; Pozzo, A.

    2004-01-01

    Commercial He mass spectrometer leak detectors usually do not provide sufficient sensitivity to perform accurate measurements of the permeation rate of He through glass. Ultrasensitive dedicated systems have adeguate sensitivity but involve high costs and complex procedures. However, both cryogenics and photomultiplier technology routinely demand this goal. Here, we propose a novel method to increase the sensitivity of commercial devices to easily measure accurate permeation rate. We modified a commercial leak detector by reducing the pumping speed at the inlet of the rotary pump, thus increasing its sensitivity by one order of magnitude. The modified detector was used to measure the leak rate of the permeation of He through the glass walls of a photomultiplier. Further improvements made to decrease the minimum detectable signal were limited by the high ultimate pressure in the spectrometer tube

  4. Research and development for the high-temperature helium-leak detection system (Joint research). Part 2. Development of temperature sensors using optical fibre for the HTTR

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Nakazawa, Toshio; Kawasaki, Kozo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Urakami, Masao; Saisyu, Sadanori [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    In the second stage of the research and development for a high-temperature helium-leak detection system, the temperature sensor using optical fibres was studied. The sensor detects the helium leakage by the temperature increase surrounded optical fibre with or without heat insulator. Moreover, the applicability of high temperature equipments as the HTTR system was studied. With the sensor we detected 5.0-20.0 cm{sup 3}/s helium leakages within 60 minutes. Also it was possible to detect earlier when the leakage level is at 20.0 cm {sup 3}/s. (author)

  5. Influence of helium-ion bombardment on the surface properties of pure and ammonia-adsorbed water thin films

    Kondo, M.; Shibata, T.; Kawanowa, H.; Gotoh, Y.; Souda, R.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of the ion bombardment on the surface properties of water-ice films has been investigated. The films are irradiated with 1.5 keV He + ions and analyzed sequentially on the basis of time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). In order to minimize any temperature-induced effects, the measurements were made at 15 K. The damage of the films, as estimated from the H/D exchange between NH 3 and the D 2 O ice and the intermixing of NH 3 with the H 2 18 O ice, is recognized at the fluence above 2 x 10 14 ions/cm 2 . The sputtering yield of the D 2 O ice is determined as 0.9 ± 0.2 molecules per incoming He + ion. The temperature-programmed TOF-SIMS analysis of the water-ice films has been completed within the fluence of 5.8 x 10 12 ions/cm 2 , so that no appreciable damage of the film should be induced during the measurement

  6. Helium leak testing of a radioactive contaminated vessel under high pressure in a contaminated environment

    Winter, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    At ANL-W, with the shutdown of EBR-II, R ampersand D has evolved from advanced reactor design to the safe handling, processing, packaging, and transporting spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. New methods of processing spent fuel rods and transforming contaminated material into acceptable waste forms are now in development. Storage of nuclear waste is a high interest item. ANL-W is participating in research of safe storage of nuclear waste, with the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site in New Mexico the repository. The vessel under test simulates gas generated by contaminated materials stored underground at the WIPP site. The test vessel is 90% filled with a mixture of contaminated material and salt brine (from WIPP site) and pressurized with N2-1% He at 2500 psia. Test acceptance criteria is leakage -7 cc/seconds at 2500 psia. The bell jar method is used to determine leakage rate using a mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). The efficient MSLD and an Al bell jar replaced a costly, time consuming pressure decay test setup. Misinterpretation of test criterion data caused lengthy delays, resulting in the development of a unique procedure. Reevaluation of the initial intent of the test criteria resulted in leak tolerances being corrected and test efficiency improved

  7. Effect of Carbon Concentration on the Sputtering of Carbon-Rich SiC Bombarded by Helium Ions

    Xinghao Liang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC is considered as an important material for nuclear engineering due to its excellent properties. Changing the carbon content in SiC can regulate and control its elastic and thermodynamic properties, but a simulation study of the effect of carbon content on the sputtering (caused by the helium ions of SiC is still lacking. In this work, we used the Monte-Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation methods to study the effects of carbon concentration, incidence energy, incident angle, and target temperature on the sputtering yield of SiC. The results show that the incident ions’ energy and angle have a significant effect on sputtering yield of SiC when the carbon concentration in SiC is around 62 at %, while the target temperature has a little effect on the sputtering yield of SiC. Our work might provide theoretical support for the experimental research and engineering application of carbon fiber-reinforced SiC that be used as the plasma-facing material in tokamak fusion reactors.

  8. Development of evaluation method of long-term confinement performance for canister. Part 1. Fundamental study of analyses method for helium leak detection

    Takeda, Hirofumi; Toriu, Daisuke; Ushijima, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    The storage management of spent nuclear fuel for ageing degradation is becoming a global issue, so we researched the present status and measures of the management in each country. In particular, for the concrete cask storage, a leak detecting method that detects the leak from the change in canister surface temperature has been proposed. We performed thermal hydraulics analysis to clarify the phenomenon and to work toward practical use of the detecting method. For analyzing the leak phenomenon with high accuracy, it is necessary to stably solve the low-Mach number flow problem considering compressibility of gas. Therefore, we originally modified the conventional compressible flow solution method and proposed a new method which is applicable to thermo-hydraulics phenomenon and satisfies the mass conservation law with high accuracy. For the cavity natural convection analysis, the mass conservation in a calculating area was satisfied with high accuracy. As for the analysis of leak from the cavity, a helium leak phenomenon could be calculated stably by using the proposed method. The pressure in the cavity and the change of the mass could be also analyzed validly. As for the temperature distribution in the cavity, it was confirmed that the temperature changes before and after the leak. (author)

  9. Leak detection : Principles and practice

    Rama Rao, V.V.K.

    1981-01-01

    Principles of leak detection are explained and various aspects of leak detection techniques and leak detectors are reviewed. The review covers: units for leaks and leak tightness, classification of leaks, timing of leak testing, designing for ease of leak testing of any job, methods of leak detection, their ranges of application and limitations, leak detectors, response time of leak test, minimum detectable concentration of search gas during leak tests, and validity of leak tests. Helium mass spectrometer type leak detector and technique are described in detail. Recent improvements in leak detectors and techniques, particularly mass spectrometer leak detectors using gases other than helium (e.g. hydrogen, argon) are also covered in the review. (M.G.B.)

  10. Hydrogen and helium recycling from a JxB-force convected liquid metal Ga{sub 67}In{sub 20.5}Sn{sub 12.5} under steady state plasma bombardment

    Hirooka, Yoshi, E-mail: hirooka.yoshihiko@nifs.ac.jp [National institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Bi, Hailin [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Shimada, Michiya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Kamikita, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ono, Masa [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    A series of first-of-a-kind laboratory-scale experiments on the JxB-force convected liquid metal divertor concept have been carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to ∼200 °C, employing a eutectic alloy: Ga{sub 67}In{sub 20.5}Sn{sub 12.5}, the melting point of which is 10.5 °C. The electrical current conducted through the alloy is set at about 70A and the magnetic field is set at about 700 G. It has reproducibly been observed that hydrogen as well as helium particle recycling is noticeably reduced under steady state plasma bombardment when the liquid is convected by the JxB force.

  11. Mantle helium along the Newport-Inglewood fault zone, Los Angeles basin, California: A leaking paleo-subduction zone

    Boles, J. R.; Garven, G.; Camacho, H.; Lupton, J. E.

    2015-07-01

    Mantle helium is a significant component of the helium gas from deep oil wells along the Newport-Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ) in the Los Angeles (LA) basin. Helium isotope ratios are as high as 5.3 Ra (Ra = 3He/4He ratio of air) indicating 66% mantle contribution (assuming R/Ra = 8 for mantle), and most values are higher than 1.0 Ra. Other samples from basin margin faults and from within the basin have much lower values (R/Ra geothermal gradients, and is modeled as truncated by a proposed major, potentially seismically active, décollement beneath the LA basin. Our results demonstrate that the NIFZ is a deep-seated fault directly or indirectly connected with the mantle. Based on a 1-D model, we calculate a maximum Darcy flow rate q ˜ 2.2 cm/yr and a fault permeability k ˜ 6 × 10-17 m2 (60 microdarcys), but the flow rates are too low to create a geothermal anomaly. The mantle leakage may be a result of the NIFZ being a former Mesozoic subduction zone in spite of being located 70 km west of the current plate boundary at the San Andreas fault.

  12. Influence of helium-ion bombardment on the optical properties of ZnO nanorods/p-GaN light-emitting diodes

    Alvi, Naveed Ul Hassan; Hussain, Sajjad; Jensen, Jen; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2011-12-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods grown by vapor-liquid-solid catalytic growth method were irradiated with 2-MeV helium (He+) ions. The fabricated LEDs were irradiated with fluencies of approximately 2 × 1013 ions/cm2 and approximately 4 × 1013 ions/cm2. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the morphology of the irradiated samples is not changed. The as-grown and He+-irradiated LEDs showed rectifying behavior with the same I-V characteristics. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed that there is a blue shift of approximately 0.0347 and 0.082 eV in the near-band emission (free exciton) and green emission of the irradiated ZnO nanorods, respectively. It was also observed that the PL intensity of the near-band emission was decreased after irradiation of the samples. The electroluminescence (EL) measurements of the fabricated LEDs showed that there is a blue shift of 0.125 eV in the broad green emission after irradiation and the EL intensity of violet emission approximately centered at 398 nm nearly disappeared after irradiations. The color-rendering properties show a small decrease in the color-rendering indices of 3% after 2 MeV He+ ions irradiation.

  13. Leak testing and repair of fusion devices

    Kozman, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The leak testing, reporting and vacuum leak repair techniques of the MFTF yin-yang number one magnet system, the world's largest superconducting magnet system, are discussed. Based on this experience, techniques will be developed for testing and repairing leaks on the 42 MFTF-B magnets. The leak-hunting techniques for the yin-yang magnet systems were applied to two helium circuits (the coil bundle and guard vacuum; both require helium flow for magnet cooldown), their associated piping, liquid nitrogen radiation shields, and piping. Additionally, during MFTF-B operation there will be warm water plasma shields and piping that require leak checking

  14. Small leak shutdown, location, and behavior in LMFBR steam generators

    Sandusky, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes an experimental study of small leaks tested under LMFBR steam generator conditions. Defected tubes were exposed to flowing sodium and steam. The observed behavior of the defected tubes is reported along with test results of shutdown methods. Leak location methods were investigated. Methods were identified to open plugged defects for helium leak testing and detect plugged leaks by nondestructive testing

  15. PFR evaporator leak

    Smedley, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    PFR has three heat removal circuits each one having an evaporator, superheater, reheater; all separate units. The status of the system was that circuit No 3 was steaming with 10 MW thermal nuclear power; No 1 circuit was filled with sodium but with the evaporator awaiting modification to cure gas entrainment problems already reported. The leak was in No 2 circuit and was located in the evaporator unit. The evaporator is rated at 120 M thermal at full power and as such is a large unit. The circuit was filled with both sodium and water for the first time three weeks before the conference so it was recent history being reported and therefore any figures quoted should be taken as indicative only. The history of the steam generator was that it was built at works to a very high standard and underwent all the usual tests of strength, inspection of welds and helium leak testing. The steam generator is of U tube design with a tube plate to which the boiler tubes are welded, with all the welds in one of two gas spaces. The inlet and outlet sides are separated by a baffle and the salient features are illustrated in the attached figure. The unit achieved a leak tightness better than the detection limit in the helium leak test at works. This limit was assessed as being less than an equivalent leak of 10 -6 g/s water under steam generator service conditions. However even though all the steam generator units passed this test at works a further test was carried out when the circuits had been completed. The test was carried out during commissioning after sodium filling and with the units hot. The method was to introduce a mixture of helium/ argon at 500 pounds/square inch into the water side of the steam generators and measure the helium concentration in the sodium side gas spaces of the circuit. The test lasted many days and under these conditions the sensitivity is such that a leak equivalent to somewhere between 10 -7 to 10 -6 g/s equivalent water leak could be detected, i

  16. PFR evaporator leak

    Smedley, J A

    1975-07-01

    PFR has three heat removal circuits each one having an evaporator, superheater, reheater; all separate units. The status of the system was that circuit No 3 was steaming with 10 MW thermal nuclear power; No 1 circuit was filled with sodium but with the evaporator awaiting modification to cure gas entrainment problems already reported. The leak was in No 2 circuit and was located in the evaporator unit. The evaporator is rated at 120 M thermal at full power and as such is a large unit. The circuit was filled with both sodium and water for the first time three weeks before the conference so it was recent history being reported and therefore any figures quoted should be taken as indicative only. The history of the steam generator was that it was built at works to a very high standard and underwent all the usual tests of strength, inspection of welds and helium leak testing. The steam generator is of U tube design with a tube plate to which the boiler tubes are welded, with all the welds in one of two gas spaces. The inlet and outlet sides are separated by a baffle and the salient features are illustrated in the attached figure. The unit achieved a leak tightness better than the detection limit in the helium leak test at works. This limit was assessed as being less than an equivalent leak of 10{sup -6} g/s water under steam generator service conditions. However even though all the steam generator units passed this test at works a further test was carried out when the circuits had been completed. The test was carried out during commissioning after sodium filling and with the units hot. The method was to introduce a mixture of helium/ argon at 500 pounds/square inch into the water side of the steam generators and measure the helium concentration in the sodium side gas spaces of the circuit. The test lasted many days and under these conditions the sensitivity is such that a leak equivalent to somewhere between 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -6} g/s equivalent water leak could be

  17. Effect of helium on void swelling in vanadium

    Brimhall, J.L.; Simonen, E.P.

    1975-01-01

    Little difference in void microstructural swelling of vanadium is observed when helium is injected simultaneously with a 46- or 5-MeV nickel beam as compared to no helium injection, at least at high dose rates. At lower dose rates, a strong helium effect is seen when the helium is injected prior to heavy ion bombardment. The effect of the helium is shown to be a strong function of the overall displacement damage rate

  18. Developments in steam generator leak detection at Ontario Hydro

    Maynard, K.J.; Singh, V.P. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    A method for locating small tube leaks in steam generators has been developed and implemented at Ontario Hydro. The technique utilizes both helium leak detection and moisture leak detection. The combination of these two methods allows tube leaks to be detected in any part of the tube bundle, including those submerged below water near the tubesheet. The estimated detection limits for the helium and moisture leak detection systems are 0.001 kg/hr and 0.05 kg/hr respectively, expressed as leak rates measured at typical boiler operating conditions. This technology is best utilized in situations where the leak rate under operating conditions is smaller than the practical limit for fluorescein dye techniques ({approx}2 kg/hour). Other novel techniques have been utilized to increase the reliability and speed of the boiler leak search process. These include the use of argon carrier gas to stabilize the buoyant helium gas in the boiler secondary. (author)

  19. Developments in steam generator leak detection at Ontario Hydro

    Maynard, K.J.; Singh, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    A method for locating small tube leaks in steam generators has been developed and implemented at Ontario Hydro. The technique utilizes both helium leak detection and moisture leak detection. The combination of these two methods allows tube leaks to be detected in any part of the tube bundle, including those submerged below water near the tubesheet. The estimated detection limits for the helium and moisture leak detection systems are 0.001 kg/hr and 0.05 kg/hr respectively, expressed as leak rates measured at typical boiler operating conditions. This technology is best utilized in situations where the leak rate under operating conditions is smaller than the practical limit for fluorescein dye techniques (∼2 kg/hour). Other novel techniques have been utilized to increase the reliability and speed of the boiler leak search process. These include the use of argon carrier gas to stabilize the buoyant helium gas in the boiler secondary. (author)

  20. Development of a vacuum leak test method for large-scale superconducting magnet test facilities

    Kawano, Katsumi; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed leak detection technology for liquid helium temperature experiments in large-scale superconducting magnet test facilities. In JAEA, a cryosorption pump that uses an absorbent cooled by liquid nitrogen with a conventional helium leak detector, is used to detect helium gas that is leaking from pressurized welded joints of pipes and valves in a vacuum chamber. The cryosorption pump plays the role of decreasing aerial components, such as water, nitrogen and oxygen, to increase the sensitivity of helium leak detection. The established detection sensitivity for helium leak testing is 10 -10 to 10 -9 Pam 3 /s. A total of 850 welded and mechanical joints inside the cryogenic test facility for the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) experiments have been tested. In the test facility, 73 units of glass fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP) insulation break are used. The amount of helium permeation through the GFRP was recorded during helium leak testing. To distinguish helium leaks from insulation-break permeation, the helium permeation characteristic of the GFRP part was measured as a function of the time of helium charging. Helium permeation was absorbed at 6 h after helium charging, and the detected permeation is around 10 -7 Pam 3 /s. Using the helium leak test method developed, CSMC experiments have been successfully completed. (author)

  1. Steam generator leak detection at Bruce A Unit 1

    Maynard, K.J.; McInnes, D.E.; Singh, V.P.

    1997-01-01

    A new steam generator leak detection system was recently developed and utilized at Bruce A. The equipment is based on standard helium leak detection, with the addition of moisture detection and several other capability improvements. All but 1% of the Unit 1 Boiler 03 tubesheet was inspected, using a sniffer probe which inspected tubes seven at a time and followed by individual tube inspections. The leak search period was completed in approximately 24 hours, following a prerequisite period of several days. No helium leak indications were found anywhere on the boiler. A single water leak indication was found, which was subsequently confirmed as a through-wall defect by eddy current inspection. (author)

  2. Mobile leak testing system

    Ungr, F.

    The design and implementation are described of a mobile testing unit ULTRATEST M for helium leak tests. The equipment has been developed by Leybold-Heraeus GmbH in Cologne and is in-built in a Mercedes-Benz 208 van. The equipment is designed for the operative use in assembly and construction of nuclear power plants and its throughput is sufficient for checking the whole upper reactor block. It may also be used for removing defects of vacuum equipment requiring a high level of tightness or equally demanding equipment used in the chemical industry. Experience with the equipment is described. (B.S.)

  3. Relation between the conditions of helium ion implantation and helium void equilibrium parameters

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Rybalko, V.F.; Ruzhitskij, V.V.; Tolstolutskaya, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The conditions of helium thermodynamic equilibrium in a system of voids produced by helium ion bombardment of a metal sample are studied. As an initial equation for description of the equilibrium the Clapeyron equation was used. The equation is obtained relating basic parameters of helium voids (average diameter and density) to irradiation parameters (dose, ion energy (straggling)) and properties of the metal (surface tension coefficient, yield strength). Comparison of the calculations with experimental data on helium in nickel found in literature shows that the equation yields satisfactory resutls for the dose range 1.10 16 -1x10 17 cm -2 and temperatures T [ru

  4. Repair of EL4 leaks

    1985-03-01

    The reactor shutdown was decided on the 15th of November 1984, because the evolution of the carbon dioxide quantity in the helium blanket of the heavy water. Leaks have been localized on three different channels. Repairs have been made in hard conditions taking into account the reactor state (materials strongly irradiated). The restart has been authorized on the 24th of January 1985 [fr

  5. Vacuum leak test technique of JT-60

    Kaminaga, Atsushi; Arai, Takashi; Kodama, Kozo; Sasaki, Noboru; Saidoh, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    Since a vacuum vessel of JT-60 is very large (167 m 3 ) and is combined with many components, such as magnetic coils, neutral beam injection systems and RF heating systems, etc., the position of leak testing exceeds 700. The two kind of techniques for vacuum leak test used in JT-60 has been described. Firstly the probe helium gas can be fed remotely in the three-dimensionally sectioned 54 regions of the JT-60 torus. The leak test was very rapidly performed by using this method. Secondly the helium detector system has been modified by the additional installation of the cryopump, which reduced the background level of the deuterium gas. The sensitivity of vacuum leak test with the cryopump was two orders of magnitude larger than that of without it. The examples of the performed vacuum leak test are stated. The vacuum leaks during experiments were 9 times. They were caused by thermal strain and plasma discharge. The vacuum leaks just after maintenance are 36 times which mainly caused by mis-installation. (author)

  6. Surface roughening under ion bombardment

    Bhatia, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Ion bombardment can cause roughening of a surface. Inadequate step coverage and poor adhesion of films on such surfaces are of concern. An extreme case of surface roughening results in cone formation under ion bombardment. The results of the investigation, using scanning electron microscopy, is discussed in terms of the role of (a) embedded particles, (b) impurities and (c) surface migration in cone formation on the target surface. (Auth.)

  7. Liquid helium

    Atkins, K R

    1959-01-01

    Originally published in 1959 as part of the Cambridge Monographs on Physics series, this book addresses liquid helium from the dual perspectives of statistical mechanics and hydrodynamics. Atkins looks at both Helium Three and Helium Four, as well as the properties of a combination of the two isotopes. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of science and the study of one of the universe's most fundamental elements.

  8. Ion bombardment simulation: a review related to fusion radiation damage

    Brimhall, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Prime emphasis is given to reviewing the ion bombardment data on the refractory metals molybdenum, niobium and vanadium which have been proposed for use in advanced fusion devices. The temperature and dose dependence of the void parameters are correlated among these metals. The effect of helium and hydrogen gas on the void parameters is also included. The similarities and differences of the response of these materials to high dose, high temperature radiation damage are evaluated. Comparisons are made with results obtained from stainless steel and nickel base alloys. The ion bombardment data is then compared and correlated, as far as possible, with existing neutron data on the refractory metals. The theoretically calculated damage state produced by neutrons and ions is also briefly discussed and compared to experimental data wherever possible. The advantages and limitations of ion simulation in relation to fusion radiation damage are finally summarized

  9. Electron driven water formation from oxyhydrogen clusters in superfluid helium nanodroplets

    Renzler, Michael; Kranabetter, Lorenz; Barwa, Erik; Scheier, Paul; Illenberger, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets provide an enviroment that allow studies of chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures. We use these droplets as a matrix to study the formation of water upon electron bombardment of oxyhydrogen clusters (paper)

  10. Facies of ion bombarded surfaces of brittle materials

    Primak, W.

    1975-12-01

    Materials were bombarded by protons, deuterons, and helium ions. The materials investigated were quartz; glasses; carbides and borides (SiC, B 4 C, TiB 2 ); oxides and nitrides (magnorite, sapphire, spinel, Al 2 O 3 , Si 3 N 4 , ZrO 2 , BaTiO 3 ); and miscellaneous (graphite, LiNbO 3 , copper). Oberservations were of growth, reflectivity, blistering, surface ablation, and swelling. Calculations were made of the effects of a layer, of its gradual transformation, and of the introduction of a gas. It is concluded that: Radiation blistering is not a primary process. Observations of blister formation and exfoliation cannot be used to calculate the surface ablation rate. The primary process is the development of a microporous layer which causes swelling. Visible blisters are caused by fracturing by transverse stresses in this layer and may occur during the bombardment, or in some cases, much later, in storage. There is no evidence of extreme gas pressures in the blisters. When blisters develop, they may be stable under continued bombardment for a dose many times that at which they formed. The swelling is a better index of the effects than is the blistering, and must be associated in most cases with permeability to the gas. Behavior with protons and deuterons is similar, with helium different. All but quartz, vitreous silica, and Pyrex are impervious to hydrogen and deuterium; only dense barium crown glass, carbides, borides, oxides, and nitrides are impervious to helium. Quartz shows swelling caused by conversion to a vitreous product of much lower density but no porosity, while for the others, most of the swelling and surface growth is caused by porosity. Surface ablation by the blistering process may be reduced by initial porosity or by initial or subsequent surface fissuring. However, for impervious materials, surface damage by the introduction of porosity would continue

  11. Determination of helium in beryl minerals

    Souza Barcellos, E. de.

    1985-08-01

    In order to obtain the diffusion coefficients of helium in beryl and phenacite samples at various temperatures, helium leak rates were measured in these minerals at these temperatures. Mass spectrometry (MS) was used to obtain helium leak rates and the gas flow was plotted against time. The gas quantity determined by MS was first obtained at various temperatures until no helium leak rate was detected. After that, these samples were irradiated with fast neutrons to produce helium which was measured again. This procedure was used to estimate the experimental error. The quantity of helium produced by interaction of gamma radiation with beryl minerals was theoretically calculated from the amount of thorium-232 at the neighbourhood of the samples. The quantity of helium produced in the minerals due to uranium and thorium decay was calculated using the amount of these heavy elements, and the results were compared with the amounts determined by MS. The amount of potassium-40 was determined in order to derive the quantity of argonium-40, since some workers found argonium in excess in these minerals. The quantity of helium in the beryl samples (s) was determined in the center and in the surface of the samples in order to obtain informations about the effectiveness of the Be(α, η) He reaction. Beryl and phenacite minerals were choosen in this research since they are opposite each other with respect to the helium contents. Both have beryllium in their compositon but beryl hold a large amount of helium while phenacite, in spite of having about three times more beryllium than beryl, do not hold the gas. (author) [pt

  12. Ion bombardment modification of surfaces

    Auciello, O.

    1984-01-01

    An historical overview of the main advances in the understanding of bombardment-induced surface topography is presented. The implantation and sputtering mechanisms which are relevant to ion bombardment modification of surfaces and consequent structural, electronic and compositional changes are described. Descriptions of plasma and ion-beam sputtering-induced film formation, primary ion-beam deposition, dual beam techniques, cluster of molecule ion-beam deposition, and modification of thin film properties by ion bombardment during deposition are presented. A detailed account is given of the analytical and computational modelling of topography from the viewpoint of first erosion theory. Finally, an account of the possible application and/or importance of textured surfaces in technologies and/or experimental techniques not considered in previous chapters is presented. refs.; figs.; tabs

  13. Helium cryogenics

    Van Sciver, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Twenty five years have elapsed since the original publication of Helium Cryogenics. During this time, a considerable amount of research and development involving helium fluids has been carried out culminating in several large-scale projects. Furthermore, the field has matured through these efforts so that there is now a broad engineering base to assist the development of future projects. Helium Cryogenics, 2nd edition brings these advances in helium cryogenics together in an updated form. As in the original edition, the author's approach is to survey the field of cryogenics with emphasis on helium fluids. This approach is more specialized and fundamental than that contained in other cryogenics books, which treat the associated range of cryogenic fluids. As a result, the level of treatment is more advanced and assumes a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles, including some quantum mechanics. The goal throughout the work is to bridge the gap between the physics and engineering aspe...

  14. Effect of helium on void formation in nickel

    Brimhall, J.L.; Simonen, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    This study examines the influence of helium on void formation in self-ion irradiated nickel. Helium was injected either simultaneously with, or prior to, the self-ion bombardment. The void microstructure was characterized as a function of helium deposition rate and the total heavy-ion dose. In particular, at 575 0 C and 5 X 10 -3 displacements per atom per second the void density is found to be proportional to the helium deposition rate. The dose dependence of swelling is initially dominated by helium driven nucleation. The void density rapidly saturates after which swelling continues with increasing dose only from void growth. It is concluded that helium promotes void nucleation in nickel with either helium implantation technique, pre-injection or simultaneous injection. Qualitative differences, however, are recognized. (Auth.)

  15. He leak testing of Indus-2 dipole vacuum chambers

    Sindal, B.K.; Bhavsar, S.T.; Shukla, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Centre for Advanced Technology is developing its second synchrotron radiation source INDUS-2 which is a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. Dipole vacuum chambers are the vital components of Indus-2 vacuum system. Each of these chambers is approx. 3.6 m long and 0.67 m wide with 24 nos. of ports of various sizes. The dipole chambers were made by machining two halves and they are then lip welded together. The dipole chamber has approx. 14 m of total weld length and it was leak tested for leak tightness of the order of 10 -10 mbar 1/s. Helium mass spectrometer leak detector (HMSLD) was utilized for the leak testing. Subsequently the leaks of various orders in welding joints were repaired and leak tightness achieved. This paper describes the experiences during leak testing of 20 nos. of aluminum dipole chambers for INDUS-2

  16. Vacuum leak detector and method

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  17. Ion bombardment damage in a modified Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel

    Farrell, K.; Lee, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    A normalized-and-tempered Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel, with small Nb and V additions, was bombarded with 4-MeV iron ions to 100 dpa at 400, 450, 500, 550, and 600 0 C. Major damage feature was dislocation tangles which coarsened with increasing bombardment temperature. Sparse cavities were heterogeneously distributed at 500 and 550 0 C. Incorporation of helium and deuterium simultaneously in the bombardments at rates of 10 and 45 appM/dpa, respectively, introduced very high concentrations of small cavities at all temperatures, many of them on grain boundaries. These cavities were shown to be promoted by helium. A small fraction of the matrix cavities exhibited bias-driven growth at 500 and 550 0 C, with swelling 0 C higher than the peak swelling temperature found in neutron irradiations, which is compatible with the higher damage rate used in the ion bombardments. High concentrations of subgrain boundaries and dislocations resulting from the heat treatment, and unbalanced cavity and dislocation sink strengths in the damage structures contribute to the swelling resistance. Such resistance may not be permanent. High densities of bubbles on grain boundaries indicate a need for helium embrittlement tests

  18. Leak testing at Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF)

    Jackson, C.N.

    1981-01-01

    Described leak testing applications require an arsenal of test equipment, a diverse range of testing techniques and a cadre of technical talent. A wide range helium mass spectrometer leak detector, a volume change tester and a halogen detector are employed to cover the 1 x 10 -8 to 1 atm cc/sec leak rate range encountered. Leak testing techniques, equipment problems, costs, and recommendations are discussed for examination of reactor pressure boundary and other ancillary components of the FFTF

  19. Depressurization as a means of leak checking large vacuum vessels

    Callis, R.W.; Langhorn, A.; Petersen, P.I.; Ward, C.; Wesley, J.

    1985-01-01

    A common problem associated with large vacuum vessels used in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is that leak checking is hampered by the inaccessibility to most of the vacuum vessel surface. This inaccessibility is caused by the close proximity of magnetic coils, diagnostics and, for those vessels that are baked, the need to completely surround the vessel with a thermal insulation blanket. These obstructions reduce the effectiveness of the standard leak checking method of using a mass spectrometer and spraying a search gas such as helium on the vessel exterior. Even when the presence of helium is detected, its entry point into the vessel cannot always be pinpointed. This paper will describe a method of overcoming this problem. By slightly depressurizing the vessel, an influx of helium through the leak is created. The leak site can then be identified by personnel within the vessel using standard sniffing procedures. There are two conditions which make this method of leak checking practical. First, the vessel need only be depressurized 2 psi, thus allowing personnel inside to perform the sniffing operation. Second, the sniffing probe used (Leybold--Heraus ''Quick Test'') could detect a change in helium concentration as small as 100 ppb, which allows for faster scanning of the vessel inferior. Use of this technique to find an elusive 10 -3 Torrxl/s leak in the Doublet III tokamak vacuum vessel will be presented

  20. Noble Gas Leak Detector for Use in the SNS Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiment

    Barrow, Chad; Huffman, Paul; Leung, Kent; Korobkina, Ekaterina; White, Christian; nEDM Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Common practice for leak-checking high vacuum systems uses helium as the probing gas. However, helium may permeate some materials at room temperature, making leak characterization difficult. The experiment to find a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM), to be conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, will employ a large volume of liquid helium housed by such a helium-permeable composite material. It is desirable to construct a leak detector that can employ alternative test gases. The purpose of this experiment is to create a leak detector that can quantify the argon gas flux in a high vacuum environment and interpret this flux as a leak-rate. This apparatus will be used to check the nEDM volumes for leaks at room temperature before cooling down to cryogenic temperatures. Our leak detector uses a residual gas analyzer and a vacuum pumping station to characterize the gas present in an evacuated volume. The introduction of argon gas into the system is interpreted as a leak-rate into the volume. The device has been calibrated with NIST certified calibrated leaks and the machine's sensitivity has been calculated using background gas analysis. As a result of the device construction and software programming, we are able to leak-check composite and polyamide volumes This work was supported in part by the US Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41042.

  1. Remote leak localization approach for fusion machines

    Durocher, Au.; Bruno, V.; Chantant, M.; Gargiulo, L.; Gherman, T.; Hatchressian, J.-C.; Houry, M.; Le, R.; Mouyon, D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Description of leaks issue. ► Selection of leak localization concepts. ► Qualification of leak localization concepts. -- Abstract: Fusion machine operation requires high-vacuum conditions and does not tolerate water or gas leak in the vacuum vessels, even if they are micrometric. Tore Supra, as a fully actively cooled tokamak, has got a large leak management experience; 34 water leaks occurred since the beginning of its operation in 1988. To handle this issue, after preliminary machine protection phases, the current process for leak localization is based on water or helium pressurization network by network. It generally allows the identification of a set of components where the leakage element is located. However, the unique background of CEA-IRFM laboratory points needs of accuracy and promptness out in the leak localization process. Moreover, in-vessel interventions have to be performed trying to minimize time and risks for the persons. They are linked to access conditions, radioactivity, tracer gas high pressure and vessel conditioning. Remote operation will be one of the ways to improve these points on future fusion machines. In this case, leak sensors would have to be light weight devices in order to be integrated on a carrier or to be located outside with a sniffing process set up. A leak localization program is on-going at CEA-IRFM Laboratory with the first goal of identifying and characterizing relevant concepts to localize helium or water leaks on ITER. In the same time, CEA has developed robotic carrier for effective in-vessel intervention in a hostile environment. Three major tests campaigns with the goal to identify leak sensors have been achieved on several CEA test-beds since 2010. Very promising results have been obtained: relevant scenario of leak localization performed, concepts tested in a high volume test-bed called TITAN, and, in several conditions of pressure and temperature (ultrahigh vacuum to atmospheric pressure and 20

  2. Remote leak localization approach for fusion machines

    Durocher, Au., E-mail: aurelien.durocher@cea.fr [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bruno, V.; Chantant, M.; Gargiulo, L. [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Gherman, T. [Floralis UJF Filiale, F-38610 Gières (France); Hatchressian, J.-C.; Houry, M.; Le, R.; Mouyon, D. [CEA-IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Description of leaks issue. ► Selection of leak localization concepts. ► Qualification of leak localization concepts. -- Abstract: Fusion machine operation requires high-vacuum conditions and does not tolerate water or gas leak in the vacuum vessels, even if they are micrometric. Tore Supra, as a fully actively cooled tokamak, has got a large leak management experience; 34 water leaks occurred since the beginning of its operation in 1988. To handle this issue, after preliminary machine protection phases, the current process for leak localization is based on water or helium pressurization network by network. It generally allows the identification of a set of components where the leakage element is located. However, the unique background of CEA-IRFM laboratory points needs of accuracy and promptness out in the leak localization process. Moreover, in-vessel interventions have to be performed trying to minimize time and risks for the persons. They are linked to access conditions, radioactivity, tracer gas high pressure and vessel conditioning. Remote operation will be one of the ways to improve these points on future fusion machines. In this case, leak sensors would have to be light weight devices in order to be integrated on a carrier or to be located outside with a sniffing process set up. A leak localization program is on-going at CEA-IRFM Laboratory with the first goal of identifying and characterizing relevant concepts to localize helium or water leaks on ITER. In the same time, CEA has developed robotic carrier for effective in-vessel intervention in a hostile environment. Three major tests campaigns with the goal to identify leak sensors have been achieved on several CEA test-beds since 2010. Very promising results have been obtained: relevant scenario of leak localization performed, concepts tested in a high volume test-bed called TITAN, and, in several conditions of pressure and temperature (ultrahigh vacuum to atmospheric pressure and 20

  3. Sputtering of solid nitrogen by keV helium ions

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1993-01-01

    Solid nitrogen has become a standard material among the frozen molecular gases for electronic sputtering. We have combined measurements of sputtering yields and energy spectra from nitrogen bombarded by 4-10 keV helium ions. The data show that the erosion is electronic rather than knockon...

  4. The influence of noble-gas ion bombardment on the electrical and optical properties of clean silicon surfaces

    Martens, J.W.D.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the effect of argon and helium ion bombardment on the electrical and optical properties of the clean silicon (211) surface is described. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of noble gas ions on the density of surface states at the clean silicon surface. (Auth.)

  5. Leak rate models and leak detection

    1992-01-01

    Leak detection may be carried out by a number of detection systems, but selection of the systems must be carefully adapted to the fluid state and the location of the leak in the reactor coolant system. Computer programs for the calculation of leak rates contain different models to take into account the fluid state before its entrance into the crack, and they have to be verified by experiments; agreement between experiments and calculations is generally not satisfactory for very small leak rates resulting from narrow cracks or from a closing bending moment

  6. Cold Leak Tests of LHC Beam Screens

    Collomb-Patton, C; Jenninger, B; Kos, N

    2009-01-01

    In order to guide the high energy proton beams inside its two 27 km long vacuum rings, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, makes use of superconducting technology to create the required magnetic fields. More than 4000 beam screens, cooled at 7 20 K, are inserted inside the 1.9 K beam vacuum tubes to intercept beam induced heat loads and to provide dynamic vacuum stability. As extremely high helium leak tightness is required, all beam screens have been leak tested under cold conditions in a dedicated test stand prior to their installation. After describing the beam screen design and its functions, this report focuses on the cold leak test sequence and discusses the results.

  7. Leak test fixture and method for using same

    Hawk, Lawrence S.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided which are especially useful for leak testing seams such as an end closure or joint in an article. The test does not require an enclosed pressurized volume within the article or joint section to be leak checked. A flexible impervious membrane is disposed over an area of the seamed surfaces to be leak checked and sealed around the outer edges. A preselected vacuum is applied through an opening in the membrane to evacuate the area between the membrane and the surface being leak checked to essentially collapse the membrane to conform to the article surface or joined adjacent surfaces. A pressure differential is concentrated at the seam bounded by the membrane and only the seam experiences a pressure differential as air or helium molecules are drawn into the vacuum system through a leak in the seam. A helium detector may be placed in a vacuum exhaust line from the membrane to detect the helium. Alternatively, the vacuum system may be isolated at a preselected pressure and leaks may be detected by a subsequent pressure increase in the vacuum system.

  8. Ion bombardment modification of surfaces

    Auciello, O.

    1984-01-01

    Ion bombardment-induced modification of surfaces may be considered one of the significant scientific and technological developments of the last two decades. The understanding acquired concerning the underlying mechanisms of several phenomena occurring during ion-surface interactions has led to applications within different modern technologies. These include microelectronics, surface acoustical and optical technologies, solar energy conversion, thin film technology, ion implantation metallurgy, nuclear track technology, thermonuclear fusion, vacuum technology, cold welding technology, biomedicine (implantology). It has become clear that information on many relevant advances, regarding ion bombardment modification of surfaces is dispersed among journals involving fields sometimes not clearly related. This may result, in some cases, in a loss of the type of interdisciplinary exchange of ideas, which has proved to be so fruitful for the advancement of science and technology. This book has been planned in an attempt to collect at least some of today's relevant information about the experimental and theoretical knowledge related to surface modification and its application to technology. (Auth.)

  9. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Labombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux ∼ 1 x 10 18 ions s -1 cm -2 to a fluence of the order of 10 21 ions/cm 2 and at temperatures around 800 degree C. The plasma bombarding energy was varied between 100 and 200 eV. The gettering speed of the activated graphite surface is estimated to be as large as 25 liters s -1 cm -2 at total pressures between 10 -6 and 10 -7 torr. The gettering capacity estimated is 0.025 torr-liter/cm 2 at room temperature. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10 18 H/cm 2 at temperatures below 100 degree C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV

  10. Leak testing of cryogenic components — problems and solutions

    Srivastava, S. P.; Pandarkar, S. P.; Unni, T. G.; Sinha, A. K.; Mahajan, K.; Suthar, R. L.

    2008-05-01

    A prototype of Cold Neutron Source (CNS) for Dhruva Reactor is being manufactured at Centre for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC, Mumbai for validating the mechanical and thermal engineering design aspects, besides checking the integrity of all joints and components at low temperature, 77K. Task of a Cold Neutron Source is to generate cold neutrons by cooling down the thermal neutrons, which are originally produced in a nuclear research reactor. The complete Cold Neutron Source system comprises a complex arrangement of moderator pot, transfer line (piping), pumps, refrigerators, storage tanks, a heat exchanger and associated controls and instrumentation. The heart of the system is moderator pot in which water (moderator) is cooled down by Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) being circulated through an annular cavity machined on the walls of the pot. Transfer lines for LN2 basically consist of two concentric Stainless Steel flexible pipes, which are joined to the inlet and outlet Aluminium tubes of the moderator pot through transition joints. Leak in any component may result in loss of liquid Nitrogen, degradation of vacuum, which in turn may affect the heat removal efficiency of the source. Hence, leak testing was considered a very important quality control tool and all joints and components were subjected to helium leak test using mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD) at cryogenic temperature. During one of the earlier experiments, flow of LN2 through inner flexible pipe of the transfer line resulted in rise of pressure in the vacuum annulus and sweating on the outer flexible pipe. After investigations it was found that large thermal stress compounded with mechanical stress resulted in cracks in the inner pipe. Accordingly design was modified to get leak proof transfer line assembly. Further, during leak testing of thin wall moderator pot, gross leak was observed on the outer jacket welded joint. Leak was so large that even a small amount of Helium gas in the vicinity of the

  11. Specialists meeting on leak detection and location in LMFBR steam generators. Summary report

    NONE

    1978-10-01

    The following topics covered at the meeting were: with leak detection and location methods and equipment, including concentration measurements, helium tests, and electromagnetic methods; acoustic leak detection and related equipment; techniques and experiences in ensuring and measuring steam generator tightness during manufacturing, installation and repair, tube inspection methods for periodic control and damage assessment following leaks, influence of these methods on design of steam generators for LMFBR type reactors.

  12. Specialists meeting on leak detection and location in LMFBR steam generators. Summary report

    1978-10-01

    The following topics covered at the meeting were: with leak detection and location methods and equipment, including concentration measurements, helium tests, and electromagnetic methods; acoustic leak detection and related equipment; techniques and experiences in ensuring and measuring steam generator tightness during manufacturing, installation and repair, tube inspection methods for periodic control and damage assessment following leaks, influence of these methods on design of steam generators for LMFBR type reactors

  13. Helium crystals

    Lipson, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed helium crystals in equilibrium with superfluid have been found to be one of the few systems in which an anisotropic solid comes into true thermodynamic equilibrium with its melt. The discovery of roughening transitions at the liquid-solid interface have shown this system to be ideal for the study of the statistical mechanics of interface structures. We describe the effect of roughening on the shape and growth of macroscopic crystals from both the theoretical and experimental points of view. (author)

  14. Operational experiences with on line BWR condenser tube leak verification

    Bryant, R.A.; Duvall, W.E.; Kirkley, W.B.; Zavadoski, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Verifying condenser tube leaks at a boiling water reactor is, at best, a difficult task carried out in hot steamy water boxes with concurrent radiation exposure. For small apparent leaks with slight chemical changes there is always uncertainty of whether the problem is a condenser tube leak or a feedback from radwaste. Most conventional methods (e.g soap tests, Saran wrap suction, and helium tests) usually involve a load reduction to isolate the water boxes one at a time and hours of drain down on each box. The sensitivity of the most sensitive test (helium) is of the order of 7500 l per day per box. Sulfur hexafluoride has been successfully used at a BWR to identify one leaking water box out of four while the unit was at 100 % power. The actual tubes leakig in the water box were identified by injecting helium during drain down of the box and subsequent manifold testing. Additional tests with sulfur hexafluoride on the second BWR unit indicated tight water boxes to within the sensitivity of the measurement, i.e. less than 19 l per day for all four boxes. Problems encountered in both tests included sulfur hexafluoride carry over from the plume of the cooling towers and off gas considerations. In brief sulfur hexafluoride can be used to quickly identify which particular water box has a condenser tube leak or, just as quickly, establish the integrity of all the water boxes to a level not previously attainable. (author)

  15. Hydrogen pumping and release by graphite under high flux plasma bombardment

    Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Nygren, R.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Inert gas (helium or argon) plasma bombardment has been found to increase the surface gas adsorptivity of isotropic graphite (POCO-graphite), which can then getter residual gases in a high vacuum system. The inert gas plasma bombardment was carried out at a flux ≅ 1 x 10 18 ions s -1 cm -2 to a fluence of the order of 10 21 ions/cm 2 and at temperatures around 800 0 C. The gettering capability of graphite can be easily recovered by repeating inert gas plasma bombardment. The activated graphite surface exhibits a smooth, sponge-like morphology with significantly increased pore openings, which correlates with the observed increase in the surface gas adsorptivity. The activated graphite surface has been observed to pump hydrogen plasma particles as well. From calibrated H-alpha measurements, the dynamic hydrogen retention capacity is evaluated to be as large as 2 x 10 18 H/cm 2 at temperatures below 100 0 C and at a plasma bombarding energy of 300 eV. The graphite temperature was varied between 15 and 480 0 C. Due to the plasma particle pumping capability, hydrogen recycling from the activated graphite surface is significantly reduced, relative to that from a pre-saturated surface. A pre-saturated surface was also observed to reproducibly pump a hydrogen plasma to a concentration of 9.5 x 10 17 H/cm 2 . The hydrogen retention capacity of graphite is found to decrease with increasing temperature. A transient pumping mechanism associated with the sponge-like surface morphology is conjectured to explain the large hydrogen retention capacity. Hydrogen release behavior under helium and argon plasma bombardment was also investigated, and the result indicated the possibility of some in-pore retrapping effect. 43 refs., 11 figs

  16. Ion-bombardment effects on the fatigue life of stainless steel under simulated fusion first-wall conditions

    Kohse, G.E.

    1983-02-01

    An experiment which uses the MITR-II 5 MW research reactor to simulate several aspects of the anticipated environment of a fusion reactor first wall is described. Pressurized tube specimens are subjected simultaneously to stress and temperature cycling, surface bombardment by energetic helium and lithium ions and bulk irradiation by high-energy neutrons. Analysis of the samples is aimed primarily at determining the behavior of the ion bombarded surface layer, which has a depth of 2.5 μm, with particular reference to possible effects on the fatigue life of the material

  17. Leak detection/verification

    Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L. [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic)

    1997-04-01

    Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

  18. Control of helium effects in irradiated materials based on theory and experiment

    Mansur, L.K.; Lee, E.H.; Maziasz, P.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    Helium produced in materials by (n,α) transmutation reactions during neutron irradiations or subjected in ion bombardment experiments causes substantial changes in the response to displacement damage. In particular, swelling, phase transformations and embrittlement are strongly affected. Present understanding of the mechanisms underlying these effects is reviewed. Key theoretical relationships describing helium effects on swelling and helium diffusion are described. Experimental data in the areas of helium effects on swelling and precipitation is reviewed with emphasis on critical experiments that have been designed and evaluated in conjunction with theory. Confirmed principles for alloy design to control irradiation performance are described

  19. Permanent underwater leak detector

    Costello, L; McStay, D; Moodie, D; Kane, D

    2009-01-01

    A new optoelectronic sensor for the real time monitoring of key components such as valves and connectors within the subsea production equipment for leaks of hydraulic fluid is reported. The sensor is capable of detecting low concentrations of such fluids, allowing the early detection of small leaks, and the ability to monitor the evolution of the leak-rate with time, hence providing an important new tool in complying with environmental requirements, enabling early intervention and optimising subsea production

  20. Ultrasensitive leak detection

    Winkelman, C.R.; Davidson, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop a method of detecting leaks to a sensitivity of 1.0 x 10 -13 std/cm 3 /s in vacuum devices and to develop a qualifiable standard leak to provide system calibration at this leak rate. The development work demonstrated that minimum detectable leak rates of 6.5 x 10 -14 std/cm 3 /s and 5.5 x 10 -15 std/cm 3 /s are possible for respective analog and digital measurement modes

  1. Characterization techniques for ion bombarded insulators

    Borders, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter gives a comprehensive review of the experimental methods for the analysis of ion-bombarded insulators including optical and structural methods, resonance, energetic ion methods, and surface techniques. 48 refs.; 34 figs

  2. Sonic Helium Detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    Bossert, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years.

  3. Sonic helium detectors in the Fermilab Tevatron

    Bossert, R.J.; Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    In the Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system there are many remotely located low-pressure plate relief valves that must vent large volumes of cold helium gas when magnet quenches occur. These valves can occasionally stick open or not reseat completely, resulting in a large helium loss. As such, the need exists for a detector to monitor the relief valve's discharge area for the presence of helium. Due to the quantity needed, cost is an important factor. A unit has been developed and built for this purpose that is quite inexpensive. Its operating principle is based on the speed of sound, where two closely matched tubes operate at their acoustic resonant frequency. When helium is introduced into one of these tubes, the resulting difference in acoustic time of flight is used to trigger an alarm. At present, there are 39 of these units installed and operating in the Tevatron. They have detected many minor and major helium leaks, and have also been found useful in detecting a rise in the helium background in the enclosed refrigerator buildings. This paper covers the construction, usage and operational experience gained with these units over the last several years

  4. The adsorption of helium atoms on coronene cations

    Kurzthaler, Thomas; Rasul, Bilal; Kuhn, Martin; Scheier, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Scheier@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: andrew.ellis@le.ac.uk [Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Lindinger, Albrecht [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Ellis, Andrew M., E-mail: Paul.Scheier@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: andrew.ellis@le.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-14

    We report the first experimental study of the attachment of multiple foreign atoms to a cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). The chosen PAH was coronene, C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, which was added to liquid helium nanodroplets and then subjected to electron bombardment. Using mass spectrometry, coronene cations decorated with helium atoms were clearly seen and the spectrum shows peaks with anomalously high intensities (“magic number” peaks), which represent ion-helium complexes with added stability. The data suggest the formation of a rigid helium layer consisting of 38 helium atoms that completely cover both faces of the coronene ion. Additional magic numbers can be seen for the further addition of 3 and 6 helium atoms, which are thought to attach to the edge of the coronene. The observation of magic numbers for the addition of 38 and 44 helium atoms is in good agreement with a recent path integral Monte Carlo prediction for helium atoms on neutral coronene. An understanding of how atoms and molecules attach to PAH ions is important for a number of reasons including the potential role such complexes might play in the chemistry of the interstellar medium.

  5. Leak detection method

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a method for removing nuclear fuel elements from a fabrication building while at the same time testing the fuel elements for leaks without releasing contaminants from the fabrication building or from the fuel elements. The vacuum source used, leak detecting mechanism and fuel element fabrication building are specified to withstand environmental hazards. (UK)

  6. Technical basis for inner container leak detection sensitivity goals in 3013 DE surveillance

    Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-11

    Helium leak checking of 3013 inner container lids is under consideration for addition to DE Surveillance tasks as an improved means to detect any through-wall flaws that may have formed during storage. This white paper evaluates whether leak checking at DE could replace and improve upon the current method of comparing gas compositions and pressures within the inner and outer containers. We have used viscous and molecular flow equations in ANSI N14.5 to calculate what the measured standard helium leak rate would be for hypothetical leaks of three different sizes. For comparison, we have also calculated the effects on gas composition and pressure differences as a function of pre-DE storage time for the same three leak sizes, using molecular and viscous flow equations as well as diffusion equations to predict the relevant gas transport. For a hypothetical leak that would be measured at 1x10-7 std cc/sec, likely an achievable sensitivity using helium leak checking at DE, the calculations predict no measurable effect on pressure difference or gas composition as measured by DE gas analysis. We also calculate that it would take over 200 years for water vapor to diffuse through a 10-7 std cc/sec leak enough to raise the RH outer container to half the RH value in the inner container. A leak 100 times larger, which would be measured at 1x10-5 std cc/sec, the same water vapor diffusion would take at least 14 years. Our conclusion is that helium leak checking will be useful even at a sensitivity of 1x10-5 std cc/sec, and a significant improvement over current DE methods at a sensitivity of 1x10-7 std cc/sec.

  7. Steam and sodium leak simulation in a fluidized-bed steam generator

    Vaux, W.G.; Keeton, A.R.; Keairns, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A fluidized-bed steam generator for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor enhances plant availability and minimizes the probability of a water/sodium reaction. An experimental test program was conceived to assess design criteria and fluidized-bed operation under conditions of water, steam, and sodium leaks. Sodium, steam, and water were leaked into helium-fluidized beds of metal and ceramic particles at 900 F. Test results show the effects of leaks on the heat transfer coefficient, quality of fluidization, leak detection, and cleanup procedures

  8. Analysis of small leaks

    Frisch, W.; Hofmann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Problems associated with 'small leaks' are described and requirements are derived for experimental facilities and computer codes. Based on these requirements, a valuation of the existing experimental facilities and codes is presented. Facilities for integral tests in relatively large scale (ex. LOFT) are suitable for small leak test in principle, however minor changes (instrumentation, secondary side) are necessary for the evaluation of certain phenomena. The 'advanced blowdown codes' are capable of describing most of the phenomena occurring during small leak events, however a substantial amount of code development and verification is still needed. In addition, the use of transient codes in small leak analysis is demonstrated. There are some areas (neutronics feedback, influence of control system) in which the use of transient codes is possible and advantageous. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 BRE [de

  9. Traumatic orbital CSF leak

    Borumandi, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the cerebrospinalfluid (CSF) leak through the nose and ear, the orbital CSF leak is a rare and underreported condition following head trauma. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with oedematous eyelid swelling and ecchymosis after a seemingly trivial fall onto the right orbit. Apart from the above, she was clinically unremarkable. The CT scan revealed a minimally displaced fracture of the orbital roof with no emphysema or intracranial bleeding. The fractured orbital roof in combination with the oedematous eyelid swelling raised the suspicion for orbital CSF leak. The MRI of the neurocranium demonstrated a small-sized CSF fistula extending from the anterior cranial fossa to the right orbit. The patient was treated conservatively and the lid swelling resolved completely after 5 days. Although rare, orbital CSF leak needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of periorbital swelling following orbital trauma. PMID:24323381

  10. WRSS jumper leak assessment

    BAILEY, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment is: (1) to assemble and document the facts associated with three recently installed jumpers which have leaked either during actual process operation or during post installation testing; (2) to describe the corrective actions taken and to identify any process improvements which need to be implemented in the Hanford jumper design and installation activities; and (3) to document WRSS jumper leak lessons learned for use by future projects and other jumper design, fabrication, and installation activities

  11. Small liquid sodium leaks

    Dufresne, J.; Rochedereux, Y.; Antonakas, D.; Casselman, C.; Malet, J.C.

    1986-05-01

    Usually, pessimistic considerations inassessing the safety of secondary sodium loops in LMFBR reactor lead to assume guillotine rupture releasing a large amount of sodium estimate the consequences of large sodium fires. In order to reduce these consequences, one has to detect the smallest leak as soon as possible and to evaluate the future of an initial small leak. Analysis of the relationship between crack size and sodium outflow rate; Analysis of a sodium pipe with a small open crack

  12. Pipeline Leak Detection Techniques

    Chis, Timur

    2009-01-01

    Leak detection systems range from simple, visual line walking and checking ones to complex arrangements of hard-ware and software. No one method is universally applicable and operating requirements dictate which method is the most cost effective. The aim of the paper is to review the basic techniques of leak detection that are currently in use. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and some indications of applicability are outlined.

  13. Pipeline Leak Detection Techniques

    Timur Chis, Ph.D., Dipl.Eng.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leak detection systems range from simple, visual line walking and checking ones to complex arrangements of hard-ware and software. No one method is universally applicable and operating requirements dictate which method is the most cost effective. The aim of the paper is to review the basic techniques of leak detection that are currently in use. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed and some indications of applicability are outlined.

  14. Low Level Leaks

    1998-01-01

    NASA has transferred the improved portable leak detector technology to UE Systems, Inc.. This instrument was developed to detect leaks in fluid systems of critical launch and ground support equipment. This system incorporates innovative electronic circuitry, improved transducers, collecting horns, and contact sensors that provide a much higher degree of reliability, sensitivity and versatility over previously used systems. Potential commercial uses are pipelines, underground utilities, air-conditioning systems, petrochemical systems, aerospace, power transmission lines and medical devices.

  15. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects

  16. Liquid helium target

    Fujii, Y.; Kitami, T.; Torikoshi, M.

    1984-12-01

    A liquid helium target system has been built and used for the experiment on the reaction 4 He(γ, p). The target system has worked satisfactorily; the consumption rate of liquid helium is 360 ml/h and the cryogenic system retains liquid helium for about ten hours. The structure, operation and performance of the target system are reported. (author)

  17. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  18. Prompt ignition of a unipolar arc on helium irradiated tungsten

    Kajita, Shin; Takamura, Shuichi; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2009-01-01

    A fibreform nanostructured layer is formed on a tungsten surface by helium plasma bombardment. The helium fluence was of the order of 10 26 m -2 , and the surface temperature and incident ion energy during helium irradiation were, respectively, 1900 K and 75 eV. By irradiating a laser pulse to the surface in the plasma, a unipolar arc, which many people have tried to verify in well-defined experiments, is promptly initiated and continued for a much longer time than the laser pulse width. The laser pulse width (∼0.6 ms) and power (∼5 MJ m -2 ) are similar to the heat load accompanied by type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in ITER. The unipolar arc is verified from an increase in the floating potential, a moving arc spot detected by a fast camera and arcing traces on the surface. This result suggests that the nanostructure on the tungsten surface formed by the bombardment of helium, which is a fusion product, could significantly change the ignition property of arcing, and ELMs become a trigger of unipolar arcing, which would be a great impurity source in fusion devices. (letter)

  19. Experimental and theoretical studies of bombardment induced surface morphology changes

    Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Williams, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    In this review results of experimental and theoretical studies of solid surface morphology changes due to ion bombardment are discussed. An attempt is undertaken to classify the observed specific features of a structure, generated by ion bombardment [ru

  20. Quantitative study of sniffer leak rate and pressure drop leak rate of liquid nitrogen panels of SST-1 tokamak

    Pathan, F. S.; Khan, Z.; Semwal, P.; Raval, D. C.; Joshi, K. S.; Thankey, P. L.; Dhanani, K. R.

    2008-05-01

    Steady State Super-conducting (SST-1) Tokamak is in commissioning stage at Institute for Plasma Research. Vacuum chamber of SST-1 Tokamak consists of 1) Vacuum vessel, an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber, 2) Cryostat, a high vacuum (HV) chamber. Cryostat encloses the liquid helium cooled super-conducting magnets (TF and PF), which require the thermal radiation protection against room temperature. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooled panels are used to provide thermal shield around super-conducting magnets. During operation, LN2 panels will be under pressurized condition and its surrounding (cryostat) will be at high vacuum. Hence, LN2 panels must have very low leak rate. This paper describes an experiment to study the behaviour of the leaks in LN2 panels during sniffer test and pressure drop test using helium gas.

  1. Quantitative study of sniffer leak rate and pressure drop leak rate of liquid nitrogen panels of SST-1 tokamak

    Pathan, F S; Khan, Z; Semwal, P; Raval, D C; Joshi, K S; Thankey, P L; Dhanani, K R [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar - 382 428, Gujarat (India)], E-mail: firose@ipr.res.in

    2008-05-01

    Steady State Super-conducting (SST-1) Tokamak is in commissioning stage at Institute for Plasma Research. Vacuum chamber of SST-1 Tokamak consists of 1) Vacuum vessel, an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber, 2) Cryostat, a high vacuum (HV) chamber. Cryostat encloses the liquid helium cooled super-conducting magnets (TF and PF), which require the thermal radiation protection against room temperature. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooled panels are used to provide thermal shield around super-conducting magnets. During operation, LN{sub 2} panels will be under pressurized condition and its surrounding (cryostat) will be at high vacuum. Hence, LN{sub 2} panels must have very low leak rate. This paper describes an experiment to study the behaviour of the leaks in LN{sub 2} panels during sniffer test and pressure drop test using helium gas.

  2. Quantitative study of sniffer leak rate and pressure drop leak rate of liquid nitrogen panels of SST-1 tokamak

    Pathan, F S; Khan, Z; Semwal, P; Raval, D C; Joshi, K S; Thankey, P L; Dhanani, K R

    2008-01-01

    Steady State Super-conducting (SST-1) Tokamak is in commissioning stage at Institute for Plasma Research. Vacuum chamber of SST-1 Tokamak consists of 1) Vacuum vessel, an ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber, 2) Cryostat, a high vacuum (HV) chamber. Cryostat encloses the liquid helium cooled super-conducting magnets (TF and PF), which require the thermal radiation protection against room temperature. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooled panels are used to provide thermal shield around super-conducting magnets. During operation, LN 2 panels will be under pressurized condition and its surrounding (cryostat) will be at high vacuum. Hence, LN 2 panels must have very low leak rate. This paper describes an experiment to study the behaviour of the leaks in LN 2 panels during sniffer test and pressure drop test using helium gas

  3. Leak test method for radioactive material packagings without pressure valve connections

    Johnson, S.F.; Stenbaeck, A.

    1976-01-01

    A leak test method has been developed at Studsvik which provides the possibility of testing Type B packagings unequipped with valves for evacuation or pressurizing. Even large packagings with pressure valve connections can be leak tested by this method. The method is a pressure test method. The test gas comprises a mixture of helium and nitrogen or helium and air. Excess pressure in a valveless packaging is achieved by vaporization of liquid nitrogen. All parts of the packaging or package where leaks might be expected are covered by plastic sheet. Samples of the gas accumulated under the plastic sheets are taken using evacuated glass ampoules which are initially sealed off to a breakable point. The gas samples are measured with a He-mass spectrometer. The sensitivity of this method of leak testing is, in practice, of the order of 10 -7 atmcm 3 s -1 . (author)

  4. Annealing of defects in indium antimonide after ion bombardment

    Bogatyrev, V.A.; Kachurin, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    Indium antimonide electric properties are investigated after ion bombardment of different mass (with energy of 60 and 300 keV) and isochrone annealing in the 20-450 deg C temperature range. It is shown that 100-150 deg C n- type stable layers are formed after proton irradiation at room temperature only. Indium antimonide exposure by average mass ions under the same conditions and also by helium ions of 300 keV energy brings to p-type layer formation with high hole concentration. Subsequent heating at the temperature over 150 deg C results in electron conductivity of irradiated layers. Electron volume density and mobility efficiency reaches 10 18 cm -3 and 10 4 cm 2 /Vs respectively. N-type formed layers are stable up to 350 deg C allowing its usage for n-p transition formation admitting thermal treatment. Analysis is given of defect behaviour peculiarities depending upon the irradiation and annealing conditions. Hole conductivity in irradiated indium antimonide is supposed to be stipulated by regions of disorder, while electron conductivity - by relatively simpler disorders

  5. Growth process of helium bubbles in aluminium

    Shiraishi, Haruki; Sakairi, Hideo; Yagi, Eiichi; Karasawa, Takashi; Hashiguti, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The growth process of helium bubbles in α-particle bombarded pure aluminum during isothermal anneal ranging 200 to 645 0 C and 1 to 100 hr was observed by a transmission electron microscope and the possible growth mechanisms are discussed. The effects of helium concentration and cold work were investigated. The helium bubbles are detectable only at the anneal above 550 0 C in both annealed and cold worked samples. The cold work does not cause any extra coarsening trend of bubbles. The observed types of bubble distribution in the grain interior are divided into two categories, irrespective of helium concentration and cold work; (1) the fine and uniform bubble distribution, in which case the average size is limited to about 200 A or less in diameter even at the anneal just below the melting point, and (2) the coarsened and non-uniform bubble distribution ranging 500 to 4000 A in diameter. The intermediate size bubbles are scarcely found in any cases. In the above fine bubble distribution, the increase of helium concentration by a factor of two increases the density by the same factor of two, but does not change the mean size of bubbles. Corresponding to the above two characteristic bubble distributions, it is concluded that two different mechanisms are operative in this experiment; (1) the growth of bubbles by the Brownian motion, in which the growth rate of bubbles is decreased to almost zero by bubble faceting and this results in the bubble size constancy during the prolonged annealing, and (2) the growth of bubbles by the grain boundary sweep-out mechanism, by which the abrupt coarsening of bubbles is caused. The lack of existence of the intermediate size bubbles is explained in this way. (auth.)

  6. The Erosion of Frozen Argon by Swift Helium Ions

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Graversen, O.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore unequivo......The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore...... unequivocally associated with electronic processes generated by the bombarding particle. In the present energy region, it is found that Y scales approximately as the electronic stopping power squared, depends on the charge state of the incoming helium ions, and perhaps more important, is independent...

  7. Deuterium pumping and erosion behavior of selected graphite materials under high flux plasma bombardment in PISCES

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; LaBombard, B.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion behavior of selected graphite materials have been investigated using the PISCES-A facility. These materials include: Pyro-graphite; 2D-graphite weave; 4D-graphite weave; and POCO-graphite. Deuterium plasma bombardment conditions are: fluxes around 7 /times/ 10 17 ions s/sup /minus/1/cm/sup /minus/2/; exposure time in the range from 10 to 100 s; bombarding energy of 300 eV; and graphite temperatures between 20 and 120/degree/C. To reduce deuterium plasma recycling, several approaches have been investigated. Erosion due to high-fluence helium plasma conditioning significantly increases the surface porosity of POCO-graphite and 4D-graphite weave whereas little change for 2D-graphite weave and Pyro-graphite. The increased pore openings and refreshed in-pore surface sites are found to reduce the deuterium plasma recycling and chemical erosion rates at transient stages. The steady state recycling rates for these graphite materials can be also correlated to the surface porosity. Surface topographical modification by machined-grooves noticeably reduces the steady state deuterium recycling rate and the impurity emission from the surface. These surface topography effects are attributed to co-deposition of remitted deuterium, chemically sputtered hydrocarbon and physically sputtered carbon under deuterium plasma bombardment. The co-deposited film is found to have a characteristic surface morphology with dendritic microstructures. 18 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  9. Fuel rod leak detector

    Womack, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of the invention detects leaking fuel rods by means of a radiation detector that measures the concentration of xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) within each individual rod. A collimated detector that provides signals related to the energy of incident radiation is aligned with one of the ends of a fuel rod. A statistically significant sample of the gamma radiation (γ-rays) that characterize 133 Xe is accumulated through the detector. The data so accumulated indicates the presence of a concentration of 133 Xe appropriate to a sound fuel rod, or a significantly different concentration that reflects a leaking fuel rod

  10. Magnetoresistance and ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning

    Hoeink, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the combination of the magnetic patterning of the unidirectional anisotropy and the tunnel magnetoresistance effect is investigated. In my diploma thesis, it has been shown that it is in principle possible to use the magnetic patterning by ion bombardment to magnetically structure the pinned layer in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with alumina barrier. Furthermore, it has been shown that the side effects which have been observed after this treatment can be at least reduced by an additional heating step. Starting from this point, the applicability of ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning (IBMP) in general and the combination of IBMP and MTJs in particular is investigated and new applications are developed. (orig.)

  11. Ultrasonic leak detection

    Murphy, R.V.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning ultrasonic microphone was used to detect the presence and locate the sources of hydraulic noises in piping systems in a reactor environment. The intensity changes of the noises correspond to changes of flow conditions within the system caused by throttled valves, flow rate changes, and leaks. (author)

  12. Modification of thin film properties by ion bombardment during deposition

    Harper, J.M.E.; Cuomo, J.J.; Gambino, R.J.; Kaufman, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Many thin film deposition techniques involve some form of energetic particle bombardment of the growing film. The degree of bombardment greatly influences the film composition, structure and other properties. While in some techniques the degree of bombardment is secondary to the original process design, in recent years more deposition systems are being designed with the capability for controlled ion bombardment of thin films during deposition. The highest degree of control is obtained with ion beam sources which operate independently of the vapor source providing the thin film material. Other plasma techniques offer varying degrees of control of energetic particle bombardment. Deposition methods involving ion bombardment are described, and the basic processes with which film properties are modified by ion bombardment are summarized. (Auth.)

  13. Cooling with Superfluid Helium

    Lebrun, P; Tavian, L [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The technical properties of helium II (‘superfluid’ helium) are presented in view of its applications to the cooling of superconducting devices, particularly in particle accelerators. Cooling schemes are discussed in terms of heat transfer performance and limitations. Large-capacity refrigeration techniques below 2 K are reviewed, with regard to thermodynamic cycles as well as process machinery. Examples drawn from existing or planned projects illustrate the presentation. Keywords: superfluid helium, cryogenics.

  14. Sodium and steam leak simulation studies for fluidized bed steam generators

    Keeton, A.R.; Vaux, W.G.; Lee, P.K.; Witkowski, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program is described which was conducted to study the effects of sodium or steam leaking into an operating fluidized bed of metal or ceramic particles at 680 to 800 0 K. This effort was part of the early development studies for a fluidized-bed steam generator concept using helium as the fluidizing gas. Test results indicated that steam and small sodium leaks had no effect on the quality of fluidization, heat transfer coefficient, temperature distribution, or fluidizing gas pressure drop across the bed. Large sodium leaks, however, immediately upset the operation of the fluidized bed. Both steam and sodium leaks were detected positively and rapidly at an early stage of a leak by instruments specifically selected to accomplish this

  15. Leaking Fuel Impacts and Practices

    Hozer, Zoltan; Szabo, Peter; Somfai, Barbara; Cherubini, Marco; Aldworth, Robin; Waeckel, Nicolas; Delorme, Tim; Dickson, Raymond; Fujii, Hajime; Rey Gayo, Jose Maria; Grant, Wade; Gorzel, Andreas; Hellwig, Christian; Kamimura, Katsuichiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Klouzal, Jan; Miklos, Marek; Nagase, Fumihisa; Nilsson, Marcus; Petit, Marc; Richards, Stuart; Lundqvist Saleh, Tobias; Stepniewski, Marek; Sim, Ki Seob; ); Rehacek, Radomir; Kissane, Martin; )

    2014-01-01

    The impact of leaking fuel rods on the operation of nuclear power plants and the practices of handling leaking fuel has been reviewed by the CSNI Working Group on Fuel Safety in order to promote a better understanding on the handling of leaking fuel in power reactors, as well as to discuss and review the current practices in member countries to help in decisions on the specification of reactor operation conditions with leaking fuel rods and on the handling of leaking fuel after removal from reactor. Experts from 15 countries provided data on the handling of leaking fuel in PWR, BWR, VVER and PHWR reactor types. The review covered the operation of NPP reactors with leaking fuel, wet and dry storage and transport of leaking assemblies. The methods and applied instruments to identify leaking fuel assemblies and the repair of them were addressed in the review. Special attention was paid to the activity release from leaking rods in the reactor and under storage conditions. The consideration of leaking fuel in safety analyses on core behaviour during postulated accidents was also discussed in the review. The main conclusions of the review pointed out that the activity release from leaking fuel rods in the reactor can be handled by technological systems, or in case of failure of too many rods the reactor can be shutdown to minimize activity release. Under accident conditions and operational transients the leaking rods may produce coolant activity concentration peaks. The storage of spent leaking fuel is normally characterised by moderate release of radionuclides from the fuel. The power plants apply limits for activity concentration to limit the amount of leaking rods in the core. In different countries, the accident analyses take into consideration the potential release from leaking fuel rods in design basis accidents in different ways. Some power plants apply special tools for handling and repair of leaking assemblies and rods. The leaking rods are stored together with

  16. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  17. Natural gas leak mapper

    Reichardt, Thomas A [Livermore, CA; Luong, Amy Khai [Dublin, CA; Kulp, Thomas J [Livermore, CA; Devdas, Sanjay [Albany, CA

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  18. Location and repair of air leaks in the ATF vacuum vessel

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Gabbard, W.A.; Schaich, C.R.; Yarber, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of partial pressure rate-of-rise and base pressure measurements, it was determined that the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel had an air leak in the low 10 -4 mbarx ell/s range. Pinpointing this leak by conventional helium leak-checking procedures was not possible, because large portions of the outside of the vessel are covered by the helical field coils and a structural shell. Various alternative leak detection schemes that were considered are summarized and their advantages and disadvantages noted. In the method ultimately employed, gum-rubber patches of various sizes ranging from 12.7 by 12.7 cm to 20.3 by 30.5 cm were positioned on the inside surfaces of the vessel and evacuated by the leak detector (LD). After roughly 5% of the surface was inspected in this way, a leak of >10 -5 mbar xL/s was discovered and localized to an area of 5 by 5 cm. Dye penetrant applied to this area disclosed three pinholes. Two small slag pockets were discovered while these points were being ground out. After these were rewelded, no further leakage could be found in the repaired area. Global leak rates measured after the machine was reevacuated indicated that this leak was about 30% of the overall leak rate. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Location and repair of air leaks in the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] vacuum vessel

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Gabbard, W.A.; Schaich, C.R.; Yarber, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of partial pressure rate-of-rise and base pressure measurements, it was determined that the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel had an air leak in the low 10 -4 mbar-ell/s range. Pinpointing this leak by conventional helium leak-checking procedures was not possible, because large portions of the outside of the vessel are covered by the helcial field coils and a structural shell. Various alternative leak-detection schemes that were considered are summarized and their advantages and disadvantages noted. In the method ultimately employed, gun-rubber patches of various sizes ranging from 12.7 by 12.7 cm to 20.3 by 30.5 cm were positioned on the inside surfaces of the vessel and evacuated by the leak detector (LD). After roughly 5% of the surface was inspected in this way, a leak of > 10 -5 mbar-ell/s was discovered and localized to an area of 5 by 5 cm. Dye penetrant applied to this area disclosed three pinholes. Two small slag pockets were discovered while these points were being ground out. After these were rewelded, no furthered leakage could be found in the repaired area. Global leak rates measured after the machine was reevacuated indicated that this leak was about 30% of the overall leak rate. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Does a dyon leak

    Grossman, B.

    1983-01-01

    In the presence of a CP-nonconservation measured by an angle theta, the ground state of a point magnetic monopole is shown to have an electric charge of value -etheta/2π which changes discontinuously to zero for massless fermions. A new version of Levinson's theorem is also given. The latter effect as well as the S-wave helicity flip of a dyon can be interpreted as a leak at the origin

  1. Aspects of leak detection

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant

  2. Aspects of leak detection

    Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  3. Gas leak tightness of SiC/SiC composites at elevated temperature

    Hayasaka, Daisuke, E-mail: hayasaka@oasis.muroran-it.ac.jp [OASIS, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Park, Joon-Soo. [OASIS, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Kishimoto, Hirotatsu [OASIS, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Kohyama, Akira [OASIS, Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • NITE-SiC/SiC has extremely densified microstructure compared with other SiC/SiC composite like CVI. • Excellent helium and hydrogen gas-leak tightness of SiC/SiC composites by DEMO-NITE method from prototype industrialization production line was presented. • The excellence against stainless steel and Zircaloy at elevated temperature, together with generic excellent properties of SiC will be inevitable for innovative blanket and divertors for DEMO- and power- fusion reactors. - Abstract: SiC/SiC composite materials are attractive candidates for high heat flux components and blanket of fusion reactor, mainly due to their high temperature properties, radiation damage tolerance and low induced radioactivity. One of the challenges for SiC/SiC application in fusion reactors is to satisfy sufficient gas leak tightness of hydrogen and helium isotopes. Although many efforts have been carried-out, SiC/SiC composites by conventional processes have not been successful to satisfy the requirements, except SiC/SiC composites by NITE-methods. Toward the early realization of SiC/SiC components into fusion reactor systems process development of NITE-process has been continued. Followed to the brief introduction of recently developed DEMO-NITE process, baseline properties and hydrogen and helium gas leak tightness is presented. SiC/SiC claddings with 10 mm in diameter and 1 mm in wall thickness are tested by gas leak tightness system developed. The leak tightness measurements are done room temperature to 400 °C. Excellent gas leak tightness equivalent or superior to Zircaloy claddings for light water fission reactors is confirmed. The excellent gas leak tightness suggests nearly perfect suppression of large gas leak path in DEMO-NITE SiC/SiC.

  4. Helium the disappearing element

    Sears, Wheeler M

    2015-01-01

    The subject of the book is helium, the element, and its use in myriad applications including MRI machines, particle accelerators, space telescopes, and of course balloons and blimps. It was at the birth of our Universe, or the Big Bang, where the majority of cosmic helium was created; and stellar helium production continues. Although helium is the second most abundant element in the Universe, it is actually quite rare here on Earth and only exists because of radioactive elements deep within the Earth. This book includes a detailed history of the discovery of helium, of the commercial industry built around it, how the helium we actually encounter is produced within the Earth, and the state of the helium industry today. The gas that most people associate with birthday party balloons is running out. “Who cares?” you might ask. Well, without helium, MRI machines could not function, rockets could not go into space, particle accelerators such as those used by CERN could not operate, fiber optic cables would not...

  5. Helium dilution refrigerator

    1973-01-01

    A new system of continuous heat exchange for a helium dilution refrigerator is proposed. The 3 He effluent tube is concurrent with the affluent mixed helium tube in a vertical downward direction. Heat exchange efficiency is enhanced by placing in series a number of elements with an enlarged surface area

  6. Helium localisation in tritides

    Flament, J.L.; Lozes, G.

    1982-06-01

    Study of titanium and LaNi 5 type alloys tritides lattice parameters evolution revealed that helium created by tritium decay remains in interstitial sites up to a limit material dependant concentration. Beyond this one exceeding helium precipites in voids [fr

  7. Evaluation of helium cooling for fusion divertors

    Baxi, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    The divertors of future fusion reactors will have a power throughput of several hundred MW. The peak heat flux on the diverter surface is estimated to be 5 to 15 MW/m 2 at an average heat flux of 2 MW/m 2 . The divertors have a requirement of both minimum temperature (100 degrees C) and maximum temperature. The minimum temperature is dictated by the requirement to reduce the absorption of plasma, and the maximum temperature is determined by the thermo-mechanical properties of the plasma facing materials. Coolants that have been considered for fusion reactors are water, liquid metals and helium. Helium cooling has been shown to be very attractive from safety and other considerations. Helium is chemically and neutronically inert and is suitable for power conversion. The challenges associated with helium cooling are: (1) Manifold sizes; (2) Pumping power; and (3) Leak prevention. In this paper the first two of the above design issues are addressed. A variety of heat transfer enhancement techniques are considered to demonstrate that the manifold sizes and the pumping power can be reduced to acceptable levels. A helium-cooled diverter module was designed and fabricated by GA for steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 . This module was recently tested at Sandia National Laboratories. At an inlet pressure of 4 MPa, the module was tested at a steady-state heat flux of 10 MW/m 2 . The pumping power required was less than 1% of the power removed. These results verified the design prediction

  8. Beryllium dust generation resulting from plasma bombardment

    Doerner, R.; Mays, C.

    1997-01-01

    The beryllium dust resulting from erosion of beryllium samples subjected to plasma bombardment has been measured in PISCES-B. Loose surface dust was found to be uniformly distributed throughout the device and accounts for 3% of the eroded material. A size distribution measurement of the loose surface dust shows an increasing number of particles with decreasing diameter. Beryllium coatings on surfaces with a line of sight view of the target interaction region account for an additional 33% of the eroded beryllium material. Flaking of these surface layers is observed and is thought to play a significant role in dust generation inside the vacuum vessel. (orig.)

  9. Electron emission from Inconel under ion bombardment

    Alonso, E.V.; Baragiola, R.A.; Ferron, J.; Oliva-Florio, A.

    1979-01-01

    Electron yields from clean and oxidized Inconel 625 surfaces have been measured for H + ,H 2 + ,He + ,O + and Ar + ions at normal incidence in the energy range 1.5 to 40 keV. These measurements have been made under ultrahigh vacuum and the samples were freed of surface contaminants by bombarding with high doses of either 20 keV H 2 + or 30 keV Ar + ions. Differences in yields of oxidized versus clean surfaces are explained in terms of differences in the probability that electrons internally excited escape upon reaching the surface. (author)

  10. Flaking and wave-like structure on metallic glasses induced by MeV-energy helium ions

    Paszti, F.; Fried, M.; Pogany, L.; Manuaba, A.; Mezey, G.; Kotai, E.; Lovas, I.; Lohner, T.; Pocs, L.

    1982-11-01

    Ten samples prepared from different kinds of metallic glasses (different in composition and manufacturing technology) were bombarded by 2 or 1 MeV helium ions with high fluence under different experimental circumstances. During bombardment the temperature increase of the samples caused by irradiation heating was estimated and kept below the temperature needed for the investigated metallic glass to be crystallized. In all cases the surface deformation processes were dominated by flaking i.e. nearly from the whole implanted area a layer suddenly flaked off with a uniform thickness of the applied ion projected range. The surface left behind the flaked layer can be characterized by a wave-like structure i.e. by a regular series of asymmetrical elevations. These elevations, which did not appear on the annealed samples, are caused by a mechanism developed during the bombardment of the amorphous structure (of metallic glasses) by high energy helium ions. Details of this unusual phenomenon are discussed. (author)

  11. AES, EELS and TRIM simulation method study of InP(100 subjected to Ar+, He+ and H+ ions bombardment.

    Abidri B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS have been performed in order to investigate the InP(100 surface subjected to ions bombardment. The InP(100 surface is always contaminated by carbon and oxygen revealed by C-KLL and O-KLL AES spectra recorded just after introduction of the sample in the UHV spectrometer chamber. The usually cleaning process of the surface is the bombardment by argon ions. However, even at low energy of ions beam (300 eV indium clusters and phosphorus vacancies are usually formed on the surface. The aim of our study is to compare the behaviour of the surface when submitted to He+ or H+ ions bombardment. The helium ions accelerated at 500V voltage and for 45 mn allow removing contaminants but induces damaged and no stoichiometric surface. The proton ions were accelerated at low energy of 500 eV to bombard the InP surface at room temperature. The proton ions broke the In-P chemical bonds to induce the formation of In metal islands. Such a chemical reactivity between hydrogen and phosphorus led to form chemical species such as PH and PH3, which desorbed from the surface. The chemical susceptibly and the small size of H+ advantaged their diffusion into bulk. Since the experimental methods alone were not able to give us with accuracy the disturbed depth of the target by these ions. We associate to the AES and EELS spectroscopies, the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter simulation method in order to show the mechanism of interaction between Ar+, He+ or H+ ions and InP and determine the disturbed depth of the target by argon, helium or proton ions.

  12. Modification of thin film properties by ion bombardment during deposition

    Harper, J.M.E.; Cuomo, J.J.; Gambino, R.J.; Kaufman, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Deposition methods involving ion bombardment are described, and the basic processes with which film properties are modified by ion bombardment are summarized. Examples of thin film property modification by ion bombardment during deposition, including effects which are primarily compositional as well as those which are primarily structural are presented. The examples demonstrate the usefulness of ion beam techniques in identifying and controlling the fundamental deposition parameters. 68 refs.; 15 figs.; 1 table

  13. Adhesion of silver films to ion-bombarded alumina

    Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on silver films deposited on alumina substrates using ion bombardment. Adhesion strength was measured as a function of deposition conditions, sputter-cleaning time, and bombarding ion species, using a pull-type adhesion tester. Argon- and argon/oxygen-ion sputtering produced large increases in adhesion strength, with the greatest increases occurring for oxygen-ion bombardment. Adhesion strength increased monotonically as a function of ion sputtering time. At a given deposition rate, further enhancement of adhesion is seen with concurrent ion bombardment

  14. A liquid helium saver

    Avenel, O.; Der Nigohossian, G.; Roubeau, P.

    1976-01-01

    A cryostat equipped with a 'liquid helium saver' is described. A mass flow rate M of helium gas at high pressure is injected in a counter-flow heat exchanger extending from room to liquid helium temperature. After isenthalpic expansion through a calibrated flow impedance this helium gas returns via the low pressure side of the heat exchanger. The helium boil-off of the cryostat represents a mass flow rate m, which provides additional precooling of the incoming helium gas. Two operating regimes appear possible giving nearly the same efficiency: (1) high pressure (20 to 25 atm) and minimum flow (M . L/W approximately = 1.5) which would be used in an open circuit with helium taken from a high pressure cylinder; and (2) low pressure (approximately = 3 atm), high flow (M . L/W > 10) which would be used in a closed circuit with a rubber diaphragm pumping-compressing unit; both provide a minimum theoretical boil-off factor of about 8%. Experimental results are reported. (U.K.)

  15. Deconstructing Gender Stereotypes in Leak

    Nengah Bawa Atmadja

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The belief of Balinese people towards leak still survive. Leak is a magic based on durgaism that can transform a person from human to another form, such as apes, pigs, etc. People tend to regard leak as evil. In general, the evilness is constructed in gender stereotypes, so it is identified that leak are always women. This idea is a power game based on the ideology of patriarchy that provides legitimacy for men to dominate women with a plea for social harmony. As a result, women are marginalized in the Balinese society. Women should be aware of so it would provide encouragement for them to make emancipatory changes dialogically. Kepercayaan orang Bali terhadap leak tetap bertahan sampai saat ini. Leak adalah sihir yang berbasiskan durgaisme yang dapat mengakibatkan seseorang bisa merubah bentuk dari manusia ke wujud yang lain, misalnya kera, babi, dll. Leak termasuk magi hitam sehingga dinilai bersifat jelek. Pada umumnya perempuan diidentikkan dengan leak sehingga melahirkan asumsi yang bermuatan steriotip gender bahwa leak = perempuan. Gagasan ini merupakan permainan kekuasaan berbasis ideologi patriarkhi dan sekaligus memberikan legitimasi bagi laki-laki untuk menguasai perempuan dengan dalih demi keharmonisan sosial. Akibatnya, perempuan menjadi termarginalisasi pada masyarakat Bali.  Perempuan harus menyadarinya sehingga memberikan dorongan bagi mereka untuk melakukan perubahan secara dialogis emansipatoris.

  16. Configuration and testing of a saturated vapor helium compressor

    Ludwigsen, J.L.; Iwasa, Y.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    A saturated vapor helium compressor was designed and tested as a component of a helium-temperature refrigeration cycle. The use of the cold compressor allows reduction of both the precooling heat exchanger area and main compressor size compared to a conventional cycle due to increased pressure of the return gas. The compressor tested was a single-piston reciprocating device which was controlled with programmable hydraulic/pneumatic logic. The compressor was mounted at the cold end of a CTI Model 1400 helium liquefier. An average compression ratio of 2.4 was obtained and an average efficiency of 82% was achieved. In computing compressor efficiency, external heat leaks to the compressor were neglected

  17. Radiation leaking protection device

    Sunami, Yoshio; Mitsumori, Kojiro

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent radioactivity from leaking outside of a reactor container by way of pipeways passing therethrough, by supplying pressurized fluid between each of a plurality of valves for separating the pipeways. Constitution: Pressurized fluid is supplied between each of a plurality of valves for separating pipeways. For instance, water in a purified water tank is pressurized by a pressure pump and the pressure of the pressurized water is controlled by a differential pressure detector, a pressure controller and a pressure control valve. In the case if a main steam pipe is ruptured outside of the reactor container or to be repaired, the separation valves are wholly closed and then the pressurizing device is actuated to supply pressurized water containing no radioactivity from the purified water tank to the position between the valves. The pressure in the pressurized water is controlled such that it is always higher by a predetermined level than the pressure in the reactor. This prevents the radioacitivity in the reactor core from leaking outside of the container passing through the valves, whereby radiation exposure in the working can be reduced and the circumferential contamination upon accident of pipeway rupture can be decreased. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. The timeline of the lunar bombardment: Revisited

    Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorny, D.; Laurenz, V.; Marchi, S.; Rubie, D. C.; Elkins-Tanton, L.; Wieczorek, M.; Jacobson, S.

    2018-05-01

    The timeline of the lunar bombardment in the first Gy of Solar System history remains unclear. Basin-forming impacts (e.g. Imbrium, Orientale), occurred 3.9-3.7 Gy ago, i.e. 600-800 My after the formation of the Moon itself. Many other basins formed before Imbrium, but their exact ages are not precisely known. There is an intense debate between two possible interpretations of the data: in the cataclysm scenario there was a surge in the impact rate approximately at the time of Imbrium formation, while in the accretion tail scenario the lunar bombardment declined since the era of planet formation and the latest basins formed in its tail-end. Here, we revisit the work of Morbidelli et al. (2012) that examined which scenario could be compatible with both the lunar crater record in the 3-4 Gy period and the abundance of highly siderophile elements (HSE) in the lunar mantle. We use updated numerical simulations of the fluxes of asteroids, comets and planetesimals leftover from the planet-formation process. Under the traditional assumption that the HSEs track the total amount of material accreted by the Moon since its formation, we conclude that only the cataclysm scenario can explain the data. The cataclysm should have started ∼ 3.95 Gy ago. However we also consider the possibility that HSEs are sequestered from the mantle of a planet during magma ocean crystallization, due to iron sulfide exsolution (O'Neil, 1991; Rubie et al., 2016). We show that this is likely true also for the Moon, if mantle overturn is taken into account. Based on the hypothesis that the lunar magma ocean crystallized about 100-150 My after Moon formation (Elkins-Tanton et al., 2011), and therefore that HSEs accumulated in the lunar mantle only after this timespan, we show that the bombardment in the 3-4 Gy period can be explained in the accretion tail scenario. This hypothesis would also explain why the Moon appears so depleted in HSEs relative to the Earth. We also extend our analysis of the

  19. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1005 Section 63.1005... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1005 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected no later than 15 calendar days after it is detected, except as...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 63.1024 Section 63.1024... Standards for Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1024 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical, but not later than 15 calendar...

  1. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 65.105 Section 65.105... FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.105 Leak repair. (a) Leak repair schedule. The owner or operator shall repair each leak detected as soon as practical but not later than 15 calendar days after it is...

  2. Light ions cyclotron bombardment to simulate fast neutron radiation damage in nuclear materials

    Segura, E.; Lucki, G.; Aguiar, D.

    1984-01-01

    The applicability and limitations of the use of cyclotron light ions bombardment to simulate the effects of the neutron irradiation are presented. Light ions with energies of about 10 MeV are capable to produce homogeneous damage in specimens suitable for measuring bulk mechanical properties although their low damage rate of 10 -5 dpa.sec -1 limit the dose range to a few dpa. On the other hand, cyclotron alpha particle implantation provides a fast and convenient way of introducing helium with a minimum of side effects so that we can take advantage of this technique to get better understanding of the mechanism by which this insoluble gas produces high temperature embrittlement. Some experimental details such as dimensions and cooling techniques are described. Finally a description of the infrastructure for cyclotron alpha particle implantation and a creep-test facility of the Division of Radiation Damage at IPEN-CNEN/SP are presented. (Author) [pt

  3. Erosion of volatile elemental condensed gases by keV electron and light-ion bombardment

    Schou, J.

    1991-11-01

    Erosion of the most volatile elemental gases by keV electron and light-ion bombardment has been studied at the experimental setup at Risoe. The present work includes frozen neon, argon, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen and three hydrogen isotopes, deuterium, hydrogen deuteride and hydrogen. The yield of these condensed gases has been measured as a function of film thickness and primary energy for almost all combinations of primary particles (1-3 keV electrons, 5-10 keV hydrogen- and helium ions) and ices. These and other existing results show that there are substantial common features for the sputtering of frozen elemental gases. Within the two groups, the solid rare gases and the solid molecular gases, the similarity is striking. The hydrogenic solids deviate in some respects from the other elements. The processes that liberate kinetic energy for the particle ejection in sputtering are characteristic of the specific gas. (au) 3 tabs., 12 ills., 159 refs

  4. Electron emission from molybdenum under ion bombardment

    Ferron, J.; Alonso, E.V.; Baragiola, R.A.; Oliva-Florio, A.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements are reported of electron emission yields of clean molybdenum surfaces under bombardment with H + , H 2 + , D + , D 2 + , He + , N + , N 2 + , O + , O 2 + , Ne + , Ar + , Kr + and Xe + in the wide energy range 0.7-60.2 keV. The clean surfaces were produced by inert gas sputtering under ultrahigh vacuum. The results are compared with those predicted by a core-level excitation model. The disagreement found when using correct values for the energy levels of Mo is traced to wrong assumptions in the model. A substantially improved agreement with experiment is obtained using a model in which electron emission results from the excitation of valence electrons from the target by the projectiles and fast recoiling target atoms. (author)

  5. Ion bombardment techniques - recent developments in SIMS

    Konarski, P.; Miśnik, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a short review of cluster ion bombardment technique recently applied in SIMS. Many advantages of using cluster ion beams are specified over monoatomic ion species. Cluster ions open really new perspectives especially in organic based structures analysis. Nevertheless cluster ions are not the perfect solution and still new ideas of ion erosion in SIMS are needed. Another issue discussed is 'storing matter' technique applied for quantitative analysis in SIMS. Simple idea of sputter deposition of eroded material onto rotating substrate and then analysing the stored material allows to avoid strong matrix effects in SIMS. Presented are the results performed in Tele and Radio Research Institute, Warszawa, Poland. These are the first results of ‘storing matter’ technique performed in one analytical chamber of SIMS instrument. (authors)

  6. Full scale leak test of the MEGAPIE containment hull

    Samec, K

    2006-07-15

    The Full Scale Leak Test (FSLT) experiment is designed to replicate an accidental leak of Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) liquid metal from the MEGAPIE neutron spallation source. The neutron source is totally encased in an aluminum containment hull cooled by heavy water. Any liquid metal which would, in a hypothetical accident, leak into the helium-filled insulation gap between the source and the aluminum containment hull, would immediately impact the hull. Furthermore, during irradiation in the PSI SINQ facility, the LBE in the MEGAPIE Lower Liquid Metal Container (LLMC) accumulates radio-active substances which, in the event of a leak, must be cooled and contained under controlled conditions, as they may otherwise contaminate the facility. The FSLT experiment has been devised to fully test the structural integrity of the containment hull against a sudden liquid metal leak, and in addition, to resolve the peak temperature of he coolant, to validate the sensors used in detecting a leak and of proof-test the analytical methods used in predicting the consequences of a leak. The FSLT experiment has been analysed ahead of the test, and both thermal and structural aspects calculated using commercial codes. The predictions applied conservative assumptions to the analysis of the thermal shock so as to preclude the likelihood of an unforeseen failure of the hull. In this document, these initial predictions are compared to the temperature and strain data recorded in the experiment. Further analysis, to be published at a later stage, will focus on applying actual conditions realised in the experiment, as opposed to the envelope case used in the test predictions. The integrity of the containment hull under loads resulting from liquid metal-leak is therefore the focal point of the experiment described in the current document, and serves as a key reference test for the Iicensing of the facility. The data recorded during the SLT experiment shows that the MEGAPIE containment hull is

  7. Full scale leak test of the MEGAPIE containment hull

    Samec, K.

    2006-07-01

    The Full Scale Leak Test (FSLT) experiment is designed to replicate an accidental leak of Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) liquid metal from the MEGAPIE neutron spallation source. The neutron source is totally encased in an aluminum containment hull cooled by heavy water. Any liquid metal which would, in a hypothetical accident, leak into the helium-filled insulation gap between the source and the aluminum containment hull, would immediately impact the hull. Furthermore, during irradiation in the PSI SINQ facility, the LBE in the MEGAPIE Lower Liquid Metal Container (LLMC) accumulates radio-active substances which, in the event of a leak, must be cooled and contained under controlled conditions, as they may otherwise contaminate the facility. The FSLT experiment has been devised to fully test the structural integrity of the containment hull against a sudden liquid metal leak, and in addition, to resolve the peak temperature of he coolant, to validate the sensors used in detecting a leak and of proof-test the analytical methods used in predicting the consequences of a leak. The FSLT experiment has been analysed ahead of the test, and both thermal and structural aspects calculated using commercial codes. The predictions applied conservative assumptions to the analysis of the thermal shock so as to preclude the likelihood of an unforeseen failure of the hull. In this document, these initial predictions are compared to the temperature and strain data recorded in the experiment. Further analysis, to be published at a later stage, will focus on applying actual conditions realised in the experiment, as opposed to the envelope case used in the test predictions. The integrity of the containment hull under loads resulting from liquid metal-leak is therefore the focal point of the experiment described in the current document, and serves as a key reference test for the Iicensing of the facility. The data recorded during the SLT experiment shows that the MEGAPIE containment hull is

  8. The terrestrial record of Late Heavy Bombardment

    Lowe, Donald R.; Byerly, Gary R.

    2018-04-01

    Until recently, the known impact record of the early Solar System lay exclusively on the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and other bodies where it has not been erased by later weathering, erosion, impact gardening, and/or tectonism. Study of the cratered surfaces of these bodies led to the concept of the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), an interval from about 4.1 to 3.8 billion years ago (Ga) during which the surfaces of the planets and moons in the inner Solar System were subject to unusually high rates of bombardment followed by a decline to present low impact rates by about 3.5 Ga. Over the past 30 years, however, it has become apparent that there is a terrestrial record of large impacts from at least 3.47 to 3.22 Ga and from 2.63 to 2.49 Ga. The present paper explores the earlier of these impact records, providing details about the nature of the 8 known ejecta layers that constitute the evidence for large terrestrial impacts during the earlier of these intervals, the inferred size of the impactors, and the potential effects of these impacts on crustal development and life. The existence of this record implies that LHB did not end abruptly at 3.8-3.7 Ga but rather that high impact rates, either continuous or as impact clusters, persisted until at least the close of the Archean at 2.5 Ga. It implies that the shift from external, impact-related controls on the long-term development of the surface system on the Earth to more internal, geodynamic controls may have occurred much later in geologic history than has been supposed previously.

  9. Cesium ion bombardment of metal surfaces

    Tompa, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    The steady state cesium coverage due to cesium ion bombardment of molybdenum and tungsten was studied for the incident energy range below 500 eV. When a sample is exposed to a positive ion beam, the work function decreases until steady state is reached with a total dose of less than ≅10 16 ions/cm 2 , for both tungsten and molybdenum. A steady state minimum work function surface is produced at an incident energy of ≅100 eV for molybdenum and at an incident energy of ≅45 eV for tungsten. Increasing the incident energy results in an increase in the work function corresponding to a decrease in the surface coverage of cesium. At incident energies less than that giving the minimum work function, the work function approaches that of cesium metal. At a given bombarding energy the cesium coverage of tungsten is uniformly less than that of molybdenum. Effects of hydrogen gas coadsorption were also examined. Hydrogen coadsorption does not have a large effect on the steady state work functions. The largest shifts in the work function due to the coadsorption of hydrogen occur on the samples when there is no cesium present. A theory describing the steady-state coverage was developed is used to make predictions for other materials. A simple sticking and sputtering relationship, not including implantation, cannot account for the steady state coverage. At low concentrations, cesium coverage of a target is proportional to the ratio of (1 - β)/γ where β is the reflection coefficient and γ is the sputter yield. High coverages are produced on molybdenum due to implantation and low backscattering, because molybdenum is lighter than cesium. For tungsten the high backscattering and low implantation result in low coverages

  10. Cleaning of diffusion bonding surface by argon ion bombardment treatment

    Wang, Airu; Ohashi, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Norio; Aoki, Masanori; Higashi, Yasuo; Hitomi, Nobuteru

    2003-01-01

    The specimens of oxygen-free high conductivity copper, SUS304L stainless steel and pure iron were treated by argon ion bombardment and then were bonded by diffusion bonding method. The effects of argon ion bombardment treatment on faying surface morphology, tensile strength of bonding joints and inclusions at the fracture surface were investigated. The results showed that argon ion bombardment treatment was effective to remove the oxide film and contamination at the faying surface and improve the quality of joints. The tensile strength of the bonded joints was improved, and minimum bonding temperature to make the metallic bonding at the interface was lowered by argon ion bombardment treatment. At the joints with argon ion bombardment treatment, ductile fractured surface was seen and the amount of inclusions was obviously decreased

  11. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Commissioning Test Results for D-Zero's Helium Refrigerator

    Rucinski, Russ

    1997-01-01

    The test objectives are: (1) Make liquid helium and measure refrigerator capacity; (2) Measure liquid helium dewar heat leak, transfer line heat leak, and liquid nitrogen consumption rates; (3) Operate all cryogenic transfer lines; (4) Get some running time on all components; (5) Debug mechanical components, instrumentation, DMACs user interface, tune loops, and otherwise shake out any problems; (6) Get some operating time in to get familiar with system behavior; (7) Revise and/or improve operating procedures to actual practice; and (8) Identify areas for future improvement. D-Zero's stand alone helium refrigerator (STAR) liquified helium at a rate of 114 L/hr. This is consistent with other STAR installations. Refrigeration capacity was not measured due to lack of a calibrated heat load. Measured heat leaks were within design values. The helium dewar loss was measured at 2 to 4 watts or 9% per day, the solenoid and VLPC helium transfer lines had a heat leak of about 20 watts each. The liquid nitrogen consumption rates of the mobile purifier, STAR, and LN2 subcooler were measured at 20 gph, 20 to 64 gph, and 3 gph respectively. All cryogenic transfer lines including the solenoid and visible light photon counter (VLPC) transfer lines were cooled to their cryogenic operating temperatures. This included independent cooling of nitrogen shields and liquid helium components. No major problems were observed. The system ran quite well. Many problems were identified and corrected as they came up. Areas for improvement were noted and will be implemented in the future. The instrumentation and control system operated commendably during the test. The commissioning test run was a worthwhile and successful venture.

  12. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  13. Device provides controlled gas leaks

    Kami, S. K.; King, H. J.

    1968-01-01

    Modified palladium leak device provides a controlled release /leak/ of very small quantities of gas at low or medium pressures. It has no moving parts, requires less than 5 watts to operate, and is capable of releasing the gas either continuously or in pulses at adjustable flow rates.

  14. Tank car leaks gasoline

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    On January 27, 1994, a Canadian National (CN) tank car loaded with gasoline began to leak from a crack in the tank shell on the end of the car near the stub sill. The tank car had been damaged from impact switching. A part of the tank car was sent for laboratory analysis which concluded that: (1) the fracture originated in two locations in welds, (2) the cracks propagated in a symmetrical manner and progressed into the tank plate, (3) the fracture surface revealed inadequate weld fusion. A stress analysis of the tank car was conducted to determine the coupling force necessary to cause the crack. It was noted that over the last decade several problems have occurred pertaining to stub sill areas of tank cars that have resulted in hazardous material spills. An advisory was sent to Transport Canada outlining many examples where tank cars containing serious defects had passed CN inspections that were specifically designed to identify such defects. 4 figs

  15. The Leaking Pipeline

    Henningsen, Inge; Højgaard, Lis

    2002-01-01

    negotiations of cultural prescriptions of gendered subjectivity and identities, organizational understandings and procedures embedded in specific university cultures, traditional of different science disciplines, and the systemic logic and political rationale of the education and research system....... these positions, and one that maintains that a closer look at the statistics does not support this optimism because women’s percentage in recruitment positions is not increasing as the pool of potential female researchers increases, or to put it metaphorically, “the pipeline is leaking women all along” (Alper...... it identifies and describes a Danish verion of ‘the leaky pipeline’ from analyses of the ratios of women in science from high school through tenured positions. Finally it illustrates the cultural mechanisms at play in this process, based on the results of three studies. The first two analyze the educational...

  16. Detection of heavy-water leaks in nuclear reactors : a novel method

    Murthy, M.S.; Gor, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, BARC has designed, developed and produced several high sensitivity mass spectrometer helium leak detectors over a period of two decades. Sometimes back, when there was a problem of detecting heavy water leaks in situ in one of the nuclear power reactors of the Department of Atomic Energy, it was referred to this division for a technical solution. After discussing with the site engineers, the various problems involved in the on-line detection of heavy water leaks especially near the end fittings of the coolant assemblies, a novel method of leak detection was developed. Some of the salient features of the method and the results obtained in the laboratory tests are given in this paper. (author)

  17. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  18. A simple method to produce quasi-simultaneous multiple energy helium implantation

    Paszti, F.; Fried, M.; Manuaba, A.; Mezey, G.; Kotai, E.; Lohner, T.

    1982-11-01

    If a monoenergetic ion beam is bombarding a target through an absorber foil tilted continuously (i.e. its effective thickness changing continuously), the depth distribution of the implanted ions in the sample depends on the way the absorber is moving. The present paper describes a way of absorber tilting for obtaining a uniform depth distribution and its experimental verification in the case of MeV energy helium ions implanted into aluminium target. (author)

  19. Impact of process parameters and design options on heat leaks of straight cryogenic distribution lines

    P. Duda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Future Circular Collider (FCC accelerator will require a helium distribution system that will exceed the presently exploited transfer lines by almost 1 order of magnitude. The helium transfer line will contain five process pipes protected against heat leaks by a common thermal shield. The design pressure of the FCC process pipe with supercritical helium will be equal to 5.0 MPa, significantly exceeding the 2.0 MPa value in the present, state-of–art transfer lines. The increase of the design pressure requires construction changes to be introduced to the support system, the vacuum barriers and the compensation bellows. This will influence heat flows to the helium. The paper analyses the impact of the increased design pressure on the heat flow. The paper also offers a discussion of the design modifications to the compensation system, including the replacement of stainless steel with Invar®—aimed at mitigating the pressure increase.

  20. Impact of process parameters and design options on heat leaks of straight cryogenic distribution lines

    Duda, Pawel; Chorowski, Maciej Pawel; Polinski, J

    2017-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) accelerator will require a helium distribution system that will exceed the presently exploited transfer lines by almost 1 order of magnitude. The helium transfer line will contain five process pipes protected against heat leaks by a common thermal shield. The design pressure of the FCC process pipe with supercritical helium will be equal to 5.0 MPa, significantly exceeding the 2.0 MPa value in the present, state-of–art transfer lines. The increase of the design pressure requires construction changes to be introduced to the support system, the vacuum barriers and the compensation bellows. This will influence heat flows to the helium. The paper analyses the impact of the increased design pressure on the heat flow. The paper also offers a discussion of the design modifications to the compensation system, including the replacement of stainless steel with Invar—aimed at mitigating the pressure increase.

  1. Experiments on leak-selfwastage and leak-propagation

    Voss, J.; Vagt, P.; Westenbrugge, J.K. van; Joziasse, J.

    1984-01-01

    During the last years a considerable number of selfwastage experiments with small leaks of different shape and size and for different ferritic materials (2 1/4% Cr - and 12% Cr-steel) were performed by TNO and by INTERATOM, using several sodium test facilities. Many fabrication-methods of artificial micro-leaks were applied and examined. Selfplugging-, selfwastage- and reopening-effects were observed and evaluated during different time periods and under various test conditions. The main results will be discussed. Concerning the leak propagation program of INTERATOM, the first series of experiments was carried out this year. A short status report and some first results will be given. (author)

  2. Modification of Polymer Materials by Ion Bombardment: Case Studies

    Bielinski, D. M.; Jagielski, J.; Lipinski, P.; Pieczynska, D.; Ostaszewska, U.; Piatkowska, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper discusses possibility of application of ion beam bombardment for modification of polymers. Changes to composition, structure and morphology of the surface layer produced by the treatment and their influence on engineering and functional properties of wide range of polymer materials are presented. Special attention has been devoted to modification of tribological properties. Ion bombardment results in significant reduction of friction, which can be explained by increase of hardness and wettability of polymer materials. Hard but thin enough skin does not result in cracking but improves their abrasion resistance. Contrary to conventional chemical treatment ion beam bombardment works even for polymers hardly susceptible to modification like silicone rubber or polyolefines.

  3. Characterization of high flux magnetized helium plasma in SCU-PSI linear device

    Xiaochun, MA; Xiaogang, CAO; Lei, HAN; Zhiyan, ZHANG; Jianjun, WEI; Fujun, GOU

    2018-02-01

    A high-flux linear plasma device in Sichuan University plasma-surface interaction (SCU-PSI) based on a cascaded arc source has been established to simulate the interactions between helium and hydrogen plasma with the plasma-facing components in fusion reactors. In this paper, the helium plasma has been characterized by a double-pin Langmuir probe. The results show that the stable helium plasma beam with a diameter of 26 mm was constrained very well at a magnetic field strength of 0.3 T. The core density and ion flux of helium plasma have a strong dependence on the applied current, magnetic field strength and gas flow rate. It could reach an electron density of 1.2 × 1019 m-3 and helium ion flux of 3.2 × 1022 m-2 s-1, with a gas flow rate of 4 standard liter per minute, magnetic field strength of 0.2 T and input power of 11 kW. With the addition of -80 V applied to the target to increase the helium ion energy and the exposure time of 2 h, the flat top temperature reached about 530 °C. The different sizes of nanostructured fuzz on irradiated tungsten and molybdenum samples surfaces under the bombardment of helium ions were observed by scanning electron microscopy. These results measured in the SCU-PSI linear device provide a reference for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor related PSI research.

  4. Aerospace Payloads Leak Test Methodology

    Lvovsky, Oleg; Grayson, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized and sealed aerospace payloads can leak on orbit. When dealing with toxic or hazardous materials, requirements for fluid and gas leakage rates have to be properly established, and most importantly, reliably verified using the best Nondestructive Test (NDT) method available. Such verification can be implemented through application of various leak test methods that will be the subject of this paper, with a purpose to show what approach to payload leakage rate requirement verification is taken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The scope of this paper will be mostly a detailed description of 14 leak test methods recommended.

  5. Tube leak detector

    Morita, Bunji; Takamura, Koichi; Matsuda, Shigehiro; Kiyosawa, Shun-ichi; Asami, Toru; Yamada, Hiroshi; Naruse, Shin-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention detects occurrence of leakage in a steam generator, a steam heating tube, or a heat exchanger of a nuclear power plant. Namely, an vibration sensor is disposed at the rear end of a rod-like supersonic resonance member. A node portion for the vibrations of the resonance member is held by a holding member and attached to a wall surface of a can such as a boiler. With such a constitution, the resonance member is resonated by supersonic waves generated upon leakage of the tube. The vibrations are measured by the vibration sensor at the rear end. Presence of leakage is detected by utilizing one or more of resonance frequencies. Since the device adopts a resonance phenomenon, a conduction efficiency of the vibrations is high, thereby enabling to detect leakage at high sensitivity. In addition, the supersonic wave resonance member has its top end directly protruded into a pressure vessel such as a boiler by using a metal or a ceramic which is excellent in heat and pressure resistance. Accordingly, the sound of leak can be detected efficiently. (I.S.)

  6. Analysis of SX farm leak histories - Historical leak model (HLM)

    Fredenburg, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report uses readily available historical information to better define the volume, chemical composition, and Cs-137/Sr-90 amounts for leaks that have occurred in the past for tanks SX-108, SX-109, SX-111, and SX-112. In particular a Historical Leak Model (HLM) is developed that is a month by month reconciliation of tank levels, fill records, and calculated boil-off rates for these tanks. The HLM analysis is an independent leak estimate that reconstructs the tank thermal histories thereby deriving each tank's evaporative volume loss and by difference, its unaccounted losses as well. The HLM analysis was meant to demonstrate the viability of its approach, not necessarily to establish the HLM leak estimates as being definitive. Past leak estimates for these tanks have invariably resorted to soil wetting arguments but the extent of soil contaminated by each leak has always been highly uncertain. There is also a great deal of uncertainty with the HLM that was not quantified in this report, but will be addressed later. These four tanks (among others) were used from 1956 to 1975 for storage of high-level waste from the Redox process at Hanford. During their operation, tank waste temperatures were often as high as 150 C (300 F), but were more typically around 130 C. The primary tank cooling was by evaporation of tank waste and therefore periodic replacement of lost volume with water was necessary to maintain each tank's inventory. This active reflux of waste resulted in very substantial turnovers in tank inventory as well as significant structural degradation of these tanks. As a result of the loss of structural integrity, each of these tanks leaked during their active periods of operation. Unfortunately, the large turnover in tank volume associated with their reflux cooling has made a determination of leak volumes very difficult. During much of these tanks operational histories, inventory losses because of evaporative cooling could have effectively masked any volume

  7. Concentration device for leak liquids

    Matsumoto, Kaname; Matsuda, Ken; Takabori, Ken-ichi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve radioactivity recovery and volume-reducing rates, as well as enable safety and easy handling for leak liquids resulted from reptures in coolant circuits. Constitution: The device of the invention comprises an evaporation vessel filled with leak fluids to a predetermined level, an airtight vessel disposed in the evaporation vessel containing hydrophilic porous material partially immersed in the leak fluids and means for heating the hydrophilic material. In this device, leak liquids are absorbed in the hydrophilic porous material, a great amount of water is evaporated from the outer surface of the hydrophilic porous material exposed above the liquid surface, and salts and radioactive material are remained on the inside and the outer surface of the porous material. The evaporated water content is condensated and recovered in a cooler and the remaining salts, etc. are discarded together with the porous material. The volume-reducing property can be improved by constituting the porous material with burnable material. (Takahashi, M.)

  8. Basis UST leak detection systems

    Silveria, V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that gasoline and other petroleum products are leaking from underground storage tanks (USTs) at an alarming rate, seeping into soil and groundwater. Buried pipes are an even greater culprit, accounting for most suspected and detected leaks according to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates. In response to this problem, the EPA issued regulations setting standards for preventing, detecting, reporting, and cleaning up leaks, as well as fiscal responsibility. However, federal regulations are only a minimum; some states have cracked down even harder Plant managers and engineers have a big job ahead of them. The EPA estimates that there are more than 75,000 fuel USTs at US industrial facilities. When considering leak detection systems, the person responsible for making the decision has five primary choices: inventory reconciliation combined with regular precision tightness tests; automatic tank gauging; groundwater monitoring; interstitial monitoring of double containment systems; and vapor monitoring

  9. LEAK AND GAS PERMEABILITY TESTING DURING SOIL-GAS SAMPLING AT HAL'S CHEVRON LUST SITE IN GREEN RIVER, UTAH

    The results of gas permeability and leak testing during active soil-gas sampling at Hal’s Chevron LUST Site in Green River, Utah are presented. This study was conducted to support development of a passive soil-gas sampling method. Gas mixtures containing helium and methane were...

  10. Helium refrigerator for 'SULTAN'

    Arpagaus, M.; Erlach, H.; Quack, H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe the helium refrigerator designed for the SULTAN test facility. SULTAN (Supraleiter-Testanlage) is intended to serve for the developments and testing of high field superconducting magnets. These magnets are needed mainly for future applications in nuclear fusion. (Auth.)

  11. Cosmological helium production simplified

    Bernstein, J.; Brown, L.S.; Feinberg, G.

    1988-01-01

    We present a simplified model of helium synthesis in the early universe. The purpose of the model is to explain clearly the physical ideas relevant to the cosmological helium synthesis, in a manner that does not overlay these ideas with complex computer calculations. The model closely follows the standard calculation, except that it neglects the small effect of Fermi-Dirac statistics for the leptons. We also neglect the temperature difference between photons and neutrinos during the period in which neutrons and protons interconvert. These approximations allow us to express the neutron-proton conversion rates in a closed form, which agrees to 10% accuracy or better with the exact rates. Using these analytic expressions for the rates, we reduce the calculation of the neutron-proton ratio as a function of temperature to a simple numerical integral. We also estimate the effect of neutron decay on the helium abundance. Our result for this quantity agrees well with precise computer calculations. We use our semi-analytic formulas to determine how the predicted helium abundance varies with such parameters as the neutron life-time, the baryon to photon ratio, the number of neutrino species, and a possible electron-neutrino chemical potential. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  12. Tests of cold helium compressors at Fermilab

    Peterson, T.J.; Fuerst, J.D.

    1987-10-01

    Fermilab has tested two cold helium compressors for possible installation in the satellite refrigerator buildings of the Tevatron cryogenic system. Operating conditions required to obtain an overall Tevatron energy upgrade from 900 to 1000 GeV are (for each of 24 machines): 52 g/s mass flow rate, 0.7 atm inlet pressure, 1.4 atm exhaust pressure. Acceptable efficiency is in the 60% range. Both Creare, Inc., and Cryogenic Consultants, Inc. (CCI), have supplied units for evaluation. The Creare machine is a high speed centrifugal pump/compressor which yielded 60% adiabatic efficiency (including an approximately 20 watt heat leak) with a 1.0 atm inlet pressure and 55 g/s flow rate. Certain mechanical difficulties were present, chiefly the device's inability to withstand two-phase flow. CCI supplied a reciprocating unit which, after initial testing and modification, achieved 59% efficiency with an approximate 35 watt heat leak at a 0.7 atm inlet pressure and 48 g/s flow rate. Although the device lacks the smooth, quiet operating characteristics of a turbomachine, it has endured mechanically throughout testing and is entirely insensitive to two-phase flow

  13. Mapping urban pipeline leaks: Methane leaks across Boston

    Phillips, Nathan G.; Ackley, Robert; Crosson, Eric R.; Down, Adrian; Hutyra, Lucy R.; Brondfield, Max; Karr, Jonathan D.; Zhao Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Natural gas is the largest source of anthropogenic emissions of methane (CH 4 ) in the United States. To assess pipeline emissions across a major city, we mapped CH 4 leaks across all 785 road miles in the city of Boston using a cavity-ring-down mobile CH 4 analyzer. We identified 3356 CH 4 leaks with concentrations exceeding up to 15 times the global background level. Separately, we measured δ 13 CH 4 isotopic signatures from a subset of these leaks. The δ 13 CH 4 signatures (mean = −42.8‰ ± 1.3‰ s.e.; n = 32) strongly indicate a fossil fuel source rather than a biogenic source for most of the leaks; natural gas sampled across the city had average δ 13 CH 4 values of −36.8‰ (±0.7‰ s.e., n = 10), whereas CH 4 collected from landfill sites, wetlands, and sewer systems had δ 13 CH 4 signatures ∼20‰ lighter (μ = −57.8‰, ±1.6‰ s.e., n = 8). Repairing leaky natural gas distribution systems will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase consumer health and safety, and save money. Highlights: ► We mapped 3356 methane leaks in Boston. ► Methane leaks in Boston carry an isotopic signature of pipeline natural gas. ► Replacing failing gas pipelines will provide safety, environmental, and economic benefits. - We identified 3356 methane leaks in Boston, with isotopic characteristics consistent with pipeline natural gas.

  14. Characterization of leaks from compressed hydrogen dispensing systems and related components

    Schefer, R.W.; Houf, W.G.; San Marchi, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Chernicoff, W.P.; Englom, L. [US DOT-RSPA, Research and Special Programs Administration, 400 7th St SW Washington, DC 20590 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    The equations are developed for the calculation of leak flow rates in various leak regimes. Leaks due to pressure-driven convection and due to permeation through metals are considered. For convective leaks, the conditions under which the flow transitions from laminar to turbulent and from subsonic to choked (sonic) flow are discussed. Equations are presented to calculate leak rates for subsonic laminar and turbulent flows, as well as choked (sonic) flow rates. Given the advantages of using noncombustible gases for leak testing and measurement, equations are also developed for calculating the equivalent leak rate of helium when it is used as a surrogate for the combustible gases hydrogen and methane in each of these flow regimes. Equations are derived for the permeation rate of hydrogen through several common metals. Tabulated data is presented for the permeation rates of hydrogen through pure iron and two types of stainless steel over a pressure range from 5000 to 15,000psi and a temperature range of -40-100{sup |}C. The results clearly show the sensitivity of flux to temperature, with over an order of magnitude increase in flux as the temperature is increased from ambient to 373K (100{sup |}C). Permeation rates are also found to vary significantly with material. For example, permeation rates for construction steel (as estimated from pure iron) are about three orders of magnitude higher than 403 stainless steel and nearly five orders of magnitude higher than type 316L stainless steel for a given temperature and pressure. Under many combinations of pressure and temperature, leak rates for Fe exceed the permissible gaseous hydrogen leak rates, while rates for 316L stainless steel are well below permissible permeation rates at all combinations of temperature and pressure considered. (author)

  15. Multiphysics model of thermomechanical and helium-induced damage of tungsten during plasma heat transients

    Crosby, Tamer, E-mail: tcrosby@ucla.edu; Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@ucla.edu

    2013-11-15

    A combination of transient heating and bombardment by helium and hydrogen atoms has been experimentally proven to lead to severe surface and sub-surface damage. We developed a computational model to determine the relationship between the thermomechanical loading conditions and the onset of damage and failure of tungsten surfaces. The model is based on a thermoelasticity fracture damage approach that was developed using the phase field method. The model simulates the distribution of helium bubbles inside the grains and on grain boundaries using space-dependent rate theory. In addition, the model is coupled with a transient heat conduction analysis for temperature distributions inside the material. The results show the effects of helium bubbles on reducing tungsten surface energy. Further, a temperature gradient in the material equals to 10 K/μm, resulted in deep cracks propagating from the tungsten surface.

  16. The leakage problem in vacuum system. Realization of a mass spectrometer detecting leaks

    Geller, R.

    1954-11-01

    In the first part of this paper we consider the problem of leaks in vacuum systems, and their detection. We consider in particular the method of detection by means of a helium spectrometer. The second part deals with the experimental set p. The analyser and the ion source have been studied in great detail, and we have also discussed the technological and mechanical aspects of the apparatus and its performances. (author) [fr

  17. Helium accumulation and bubble formation in FeCoNiCr alloy under high fluence He+ implantation

    Chen, Da; Tong, Y.; Li, H.; Wang, J.; Zhao, Y. L.; Hu, Alice; Kai, J. J.

    2018-04-01

    Face-centered cubic (FCC) high-entropy alloys (HEA), as emerging alloys with equal-molar or near equal-molar constituents, show a promising radiation damage resistance under heavy ion bombardment, making them potential for structural material application in next-generation nuclear reactors, but the accumulation of light helium ions, a product of nuclear fission reaction, has not been studied. The present work experimentally studied the helium accumulation and bubble formation at implantation temperatures of 523 K, 573 K and 673 K in a homogenized FCC FeCoNiCr HEA, a HEA showing excellent radiation damage resistance under heavy ion irradiation. The size and population density of helium bubbles in FeCoNiCr samples were quantitatively analyzed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the helium content existing in bubbles were estimated from a high-pressure Equation of State (EOS). We found that the helium diffusion in such condition was dominated by the self-interstitial/He replacement mechanism, and the corresponding activation energy in FeCoNiCr is comparable with the vacancy migration energy in Ni and austenitic stainless steel but only 14.3%, 31.4% and 51.4% of the accumulated helium precipitated into helium bubbles at 523 K, 573 K and 673 K, respectively, smaller than the pure Ni case. Importantly, the small bubble size suggested that FeCoNiCr HEA has a high resistance of helium bubble formation compared with Ni and steels.

  18. Mitigated Transfer Line Leaks that Result in Surface Pools and Spray Leaks into Pits

    HEY, B.E.

    1999-12-07

    This analysis provides radiological and toxicological consequence calculations for postulated mitigated leaks during transfers of six waste compositions. Leaks in Cleanout Boxes equipped with supplemental covers and leaks in pits are analyzed.

  19. Mitigated Transfer Line Leaks that Result in Surface Pools and Spray Leaks into Pits

    HEY, B.E.

    1999-01-01

    This analysis provides radiological and toxicological consequence calculations for postulated mitigated leaks during transfers of six waste compositions. Leaks in Cleanout Boxes equipped with supplemental covers and leaks in pits are analyzed

  20. Neutral helium beam probe

    Karim, Rezwanul

    1999-10-01

    This article discusses the development of a code where diagnostic neutral helium beam can be used as a probe. The code solves numerically the evolution of the population densities of helium atoms at their several different energy levels as the beam propagates through the plasma. The collisional radiative model has been utilized in this numerical calculation. The spatial dependence of the metastable states of neutral helium atom, as obtained in this numerical analysis, offers a possible diagnostic tool for tokamak plasma. The spatial evolution for several hypothetical plasma conditions was tested. Simulation routines were also run with the plasma parameters (density and temperature profiles) similar to a shot in the Princeton beta experiment modified (PBX-M) tokamak and a shot in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor tokamak. A comparison between the simulation result and the experimentally obtained data (for each of these two shots) is presented. A good correlation in such comparisons for a number of such shots can establish the accurateness and usefulness of this probe. The result can possibly be extended for other plasma machines and for various plasma conditions in those machines.

  1. Antiprotonic helium atomcules

    Sauge Sébastien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available About 3% of antiprotons ( stopped in helium are long-lived with microsecond lifetimes, against picoseconds in all other materials. This unusual longevity has been ascribed to the trapping of on metastable bound states in He+ helium atom-molecules thus named atomcules. Apart from their unique dual structure investigated by laser spectroscopy – a near-circular quasi-classical Rydberg atom with l ~ n – 1 ~ 37 or a special diatomic molecule with a negatively charged nucleus in high rotational state with J = l – the chemical physics aspects of their interaction with other atoms or molecules constitute an interesting topic for molecular physics. While atomcules may resist to million collisions in helium, molecular contaminants such as H2 are likely to destroy them in a single one, down to very low temperatures. In the Born-Oppenheimer framework, we interpret the molecular interaction obtained by ab initio quantum chemical calculations in terms of classical reactive channels, with activation barriers accounting for the experiments carried out in He and H2. From classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the thermalization stage strongly quenches initial populations, thus reduced to a recovered 3 % trapping fraction. This work illustrates the pertinence of chemical physics concepts to the study of exotic processes involving antimatter. New insights into the physico-chemistry of cold interstellar radicals are anticipated.

  2. The Liquefaction of Hydrogen and Helium Using Small Coolers

    Green, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    This report discusses the history of the liquefaction of hydrogen and helium using small coolers. This history dates form the 1960's when two stage GM coolers capable of reaching 7 K were used to liquefy helium and hydrogen by suing an added compressor and J-T circuit. Liquefaction using the added circuit failed to become mainstream because the J-T valve and heat exchanger clogged because of impurities in the gas being liquefied. Liquefaction using a GM cooler without an added J-T circuit proved to be difficult because the first stage was not used to pre-cool the gas coming to the second stage of the cooler. Once the gas being liquefied was pre-cooled using the cooler first stage, improvements in the liquefaction rates were noted. The advent of low temperature pulse tube cooler (down to 2.5 K) permitted one to achieve dramatic improvement is the liquefactions rates for helium. Similar but less dramatic improvements are expected for hydrogen as well. Using the PT-415 cooler, one can expect liquefaction rates of 15 to 20 liters per day for helium or hydrogen provided the heat leak into the cooler and the storage vessel is low. A hydrogen liquefier for MICE is presented at the end of this report

  3. Study and optimisation of SIMS performed with He+ and Ne+ bombardment

    Pillatsch, L.; Vanhove, N.; Dowsett, D.; Sijbrandij, S.; Notte, J.; Wirtz, T.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the high-brightness He + /Ne + atomic level ion source with the detection capabilities of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) opens up the prospect of obtaining chemical information with high lateral resolution and high sensitivity on the Zeiss ORION helium ion microscope (HIM). A feasibility study with He + and Ne + ion bombardment is presented in order to determine the performance of SIMS analyses using the HIM. Therefore, the sputtering yields, useful yields and detection limits obtained for metallic (Al, Ni and W) as well as semiconductor samples (Si, Ge, GaAs and InP) were investigated. All the experiments were performed on a Cameca IMS4f SIMS instrument which was equipped with a caesium evaporator and oxygen flooding system. For most of the elements, useful yields in the range of 10 −4 to 3 × 10 −2 were measured with either O 2 or Cs flooding. SIMS experiments performed directly on the ORION with a prototype secondary ion extraction and detection system lead to results that are consistent with those obtained on the IMS4f. Taking into account the obtained useful yields and the analytical conditions, such as the ion current and typical dwell time on the ORION HIM, detection limits in the at% range and better can be obtained during SIMS imaging at 10 nm lateral resolution with Ne + bombardment and down to the ppm level when a lateral resolution of 100 nm is chosen. Performing SIMS on the HIM with a good detection limit while maintaining an excellent lateral resolution (<50 nm) is therefore very promising.

  4. Sensors for Fluid Leak Detection

    Gonzalo Pajares Martinsanz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluid leak detection represents a problem that has attracted the interest of researchers, but not exclusively because in industries and services leaks are frequently common. Indeed, in water or gas supplies, chemical or thermal plants, sea-lines or cooling/heating systems leakage rates can cause important economic losses and sometimes, what it is more relevant, environmental pollution with human, animal or plant lives at risk. This last issue has led to increased national and international regulations with different degrees of severity regarding environmental conservation.[...

  5. Leak testing United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission type b packaging

    Lacy, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WTPP) is a one of its kind research and development facility operated by the Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office. Located in southeastern New Mexico, the WTPP is designed to demonstrate the safe, permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive nuclear waste, accumulated from 40 years of nuclear weapons production. Before the waste can be disposed of, it must first be safely transported from generator storage sites to the WIPP. To accomplish this, the TRUPACT-II was designed and fabricated. This double containment, non-vented waste packaging successfully completed a rigorous testing program, and in 1989 received a Certificate of Compliance (C of C) from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Currently, the TRUPACT-II is in use at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to transport waste on site for characterization. The DOE/CAO is responsible for maintaining the TRUPACT-II C of C. The C of C requires performance of nondestructive examination (NDE), e.g., visual testing (VT), dimensional inspections, Liquid Dye Penetrant testing (PT), and Helium Leak Detection (HLD). The Waste Isolation Division (WID) uses HLD for verification of the containment integrity. The following HLD tests are performed on annual basis or when required, i.e. repairs or component replacement: (1) fabrication verification leak tests on both the outer containment vessel (OCV) and the inner containment vessel (ICV); (2) assembly verification leak tests on the OCV and ICV upper main o-rings; and (3) assembly verification leak tests on the OCV and the ICV vent port plugs. These tests are addressed in detail as part of this presentation

  6. Surface electrons of helium films

    Studart, N.; Hipolito, O.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of some properties of two-dimensional electrons on a liquid helium film adsorbed on a solid substrate are reviewed. We describe the spectrum of electron bound states on bulk helium as well on helium films. The correlational properties, such as the structure factor and correlation energy, are determined as functions of the film thickness for different types of substrates in the framework of a Generalized Random-Phase Approximation. The collective excitations of this system are also described. The results for electrons on the surface of thin films and bulk helium are easily obtained. we examine the electron interaction with the excitations of the liquid helium surface resulting in a new polaron state, which was observed very recently. The ground state energy and the effective mass of this polaron are determined by using the path-integral formalism and unitary-transformation method. Recent speculations about the phase diagram of electrons on the helium film are also discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. Impact and spreading behavior of cluster atoms bombarding substrates

    Fang, Te-Hua, E-mail: fang.tehua@msa.hinet.net [Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Kang, Shao-Hui; Liao, Jia-Hung [Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of copper cluster atoms bombarding a substrate using molecule dynamics based on tight-binding second moment approximation (TB-SMA) potential. The simulated results show that a crater on the substrate surface was created by the impact of the clusters. The variations of kinetic energy of cluster bombardments can be divided into three stages. At the initial impact level, the kinetic energies of the clusters and the substrate were constant. Then, the system went into a sluggish stage of energy variation, in which the kinetic energy of the clusters reduced. In the final stage, the kinetic energy of the system became stable. The high slip vector region around the crater had a disorder damage zone. The symmetry-like cross-slip occurred beneath the top layer of the substrate along the <1 1 0> orientations. The spreading index, temperature, and potential functions that affect the bombardments are also discussed.

  8. Impact and spreading behavior of cluster atoms bombarding substrates

    Fang, Te-Hua; Kang, Shao-Hui; Liao, Jia-Hung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of copper cluster atoms bombarding a substrate using molecule dynamics based on tight-binding second moment approximation (TB-SMA) potential. The simulated results show that a crater on the substrate surface was created by the impact of the clusters. The variations of kinetic energy of cluster bombardments can be divided into three stages. At the initial impact level, the kinetic energies of the clusters and the substrate were constant. Then, the system went into a sluggish stage of energy variation, in which the kinetic energy of the clusters reduced. In the final stage, the kinetic energy of the system became stable. The high slip vector region around the crater had a disorder damage zone. The symmetry-like cross-slip occurred beneath the top layer of the substrate along the orientations. The spreading index, temperature, and potential functions that affect the bombardments are also discussed.

  9. Destruction of C60 films by boron ion bombardment

    Ren Zhongmin; Du Yuancheng; Ying Zhifeng; Xiong Xiaxing; Li Fuming

    1995-01-01

    C 60 films are bombarded by 100 keV boron ion beams at doses ranging from 3x10 14 to 1x10 16 /cm 2 . The bombarded films are analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Most C 60 soccer-balls in the implanted region in the films are found to be broken at a dose over 1x10 15 /cm 2 , while at a dose less than 6x10 14 /cm 2 a few C 60 molecules remain undestroyed and maintain some crystal structure. The results of the analyses suggest a complete disintegration of a C 60 molecule under B + bombardment. ((orig.))

  10. Catalytic oxidation of silicon by cesium ion bombardment

    Souzis, A.E.; Huang, H.; Carr, W.E.; Seidl, M.

    1991-01-01

    Results for room-temperature oxidation of silicon using cesium ion bombardment and low oxygen exposure are presented. Bombardment with cesium ions is shown to allow oxidation at O 2 pressures orders of magnitude smaller than with noble gas ion bombardment. Oxide layers of up to 30 A in thickness are grown with beam energies ranging from 20--2000 eV, O 2 pressures from 10 -9 to 10 -6 Torr, and total O 2 exposures of 10 0 to 10 4 L. Results are shown to be consistent with models indicating that initial oxidation of silicon is via dissociative chemisorption of O 2 , and that the low work function of the cesium- and oxygen-coated silicon plays the primary role in promoting the oxidation process

  11. Adhesion of evaporated titanium films to ion-bombarded polyethylene

    Bodoe, P.; Sundgren, J.

    1986-01-01

    Ti films were deposited onto high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples by electron-beam evaporation. Prior to film deposition the samples were in situ pretreated by Ar ion bombardment using a sputter ion gun. The adhesion of the films, determined as the pull strength required for film failure, was measured as a function of ion dose. HDPE substrates processed at two different temperatures were examined. The adhesion of the Ti films to HDPE samples processed at roughly-equal150 0 C increased with the ion dose to a steady-state value corresponding to the cohesive strength of the HDPE substrate. The adhesion to the samples processed at roughly-equal200 0 C increased to a maximum and then decreased for further ion bombardment to a level of the same order as that for films deposited onto as-prepared samples. The effects of the ion bombardment upon the HDPE surface chemistry were examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ion bombardment resulted in dehydrogenation and cross linking of the surface region and for prolonged ion bombardment, a graphitelike surface was obtained. The film/substrate interface as well as the initial Ti film growth were examined by XPS analysis. A chemical interaction which resulted in Ti--C bonds was observed at the interface. The Ti film growth followed a pronounced three-dimensional growth mode on as-prepared surfaces whereas the ion bombardment resulted in a change toward a more two-dimensional growth mode. The difference in adhesion behavior for the two types of HDPE substrates was found to be due to a difference in the amounts of low molecular weight products present within the substrates

  12. Canada's helium output rising fast

    1966-12-01

    About 12 months from now, International Helium Limited will be almost ready to start up Canada's second helium extraction plant at Mankota, in Saskatchewan's Wood Mountain area about 100 miles southwest of Moose Jaw. Another 80 miles north is Saskatchewan's (and Canada's) first helium plant, operated by Canadian Helium and sitting on a gas deposit at Wilhelm, 9 miles north of Swift Current. It contains almost 2% helium, some COD2U, and the rest nitrogen. One year in production was apparently enough to convince Canadian Helium that the export market (it sells most of its helium in W. Europe) can take a lot more than it's getting. Construction began this summer on an addition to the Swift Current plant that will raise its capacity from 12 to 36MMcf per yr when it goes on stream next spring. Six months later, International Helium's 40 MMcf per yr plant to be located about 4 miles from its 2 Wood Mountain wells will double Canada's helium output again.

  13. Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC Tunnel at CERN

    Koettig, T.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chorowski, M.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Grabowski, M.; Jedrusyna, A.; Lindell, G.; Nonis, M.; Vauthier, N.; van Weelderen, R.; Winkler, T.; Bremer, J.

    The helium cooled magnets of the LHC particle accelerator are installed in a confined space, formed by a 27 km circumference 3.8 m diameter underground tunnel. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting LHC magnets are protected by a lift plate against excessive overpressure created by eventual leaks from the magnet helium bath, or from the helium supply headers. A three-meter long no stay zone has been defined centered to these plates, based on earlier scale model studies, to protect the personnel against the consequences of an eventual opening of such a lift plate. More recently several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the resulting helium/air mixture along the tunnel in case of such a cold helium release at a rate in the range of 1 kg/s. To validate the different scale models and simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed in the LHC, releasing about 1000 liter of liquid helium under standard operational tunnel conditions. Data recorded during these tests include oxygen level, temperature and flow speed as well as video recordings, taken up- and downstream of the spill point (-100 m to +200 m) with respect to the ventilation direction in the LHC tunnel. The experimental set-up and measurement results are presented. Generic effects found during the tests will be discussed to allow the transposal to possible cold helium release cases in similar facilities.

  14. Detecting leaks in vacuum bags

    Carlstrom, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum bag can be readily detected by eye, using simple chemical reaction: combination of ammonia and acetic acid vapors to produce cloudy white smoke. Technique has been successfully used to test seam integrity and to identify minute pinholes in vacuum bag used in assembly of ceramic-tile heat shield for Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  15. LOCATING LEAKS WITH ACOUSTIC TECHNOLOGY

    Many water distribution systems in this country are almost 100 years old. About 26 percent of piping in these systems is made of unlined cast iron or steel and is in poor condition. Many methods that locate leaks in these pipes are time-consuming, costly, disruptive to operations...

  16. Pipe Leak Detection Technology Development

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that one of the nation’s biggest infrastructural needs is the replacement or rehabilitation of the water distribution and transmission systems. The institution of more effective pipe leak detection technology will im...

  17. Ion bombardment induced ripple topography on amorphous solids

    Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Paton, F.; Williams, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    Earlier studies of the ion bombardment induced ripple morphology on the surfaces of amorphous solids when compared with geomorphological effects are shown to possess many similar features. The present study, with 40 keV Ar + ion bombarded Si suggests that analogies are incomplete, however, and that greater similarities with the process of macroscopic sandblasting (corrosion) exist. It is shown that the genesis of wave like structures on Si is from isolated features, which have the appearance of ripple trains, which are faceted. It is suggested that these features result from particle flux enhancement processes near surface dimples generated by stress induced surface lifting. (author)

  18. Anomalous heat evolution of deuteron implanted Al on electron bombardment

    Kamada, K.; Kinoshita, H.; Takahashi, H.

    1994-05-01

    Anomalous heat evolution was observed in deuteron implanted Al foils on 175 keV electron bombardment. Local regions with linear dimension of several 100nm showed simultaneous transformation from single crystalline to polycrystalline structure instantaneously on the electron bombardment, indicating the temperature rise up to more than melting point of Al from room temperature. The amount of energy evolved was more than 180 MeV for each transformed region. The transformation was never observed in proton implanted Al foils. The heat evolution was considered due to a nuclear reaction in D 2 molecular collections. (author)

  19. Computer simulation of the topography evolution on ion bombarded surfaces

    Zier, M

    2003-01-01

    The development of roughness on ion bombarded surfaces (facets, ripples) on single crystalline and amorphous homogeneous solids plays an important role for example in depth profiling techniques. To verify a faceting mechanism based not only on sputtering by directly impinging ions but also on the contribution of reflected ions and the redeposition of sputtered material a computer simulation has been carried out. The surface in this model is treated as a two-dimensional line segment profile. The model describes the topography evolution on ion bombarded surfaces including the growth mechanism of a facetted surface, using only the interplay of reflected and primary ions and redeposited atoms.

  20. Reliability of leak detection systems in LWRs

    Kupperman, D.S.

    1986-10-01

    In this paper, NRC guidelines for leak detection will be reviewed, current practices described, potential safety-related problems discussed, and potential improvements in leak detection technology (with emphasis on acoustic methods) evaluated

  1. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  2. Orion A helium abundance

    Tsivilev, A.P.; Ershov, A.A.; Smirnov, G.T.; Sorochenko, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The 22.4-GHz (H,He)66-alpha and 36.5-GHz (H,He)56-alpha radio recombination lines have been observed at several Jaffe-Pankonin positions in the central part of the Orion A source. The measured relative abundance of ionized helium increases with distance, averaging 11.6 percent at peripheral points. The observed behavior is interpreted by a blister-type model nebula, which implies that Orion A has a true He abundance of 12 percent, is moving with a radial velocity of 5 km/sec, and is expanding. 18 references

  3. Simulation of liquid helium

    Ceperley, D.M.

    1985-07-01

    The author discusses simulation methods for quantum mechanical systems at finite temperatures. Recently it has been shown that static properties of some quantum systems can be obtained by simulation in a straightforward manner using path integrals, albeit with an order of magnitude more computing effort needed than for the corresponding classical systems. Some dynamical information can be gleaned from these simulations as will be discussed below. But this is very limited - there is no quantum version of the molecular dynamics method. The path integral method is illustrated by discussing the application to liquid helium. 12 refs., 8 figs

  4. Simulation of leaking fuel rods

    Hozer, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of failed fuel rods includes several complex phenomena. The cladding failure initiates the release of fission product from the fuel and in case of large defect even urania grains can be released into the coolant. In steady state conditions an equilibrium - diffusion type - release is expected. During transients the release is driven by a convective type leaching mechanism. There are very few experimental data on leaking WWER fuel rods. For this reason the activity measurements at the nuclear power plants provide very important information. The evaluation of measured data can help in the estimation of failed fuel rod characteristics and the prediction of transient release dynamics in power plant transients. The paper deals with the simulation of leaking fuel rods under steady state and transient conditions and describes the following new results: 1) A new algorithm has been developed for the simulation of leaking fuel rods under steady state conditions and the specific parameters of the model for the Paks NPP has been determined; 2) The steady state model has been applied to calculation of leaking fuel characteristics using iodine and noble gas activity measurement data; 3) A new computational method has been developed for the simulation of leaking fuel rods under transient conditions and the specific parameters for the Paks NPP has been determined; 4) The transient model has been applied to the simulation of shutdown process at the Paks NPP and for the prediction of the time and magnitude of 123 I activity peak; 5) Using Paks NPP data a conservative value has been determined for the upper limit of the 123 I release from failed fuel rods during transients

  5. Imaging review of cerebrospinal fluid leaks

    Naga V Vemuri; Lakshmi S P Karanam; Venkatesh Manchikanti; Srinivas Dandamudi; Sampath K Puvvada; Vineet K Vemuri

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurs due to a defect in the dura and skull base. Trauma remains the most common cause of CSF leak; however, a significant number of cases are iatrogenic, and result from a complication of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Early diagnosis of CSF leak is of paramount importance to prevent life-threatening complications such as brain abscess and meningitis. Imaging plays a crucial role in the detection and characterization of CSF leaks. Three-dimensiona...

  6. Calibration of a leak detection spectrometer

    Geller, R.

    1958-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the possible methods for calibrating a leak detection spectrometer, and the estimation of outputs from the leaks is considered. With this in mind the question of sensitivity of leak detection is tackled on a very general level; first the sensitivity of the isolated instrument is determined, and then the sensitivity of an instrument connected to an installation where leaks may be suspected. Finally, practical solutions are proposed. (author) [fr

  7. Intraoperative leak testing has no correlation with leak after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Sethi, Monica; Zagzag, Jonathan; Patel, Karan; Magrath, Melissa; Somoza, Eduardo; Parikh, Manish S; Saunders, John K; Ude-Welcome, Aku; Schwack, Bradley F; Kurian, Marina S; Fielding, George A; Ren-Fielding, Christine J

    2016-03-01

    Staple line leak is a serious complication of sleeve gastrectomy. Intraoperative methylene blue and air leak tests are routinely used to evaluate for leak; however, the utility of these tests is controversial. We hypothesize that the practice of routine intraoperative leak testing is unnecessary during sleeve gastrectomy. A retrospective cohort study was designed using a prospectively collected database of seven bariatric surgeons from two institutions. All patients who underwent sleeve gastrectomy from March 2012 to November 2014 were included. The performance of intraoperative leak testing and the type of test (air or methylene blue) were based on surgeon preference. Data obtained included BMI, demographics, comorbidity, presence of intraoperative leak test, result of test, and type of test. The primary outcome was leak rate between the leak test (LT) and no leak test (NLT) groups. SAS version 9.4 was used for univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 1550 sleeve gastrectomies were included; most were laparoscopic (99.8%), except for one converted and two open cases. Routine intraoperative leak tests were performed in 1329 (85.7%) cases, while 221 (14.3%) did not have LTs. Of the 1329 cases with LTs, there were no positive intraoperative results. Fifteen (1%) patients developed leaks, with no difference in leak rate between the LT and NLT groups (1 vs. 1%, p = 0.999). After adjusting for baseline differences between the groups with a propensity analysis, the observed lack of association between leak and intraoperative leak test remained. In this cohort, leaks presented at a mean of 17.3 days postoperatively (range 1-67 days). Two patients with staple line leaks underwent repeat intraoperative leak testing at leak presentation, and the tests remained negative. Intraoperative leak testing has no correlation with leak due to laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and is not predictive of the later development of staple line leak.

  8. High Efficiency Regenerative Helium Compressor, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Helium plays several critical rolls in spacecraft propulsion. High pressure helium is commonly used to pressurize propellant fuel tanks. Helium cryocoolers can be...

  9. Interactions of solid and liquid lithium with steady state hydrogen and helium plasmas

    Hirooka, Y.; Nishikawa, M.; Ohgaki, H.; Ohtsuka, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of innovative Plasma-Facing Component (PFC) concepts, employing moving solid or liquid surfaces, have recently been proposed in order to resolve technical issues, associated with the applications of currently used PFCs in future steady state fusion devices. As the first step to evaluate the concept using flowing-liquids for PFCs, steady state hydrogen and helium plasma interactions with solid and standing liquid lithium have been investigated in the present work, using the H α and He-I spectroscopy at the ion bombarding energies up to 150eV and at the lithium temperatures between room temperature and 480 deg C. Data indicate that hydrogen recycling over liquid lithium is clearly reduced, relative to that over solid lithium, whereas helium recycling does not show the same trend. From the kinetic analysis of these recycling time constant data, the activation energies for the overall recycling processes have been evaluated to be 0.02±0.01eV, both for hydrogen and helium plasmas. Also, it has been found that the activation energy is nearly independent of ion bombarding energy. (author)

  10. A helium regenerative compressor

    Swift, W.L.; Nutt, W.E.; Sixsmith, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and performance of a regenerative compressor that was developed primarily for use in cryogenic helium systems. The objectives for the development were to achieve acceptable efficiency in the machine using conventional motor and bearing technology while reducing the complexity of the system required to control contamination from the lubricants. A single stage compressor was built and tested. The compressor incorporates aerodynamically shaped blades on a 218 mm (8.6 inches) diameter impeller to achieve high efficiency. A gas-buffered non-contact shaft seal is used to oppose the diffusion of lubricant from the motor bearings into the cryogenic circuit. Since it is a rotating machine, the flow is continuous and steady, and the machine is very quiet. During performance testing with helium, the single stage machine has demonstrated a pressure ratio of 1.5 at a flow rate of 12 g/s with measured isothermal efficiencies in excess of 30%. This performance compares favorably with efficiencies generally achieved in oil flooded screw compressors

  11. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    Fiflis, P., E-mail: fiflis1@illinois.edu; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-12-15

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  12. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    Fiflis, P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  13. Helium production in reactor materials

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Farrar, H. IV.

    1975-02-01

    Comparisons of integral helium production measurements with predictions based on ENDF/B Version IV cross sections have been made. It is concluded that an ENDF/B helium production cross section file should be established in order to ensure a complete and consistent cross section evaluation to meet accuracies required for LMFBR, CTR, and LWR applications. (U.S.)

  14. Fertile transgenic wheat from microprojectile bombardment of scutellar tissue.

    Becker, D; Brettschneider, R; Lörz, H

    1994-02-01

    A reproducible transformation system for hexaploid wheat was developed based on particle bombardment of scutellar tissue of immature embryos. Particle bombardment was carried out using a PDS 1000/He gun. Plant material was bombarded with the plasmid pDB1 containing the beta-glucuronidase gene (uidA) under the control of the actin-1 promoter of rice, and the selectable marker gene bar (phosphinothricin acetyltransferase) under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter. Selection was carried out using the herbicide Basta (Glufosinate-ammonium). From a total number of 1050 bombarded immature embryos, in seven independent transformation experiments, 59 plants could be regenerated. Putative transformants were screened for enzyme activity by the histochemical GUS assay using cut leaf material and by spraying the whole plants with an aqueous solution of the herbicide Basta. Twelve regenerants survived Basta spraying and showed GUS-activity. Southern-blot analysis indicated the presence of introduced foreign genes in the genomic DNA of the transformants and both marker genes were present in all plants analysed. To date, four plants have been grown to maturity and set seed. Histochemically stained pollen grains showed a 1:1 segregation of the uidA gene in all plants tested. A 3:1 segregation of the introduced genes was demonstrated by enzyme activity tests and Southern blot analysis of R1 plants.

  15. Target bombardment by ion beams generated in the Focus experiment

    Bernard, Alain; Coudeville, Alain; Garconnet, J.-P.; Jolas, A.; Mascureau, J. de; Nazet, Christian.

    1976-01-01

    In a Mather-Focus experiment, it was shown that 80% of the neutron emitted were generated through bombardment. The apparatus was operated with various targets at a distance of 13mm from the anode. In the low pressure regime, a deuteron beam of high energy was produced. Its emission duration was measured using a CD 2 target [fr

  16. Stable transformation of the oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, using microprojectile bombardment

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2003-01-01

    Germinated asexual sporangia, zoospores, and mycelia of Phytophthora infestans were transformed to G418-resistance by microprojectile bombardment. After optimization, an average of 14 transformants/shot were obtained, using 10(6) germinated sporangia and gold particles coated with 1 microg...

  17. Ion bombardment effect on surface state of metal

    Vaulin, E.P.; Georgieva, N.E.; Martynenko, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of slow argon ion bombardment on the surface microstructure of polycrystalline copper as well as the effect of surface state on sputtering of D-16 polycrystalline alloy are experimentally studied. Reduction of copper surface roughness is observed. It is shown that the D-16 alloy sputtering coefficient is sensitive to the surface state within the limits of the destructed surface layer

  18. Diffusion processes in bombardment-induced surface topography

    Robinson, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    A treatment is given of the problem of surface diffusion processes occurring during surface topography development, whenever a surface is simultaneously seeded with impurities and ion bombarded. The development of controllable topography and the importance of surface diffusion parameters, which can be obtained during these studies, are also analyzed. 101 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  19. On the reasons for bombarding uranium with slow neutrons

    Xu Diyu

    1997-01-01

    Form the concepts of slow neutrons, the binding energy and the excitation energy of complex nuclei, and the activation energy in nuclear fission, the four reasons for bombarding uranium with slow neutrons are summed up. Not only the reasons for uranium fission are brought in light, but also the micromechanism is dealt with

  20. Dating Howardite Melt Clasts: Evidence for an Extended Vestan Bombardment?

    Cartwright, J. A.; Hodges, K. V.; Wadhwa, M.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Howardites are polymict breccias that, together with eucrites and diogenites (HED), likely originate from the vestan surface (regolith/ megaregolith), and display a heterogeneous distribution of eucritic and diogenitic material. Melt clasts are also present alongside other regolithic features within howardites, and are noteworthy for their compositional variability and appearance. Melt clasts formed by impact events provide a snapshot of the timings and conditions of surface gardening and bombardment on the vestan surface. By dating such clasts, we aim to better constrain the timings of impact events on Vesta, and to establish whether the impact flux in the asteroid belt was similar to that on the Moon. As the Moon is used as the basis for characterising impact models of the inner solar system, it is necessary to verify that apparent wide-scale events are seen in other planetary bodies. In particular, the observed clustering of Apollo melt clast ages between 3.8-4.0 Ga has led to two hypotheses: 1) The Moon was subjected to a sudden event - 'Lunar Cataclysm' or period of 'Late Heavy Bombardment' (LHB), 2) The age cluster represents the end of an epoch of declining bombardment or 'Heavy Bombardment. No consensus has emerged regarding one or other hypothesis. We are testing these hypotheses by seeking evidence for such events in materials other than those derived from the Moon.

  1. Advances in fast-atom-bombardment mass spectroscopy

    Hemling, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of fast atom bombardment and field desorption mass spectrometry was made to determine relative sensitivity and applicability. A series of glycosphingolipids and a series of protected oligonucleotides of known structure were analyzed to ascertain the potential utility of fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry in the structural elucidation of novel compounds in these classes. Negative ion mass markers were also developed. Fast atom bombardment was found to be one-to-two orders of magnitude more sensitive than field desorption based on the analysis of a limited number of compounds from several classes. Superior sensitivity was not universal and field desorption was clearly better in certain cases. In the negative ion mode in particular, fast atom bombardment was found to be a useful tool for the determination of the primary structure of glycosphingolipids and oligonucleotides. Carbohydrate sequence and branching information, and a fatty acid and lipid base composition were readily obtained from the mass spectra of glycosphingolipids while bidirectional nucleotide sequence, nucleotide base, and protecting group assignments were obtained for oligonucleotides. Based on this knowledge, a tentative structure of a human peripheral nervous system glycosphingolipid implicated in certain cases of disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's Disease, was proposed. Suitable negative ion mass markers were found in dispersions of poly(ethylene) and poly(propylene)glycols in a triethylenetetramine matrix, a matrix which also proved useful in the analysis of glycosphingolipids. These polyglycol dispersions provided ions for calibration to 2300 daltons

  2. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives

    J.J. Karchesy; L.Y. Foo; Richard W. Hemingway; E. Barofsky; D.F. Barofsky

    1989-01-01

    Condensed tannin sulfonate derivatives were studied by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) to assess the feasibility of using this technique for determining molecular weight and structural information about these compounds. Both positive- and negative-ion spectra provided useful data with regard to molecular weight, cation species present, and presence of...

  3. Neutron yields from bombardment of α-particles

    Nakasima, Ryuzo

    1982-09-01

    The thick target neutron yields from bombardment of <10 MeV α-particles are calculated based on the reaction cross sections. The results for the elements of Z < 15 are compared with existing calculated or measured neutron yield data. For the elements of 16 < Z < 50, elemental or isotopic neutron yields are calculated if the cross section data are available. (author)

  4. Helium behaviour in nuclear glasses

    Fares, T.

    2011-01-01

    The present thesis focuses on the study of helium behavior in R7T7 nuclear waste glass. Helium is generated by the minor actinides alpha decays incorporated in the glass matrix. Therefore, four types of materials were used in this work. These are non radioactive R7T7 glasses saturated with helium under pressure, glasses implanted with 3 He + ions, glasses doped with curium and glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor. The study of helium solubility in saturated R7T7 glass has shown that helium atoms are inserted in the glass free volume. The results yielded a solubility of about 10 16 at. cm -3 atm. -1 . The incorporation limit of helium in this type of glass has been determined; its value amounted to about 2*10 21 at. cm -3 , corresponding to 2.5 at.%. Diffusion studies have shown that the helium migration is controlled by the single population dissolved in the glass free volume. An ideal diffusion model was used to simulate the helium release data which allowed to determine diffusion coefficients obeying to the following Arrhenius law: D = D 0 exp(-E a /kBT), where D 0 = 2.2*10 -2 and 5.4*10 -3 cm 2 s -1 and E a = 0.61 eV for the helium saturated and the curium doped glass respectively. These results reflect a thermally activated diffusion mechanism which seems to be not influenced by the glass radiation damage and helium concentrations studied in the present work (up to 8*10 19 at. g -1 , corresponding to 0.1 at.%). Characterizations of the macroscopic, structural and microstructural properties of glasses irradiated in nuclear reactor did not reveal any impact associated with the presence of helium at high concentrations. The observed modifications i.e. a swelling of 0.7 %, a decrease in hardness by 38 %, an increase between 8 and 34 % of the fracture toughness and a stabilization of the glass structure under irradiation, were attributed to the glass nuclear damage induced by the irradiation in reactor. Characterizations by SEM and TEM of R7T7 glasses implanted

  5. Nuclear fuel element leak detection system

    John, C.D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a leak detection system integral with a wall of a building used to fabricate nuclear fuel elements for detecting radiation leakage from the nuclear fuel elements as the fuel elements exit the building. The leak detecting system comprises a shielded compartment constructed to withstand environmental hazards extending into a similarly constructed building and having sealed doors on both ends along with leak detecting apparatus connected to the compartment. The leak detecting system provides a system for removing a nuclear fuel element from its fabrication building while testing for radiation leaks in the fuel element

  6. Leak rate measurements and detection systems

    Kupperman, D.; Shack, W.J.; Claytor, T.

    1983-10-01

    A research program is under way to evaluate and develop improve leak detection systems. The primary focus of the work has been on acoustic emission detection of leaks. Leaks from artificial flaws, laboratory-generated IGSCCs and thermal fatigue cracks, and field-induced intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) from reactor piping have been examined. The effects of pressure, temperature, and leak rate and geometry on the acoustic signature are under study. The use of cross-correlation techniques for leak location and pattern recognition and autocorrelation for source discrimination is also being considered

  7. Leak detection by vibrational diagnostic methods

    Siklossy, P.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities and methods of leak detection due to mechanical failures in nuclear power plants are reviewed on the basis of the literature. Great importance is attributed to vibrational diagnostic methods for their adventageous characteristics which enable them to become final leak detecting methods. The problems of noise analysis, e.g. leak detection by impact sound measurements, probe characteristics, gain problems, probe selection, off-line analysis and correlation functions, types of leak noises etc. are summarized. Leak detection based on noise analysis can be installed additionally to power plants. Its maintenance and testing is simple. On the other hand, it requires special training and measuring methods. (Sz.J.)

  8. Anomalous microstructural changes in III-nitrides under ion bombardment

    Kucheyev, S.O.; Williams, J.S.; Jagadish, C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Group-III nitrides (GaN, AlGaN, and InGaN) are currently a 'hot topic' in the physics and material research community due to very important technological applications of these materials in (opto)electronics. In the fabrication of III-nitride-based devices, ion bombardment represents a very attractive processing tool. However, ion-beam-produced lattice disorder and its undesirable consequences limit technological applications of ion implantation. Hence, studies of ion-beam-damage processes in Ill-nitrides are not only physically interesting but also technologically important. In this study, wurtzite GaN, AlGaN, and InGaN films exposed to ion bombardment under a wide range of irradiation conditions are studied by a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and Rutherford backscattering/channeling (RBS/C) spectrometry. Results show that, unlike the situation for mature semiconductors such as Si and GaAs, Ill-nitrides exhibit a range of intriguing behavior involving extreme microstructural changes under ion bombardment. In this presentation, the following aspects are discussed: (i) formation of lattice defects during ion bombardment, (ii) ion-beam-induced phase transformations, (iii) ion-beam-produced stoichiometric imbalance and associated material decomposition, and (iv) an application of charging phenomena during ESEM imaging for studies of electrical isolation in GaN by MeV light ion irradiation. Emphasis is given to the (powerful) application of electron microscopy techniques for the understanding of physical processes occurring in Ill-nitrides under ion bombardment. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  9. Genetic Transformation of Metroxylon sagu (Rottb.) Cultures via Agrobacterium-Mediated and Particle Bombardment

    Ibrahim, Evra Raunie

    2014-01-01

    Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu) is a perennial plant native to Southeast Asia and exploited mainly for the starch content in its trunk. Genetic improvement of sago palm is extremely slow when compared to other annual starch crops. Urgent attention is needed to improve the sago palm planting material and can be achieved through nonconventional methods. We have previously developed a tissue culture method for sago palm, which is used to provide the planting materials and to develop a genetic transformation procedure. Here, we report the genetic transformation of sago embryonic callus derived from suspension culture using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and gene gun systems. The transformed embryoids cells were selected against Basta (concentration 10 to 30 mg/L). Evidence of foreign genes integration and function of the bar and gus genes were verified via gene specific PCR amplification, gus staining, and dot blot analysis. This study showed that the embryogenic callus was the most suitable material for transformation as compared to the fine callus, embryoid stage, and initiated shoots. The gene gun transformation showed higher transformation efficiency than the ones transformed using Agrobacterium when targets were bombarded once or twice using 280 psi of helium pressure at 6 to 8 cm distance. PMID:25295258

  10. Genetic Transformation of Metroxylon sagu (Rottb. Cultures via Agrobacterium-Mediated and Particle Bombardment

    Evra Raunie Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sago palm (Metroxylon sagu is a perennial plant native to Southeast Asia and exploited mainly for the starch content in its trunk. Genetic improvement of sago palm is extremely slow when compared to other annual starch crops. Urgent attention is needed to improve the sago palm planting material and can be achieved through nonconventional methods. We have previously developed a tissue culture method for sago palm, which is used to provide the planting materials and to develop a genetic transformation procedure. Here, we report the genetic transformation of sago embryonic callus derived from suspension culture using Agrobacterium tumefaciens and gene gun systems. The transformed embryoids cells were selected against Basta (concentration 10 to 30 mg/L. Evidence of foreign genes integration and function of the bar and gus genes were verified via gene specific PCR amplification, gus staining, and dot blot analysis. This study showed that the embryogenic callus was the most suitable material for transformation as compared to the fine callus, embryoid stage, and initiated shoots. The gene gun transformation showed higher transformation efficiency than the ones transformed using Agrobacterium when targets were bombarded once or twice using 280 psi of helium pressure at 6 to 8 cm distance.

  11. Radiation-induced segregation in light-ion bombarded Ni-8% Si

    Packan, N.H.; Heatherly, L.; Kesternich, W.; Schroeder, H.

    1986-01-01

    Tensile specimens 60 μm thick of Ni-8 at. % Si have been bombarded at 475 0 C to doses of 0.1 to 0.3 dpa with either 7 MeV proton or 28 MeV alpha particle beams. Deliberate embrittlement by high temperature (700 0 C) preimplantation of helium was required to produce intergranular fracture. Depth profile sputtering and analysis in a Scanning Auger Microprobe was then used to study radiation-induced segregation of silicon both at the external surfaces and at internal interfaces. The external surfaces exhibited a strongly silicon-enriched zone for the first 10 to 20 nm followed by a broad (approx.200 nm), shallow silicon-depleted region. Segregation of silicon to grain boundaries varied from interface to interface and possibly from region to region on a given interface. In general, however, depth profiles of silicon content with distance from internal boundaries showed no noticeable depletion zone and a more gradual fall-off compared to the profiles from external surfaces. The variations of RIS among boundaries and with type of interface probably reflect, at least in part, intrinsic differences in sink efficiency

  12. Leaking electricity in domestic appliances

    Meier, Alan; Rosen, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Many types of home electronic equipment draw electric power when switched off or not performing their principal functions. Standby power use (or ''leaking electricity'') for most appliances ranges from 1 - 20 watts. Even though standby use of each device is small, the combined standby power use of all appliances in a home can easily exceed 50 watts. Leaking electricity is already responsible for 5 to 10 percent of residential electricity use in the United States and over 10 percent in Japan. An increasing number of white goods also have standby power requirements. There is a growing international effort to limit standby power to around one watt per device. New and existing technologies are available to meet this target at little or no extra cost

  13. Leak testing. Environment and workplaces

    1984-01-01

    Workplaces specified for leak testing are divided into clean workplaces of the 1st degree, clean workplaces of the second degree, clean workplaces of the third degree and semi-clean workplaces. Clean workplaces are further subdivided into permanent and temporary workplaces. For all said types of workplaces the standard sets the following provisions: basic equipment, machines and instrumentation, permitted and prohibited working activities and principles for maintenance and inspection. (E.S.)

  14. Hydrogen Leak Detection Sensor Database

    Baker, Barton D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the characteristics of the Hydrogen Sensor database. The database is the result of NASA's continuing interest in and improvement of its ability to detect and assess gas leaks in space applications. The database specifics and a snapshot of an entry in the database are reviewed. Attempts were made to determine the applicability of each of the 65 sensors for ground and/or vehicle use.

  15. Process and device for detecting and localizing leaks in a tube bundle heat exchanger when it is stopped

    Germain, J.L.; Jeanneteau, E.; Loisy, F.

    1986-01-01

    The device can be used to detect the tubes presenting leaks in a tube bundle exchanger of a light water reactor. This device comprises a feeding point to fill the secondary part of the exchanger, in which the tubes are immersed, with a pressure mixture of vector gas (air) and helium. It has also a feeding point to establish in the tube a sweeping air flow. An analysis apparatus, such as a spectrograph, measures the helium content of air at the outlet of each tube [fr

  16. Photoionization of helium dimers

    Havermeier, Tilo

    2010-01-01

    The helium dimer is one of the most weakly bound systems in the universe. This makes it an interesting quantum mechanical object for investigation. These Van der Waals Clusters can be produced in an expansion of a cryogenic gas jet through a small nozzle into vacuum. In the present experiment we examine the interaction of He dimers with synchrotron radiation at an energy range from 64 to 78 eV. We observed different pathways leading to single ionization of both He atoms of the dimer compound. This two close standing ions begin now to dissociate in cause of their coulomb potential. All charged fragments were detected in coincidence with a COLTRIMS system. Especially Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) and the two step process (TS1) were clearly identified. Furthermore a distribution of the internuclear distance was obtained from the measured Kinetic Energy Release (KER). (orig.)

  17. Development of sodium leak detectors for PFBR

    Sylvia, J.I.; Rao, P. Vijayamohana; Babu, B.; Madhusoodanan, K.; Rajan, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sodium leak detection system developed for PFBR using diverse principle. ► Miniature, remotely locatable diverse leak detector developed for Main Vessel. ► Mutual inductance type leak detectors designed and adapted for different locations. ► Sodium Ionisation detectors used for area monitoring. ► Crosswire type leak detector designed, developed and tested. - Abstract: The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is under advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam near Chennai in India. The wide and high operating temperature, highly chemically active nature of sodium and its reaction with air make the sodium instrumentation complex over the conventional instrumentation. Over the years, traditional instruments such as wire type leak detectors, spark plug type leak detectors were developed and used in different sodium systems. The redundant and diverse leak detection method calls for development of special instrumentation for sodium systems which include sodium ionization (leak) detector for detecting minute sodium leak in addition to those systems based on mutual inductance principle. For detection of sodium leak from reactor Main Vessel (MV), diverse methods are used such as miniature, remotely locatable, Mutual Inductance type Leak Detector(MILD) and specially modified spark plug type leak detector. The design of MILD is suitably modified for detecting leak in double wall pipes and Diverse Safety Rod drive Mechanism (DSRDM). Steam/water leak in steam generator produces hydrogen and leads to high pressure and temperature in the system. Rupture disc is used as a safety device which punctures itself due to sudden pressure rise. To detect the discharge of sodium and its reaction products at the downstream of the rupture disc due to bursting of the rupture disc, cross wire type leak detector has been designed, developed and tested. The selection of the leak detection system depends on the location where leak has to be detected. This paper

  18. Exotic helium molecules

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  19. Wall conditioning and leak localization in the advanced toroidal facility

    Langley, R.A.; Glowienka, J.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Rayburn, T.F.; Simpkins, J.E.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Yarber, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel and its internal components have been conditioned for plasma operation by baking, discharge cleaning with hydrogen and helium, and gettering with chromium and titanium. The plasma-facing surface of ATF consists mainly of stainless steel with some graphite; the outgassing area is dominated by the graphite because of its open porosity. Since this situation is somewhat different from that in other fusion plasma experiments, in which a single material dominates both the outgassing area and the plasma-facing area, different cleaning and conditioning techniques are required. The situation was aggravated by air leaks in the vacuum vessel, presumably resulting from baking and from vibration during plasma operation. The results of the various cleaning and conditioning techniques used are presented and compared on the basis of residual gas analysis and plasma performance. A technique for detecting leaks from the inside of the vacuum vessel is described; this technique was developed because access to the outside of the vessel is severely restricted by external components. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Wall conditioning and leak localization in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    Langley, R.A.; Glowienka, J.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Rayburn, T.F.; Simpkins, J.E.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Yarber, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel and its internal components have been conditioned for plasma operation by baking, discharge cleaning with hydrogen and helium, and gettering with chromium and titanium. The plasma-facing surface of ATF consists mainly of stainless steel with some graphite; the outgassing area is dominated by the graphite because of its open porosity. Since this situation is somewhat different from that in other fusion plasma experiments, in which a single material dominates both the outgassing area and the plasma-facing area, different cleaning and conditioning techniques are required. The situation was aggravated by air leaks in the vacuum vessel, presumably resulting from baking and from vibration during plasma operation. The results of the various cleaning and conditioning techniques used are presented and compared on the basis of residual gas analysis and plasma performance. A technique for detecting leaks from the inside of the vacuum vessel is described. This technique was developed because access to the outside of the vessel is severely restricted by external components

  1. Transfer of hydrogen and helium through corrugated, flexible tubes

    Schippl, K.

    2001-01-01

    The transfer of liquid gas or cold gas through corrugated tubes is an alternative to rigid systems for the use in reactor technique. Advantages: flexibility for easy installation; these tubes together with their associated terminations and hardware are assembled, leak-tested and evacuated at the factory. This permits simple and cost saving installation on site. All tubes are helium leak-tested with a sensitivity of 10E -9 mbar 1/sec. Following the leak test, the vacuum space is pumped down to the operation vacuum level and properly sealed. The vacuum integrity is guaranteed as a result of the high degree of cleanliness observed during production and from the use of a specially selected better material inside the vacuum space. Disadvantage: pressure is limited to 20 bar. To fulfil all rules of the reactor safety, different tests have to be done. Because of the longitudinal weld of the corrugated tube, a bursting test of different sizes gives the best information of the liability of this kind of tube. It can be shown that the bursting pressure of such a tube is more than 5 times higher than the max. working pressure

  2. Online helium inventory monitoring of JLab cryogenic systems

    Hasan, N.; Knudsen, P.; Wright, M.

    2017-12-01

    There are five cryogenic plants at Jefferson Lab which support the LINAC, experiment hall end-stations and test facility. The majority of JLab’s helium inventory, which is around 15 tons, is allocated in the LINAC cryo-modules, with the majority of the balance of helium distributed at the cryogenic-plant level mainly as stored gas and liquid for stable operation. Due to the organic evolution of the five plants and independent actions within the experiment halls, the traditional inventory management strategy suffers from rapid identification of potential leaks. This can easily result in losses many times higher than the normally accepted (average) loss rate. A real-time program to quickly identify potential excessive leakage was developed and tested. This program was written in MATLAB© for portability, easy diagnostics and modification. It interfaces directly with EPICS to access the cryogenic system state, and with and NIST REFPROP© for real fluid properties. This program was validated against the actual helium offloaded into the system. The present paper outlines the details of the inventory monitoring program, its validation and a sample of the achieved results.

  3. Electronic properties of physisorbed helium

    Kossler, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with electronic excitations of helium physisorbed on metal substrates. It is studied to what extent the electronic properties change compared to the gas phase due to the increased helium density and the proximity of the metal. Furthermore, the influence of different substrate materials is investigated systematically. To this end, up to two helium layers were adsorbed onto Ru (001), Pt (111), Cu (111), and Ag (111) surfaces in a custom-made cryostat. These samples were studied spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation and a time-of-flight detector. The experimental results were then analyzed in comparison with extensive theoretical model calculations.

  4. Electronic properties of physisorbed helium

    Kossler, Sarah

    2011-09-22

    This thesis deals with electronic excitations of helium physisorbed on metal substrates. It is studied to what extent the electronic properties change compared to the gas phase due to the increased helium density and the proximity of the metal. Furthermore, the influence of different substrate materials is investigated systematically. To this end, up to two helium layers were adsorbed onto Ru (001), Pt (111), Cu (111), and Ag (111) surfaces in a custom-made cryostat. These samples were studied spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation and a time-of-flight detector. The experimental results were then analyzed in comparison with extensive theoretical model calculations.

  5. Trace element analysis of single synthetic fibres by proton induced X-ray analysis in a helium atmosphere

    Ahmed, M.; Cookson, J.A.

    1976-10-01

    A technique for measuring the trace element content of synthetic fibres by detecting X-rays produced by 3 MeV proton bombardment has been developed. Largely to reduce the problems of removing heat from the fibres, an arrangement was used in which the beam was brought out of the vacuum into air or helium. Kapton, aluminium, nickel and molybdenum were tested for suitability as exit windows. Of these, aluminium produced significantly the most background in X-ray spectra while helium was found to be significantly better than air as the medium around the targets. With a kapton window, helium in the target chamber, and suitable collimation, trace element concentration down to a few parts per million could be measured when quantities of fibre of only a few times 10 -5 g were available for analysis. (author)

  6. Experiments for post accident hydrogen dispersion in F.M. vault using helium

    Bajaj, S.S.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Mishra, S.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain postulated accident scenarios involving a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simultaneous with impairment of Emergency Core Cooling (ECC), generation of hydrogen due to reaction between the zirconium clad and coolant is predicted in the coolant channel. The hydrogen generated in the coolant channels would eventually get released either in Fuelling Machine (FM) vault or in the pump room atmosphere depending on the location of the break. Analytical studies carried out so far to estimate the time dependent hydrogen concentration in the accident FM Vault consider the entire vault as a single volume. Tests were, therefore, planned to assess the mixing within the FM vault atmosphere with and without the availability of cooling fan units by releasing a known quantity of helium (instead of hydrogen) at selected locations and monitoring the relative concentration of helium in air at various locations. Test was conducted by releasing about 360 1 helium over a period of to 4 minutes at preselected locations and by measuring the relative concentration (leak rates indicated by helium leak detectors) at various locations in the FM vault. The results of cases with fans operating indicate repeatable and consistent trends of good mixing in the vault. For other cases (non turbulent, still condition) the results are sensitive to various factors including orientation of release. The former set of cases (turbulent. fans operating) are more relevant for postulated accident conditions. (author). 1 tab., 18 figs

  7. Operating Manual of Helium Refrigerator (Rev. 2)

    Song, K.M.; Son, S.H.; Kim, K.S.; Lee, S.K.; Kim, M.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    A helium refrigerator was installed as a supplier of 20K cold helium to the cryogenic distillation system of WTRF pilot plant. The operating procedures of the helium refrigerator, helium compressor and auxiliary apparatus are described for the safety and efficient operation in this manual. The function of the helium refrigerator is to remove the impurities from the compressed helium of about 250psig, to cool down the helium from ambient temperature to 20K through the heat exchanger and expansion engine and to transfer the cold helium to the cryogenic distillation system. For the smoothly operation of helium refrigerator, the preparation, the start-up, the cool-down and the shut-down of the helium refrigerator are described in this operating manual. (author). 3 refs., 14 tabs.

  8. Development of pits and cones on ion bombarded copper

    Tanovic, L.A.; Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Whitton, I.L.; Williams, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    The formation of pits and cones on Ar ion bombarded copper has been studied. Carefully polished surfaces of large grained 99.999% pure copper crystals have been bombarded at normal incidence with 40 keV argon ions. The cone formation has been investigated for annealed and non-annealed crystals at room temperature and at 30 K and in the case of monocrystal and polycrystal samples. Although in the most other studies the presence of impurities is as a necessary condition for generation of cones and pits the obtained experimental results show that under certain conditions these features are formed on clean surfaces. It is shown that the dominant parameter in the production of cones on copper is the crystal orientation [ru

  9. Diffusion processes in bombardment-induced surface topography

    Robinson, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    The bombardment of surfaces with moderate energy ions can lead to the development of various micron-sized surface structures. These structures include ridges, ledges, flat planes, pits and cones. The causal phenomena in the production of these features are sputtering, ion reflection, redeposition of sputtered material, and surface diffusion of both impurity and target-atom species. The authors concentrate on the formation of ion bombardment-induced surface topography wherein surface diffusion is a dominant process. The most thoroughly understood aspect of this topography development is the generation of cone-like structures during sputtering. The formation of cones during sputtering has been attributed to three effects. These are: (1) the presence of asperities, defects, or micro-inclusions in the surface layers, (2) the presence of impurities on the surfaces, and (3) particular crystal orientations. (Auth.)

  10. Miniature electron bombardment evaporation source: evaporation rate measurement

    Nehasil, V.; Masek, K.; Matolin, V.; Moreau, O.

    1997-01-01

    Miniature electron beam evaporation sources which operate on the principle of vaporization of source material, in the form of a tip, by electron bombardment are produced by several companies specialized in UHV equipment. These sources are used primarily for materials that are normally difficult to deposit due to their high evaporation temperature. They are appropriate for special applications such as heteroepitaxial thin film growth requiring a very low and well controlled deposition rate. A simple and easily applicable method of evaporation rate control is proposed. The method is based on the measurement of ion current produced by electron bombardment of evaporated atoms. The absolute evaporation flux values were measured by means of the Bayard-Alpert ion gauge, which enabled the ion current vs evaporation flux calibration curves to be plotted. (author). 1 tab., 4 figs., 6 refs

  11. Helium cooling of fusion reactors

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.; Bourque, R.; Dahms, C.; Inamati, S.; Ryder, R.; Sager, G.; Schleicher, R.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of worldwide design experience and in coordination with the evolution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the application of helium as a coolant for fusion appears to be at the verge of a transition from conceptual design to engineering development. This paper presents a review of the use of helium as the coolant for fusion reactor blanket and divertor designs. The concept of a high-pressure helium cooling radial plate design was studied for both ITER and PULSAR. These designs can resolve many engineering issues, and can help with reaching the goals of low activation and high performance designs. The combination of helium cooling, advanced low-activation materials, and gas turbine technology may permit high thermal efficiency and reduced costs, resulting in the environmental advantages and competitive economics required to make fusion a 21st century power source. ((orig.))

  12. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    Hori, M

    2005-01-01

    When antiprotons (i.e. the antimatter counterpart of protons) are stopped in helium gas, 97% of them annihilate within picoseconds by reacting with the helium nuclei; a 3% fraction, however, survive with an anomalously long lifetime of several microseconds. This longevity is due to the formation of antiprotonic helium, which is a three-body Rydberg atom composed of an antiproton, electron, and helium nucleus. The ASACUSA experimental collaboration has recently synthesized large numbers of these atoms using CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility, and measured the atom's transition frequencies to 60 parts per billion by laser spectroscopy. By comparing the experimental results with recent three-body QED calculations and the known antiproton cyclotron frequency, we were able to show that the antiproton mass and charge are the same as the corresponding proton values to a precision of 10 parts per billion. Ongoing and future series of experiments will further improve the experimental precision by using chirp-compe...

  13. High Accuracy Vector Helium Magnetometer

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed HAVHM instrument is a laser-pumped helium magnetometer with both triaxial vector and omnidirectional scalar measurement capabilities in a single...

  14. Thermo-mechanical design aspects of mercury bombardment ion thrusters.

    Schnelker, D. E.; Kami, S.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical design criteria are presented as background considerations for solving problems associated with the thermomechanical design of mercury ion bombardment thrusters. Various analytical procedures are used to aid in the development of thruster subassemblies and components in the fields of heat transfer, vibration, and stress analysis. Examples of these techniques which provide computer solutions to predict and control stress levels encountered during launch and operation of thruster systems are discussed. Computer models of specific examples are presented.

  15. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis

  16. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J. [and others

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  17. Acoustic leak detection of LMFBR steam generator

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo

    1993-01-01

    The development of a water leak detector with short response time for LMFBR steam generators is required to prevent the failure propagation caused by the sodium-water reaction and to maintain structural safety in steam generators. The development of an acoustic leak detector assuring short response time has attracted. The purpose of this paper is to confirm the basic detection feasibility of the active acoustic leak detector, and to investigate the leak detection method by erasing the background noise by spectrum analysis of the passive acoustic leak detector. From a comparison of the leak detection sensitivity of the active and the passive method, the active method is not influenced remarkably by the background noise, and it has possibility to detect microleakage with short response time. We anticipate a practical application of the active method in the future. (author)

  18. Paravalvular Leak in Structural Heart Disease.

    Goel, Kashish; Eleid, Mackram F

    2018-03-06

    This review will summarize the growing importance of diagnosing and managing paravalvular leak associated with surgical and transcatheter valves. The burden of paravalvular leak is increasing; however, advanced imaging techniques and high degree of clinical suspicion are required for diagnosis and management. The latest data from pivotal clinical trials in the field of transcatheter aortic valve replacement suggest that any paravalvular leak greater than mild was associated with worse clinical outcomes. Percutaneous techniques for paravalvular leak closure are now the preferred approach, and surgical repair is reserved for contraindications and unsuccessful procedures. Recent data from studies evaluating paravalvular leak closure outcomes report a greater than 90% success rate with a significant improvement in patient symptoms. Paravalvular leak is a growing problem in the structural heart disease arena. Percutaneous closure is successful in more than 90% of the procedures with a low complication rate.

  19. Hermetic compartments leak-tightness enhancement

    Murani, J.

    2000-01-01

    In connection with the enhancement of the nuclear safety of the Jaslovske Bohunice V-1 NPP actions for the increase of the leak tightness are performed. The reconstruction has been done in the following directions: hermetic compartments leak tightness enhancement; air lock installation; installation of air lock in SP 4 vent system; integrated leakage rate test to hermetic compartments with leak detection. After 'major' leaks on the hermetic boundary components had been eliminated, since 1994 works on a higher qualitative level began. The essence of the works consists in the detection and identification of leaks in the structural component of the hermetic boundary during the planned refueling outages. The results of the Small Reconstruction and gradual enhancement of leak tightness are presented

  20. Benign Biliary Strictures and Leaks.

    Devière, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    The major causes of benign biliary strictures include surgery, chronic pancreatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune cholangitis. Biliary leaks mainly occur after surgery and, rarely, abdominal trauma. These conditions may benefit from a nonsurgical approach in which endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) plays a pivotal role in association with other minimally invasive approaches. This approach should be evaluated for any injury before deciding about the method for repair. ERCP, associated with peroral cholangioscopy, plays a growing role in characterizing undeterminate strictures, avoiding both unuseful major surgeries and palliative options that might compromise any further management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Leak detection of KNI seals

    Baranyai, G.; Peter, A.; Windberg, P.

    1990-03-01

    In Unit 3 and 4 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary, KNI type seals are used as lead-throughs with conical nickel sealing rings. Their failure can be critical for the operation of the reactor. An Acoustical Leak Detection System (ALDS) was constructed and tested for the operational testing of the seals. Some individual papers are presented in this collection on the calibration and testing of the ALDS intended to be placed on the top of the reactor vessels. The papers include simulation measurements of Unit 3 of NPP, laboratory experiments, evaluation of measurements, and further development needs with the ALDS. (R.P.) 50 figs.; 19 tabs

  2. Quantification of steroid conjugates using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    Gaskell, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fast atom bombardment/mass spectrometry or liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry provides the capability for direct analysis of steroid conjugates (sulfates, glucuronides) without prior hydrolysis or derivatization. During the analysis of biologic extracts, limitations on the sensitivity of detection arise from the presence of co-extracted material which may suppress or obscure the analyte signal. A procedure is described for the quantitative determination of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate in serum which achieved selective isolation of the analyte using immunoadsorption extraction and highly specific detection using tandem mass spectrometry. A stable isotope-labeled analog [( 2H2]dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) was used as internal standard. Fast atom bombardment of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate yielded abundant [M-H]- ions that fragmented following collisional activation to give HSO4-; m/z 97. During fast atom bombardment/tandem mass spectrometry of serum extracts, a scan of precursor ions fragmenting to give m/z 97 detected dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and the [2H2]-labeled analog with a selectivity markedly superior to that observed using conventional mass spectrometry detection. Satisfactory agreement was observed between quantitative data obtained in this way and data obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the heptafluorobutyrates of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and [2H2]dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate obtained by direct derivatization. 21 refs

  3. Acoustic emission leak monitoring system LMS-96

    Liska, J.; Cvrcek, M.; Mueller, L.

    1997-01-01

    On-line acoustic emission leak monitoring under industrial conditions of nuclear power plants is a problem with specific features setting specific demands on the leak monitoring system. The paper briefly reviews those problems (attenuation pattern of a real structure, acoustic background, alarm system, etc.) and the solution of some of them is discussed. Information is presented on the Acoustic Emission Leak Monitoring System LMS-96 by SKODA NUCLEAR MACHINERY and the system's function is briefly described. (author)

  4. Leak detection using structure-borne noise

    Holland, Stephen D. (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor); Roberts, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for detection and location of air leaks in a pressure vessel, such as a spacecraft, includes sensing structure-borne ultrasound waveforms associated with turbulence caused by a leak from a plurality of sensors and cross correlating the waveforms to determine existence and location of the leak. Different configurations of sensors and corresponding methods can be used. An apparatus for performing the methods is also provided.

  5. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients with bile leaks

    Carichner, S.L.; Nagle, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Hepatobiliary scintigraphy has been recognized as a useful tool in detecting the presence and sites of bile leaks. The clinical settings in which bile leaks are likely to occur, as well as some of the scintigraphic patterns seen in patients with bile leaks, are reviewed here. Tips for technologists are offered on interventions that might enhanced the quality of information available to the nuclear physician

  6. Acoustic surveillance techniques for SGU leak monitoring

    McKnight, J.A.; Rowley, R.; Beesley, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a brief review of the acoustic techniques applicable to the detection of steam generator unit leaks that have been studied in the UK. Before discussion of the acoustic detection methods a reference representation of the required performance as developed in the UK is given. The conclusion is made that preliminary specification for the acoustic leak detection of sodium/water leaks in steam generating units suggests that it will be necessary to detect better than a leak rate of 3 g/s within a few seconds. 10 refs, 12 figs

  7. Radon/helium survey of thermal springs of Parbati, Beas and Sutlej valleys in Himachal Himalaya

    Virk, H.S.; Sharma, Anand K.; Naresh Kumar

    1998-01-01

    India has more than 300 thermal springs spread over the entire geographical area of the subcontinent. Some of these springs have linkage with Indian mythology and are famous pilgrimage centres since historical times. The temperature of water recorded in these springs varies from 40 degC to that of steam. Some of them are being exploited as a source for geothermal energy. The purpose of this study is to measure radon and helium activity in the thermal springs of Himachal Himalaya. Radon is estimated in the soil and thermal waters using alpha spectrometry and scintillometry, respectively. The radon activity is maximum ( 716.3 Bq/l ) in thermal spring at Kasol and minimum ( 15.9 Bq/l ) in a natural spring ( bauli ) at Takrer. Radon concentration is highly variable in the Parbati valley with minimum value of 2230±430 Bq/m 3 recorded at Chhinjra on the banks of river Parbati and a maximum value of 57700±2050 Bq/m 3 at Dharmaur, the site of uranium ore exploitation by the AMD (DAE). Helium is estimated in the thermal springs by using a Helium Leak Detector (sniffing technique). The radon and helium contents of Kasol thermal springs are correlatable with high radioactivity in the soil of the area as revealed by Alpha Guard survey in the environs of Parbati valley. The helium content recorded in thermal springs is found to vary between 15-90 ppm. Radon and helium are well established as geochemical precursors for earthquake prediction studies. Helium/radon ratio seems to be a better predictive tool for earthquakes in comparison to individual radon and helium precursors. (author)

  8. Cryogenic filter method produces super-pure helium and helium isotopes

    Hildebrandt, A. F.

    1964-01-01

    Helium is purified when cooled in a low pressure environment until it becomes superfluid. The liquid helium is then filtered through iron oxide particles. Heating, cooling and filtering processes continue until the purified liquid helium is heated to a gas.

  9. Study on water leak-tightness of small leaks on a 1 inch cylinder valve

    Miyazawa, T.; Kasai, Y.; Inabe, N.; Aritomi, M.

    2002-01-01

    Practical thresholds for water leak-tightness of small leaks were determined by experimentation. Measurements for small leak samples were taken of air leakage rates and water leakage rates for identical leak samples in order to identify parameters that influence water leak-tightness threshold. Four types of leaks were evaluated: a fine wire inserted in an O-ring seal, a glass capillary tube, a stainless steel orifice, and a scratched valve stem on a 1 inch UF 6 cylinder valve. Experimental results demonstrated that the key parameter for water leak-tightness is the opening size of the leak hole. The maximum allowable hole size to achieve water leak-tightness ranged from 10 to 20 μm in diameter in this study. Experimental results with 1 inch UF 6 cylinder valve samples demonstrated that the acceptance criteria for preshipment leakage test, 1x10 -3 ref-cm 3 .s -1 , as prescribed in ANSI N14.5 is an appropriate value from the point of view of water leak-tightness for enriched UF 6 packages. The mechanism of water leak-tightness is plugging by tiny particles existing in water. The water used in experiments in this study contained far fewer particles than in water assumed to be encountered under accident conditions of transport. Therefore, the water leak-tightness threshold determined in this study is a conservative value in a practical evaluation. (author)

  10. He leak detection in the presence of deuterium background in tokamak vacuum systems

    Blanchard, W.R.; Krawchuk, R.B.; Dylla, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    Helium leak detection systems for magnetic fusion devices present several unique design problems because of the large dynamic range required and the high partial pressures of D 2 encountered. We describe the design and operation of a He leak detector system for the PDX tokamak. The system consists of a differentially-pumped, low resolution, He mass spectrometer which is interfaced to the foreline of one of the torus turbomolecular pump lines. The He detector has a minimum throughput sensitivity of 10 -10 Torrxl/s, and the torus-integrated system has been designed for detection of torus leaks over the range of 10 -7 to 10 Torrxl/s. Minimum leak-rates on the 38 m 3 PDX vessel which have been quantified using this system are approx.3 x 10 -8 Torrxl/s. When PDX is operated with D 2 plasmas it is necessary to reduce the partial pressure of D 2 by a factor of 100 within the mass spectrometer to maintain this sensitivity in the presence of the torus D 2 outgassing. We have designed and incorporated a D 2 filter which employs a Zr--Al getter assembly to affect the required D 2 pressure reduction

  11. Summary of PWR leak detection studies

    Cho, J.H.; Elia, F.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis can be used to determine the location and magnitude of leaks inside and location of leaks outside a pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment as required by plant technical specifications. The major advantage of this detection method is that it minimizes radiation exposure of maintenance personnel because most of the leak detection process is performed from the control room outside containment. Plant-specific analyses are utilized to predict change in parameters such as local dew point temperature, relative humidity, dry bulb temperature, and flow rate to sump for various leak rates and enthalpies. These parameter responses are then programmed into the plant computer and instrumentation is provided for area monitoring. The actual inputs are continuously monitored and compared to the predicted plant responses to identify the leak location and quantify the leak. This study concludes that a system that monitors dew point (or relative humidity) and dry bulb temperature changes together with the flow rate to the sump will provide the capability to both locate and quantify a leak inside a containment, while a system that monitors dew point temperature (or relative humidity) changes will provide the capability to locate a leak outside a containment

  12. ISOLDE Off-line Gas Leak Upgrade

    Nielsen, Kristoffer Bested

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates gas injection system of the ISOLDE Off-line separator. A quadrupole mass spectrometer is used to analysis the composition of the gas. Based on these measurements a contamination of the injected gas is found and a system upgrade is purposed. Furthermore a calibration of the leak rate of the leak valve is made.

  13. Leak testing requirements at a research facility

    Conner, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Since September, 1952, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has conducted pioneering research in applied science. A vital part of this activity has been the development of a variety of high vacuum and ultrahigh vacuum systems. Leaks occur in everything, including vacuum systems. The mass spectrometer leak detection equipment is described

  14. Improved method of measurement for outer leak

    Xu Guang

    2012-01-01

    Pneumatic pipeline is installed for the airborne radioactivity measurement equipment, air tightness and outer leak rate are essential for the testing of the characteristics, both in the national criteria and ISO standards, an improved practical method is available for the measurement of the outer air leak rate based on the engineering experiences for the equipment acceptance and testing procedure. (authors)

  15. Capacitive system detects and locates fluid leaks

    1966-01-01

    Electronic monitoring system automatically detects and locates minute leaks in seams of large fluid storage tanks and pipelines covered with thermal insulation. The system uses a capacitive tape-sensing element that is adhesively bonded over seams where fluid leaks are likely to occur.

  16. Leak detector of liquid sodium

    Himeno, Yoshiaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To arrange a cable core connected to a leakage current detector on the outer wall of piping for liquid sodium, devices or the like and apply a voltage to said core and outer wall to quickly and securely detect the leakage of liquid sodium. Structure: A cable, which is composed of metal coating formed of metal material (copper, steel, stainless, etc.) which is apt to be corroded by reaction products of liquid sodium with water and oxygen in air, and metal oxide (such as magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide, aluminum oxide) as an electric insulator is arranged on the outer wall of pipes or devices. In the event sodium is leaked from the pipes or devices, said metal coating and the insulator are corroded, and the leakage of sodium is sensed by a leakage current detector through the core in the cable. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Leak detection for underground storage tanks

    Durgin, P.B.; Young, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    This symposium was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on January 29, 1992. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on leak detection for underground storage tanks that leaked fuel. A widespread concern was protection of groundwater supplies from these leaking tanks. In some cases, the papers report on research that was conducted two or three years ago but has never been adequately directed to the underground storage tank leak-detection audience. In other cases, the papers report on the latest leak-detection research. The symposium was divided into four sessions that were entitled: Internal Monitoring; External Monitoring; Regulations and Standards; and Site and Risk Evaluation. Individual papers have been cataloged separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  18. SCTI chemical leak detection test plan

    1981-01-01

    Tests will be conducted on the CRBRP prototype steam generator at SCTI to determine the effects of steam generator geometry on the response of the CRBRP chemical leak detection system to small water-to-sodium leaks in various regions of the steam generator. Specifically, small injections of hydrogen gas (simulating water leaks) will be made near the two tubesheets, and the effective transport times to the main stream exit and vent line hydrogen meters will be measured. The magnitude and time characteristics of the meters' response will also be measured. This information will be used by the Small Leak Protection Base Program (SG027) for improved predictions of meter response times and leak detection sensitivity

  19. Small sodium-to-gas leak behavior in relation to LMFBR leak detection system design

    Hopenfeld, J.; Taylor, G.R.; James, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    Various aspects of sodium-to-gas leaks which must be considered in the design of leak detection systems for LMFBR's are discussed. Attention is focused primarily on small, weeping type leaks. Corrosion rates of steels in fused sodium hydroxide and corrosion damage observed at the site of small leaks lead to the conclusion that the sodium-gas reaction products could attack the primary hot leg piping at rates up to 0.08 mils per hour. Based on theoretical considerations of the corrosion mechanism and on visual observations of pipe topography following small sodium leak tests, it is concluded that pipe damage will be manifested by the formation of small detectable leaks prior to the appearance of larger leaks. The case for uniform pipe corrosion along the pipe circumference or along a vertical section of the pipe is also examined. Using a theoretical model for the gravity flow of sodium and reaction products along the pipe surface and a mass transport controlled corrosion process, it is shown that below sodium leak rates of about 30 g/hr for the primary piping corrosion damage will not extend beyond one radius distance from the leak site. A method of estimating the time delay between the initiation of such leaks and the development of a larger leak due to increased pipe stresses resulting from corrosion is presented

  20. Leak Signature Space: An Original Representation for Robust Leak Location in Water Distribution Networks

    Myrna V. Casillas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an original model-based scheme for leak location using pressure sensors in water distribution networks is introduced. The proposed approach is based on a new representation called the Leak Signature Space (LSS that associates a specific signature to each leak location being minimally affected by leak magnitude. The LSS considers a linear model approximation of the relation between pressure residuals and leaks that is projected onto a selected hyperplane. This new approach allows to infer the location of a given leak by comparing the position of its signature with other leak signatures. Moreover, two ways of improving the method’s robustness are proposed. First, by associating a domain of influence to each signature and second, through a time horizon analysis. The efficiency of the method is highlighted by means of a real network using several scenarios involving different number of sensors and considering the presence of noise in the measurements.

  1. A mathematical model for leak location and leak area determination in pipeline networks

    Oyedokun O.I.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prompt leak location and leak area determination in oil and gas pipeline installations is an indispensable approach to controlling petroleum products wastages in pipes. However, there is an evident lack of literature information on this subject. In this paper, we modelled leak location detection and leak area determination in pipes by applying two methodologies and gave an illustrative example using simulated data with the aid of Matlab. A comparison of these two approaches resulted in an error of 6.24%, suggesting that the closer the leak is to the measurement station, the lower will be the time interval between two successive waves that will pass through the leak and get to the measurement station. The relationship between the pipe area and coefficient of reflection is parabolic. This contribution is valuable to pipeline engineers in the economic control of leaks.

  2. Ultrasonic Detectors Safely Identify Dangerous, Costly Leaks

    2013-01-01

    In 1990, NASA grounded its space shuttle fleet. The reason: leaks detected in the hydrogen fuel systems of the Space Shuttles Atlantis and Columbia. Unless the sources of the leaks could be identified and fixed, the shuttles would not be safe to fly. To help locate the existing leaks and check for others, Kennedy Space Center engineers used portable ultrasonic detectors to scan the fuel systems. As a gas or liquid escapes from a leak, the resulting turbulence creates ultrasonic noise, explains Gary Mohr, president of Elmsford, New York-based UE Systems Inc., a long-time leader in ultrasonic detector technologies. "In lay terms, the leak is like a dog whistle, and the detector is like the dog ear." Because the ultrasound emissions from a leak are highly localized, they can be used not only to identify the presence of a leak but also to help pinpoint a leak s location. The NASA engineers employed UE s detectors to examine the shuttle fuel tanks and solid rocket boosters, but encountered difficulty with the devices limited range-certain areas of the shuttle proved difficult or unsafe to scan up close. To remedy the problem, the engineers created a long-range attachment for the detectors, similar to "a zoom lens on a camera," Mohr says. "If you are on the ground, and the leak is 50 feet away, the detector would now give you the same impression as if you were only 25 feet away." The enhancement also had the effect of reducing background noise, allowing for a clearer, more precise detection of a leak s location.

  3. Actinide production in 136Xe bombardments of 249Cf

    Gregorich, K.E.

    1985-08-01

    The production cross sections for the actinide products from 136 Xe bombardments of 249 Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these 136 Xe + 249 Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the 136 Xe + 248 Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Bed system performance in helium circulation mode

    Kim, Yean Jin; Jung, Kwang Jin; Ahn, Do Hee; Chung, Hong Suk [UST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Suk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei Hun [NFRI, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, We have conducted an experiment for storing hydrogen to depleted uranium and zirconium cobalt. The helium blanket effect has been observed in experiments using metal hydrides. The collapse of the hydrogen isotopes are accompanied by the decay heat and helium-3. Helium-3 dramatically reduces the hydrogen isotope storage capacity by surrounding the metal. This phenomenon is called a helium blanket effect. In addition the authors are working on the recovery and removal techniques of helium-3. In this paper, we discuss the equipment used to test the helium blanket effect and the results of a helium circulation experiment. The helium-3 produced surrounds the storage material surface and thus disturbs the reaction of the storage material and the hydrogen isotope. Even if the amount of helium-3 is small, the storage capacity of the SDS bed significantly drops. This phenomenon is the helium blanket effect. To resolve this phenomenon, a circulating loop was introduced. Using a circulating system, helium can be separated from the storage material. We made a helium loop that includes a ZrCo bed. Then using a metal bellows pump, we tested the helium circulation.

  5. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Semsang, Nuananong, E-mail: nsemsang@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, LiangDeng [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Ion beam bombarded rice seeds in vacuum. ► Studied seed survival from the ion bombardment. ► Determined various antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level. ► Discussed vacuum, ion species and ion energy effects. ► Attributed the changes to free radical formation due to ion bombardment. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29–60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  6. Direct evidence for a thermal effect of Ar+ ion bombardment in a conventional sputtering mode

    Okuyama, F.; Fujimoto, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the Ar + ion bombardment for sputtering in Auger electron spectroscopy can heat the target up to 2000 0 C if the target has poor heat conduction. Polycrystalline microneedles of Cr exhibited spherical tips after being exposed to 3 keV Ar + ions, proving that the needle tips were melted by impacting Ar + ions. Microneedles of Mo ion bombarded under the same condition were bent plastically, which perhaps reflects the thermal annealing of the needles during ion bombardment

  7. Pierre Gorce working on a helium pump.

    1975-01-01

    This type of pump was designed by Mario Morpurgo, to circulate liquid helium in superconducting magnets wound with hollow conductors. M. Morpurgo, Design and construction of a pump for liquid helium, CRYIOGENICS, February 1977, p. 91

  8. Convective mixing in helium white dwarfs

    Vauclair, G.; Fontaine, G.

    1979-01-01

    The conditions under which convective mixing episodes take place between the helium envelopes and the underlying carbon layers in helium-rich white dwarfs are investigated. It is found that, for essentially any value of the initial helium content less than the maximum mass a helium convection zone can have, mixing does occur, and leads, in the vast majority of cases, to an almost pure carbon superficial composition. Mixing products that show only traces of carbon while retaining helium-dominated envelopes are possible only if the initial helium content is quite close to the maximum possible mass of the helium convection zone. In the presence of turbulence, this restriction could be relaxed, however, and the helium-rich lambda4670 stars may possibly be explained in this fashion

  9. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  10. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Decelerated ultra-low energy ion beam bombarded naked DNA. • DNA form change induced by ion bombardment was investigated. • N-ion bombardment at 32 eV induced DNA single and double strand breaks. • Ar-ion bombardment at a-few-hundreds eV induced DNA single strand break. - Abstract: Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  11. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    Thopan, P.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Decelerated ultra-low energy ion beam bombarded naked DNA. • DNA form change induced by ion bombardment was investigated. • N-ion bombardment at 32 eV induced DNA single and double strand breaks. • Ar-ion bombardment at a-few-hundreds eV induced DNA single strand break. - Abstract: Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms

  12. The new generations of power components will depend on neutron and/or electron bombardment techniques

    Lilen, H.

    1976-01-01

    Neutron and electron bombardment techniques for materials doping, newly introduced in the fabrication of power semiconductor components: diodes, transistors, thyristors, and triacs are briefly outlined. A neutron bombardment of high purity silicon results in a short-lived 31 Si isotope (from 30 Si) decaying into 31 P. The phosphorus with its five peripheral electrons induces a negative doping (N), and the neutron technique gives a homogeneous doping. Furthermore, silicon bombardment with 1 to 2MeV electrons induces micro-ruptures in the lattice, that act as recombination traps reducing carrier lifetimes. Consequently, gold diffusion techniques can be replaced by electron bombardment with a gain in controlling carrier lifetimes [fr

  13. Helium localization around the microscopic impurities embedded to liquid helium

    Gordon, E.B.; Shestakov, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    The structure and properties of the environment round the impurity atoms (Im) embedded in liquid helium are considered. It is shown that there are two qualitatively different types of structure of the He atom layer next to Im - attraction and repulsion structures. For the center attraction structure (strong Im-He interaction) the Im-He separation is longer than the equilibrium one for the pair Im-He potential, and the density and localization of He atoms are higher than in the bulk. It this case the He atom content in the layer, n, is almost independent of applied pressure. In the repulsion structure realized for alkaline metal atoms the Im-He separation is shorter than the equilibrium one and the density is lower than in the helium bulk. At T approx 1 K occupied are several states with different n and their energies differ only by approx 0.1 K, an increase in pressure resulting in a considerable reduction of n. The optical and EPR spectra of the atoms embedded to liquid and solid helium are interpreted on the basis of the analysis carried out. A simple model is proposed to evaluate the helium surroundings characteristics from the experimental pressure dependences of atomic line shifts in the absorption and emission spectra. The attraction structures in 3 He - 4 He mixtures are suggested to be highly enriched by 4 He atoms which the repulsion structures - by 3 He atoms. a possibility for existence of phase transitions in helium shells surrounding impurity atoms is considered

  14. Imaging review of cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

    Vemuri, Naga V; Karanam, Lakshmi S P; Manchikanti, Venkatesh; Dandamudi, Srinivas; Puvvada, Sampath K; Vemuri, Vineet K

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurs due to a defect in the dura and skull base. Trauma remains the most common cause of CSF leak; however, a significant number of cases are iatrogenic, and result from a complication of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Early diagnosis of CSF leak is of paramount importance to prevent life-threatening complications such as brain abscess and meningitis. Imaging plays a crucial role in the detection and characterization of CSF leaks. Three-dimensional, isotropic, high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) accurately detects the site and size of the bony defect. CT cisternography, though invasive, helps accurately identify the site of CSF leak, especially in the presence of multiple bony defects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) accurately detects CSF leaks and associated complications such as the encephaloceles and meningoceles. In this review, we emphasize the importance and usefulness of 3D T2 DRIVE MR cisternography in localizing CSF leaks. This sequence has the advantages of effective bone and fat suppression, decreased artefacts, faster acquisition times, three-dimensional capability, y and high spatial resolution in addition to providing very bright signal from the CSF.

  15. Imaging review of cerebrospinal fluid leaks

    Naga V Vemuri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leak occurs due to a defect in the dura and skull base. Trauma remains the most common cause of CSF leak; however, a significant number of cases are iatrogenic, and result from a complication of functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS. Early diagnosis of CSF leak is of paramount importance to prevent life-threatening complications such as brain abscess and meningitis. Imaging plays a crucial role in the detection and characterization of CSF leaks. Three-dimensional, isotropic, high resolution computed tomography (HRCT accurately detects the site and size of the bony defect. CT cisternography, though invasive, helps accurately identify the site of CSF leak, especially in the presence of multiple bony defects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI accurately detects CSF leaks and associated complications such as the encephaloceles and meningoceles. In this review, we emphasize the importance and usefulness of 3D T2 DRIVE MR cisternography in localizing CSF leaks. This sequence has the advantages of effective bone and fat suppression, decreased artefacts, faster acquisition times, three-dimensional capability, y and high spatial resolution in addition to providing very bright signal from the CSF.

  16. Successful Endoscopic Therapy of Traumatic Bile Leaks

    Matthew P. Spinn

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic bile leaks often result in high morbidity and prolonged hospital stay that requires multimodality management. Data on endoscopic management of traumatic bile leaks are scarce. Our study objective was to evaluate the efficacy of the endoscopic management of a traumatic bile leak. We performed a retrospective case review of patients who were referred for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP after traumatic bile duct injury secondary to blunt (motor vehicle accident or penetrating (gunshot trauma for management of bile leaks at our tertiary academic referral center. Fourteen patients underwent ERCP for the management of a traumatic bile leak over a 5-year period. The etiology included blunt trauma from motor vehicle accident in 8 patients, motorcycle accident in 3 patients and penetrating injury from a gunshot wound in 3 patients. Liver injuries were grade III in 1 patient, grade IV in 10 patients, and grade V in 3 patients. All patients were treated by biliary stent placement, and the outcome was successful in 14 of 14 cases (100%. The mean duration of follow-up was 85.6 days (range 54-175 days. There were no ERCP-related complications. In our case review, endoscopic management with endobiliary stent placement was found to be successful and resulted in resolution of the bile leak in all 14 patients. Based on our study results, ERCP should be considered as first-line therapy in the management of traumatic bile leaks.

  17. Pipeline leak detection using volatile tracers

    Thompson, G.M.; Golding, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of leak detection for underground storage tanks and pipelines adds volatile tracers to the products in the tanks and analyzes the surrounding shallow soil gases for tracer vapors. This method has several advantages: the success of the test is not limited by the size and structural design of the vessels, tanks can be tested at any fill level without taking the tank out of service, the location of a leak along a pipeline is clearly marked by the location of the tracer, and liquid leaks as small as 0.2 liters per hour (lph) can be detected. A limitation is: the backfill material must have some degree of air permeability in the zone above the water table. Several field tests document the success achieved using this method. A tracer leak detection system was installed at Homestead AFB after several other testing methods failed to locate a leak at a valve pit location along approximately 4 kilometers of fuel transfer piping. The leak was detected to the side of the valve pit at a depth of approximately 2.5 meters below the ground surface. Another installation of Edwards AFB involved the collection of 415 soil gas samples along approximately 3,050 meters of 15.25-centimeter fiberglass pipeline. Fourteen separate leaks were detected

  18. Helium behaviour in aluminium under hydrostatic pressure

    Sokurskij, Yu.N.; Tebus, V.N.; Zudilin, V.A.; Tumanova, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of hydrostatic compression on equilibrium helium bubbles in low aluminium-lithium alloy irradiated in reactor at 570 K is investigated. Measurements of hydrostatic density and electron-microscopic investigations have shown, that application of up to 2 GPa pressure reduces equilibrium size of helium bubbles and reduces helium swelling. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the process are considered with application of 'rigid sphere' equation which describes helium state in bubbles

  19. Summary of leak testing work for Tiangong-I target spacecraft%“天宫一号”目标飞行器检漏工作总述

    韩琰; 闫荣鑫; 冯琪; 黄锡宁

    2011-01-01

    文章主要描述了“天宫一号”目标飞行器研制过程中与检漏相关的内容,包括检漏项目、检漏方法和检漏结果等.重点介绍了氦质谱吸枪检漏、压力变化检漏和氦质谱非真空累积检漏及多种气体分析等多种检漏方法及其适用范围.“天宫一号”的检漏数据验证了应用以上检漏方法可行且有效.%This paper reviews the leak testing in the development of the experimental module of the Tiangong-Ⅰ target spacecraft, including the leak testing items, the leak testing methods and the leak testing results. Stresses are put on the following three methods, namely, the helium mass spectrum with sniffer, the pressure leak testing, and the helium mass spectrum with cumulation in a non-vacuum container. The leak testing results of Tiangong-Ⅰ's experimental module validate the feasibility and the effectiveness of each method applied in different leak detection items.

  20. Model to estimate fractal dimension for ion-bombarded materials

    Hu, A., E-mail: hu77@purdue.edu; Hassanein, A.

    2014-03-15

    Comprehensive fractal Monte Carlo model ITMC-F (Hu and Hassanein, 2012 [1]) is developed based on the Monte Carlo ion bombardment simulation code, i.e., Ion Transport in Materials and Compounds (ITMC) code (Hassanein, 1985 [2]). The ITMC-F studies the impact of surface roughness on the angular dependence of sputtering yield. Instead of assuming material surfaces to be flat or composed of exact self-similar fractals in simulation, we developed a new method to describe the surface shapes. Random fractal surfaces which are generated by midpoint displacement algorithm and support vector machine algorithm are combined with ITMC. With this new fractal version of ITMC-F, we successfully simulated the angular dependence of sputtering yield for various ion-target combinations, with the input surface roughness exponent directly depicted from experimental data (Hu and Hassanein, 2012 [1]). The ITMC-F code showed good agreement with the experimental data. In advanced, we compare other experimental sputtering yield with the results from ITMC-F to estimate the surface roughness exponent for ion-bombarded material in this research.

  1. Damage and redistribution of impurities by ionic bombardment

    Tognetti, N.P.

    1982-01-01

    Some aspects of displacement collisions in solids bombarded with ions in the medium energy range have been studied using the backscattering and channelling techniques. The production of lattice damage and the spatial redistribution of atoms within the collision cascade were the two main effects considered and experimentally studied. A comprehensive study of disorder production in GaAs was carried out at 40 K for a variety of ions and ion energies, providing insight into the mechanisms of damage generation from both the macro and microscopic points of view. Experiments on thermal recovery of partially disordered substrates revealed that annealing occurs from approximately 100 K to 300 K. A direct procedure developed for the obtainment of damage profiles from backscattering-channelling measurements is described. The net spatial redistribution of displaced atoms, in combined impurity-matrix substrates was studied and compared with existing theories of ion beam mixing. The Ag-Si system was studied for a wide range of fluence of bombarding Ar + ions. Furthermore, the contribution of atomic mixing in the experimental observation of Ge implantation at high doses into Si is discussed. (M.E.L) [es

  2. Chemical changes in titanate surfaces induced by Ar+ ion bombardment

    Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R.; Fernandez, A.; Espinos, J.P.; Munuera, G.; Sanz, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The reduction effects and compositional changes induced by 3.5 keV Ar + bombardment of several titanates (i.e. SrTiO 3 , Al 2 TiO 5 and NiTiO 3 ) have been quantitatively investigated by XPS. In all the samples studied here the original Ti 4+ species were reduced to lower oxidation states (i.e. Ti 3+ and Ti 2+ ), although to a lesser extent than in pure TiO 2 . On the contrary, whereas Sr 2+ and Al 3+ seem to remain unaffected by Ar + bombardment, in agreement with the behaviour of the respective oxides (i.e. SrO and Al 2 O 3 ), Ni 2+ appears more easily reducible to Ni o in NiTiO 3 than in NiO. In addition, other specific differences were observed between the titanates, which reveal the existence of interesting chemical effects related to the presence of the different counter-ions in the titanates. In the case of Al 2 TiO 5 , its Ar + -induced decomposition to form TiO 2 + Al 2 O 3 could be followed by XPS. (Author)

  3. Continuum radiation emitted from transition metals under ion bombardment

    El Boujlaidi, A.; Kaddouri, A.; Ait El Fqih, M.; Hammoum, K.; Aouchiche, H.

    2012-01-01

    Optical emission of transition metals has been studied during 5 keV Kr + ions bombardment within and without oxygen atmosphere in the colliding chamber. The observed spectra consist of a series of discrete lines superimposed on a broad continuum. Generally, the emission intensity was influenced by the presence of oxygen giving rise to transient effects as well as to an increase in the line intensity. The behaviours of spectral lines were successfully explained in term of electron-transfer process between the excited sputtered atom and the solid surface. In this work, we have focused our study on the continuous radiation emitted during ion bombardment. The experimental results suggest that the continuum emission depends on the nature of metal and very probably related to its electronic structure. The collective deactivation of 3d-shell electrons appears to play a role in the emission of this radiation. The observed enhancement in the presence of oxygen is probably due to a significant contribution of the oxide molecules. (authors)

  4. Universality of spectator fragmentation at relativistic bombarding energies

    Schuettauf, A.; Woerner, A.

    1996-06-01

    Multi-fragment decays of 129 Xe, 197 Au, and 238 U projectiles in collisions with Be, C, Al, Cu, In, Au, and U targets at energies between E/A=400 MeV and 1000 MeV have been studied with the ALADIN forward-spectrometer at SIS. By adding an array of 84 Si-CsI(Tl) telescopes the solid-angle coverage of the setup was extended to θ lab =16 . This permitted the complete detection of fragments from the projectile-spectator source. The dominant feature of the systematic set of data is the Z bound universality that is obeyed by the fragment multiplicities and correlations. These observables are invariant with respect to the entrance channel if plotted as a function of Z bound , where Z bound is the sum of the atomic numbers Z i of all projectile fragments with Z i ≥2. No significant dependence on the bombarding energy nor on the target mass is observed. The dependence of the fragment multiplicity on the projectile mass follows a linear scaling law. The reasons for and the limits of the observed universality of spectator fragmentation are explored within the realm of the available data and with model studies. It is found that the universal properties should persist up to much higher bombarding energies than explored in this work and that they are consistent with universal features exhibited by the intranuclear cascade and statistical multifragmentation models. (orig.)

  5. Flaking and blistering on He and Ne bombardments

    Kamada, K.; Naramoto, H.

    1979-01-01

    Large scale exfoliation formed by 300 keV He + bombardment of niobium without any preceding blistering is investigated, in comparison with the blistering due to 450 and 850 keV Ne + bombardments. In-situ observations of the erosion processes were performed in a scanning electron microscope connected to the Van de Graaff. Critical doses of 7.2 x 10 17 He + /cm 2 , 2.4 x 10 17 Ne + /cm 2 and 4.0 x 10 17 Ne + /cm 2 were obtained for the 300 keV He flaking, 450 keV Ne blistering and 850 keV Ne blistering, respectively. The He flaking was presumed to be due to brittle fashion peeling-off of the surface layer by the bending moment driven by the internal gas pressure. The blistering, on the other hand, was presumed to be the result of the ductile fashion spreading of the lenticular bubble in the sub-surface layer. The necessary pressure for the peeling-off of the cover was calculated, and was speculated to be able to work as the driving force for the flaking from its unexpectedly low values. Fractographies under the exfoliations were discussed for both flaking and blistering. (author)

  6. Transient leak detection in crude oil pipelines

    Beushausen, R.; Tornow, S.; Borchers, H. [Nord-West Oelleitung, Wilhelmshaven (Germany); Murphy, K.; Zhang, J. [Atmos International Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Nord-West Oelleitung (NWO) operates 2 crude oil pipelines from Wilhemshaven to Koln and Hamburg respectively. German regulations for transporting flammable substances stipulate that 2 independent continuously working procedures be used to detect leaks. Leak detection pigs are used routinely to complement the surveillance system. This paper described the specific issues of transient leak detection in crude oil pipelines. It was noted that traditional methods have failed to detect leaks that occur immediately after pumps are turned on or off because the pressure wave generated by the transient dominates the pressure wave that results from the leak. Frequent operational changes in a pipeline are often accompanied by an increased number of false alarms and failure to detect leaks due to unsteady operations. NWO therefore decided to have the Atmos statistical pipeline leak detection (SPLD) system installed on their pipelines. The key to the SPLD system is the sequential probability ratio test. Comprehensive data validation is performed following reception of pipeline data from the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system. The validated data is then used to calculate the corrected flow imbalance, which is fed into the SPRT to determine if there is an increase in the flow imbalance. Pattern recognition is then used to distinguish a leak from operational changes. The SPLD is unique because it uses 3 computational pipeline monitoring methods simultaneously, namely modified volume balance, statistical analysis, and pressure and flow monitoring. The successful installation and testing of the SPLD in 2 crude oil pipelines was described along with the main difficulties associated with transient leaks. Field results were presented for both steady-state and transient conditions. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 16 figs.

  7. Explosive helium burning in white dwarf stars

    Khokhlov, A.M. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Astronomicheskij Sovet)

    1984-04-01

    Helium burning kinetics in white dwarfs has been considered at constant temperatures T >= 10/sup 9/ K and densities rho >10/sup 5/ g/cm/sup 3/. It is found, that helium detonation in white dwarfs does not lead to formation of light (A < 56) elements. Thus, helium white dwarf model for supernova 1 is inconsistent with observations.

  8. Clustering of Helium Atoms at a ½

    Berg, F. v.d.; Heugten, W. v.; Caspers, L.M.; Veen, A. v.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    1977-01-01

    Atomistic calculations on a ½<111>{110} edge dislocation show a restricted tendency of clustering of helium atom along this dislocation. Clusters with up to 4 helium atoms have been studied. A cluster with 3 helium proved to be most stable.

  9. Leak detection system for RBMK coolant circuit

    Cherkashov, Ju.M.; Strelkov, B.P.; Korolev, Yu.V.; Eperin, A.P.; Kozlov, E.P.; Belyanin, L.A.; Vanukov, V.N.

    1996-01-01

    In report the description of an object of the control is submitted, requests to control of leak-tightness and functioning of system are formulated, analysis of a current status on NPP with RBMK is submitted, review of methods of the leak-tightness monitoring, their advantage and defects with reference to conditions and features of a design RBMK is indicated, some results of tests and operation of various monitoring methods are submitted, requests on interaction of operative staff, leak-tightness monitoring system and protection system of reactor are submitted. (author). 11 figs, 1 tab

  10. Acoustic leak detector in Monju steam generator

    Wachi, E.; Inoue, T.

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic leak detectors are equipped with the Monju steam generators for one of the R and D activities, which are the same type of the detectors developed in the PNC 50MW Steam Generator Test Facility. Although they are an additional leak detection system to the regular one in Monju SG, they would also detect the intermediate or large leaks of the SG tube failures. The extrapolation method of a background noise analysis is expected to be verified by Monju SG data. (author). 4 figs

  11. Means for preventing radioactive fluid leaking

    Akatsu, Jun-ichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To permit prevention of leakage of radioactive fluid from line and valve leak sections while also recovering the liquid by producing a vacuum state in a leak-off line by means of a water ejector. Structure: A portion of the water from a condenser is forced by a condensed water pump through a water ejector tank to a recovery tank while controlling an orifice and valve, whereby a vacuum state is produced in the leak-off line to withdraw the leakage fluid. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Leak detection system for RBMK coolant circuit

    Cherkashov, Ju M; Strelkov, B P; Korolev, Yu V; Eperin, A P; Kozlov, E P; Belyanin, L A; Vanukov, V N [Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant, Leningrad (Russian Federation). Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering

    1997-12-31

    In report the description of an object of the control is submitted, requests to control of leak-tightness and functioning of system are formulated, analysis of a current status on NPP with RBMK is submitted, review of methods of the leak-tightness monitoring, their advantage and defects with reference to conditions and features of a design RBMK is indicated, some results of tests and operation of various monitoring methods are submitted, requests on interaction of operative staff, leak-tightness monitoring system and protection system of reactor are submitted. (author). 11 figs, 1 tab.

  13. Muonium and neutral muonic helium

    Orth, H.

    1981-01-01

    In this brief article the current status on muonium spectroscopy with emphasis on recent developments will be summarized. The experimental and theoretical progress of the muonic helium atom will be reviewed. Future directions in this field of research will be discussed. (orig./HSI)

  14. Electric response in superfluid helium

    Chagovets, Tymofiy

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 488, May (2016), s. 62-66 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-03806P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : superfluid helium * electric response * second sound * ions in He II Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.386, year: 2016

  15. Production of negative helium ions

    Toledo, A.S. de; Sala, O.

    1977-01-01

    A negative helium ion source using potassium charge exchange vapor has been developed to be used as an injector for the Pelletron accelerator. 3 He and α beam currents of up to 2μA have been extracted with 75% particle transmission through the machine [pt

  16. Prestressed concrete vessels suitable for helium high temperature reactors

    Lockett, G.E.; Kinkead, A.N.

    1967-02-01

    In considering prestressed concrete vessels for use with helium cooled high temperature reactors, a number of new problems arise and projected designs involve new approaches and new solutions. These reactors, having high coolant outlet temperature from the core and relatively high power densities, can be built into compact designs which permit usefully high working pressures. Consequently, steam generators and circulating units tend to be small. Although circuit activity can be kept quite low with coated particle fuels, designs which involve entry for subsequent repair are not favoured, and coupled with the preferred aim of using fully shop fabricated units within the designs with removable steam generators which involve no tube welding inside the vessel. A particular solution uses a number of slim cylindrical assemblies housed in the wall of the pressure vessel and this vessel design concept is presented. The use of helium requires very high sealing standards and one of the important requirements is a vessel design which permits leak testing during construction, so that a repair seal can be made to any faulty part in a liner seam. Very good demountable joint seals can be made without particular difficulty and Dragon experience is used to provide solutions which are suitable for prestressed concrete vessel penetrations. The concept layout is given of a vessel meeting these requirements; the basis of design is outlined and special features of importance discussed. (author)

  17. The leak microstructure, preliminary results

    Lombardi, M.

    1997-01-01

    The leak microstructure, a new type of element for position-sensitive proportional gas counter, is introduced. For every single detected ionizing radiation it gives a pair of ''induced'' charges of the same quantity (pulses of the same amplitude), of opposite sign, with the same collection time and essentially in time coincidence, that are proportional to the collected primary ionization. A gas multiplication up to 1.5 x 10 5 was achieved. The complete absence of insulating materials in the active volume of this microstructure enables to avoid problems of charging-up and makes its behaviour stable and repeatable. By using the charge-pair generated, it allows the development of a position-sensitive detecting board with a two-dimensional read-out. Between the two external surfaces of this board it is possible to insert an intermediate third conducting layer which reduces (or practically suppresses) the capacitive cross-talk between the X and Y read-out strip systems. Furthermore, this intermediate layer can give a very fast trigger to coordinate the charge-pair and to govern the data acquisition system. By reading every strip separately it is possible to resolve the multi hit problem in two-dimensions. Using isobutane as the gas, an energy resolution of about 8% FWHM was recorded with α-particles from an 241 Am source. In isobutane gas, X-rays from a 55 Fe source and β-particles from a 14 C source were also detected. (orig.)

  18. Simplicity works for superfluid helium

    Bowley, Roger

    2000-01-01

    The famous philosopher Karl Popper once said that ''science is the art of systematic oversimplification''. Indeed, when faced with a new puzzle the trick is to simplify it without losing the essential physics - something that is easier said than done. However, this approach has paid off recently in low-temperature physics. Last year Richard Packard, Seamus Davis and co-workers at the University of California at Berkeley encountered a puzzling new phenomenon in superfluid helium-3, a quantum fluid that remains a liquid close to absolute zero and exhibits unusual properties such as the ability to flow without friction (A Machenkov et al. 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 3860). Previous experiments had revealed that certain effects in liquid helium are analogous to effects observed in superconductors, materials that lose all resistance to electric current at low temperatures. When the Berkeley researchers connected two reservoirs of superfluid helium-3, the superfluid flowed back and forth through apertures that formed a ''weak link'' between the two containers. This behaviour is similar to the oscillatory current of electrons that can flow across an insulating gap separating two superconductors - a device that is known as a Josephson junction. What was puzzling about the Berkeley results was that the helium-3 had two different stable configurations, both of which behaved in an unconventional way compared with a Josephson junction. This puzzle has now been solved independently by Sidney Yip at the National Center for Theoretical Sciences in Taiwan, and by Janne Viljas and Erkki Thuneberg at the Helsinki University of Technology in Finland (Phys. Rev. Lett. 1999 83 3864 and 3868). In this article the author describes the latest research on superfluid helium. (UK)

  19. Simplicity works for superfluid helium

    Bowley, Roger [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-01

    The famous philosopher Karl Popper once said that ''science is the art of systematic oversimplification''. Indeed, when faced with a new puzzle the trick is to simplify it without losing the essential physics - something that is easier said than done. However, this approach has paid off recently in low-temperature physics. Last year Richard Packard, Seamus Davis and co-workers at the University of California at Berkeley encountered a puzzling new phenomenon in superfluid helium-3, a quantum fluid that remains a liquid close to absolute zero and exhibits unusual properties such as the ability to flow without friction (A Machenkov et al. 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 3860). Previous experiments had revealed that certain effects in liquid helium are analogous to effects observed in superconductors, materials that lose all resistance to electric current at low temperatures. When the Berkeley researchers connected two reservoirs of superfluid helium-3, the superfluid flowed back and forth through apertures that formed a ''weak link'' between the two containers. This behaviour is similar to the oscillatory current of electrons that can flow across an insulating gap separating two superconductors - a device that is known as a Josephson junction. What was puzzling about the Berkeley results was that the helium-3 had two different stable configurations, both of which behaved in an unconventional way compared with a Josephson junction. This puzzle has now been solved independently by Sidney Yip at the National Center for Theoretical Sciences in Taiwan, and by Janne Viljas and Erkki Thuneberg at the Helsinki University of Technology in Finland (Phys. Rev. Lett. 1999 83 3864 and 3868). In this article the author describes the latest research on superfluid helium. (UK)

  20. Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic ...

    Endoscopic management of bile leaks after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. ... endoscopic management at a median of 12 days (range 2 - 104 days) after surgery. Presenting features included intra-abdominal collections with pain in 58 cases ...

  1. Evaluation of leak rate by EPRI code

    Isozaki, Toshikuni; Hashiguchi, Issei; Kato, Kiyoshi; Miyazono, Shohachiro

    1987-08-01

    From 1987, a research on the leak rate from a cracked pipe under BWR or PWR operating condition is going to be carried out at the authors' laboratory. This report describes the computed results by EPRI's leak rate code which was mounted on JAERI FACOM-M380 machine. Henry's critical flow model is used in this program. For the planning of an experimental research, the leak rate from a crack under BWR or PWR operating condition is computed, varying a crack length 2c, crack opening diameter COD and pipe diameter. The COD value under which the minimum detectable leak rate of 5 gpm is given is 0.22 mm or 0.21 mm under the BWR or PWR condition with 2c = 100 mm and 16B pipe geometry. The entire lists are shown in the appendix. (author)

  2. The new CSA standard for leak detection

    Pietsch, Ulli [TAU, Edmonton, Alberta, (Canada); Scott, Don [TransCanada Pipelines, Edmonton, Alberta, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Standards need to be updated regularly to reflect current technology and industry practices. This paper describes the new Canadian Standards Association (CSA) for leak detection called Recommended Practice for Liquid Hydrocarbon Pipeline System Leak Detection, Annex E, which can be found in the CSA Z662 Oil and Gas Pipeline Systems standard. The CSA formed a task force of industry experts and regulators for a period of 18 months to draft the new standards. Several comparisons were made with the American Petroleum Institute (API) recommended practice API 1130. This new version introduces and defines the terms, critical instrument, critical process and dependent instrument. The most significant improvement made by the new Annex E is the new requirement that an operating company must develop a leak detection strategy. The writing of a leak detection manual is given high priority. The use of both Annex E and API 1130 is recommended.

  3. Postoperative ascitic leaks: the ongoing challenge.

    Rosemurgy, A S; Statman, R C; Murphy, C G; Albrink, M H; McAllister, E W

    1992-06-01

    The leak of ascitic fluid from surgical incisions is thought to be associated with a very high mortality rate. There have been few reports, however, focusing on the clinical characteristics, management, or mortality rates of this condition. During a 10-year period, 18 patients with postoperative ascitic fluid leaks were treated. All patients had ascites before surgery and all had liver disease; in 13 of the 18 patients alcoholic liver disease was the cause of ascites. Ten of the 18 patients died (56%). Midline incisions were more often associated with recalcitrant leaks and fatal complications than were transverse incisions. Early consideration of fascial dehiscence and prompt repair is emphasized. The most effective predictor of survival was cessation of the leak.

  4. Leak Detectives Saving Money, Water in Virginia

    “Circuit riders” from the Virginia Rural Water Association (VRWA) are traveling to small communities across the Commonwealth using special equipment financed by EPA to locate expensive and wasteful leaks in drinking water distribution systems.

  5. Acoustic leak detection in piping systems, 4

    Kitajima, Akira; Naohara, Nobuyuki; Aihara, Akihiko

    1983-01-01

    To monitor a high-pressure piping of nuclear power plants, a possibility of acoustic leak detection method has been experimentally studied in practical field tests and laboratory tests. Characteristics of background noise in field test and the results of experiment are summarized as follows: (1) The level of background noise in primary loop (PWR) was almost constant under actual plant operation. But it is possible that it rises at the condition of the pressure in primary loop. (2) Based on many experience of laboratory tests and practical field tests. The leak monitoring system for practical field was designed and developed. To improve the reliability, a judgment of leak on this system is used three factors of noise level, duration time of phenomena and frequency spectrum of noise signal emitted from the leak point. (author)

  6. Acoustic leak detection in nuclear power plants

    McElroy, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    For several years now, utilities have been utilizing acoustic leak detection methods as an operating tool in their nuclear power stations. The purpose for using the leak detection system at the various stations vary from safety, ALARA, improved operations, preventive maintenance, or increased plant availability. This paper describes the various acoustic techniques and their application. The techniques are divided into three categories: specific component leakage, intersystem leakage, and pipe through-wall crack leakage. The paper addresses each category in terms of motivation to monitor, method of application and operation, and benefits to be gained. Current requirements are reviewed and analyzed with respect to the acoustic techniques. The paper shows how acoustic leak detection is one of the most effective leak detection tools available. 9 figures, 1 table

  7. Leaking Underground Storage Tank Sites in Iowa

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) sites where petroleum contamination has been found. There may be more than one LUST site per UST site.

  8. Routine intraoperative leak testing for sleeve gastrectomy: is the leak test full of hot air?

    Bingham, Jason; Lallemand, Michael; Barron, Morgan; Kuckelman, John; Carter, Preston; Blair, Kelly; Martin, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    Staple line leak after sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a rare but dreaded complication with a reported incidence of 0% to 8%. Many surgeons routinely test the staple line with an intraoperative leak test (IOLT), but there is little evidence to validate this practice. In fact, there is a theoretical concern that the leak test may weaken the staple line and increase the risk of a postop leak. Retrospective review of all SGs performed over a 7-year period was conducted. Cases were grouped by whether an IOLT was performed, and compared for the incidence of postop staple line leaks. The ability of the IOLT for identifying a staple line defect and for predicting a postoperative leak was analyzed. Five hundred forty-two SGs were performed between 2007 and 2014. Thirteen patients (2.4%) developed a postop staple line leak. The majority of patients (n = 494, 91%) received an IOLT, including all 13 patients (100%) who developed a subsequent clinical leak. There were no (0%) positive IOLTs and no additional interventions were performed based on the IOLT. The IOLT sensitivity and positive predictive value were both 0%. There was a trend, although not significant, to increase leak rates when a routine IOLT was performed vs no routine IOLT (2.6% vs 0%, P = .6). The performance of routine IOLT after SG provided no actionable information, and was negative in all patients who developed a postoperative leak. The routine use of an IOLT did not reduce the incidence of postop leak, and in fact was associated with a higher leak rate after SG. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Cable-Based Water Leak Detection Technology

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Water leaks can be considered as a serious problem from many sources such as water supply and return chains, air conditioning units, cold-water chillers, clogged drains, damaged skylights or windows, or even construction errors. The new water leak detection technologies can provide significant advantages in cost, reliability, and easy adoption have continued since the traditional technology mainly focusing on a spot detector revealed several limitations.

  10. Evaluation of pipeline leak detection systems

    Glauz, W.D.; Flora, J.D.; Hennon, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tank system presents an environmental concern and a potential health hazard. It is well known that leaks in the piping associated with these systems account for a sizeable fraction of the leaks. EPA has established performance standards for pipeline leak detection systems, and published a document presenting test protocols for evaluating these systems against the standards. This paper discusses a number of facets and important features of evaluating such systems, and presents results from tests of several systems. The importance of temperature differences between the ground and the product in the line is shown both in theory and with test data. The impact of the amount of soil moisture present is addressed, along with the effect of frozen soil. These features are addressed both for line tightness test systems, which must detect leaks of 0.10 gal/h (0.38 L/h) at 150% of normal line pressure, or 0.20 gal/h (0.76 L/h) at normal line pressure, and for automatic line leak detectors that must detect leaks of 3 gal/h (11 L/h) at 10 psi (69 kPa) within an hour of the occurrence of the leak. This paper also addresses some statistical aspects of the evaluation of these systems. Reasons for keeping the evaluation process ''blind'' to the evaluated company are given, along with methods for assuring that the tests are blind. Most importantly, a test procedure is presented for evaluating systems that report a flow rate (not just a pass/fail decision) that is much more efficient than the procedure presented in the EPA protocol, and is just as stringent

  11. Detection of primary coolant leaks in NPP

    Slavov, S.; Bakalov, I.; Vassilev, H.

    2001-01-01

    The thermo-hydraulic analyses of the SG box behaviour of Kozloduy NPP units 3 and 4 in case of small primary circuit leaks and during normal operation of the existing ventilation systems in order to determine the detectable leakages from the primary circuit by analysing different parameters used for the purposes of 'Leak before break' concept, performed by ENPRO Consult Ltd. are presented. The following methods for leak detection: measurement of relative air humidity in SG box (can be used for detection of leaks with flow rate 3.78 l/min within one hour at ambient parameters - temperature 40 0 - 60 0 C and relative humidity form 30% to 60%); measurement of water level in SG box sumps (can not be used for reliable detection of small primary circuit leakages with flow rate about 3.78 l/min); measurement of gaseous radioactivity in SG box( can be used as a general global indication for detection of small leakages from the primary circuit); measurement of condensate flow after the air coolers of P-1 venting system (can be used for primary circuit leak detection) are considered. For determination of the confinement behaviour, a model used with computer code MELCOR has been developed by ENPRO Consult Ltd. A brief summary based on the capabilities of the different methods of leak detection, from the point of view of the applicability of a particular method is given. For both Units 3 and 4 of Kozloduy NPP a qualified complex system for small leak detection is planned to be constructed. Such a system has to unite the following systems: acoustic system for leak detection 'ALUS'; system for control of the tightness of the main primary circuit pipelines by monitoring the local humidity; system for primary circuit leakage detection by measuring condensate run-off in collecting tank after ventilation system P-1 air coolers

  12. Leak of draft report on radioactive waste

    1986-01-01

    The Environment Committee's second report discusses the leak of the draft report on radioactive waste. The circumstances of the leak are discussed and ''The Times'' and ''The Guardian'' articles of December 1985 are printed in full, as are the letter from the Chairman of the environmental committee to the members and their replies. The letters from Mr John Large of Large and Associates to the Chairman of the Environment Committee, and Mr Large's correspondence with Greenpeace are also printed. (UK)

  13. Leak detection systems for VVER units based on leak before break concept. PowerPoint presentation

    Matal, Oldrich

    2010-01-01

    To comply with international standards, independent leak monitoring systems should be installed based on the monitoring of different physical parameters capable of detecting any small leak within one hour from the start of the leak. Such leak detection systems are based mainly on acoustic emission monitoring, humidity monitoring and/or radiation monitoring. Advanced systems integrate the monitoring of different physical parameters into one integrated leak detection system. The Integrated Leak Detection System (ILDS) for NPP Metsamor is described. This system consists of three independent leak detection subsystems, viz. LEMOP (LEak MOnitoring of Pipelines) based on acoustic emission monitoring, HUMOS (HUmidity MOnitoring System) based on humidity monitoring, and RAMOS (RAdiation MOnitoring System) based on radiation monitoring). The Integrated Leak Detection System (ILDS) collects data from the three systems, performs data evaluation, data storage, generates alarms and provides a user interface for the whole system including all subsystems. An example of DiagAssist user interface in the ILDS system in the pictorial form. (P.A.)

  14. HeREF-2003: Helium Refrigeration Techniques

    2003-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC ! Theory, Technology, Maintenance and Control of Helium Refrigerators HeREF-2003 is a course in the framework of the 2002 Technical Training Programme, that will provide a complete introduction to Helium refrigeration, with a practical approach to theory, technology, maintenance and control of Helium refrigeration installations. Theoretical aspects and equations will be limited to a minimum. HeREF-2003 targets an audience of technicians and operators of Helium refrigeration plants at CERN, as well as physicists and engineers needing an overview of current Helium refrigeration techniques. HeREF-2003 will address, among other, issues related to component technology, installation maintenance, process control and Helium purity. A commented visit to a couple of CERN Helium refrigeration or liquefaction plants will also take place. Duration: 7 half days (4 mornings and 3 afternoons), 6-10 October, 2003 Cost per participant: 500.- CHF Language: Bilingual English...

  15. HeREF-2003 : Helium Refrigeration Techniques

    2003-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC ! Theory, Technology, Maintenance and Control of Helium Refrigerators HeREF-2003 is a course in the framework of the 2002 Technical Training Programme, that will provide a complete introduction to Helium refrigeration, with a practical approach to theory, technology, maintenance and control of Helium refrigeration installations. Theoretical aspects and equations will be limited to a minimum. HeREF-2003 targets an audience of technicians and operators of Helium refrigeration plants at CERN, as well as physicists and engineers needing an overview of current Helium refrigeration techniques. HeREF-2003 will address, among other, issues related to component technology, installation maintenance, process control and Helium purity. A commented visit to a couple of CERN Helium refrigeration or liquefaction plants will also take place. • Duration: 7 half days (4 mornings and 3 afternoons), 6-10 October, 2003 • Cost per participant: 500.- CHF ...

  16. Wireless sensor network for sodium leak detection

    Satya Murty, S.A.V.; Raj, Baldev; Sivalingam, Krishna M.; Ebenezer, Jemimah; Chandran, T.; Shanmugavel, M.; Rajan, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Early detection of sodium leak is mandatory in any reactor handling liquid sodium. ► Wireless sensor networking technology has been introduced for detecting sodium leak. ► We designed and developed a wireless sensor node in-house. ► We deployed a pilot wireless sensor network for handling nine sodium leak signals. - Abstract: To study the mechanical properties of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor component materials under the influence of sodium, the IN Sodium Test (INSOT) facility has been erected and commissioned at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research. Sodium reacts violently with air/moisture leading to fire. Hence early detection of sodium leak if any is mandatory for such plants and almost 140 sodium leak detectors are placed throughout the loop. All these detectors are wired to the control room for data collection and monitoring. To reduce the cost, space and maintenance that are involved in cabling, the wireless sensor networking technology has been introduced in the sodium leak detection system of INSOT. This paper describes about the deployment details of the pilot wireless sensor network and the measures taken for the successful deployment.

  17. Leak detector for reactor pressure vessel

    Morimoto, Mikio.

    1991-01-01

    A branched pipe is disposed to a leak off pipeline led from a flange surface which connects the main body and the upper lid of a reactor pressure vessel. An exhaust pump is disposed to the branched pipe and a moisture gage is disposed on the side of the exhaustion and a dry air supplier is connected to the branched pipe. Upon conducting a pressure-proof leak test for the reactor pressure vessel, the exhaust pump is operated and an electromagnet valve disposed at the upstream of the dry air supplier is opened and closed repeatedly. The humidity of air sucked by the exhaust pump is detected by the moisture gage. If leaks should be caused in the joining surface of the flange, leaked water is diffused as steams. Accordingly, occurrence of leak can be detected instantly based on the comparison with the moisture level of the dry air as a standard. In this way, a leak test can be conducted reliably in a short period of time with no change of for the reactor pressure container itself. (I.N.)

  18. 40 CFR 63.424 - Standards: Equipment leaks.

    2010-07-01

    ....424 Standards: Equipment leaks. (a) Each owner or operator of a bulk gasoline terminal or pipeline... location of all equipment in gasoline service at the facility. (c) Each detection of a liquid or vapor leak... replacement of leaking equipment shall be completed within 15 calendar days after detection of each leak...

  19. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak checks. 86.328-79 Section 86.328... Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.328-79 Leak checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could...

  20. Evidence Supporting an Early as Well as Late Heavy Bombardment on the Moon

    Frey, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting an intense early bombardment on the Moon in addition to the traditional Late Heavy Bombardment at approx. 4 BY ago include the distribution of N(50) Crater Retention Ages (CRAs) for candidate basins, a variety of absolute age scenarios for both a "young" and an "old" Nectaris age, and the decreasing contrasts in both topographic relief and Bouguer gravity with increasing CRA.

  1. Ion bombardment effects on surface states in selected oxide systems: rutile and alkaline earth titanates

    Gruen, D.M.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, the nature of the surface states of n-type TiO 2 and SrTiO 3 is discussed and the role of ion bombardment in modifying the properties of these states is elucidated. Insofar as possible, the interrelationships between oxide nonstoichiometry, surface states, ion bombardment effects and photoelectrolysis are explored

  2. A Unique Photon Bombardment System for Space Applications

    Klein, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    The innovative Electromagnetic Radiation Collection and Concentration System (EMRCCS) described is the foundation for the development of a multiplicity of space and terrestrial system formats. The system capability allows its use in the visual, infrared, and ultraviolet ranges of the spectrum for EM collection, concentration, source/receptor tracking, and targeting. The nonimaging modular optical system uses a physically static position aperture for EM radiation collection. Folded optics provide the concentration of the radiation and source autotracking. The collected and concentrated electromagnetic radiation is utilized in many applications, e.g., solar spectrum in thermal and associative photon bombardment applications for hazardous waste management, water purification, metal hardening, hydrogen generation, photovoltaics, etc., in both space and terrestrial segment utilization. Additionally, at the high end of the concentration capability range, i.e., 60,000+, a solar-pulsed laser system is possible.

  3. Creep and fatigue properties of Incoloy 800H in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment

    Chow, J.G.Y.; Soo, P.; Epel, L.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanical test program to assess the effects of a simulated HTGR helium environment on the fatigue and creep properties of Incoloy 800H and other primary-circuit metals is described. The emphasis and the objectives of this work are directed toward obtaining information to assess the integrity and safety of an HTGR throughout its service life. The helium test environment selected for study contained 40 μ atm H 2 O, 200 μ atm H 2 , 40 μ atm CO, 10 μ atm CO 2 , and 20 μ atm CH 4 . It is believed that this ''wet'' environment simulates that which could exist in a steam-cycle HTGR containing some leaking steam-generator tubes. A recirculating helium loop operating at about 4 psi in which impurities can be maintained at a constant level, has been constructed to supply the desired environment for fatigue and creep testing

  4. Field tests and commercialization of natural gas leak detectors

    Choi, D S; Jeon, J S; Kim, K D; Cho, Y A [R and D Center, Korea Gas Corporation, Ansan (Korea)

    1999-09-01

    Objectives - (1) fields test of industrial gas leak detection monitoring system. (2) commericialization of residential gas leak detector. Contents - (1) five sets of gas leak detection monitoring system were installed at natural gas transmition facilities and tested long term stability and their performance. (2) improved residential gas leak detector was commercialised. Expected benefits and application fields - (1) contribution to the improvement of domestic gas sensor technology. (2) localization of fabrication technology for gas leak detectors. 23 refs., 126 figs., 37 tabs.

  5. Science of Water Leaks: Validated Theory for Moisture Flow in Microchannels and Nanochannels.

    Lei, Wenwen; Fong, Nicole; Yin, Yongbai; Svehla, Martin; McKenzie, David R

    2015-10-27

    Water is ubiquitous; the science of its transport in micro- and nanochannels has applications in electronics, medicine, filtration, packaging, and earth and planetary science. Validated theory for water vapor and two-phase water flows is a "missing link"; completing it enables us to define and quantify flow in a set of four standard leak configurations with dimensions from the nanoscale to the microscale. Here we report the first measurements of water vapor flow rates through four silica microchannels as a function of humidity, including under conditions when air is present as a background gas. An important finding is that the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) is strongly modified by surface layers of adsorbed water molecules, in agreement with previous work on the TMAC for nitrogen molecules impacting a silica surface in the presence of moisture. We measure enhanced flow rates for two-phase flows in silica microchannels driven by capillary filling. For the measurement of flows in nanochannels we use heavy water mass spectrometry. We construct the theory for the flow rates of the dominant modes of water transport through each of the four standard configurations and benchmark it against our new measurements in silica and against previously reported measurements for nanochannels in carbon nanotubes, carbon nanopipes, and porous alumina. The findings show that all behavior can be described by the four standard leak configurations and that measurements of leak behavior made using other molecules, such as helium, are not reliable. Single-phase water vapor flow is overestimated by a helium measurement, while two-phase flows are greatly underestimated for channels larger than 100 nm or for all channels when boundary slip applies, to an extent that depends on the slip length for the liquid-phase flows.

  6. Use of stable helium tracer for the early detection of impaired pulmonary function

    Susskind, H.; Richards, P.; Atkins, H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Methodology and instrumentation are being developed to measure distal airway closure, a very sensitive diagnostic technique for the early detection of emphysema and other obstructive lung diseases and premature closure indicating abnormalities. The procedure is rapid and involves the inhalation of only a 1 ml bolus of readily available stable 4 He, continuous measurement of its concentration in the exhaled air with a helium leak detector type of mass spectrometer, and the subsequent analysis of the single-breath washout curve. Helium appears to be an ideal tracer, well-suited for testing in clinics and hospitals, as well as for epidemiological studies relating the effects of atmospheric pollutants and lung impairment and for screening of large populations for pulmonary dysfunction

  7. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  8. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    Girardot, Crystal [URS- Safety Management Solutions, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Harlow, Don [ELR Consulting Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Johnson, Jeremy [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-91F Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal 1-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX- 111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and dry-wells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  9. Helium desorption in EFDA iron materials for use in nuclear fusion reactors

    Salazar R, A. R.; Pinedo V, J. L.; Sanchez, F. J.; Ibarra, A.; Vila, R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper the implantation with monoenergetic ions (He + ) was realized with an energy of 5 KeV in iron samples (99.9999 %) EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement) using a collimated beam, after this a Thermal Desorption Spectrometry of Helium (THeDS) was made using a leak meter that detects amounts of helium of up to 10 - - 12 mbar l/s. Doses with which the implantation was carried out were 2 x 10 15 He + /cm 2 , 1 x 10 16 He + /cm 2 , 2 x 10 16 He + /cm 2 , 1 x 10 17 He + /cm 2 during times of 90 s, 450 s, 900 s and 4500 s, respectively. Also, using the SRIM program was calculated the depth at which the helium ions penetrate the sample of pure ion, finding that the maximum distance is 0.025μm in the sample. For this study, 11 samples of Fe EFDA were prepared to find defects that are caused after implantation of helium in order to provide valuable information to the manufacture of materials for future fusion reactors. However understand the effects of helium in the micro structural evolution and mechanical properties of structural materials are some of the most difficult questions to answer in materials research for nuclear fusion. When analyzing the spectra of THeDS was found that five different groups of desorption peaks existed, which are attributed to defects of He caused in the material, these defects are He n V (2≤n≤6), He n V m , He V for the groups I, II and IV respectively. These results are due to the comparison of the peaks presented in the desorption spectrum of He, with those of other authors who have made theoretical calculations. Is important to note that the thermal desorption spectrum of helium was different depending on the dose with which the implantation of He + was performed. (Author)

  10. Impulse approximation in solid helium

    Glyde, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    The incoherent dynamic form factor S/sub i/(Q, ω) is evaluated in solid helium for comparison with the impulse approximation (IA). The purpose is to determine the Q values for which the IA is valid for systems such a helium where the atoms interact via a potential having a steeply repulsive but not infinite hard core. For 3 He, S/sub i/(Q, ω) is evaluated from first principles, beginning with the pair potential. The density of states g(ω) is evaluated using the self-consistent phonon theory and S/sub i/(Q,ω) is expressed in terms of g(ω). For solid 4 He resonable models of g(ω) using observed input parameters are used to evaluate S/sub i/(Q,ω). In both cases S/sub i/(Q, ω) is found to approach the impulse approximation S/sub IA/(Q, ω) closely for wave vector transfers Q> or approx. =20 A -1 . The difference between S/sub i/ and S/sub IA/, which is due to final state interactions of the scattering atom with the remainder of the atoms in the solid, is also predominantly antisymmetric in (ω-ω/sub R/), where ω/sub R/ is the recoil frequency. This suggests that the symmetrization procedure proposed by Sears to eliminate final state contributions should work well in solid helium

  11. Liquid helium plant in Dubna

    Agapov, N.N.; Baldin, A.M.; Kovalenko, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    The liquid-helium cooling capacity installed at the Laboratory of High Energies is about 5 kw at a 4.5 K temperature level. It is provided with four industrial helium liquefiers of 1.6 kw/4.5 K each. They have been made by the Russian enterprise NPO GELYMASH and upgraded by the specialists of the Laboratory. The first one was put into operation in 1980, the two others in 1991, and the last one is under commissioning. The development of the LHE cryoplant was concerned with the construction of the new superconducting accelerator Nuclotron aimed to accelerate nuclei and heavy ions up to energies of 6 GeV/u. The first test run at the Nuclotron was carried out in March 1993, and the total running time has been about 2000 hours up to now. Since 1992 the cryoplant has been intensively used by the users outside the Laboratory. More than a million liters of liquid helium was provided in 1993 for such users. The reliability of the cryoplant system was as high as 98 percent for 4500 hours of operation in 1993-1994. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Leak Detection in a Space Environment

    Sinko, John E.; Korman, Valentin; Hendrickson, Adam; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2009-01-01

    A miniature fiber-optic, laser-based, interferometric leak detector is presented for application as a means to detect on-orbit gas leaks. The sensor employs a fiber-coupled modified Michelson interferometer to detect gas leaks by measuring an increase in gas density in the sensing region. Monitoring changes in the fringe pattern output by the interferometer allows for direct measurement of the gas density in the sensing region and, under the assumption of an equation of state, this can be used to obtain a pressure measurement. Measurements obtained over a pressure range from 20 mtorr to 760 torr using a prototypical interferometer on working gases of air, nitrogen, argon, and helium generally exhibit agreement with a theoretical prediction of the pressure increase required before an interference fringe completely moves over the detector. Additional measurements performed on various gases demonstrate the range of detectable species, measuring sub-torr pressure changes in the process. A high-fidelity measurement places the ultimate pressure resolution for this particular sensor configuration in the 10 mtorr range. Time-resolved data prove the capability of this sensor to detect fast gas flow phenomena associated with transients and pressure waves.

  13. Capillary leak syndrome: etiologies, pathophysiology, and management.

    Siddall, Eric; Khatri, Minesh; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2017-07-01

    In various human diseases, an increase in capillary permeability to proteins leads to the loss of protein-rich fluid from the intravascular to the interstitial space. Although sepsis is the disease most commonly associated with this phenomenon, many other diseases can lead to a "sepsis-like" syndrome with manifestations of diffuse pitting edema, exudative serous cavity effusions, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, hypotension, and, in some cases, hypovolemic shock with multiple-organ failure. The term capillary leak syndrome has been used to describe this constellation of disease manifestations associated with an increased capillary permeability to proteins. Diseases other than sepsis that can result in capillary leak syndrome include the idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome or Clarkson's disease, engraftment syndrome, differentiation syndrome, the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, viral hemorrhagic fevers, autoimmune diseases, snakebite envenomation, and ricin poisoning. Drugs including some interleukins, some monoclonal antibodies, and gemcitabine can also cause capillary leak syndrome. Acute kidney injury is commonly seen in all of these diseases. In addition to hypotension, cytokines are likely to be important in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury in capillary leak syndrome. Fluid management is a critical part of the treatment of capillary leak syndrome; hypovolemia and hypotension can cause organ injury, whereas capillary leakage of administered fluid can worsen organ edema leading to progressive organ injury. The purpose of this article is to discuss the diseases other than sepsis that produce capillary leak and review their collective pathophysiology and treatment. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-trapping of helium in metals

    Wilson, W.D.; Bisson, C.L.; Baskes, M.I.

    1981-01-01

    Atomistic calculations are presented which demonstrate that helium atoms in a metal lattice are able to cluster with each other, producing vacancies and nearby self-interstitial defects. Even a small number of helium atoms is found to be sufficient to create these large distortions. As few as five interstitial helium can spontaneously produce a lattice vacancy and nearby self-interstitial. An eight-helium-atom cluster gives rise to two such defects, and 16 helium atoms to more than five self-interstitial vacancy pairs. It was noted that the self-interstitials prefer to agglomerate on the same ''side'' of the helium cluster rather than to spread themselves out uniformly. The binding energy of each additional helium atom to these clusters increases with helium concentration and the trap is apparently unsaturable. A rate theory using these atomistic binding energies has been used to calculate the kinetics of helium-bubble nucleation and growth. The results are consistent with measurements of the properties of helium resulting from tritium decay

  15. Helium in inert matrix dispersion fuels

    Veen, A. van; Konings, R.J.M.; Fedorov, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    The behaviour of helium, an important decay product in the transmutation chains of actinides, in dispersion-type inert matrix fuels is discussed. A phenomenological description of its accumulation and release in CERCER and CERMET fuel is given. A summary of recent He-implantation studies with inert matrix metal oxides (ZrO 2 , MgAl 2 O 4 , MgO and Al 2 O 3 ) is presented. A general picture is that for high helium concentrations helium and vacancy defects form helium clusters which convert into over-pressurized bubbles. At elevated temperature helium is released from the bubbles. On some occasions thermal stable nano-cavities or nano-pores remain. On the basis of these results the consequences for helium induced swelling and helium storage in oxide matrices kept at 800-1000 deg. C will be discussed. In addition, results of He-implantation studies for metal matrices (W, Mo, Nb and V alloys) will be presented. Introduction of helium in metals at elevated temperatures leads to clustering of helium to bubbles. When operational temperatures are higher than 0.5 melting temperature, swelling and helium embrittlement might occur

  16. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  17. Standard practice for leaks using ultrasonics

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 Practice A, Pressurization—This practice covers procedures for calibration of ultrasonic instruments, location, and estimated measurements of gas leakage to atmosphere by the airborne ultrasonic technique. 1.2 In general practice this should be limited to leaks detected by two classifications of instruments, Class I and Class II. Class I instruments should have a minimum detectable leak rate of 6.7 × 10−7 mol/s (1.5 × 10−2 std. cm3/s at 0°C) or more for the pressure method of gas leakage to atmosphere. Class II instruments should have a minimal detectable leak rate of 6.7 × 10−6 mol/s (1.5 × 10−1 std. cm3/s at 0°C) or more for the pressure method of gas leakage to atmosphere. Refer to Guide E432 for additional information. 1.3 Practice B, Ultrasonic Transmitter—For object under test not capable of being pressurized but capable of having ultrasonic tone placed/injected into the test area to act as an ultrasonic leak trace source. 1.3.1 This practice is limited to leaks producing leakage o...

  18. Leak processing system for valve gland portion

    Nishino, Masami

    1990-01-01

    When a process fluid for a valve to be checked is at such a normal temperature as during reactor operation, leaked fluid can be detected depending on the temperature increase accompanying the leakage. However, detection is difficult if the temperature of the process fluid for the valve to be checked is low and, if leakage is detected after the reactor start-up, repair has to be applied after the shutdown of the plant. Then, gland leak is detected by detecting the pressure instead of the temperature in the pipeline system and the leak flow rate is calculated based on the pressure. As a result, leakage is detected irrespective of the temperature of the leaked fluid and, for instance, leakage can be detected even in a case where the temperature is not high as in the case of pressure proof test for the pressure vessel before start-up. It can contribute much to the improvement of the plant operation efficiency and can determine the leak flow rate at a high accuracy. (N.H.)

  19. Helium diffusion in nickel at high temperatures

    Philipps, V.

    1980-09-01

    Helium has been implanted at certain temperatures between 800 and 1250 0 C into single and polycrystalline Ni-samples with implantation depths between 15 and 90 μm. Simultaneously the helium reemission from the sample is measured by a mass-spectrometer. It has been shown that the time dependence of the observed reemission rate is governed by volume diffusion of the helium. Measuring this time dependence as a function of temperature the helium diffusion constant has been determined. The He-diffusion is interpreted as a interstitial diffusion hindered by thermal vacancies. Depending on the implantation depth more or less of the implanted helium remains in the sample and forms large helium bubbles. (orig./GSCH)

  20. Test of a cryogenic helium pump

    Lue, J.W.; Miller, J.R.; Walstrom, P.L.; Herz, W.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a cryogenic helium pump for circulating liquid helium in a magnet and the design of a test loop for measuring the pump performance in terms of mass flow vs pump head at various pump speeds are described. A commercial cryogenic helium pump was tested successfully. Despite flaws in the demountable connections, the piston pump itself has performed satisfactorily. A helium pump of this type is suitable for the use of flowing supercritical helium through Internally Cooled Superconductor (ICS) magnets. It has pumped supercritical helium up to 7.5 atm with a pump head up to 2.8 atm. The maximum mass flow rate obtained was about 16 g/s. Performance of the pump was degraded at lower pumping speeds

  1. Efficient and rapid C. elegans transgenesis by bombardment and hygromycin B selection.

    Inja Radman

    Full Text Available We report a simple, cost-effective, scalable and efficient method for creating transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans that requires minimal hands-on time. The method combines biolistic bombardment with selection for transgenics that bear a hygromycin B resistance gene on agar plates supplemented with hygromycin B, taking advantage of our observation that hygromycin B is sufficient to kill wild-type C. elegans at very low concentrations. Crucially, the method provides substantial improvements in the success of bombardments for isolating transmitting strains, the isolation of multiple independent strains, and the isolation of integrated strains: 100% of bombardments in a large data set yielded transgenics; 10 or more independent strains were isolated from 84% of bombardments, and up to 28 independent strains were isolated from a single bombardment; 82% of bombardments yielded stably transmitting integrated lines with most yielding multiple integrated lines. We anticipate that the selection will be widely adopted for C. elegans transgenesis via bombardment, and that hygromycin B resistance will be adopted as a marker in other approaches for manipulating, introducing or deleting DNA in C. elegans.

  2. Backscattered Helium Spectroscopy in the Helium Ion Microscope: Principles, Resolution and Applications

    van Gastel, Raoul; Hlawacek, G.; Dutta, S.; Poelsema, Bene

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibilities and limitations for microstructure characterization using backscattered particles from a sharply focused helium ion beam. The interaction of helium ions with matter enables the imaging, spectroscopic characterization, as well as the nanometer scale modification of

  3. Direct-write three-dimensional nanofabrication of nanopyramids and nanocones on Si by nanotumefaction using a helium ion microscope

    Zhang, L.; Heinig, N. F.; Bazargan, S.; Abd-Ellah, M.; Moghimi, N.; Leung, K. T.

    2015-06-01

    The recently commercialized helium ion microscope (HIM) has already demonstrated its outstanding imaging capabilities in terms of resolution, surface sensitivity, depth of field and ease of charge compensation. Here, we show its exceptional patterning capabilities by fabricating dense lines and three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures on a Si substrate. Small focusing spot size and confined ion-Si interaction volume of a high-energy helium ion beam account for the high resolution in HIM patterning. We demonstrate that a set of resolvable parallel lines with a half pitch as small as 3.5 nm can be achieved. During helium ion bombardment of the Si surface, implantation outperforms milling due to the small mass of the helium ions, which produces tumefaction instead of depression in the Si surface. The Si surface tumefaction is the result of different kinetic processes including diffusion, coalescence and nanobubble formation of the implanted ions, and is found to be very stable structurally at room temperature. Under appropriate conditions, a linear dependence of the surface swollen height on the ion doses can be observed. This relation has enabled us to fabricate nanopyramids and nanocones, thus demonstrating that HIM patterning provides a new ‘bottom-up’ approach to fabricate 3D nanostructures. This surface tumefaction method is direct, both positioning and height accurate, and free of resist, etch, mode and precursor, and it promises new applications in nanoimprint mold fabrication and photomask clear defect reparation.

  4. Direct-write three-dimensional nanofabrication of nanopyramids and nanocones on Si by nanotumefaction using a helium ion microscope

    Zhang, L; Heinig, N F; Bazargan, S; Abd-Ellah, M; Moghimi, N; Leung, K T

    2015-01-01

    The recently commercialized helium ion microscope (HIM) has already demonstrated its outstanding imaging capabilities in terms of resolution, surface sensitivity, depth of field and ease of charge compensation. Here, we show its exceptional patterning capabilities by fabricating dense lines and three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures on a Si substrate. Small focusing spot size and confined ion–Si interaction volume of a high-energy helium ion beam account for the high resolution in HIM patterning. We demonstrate that a set of resolvable parallel lines with a half pitch as small as 3.5 nm can be achieved. During helium ion bombardment of the Si surface, implantation outperforms milling due to the small mass of the helium ions, which produces tumefaction instead of depression in the Si surface. The Si surface tumefaction is the result of different kinetic processes including diffusion, coalescence and nanobubble formation of the implanted ions, and is found to be very stable structurally at room temperature. Under appropriate conditions, a linear dependence of the surface swollen height on the ion doses can be observed. This relation has enabled us to fabricate nanopyramids and nanocones, thus demonstrating that HIM patterning provides a new ‘bottom-up’ approach to fabricate 3D nanostructures. This surface tumefaction method is direct, both positioning and height accurate, and free of resist, etch, mode and precursor, and it promises new applications in nanoimprint mold fabrication and photomask clear defect reparation. (paper)

  5. Recent Progress in Technology of Leak detection

    Jung, H. K.; Kim, S. H.; Cho, J. W.; Joo, Y. S.; Yang, D. J

    2005-07-15

    It is very important to check for leakage points of fluids and gases on primary pressure boundary of nuclear power plants in order to maintain and manage various structures safely. Even though much investigation has been performed by a number of researchers, there are a lot of problems to detect the leakage under some areas to which people can not approach. In particular, it is certainly necessary to find the leakage point in order to repair and replace the pressure boundaries. In this report, the basic principle and application situations for the development of the leak detection system which can detect micro-leaks are introduced. As the technologies and performances of recent sensors have been improving, the application range of leak detection has been increasing steadily. Therefore the sensor technologies written in this report will be able to contribute to nuclear safety to detect the leakage rate and the leakage point with an on-line monitoring system in the near future.

  6. Location of leaks in pressurized underground pipelines

    Eckert, E.G.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Millions of underground storage tanks (UST) are used to store petroleum and other chemicals. The pressurized underground pipelines associated with USTs containing petroleum motor fuels are typically 2 in. in diameter and 50 to 200 ft in length. These pipelines typically operate at pressures of 20 to 30 psi. Longer lines, with diameters up to 4 in., are found in some high-volume facilities. There are many systems that can be used to detect leaks in pressurized underground pipelines. When a leak is detected, the first step in the remediation process is to find its location. Passive-acoustic measurements, combined with advanced signal-processing techniques, provide a nondestructive method of leak location that is accurate and relatively simple, and that can be applied to a wide variety of pipelines and pipeline products

  7. Enhanced leak detection risk model development

    Harron, Lorna; Barlow, Rick; Farquhar, Ted [Enbridge Pipelines Inc., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Increasing concerns and attention to pipeline safety have engaged pipeline companies and regulatory agencies to extend their approaches to pipeline integrity. The implementation of High Consequence Areas (HCAs) has especially had an impact on the development of integrity management protocols (IMPs) for pipelines. These IMPs can require that a risk based assessment of integrity issues be applied to specific HCA risk factors. This paper addresses the development of an operational risk assessment approach for pipeline leak detection requirements for HCAs. A detailed risk assessment algorithm that includes 25 risk variables and 28 consequence variables was developed for application to all HCA areas. This paper describes the consultative process that was used to workshop the development of this algorithm. Included in this description is how the process addressed various methods of leak detection across a wide variety of pipelines. The paper also looks at development challenges and future steps in applying operation risk assessment techniques to mainline leak detection risk management.

  8. Remote leak detection for the TFTR

    Walthers, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The planned design for the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor) remote leak detection system consists of a central console which controls the application of tracer gas to possible leak areas. Seals are tested by admitting tracer gas to machined cavities on the atmospheric side of the seal. The tracer gas is brought to the seal cavity by 1 / 8 -inch diameter tubes which connect to local tracer gas/vacuum manifolds located outside the protective radiation shielding. Vacuum shell walls and welds are checked by flowing tracer gas through annular heating/cooling passages. The detector will be either an MSLD (mass spectrometer leak detector) or an RGA (residual gas analyzer), the location of which is not finalized. Feasibility tests performed and planned include response and sensitivity measurements of possible tubing/detector configurations with several tracer gases

  9. Combustion suppressing device for leaked sodium

    Ooto, Akihiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the atmospheric temperature to secure the building safety and shorten the recovery time after the leakage in a chamber for containing sodium leaked from coolant circuit equipments or pipeways of LMFBR type rector by suppressing the combustion of sodium contained in the chamber. Constitution: To the inner wall of a chamber for containing sodium handling equipments, are vertically disposed a panel having a coolant supply port at the upper portion and a coolant discharge port at the lower portion thereof and defined with a coolant flowing channel and a panel for sucking the coolant discharged from the abovementioned panel and exhausting the same externally. Further, a corrugated combustion suppressing plate having apertures for draining the condensated leaked sodium is disposed near the sodium handling equipments. If ruptures are resulted to the sodium handling equipments or pipeway, leaked sodium is passed through the drain apertures in the suppressing plate and stored at the bottom of the containing chamber. (Horiuchi, T.)

  10. Behaviour of helium after implantation in molybdenum

    Viaud, C.; Maillard, S.; Carlot, G.; Valot, C.; Gilabert, E.; Sauvage, T.; Peaucelle, C.; Moncoffre, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the behaviour of helium in a molybdenum liner dedicated to the retention of fission products. More precisely this work contributes to evaluate the release of implanted helium when the gas has precipitated into nanometric bubbles close to the free surface. A simple model dedicated to calculate the helium release in such a condition is presented. The specificity of this model lays on the assumption that the gas is in equilibrium with a simple distribution of growing bubbles. This effort is encouraging since the calculated helium release fits an experimental dataset with a set of parameters in good agreement with the literature

  11. Helium turbo-expander with an alternator

    Akiyama, Yoshitane

    1980-01-01

    Study was made on a helium turbo-expander, the heart of helium refrigerator systems, in order to develop a system which satisfies the required conditions. A helium turbo-expander with externally pressurized helium gas bearings at the temperature of liquid nitrogen and an alternator as a brake have been employed. The essential difference between a helium turbo-expander and a nitrogen turbo-expander was clarified. The gas bearing lubricated with nitrogen at room temperature and the gas bearing lubricated with helium at low temperature were tested. The flow rate of helium in a helium refrigerator for a large superconducting magnet is comparatively small, therefore a helium turbine must be small, but the standard for large turbine design can be applied to such small turbine. Using the alternator as a brake, the turbo-expander was easily controllable electrically. The prototype turbo-expander was made, and the liquefaction test with it and MHD power generation test were carried out. (Kako, I.)

  12. Helium Extraction from LNG End Flash

    Kim, Donghoi

    2014-01-01

    Helium is an invaluable element as it is widely used in industry such as cryo-genics and welding due to its unique properties. However, helium shortage is expected in near future because of increasing demand and the anxiety of sup-ply. Consequently, helium production has attracted the attention of industry. The main source of He is natural gas and extracting it from LNG end-flash is considered as the most promising way of producing crude helium. Thus, many process suppliers have proposed proc...

  13. Helium supply demand in future years

    Laverick, C.

    1975-01-01

    Adequate helium will be available to the year 2000 AD to meet anticipated helium demands for present day applications and the development of new superconducting technologies of potential importance to the nation. It is almost certain that there will not be enough helium at acceptable financial and energy cost after the turn of the century to meet the needs of the many promising helium based technologies now under development. Serious consideration should be given to establishing priorities in development and application based upon their relative value to the country. In the first half of the next century, three ways of estimating helium demand lead to cumulative ranges of from 75 to 125 Gcf (economic study), 89 to 470 Gcf (projected national energy growth rates) and 154 to 328 Gcf (needs for new technologies). These needs contrast with estimated helium resources in natural gas after 2000 AD which may be as low as 10 or 126 Gcf depending upon how the federal helium program is managed and the nation's natural gas resources are utilized. The technological and financial return on a modest national investment in further helium storage and a rational long term helium program promises to be considerable

  14. Novel Methods of Hydrogen Leak Detection

    Pushpinder S Puri

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of the fuel cell technology and a drive for clean fuel, hydrogen gas is emerging as a leading candidate for the fuel of choice. For hydrogen to become a consumer fuel for automotive and domestic power generation, safety is paramount. It is, therefore, desired to have a method and system for hydrogen leak detection using odorant which can incorporate a uniform concentration of odorant in the hydrogen gas, when odorants are mixed in the hydrogen storage or delivery means. It is also desired to develop methods where the odorant is not added to the bulk hydrogen, keeping it free of the odorization additives. When odorants are not added to the hydrogen gas in the storage or delivery means, methods must be developed to incorporate odorant in the leaking gas so that leaks can be detected by small. Further, when odorants are not added to the stored hydrogen, it may also be desirable to observe leaks by sight by discoloration of the surface of the storage or transportation vessels. A series of novel solutions are proposed which address the issues raised above. These solutions are divided into three categories as follows: 1. Methods incorporating an odorant in the path of hydrogen leak as opposed to adding it to the hydrogen gas. 2. Methods where odorants are generated in-situ by chemical reaction with the leaking hydrogen 3. Methods of dispensing and storing odorants in high pressure hydrogen gas which release odorants to the gas at a uniform and predetermined rates. Use of one or more of the methods described here in conjunction with appropriate engineering solutions will assure the ultimate safety of hydrogen use as a commercial fuel. (authors)

  15. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    Power, N.; Atri, M.; Ryan, S.; Haddad, R.; Smith, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 ± 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 ± 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 ± 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air

  16. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    Power, N. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Atri, M. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)]. E-mail: mostafa.atri@sw.ca; Ryan, S. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Haddad, R. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Smith, A. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 {+-} 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 {+-} 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 {+-} 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air.

  17. Direct and Recoil-Induced Electron Emission from Ion-Bombarded Solids

    Holmen, G.; Svensson, B.; Schou, Jørgen

    1979-01-01

    The kinetic emission of secondary electrons from ion-bombarded solid surfaces is split into two contributions, a direct one caused by ionizing collisions between the bombarding ion and target atoms, and an indirect one originating from ionizing collisions undergone by recoil atoms with other target...... atoms. The direct contribution, which has been treated by several authors in previous studies, shows a behavior that is determined primarily by the electronic stopping power of the bombarding ion, while the indirect contribution is nonproportionally related to the nuclear stopping power. This latter...

  18. Topography of InP surface bombarded by O2+ ion beam

    Sun Zhaoqi

    1997-01-01

    The topography of InP surface bombarded by O 2 + ion beam was investigated. Rippled topographies were observed for bombarded samples, and the data show that the ripple formation starts from a sputtering depth of about 0.4 μm. The wavelength and the disorder of the ripples both increase as the sputtering depth increases. The wavelength of the ripples appears to be sputtering depth dependent rather than sputtering rate dependent. It is confirmed that the ion-beam-induced surface rippling can be effectively suppressed by sample rotation during bombardment

  19. Effect of the ion bombardment on the apparent barrier height in GaAs Schottky junctions

    Horvath, Zs. J.

    1994-01-01

    The bombardment of the semiconductor with different particles often results in the change of the doping concentration at the semiconductor surface. In this paper the effects of this near-interface concentration change on the apparent and real Schottky barrier heights are discussed. Experimental results obtained in GaAs Schottky junctions prepared on ion-bombarded semiconductor surfaces are analysed, and it is shown that their electrical characteristics are strongly influenced by the near-interface concentration change due to the ion bombardment. (author). 36 refs., 2 figs

  20. Preliminary report into the effects of nitrogen ion bombardment treatment on mustard seeds

    Smith, C.W.; Al-Hashmi, S.A.R.; Ahmed, N.A.G.; Pollard, M.

    1988-01-01

    Mustard seeds have been subjected to nitrogen ion bombardment. A range of conditions was found within which there was an enhancement in the growth of seedlings from the ion bombardment treated seeds relative to those grown from control seeds. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine seeds after treatment. It appeared that there had been an etching of the seed coating by the ion bombardment. This view was supported by experiments which showed that the rate of capillary water uptake by the treated seeds had been enhanced. (author)

  1. Recycling, inventory and permeation of hydrogen isotopes and helium in the first wall of a thermonuclear fusion reactor

    Gervasini, G.; Reiter, F.

    1989-01-01

    The work was divided into three parts. The first part, which is theoretical, examines the behaviour of hydrogen in metals. After an introduction on the presence of hydrogen isotopes in fusion reactors, the main phenomena connected with hydrogen-metal interaction are summarised: solubility, diffusivity and trapping in material defects. The metal temperature is highlighted as the main parameter in the description of the phenomena. The second part of the work, also theoretical, concerns the interaction between helium and metals. We have tried as much as possible to show analogies and differences in the comparisons of the behaviour of hydrogen. The main types of damage caused by helium in metallic structures, which are the most important consequence of helium-metal interaction, were summarised. The characteristics of helium were treated in greater depth than those of hydrogen, because the latter are very well known. Also, there is a vast literature on the hydrogen-metal interaction. In the third and last part of the work a model was identified which allows the simulation of the evolution of a system formed from a metal in which hydrogen and helium isotopes have been introduced. A system of algebraic-differential equations was used to study the temporal evolution of the concentrations, the recycling, the inventory and the permeation of tritium and helium considering that these atoms diffuse in the metallic lattice and remain trapped in the vacancies created inside the metal by the bombardment of the neutrons from the fusion reactions. For the numerical simulation a series of data intended to represent the situation inside a thermonuclear reactor as precisely as possible were used for the numerical simulation. Analysis of the system was preceded by the analytical resolution of the steady state equations so that they could be compared with the simulation results

  2. The physics of confined flow and its application to water leaks, water permeation and water nanoflows: a review

    Lei, Wenwen; Rigozzi, Michelle K; McKenzie, David R

    2016-01-01

    This review assesses the current state of understanding of the calculation of the rate of flow of gases, vapours and liquids confined in channels, in porous media and in permeable materials with an emphasis on the flow of water and its vapour. One motivation is to investigate the relation between the permeation rate of moisture and that of a noncondensable test gas such as helium, another is to assist in unifying theory and experiment across disparate fields. Available theories of single component ideal gas flows in channels of defined geometry (cylindrical, rectangular and elliptical) are described and their predictions compared with measurement over a wide range of conditions defined by the Knudsen number. Theory for two phase flows is assembled in order to understand the behaviour of four standard water leak configurations: vapour, slug, Washburn and liquid flow, distinguished by the number and location of phase boundaries (menisci). Air may or may not be present as a background gas. Slip length is an important parameter that greatly affects leak rates. Measurements of water vapour flows confirm that water vapour shows ideal gas behaviour. Results on carbon nanotubes show that smooth walls may lead to anomalously high slip lengths arising from the properties of ‘confined’ water. In porous media, behaviour can be matched to the four standard leaks. Traditional membrane permeation models consider that the permeant dissolves, diffuses and evaporates at the outlet side, ideas we align with those from channel flow. Recent results on graphite oxide membranes show examples where helium which does not permeate while at the same time moisture is almost unimpeded, again a result of confined water. We conclude that while there is no a priori relation between a noncondensable gas flow and a moisture flow, measurements using helium will give results within two orders of magnitude of the moisture flow rate, except in the case where there is anomalous slip or confined

  3. The physics of confined flow and its application to water leaks, water permeation and water nanoflows: a review.

    Lei, Wenwen; Rigozzi, Michelle K; McKenzie, David R

    2016-02-01

    This review assesses the current state of understanding of the calculation of the rate of flow of gases, vapours and liquids confined in channels, in porous media and in permeable materials with an emphasis on the flow of water and its vapour. One motivation is to investigate the relation between the permeation rate of moisture and that of a noncondensable test gas such as helium, another is to assist in unifying theory and experiment across disparate fields. Available theories of single component ideal gas flows in channels of defined geometry (cylindrical, rectangular and elliptical) are described and their predictions compared with measurement over a wide range of conditions defined by the Knudsen number. Theory for two phase flows is assembled in order to understand the behaviour of four standard water leak configurations: vapour, slug, Washburn and liquid flow, distinguished by the number and location of phase boundaries (menisci). Air may or may not be present as a background gas. Slip length is an important parameter that greatly affects leak rates. Measurements of water vapour flows confirm that water vapour shows ideal gas behaviour. Results on carbon nanotubes show that smooth walls may lead to anomalously high slip lengths arising from the properties of 'confined' water. In porous media, behaviour can be matched to the four standard leaks. Traditional membrane permeation models consider that the permeant dissolves, diffuses and evaporates at the outlet side, ideas we align with those from channel flow. Recent results on graphite oxide membranes show examples where helium which does not permeate while at the same time moisture is almost unimpeded, again a result of confined water. We conclude that while there is no a priori relation between a noncondensable gas flow and a moisture flow, measurements using helium will give results within two orders of magnitude of the moisture flow rate, except in the case where there is anomalous slip or confined water

  4. LMFBR steam generator leak detection development in the United States

    Magee, P M; Gerrels, E E; Greene, D A [General Electric Company, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); McKee, J [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1978-10-01

    Leak detection for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor steam generators is an important economic factor in the shutdown, repair and restart of a plant. Development of leak detection systems in the U.S. has concentrated on four areas: (1) chemical (H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}) leak detection meters; (2) acoustic leak detection/location techniques; (3) investigation of leak behavior (enlargement, damage effects, plugging and unplugging); and (4) data management for plant operations. This paper discusses the status, design aspects, and applications of leak detection technology for LMFBR plants. (author)

  5. LMFBR steam generator leak detection development in the United States

    Magee, P.M.; Gerrels, E.E.; Greene, D.A.; McKee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Leak detection for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor steam generators is an important economic factor in the shutdown, repair and restart of a plant. Development of leak detection systems in the U.S. has concentrated on four areas: (1) chemical (H 2 and O 2 ) leak detection meters; (2) acoustic leak detection/location techniques; (3) investigation of leak behavior (enlargement, damage effects, plugging and unplugging); and (4) data management for plant operations. This paper discusses the status, design aspects, and applications of leak detection technology for LMFBR plants. (author)

  6. Fuel leak detection on large transport airplanes

    Behbahani-Pour, M.J.; Radice, G.

    2016-01-01

    Fuel leakage has the risk of being ignited by external ignition sources, and therefore it is important to detect\\ud any fuel leakage before the departure of the aircraft. Currently, there are no fuel leak detection systems installed\\ud on commercial aircrafts, to detect fuel tank leakage, while only a small number of more recent aircraft, have a fuel\\ud monitoring system, that generates a fuel leak-warning message in cockpit in the case of fuel imbalance between the\\ud tanks. The approach pro...

  7. Technique for detecting liquid metal leaks

    Bauerle, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    In a system employing flowing liquid metal as a heat transfer medium in contact with tubular members containing a working fluid, i.e., steam, liquid metal leaks through the wall of the tubular member are detected by dislodging the liquid metal compounds forming in the tubular member at the leak locations and subsequently transporting the dislodged compound in the form of an aerosol to a detector responsive to the liquid metal compound. In the application to a sodium cooled tubular member, the detector would consist of a sodium responsive device, such as a sodium ion detector

  8. Hydrogen detection systems leak response codes

    Desmas, T.; Kong, N.; Maupre, J.P.; Schindler, P.; Blanc, D.

    1990-01-01

    A loss in tightness of a water tube inside a Steam Generator Unit of a Fast Reactor is usually monitored by hydrogen detection systems. Such systems have demonstrated in the past their ability to detect a leak in a SGU. However, the increase in size of the SGU or the choice of ferritic material entails improvement of these systems in order to avoid secondary leak or to limit damages to the tube bundle. The R and D undertaken in France on this subject is presented. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs

  9. Acoustic leak detection development in the USA

    Greene, D.A.; Malovrh, J.W.; Magee, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic monitoring systems that detect and locate a leak of water/steam from a defective tube in an LMFBR steam generator have been developed in the United States. A low frequency (approx. 10 KHz) system was developed by General Electric, and a high frequency (200 to 300 KHz) system by Rockwell International with support from Argonne National Laboratory. A comprehensive base technology program provided absolute signal amplitudes, background noise amplitudes, and signal source-to-detector transfer functions. Field tests of these systems demonstrated an ability to detect and locate simulated leaks under operating and quiescent conditions in an LMFBR steam generator. (author)

  10. Transanal Drainage of Coloanal Anastomotic Leaks

    Bradley Sherman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional operative intervention for leaks following coloanal anastomoses has been proximal fecal diversion with or without take-down of anastomosis. A few of these cases are also amenable to percutaneous drainage. Ostomies created in this situation are often permanent, specifically in cases where coloanal anastomoses are taken down at the time of reoperation. We present two patients who developed perianastomotic pelvic abscesses that were treated with transanal large bore catheter drainage resulting in successful salvage of coloanal anastomoses without the need for a laparotomy or ostomy creation. We propose this to be an effective therapeutic approach to leaks involving low coloanal anastomoses in the absence of generalized peritonitis.

  11. Apparatus for Leak Testing Pressurized Hoses

    Underwood, Steve D. (Inventor); Garrison, Steve G. (Inventor); Gant, Bobby D. (Inventor); Palmer, John R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A hose-attaching apparatus for leak-testing a pressurized hose may include a hose-attaching member. A bore may extend through the hose-attaching member. An internal annular cavity may extend coaxially around the bore. At least one of a detector probe hole and a detector probe may be connected to the internal annular cavity. At least a portion of the bore may have a diameter which is at least one of substantially equal to and less than a diameter of a hose to be leak-tested.

  12. Single-Shell Tank Leak Integrity Summary

    Harlow, D. G. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Girardot, C. L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Venetz, T. J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This document summarizes and evaluates the information in the Hanford Tri-Party Agreement Interim Milestone M-045-91F Targets completed between 2010 and 2015. 1) Common factors of SST liner failures (M-045-91F-T02), 2) the feasibility of testing for ionic conductivity between the inside and outside of SSTs (M-045-91F-T03, and 3) the causes, locations, and rates of leaks from leaking SSTs (M-045-91F-T04).

  13. New helium spectrum variable and a new helium-rich star

    Walborn, N.R.

    1974-01-01

    HD 184927, known previously as a helium-rich star, has been found to have a variable helium spectrum; the equivalent widths of five He I lines are larger by an average of 46 percent on a 1974 spectrogram than on one obtained with the same equipment in 1970. HD 186205 has been found to be a new, pronounced helium-rich star. (auth)

  14. Helium transfer line installation details.

    G. Perinic

    2007-01-01

    A particularity of the 32 m long four in one helium transfer line in between the cold box in USC55 and the cavern UX5 is the fact that the transfer line passes through a hole in the crane rail support beam. In order to ensure the alignment of the suspension rail in the interconnecting tunnel with the hole in the rail support as well as the connection points at both ends required precise measurements of the given geometries as well as the installation of a temporary target for the verification of the theoretical predictions.

  15. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  16. A Correlated Active Acoustic Leak Detection in a SFR Steam Generator

    Kim, Tae Joon; Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Byung Ho; Kim, Yong Il

    2009-01-01

    The methods of acoustic leak detection are active acoustic leak detection and passive acoustic leak detection. The methods for passive acoustic leak detection are already established, but because our goal is development of passive acoustic leak detection for detecting a leakage range of small and micro leak rates, it is difficult detecting a leak in steam generator using this developed passive acoustic leak detection. Thus the acoustic leak detection system is required to be able to detect wide range of water leaks. From this view point we need to develop an active acoustic leak detection technology to be able to detect intermediate leak rates

  17. Performance evaluation of cryogenic counter-flow heat exchangers with longitudinal conduction, heat in-leak and property variations

    Jiang, Q. F.; Zhuang, M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Y Zhang, Q.; Sheng, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    Counter-flow plate-fin heat exchangers are commonly utilized in cryogenic applications due to their high effectiveness and compact size. For cryogenic heat exchangers in helium liquefaction/refrigeration systems, conventional design theory is no longer applicable and they are usually sensitive to longitudinal heat conduction, heat in-leak from surroundings and variable fluid properties. Governing equations based on distributed parameter method are developed to evaluate performance deterioration caused by these effects. The numerical model could also be applied in many other recuperators with different structures and, hence, available experimental data are used to validate it. For a specific case of the multi-stream heat exchanger in the EAST helium refrigerator, quantitative effects of these heat losses are further discussed, in comparison with design results obtained by the common commercial software. The numerical model could be useful to evaluate and rate the heat exchanger performance under the actual cryogenic environment.

  18. Electrochemically assisted fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry

    Phillips, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The hybridization of electrochemistry and fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry (MS) creates a new hyphenated technique, referred to as electrochemically assisted FAB (EFAB) MS, which improves the applicability of FAB MS in selectivity and extends the range of compounds to include low polarity molecules, and also reduces mass spectral complications due to matrix-related artifacts. FAB MS has proven to be indispensable in analysis of samples that are otherwise too intractable for conventional MS, such as peptides, oligosaccharides, and oligonucleotides, due to low volatility and ready thermal degradation. There are limits on its applicability, however, in that it works best with samples that are already ionic, or predisposed to become so by simple proton transfer to or from the matrix. A wide range of chemical substances can be ionized/analyzed by electrochemical methods. Therefore, a possible approach towards improving applicability of FAB MS is through its hybridization with electrochemistry. Samples are activated by electrolysis, carried out directly in the sample matrix through use of a modified FAB sample probe which was constructed containing a small electrolytic cell on the tip. In operation, one electrode is held at normal sample-probe/ion-source voltage, while the other electrode can be continuously varied ±15 volts to create electrochemical potentials. Several chemical substances, known to be unresponsive to FAB MS, have been examined by EFAB MS. Resultant spectra generally show a dramatic increases in signal/chemical noise ratio of structurally significant ions when compared to normal FAB spectra

  19. Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248

    Welch, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of 129 Xe and 132 Xe with 248 Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a 136 Xe + 248 Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with 136 Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, 129 Xe, 132 Xe, and 136 Xe with 197 Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions

  20. A molecular dynamics study of energetic particle bombardment on diamond

    Li Rongbin; Dai Yongbing; Hu Xiaojun; Shen Hesheng; He Xianchang

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations, utilizing the Tersoff many-body potential, are used to investigate the microscopic processes of a single boron atom with an energy of 500 eV implanted into the diamond (001) 2 x 1 reconstructed surface. By calculating the variation of the mean coordination number with time, the lifetime of a thermal spike created by B bombardment is about 0.18 ps. Formation of the split-interstitial composed of projectile and lattice atom (B-C) is observed. The total potential energy of the system decreases about 0.56 eV with a stable B split-interstitial existing in diamond. Lattice relaxations in the diamond (001) 2 x 1 reconstructed surface or near surface of the simulated have been discussed, and the results show that the outermost layer atoms tend to move inward and other atoms move outward, while the interplanar distance between the outermost layer and the second layer has been shortened by 15%, compared with its starting interplanar distance. Stress distribution in the calculated diamond configuration is inhomogeneous. After boron implanted into diamond with an energy of 500 eV, there is an excess of compressively stressed atoms in the lattice, which induces the total stress being compressive

  1. Sputtering and reflection of self-bombardment of tungsten material

    Niu, Guo-jian [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-nan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of CAS, Hefei (China)

    2015-04-15

    In present research, the sputtering and reflection yield of self-bombardment of tungsten are investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations. The source of sputtered and reflected atoms is detected by traced the original locations of sputtered and reflected atoms. Results show that for the reflected atoms no specific region exists which means cluster atoms are randomly reflected. But almost all of sputtered atoms are from a conical region under the landing point of cluster. So we can determine the sputtering yield by study the dimension of the sputtering region. Molecular dynamics shows the depth and radius of the conical are power functions of impacting energy. The effects of cluster size and temperature of target on sputtering and reflection rate are also preformed in present study. Both sputtering and reflection yield are proportion to cluster size in present cluster size, i.e. 66–2647 atoms. Higher target temperature can increase sputtering yield and deduce sputtering threshold energy, but little effect on reflection rate.

  2. Auger emission from solid surfaces bombarded with ions

    Grizzi, Oscar.

    1986-01-01

    The Auger electron emission from Be, Na, Mg, Al and Si bombarded with 0,5-20 KeV noble gas ions is studied. Sharp structures of the Auger electron spectra of Na and Be were identified. A Monte Carlo program was adapted to simulate the colision cascade in the solid, inner shell excitations and Auger decays. From the comparision of experimental and simulated Auger intensities, the relative role of symmetric and asymmetric collisions in Be K- and Al L-shell excitation were evaluated. In the case of Be, the discussion of the exciting processes to higher projectile energies was extended. To this end, the simulation to early measurements of Be K X-ray yields was applied. From this analysis, information about the variations of the fluorescence yield and outer-shell occupation numbers of Be with projectile energy was obtained. The study of the shape of the sharp Auger structures and their dependence with the energy and incidence projectile angle gives information about the collisional processes, inner hole lifetimes and Auger decays. From the evaluation of the energy and angular distribution of the excited sputtered atoms and the interaction between them and the metallic-surface, the energy shift distributions in the Auger energies were obtained. From the comparison of these distributions with the experimental atomic peaks, the main causes of the broadening of these peaks were determined. (M.E.L.) [es

  3. Modelling and simulation of surface morphology driven by ion bombardment

    Yewande, E.O.

    2006-05-02

    Non-equilibrium surfaces, at nanometer length scales, externally driven via bombardment with energetic particles are known to exhibit well ordered patterns with a variety of applications in nano-technology. These patterns emerge at time scales on the order of minutes. Continuum theory has been quite successful in giving a general picture of the processes that interplay to give the observed patterns, as well as how such competition might determine the properties of the nanostructures. However, continuum theoretical descriptions are ideal only in the asymptotic limit. The only other theoretical alternative, which happens to be more suitable for the characteristic length-and time-scales of pattern formation, is Monte Carlo simulation. In this thesis, surface morphology is studied using discrete solid-on-solid Monte Carlo models of sputtering and surface diffusion. The simulations are performed in the context of the continuum theories and experiments. In agreement with the experiments, the ripples coarsen with time and the ripple velocity exhibits a power-law behaviour with the ripple wavelength, in addition, the exponent was found to depend on the simulation temperature, which suggests future experimental studies of flux dependence. Moreover, a detailed exploration of possible topographies, for different sputtering conditions, corresponding to different materials, was performed. And different surface topographies e.g. holes, ripples, and dots, were found at oblique incidence, without sample rotation. With sample rotation no new topography was found, its only role being to destroy any inherent anisotropy in the system. (orig.)

  4. Sputtering and reflection of self-bombardment of tungsten material

    Niu, Guo-jian; Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi; Luo, Guang-nan

    2015-01-01

    In present research, the sputtering and reflection yield of self-bombardment of tungsten are investigated with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations. The source of sputtered and reflected atoms is detected by traced the original locations of sputtered and reflected atoms. Results show that for the reflected atoms no specific region exists which means cluster atoms are randomly reflected. But almost all of sputtered atoms are from a conical region under the landing point of cluster. So we can determine the sputtering yield by study the dimension of the sputtering region. Molecular dynamics shows the depth and radius of the conical are power functions of impacting energy. The effects of cluster size and temperature of target on sputtering and reflection rate are also preformed in present study. Both sputtering and reflection yield are proportion to cluster size in present cluster size, i.e. 66–2647 atoms. Higher target temperature can increase sputtering yield and deduce sputtering threshold energy, but little effect on reflection rate

  5. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    van Breeman, R.B. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Humos monitoring system of leaks in to the containment atmosphere

    Matal, O.; Zaloudek, J.; Matal, O. Jr.; Klinga, J.; Brom, J.

    1997-01-01

    HUmidity MOnitoring System (HUMOS) has been developed and designed to detect the presence of leak in selected primary circuit high energy pipelines and components that are evaluated from the point of view of Leak Before Break (LBB) requirements. It also requires to apply technical tools for detection and identification of coolant leaks from primary circuit and components of PWRs reactors. Safety significant of leaks depend on: leak source (location); leak rate, and leak duration. Therefore to detect and monitor coolant leaks in to the containment atmosphere during reactor operation is one of important safety measures. As potential leak sources flange connection in the upper head region of WWER reactors can be considered. HUMOS does not rely on the release of radioactivity to detect leaks but rather the relies on detection of moisture in the air resulting from a primary boundary leak. Because HUMOS relies on moisture and temperature detection, leaks can be detected without requiring the reactor to be critical. Therefore leaks can be detected during integrity pressure tests and any other mode of operation provided the reactor ventilation system is operating and primary circuit and components are pressurized. 3 figs

  7. Impact of Ion Bombardment on the Structure and Magnetic Properties of Fe78Si13B9 Amorphous Alloy

    Wu, Yingwei; Peng, Kun

    2018-06-01

    Amorphous Fe78Si13B9 alloy ribbons were bombarded by ion beams with different incident angles ( θ ). The evolution of the microstructure and magnetic properties of ribbons caused by ion beam bombardment was investigated by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer analysis. Low-incident-angle bombardment led to atomic migration in the short range, and high-incident-angle bombardment resulted in the crystallization of amorphous alloys. Ion bombardment induces magnetic anisotropy and affects magnetic properties. The effective magnetic anisotropy was determined by applying the law of approach to saturation, and it increased with the increase of the ion bombardment angle. The introduction of effective magnetic anisotropy will reduce the permeability and increase the relaxation frequency. Excellent high-frequency magnetic properties can be obtained by selecting suitable ion bombardment parameters.

  8. Autonomous Cryogenic Leak Detector for Improving Launch Site Operations

    Goswami, Kisholoy

    2013-01-01

    NASA, military, and commercial satellite users need launch services that are highly reliable, less complex, easier to test, and cost effective. This project has developed a tapered optical fiber sensor for detecting hydrogen. The invention involves incorporating chemical indicators on the tapered end of an optical fiber using organically modified silicate nanomaterials. The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab (HGDL) at Kennedy Space Center is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and qualify various mission-critical chemicals. Historically, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are the first five gases of HGDL focus. The use of these cryogenic fluids in the area of propulsion offers challenges. Due to their extreme low temperatures, these fluids induce contraction of the materials they contact, a potential cause of leakage. Among them, hydrogen is of particular concern. Small sensors are needed in multiple locations without adding to the structural weight. The most vulnerable parts of the engine are the connection flanges on the transfer lines, which have to support cycles of large thermal amplitude. The thermal protection of the engine provides a closed area, increasing the likelihood of an explosive atmosphere. Thus, even a small leak represents an unacceptable hazardous condition during loading operations, in flight, or after an aborted launch. Tapered fibers were first fabricated from 1/1.3-mm core/cladding (silica/ plastic) optical fibers. Typically a 1-ft (approx. 30- cm) section of the 1-mm fiber is cut from the bundle and marked with a pen into five 2-.-in. (.5.7-cm) sections. A propane torch is applied at every alternate mark to burn the jacket and soften the glass core. While the core is softening, the two ends of the fiber are pulled apart slowly to create fine tapers of .- to .-in. (.6- to 12-mm) long on the 1-mm optical fiber. Following this, the non-tapered ends of the fibers are polished to a 0.3-micron finish

  9. Role of Outgassing of ITER Vacuum Vessel In-Wall Shielding Materials in Leak Detection of ITER Vacuum Vessel

    Maheshwari, A.; Pathak, H. A.; Mehta, B. K.; Phull, G. S.; Laad, R.; Shaikh, M. S.; George, S.; Joshi, K.; Khan, Z.

    2017-04-01

    ITER Vacuum Vessel is a torus-shaped, double wall structure. The space between the double walls of the VV is filled with In-Wall Shielding Blocks (IWS) and Water. The main purpose of IWS is to provide neutron shielding during ITER plasma operation and to reduce ripple of Toroidal Magnetic Field (TF). Although In-Wall Shield Blocks (IWS) will be submerged in water in between the walls of the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV), Outgassing Rate (OGR) of IWS materials plays a significant role in leak detection of Vacuum Vessel of ITER. Thermal Outgassing Rate of a material critically depends on the Surface Roughness of material. During leak detection process using RGA equipped Leak detector and tracer gas Helium, there will be a spill over of mass 3 and mass 2 to mass 4 which creates a background reading. Helium background will have contribution of Hydrogen too. So it is necessary to ensure the low OGR of Hydrogen. To achieve an effective leak test it is required to obtain a background below 1 × 10-8 mbar 1 s-1 and hence the maximum Outgassing rate of IWS Materials should comply with the maximum Outgassing rate required for hydrogen i.e. 1 x 10-10 mbar 1 s-1 cm-2 at room temperature. As IWS Materials are special materials developed for ITER project, it is necessary to ensure the compliance of Outgassing rate with the requirement. There is a possibility of diffusing the gasses in material at the time of production. So, to validate the production process of materials as well as manufacturing of final product from this material, three coupons of each IWS material have been manufactured with the same technique which is being used in manufacturing of IWS blocks. Manufacturing records of these coupons have been approved by ITER-IO (International Organization). Outgassing rates of these coupons have been measured at room temperature and found in acceptable limit to obtain the required Helium Background. On the basis of these measurements, test reports have been generated and got

  10. Ion peening and stress relaxation induced by low-energy atom bombardment of covalent solids

    Koster, Monika; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2001-01-01

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the buildup and relaxation of stress induced by low-energy (≤150 eV) atom bombardment of a target material. The effect is brought out most clearly by using an initially compressed specimen. As target material, we employ Si, based on the Tersoff potential. By varying the bond strength in the potential, we can specifically study its effect on damage production and stress changes. We find that in general, stress is relaxed by the atom bombardment; only for low bombarding energies and strong bonds, atom bombardment increases stress. We rationalize this behavior by considering the role of energized atoms and of recoil-implanted target atoms

  11. The interpretation of ellipsometric measurements of ion bombardment of noble gases on semiconductor surfaces

    Holtslag, A.H.M.; Slager, U.C.; van Silfhout, Arend

    1985-01-01

    Low energy noble gas ion bombardment and thermal desorption studies were carried out on Si(111) and analysed, in situ, using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The amorphous layer thickness and implanted noble gas fraction were calculated.

  12. Self-Assembled Gold Nano-Ripple Formation by Gas Cluster Ion Beam Bombardment.

    Tilakaratne, Buddhi P; Chen, Quark Y; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2017-09-08

    In this study, we used a 30 keV argon cluster ion beam bombardment to investigate the dynamic processes during nano-ripple formation on gold surfaces. Atomic force microscope analysis shows that the gold surface has maximum roughness at an incident angle of 60° from the surface normal; moreover, at this angle, and for an applied fluence of 3 × 10 16 clusters/cm², the aspect ratio of the nano-ripple pattern is in the range of ~50%. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis reveals a formation of a surface gradient due to prolonged gas cluster ion bombardment, although the surface roughness remains consistent throughout the bombarded surface area. As a result, significant mass redistribution is triggered by gas cluster ion beam bombardment at room temperature. Where mass redistribution is responsible for nano-ripple formation, the surface erosion process refines the formed nano-ripple structures.

  13. Spectroscopy of antiproton helium atoms

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2005-01-01

    Antiproton helium atom is three-body system consisting of an antiproton, electrons and a helium nucleus (denoted by the chemical symbol, p-bar H + ). The authors produced abundant atoms of p-bar 4 He + , and p-bar 3 He + in a cooled He gas target chamber stopping the p-bar beam decelerated to approximately 100 keV in the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN. A precision laser spectroscopy on the atomic transitions in the p-bar 4 He + , and in p-bar 3 He + was performed. Principle of laser spectroscopy and various modifications of the system to eliminate factors affecting the accuracy of the experiment were described. Deduced mass ratio of antiproton and proton, (|m p -bar - m p |)/m p reached to the accuracy of 10 ppb (10 -8 ) as of 2002, as adopted in the recent article of the Particle Data Group by P.J. Mohr and B.N. Taylor. This value is the highest precise data for the CPT invariance in baryon. In future, antihydrogen atoms will be produced in the same facility, and will provide far accurate value of antiproton mass thus enabling a better confirmation of CPT theorem in baryon. (T. Tamura)

  14. Localized leak detection utilizing moisture sensitive tape

    Riddle, P.

    1984-01-01

    Moisture sensitive tape (MST) has been used in various nuclear power plants to detect leaks in reactor piping systems. The sensor assembly consists of MST, transponder, and sensor carrier, and is installed on the exterior of thermal insulation. The components, applications, installation, and purchasing information are discussed in the paper

  15. Steam generator leak detection using acoustic method

    Goluchko, V.V.; Sokolov, B.M.; Bulanov, A.N.

    1982-05-01

    The main requirements to meet by a device for leak detection in sodium - water steam generators are determined. The potentialities of instrumentation designed based on the developed requirements have been tested using a model of a 550 kw steam generator [fr

  16. GASFLOW analysis of a tritium leak accident

    Farman, R.F.; Fujita, R.K.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The consequences of an earthquake-induced fire involving a tritium leak were analyzed using the GASFLOW computer code. Modeling features required by the analysis include ventilation boundary conditions, flow of a gas mixture in an enclosure containing obstacles, thermally induced buoyancy, and combustion phenomena. (author). 2 refs., 6 figs

  17. GASFLOW analysis of a tritium leak accident

    Farman, R.F.; Fujita, R.K.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The consequences of an earthquake-induced fire involving a tritium leak were analyzed using the GASFLOW computer code. Modeling features required by the analysis include ventilation boundary conditions, flow of a gas mixture in an enclosure containing obstacles, thermally induced buoyancy, and combustion phenomena

  18. Detecting gas leaks by ultrasonic emission

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Henriksen, Eigil

    1997-01-01

    The emission of noise in the frequency range 10 kHz to 25.6 kHz from an experimental gas leak in a flanged joint has been experimentally investigated. The overall conclusion is that the emitted noise is almost frequency independent in level within the considered frequency range.A small PC program...

  19. A Quick Guide to Paravalvular Leak Closure

    Gafoor, Sameer; Franke, Jennifer; Bertog, Stefan; Lam, Simon; Vaskelyte, Laura; Hofmann, Ilona; Matic, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Paravalvular leak (PVL) is a seldomly covered aspect of structural heart disease. However, this is a condition that frequently presents after valvular replacement. This article will cover the diagnosising and treating PVL (i.e. imaging, access, and device selection). In addition, specific aspects of aortic and mitral PVL closure will be covered in this review. PMID:29588686

  20. The concept of leak before failure

    Pellissier-Tanon, A.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to demonstrate the state of leak before failure introduce a new tangible element in the estimation of safety from which it becomes possible to estimate more rationnally the risks associated to crack formation. This paper presents the international positions on the full section break suppression of steam and primary pipes (Federal Republic of Germany, USA, France) [fr

  1. Development of pressure boundaries leak detection technology for nuclear reactor

    Zhang Yao; Zhang Dafa; Chen Dengke; Zhang Liming

    2008-01-01

    The leak detection for the pressure boundaries is an important safeguard in nuclear reactor operation. In the paper, the status and the characters on the development of the pressure boundaries leak detection technology for the nuclear reactor were reviewed, especially, and the advance of the radiation leak detection technology and the acoustic emission leak detection technology were analyzed. The new advance trend of the leak detection technology was primarily explored. According to the analysis results, it is point out that the advancing target of the leak detection technology is to enhance its response speed, sensitivity, and reliability, and to provide effective information for operator and decision-maker. The realization of the global leak detection and the whole life cycle health monitoring for the nuclear boundaries is a significant advancing tendency of the leak detection technology. (authors)

  2. Strange matter and Big Bang helium synthesis

    Madsen, J.; Riisager, K.

    1985-01-01

    Stable strange quark matter produced in the QCD phase transition in the early universe will trap neutrons and repel protons, thus reducing primordial helium production, Ysub(p). For reasonable values of Ysub(p), the radius of strange droplets must exceed 10 -6 cm if strange matter shall solve the dark-matter problem without spoiling Big Bang helium synthesis. (orig.)

  3. Post-giant evolution of helium stars

    Schoenberner, D.

    1977-01-01

    Extremely hydrogen deficient stars (helium stars and R Coronae Borealis variables) are considered to be remnants of double shell source stars (of the asymptotic giant branch). The evolution of stars with a condensed C/O-core and a helium envelope is followed numerically from the red giant stage to the white dwarf domain, crossing the regions of R CrB- and helium stars (so far analyzed). They have typically masses M/M(sun) = 0.7 and luminosities log L/L(sun) = 4.1. The time for crossing the helium star domain is some 10 3 years. The corresponding times in the R CrB-region amounts up to several 10 4 years. The lower limit of the death rate of helium stars is estimated to be 4 x 10 -14 pc -3 yr -1 . This value is only a factor of ten lower than the birth rate of all non-DA white dwarfs. It is therefore possible that the helium stars are the precursors of helium rich white dwarfs. As a consequence, a significant fraction of all stars which end their lives as white dwarfs should pass through the helium star phase. (orig.) [de

  4. Organ protection by the noble gas helium

    Smit, K.F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this thesis were to investigate whether helium induces preconditioning in humans, and to elucidate the mechanisms behind this possible protection. First, we collected data regarding organ protective effects of noble gases in general, and of helium in particular (chapters 1-3). In chapter

  5. Radioactive ions and atoms in superfluid helium

    Dendooven, P.G.; Purushothaman, S.; Gloos, K.; Aysto, J.; Takahashi, N.; Huang, W.; Harissopulos, S; Demetriou, P; Julin, R

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating the use of superfluid helium as a medium to handle and manipulate radioactive ions and atoms. Preliminary results on the extraction of positive ions from superfluid helium at temperatures close to 1 K are described. Increasing the electric field up to 1.2 kV/cm did not improve

  6. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back Bombardment in Photoinjectors

    Qiang, Ji; Corlett, John; Staples, John

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report on studies of ion back bombardment in high average current dc and rf photoinjectors using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo method. Using H 2 ion as an example, we observed that the ion density and energy deposition on the photocathode in rf guns are order of magnitude lower than that in a dc gun. A higher rf frequency helps mitigate the ion back bombardment of the cathode in rf guns

  7. The effects of thermal annealing on iron bombarded InP/InGaAs multilayer structures

    Subramaniam, S.C.; Rezazadeh, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of Fe-ion bombardment at 77 K (cold) and room temperature (RT) into single layer InGaAs, InP and multilayer InP/InGaAs HBT structures have been investigated. Annealing characteristics and RF dissipation loss measurements of Fe-ion bombarded samples at 77 K indicated good electrical isolation in n-, p-type InGaAs materials and InP/InGaAs HBT structures. Thermally stable (up to 250 deg. C) high sheet resistance (R sh ) of ∼5 x 10 6 Ω/sq has been achieved on these samples while higher R sh of ∼10 7 Ω/sq was obtained for the n-InP materials bombarded with similar conditions. Dissipation losses of 1.7 dB/cm at 10 GHz and 2.8 dB/cm at 40 GHz have been measured for the cold Fe-ion bombarded InP-based HBT structures. This result is similar to those obtained for an un-bombarded S.I. InP substrate, indicating good electrical isolation. We have also determined electron trapping levels by thermal annealing for the cold and RT Fe-ion bombarded samples. It is shown that the high resistivity achieved in the cold implanted InGaAs layer is most likely due to the creation of mid-bandgap defect levels (E C - 0.33) eV, which are created only in the cold Fe-ion bombardment. The DC isolation and RF dissipation loss analysis have been used to identify a suitable bombardment scheme for the fabrication of planar InP/InGaAs HBTs

  8. Experiments and calculations to leak openings and leak rates on typical piping components and systems

    Hoefler, A.; Grebner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of leak opening and leak rate for through cracks in piping components have been performed. The analyses are pre- or mostly post-calculations to experiments performed at the HDR facility under PWR operating conditions. Piping components under consideration are small diameter straight pipes with circumferential cracks, pipe bends with longitudinal or circumferential cracks and pipe branches with weldment cracks. The component are loaded by internal pressure and opening as well as closing bending moment. The finite element method and two-phase flow leak rate programs are used for the calculations. Results of the analyses are presented as J-integral values, crack opening displacements and areas and leak rates as well as comparisons to the experimental results. 6 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Comparison of leak opening and leak rate calculations to HDR experimental results

    Grebner, H.; Hoefler, A.; Hunger, H.

    1993-01-01

    During the last years a number of calculations of leak opening and leak rate for through cracks in piping components have been performed. Analyses are pre- or mostly post-calculations to experiments performed at the HDR facility under PWR operating conditions. Piping components under consideration were small diameter straight pipes with circumferential cracks, pipe bends with longitudinal or circumferential cracks and pipe branches with weldment cracks. The components were loaded by internal pressure and opening as well as closing bending moment. The finite element method and two-phase flow leak rate programs were used for the calculations. Results of the analyses are presented as J-integral values, crack opening displacements and areas and leak rates as well as comparisons to the experimental results

  10. Performance evaluation of PFBR wire type sodium leak detectors

    Vijayakumar, G.; Rajan, K.K.; Nashine, B.K.; Chandramouli, S.; Madhusoodanan, K.; Kalyanasundaram, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Performance evaluation of wire type leak detectors was conducted in LEENA facility by creating sodium leaks. → The lowest leak rate of 214 g/h was detected in 50 min and the highest detection time was 6 h for a leak rate of 222 g/h. → Factors affecting the leak detection time are packing density of thermal insulation, layout of heater, temperature, etc. → Relationship between leak rate and detection time was established and a leak rate of 100 g/h is likely to be detected in 11.1 h. → Contact resistance of leaked sodium increased to 3.5 kilo ohms in 20 h. - Abstract: Wire type leak detectors working on conductivity principle are used for detecting sodium leak in the secondary sodium circuits of fast breeder reactors. It is required to assess the performance of these detectors and confirm that they are meeting the requirements. A test facility by name LEENA was constructed at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam to test the wire type leak detector lay out by simulating different sodium leak rates. This test facility consists of a sodium dump tank, a test vessel, interconnecting pipelines with valves, micro filter and test section with leak simulators. There are three different test sections in the test set up of length 1000 mm each. These test sections simulate piping of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) secondary circuit and the wire type leak detector layout in full scale. All test sections are provided with leak simulators. A leak simulator consists of a hole of size one mm drilled in the test section and closed with a tapered pin. The tapered pin position in the hole is adjusted by a screw mechanism and there by the annular gap of flow area is varied for getting different leak rates. Various experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the leak detectors by creating different sodium leak rates. This paper deals with the details of wire type leak detector layout for the secondary sodium circuit of

  11. Sniffer used as portable hydrogen leak detector

    Dayan, V. H.; Rommel, M. A.

    1966-01-01

    Sniffer type portable monitor detects hydrogen in air, oxygen, nitrogen, or helium. It indicates the presence of hydrogen in contact with activated palladium black by a change in color of a thermochromic paint, and indicates the quantity of hydrogen by a sensor probe and continuous readout.

  12. Thermal optimization of the helium-cooled power leads for the SSC

    Demko, J.A.; Schiesser, W.E.; Carcagno, R.; McAshan, M.; McConeghy, R.

    1992-01-01

    The optimum thermal design of the power leads for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will minimize the amount of Carnot work (which is a combination of refrigeration and liquefaction work) required. This optimization can be accomplished by the judicious selection of lead length and diameter. Even though an optimum set of dimensions is found, the final design must satisfy other physical constraints such as maximum allowable heat leak and helium vapor mass flow rate. A set of corresponding lengths and diameters has been determined that meets these requirements for the helium vapor-cooled, spiral-fin power lead design of the SSC. Early efforts by McFee and Mallon investigated optimizing power leads for cryogenic applications with no convection cooling. Later designs utilized the boiled-off helium vapor to cool the lead. One notable design for currents up to several thousand amps is presented by Efferson based on a series of recommendations discussed by Deiness. Buyanov presents many theoretical models and design formulae but does not demonstrate an approach to thermally optimizing the design of a vapor-cooled lead. In this study, a detailed numerical thermal model of a power lead design for the SSC has been developed. It was adapted from the dynamic model developed by Schiesser. This model was used to determine the optimum dimensions that minimize the Carnot refrigeration and liquefaction work due to the leads. Since the SSC leads will be cooled by supercritical helium, the flow of vapor is regulated by a control valve. These leads include a superconducting portion at the cold end. All of the material properties in the model are functions of temperature, and for the helium are functions of pressure and temperature. No pressure drop calculations were performed as part of this analysis. The diameter that minimizes the Carnot work was determined for four different lengths at a design current of 6600 amps

  13. Thermal optimization of the helium-cooled power leads for the SSC

    Demko, J.A.; Schiesser, W.E.; Carcagno, R.; McAshan, M.; McConeghy, R.

    1992-03-01

    The optimum thermal design of the power leads for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will minimize the amount of Carnot work (which is a combination of refrigeration and liquefaction work) required. This optimization can be accomplished by the judicious selection of lead length and diameter. Even though an optimum set of dimensions is found, the final design must satisfy other physical constraints such as maximum allowable heat leak and helium vapor mass flow rate. A set of corresponding lengths and diameters has been determined that meets these requirements for the helium vapor-cooled, spiral-fin power lead design of the SSC. Early efforts by McFee and Mallon investigated optimizing power leads for cryogenic applications with no convection cooling. Later designs utilized the boiled-off helium vapor to cool the lead. One notable design for currents up to several thousand amps is presented by Efferson based on a series of recommendations discussed by Deiness. Buyanov presents many theoretical models and design formulate but does not demonstrate an approach to thermally optimizing the design of a vapor-cooled lead. A method for optimizing superconducting magnet current leads is described by Maehata et al. The approach assumes that the helium boil-off caused by heat conduction along with power lead into the low-temperature helium is used to cool the lead. The optimum solution is found when the heat flow at the cold end is minimized.. In this study, a detailed numerical thermal model of a power lead design for the SSC has been developed. It was adapted from the dynamic model developed by Schiesser. This model was used to determine the optimum dimensions that minimize the Carnot refrigeration and liquefaction work due to the leads

  14. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    Rista, P. E. C.; Shull, J.; Sargent, S.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen & helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper.

  15. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    C Rista, P E; Shull, J; Sargent, S

    2015-01-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen and helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper. (paper)

  16. Endoscopic management of biliary injuries and leaks

    T S Chandrasekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct injuries and subsequent leaks can occur following laparoscopic and open cholecystectomies and also during other hepatobiliary surgeries. Various patient related and technical factors are implicated in the causation of biliary injuries. Over a period of twenty five years managing such patients of biliary injuries our team has found a practical approach to assess the cause of biliary injuries based on the symptoms, clinical examination and imaging. Bismuth classification is helpful in most of the cases. Immediate referral to a centre experienced in the management of bile duct injury and timely intervention is associated with improved outcomes. Resuscitation, correcting dyselectrolytemia, aspiration of undrained biloma and antibiotics take the priority in the management. The goal is to restore the bile conduit, and to prevent short and longterm complications such as biliary fistula, intra-abdominal abscess, biliary stricture, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapy by reducing the transpapillary pressure gradient helps in reducing the leak. Endoscopic therapy with biliary sphincterotomy alone or with additional placement of a biliary stent/ nasobiliary drainage is advocated. In our tertiary care referral unit, we found endoscopic interventions are useful in situations where there is leak with associated CBD calculus or a foreign body, peripheral bile duct injury, cystic duct stump leak and partial bile duct injury with leak/ narrowing of the lumen. Endotherapy is not useful in case of complete transection (total cut off and complete stricture involving common hepatic or common bile ducts. In conclusion, endoscopic treatment can be considered a highly effective therapy and should be the first-line therapy in such patients. Though less successful, an endoscopic attempt is warranted in patients suffering from central bile duct leakages failing which surgical management is recommended.

  17. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  18. Investigation for the sodium leak in Monju. Sodium leak and fire test-1

    Kawata, Koji; Ohno, Shuji; Miyahara, Shinya; Miyake, Osamu; Tanabe, Hiromi

    2000-08-01

    As a part of the work for investigating the sodium leak accident which occurred in the Monju reactor (hereinafter referred to as Monju) on December 8, 1995, three tests, (1) a sodium leak test, (2) a sodium leak and fire test-1, and (3) a sodium leak and fire test-II, were carried out at OEC/PEC. The main objectives of these tests were to confirm the leak and burning behavior of sodium from the damaged thermometer, and the effects of the sodium fire on the integrity of the surrounding structure. This report describes the results of the sodium fire test-I carried out as a preliminary test. The test was performed using the SOLFA-2 (Sodium Leak, Fire and Aerosol) facility on April 8, 1996. In this test, sodium heated to 480degC was leaked for approximately 1.5 hours from a leak simulating apparatus and caused to drop onto a ventilation duct and a grating with the same dimensions and layout as those in Monju. The main conclusions obtained from the test are shown below: 1) Observation from video cameras in the test revealed that in the early stages of the sodium leak, sodium dripped out of the flexible tube of the thermometer. This dripping and burning expanded in range as the sodium splashed on the duct. 2) No damage to the duct itself was detected. However, the aluminum louver frame of the ventilation duct's lower inlet was damaged. Its machine screws came off, leaving half of the grill (on the grating side) detached. 3) No large hole, like the one seen at Monju, was found when the grating was removed from the testing system for inspection, although the area centered on the point were the sodium dripped was damaged in a way indicating the first stages of grating failure. The 5mm square lattice was corroded through in some parts, and numerous blades (originally 3.2 mm thick) had become sharpened like the blade of a knife. 4) The burning pan underside thermocouple near the leak point measured 700degC in within approximately 10 minutes, and for the next hour remained

  19. Modeling Secondary Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere

    Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Möbius, Eberhard; Wood, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate, analytic heliospheric neutral test-particle code for helium atoms from the interstellar medium (ISM) is coupled to global heliospheric models dominated by hydrogen and protons from the solar wind and the ISM. This coupling enables the forward-calculation of secondary helium neutrals from first principles. Secondaries are produced predominantly in the outer heliosheath, upwind of the heliopause, by charge exchange of helium ions with neutral atoms. The forward model integrates the secondary production terms along neutral trajectories and calculates the combined neutral helium phase space density in the innermost heliosphere where it can be related to in-situ observations. The phase space density of the secondary component is lower than that of primary neutral helium, but its presence can change the analysis of primaries and the ISM, and can yield valuable insight into the characteristics of the plasma in the outer heliosheath. (paper)

  20. Very low-energy and low-fluence ion beam bombardment of naked plasmid DNA

    Norarat, R.; Semsang, N.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Ion beam bombardment of biological organisms has been recently applied to mutation breeding of both agricultural and horticultural plants. In order to explore relevant mechanisms, this study employed low-energy ion beams to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The study aimed at simulation of the final stage of the process of the ion beam bombardment of real cells to check whether and how very low-energy and low-fluence of ions can induce mutation. Argon and nitrogen ions at 5 keV and 2.5 keV respectively bombarded naked plasmid DNA pGFP to very low-fluences, an order of 10 13 ions/cm 2 . Subsequently, DNA states were analyzed using electrophoresis. Results provided evidences that the very low-energy and low-fluence ion bombardment indeed altered the DNA structure from supercoil to short linear fragments through multiple double strand breaks and thus induced mutation, which was confirmed by transfer of the bombarded DNA into bacteria Escherichia coli and subsequent expression of the marker gene.

  1. Influence of the ion bombardment of O{sub 2} plasmas on low-k materials

    Verdonck, Patrick, E-mail: verdonck@imec.be [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Samara, Vladimir [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Open University, Materials Engineering, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Goodyear, Alec [Open University, Materials Engineering, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ferchichi, Abdelkarim; Van Besien, Els; Baklanov, Mikhail R. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Braithwaite, Nicholas [Open University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-31

    In this study, special tests were devised in order to investigate the influence of ion bombardment on the damage induced in low-k dielectrics by oxygen plasmas. By placing a sample that suffered a lot of ion bombardment and one which suffered little ion bombardment simultaneously in the same plasma, it was possible to verify that ion bombardment in fact helped to protect the low-k film against oxygen plasma induced damage. Exhaustive analyses (ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, porosimetry, capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, water contact angle analysis) show that ion bombardment induced the formation of a denser top layer in the film, which then hampered further penetration of active oxygen species deeper into the bulk. This was further confirmed by other tests combining capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that, at least for these plasmas, ion bombardment may help to reduce plasma induced damage to low-k materials.

  2. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations

  3. Dynamic pressure measures for long pipeline leak detection

    Likun Wang; Hongchao Wang; Min Xiong; Bin Xu; Dongjie Tan; Hengzhang Zhou [PetroChina Pipeline Company, Langfang (China). R and D Center

    2009-07-01

    Pipeline leak detection method based on dynamic pressure is studied. The feature of dynamic pressure which is generated by the leakage of pipeline is analyzed. The dynamic pressure method is compared with the static pressure method for the advantages and disadvantages in pipeline leak detection. The dynamic pressure signal is suitable for pipeline leak detection for quick-change of pipeline internal pressure. Field tests show that the dynamic pressure method detects pipeline leak rapidly and precisely. (author)

  4. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G. [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  5. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  6. Exotic helium molecules; Molecules exotiques d'helium

    Portier, M

    2007-12-15

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}P{sub 0}) molecule, or a {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 {+-} 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range {sup 4}He{sub 2}(2{sup 3}S{sub 1}-2{sup 3}S{sub 1}) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime {tau} = (1.4 {+-} 0.3) {mu}s is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  7. Back bombardment for dispenser and lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    Mahmoud Bakr

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The back bombardment (BB effect limits wide usage of thermionic rf guns. The BB effect induces not only ramping-up of a cathode’s temperature and beam current, but also degradation of cavity voltage and beam energy during a macropulse. This paper presents a comparison of the BB effect for the case of dispenser tungsten-base (DC and lanthanum hexaboride (LaB_{6} thermionic rf gun cathodes. For each, particle simulation codes are used to simulate the BB effect and electron beam dynamics in a thermionic rf gun cathode. A semiempirical equation is also used to investigate the stopping range and deposited heat power of BB electrons in the cathode material. A numerical simulation method is used to calculate the change of the cathode temperature and current density during a single macropulse. This is done by solving two differential equations for the rf gun cavity equivalent circuit and one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation. High electron emission and small beam size are required for generation of a high-brightness electron beam, and so in this work the emission properties of the cathode are taken into account. Simulations of the BB effect show that, for a pulse of 6  μs duration, the DC cathode experiences a large change in the temperature compared with LaB_{6}, and a change in current density 6 times higher. Validation of the simulation results is performed using experimental data for beam current beyond the gun exit. The experimental data is well reproduced using the simulation method.

  8. Vehicle-based Methane Mapping Helps Find Natural Gas Leaks and Prioritize Leak Repairs

    von Fischer, J. C.; Weller, Z.; Roscioli, J. R.; Lamb, B. K.; Ferrara, T.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, mobile methane sensing platforms have been developed to detect and locate natural gas (NG) leaks in urban distribution systems and to estimate their size. Although this technology has already been used in targeted deployment for prioritization of NG pipeline infrastructure repair and replacement, one open question regarding this technology is how effective the resulting data are for prioritizing infrastructure repair and replacement. To answer this question we explore the accuracy and precision of the natural gas leak location and emission estimates provided by methane sensors placed on Google Street View (GSV) vehicles. We find that the vast majority (75%) of methane emitting sources detected by these mobile platforms are NG leaks and that the location estimates are effective at identifying the general location of leaks. We also show that the emission rate estimates from mobile detection platforms are able to effectively rank NG leaks for prioritizing leak repair. Our findings establish that mobile sensing platforms are an efficient and effective tool for improving the safety and reducing the environmental impacts of low-pressure NG distribution systems by reducing atmospheric methane emissions.

  9. Acoustic leak detection at complicated topologies using neural netwoks

    Hessel, G.; Schmitt, W.; Weiss, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    Considering the shortcomings of all the existing leak detecting principles, a new method again based on the measurement of the leak induced sound but also applying pattern recognition is being developed. The capability of neural networks to localize leaks at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head of VVER-440 reactors is discussed. (orig./DG)

  10. Damage phenomena at target surface by small leak

    Jeong, Kyung Chai; Jeong, J. Y.; Kim, B. H.; Kim, T. J.; Choi, J. H.

    2001-04-01

    Design of the steam generator should be considered the safety about the sodium-water reaction occurred by water leak in heat transfer tube. Water leak mainly occurred from welding defect at the process of tube connection, the vibration of heat transfer tube bundle in steam generating system, fretting, and pin hole in original tube manufacturing. The classification of water leak divided to two parts, roughly, in case of the water leak studies. One is small leak phenomena analysis, and the other is it of large leak which was mainly treated to the evaluation on pressure increasing from hydrogen gas formed by sodium-water reaction in sodium system. In small water leak, the leak propagation phenomena and the development of leak detecting system at initial stage of small water leak were studied, mainly. In this study, the corrosion phenomena on the target tube surface appeared by sodium-water reaction was analyzed through the small water leak experiments, and, also, the jet phenomena formed by N 2 gas injection through the leak nozzle under water medium was observed

  11. Small leak detection requirements for SNR-300 steam generator operation

    Dumm, K.

    1975-01-01

    The leak detection philosophy of the SNR-300 steam generators is described. Due to operational demands small leaks have already to be detectable at a stage where secondary tube damage has not yet occurred. The requirements on a leak detection instrument are developed and the instrument itself is described. (author)

  12. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program

  13. 1999 Leak Detection, Monitoring, and Mitigation Strategy Update

    OHL, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented

  14. Special storage of leaking fuel at Paks NPP

    Biro, Janos; Szőke, L.; Burján, T.; Lukács, R.; Hózer, H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the activities related with spent, hermetic as well as leaking fuel handling and storage, including: Spent fuel pool; Transportation criteria for the spent fuel assemblies and Interim spent fuel dry storage; Short-term storage in the spent fuel pool; Identification of the leaking assemblies by the TS-device; Present conception of Identification, handling of the leaking FAs; Modified transport procedure for the leaking FAs; Calculation of solved activity inside the leaking fuel rod; Solved activity limit values for the leaking FAs; Long-term storage in the interim spent Fuel dry storage are presented. At the end authors’ concluded that: 1) The leaking FA can be transported to the interim dry storage together with the other spent fuel assemblies in the transport container. 2) The transport-documentation of the leaking FA has to contain: isotope inventory, calculated solved activity values of the failed FA and the quantity of failed fuel rods. 3) Performing three leakage tests of the identified leaking FA before the transportation in the 5FP. it is useful to decrease the solved activity concentration inside the leaking FA and give additional information about the extent of the leakage. 4) We can calculate simply the solved activity of the leaking FA. 5) The modified transport procedure will have to be authorized. 6) The radiological effects of the leaking FA are negligible relative to the natural background radiation

  15. Final evaluation of advanced and current leak detection systems

    Kupperman, D.S.; Carlson, R.; Brewer, W.; Lanham, R.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the adequacy of leak detection systems in light water reactors. The sources of numerous reported leaks and methods of detection have been documented. Research to advance the state of the art of acoustic leak detection is presented, and procedures for implementation are discussed

  16. Automated leak localization performance without detailed demand distribution data

    Moors, Janneke; Scholten, L.; van der Hoek, J.P.; den Besten, J.

    2018-01-01

    Automatic leak localization has been suggested to reduce the time and personnel efforts needed to localize
    (small) leaks. Yet, the available methods require a detailed demand distribution model for successful
    calibration and good leak localization performance. The main aim of this work was

  17. Water leaks in sodium-heated fast reactor boilers

    Hayes, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    Constraints on plant design which may result from considerations of leak behaviour and leak detection limits are briefly considered. The sodium-water interface and reactions, the behaviour of small leaks, hydrogen bubbles and detection methods, including galvanic cell methods, are included. (UK)

  18. 40 CFR 63.648 - Equipment leak standards.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment leak standards. 63.648...) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.648 Equipment leak...) through (c)(10) and (e) through (i) of this section. (1) The instrument readings that define a leak for...

  19. 40 CFR 63.769 - Equipment leak standards.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment leak standards. 63.769... § 63.769 Equipment leak standards. (a) This section applies to equipment subject to this subpart and... release to detect leaks, except under the following conditions. (i) The owner or operator has obtained...

  20. 40 CFR 63.1331 - Equipment leak provisions.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment leak provisions. 63.1331... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1331 Equipment leak... in pumps and agitator seals in light liquid service shall not be considered to be a leak. For...

  1. 10 CFR 39.35 - Leak testing of sealed sources.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leak testing of sealed sources. 39.35 Section 39.35 Energy....35 Leak testing of sealed sources. (a) Testing and recordkeeping requirements. Each licensee who uses... record of leak test results in units of microcuries and retain the record for inspection by the...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1434 - Equipment leak provisions.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment leak provisions. 63.1434... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Polyether Polyols Production § 63.1434 Equipment leak provisions. (a) The owner or operator of each affected source shall comply with the HON equipment leak...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1410 - Equipment leak provisions.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment leak provisions. 63.1410... leak provisions. The owner or operator of each affected source shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 63, subpart UU (national emission standards for equipment leaks (control level 2)) for all...

  4. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in single...

  5. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing CPM...

  6. Small leak detection requirements for SNR-300 steam generator operation

    Dumm, K

    1975-07-01

    The leak detection philosophy of the SNR-300 steam generators is described. Due to operational demands small leaks have already to be detectable at a stage where secondary tube damage has not yet occurred. The requirements on a leak detection instrument are developed and the instrument itself is described. (author)

  7. Commercial helium reserves, continental rifting and volcanism

    Ballentine, C. J.; Barry, P. H.; Hillegonds, D.; Fontijn, K.; Bluett, J.; Abraham-James, T.; Danabalan, D.; Gluyas, J.; Brennwald, M. S.; Pluess, B.; Seneshens, D.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2017-12-01

    Helium has many industrial applications, but notably provides the unique cooling medium for superconducting magnets in medical MRI scanners and high energy beam lines. In 2013 the global supply chainfailed to meet demand causing significant concern - the `Liquid Helium Crisis' [1]. The 2017 closure of Quatar borders, a major helium supplier, is likely to further disrupt helium supply, and accentuates the urgent need to diversify supply. Helium is found in very few natural gas reservoirs that have focused 4He produced by the dispersed decay (a-particle) of U and Th in the crust. We show here, using the example of the Rukwa section of the Tanzanian East African Rift, how continental rifting and local volcanism provides the combination of processes required to generate helium reserves. The ancient continental crust provides the source of 4He. Rifting and associated magmatism provides the tectonic and thermal mechanism to mobilise deep fluid circulation, focusing flow to the near surface along major basement faults. Helium-rich springs in the Tanzanian Great Rift Valley were first identified in the 1950's[2]. The isotopic compositions and major element chemistry of the gases from springs and seeps are consistent with their release from the crystalline basement during rifting [3]. Within the Rukwa Rift Valley, helium seeps occur in the vicinity of trapping structures that have the potential to store significant reserves of helium [3]. Soil gas surveys over 6 prospective trapping structures (1m depth, n=1486) show helium anomalies in 5 out of the 6 at levels similar to those observed over a known helium-rich gas reservoir at 1200m depth (7% He - Harley Dome, Utah). Detailed macroseep gas compositions collected over two days (n=17) at one site allows us to distinguish shallow gas contributions and shows the deep gas to contain between 8-10% helium, significantly increasing resource estimates based on uncorrected values (1.8-4.2%)[2,3]. The remainder of the deep gas is

  8. Helium hammer in superfluid transfer

    Tward, E.; Mason, P. V.

    1984-01-01

    Large transient pressure pulses, referred to as a helium hammer, which occurred in the transfer line of the main cryogenic tank during the development tests of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, launched on January 25, 1983, are analyzed, and the measures taken to prevent a failure described. The modifications include an installation of a 2.3-liter surge tank upstream, and a back-up relief valve downstream, of a burst disk. The surge tank is designed to attenuate a 0.33-MPa pressure pulse at the inlet down to 0.092 MPa at the outlet. A mechanism of the pulse generation is suggested, which involves flashing and rapid recondensation of the small amount of liquid entering the warm section of a transition to room temperature.

  9. Leak detection of SF6 gas pressure vessel safety devices at BARC-TIFR Pelletron accelerator

    Ninawe, N.G.; Sharma, S.C.; Nair, J.P.; Sparrow, H.; Bolar, P.C.; Gudekar, P.V.; Mahapatra, S.; Vishwakarma, R.S.; Ramjilal; Matkar, U.V.; Gore, J.A.; Gupta, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Pelletron accelerator is in operation since last more than 26 years. To achieve desired voltage gradient SF6 gas of about 20 tons is used to have 75-80 psig pressure in main accelerator tank. During accelerator tank maintenance gas is transferred to four storage tanks, kept in open space in the vicinity of sea. Recently refurbishment and retrofitting of four storage tanks was carried out which includes the installation of new drift space, rupture disc assembly, relief valves and manual valves along with civil and painting work. All components to be installed were tested for high pressure. Helium gas sniffer technique was used to check micro leaks for new joints for all components before installing for storage tanks. Subsequently, the tanks were tested up to 90 psig SF6 gradually in succession. No pressure drop was observed in storage tanks. This work was carried out as per recommendation of the then particle accelerator committee (PASC). (author)

  10. Leak Detection Modeling and Simulation for Oil Pipeline with Artificial Intelligence Method

    Sukarno, Pudjo; Sidarto, Kuntjoro Adji; Trisnobudi, Amoranto; Setyoadi, Delint Ira; Rohani, Nancy; Darmadi, Darmadi

    2007-01-01

    Leak detection is always interesting research topic, where leak location and leak rate are two pipeline leaking parameters that should be determined accurately to overcome pipe leaking problems. In this research those two parameters are investigated by developing transmission pipeline model and the leak detection model which is developed using Artificial Neural Network. The mathematical approach needs actual leak data to train the leak detection model, however such data could not be obtained ...

  11. Intraoperative air leak measured after lobectomy is associated with postoperative duration of air leak.

    Brunelli, Alessandro; Salati, Michele; Pompili, Cecilia; Gentili, Paolo; Sabbatini, Armando

    2017-11-01

    To verify the association between the air leak objectively measured intraoperatively (IAL) using the ventilator and the air leak duration after pulmonary lobectomy. Prospective analysis on 111 patients submitted to pulmonary lobectomy (33 by video-assisted thoracic surgery). After resection, objective assessment of air leak (in milliliter per minute) was performed before closure of the chest by measuring the difference between a fixed inspired and expired volume, using a tidal volume of 8 ml/kg, a respiratory rate of 10 and a positive-end expiratory pressure of 5 cmH2O. A multivariable analysis was performed for identifying factors associated with duration of postoperative air leak. Average IAL was 158 ml/min (range 0-1500 ml/min). The best cut-off (receiver-operating characteristics analysis) associated with air leak longer than 5 days was 500 ml/min. Nine patients had IAL >500 ml/min (8%). They had a longer duration of postoperative air leak compared with those with a lower IAL (mean values, 10.1 days, SD 8.8 vs 1.5 days, SD 4.9 P leak duration after multivariable regression: left side resection (P = 0.018), upper site resection (P = 0.031) and IAL >500 ml/min (P leak duration was generated: 1.7 + 2.4 × left side + 2.2 × upper site + 8.8 × IAL >500. The air leak measurement using the ventilator parameters after lung resection may assist in estimating the risk of postoperative prolonged air leak. An IAL > 500 ml/min may warrant the use of intraoperative preventative measures, particularly after video-assisted thoracic surgery lobectomy where a submersion test is often unreliable. © 2017 European Society of Cardiology and European Atherosclerosis Association. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Novel Methods of Hydrogen Leak Detection

    Pushpinder S Puri

    2006-01-01

    For hydrogen to become a consumer fuel for automotive and domestic power generation, safety is paramount. Today's hydrogen systems are built with inherent safety measures and multiple levels of protection. However, human senses, in particular, the sense of smell, is considered the ultimate safeguards against leaks. Since hydrogen is an odorless gas, use of odorants to detect leaks, as is done in case of natural gas, is obvious solution. The odorants required for hydrogen used in fuel cells have a unique requirement which must be met. This is because almost all of the commercial odorants used in gas leak detection contain sulfur which acts as poison for the catalysts used in hydrogen based fuel cells, most specifically for the PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane or proton exchange membrane) fuel cells. A possible solution to this problem is to use non-sulfur containing odorants. Chemical compounds based on mixtures of acrylic acid and nitrogen compounds have been adopted to achieve a sulfur-free odorization of a gas. It is, therefore, desired to have a method and system for hydrogen leak detection using odorant which can incorporate a uniform concentration of odorant in the hydrogen gas, when odorants are mixed in the hydrogen storage or delivery means. It is also desired to develop methods where the odorant is not added to the bulk hydrogen, keeping it free of the odorization additives. A series of novel solutions are proposed which address the issues raised above. These solutions are divided into three categories as follows: 1. Methods incorporating an odorant in the path of hydrogen leak as opposed to adding it to the hydrogen gas. 2. Methods where odorants are generated in-situ by chemical reaction with the leaking hydrogen 3. Methods of dispensing and storing odorants in high pressure hydrogen gas which release odorants to the gas at a uniform and predetermined rates. Use of one or more of the methods described here in conjunction with appropriate engineering

  13. Application of acoustic leak detection technology for the detection and location of leaks in light water reactors

    Kupperman, D.S.; Prine, D.; Mathieson, T.

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the adequacy of leak detection systems in light water reactors. The sources of numerous reported leaks and methods of detection have been documented. Research to advance the state of the art of acoustic leak detection is presented, and procedures for implementation are discussed. 14 refs., 70 figs., 10 tabs

  14. Friendly fermions of helium-three

    Leggatt, T.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of helium in showing up the effects of atomic indistinguishability and as a material by which to test some of the most fundamental principles of quantum mechanics is discussed. Helium not only remains liquid down to zero temperature but of the two isotopes helium-three has intrinsic spin 1/2 and should therefore obey the Pauli principle, while helium-four has spin zero and is expected to undergo Bose condensation. Helium-three becomes superfluid at temperatures of a few thousandths of a degree above absolute zero by the bulk liquid collecting its atoms into spinning pairs. There are three different superfluid phases, now conveniently called A, B and A 1 and each is characterised by a different behaviour of the spin and/or relative angular motion of the atoms composing the Cooper pairs. Problems surrounding the complicated physical system of helium-three are discussed. It is suggested that the combined coherence and directionality of superfluid helium-three should create some fascinating physics. (U.K.)

  15. Seismological measurement of solar helium abundance

    Vorontsov, S.V.; Pamyatnykh, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The internal structure and evolution of the Sun depends on its chemical composition, particularly the helium abundance. In addition, the helium abundance in the solar envelope is thought to represent the protosolar value, making it a datum of cosmological significance. Spectroscopic measurements of the helium abundance are uncertain, and the most reliable estimates until now have come from the calibration of solar evolutionary models. The frequencies of solar acoustic oscillations are sensitive, however, to the behaviour of the speed of sound in the Sun's helium ionization zone, which allows a helioseismological determination of the helium abundance. Sound-speed inversion of helioseismological data can be used for this purpose, but precise frequency measurements of high-degree oscillation modes are needed. Here we describe a new approach based on an analysis of the phase shift of acoustic waves of intermediate-degree modes. From the accurate intermediate-mode data now available, we obtain a helium mass fraction Y=0.25±0.01 in the solar convection zone, significantly smaller than the value Y=0.27-0.29 predicted by recent solar evolutionary models. The discrepancy indicates either that initial helium abundance was reduced in the envelope by downward diffusion or that the protosolar value was lower than currently accepted. (author)

  16. Fluid pipeline leak detection and location with miniature RF tags

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    2017-05-16

    Sensors locate troublesome leaks in pipes or conduits that carry a flowing medium. These sensors, through tailored physical and geometric properties, preferentially seek conduit leaks or breaches due to flow streaming. The sensors can be queried via transceivers outside the conduit or located and interrogated inside by submersible unmanned vehicle to identify and characterize the nature of a leak. The sensors can be functionalized with other capabilities for additional leak and pipeline characterization if needed. Sensors can be recovered from a conduit flow stream and reused for future leak detection activities.

  17. Description and Operational Experiences of the Engineering Test Facility - Helium Technology (ETF-HT)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Yang Mingde; Bo Hanliang; Duan Riqqiang; Zhu Hongye

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the configuration of the Engineering Test Facility - Helium Technology (ETF-HT) and the information of its key components and subsystems, which is located in the Changping campus of Tsinghua University. The ETF-HT facility began to be constructed in Jan. 2009. The main objective of the facility is to test and verify the thermo-hydraulic performance of one full-sized modular unit of HTR-PM helically coiled SG assembly. In the ETF-HT facility, electricity energy is used to heat the loop helium, centrifugal blower is used to circulate the helium medium, and the heat sink is one would-tested SG module. Up to now, except for the tested SG module, preheater and hot gas duct under way of construction, the other components has been installed in situ. Via the temporary connection of the installed components, the preliminary operation of the loop has been carried out to test its performances as can be done, which include the loop leak tightness, blower pneumatic performance and electrical heater at partial thermal load. (author)

  18. Test results from a helium gas-cooled porous metal heat exchanger

    North, M.T.; Rosenfeld, J.H.; Youchison, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    A helium-cooled porous metal heat exchanger was built and tested, which successfully absorbed heat fluxes exceeding all previously tested gas-cooled designs. Helium-cooled plasma-facing components are being evaluated for fusion applications. Helium is a favorable coolant for fusion devices because it is not a plasma contaminant, it is not easily activated, and it is easily removed from the device in the event of a leak. The main drawback of gas coolants is their relatively poor thermal transport properties. This limitation can be removed through use of a highly efficient heat exchanger design. A low flow resistance porous metal heat exchanger design was developed, based on the requirements for the Faraday shield for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) device. High heat flux tests were conducted on two representative test articles at the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) at Sandia National Laboratories. Absorbed heat fluxes as high as 40 MW/m 2 were successfully removed during these tests without failure of the devices. Commercial applications for electronics cooling and other high heat flux applications are being identified

  19. Closed-loop helium circulation system for actuation of a continuously operating heart catheter pump.

    Karabegovic, Alen; Hinteregger, Markus; Janeczek, Christoph; Mohl, Werner; Gföhler, Margit

    2017-06-09

    Currently available, pneumatic-based medical devices are operated using closed-loop pulsatile or open continuous systems. Medical devices utilizing gases with a low atomic number in a continuous closed loop stream have not been documented to date. This work presents the construction of a portable helium circulation addressing the need for actuating a novel, pneumatically operated catheter pump. The design of its control system puts emphasis on the performance, safety and low running cost of the catheter pump. Static and dynamic characteristics of individual elements in the circulation are analyzed to ensure a proper operation of the system. The pneumatic circulation maximizes the working range of the drive unit inside the catheter pump while reducing the total size and noise production.Separate flow and pressure controllers position the turbine's working point into the stable region of the pressure creation element. A subsystem for rapid gas evacuation significantly decreases the duration of helium removal after a leak, reaching subatmospheric pressure in the intracorporeal catheter within several milliseconds. The system presented in the study offers an easy control of helium mass flow while ensuring stable behavior of its internal components.

  20. Wobbling The Galactic Disk with Bombardment of Satellite Galaxies

    D'Onghia, Elena

    We propose to assess the effect of impacts of large visible satellite galaxies on a disk, as well as the relevance of the continuing bombardment of the Galactic disk by dark matter clumps as predicted by the current cosmological framework that can wobble the disk, heating it and eventually exciting ragged spiral structures. In particular, we make detailed predictions for observable features such as spiral arms, rings and their associated stars in galactic disks and relate them to the physical processes that drive their formation and evolution in our Milky Way galaxy and nearby spirals. To do this, we will combine analytic methods and numerical simulations that allow us to calculate observables, which we will compare to present and forthcoming observations. Our methodology utilizes a combination of state of the art hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy evolution and multi- wavelength radiative transfer simulations. Our primary goals are: (1) To identify the physical processes that are responsible for spiral structure formation observed in our Milky Way and nearby disk galaxies, from the flocculent to grand- designed spiral galaxies and to provide observable signatures to be compared with data on nearby galaxies combining maps of 24 micron emission (Spitzer) and cold gas, CO (Heracles) and HI (THINGS). (2) To explore different morphologies of spiral galaxies: from the multi-armed galaxies to the Milky Way sized galaxies with few arms. (3) For a Milky Way disk we will assess the effect of impacts of substructures passing through the disk to origin the asymmetry in the number density of stars recently discovered from SDSS and SEGUE data and confirmed from RAVE data. We will also investigate the disk heating in the vertical plane due to the formation of vertical oscillations that are produced by the impact and migration of stars in the disk as consequence of the heating as compared to the classical stellar migration mechanism. (4) We will measure the spiral pattern speed