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Sample records for helicobacter pylori-infected mongolian

  1. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. METHODS: A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. RESULTS: Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P gastritis changed from antrum-predominant gastritis to corpus-predominant gastritis with age in both populations. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer was located in the upper part of the stomach in half of the Mongolian patients; Mongolian patients were infected with non-East-Asian-type H. pylori. PMID:26217093

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007715.htm Helicobacter pylori infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori ) is a type of bacteria that ...

  3. Inhibitory effect of green tea catechins in combination with sucralfate on Helicobacter pylori infection in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Fumiyo; Harada, Noboru; Yamada, Masami; Murohisa, Binzaburo; Oguni, Itaro

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori has been reported. It is desirable to develop an effective method to prevent the occurrence of resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori. Green tea catechins (GTCs) have been reported to have an antibacterial effect. Therefore, the possibility of eradicating Helicobacter pylori by the oral administration of GTCs was investigated. Solutions of GTCs and solutions of GTCs adsorbed to sucralfate (GTC-scf), at concentrations of 20 mg GTCs and/or 20 mg sucralfate/ml were prepared. Then 1 ml of the GTC-scf or the GTC solution was administered daily, for 10 days to Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori. Then the stomachs were extirpated and homogenized. The homogenate was spread on selective medium plates. After 5-day culture, colony-forming units (CFU) of Helicobacter pylori were counted. The CFU of Helicobacter pylori was significantly decreased by GTC-scf. GTC-scf may have a bactericidal effect on Helicobacter pylori infection.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection. A...

  5. Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    90%, the sequential therapy seems to have a potential of becoming the standard first-line treatment for H pylori infection in the interim, while search is being made for the ideal antimicrobial monotherapy. . Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, Dyspepsia, Gastric cancer, Gastric Ulcer, Duodenal ulcer. INTRODUCTION. 1. Since the ...

  6. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to

  7. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is significantly high in rural and suburban population of Ernakulam district, Kerala. Early detection and prompt treatment are essential for prevention of serious complications. Keywords: Gastrointestinal complications, Helicobacter pylori infection, Histopathological ...

  8. Apigenin has anti-atrophic gastritis and anti-gastric cancer progression effects in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Weng, Bi-Chuang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wu, Deng-Chang; Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-02-12

    Apigenin, one of the most common flavonoids, is abundant in celery, parsley, chamomile, passionflower, and other vegetables and fruits. Celery is recognized as a medicinal vegetable in Oriental countries to traditionally treat inflammation, swelling, blood pressure, serum lipid, and toothache. In this study, we investigated apigenin treatment effects on Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression in Mongolian gerbils. Five to eight-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori for four weeks without (atrophic gastritis group) or with N'-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) (gastric cancer group) in drinking water, and were then rested for two weeks. During the 7th-32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 7th-52th (gastric cancer group) weeks, they were given various doses (0-60 mg/kgbw/day) of apigenin. At the end of the 32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 52th (atrophic gastritis group) week, all Mongolian gerbils were sacrificed using the CO2 asphyxia method. The histological changes of Helicobacter pylori colonization, neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations, and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils were examined using immunohistochemistry stain and Sydney System scoring. Apigenin treatments (30-60 mg/kgbw/day) effectively decreased atrophic gastritis (atrophic gastritis group) and dysplasia/gastric cancer (gastric cancer group) rates in Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin treatment (60 mg/kgbw/day) significantly decreased Helicobacter pylori colonization and Helicobacter pylori-induced histological changes of neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin has the remarkable ability to inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression as well as possessing potent anti-gastric cancer activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Raymond, Josette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in children differs from that in adults, from the point of view of epidemiology, host response, clinical features, related diseases, and diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. The prevalence of H. pylori infection, in both children and adults, is decreasing in the Western World as well as in some developing countries, which contrasts with the increase in childhood asthma and allergic diseases. Recurrent abdominal pain is not specific during H. pylori infection in children. The role of H. pylori infection and failure to thrive, children's growth, type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease remains controversial. The main initial diagnosis is based on upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy-based methods. Nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. The infection eradication control is based on validated noninvasive tests. The main cause of treatment failure of H. pylori infection is its clarithromycin resistance. We recommend standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of H. pylori in pediatric patients prior to the initiation of eradication therapy. H. pylori treatment in children should be based on an evaluation of the rate of eradication in the local population, a systematic use of a treatment adapted to the susceptibility profile and a treatment compliance greater than 90%. The last meta-analysis in children did not show an advantage for sequential therapy when compared to a 14-day triple therapy. Finally, the high rate of antibiotic resistance responsible for therapy failure in recent years justifies the necessity of a novel vaccine to prevent H. pylori infection in children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Among Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was seen. Conclusion: The prevalence of H. pylori infection is significantly high in rural and suburban population of Ernakulam district, Kerala. Early detection and prompt treatment are essential for prevention of serious complications. Keywords: Gastrointestinal complications, Helicobacter pylori infection, Histopathological ...

  11. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nysaeter, G.; Berstad, K.; Weberg, R.; Berstad, A.; Hardardottir, H.

    1992-01-01

    By employing the 14 C-urea breath test as the reference methods the authors determined the specificity and sensitivity of three bioptic methods for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in 103 subjects. All biopsy specimens were obtained from the gastric antrum. For culture the specificity was 100%. Its applicability was reduced, however, by a low sensitivity (73.8%) and a delay of several days before the final result was available. Microscopy of Loeffler-stained biopsy smears yielded a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 92.9%, but the method was regarded time-consuming. The rapid urease test yielded a specificity of 98.4% and a sensitivity of 85.7%. Being quick, simple and inexpensive, the rapid urease test is well suited for routine use in gastroscopy. 17 refs., 4 tabs

  12. Inhibitory effect of etodolac, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on stomach carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magari, Hirohito; Shimizu, Yasuhito; Inada, Ken-ichi; Enomoto, Shotaro; Tomeki, Tatsuji; Yanaoka, Kimihiko; Tamai, Hideyuki; Arii, Kenji; Nakata, Hiroya; Oka, Masashi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Tatematsu, Masae; Ichinose, Masao

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the selective COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, on Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-associated stomach carcinogenesis was investigated in Mongolian gerbils (MGs). Hp-infected MGs were fed for 23 weeks with drinking water containing 10 ppm N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. They were then switched to distilled water and placed on a diet containing 5-30 mg/kg/day etodolac for 30 weeks. We found that etodolac dose-dependently inhibited the development of gastric cancer, and no cancer was detected at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day. Etodolac did not affect the extent of inflammatory cell infiltration or oxidative DNA damage, but it significantly inhibited mucosal cell proliferation and dose-dependently repressed the development of intestinal metaplasia in the stomachs of Hp-infected MGs. These results suggest that COX-2 is a key molecule in inflammation-mediated stomach carcinogenesis and that chemoprevention of stomach cancer should be possible by controlling COX-2 expression or activity

  13. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18...... prevalence of H. pylori infection was 39.2%. There was a clear inverse dose-response-relation between reported alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection. The relation persisted after control for potential confounding factors. The adjusted prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) for H. pylori infection...... among persons who consumed up to 10, 10 to 20, and more than 20 gm of alcohol per day compared with non-drinkers were 0.93 (0.77-1.13), 0.82 (0.65-1.04), and 0.71 (0.55-0.92). The inverse relation between alcohol consumption and H. pylori infection was even stronger when individuals with an indication...

  14. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burucoa, Christophe; Axon, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    The study of Helicobacter pylori genetic variability brought us interesting data on the history of mankind. Based on multilocus sequence typing and more recently on whole-genome sequencing, paleomicrobiology still attracts the attention of global researchers in relation to its ancestor roots and coexistence with humans. Three studies determining the prevalence of virulence factors illustrates the controversial results obtained since 30 years by studies trying to associate prevalence of different virulence markers and clinical outcomes of H. pylori infection. Three articles analyzed the prevalence and risk of multiple (genetically distinct isolates) and mixed (susceptible and resistant isolates) infections. A number of studies confirm that H. pylori prevalence is falling worldwide especially in the developed world and in children but that the level of infection is higher in certain ethnic minorities and in Migrants. There is little new in identifying the mode of H. pylori transmission though intrafamilial spread appears to be important. There have, however, been some interesting papers on the presence of the organism in food, water, and the oral cavity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferritin...... in 1987/1988. The examination included a detailed questionnaire on medical history and lifestyle factors, a 7-day food record, and blood samples. Infection with H. pylori was measured serologically by ELISA and Westernblot. RESULTS: In total, 39.2% of 1806 persons aged 18 to 89 yr included in the study...... were H. pylori positive, of whom 57.6% had an infection with a CagA-positive H. pylori strain. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean of ferritin was 54.5 microg/dl among H. pylori-infected compared with 63.8 microg/dl among uninfected persons. A multiple linear regression model with log...

  17. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with peptic ulcer disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection has been identified as an important risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and is probably the most important cause of relapse in those previously treated for peptic ulcer disease. The aim of this study was to determine the association of Helicobacter pylori infection as ...

  18. Helicobacter Pylori Infection in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ming Liou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly often seek medical attention because of gastroduodenal diseases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is associated with several gastroduodenal diseases and its prevalence increases with age worldwide. It is estimated that 10–15% of infected patients will have peptic ulcer disease and 1% of patients will have gastric cancer or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Notably, the most severe clinical outcomes, i.e., gastric cancer and complicated peptic ulcer diseases, usually occur in elderly patients. Thus the test-and-treatment strategy is not recommended for elderly patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia. However, biopsy specimens for the rapid urease test and histology should be taken from both the antrum and corpus to increase the detection rate in elderly patients, especially in those with atrophic gastritis. The urea breath test may increase the detection rate if the rapid urease test or histology are negative in elderly patients with atrophic gastritis. Standard triple therapy and sequential therapy can achieve satisfactory eradication rates for H. pylori in elderly patients. Elderly patients with peptic ulcers may have a similar benefit from treatment of H. pylori infection as non-elderly patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection may also lead to improvement in histologic grading of gastritis, but the risk of gastric cancer cannot be completely reduced, especially in patients with existing premalignant lesions.

  19. Relationship between childhood asthma and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the correlation between childhood asthma and Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods: A total of 80 children with asthma who were treated in our hospital from May 2012 to May 2015 were selected as the research subjects, and 40 cases of healthy children were selected as control group, the Helicobacter pylori infection of the two groups of patients were compared, the double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the serum Helicobacter pylori-IgG, Helicobacter pylori-CagAIgG, IL-4, Helicobacter pylori, IFN-γ and IL-1β, etc., and the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma was analyzed. Results: The positive rates of Helicobacter pylori infection in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly higher than those in control group and children in remission stage (P<0.05. The positive rates of serum Helicobacter pylori-IgG and Helicobacter pylori-CagAIgG in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly lower than those in control group and children in remission stage (P<0.05. The serum levels of IFN-γ in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly lower than those in control group and children in remission stage, IL-4 and IL-1β levels in the former were significantly higher than those in the latter (P<0.05. Helicobacter pylori infection positive had significant positive correlation with IL-1β concentration (r=0.75, P<0.05. Conclusions: Helicobacter pylori infection in children has significant positive correlation with the incidence of asthma, suggesting that Helicobacter pylori infection has a certain protective effect on childhood asthma, but persistent Helicobacter pylori infection in children with asthma can aggravate the immune disorder, which is the main reason for the difficulty of treatment of asthma.

  20. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and nonmalignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjomina, Olga; Heluwaert, Frederic; Moussata, Driffa; Leja, Marcis

    2017-09-01

    A substantial decrease in Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease has been observed during the last decades. Drug-related ulcers as well as idiopathic ulcers are becoming predominant and are more refractory to treatment; however, H. pylori infection still plays an important role in ulcer bleeding and recurrence after therapy. The effect of H. pylori eradication upon functional dyspepsia symptoms has been reviewed in this article and generally confirms the results of previous meta-analyses. Additional evidence suggests a lack of impact upon the quality of life, in spite of improvement in symptoms. The association of H. pylori with gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus remains controversial with a majority of published studies showing a negative association. Furthermore, a strong inverse relationship between the presence of H. pylori and the esophageal eosinophilia was also reported. Several studies and a review addressed the role of H. pylori in autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia. The association of the above still remains controversial. Finally, the necessity of routine endoscopy and H. pylori eradication before bariatric surgery is discussed. Several studies suggest the rationale of preoperative upper endoscopy and H. pylori eradication prior to surgery. However, the prevalence of H. pylori infection prior to surgery in these studies generally reflects the overall prevalence of the infection in the particular geographic area. In addition, results on the role of H. pylori in developing postoperative complications remain controversial. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients undergoing appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, T E; Atmatzidis, K S; Papaziogas, B T; Souparis, A; Koutelidakis, I M; Papaziogas, T B

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been found in the upper gastrointestinal tract; it is incriminated as aetiological factor in various pathological conditions. This prospective study assesses the presence of this microorganism in the appendix flora and the possible role of its infection in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis. H. pylori was investigated in 46 consecutive patients undergoing emergent appendectomy for presumed acute appendicitis. Blood sample for serological test of H. pylori infection was drawn before operation. The removed appendix specimen was stained for H. pylori; confirmation was made by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis. The intensity of inflammation was determined pathologically grading from no inflammation to gangrenous appendicitis. Statistical analysis was made using the chi-square test. Seropositivity for H. pylori infection was found in 18 patients (39%), but the microbe was detected in just two appendix specimens (4%). In all seropositive patients acute appendicitis was confirmed by the pathology study; serous (33%) and purulent or gangrenous (67%). The latter incidence in the seronegative patients was 50%. There were found eight specimens (17%) negative for inflammation dealing all with seronegative patients. It seems that H. pylori colonizes the appendix in small proportion and is unlikely to be associated in direct correlation with acute appendicitis. However, seropositive patients with acute inflammation are likely to suffer from purulent or gangrenous form.

  3. Relation between Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adianez Sugrañes-Montalván

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: In the present study, the relationship between chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori infection was demonstrated. Apparently, the eradicating treatment for Helicobacter pylori was effective as the patients had no symptoms after treatment. Specific immunoglobulin G and Urease Test together constitute a suitable diagnostic module for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori conditions.

  4. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Céu; Seruca, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... of the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection: past, present and future | Jemilohun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori infection: past, present and future. ... The discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) by Warren and Marshall in 1982 was preceded by nearly a hundred year of inconspicuous publications in ... A major challenge is the absence of a specific antibiotic monotherapy for effective treatment of the infection.

  7. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  8. Rescue Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier P. Gisbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. After 30 years of experience in H. pylori treatment, however, the ideal regimen to treat this infection has still to be found. Nowadays, apart from having to know well first-line eradication regimens, we must also be prepared to face treatment failures. In designing a treatment strategy, we should not only focus on the results of primary therapy alone but also on the final—overall—eradication rate. The choice of a “rescue” treatment depends on which treatment is used initially. If a first-line clarithromycin-based regimen was used, a second-line metronidazole-based treatment (quadruple therapy may be used afterwards, and then a levofloxacin-based combination would be a third-line “rescue” option. Alternatively, it has recently been suggested that levofloxacin-based “rescue” therapy constitutes an encouraging 2nd-line strategy, representing an alternative to quadruple therapy in patients with previous PPI-clarithromycin-amoxicillin failure, with the advantage of efficacy, simplicity and safety. In this case, quadruple regimen may be reserved as a 3rd-line “rescue” option. Even after two consecutive failures, several studies have demonstrated that H. pylori eradication can finally be achieved in almost all patients if several “rescue” therapies are consecutively given.

  9. Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection | Jemilohun | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review aims at outlining the various diagnostic and therapeutic options available to the clinician in the management of H. pylori infection with an appraisal of their strength and weaknesses. Relevant literatures on diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection in texts and journals were reviewed. Extensive internet ...

  10. Development of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the stomach. However, gastric cancer only develops in a minority of infected individuals. Such clinical diversity is caused by variations in the interactions between H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and environmental factors. Based on evidence from three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori has a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. Two large-scale, prospective, epidemiological studies have recently been reported in Japan and have confirmed that H. pylori infection constitutes a high risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, at least in males. In order to obtain evidence that eradication of H. pylori leads to a reduction in the occurrence of gastric cancer, reversibility of precancerous lesions, gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia should be proven after eradication treatment. A biopsy specimen from the lesser curvature of the corpus is the most sensitive for evaluating the regression of gastric atrophy on histology, and the evaluation needs be conducted at least 13 months after treatment. In a Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens, it has been demonstrated that H. pylori can lead to the development of gastric cancer. Experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori interact with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster; it encodes the type IV secretion machinery system forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird phenotype, a growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection in apparently healthy South Indian children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurpad, A.V.; Caszo, B.; Raj, T.; Vaz, M.

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has been established as a major cause of chronic gastritis in adults, and it has been implicated in the genesis of gastric carcinomas and the development of gastric and duodenal ulcers. It is now postulated that neatly 90% of the adult population in developing countries may be affected with the infection since childhood. Earlier studies on Indians using serology and endoscopic biopsy have shown a high incidence of H. pylori infection in small numbers of patients. The 13 C-urea breath test, which is simple, specific and non-invasive, is also increasingly being used to determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Preliminary data from India has shown a high prevalence in the urban Indian environment, and there is an urgent need to quantify the prevalence of H. pylori infections on an epidemiological basis in both urban and rural settings. It is also important to study the possible impact of this infection on growth in children, particularly in environments with low sanitation and high crowding. In this paper, we outline a proposal to study the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections in children from the following different environments: urban middle socio-economic class, urban slum, rural middle socio-economic class and rural village. (author)

  12. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Anemia in Taiwanese Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Yao Shih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA are common in adults. Although the most common causes of IDA usually arise from the gastrointestinal tract, the association between chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and anemia remains unclear. Aim. To evaluate the association of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and IDA. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 882 patients from January 2010 to April 2013. The status of Helicobacter pylori (H.p infection was confirmed and blood samples from the same participants were taken on the same day to check the level of hemoglobin, serum iron, ferritin, and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC. Results. No significant difference was noted from the demographic data. The average level of hemoglobin (Hb was not different between negative and positive groups, pos 13.57 g/dL versus neg 13.65 g/dL (P=0.699. Although the levels of serum IDA related parameters were expected in positive group (lower serum iron and ferritin and higher TIBC these differences did not reach statistical significance (P=0.824 for iron, P=0.360 for ferritin, and P=0.252 for TIBC. Conclusion. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is not attributed to IDA. The levels of hemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin, and TIBC remain unaffected after chronic H.p infection. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to prove the association.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection and typhoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Verspaget, H.W.; Ali, S.; Visser, L.G.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the association between typhoid fever and Helicobacter pylori infection, as the latter microorganism may influence gastric acid secretion and consequently increase susceptibility to Salmonella typhi infection. Anti-H. pylori IgG and IgA antibody titres (ELISA) and gastrin concentration

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis | Ebule | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Helicobacter pylori-infection associated gastritis is known to be a significant risk factor of gastric cancer. Serum levels of Gastrin-17 and Pepsinogen1which are respectively biomarkers of gastric antral and corpus mucosal activity are well known parameters of atrophic gastritis. Objectives: To determine the ...

  15. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic Ghanaian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archampong, Timothy Nii Akushe; Asmah, Richard Harry; Wiredu, Edwin Kwame; Gyasi, Richard Kwasi; Nkrumah, Kofi Nyaako; Rajakumar, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative urease-producing bacterium causally linked with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is more frequent and acquired at an earlier age in developing countries compared to European populations. The incidence of Helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic Ghanaian patients was 75.4%. However, epidemiological factors associated with infection vary across populations. This study used a cross-sectional design to consecutively sample dyspeptic patients at the Endoscopy Unit of the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra between 2010 and 2012. The study questionnaire elicited their epidemiological clinical characteristics. Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by rapid-urease examination of antral biopsies at upper Gastro-intestinal endoscopy. The sample population of dyspeptic patients attending the Endoscopy Unit for upper GI endoscopy yielded 242 patients of which 47.5% were females. The age distribution of H. pylori-infection was even across most age - groups, ranging from 69.2% (61 - 70) years to 80% (21 - 30) years. Helicobacter pylori prevalence decreased across areas mapping to the three residential classes in accordance with increasing affluence with rural areas having the highest prevalence. The unemployed and patients in farming had relatively high Helicobacter pylori infection rates of 92.3% and 91.7% respectively. Helicobacter pylori is endemic in Ghana but the persistently high prevalence across age groups despite significant community anti-microbial use suggests likely recrudescence or re-infection from multiple sources in a developing country. Socio-cultural factors such as residential class and farming may be facilitating factors for its continued prevalence.

  16. [Helicobacter pylori infection in children and socio-economic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciorkowska, Elzbieta; Cieśla, Justyna Maria; Kaczmarski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find a correlation between the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and their accommodation and socio-economic conditions. The results of questionnaire studies were analyzed and levels of IgG specific antibodies against H. pylori were assessed in children randomly chosen in the north-east of Poland at the level of a district, county and province city. The incidence of H. pylori infection in the studied children was varied and depended on the living place. The highest percentage of the infected was revealed in a district (40.4%) and the lowest in a province city (19.0%). There was a correlation between H. pylori infection and socio-economic conditions. The highest percentage of the infected children (59.7%) was found in families whose income was within the first income tax group. The incidence of the infection was also determined by the type of a flat, the number of members in a family, water intake and personal hygiene. 1) the highest incidence of H. pylori infection in children was found in a county, the lowest in a province city. 2) environmental and socio-economic conditions influence the presence of H. pylori infection in children.

  17. Relationship of Halitosis with Gastric Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz HajiFattahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori may be one of the main causes of halitosis. This study was performed to evaluate the relationship of Heli- cobacter pylori infection with halitosis.Materials and Methods: This case control study was performed on 44 dyspeptic patients with a mean age of 34.29±13.71 years (range 17 to 76 years. The case group included 22 patients with halitosis and no signs of diabetes mellitus, renal or liver failure, upper respiratory tract infection, malignancies, deep carious teeth, severe  periodontitis,  coated  tongue,  dry  mouth  or poor  oral  hygiene.  Control group included 22 patients without halitosis and the same age, sex, systemic and oral conditions as the case group. Halitosis was evaluated using organoleptic test (OLT and Helicobacter pylori infection was evaluated by Rapid Urease Test (RUT during endoscopy. The data were statistically analyzed using chi square, Mann Whitney and t-tests.Results: Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 20 (91% out of 22 halitosis patients, and 7 control subjects (32% (P<0.001.Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori gastric infection can be a cause of bad breath. Dentists should pay more attention to this infection and refer these patients to in- ternists to prevent further gastrointestinal (GI complications and probable malig- nancies.

  18. Evidence of mother-child transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar,Mario Luis; Kawakami,Elisabete

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low socioeconomical status is a major risk factor for natural acquisition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in developing countries. Its transmission route is unknown but studies suggest person-to-person transmission. AIM: To evaluate seropositivity of anti-H. pylori antibodies in family members of infected symptomatic index patients as compared to family members of symptomatic uninfected index patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and twelve family members of 38 ...

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection affects mitochondrial function and DNA repair, thus, mediating genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Desler, Claus; Boggild, Sisse

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is an important factor for the development of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms explaining the effects of H. pylori infection are not fully elucidated. H. pylori infection is known to induce genetic instability in both nuclear and....... pylori infection, furthermore, the results demonstrate that multiple DNA repair activities are involved in protecting mtDNA during infection. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Systematic review: Helicobacter pylori infection and impaired drug absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, E; Annibale, B; Delle Fave, G

    2009-02-15

    Impaired acid secretion may affect drug absorption and may be consequent to corporal Helicobacter pylori-gastritis, which may affect the absorption of orally administered drugs. To focus on the evidence of impaired drug absorption associated with H. pylori infection. Data sources were the systematic search of MEDLINE/EMBASE/SCOPUS databases (1980-April 2008) for English articles using the keywords: drug malabsorption/absorption, stomach, Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, gastric acid, gastric pH, hypochlorhydria, gastric hypoacidity. Study selection was made from 2099 retrieved articles, five studies were identified. Data were extracted from selected papers, investigated drugs, study type, main features of subjects, study design, intervention type and results were extracted. In all, five studies investigated impaired absorption of l-dopa, thyroxine and delavirdine in H. pylori infection. Eradication treatment led to 21-54% increase in l-dopa in Parkinson's disease. Thyroxine requirement was higher in hypochlorhydric goitre with H. pylori-gastritis and thyrotropin levels decreased by 94% after treatment. In H. pylori- and HIV-positive hypochlorhydric subjects, delavirdine absorption increased by 57% with orange juice administration and by 150% after eradication. A plausible mechanism of impaired drug absorption is decreased acid secretion in H. pylori-gastritis patients. Helicobacter pylori infection and hypochlorhydria should be considered in prescribing drugs the absorption of which is potentially affected by intragastric pH.

  1. Serum prolidase activity and oxidative status in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Mehmet; Nazligul, Yasar; Horoz, Mehmet; Bolukbas, Cengiz; Bolukbas, Fusun F; Aksoy, Nurten; Celik, Hakim; Erel, Ozcan

    2007-01-01

    During the course of Helicobacter pylori infection, increased oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal mucosal inflammation, which can cause gastric mucosal atrophy that characterized by the replacement of the gastric mucosal glands by collagen fibers. In the present study, we aimed to determine serum prolidase activity and oxidative status, and to find out if there is any association between serum prolidase activity and oxidative status in H. pylori infection. Forty H. pylori-positive and 32 H. pylori-negative subjects were enrolled. Serum prolidase activity was measured spectrophotometrically. Oxidative status was determined using total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status measurement and calculation of oxidative stress index. Total antioxidant capacity level was lower in H. pylori-positive group than H. pylori-negative group (ptotal oxidant status, oxidative stress index and prolidase activity were higher (all ptotal antioxidant capacity, total oxidant status and oxidative stress index (p<0.01, r=-0.367; p<0.05, r=0.283; p<0.01, r=0.379; respectively) in H. pylori-positive subjects. H. pylori infection may be associated with increased oxidative stress and increased serum prolidase activity. Increased oxidative stress seems to be associated with increased serum prolidase activity and this association may help to provide a better understanding about the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection.

  2. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer.

  3. Correlation between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Intra Ocular Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatamizadeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of blindness. It is estimated that more than 60 million people suffer from this disease of all over the world. In other hand helicobacter pylori is a gram negative bacillus that is reported in some extra-gastrointestinal system diseases recently. This study is designed to determine the association between helicobacter pylori infection and intra-ocular pressure. Methods: This was an analytical cross-sectional study that was conducted on 74 persons who were randomly selected after referring to endoscopy ward of Shohadaye Kargar hospital of Yazd in 2009. Data was analyzed by Mann-Whitney U and fisher exact tests using SPSS software (ver16. Results: Mean of intra-ocular pressure in positive helicobacter pylori group was more than negative helicobacter pylori group but there was no significant relationship (P value > 0.05, also there was no significant relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes, hypertension, hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism (P value > 0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, more detailed studies with larger sample size are required for more reliable decisions also considering the confounder variables can help us to determine the common risk factors of these two outcomes.

  4. Animal models for the study of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Miszczyk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacillus Helicobacter pylori is widely recognized as a major etiologic agent responsible for chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcers, the development of gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. Still, little is known about the natural history of H. pylori infection, since patients usually after many years of not suffering from symptoms of the infection are simply asymptomatic. Since the research investigators carried out on human models has many limitations, there is an urgent need for the development of an animal model optimal and suitable for the monitoring of H. pylori infections. This review summarizes the recent findings on the suitability of animal models used in H. pylori research. Several animal models are useful for the assessment of pathological, microbiological and immunological consequences of infection, which makes it possible to monitor the natural

  5. "Helicobacter Pylori" Infection in Five Inpatient Units for People with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Vemuri, Murali; Gunatilake, Deepthi; Tewari, Sidhartha

    2008-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of "Helicobacter pylori" infection has been reported among people with intellectual disability, especially those residing in hospital and similar settings. Surveys of inpatients have found unusually high rates of gastrointestinal malignancy, to which "H. pylori" infection predisposes. Methods: "Helicobacter pylori"…

  6. Possible association between Helicobacter pylori infection and vocal fold leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chen, Jian; Yang, Yue; Cheng, Lei; Wu, Hai-Tao

    2018-03-06

    Several studies have indicated the larynx as possible Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) reservoirs. This study explored the association between H. pylori and vocal fold leukoplakia. The case-control study involved 51 patients with vocal fold leukoplakia and 35 control patients with vocal polyps. Helicobacter pylori was detected in tissues by the rapid urease test, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and single-step PCR. The H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin antibodies were detected in plasma by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Helicobacter pylori-positive rate of vocal fold leukoplakia and vocal polyps was 23.5% versus 11.4% (P = .157), 37.2% versus 14.3% (P = .020), 27.5% versus 8.6% (P = .031), and 70.6% versus 68.6% (P = .841) detected by rapid urease test, nested PCR, single-step PCR, and ELISA, respectively. Regression analysis indicated that H. pylori infection (P = .044) was the independent risk factor for vocal fold leukoplakia. Helicobacter pylori infection exists in the larynx and may be associated with vocal fold leukoplakia. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Breastfeeding and helicobacter pylori infection in children with digestive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monajemzadeh, Maryam; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Vakilian, Fatemeh; Mahjoub, Fatemeh; Alam, Milad; Kashef, Nasim

    2010-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of breastfeeding in the acquisition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Iran and to compare the histopathologic changes occurring in children feeding on breast milk with those in infants feeding on formula. In a case-control study parents of children with and without H. pylori infection who had undergone endoscopic survey and gastric biopsy in the Children's Medical Center, Tehran, were asked about their feeding practices during the first 6 months after birth, the duration of breastfeeding period, the symptoms, and the duration of symptoms and concomitant diseases. A total of 154 children were included in this study. From this sample, 77 children formed the case group and 77 children formed the control group. A significant difference was found between H. pylori infection and feeding with formula (P=0.045). In case group, a significant difference was found between breastfeeding and age of the infected child (P=0.034), shorter duration of symptoms (P=0.016), and finally degree of H. pylori colonization (P=0.021). It appears that breastfeeding in the first 6 months after birth can decrease the degree of H. pylori colonization, postpone infection until older age, shorten the duration of symptoms, and be concomitant with milder gastritis.

  8. Alteration of histological gastritis after cure of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, M; Miwa, H; Ohkusa, T; Ohkura, R; Kurosawa, A; Sato, N

    2002-11-01

    It is still disputed whether gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia improves after the cure of Helicobacter pylori infection. To clarify the histological changes after the cure of H. pylori infection through a literature survey. Fifty-one selected reports from 1066 relevant articles were reviewed. The extracted data were pooled according to histological parameters of gastritis based on the (updated) Sydney system. Activity improved more rapidly than inflammation. Eleven of 25 reports described significant improvement of atrophy. Atrophy was not improved in one of four studies with a large sample size (> 100 samples) and in two of five studies with a long follow-up period (> 12 months), suggesting that disagreement between the studies was not totally due to sample size or follow-up period. Methodological flaws, such as patient selection, and statistical analysis based on the assumption that atrophy improves continuously and generally in all patients might be responsible for the inconsistent results. Four of 28 studies described significant improvement of intestinal metaplasia [corrected]. Activity and inflammation were improved after the cure of H. pylori infection. Atrophy did not improve generally among all patients, but improved in certain patients. Improvement of intestinal metaplasia was difficult to analyse due to methodological problems including statistical power.

  9. [Epidemiologic study of Helicobacter pylori infection in Perú].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Ramos, Alberto; Gilman, Robert H; Watanabe-Yamamoto, José; Rosas-Aguirre, Angel

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of our investigations in the epidemiology of H. pylori infection in Peru during the last two decades. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Lima is decreasing in people of middle and high socioeconomic status and continues stationary in people of low socioeconomic status. This decrease is similar in Peruvian and Japanese population in this city, and is associated to the decrease of the gastrointestinal diseases related to this bacterium: peptic ulcer and stomach adenocarcinoma. The infection is slightly greater in males and is acquired in early ages of life. Via oro-fecal and water contamination are probably the most important transmission ways. In our country, so far, there is no evidence to assure that some races have higher pre-disposition to acquire the infection. There are no differences in the infection by H. pylori among coast, mountain or jungle populations; and people who live in high altitudes have more atrophic chronic gastritis secondary to H. pylori infection than people who live at sea level.

  10. Relationship Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Seif-Rabiei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There is some evidence indicating the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal diseases including skin, vascular, and autoimmune disorders, as well as some respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between H. pylori and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In a case-control study, 90 patients with COPD and 90 age- and sex- matched control subjects were included. Serum samples were tested for anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA IgG by ELISA. A physician completed a questionnaire including demographic characteristics, habitual history, and spirometric findings for each patient. Of 90 patients with COPD 66 (51% had mild, 31 (34.4% moderate, and 13 (14.4% sever disease. There was no significant association between H. pylori IgG seropositivity and COPD. Serum levels of anti-CagA IgG were significantly higher in patients with COPD than in the control subjects (P < 0.001. No association was observed between H. pylori infection and severity of COPD. The results suggest that there is an association between CagA-positive H. pylori infections and COPD. Further studies should be planned to investigate the potential pathogenic mechanisms that might underlie these associations.

  11. Autophagy-related genes in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uotani, Takahiro; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces autophagy in gastric epithelial cells. However, prolonged exposure to H. pylori reduces autophagy by preventing maturation of the autolysosome. The alterations of the autophagy-related genes in H. pylori infection are not yet fully understood. We analyzed autophagy-related gene expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from 136 Bhutanese volunteers with mild dyspeptic symptoms. We also studied single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of autophagy-related gene in 283 Bhutanese participants to identify the influence on susceptibility to H. pylori infection. Microarray analysis of 226 autophagy-related genes showed that 16 genes were upregulated (7%) and nine were downregulated (4%). We used quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to measure mRNA levels of the downregulated genes (ATG16L1, ATG5, ATG4D, and ATG9A) that were core molecules of autophagy. ATG16L1 and ATG5 mRNA levels in H. pylori-positive specimens (n=86) were significantly less than those in H. pylori-negative specimens (n=50). ATG16L1 mRNA levels were inversely related to H. pylori density. We also compared SNPs of ATG16L1 (rs2241880) among 206 H. pylori-positive and 77 H. pylori-negative subjects. The odds ratio for the presence of H. pylori in the GG genotype was 0.40 (95% CI: 0.18-0.91) relative to the AA/AG genotypes. Autophagy-related gene expression profiling using high-throughput microarray analysis indicated that downregulation of core autophagy machinery genes may depress autophagy functions and possibly provide a better intracellular habit for H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The role of helicobacter pylori infection in the pathogenesis of chronic urticaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazzawi, I.M.; Obidat, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria (ICU) and to see if eradication of the bacterium affects the course of the urticaria. Patients and Methods: One hundred patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria and 43 healthy subjects (matched for age and sex) underwent serological testing for H. pylori infection. All patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria were examined for Helicobacter pylori infection with the /sup 13/C-urea test as well as the serological testing. Gastric biopsy was obtained from 36 patients. Patients with proven Helicobacter pylori infection were given treatment for 2 weeks. Six weeks afterwards they were tested again for Helicobacter pylori infection, and their urticaria was clinically assessed. Results: There was no significant difference in the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection between : idiopathic chronic urticaria patients and healthy subjects. Helicobacter pylori was detected in 76% of patients and 69.8% of controls. Out of the 76 patients treated, only 24 showed complete remission of their urticaria after successfully eradicating Helicobacter pylori infection, the others only having some improvement in their symptoms. Conclusion: Patients with idiopathic chronic urticaria have similar high rates of H. pylori infection as healthy subjects. Bacterium eradication is associated with improvement of urticaria symptoms, suggesting a possible role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of this skin disorder. (author)

  13. Prevalence and risk factors of Helicobacter pylori infection in Chinese maritime workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dongmei; Shao, Jing; Wang, Ligang; Zheng, Huichun; Xu, Yan; Song, Guirong; Liu, Qigui

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very common worldwide. To evaluate the prevalence and identify the risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection in Chinese maritime workers. Between March 2010 and October 2010, 3995 subjects were selected in the Hospital of Dalian Port. The presence of Helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed using laboratory tests (serum IgG anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies) and background information, family history, lifestyle and eating habits were collected using questionnaires. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was 44.9% in these Chinese maritime workers. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was associated with family income, living space, family history of gastrointestinal diseases, smoking, drinking tea, raw vegetables consumption, spicy food, pickle food, dining outside, no regular meal and dish sharing. Further analysis with multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that raw vegetables consumption, pickle food consumption, family income and family history of gastrointestinal diseases were independent predictors for Helicobacter pylori infection. No association was found between infection and gender, marital status, education, alcohol consumption and tap water consumption. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with raw vegetables consumption, pickle food consumption, family income and family history of gastrointestinal disease among Chinese maritime workers.

  14. Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zare Javid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped, microaerophilic organism that colonizes the stomach of humans and causes chronic-active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancers, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach and MALT (mucosal-associated lymphoid tumor lymphomas. H. pylori colonizes the stomach of over 50 % the world’s human population, primarily those who reside in developing nations. Infection is generally first acquired in children, who may be entirely asymptomatic, and then persists for life, unless specific eradication therapy is initiated. All infected individuals have mucosal inflammation in the stomach in response to the organism, but only a subset will develop disease complications, such as an ulcer in the stomach or proximal duodenum and cancer in either the body or the antrum of the stomach. It is estimated that the lifetime risk of developing peptic ulceration is roughly 15%. However, this is an exceedingly important disease, because it has serious morbidity and mortality. Eradication of H. pylori infection is not successful when using antibiotics as monotherapy or dual therapy using combinations of an acid-suppressing agent and an antibiotic or two antibiotics without acid blockage. Multiple studies show that some probiotic strains can inhibit the growth of H. pylori. To date, probiotics do not appear to have a role as sole therapy for use in the prevention or treatment of H. pylori infection. However, there is increasing evidence that a variety of probiotic agents are useful as adjunctive therapy, which can both enhance the success of eradicating the gastric pathogen while, reduce the frequency and severity of adverse effects arising from the other agents that are employed in current combination treatment regimens. Future studies should assess the role of prebiotics and synbiotics and products derived from probiotics as additional options for use in the prevention and treatment of H. pylori infection

  15. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  16. Recent Advances in Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: From the Petri Dish to the Playgound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Yuan Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is acquired in childhood, plays a causative role in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, and is associated with the development of gastric cancer. The present review focuses on recent advances in the scientific knowledge of H pylori infection in children, including clinical sequelae, diagnosis and treatment. In addition, recent insights regarding both bacterial and host factors that mediate human diseases associated with H pylori infection are discussed.

  17. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    It is accepted that the success of Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment using standard triple therapy is declining. Resistance, particularly to clarithromycin, has been shown in numerous countries to be rising to a level where the use of standard triple therapy in its current form may no longer be justified. The two major factors influencing resistance are prior exposure to the antibiotic and compliance with therapy. Regimes based on bismuth and levofloxacin, which had previously been mainly second-line options, are now emerging as superior first-line options. Trials of sequential and concomitant therapies are also showing the usefulness of these treatments in different populations. Options for third and subsequent line therapies include furazolidone and rifabutin-based regimes. Susceptibility testing should be performed to maintain accurate data on resistance levels, and has also clinical utility in difficult to eradicate cases. None of these, however, will be successful unless compliance is improved upon. If compliance is assured and eradication confirmation pursued, it has been repeatedly illustrated that near full eradication is achievable.

  18. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection 2013.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2013-09-01

    This review summarizes important studies regarding Helicobacter pylori therapy published from April 2012 up to March 2013. To begin with, the updated European Consensus Guidelines were published last year, highlighting the role of bismuth and nonbismuth quadruple regimen as first-line treatments. Cure rates for standard triple therapy remain acceptable in quite a few settings nowadays, and some reports on innovative triple therapies look promising. One study evaluating bismuth quadruple therapy as first-line therapy was reported. Regarding nonbismuth quadruple regimens, there is a trend of superiority emerging for the "concomitant" therapy over the "sequential" regimen. "Hybrid" therapy, a combination of sequential and concomitant therapy, has also shown advantage over sequential therapy. Levofloxacin-based therapies appear to be useful and versatile in second- and third-line therapies, with interesting results for newer generation quinolones, which may partially overcome antibiotic resistance. Some promising works have been reported for bismuth-based rescue therapy, using individualized therapies upon antimicrobial information, as well as for rifabutin fourth-line therapy. Probiotics appear to have an effect in terms of reducing side effects and improving compliance, but data on improvement of eradication rates remain controversial.

  19. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection favourably affects gastric mucosal superoxide dismutases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, J. M.; Thio, J. L.; Verspaget, H. W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Biemond, I.; Lamers, C. B.; Veenendaal, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) by phagocytic cells is thought to contribute to the mucosal pathology of Helicobacter pylori infection. Previously, H pylori infection was shown to have a differential effect on some gastric mucosal scavenger enzymes of ROMs-namely,

  20. Suppression of Helicobacter pylori infection during intensive care stay: related to stress ulcer bleeding incidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Voort, P. H.; van der Hulst, R. W.; Zandstra, D. F.; Geraedts, A. A.; van der Ende, A.; Tytgat, G. N.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the prevalence of active Helicobacter pylori infection in patients admitted to the intensive care unit, to determine the effect of selective gut decontamination on the persistence of this organism, and to explore the possible relationship between H. pylori infection and stress

  1. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current options and developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Kuang; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Liu, Chung-Jung; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Wang, Sophie SW; Wu, Jeng-Yih; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Huang, Yao-Kang; Wu, Deng-Chyang

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a crucial part in the effective management of many gastroduodenal diseases. Several invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori and each test has its usefulness and limitations in different clinical situations. Although none can be considered as a single gold standard in clinical practice, several techniques have been developed to give the more reliable results. Invasive tests are performed via endoscopic biopsy specimens and these tests include histology, culture, rapid urease test as well as molecular methods. Developments of endoscopic equipment also contribute to the real-time diagnosis of H. pylori during endoscopy. Urea breathing test and stool antigen test are most widely used non-invasive tests, whereas serology is useful in screening and epidemiological studies. Molecular methods have been used in variable specimens other than gastric mucosa. More than detection of H. pylori infection, several tests are introduced into the evaluation of virulence factors and antibiotic sensitivity of H. pylori, as well as screening precancerous lesions and gastric cancer. The aim of this article is to review the current options and novel developments of diagnostic tests and their applications in different clinical conditions or for specific purposes. PMID:26523098

  2. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, G A; Brawley, O W

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has generated public health interest since its identification in 1983. Past studies have suggested that the bacterium plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. More recent studies support the conclusion that the association of H. pylori with gastric cancer is causal. The purpose of this article is to review the available evidence supporting the association of H. pylori with gastric cancer. We performed a critical review of the relevant literature published in the English language on H. pylori and gastric cancer using MEDLINE, Index Medicus for the years 1985 to 1997. The reference lists of selected articles also were reviewed to capture citations for further pertinent studies. H. pylori is thought to be the major cause of chronic atrophic gastritis. H. pylori gastritis is worldwide in distribution. H. pylori is now categorized by the International Agency for Cancer Research as a group 1 carcinogen, i.e., an agent that is carcinogenic to humans. Several reports from the United States have found the highest frequencies of gastric cancer in geographic areas and populations with the highest rates of acquisition of H. pylori infection. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection has been documented most notably in blacks and Hispanics, who also are at high risk for gastric cancer. New studies that focus on the epidemiology and pathology of H. pylori improve our understanding of its relationship with gastric cancer and advance the development of gastric cancer prevention and control strategies that are proposed.

  3. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and its relation with body mass index in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengfu; Yan, Ming; Sun, Yan; Joo, Jungsoo; Wan, Xingyong; Yu, Chaohui; Wang, Qunyan; Shen, Chao; Chen, Peng; Li, Youming; Coleman, William G

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide. The association between obesity and H. pylori infection is controversial in the literature. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its relation with body mass index (BMI) in a Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was performed among adults who underwent health checkups at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University in 2013. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was examined by (13)C urea breath tests, and the association between prevalence of H. pylori infection and BMI was analyzed. Of the 8820 participants enrolled, 3859 (43.8%) were positive for H. pylori infection. H. pylori-positive participants had a more unfavorable metabolic profile than H. pylori-negative participants. Overweight/obese participants showed a higher prevalence of H. pylori infection than that of lean participants, and a positive linear correlation between BMI and prevalence of H. pylori infection was observed. Both unadjusted and adjusted analysis revealed that BMI was significantly associated with risk factors of H. pylori infection. Our results showed that BMI was significantly and positively associated with H. pylori infection, and a high BMI was associated with an increased risk of the infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. CagA-positive Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with decreased risk of Barrett's esophagus in a population with high H. pylori infection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortego Javier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim The role that H. pylori infection plays in the development of and Barrett's esophagus (BE is uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that infection with cagA+ Helicobacter pylori strains protects against the development of BE. Methods We studied 104 consecutive patients, residents in an area with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection, with BE and 213 sex- and age-matched controls. H. pylori infection and CagA antibody status were determined by western blot serology. Results H. pylori prevalence was higher in patients with BE than in controls (87.5% vs. 74.6%; OR. 2.3; 95% CI: 1.23–4.59. Increasing age was associated with a higher prevalence of H. pylori (p Conclusion Neither H. pylori infection nor H. pylori infection by CagA+ strains reduce the risk of BE in a population with high prevalence of H. pylori infection.

  5. Indications for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: a systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J; Sherman, P M

    1994-01-15

    To determine (a) the advantages and disadvantages of treatment options for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and (b) whether eradication of H. pylori is indicated in patients with duodenal ulcer, nonucler dyspepsia and gastric cancer. A MEDLINE search for articles published in English between January 1983 and December 1992 with the use of MeSH terms Helicobacter pylori (called Campylobacter pylori before 1990) and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, dyspepsia and clinical trial. Six journals and Current Contents were searched manually for pertinent articles published in that time frame. For duodenal ulcer the search was limited to studies involving adults, studies of H. pylori eradication and randomized clinical trials comparing anti-H. pylori therapy with conventional ulcer treatment. For nonulcer dyspepsia with H. pylori infection the search was limited to placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials. The quality of each study was rated independently on a four-point scale by each author. For the studies of duodenal ulcer the outcome measures assessed were acute ulcer healing and time required for healing, H. pylori eradication and ulcer relapse. For the studies of nonulcer dyspepsia with H. pylori infection the authors assessed H. pylori eradication, the symptoms used as outcome measures and whether validated outcome measures had been used. Eight trials involving duodenal ulcer met our inclusion criteria: five were considered high quality, two were of reasonable quality, and one was weak. Six trials involving nonulcer dyspepsia met the criteria, but all were rated as weak. Among treatment options triple therapy with a bismuth compound, metronidazole and either amoxicillin or tetracycline achieved the highest eradication rates (73% to 94%). Results concerning treatment indications for duodenal ulcer were consistent among all of the studies: when anti-H. pylori therapy was added to conventional ulcer treatment acute ulcers healed more rapidly. Ulcer relapse rates

  6. Review: Prevalence and dynamics of Helicobacter pylori infection during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala Torrres, Beatriz; Lucero, Yalda; Lagomarcino, Anne J; Orellana-Manzano, Andrea; George, Sergio; Torres, Juan P; O'Ryan, Miguel

    2017-10-01

    Long-term persistent Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with ulceropeptic disease and gastric cancer. Although H. pylori is predominantly acquired early in life, a clear understanding of infection dynamics during childhood has been obfuscated by the diversity of populations evaluated, study designs, and methods used. Update understanding of true prevalence of H. pylori infection during childhood, based on a critical analysis of the literature published in the past 5 years. Comprehensive review and meta-analysis of original studies published from 2011 to 2016. A MEDLINE ® /PubMed ® search on May 1, 2016, using the terms pylori and children, and subsequent exclusion, based on abstract review using predefined criteria, resulted in 261 citations. An Embase ® search with the same criteria added an additional 8 citations. In healthy children, meta-analysis estimated an overall seroprevalence rate of 33% (95% CI: 27%-38%). Seven healthy cohort studies using noninvasive direct detection methods showed infection prevalence estimates ranging from 20% to 50% in children ≤5 and 38% to 79% in children >5 years. The probability of infection persistence after a first positive sample ranged from 49% to 95%. Model estimates of cross-sectional direct detection studies in asymptomatic children indicated a prevalence of 37% (95% CI: 30%-44%). Seroprevalence, but not direct detection rates increased with age; both decreased with increasing income. The model estimate based on cross-sectional studies in symptomatic children was 39% (95% CI: 35%-43%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection varied widely in the studies included here; nevertheless, model estimates by detection type were similar, suggesting that overall, one-third of children worldwide are or have been infected. The few cohort and longitudinal studies available show variability, but most studies, show infection rates over 30%. Rather surprisingly, overall infection prevalence in symptomatic children

  7. Metabolic consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is still the most prevalent infection of the world. Colonization of the stomach by this agent will invariably induce chronic gastritis which is a low-grade inflammatory state leading to local complications (peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, lymphoma) and remote manifestations. While H. pylori does not enter circulation, these extragastric manifestations are probably mediated by the cytokines and acute phase proteins produced by the inflammed mucosa. The epidemiologic link between the H. pylori infection and metabolic changes is inconstant and controversial. Growth delay was described mainly in low-income regions with high prevalence of the infection, where probably other nutritional and social factors contribute to it. The timely eradication of the infection will lead to a more healthy development of the young population, along with preventing peptic ulcers and gastric cancer An increase of total, low density lipoprotein and high density liporotein cholesterol levels in some infected people creates an atherogenic lipid profile which could promote atherosclerosis with its complications, myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Well designed and adequately powered long-term studies are required to see whether eradication of the infection will prevent these conditions. In case of glucose metabolism, the most consistent association was found between H. pylori and insulin resistance: again, proof that eradication prevents this common metabolic disturbance is expected. The results of eradication with standard regimens in diabetics are significantly worse than in non-diabetic patients, thus, more active regimens must be found to obtain better results. Successful eradication itself led to an increase of body mass index and cholesterol levels in some populations, while in others no such changes were encountered. Uncertainities of the metabolic consequences of H. pylori infection must be clarified in the future. PMID:24833852

  8. Dietary Factors in Relation to Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ali Mard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Helicobacter pylori (HP and diet are both risk factors for gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Helicobacter pylori infection and dietary habits common in Khuzestan province. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011–2013 on 374 patients. Participants were interviewed using a food frequency questionnaire and tissue sample of the antrum was sent for pathology lab. The histopathological major variables were graded on a scale of 3 (mild, moderate, and severe and data analyzed using nonparametric tests. Results. In this study, of 160 patients (43% that were determined, 8.1 percent had severe contamination. Among dietary patterns, relationship between energy intake and carbohydrate with H. pylori was significant. A direct association was found between mean daily intakes of sausage (P=0.001 and burgers (P<0.05 with HP infection. Low intake of fresh vegetables and fruits was the most significant risk factors (P<0.05. Conclusion. There is a possibility that some dietary factors such as consumption of fast foods and low intake of fresh vegetables may increase the chance of HP and severity of this infection.

  9. Accumulation of 8-nitroguanine in human gastric epithelium induced by Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ning; Adachi, Yukihiko; Hiraku, Yusuke; Horiki, Noriyuki; Horiike, Shinichirou; Imoto, Ichiro; Pinlaor, Somchai; Murata, Mariko; Semba, Reiji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic inflammation, which can lead to gastric carcinoma. A double immunofluorescence labeling study demonstrated that the level of 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 ' -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) apparent in gastric gland epithelium was significantly higher in gastritis patients with H. pylori infection than in those without infection. A significant accumulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a prognostic factor for gastric cancer, was observed in gastric gland epithelial cells in patients with H. pylori infection as compared to those without infection, and its accumulation was closely correlated with the formation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG. These results suggest that nitrosative and oxidative DNA damage in gastric epithelial cells and their proliferation by H. pylori infection may lead to gastric carcinoma. 8-Nitroguanine could be not only a promising biomarker for inflammation but also a useful indicator of the risk of gastric cancer development in response to chronic H. pylori infection

  10. Relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection with diarrhea and nutritional status among nutritionally-at-risk children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husaini, M.A.; Husaini, Y.K.; Suwardi, S.; Salimar; Widodo, Y.; Kurpad, A.; Miranda-Da-Cruz, B.

    2005-01-01

    A crossectional study of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was carried out in 275 children (Age range = 6-36 months) belonging to the low socio-economic strata (SES) in the rural and suburban areas of Bogor (West Java Indonesia). H. Pylori infection was diagnosed by using C-13 urea breath test and nutritional status was analyzed by z- 2 scores. The study revealed a strong (χ 2 = 30.9; df=4; p 2 =7.2; df=3; p<0.05) association was observed between the educational status of mothers and prevalence of H. pylori infection. Although there was a trend, the results did not yield any significant association between diarrhoea and H. pylori infection. A similar trend was also seen between anemia status and H. pylori infection. Of particular interest was the higher rate of H.pylori infection in children who were on breast-feeding as compared to those who had already been weaned (p<0.05). Stunting, a deficit of length-for-age was the only parameter among the three indicators of malnutrition (underweight, wasting, stunting), which was observed to be significantly (P<0.05) associated with H. pylori infection in our study. Although the other two parameters, underweight and wasting, were also manifested, the associations were not statistically significant. The results of this study have demonstrated that H. Pylori infection has an effect on malabsorption leading to a negative impact on the ability of children to thrive. (author)

  11. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Thein; Shiota, Seiji; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ni, New; Aye, Than Than; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tran, Trang Thi Huyen; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To survey the detailed analyses for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric mucosal status in Myanmar. METHODS: A total of 252 volunteers with dyspeptic symptoms (155 female and 97 male; mean age of 43.6 ± 14.2 years) was participated in Yangon and Mandalay. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on 5 different tests including rapid urease test, culture, histology, immunohistochemistry and serology. Histological scores were evaluated according to the update Sydney system and the Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment system. Pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 48.0%. There was no relationship between age and infection rate. Even in young group (less than 29 years old), the H. pylori infection rate was relatively high (41.9%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in Yangon than that of Mandalay. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the presence of gastric mucosal atrophy. All 7 subjects with peptic ulcer were infected with H. pylori. Although H. pylori-positive subjects showed stronger gastritis than H. pylori-negative subjects, most cases had mild gastritis. CONCLUSION: We revealed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar. The H. pylori infection was a risk factor for peptic ulcer and stronger gastritis. PMID:25605987

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with dyspeptic symptoms having normal endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.F.; Hussain, T.; Khan, M.N.; Mirza, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    To find out the frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection in the local population presenting with dyspeptic symptoms but having normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings. Hundred cases of dyspepsia having normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were taken as study population. Although the gold standard for presence or absence of Helicobacter pylori infection is culture but in this study the diagnostic method used was histopathology of gastric antrum. The male and female ratio was 2:1. Majority of the patients were either 40 years of age or less, mean age being 40.52 (sd+-13.22). The chief symptoms were pain epigastrium (46%) and upper abdominal discomfort (27%). Helicobacter pylori gastritis was found in 51% of cases. We conclude that Helicobacter pylori infection is quite common in dyspeptic patients apparently having normal endoscopic gastric mucosal findings. Eradication therapy should be instituted in positive cases to avoid its long-term complications. (author)

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Bukurije Zhubi; Zana Baruti-Gafurri; Ymer Mekaj; Mimoza Zhubi; Idriz Merovci; Iliriane Bunjaku; Valdete Topciu; Emine Devoli-Disha

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzym...

  14. Vitamin B12 status and its association with Helicobacter pylori infection in alcohol dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Laheij, Robert J. F.; de Jong, Cor A. J.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Jansen, Jan B. M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Both infection with Helicobacter pylori and alcohol abuse have been associated with low vitamin B12 serum levels. The interaction between both risk factors is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with low vitamin B12 levels in alcohol

  15. Functional dyspepsia and dyspepsia associated with Helicobacter pylori infection: Do they have different clinical characteristics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Rodríguez-García

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The patients with dyspepsia infected with Helicobacter pylori had similar clinical characteristics to the non-infected patients and could not be differentiated a priori. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with functional dyspepsia was 58% and increased with age.

  16. Implications of Helicobacter pylori infection for stomach cancer prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Karen J.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has implicated Helicobacter pylori, an established cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer, in the etiology of gastric cancer. Control of this infection would reduce the occurrence of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and might substantially lower the risk of stomach cancer as well. The public health impact of this infectious agent warrants efforts to identify preventive measures. This paper reviews the evidence linking H. pylori infection to gastric cancer and evaluates the potential for control in high-risk populations. Current obstacles to H. pylori control are discussed, including the link to poor socioeconomic conditions, difficulty in identifying incident cases, lack of natural immunity to reinfection, limited effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in high-prevalence populations, and incomplete knowledge regarding the reservoir of infection, mode of transmission, host susceptibility factors, and the potential for developing an effective vaccine. Worthwhile avenues of research include studies designed to identify modifiable risk factors for acquisition of the infection, modifiable host factors that may increase resistance to chronic infection, more effective antibiotic therapies, and effective vaccines.

  17. Pylera for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saleem, Aamir

    2012-02-01

    An ideal antibiotic regimen for Helicobacter pylori should achieve eradication rates of approximately 90%. Current 7-day triple therapy is successful in about two-thirds of patients. A novel treatment is required to achieve higher eradication with minimal induction of bacterial resistance. The aim of this article is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a single triple capsule (Pylera) containing bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline, given with omeprazole for the eradication of H. pylori infection. Extensive literature searches were conducted using PubMed data from 1982 to 2007. This search included headings of H. pylori, bismuth and eradication therapy. The triple capsule Pylera, when given with omeprazole, achieved eradication rates ranging between 84 and 97%. Eradication rates were similar for clarithromycin- and metronidazole-resistant strains. Eradication rates with an omeprazole, bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline regimen appeared comparable for metronidazole-resistant and -sensitive strains. This effect is not seen with the use of triple therapy in cases of clarithromycin resistance. Clinical trials did not report any serious side effects from bismuth-based regimens and compliance was similar to standard triple therapy. Bismuth-based triple therapy using Pylera is a simplified, effective and well-tolerated regimen achieving cure rates of above 90%.

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection in women with Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmuely, Haim; Shimon, Ilan; Gitter, Limor Azulay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An association between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection as environmental risk factors for Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has been reported. We investigated this hypothesis in women in which HT is more common. Serum immunoglobulin G antibodies against H pylori (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), CagA protein (Western blot assay), circulating antibodies to thyroid antigens, mainly thyroperoxidase (TPOAbs) and thyroglobulin (TgAbs), were tested in 101 females with HT and 111 non-HT control women without a history of autoimmune disease. Thyroid function, socioeconomic status at childhood, and family history of thyroid malfunction were also studied. Forty-seven HT women (46.5%) tested seropositive for H pylori versus 48 controls (43.2%; P = 0.63). The prevalence of anti-CagA antibodies was 21.3% in HT-infected patients and 31.2% in infected controls (P = 0.352). Women with HT were older than the controls at a significance level of 0.03, and higher prevalence of hypothyroidism (69% vs 13.5%, respectively) and family history of thyroid malfunction (59% vs 34%, respectively) (P thyroid malfunction was independently associated with an increased risk of HT (odds ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 1.86–6.18, P thyroid malfunction is a risk factor for HT. PMID:27442635

  19. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with the Lewis and ABO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of this controversy and the fact that H. pylori infection and gastric adenocarcinoma are common diseases in Iran, the assessment of the association of H. pylori infection with these blood groups could be valuable. Materials and Methods: In a cross sectional study on 135 adult dyspeptic patients in Mashhad, Iran, ...

  20. The Association of Helicobacter pylori Infection with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alsadat Salami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD are multifactorial conditions that result from genetic predisposition in combination with environmental risk factors. Helicobacter pylori infection as an environmental risk factor has been proposed to imitate the antigenic components of the thyroid cell membrane and may play a leading role in the onset of the autoimmune diseases, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP infection and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT. The participants in this case-control study included 43 patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 40 healthy individuals without history of autoimmune disease as the control group. Anti HP IgG and anti-TPO antibodies were determined using ELISA method. Results were considered positive when the IgG anti-HP value was higher than 30 IU/ml and the anti-TPO autoantibody value was higher than 75 IU/ml. The mean TSH level was 18.3±16.8 IU/ml for patients and 2.8±1.2 IU/ml for the control group (P<0.001. 46.5% of the patient group and 10.8% of the control group were infected with HP. The association between HP and Hashimoto's thyroiditis was statistically significant (Odds Ratio=7.2, 95%, Confidence Interval: 2.0- 28.8, P<0.001. The findings show that, there is an association between HP and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. To establish a definite correlation between them, more detailed studies with a more specialized examination and precise consideration regarding species of HP, genetic polymorphism of the host and investigation of environmental factors are needed.

  1. Meta-analysis: Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with Parkinson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoli; Yang, Huazhen; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng; Jiang, Hong

    2017-10-01

    The results from observational studies on the relationship between helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and Parkinson's disease remain controversial. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between helicobacter pylori infection and Parkinson's disease. A comprehensive literature search was performed on relevant studies published from January 1983 to January 2017 in PubMed, Web of Science and EMBASE databases. The fixed or random effects model was used to pool the odds ratio with 95% confidence interval from individual studies. Publication bias was estimated by Egger's test and the funnel plot. Eight eligible studies involving 33 125 participants were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with the no helicobacter pylori infected person, the pooled odds ratio of Parkinson's disease in helicobacter pylori infected person was 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 1.37-1.85). In subgroup analyzes, the combined odds ratios were 1.96 (1.23-3.12) in Asia, 1.55 (1.32-1.82) in Europe, 1.59 (1.35-1.88) in case-control studies, 1.56 (1.01-2.39) in cross-sectional studies, 1.56 (1.32-1.85) in studies with confounders adjusted, and 1.71 (1.21-2.43) in studies with no confounder adjusted, respectively. This meta-analysis indicated that H. pylori infection might be associated with the risk of Parkinson's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Time Trends in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Atrophic Gastritis Over 40 Years in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Tomoari; Haruma, Ken; Ito, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Sumii, Koji; Akiyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinji; Shiotani, Akiko; Graham, David Y

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection produces progressive mucosal damage that may eventually result in gastric cancer. We studied the changes that occurred in the presence and severity of atrophic gastritis and the prevalence of H. pylori infection that occurred coincident with improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. The prevalence of H. pylori infection and histologic grades of gastric damage were retrospectively evaluated using gastric biopsy specimens obtained over a 40-year period. Gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were scored using the updated Sydney classification system. The prevalence of H. pylori and severity of atrophy were examined in 1381 patients including 289 patients examined in the 1970s (158 men; mean age, 44.9 years), 787 in the 1990s (430 men; 44.2 years), and 305 in the 2010s (163 men; 53.2 years). Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection decreased significantly from 74.7% (1970s) to 53% (1990s) and 35.1% (2010s) (p pylori infection. There has been a progressive and rapid decline in the prevalence of H. pylori infection as well a fall in the rate of progression of gastric atrophy among H. pylori-infected Japanese coincident with the westernization and improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with failure to thrive: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nan-Chang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chi, Hsin; Yeung, Chun-Yan; Ting, Wei-Hsin; Chan, Wai-Tao; Jiang, Chuen-Bin; Li, Sung-Tse; Lin, Chao-Hsu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2017-01-01

    The long-term impact of Helicobacter pylori infection is complex, and concerns about the need for eradication exist. We conducted this case control study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and failure to thrive (FTT). From January 2009 to December 2011, 53 children with FTT group and matched children with the same sex and age and similar socioeconomic status without FTT (control group) were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered to the parents/guardian, and a 13 C-urea breath test was performed to detect H. pylori infection. We found that the total prevalence of H. pylori infection was 29.2% and that there was no association between FTT and H. pylori infection (FTT group: 32%; control group: 26.4%; P =0.67). Short stature was more common in the FTT group and abdominal pain in the control group (FTT group: 37.7%; control group: 11.3%; P =0.003). In a comparison between the H. pylori -positive and -negative groups, abdominal pain (87.1% vs 64%; P =0.032) and the frequency of endoscopy (74.2% vs 32%; P <0.001) were significantly more common in the H. pylori -positive group. We found that children with H. pylori infection are at an increased risk for abdominal pain and that FTT is not associated with H. pylori infection. The decision for eradication should be evaluated carefully and individualized.

  4. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with nodular antritis and follicular gastritis

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    Tomašević Ratko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is known to be the must common cause of chronic gastritis having some endoscopic and pathologic characteristies as determinated by the Sydney System for Gastritis Classification. The aim of our case report was to point out the relationship between an endoscopic finding of nodular antritis and the presence of H. pylori infection and active chronic gastritis. Case report. Our patient underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for dyspeptic complaints and was diagnosed as having nodular antritis, but also underwent urease test and hystopathologic examination of antral mucosa, to determine the presence and density of H. pylori infection and the presence and severity of gastritis. After a course of anti H. pylori treatment, dyspepsia improved and new biopsy specimens obtained two months and six months afterwards revealed no pathological findings. Conclusion. The case report supported the association of H. pylori infection of lymphoid follicles with nodular gastric mucosis.

  5. The Possible Role of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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    Dan-dan Cheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori which colonizes the stomach can cause a wide array of gastric disorders, including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Recently, accumulating evidence has implicated H. pylori infection in extragastrointestinal diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases. At the same time, many scholars have noted the relationship between H. pylori infection and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Despite the positive association between H. pylori and NAFLD reported in some researches, there are opposite perspectives denying their relationship. Due to high prevalence, unclear etiology and difficult treatment of NAFLD, confirming the pathogenicity of H. pylori infection in NAFLD will undoubtedly provide insights for novel treatment strategies for NAFLD. This paper will review the relationship between H. pylori infection and NAFLD and the possible pathogenic mechanisms.

  6. N-acetylcysteine prevents the development of gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Jang, Sungil; Bak, Eun-Jung; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen, causing various gastric diseases ranging from gastritis to gastric adenocarcinoma. It has been reported that combining N-acetylcysteine (NAC) with conventional antibiotic therapy increases the success rate of H. pylori eradication. We evaluated the effect of NAC itself on the growth and colonization of H. pylori, and development of gastritis, using in vitro liquid culture system and in vivo animal models. H. pylori growth was evaluated in broth culture containing NAC. The H. pylori load and histopathological scores of stomachs were measured in Mongolian gerbils infected with H. pylori strain 7.13, and fed with NAC-containing diet. In liquid culture, NAC inhibited H. pylori growth in a concentration-dependent manner. In the animal model, 3-day administration of NAC after 1 week from infection reduced the H. pylori load; 6-week administration of NAC after 1 week from infection prevented the development of gastritis and reduced H. pylori colonization. However, no reduction in the bacterial load or degree of gastritis was observed with a 6-week administration of NAC following 6-week infection period. Our results indicate that NAC may exert a beneficial effect on reduction of bacterial colonization, and prevents the development of severe inflammation, in people with initial asymptomatic or mild H. pylori infection.

  7. Molecular Mechanism of Gastric Carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Rodent Models

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    Takeshi Toyoda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, many efforts have been made to establish animal models for the investigation of the pathological features and molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Among the animal models, Mongolian gerbils and mice are particularly useful for the analysis of H. pylori-associated inflammatory reactions and gastric cancer development. Inhibitors of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and nuclear factor-κB, exert preventive effects on chronic gastritis and the development of adenocarcinomas in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Genetically-modified mouse models, including transgenic and knockout mice, have also revealed the importance of p53, COX-2/prostaglandin, Wnt/β-catenin, proinflammatory cytokines, gastrin and type III mucin in the molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis. Microarray technology is available for comprehensive gene analysis in the gastric mucosa of mouse models, and epigenetics, such as DNA methylation, could be an alternative approach to correlate the observations in animal models with the etiology in humans.

  8. Radio-iodine therapy and Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholamrezanezhad, A.; Mirpour, S.; Saghari, M.; Abdollahzadeh, J.; Pourmoslemi, A.; Yarmand, S.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most important cause of gastritis and related morbidities. Following consumption, radioactive iodine accumulates considerably in the stomach. On the basis of this observation, we decided to determine whether the high radiation induced by radio-iodine in the stomach is effective in the eradication of this infection. All consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, who were referred for radio-iodine therapy [dose 117.1±24.4 mCi (4.3±0.9 GBq), range 100-200 mCi (3.7-7.4 GBq)], were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urease breath test (UBT) was performed 1-2 h before radio-iodine consumption and the test was repeated 2 months later. Of 88 patients, 71 had pre-treatment positive UBT. Of these, 23 patients had negative post-treatment result, which means a significant reduction (26.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 16.8-35.5%) in the number of positive UBT results in our treated population (32.4% of UBT-positive cases became UBT-negative). Considering the high prevalence of reinfection in developing countries, the therapeutic benefit would have been more considerable if the second UBT had been done with a lag time of less than 2 months. Although radio-iodine therapy is not a logical method for the treatment of patients suffering from H. pylori, our finding provides indirect evidence about the radiosensitivity of bacteria, the future clinical applications of which need to be further evaluated. Also this finding can be useful for the food industry, where radiation is used widely to sterilize food. Regarding the possibility of H. pylori suppression, we recommend not using UBT for screening for the infection for at least within 2 months following radio-iodine therapy. (author)

  9. Helicobacter pylori Infection Rates in Patients Undergoing Endoscopy in the Interior of Borneo.

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    Chai, Feng Yih; Chong, Hock Chin; Tan, Yew Eng; Heng, Sophia Si Ling; Asilah, Siti Mohd Desa; Ridwan, Hashim

    2016-04-01

    Very limited data are available on the Helicobacter pylori infection among the population of interior Borneo. We aimed to investigate the H. pylori infection rate among an endoscoped interior Borneo population and to report the differences between the infected and noninfected patients. We retrospectively analyzed the data of the rapid urease test (RUT) records in Endoscopy Unit Hospital Keningau from January 2009 to May 2014. Student's t-test, chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were used accordingly. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for H. pylori infection. Birth cohort was analyzed against H. pylori infection rate with chi-square test. Overall, there were 215 of 774 (27.8%) positive RUTs. Patients with H. pylori infection were younger (47.66 ± 14.93 vs 50.50 ± 15.02 years, p = .019), more likely to be female (OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.12-2.13, p = .008) and originated from the Pensiangan district (OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.01-2.64, p = .047). Chinese patients were less likely infected with H. pylori (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.16-0.80, p = .013). Birth cohort was significantly associated with H. pylori infection rate (χ(2) (7) = 14.71, p = .040) with an increasing trend of H. pylori infection rate in patients born later (χ(2) (1) = 5.26, p = .022). The overall H. pylori infection rate in this population was unexpectedly low. Accordingly, it may be a recent arrival in this community. Gender, age, dietary practice, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity were among the factors associated with H. pylori infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  11. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections among patients referred for endoscopy at Hospital Sultan Abdul Halim

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    Ranita Kirubakaran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection according to age, gender, ethnicity, and endoscopic finding and to study the association between smoking and alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection. Methods: A retrospective observational study on 582 consecutive patients referred for endoscopy with H. pylori tested was conducted in Hospital Sultan Abdul Halim from 1st of January 2013 till 31st of December 2013. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi-square, Fisher’s exact test and binary logistic regression with SPSS version 16. Results: Out of the 582 patients, 74 (12.7% were positive for H. pylori infection. Among those with H. pylori infection, 42 (56.8% were female. Infection was highest in the age group of 51 to 60 years old, 25 (33.8% with the mean (SD age of 52.9 (14.9 years. From the endoscopic finding, erosions, 38 (51.4% had the highest H. pylori positive cases. H. pylori infection was commonly found among Indians (36.3%; 41/113 followed by Chinese (17.6%, 18/102 and Malays (4.1%; 15/367 (P 0.05. Conclusions: The increased risk of H. pylori infection in Indians might be due to the unusual socio-cultural practices and difference in diet which may be responsible for the transmission of the infection. Therefore, further studies are warranted.

  12. Association between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Chronic Urticaria: A Meta-Analysis

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    Huiyuan Gu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Some studies have shown the possible involvement of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in chronic urticaria, but the relationship remains controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively assess the association between H. pylori infection and chronic urticaria. Methods. Observational studies comparing the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with chronic urticaria and control subjects were identified through a systematic search in MEDLINE and EMBASE up to July 2014. H. pylori infection was confirmed by serological or nonserological tests. For subgroup analyses, studies were separated by region, publication year, and H. pylori detection method to screen the potential factors resulting in heterogeneity. Results. 16 studies involving 965 CU cases and 1235 controls were included. Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in urticarial patients than in controls (OR = 1.66; 95% CI: 1.12–2.45; P=0.01. This result persisted in subanalysis of nine high-quality studies (OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.03–1.80; P=0.03. Subgroup analysis showed that detection method of H. pylori is also a potential influential factor for the overall results. Conclusions. Our present meta-analysis suggests that H. pylori infection is significantly, though weakly, associated with an increased risk of chronic urticaria.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum leptin, obestatin, and ghrelin levels in Mexican schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-González, Carolina; Mendoza, Eugenia; Mera, Robertino M; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Chico-Aldama, Patricia; Gomez-Diaz, Rita; Duque, Ximena

    2017-10-01

    BackgroundThere is little information about the possible role of Helicobacter pylori infection on appetite-regulating peptides in children. This study evaluated the association between H. pylori infection and serum levels of ghrelin, leptin, and obestatin in schoolchildren.MethodsOne hundred seventy-eight schoolchildren, students at boarding schools in Mexico City, participated. H. pylori infection status was determined every 6 months for 1 year by a breath test using 13 C-urea; schoolchildren with consistently positive or negative results were selected to participate. Age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) were recorded. Serum concentrations of total ghrelin, leptin, and obestatin via specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were determined.ResultsSchoolchildren with H. pylori infection had lower concentration of leptin, -0.54 pg/ml (95% CI: -0.98 to -0.09), compared to the schoolchildren without infection, after adjustment by age, gender, and BMI. And the children with the infection had a median of obestatin lower in 0.99 ng/ml (95% CI: -1.93 to -0.06) compared with the uninfected children after adjustment by BMI.ConclusionAssociation was found between H. pylori infection and decreased serum concentrations of leptin and obestatin. These results suggest that in schoolchildren, H. pylori infection affects the levels of hormones implicated in regulating appetite and energy homeostasis.

  14. Outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsoekh, Dewkoemar; van Leerdam, Monique E.; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Tytgat, Guido N. J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: NSAIDs and Helicobacter pylori are risk factors for the development of peptic ulcers. A prospective study was conducted to determine prevalence of NSAID use, H pylori infection, and outcome of peptic ulcer bleeding. METHODS: In 2000, data of all 361 patients presenting with peptic

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection as a triggering factor of attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visy, Beáta; Füst, George; Bygum, Anette

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori infection is considered among the causative factors of urticaria and angioedema. Having conducted a study on 65 patients, Hungarian authors reported in 2001 that successful eradication of H. pylori is followed by a significant reduction in the number of attacks in ...

  16. Effect of Helicobacter pylori Infection on Symptoms of Gastroenteritis Due to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Alicia Hsin-Ming; Haggerty, Thomas Dean; de Martel, Catherine; Leung, Cynthia Wai-Mun; Parsonnet, Julie

    Helicobacter pylori can cause hypochlorhydria in some hosts and predispose to diarrheal infections. We tested the hypothesis that chronic H. pylori infection increases the risk of diarrheal illness due to an acid-sensitive organism: enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). After testing healthy

  17. Human Gastric Mucosal Hydrophobicity Does dot Decrease with Helicobacter Pylori Infection or Chronological Age

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    Mohammed S Al-Marhoon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infection with cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe gastric diseases. Previous studies in humans have reported a decreased gastric hydrophobicity with H pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to differentiate between the effect of cagA+ and cagA- strains on gastric mucus hydrophobicity.

  18. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarkar, Zohreh; Jafarnejad, Majid; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2011-01-01

    Background: Coronary Artery Disease is known as the main cause of death in industrialized countries. Relation between this disease and some infections such as Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) has been shown in several studies. The purpose of this study was to dermine the relationship between Hypylori and mycardical infarctions. Methods: Seventy-three myocardial infarction patients and 78 individuals with no history of this disease were compared. Patients and control matched for age and sex person to person by the match method. Levels of serum IgA and IgG antibodies against H. pylori were measured by Elisa method. Also, cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, HDL measured in both groups and data were compared between two groups in terms of relation with cardiac risk factors. Results: From 151 participants, 73 were patients and 78 were control subjects. The percentage of IgG positive cases against H. pylori was 57.5% in the case group and 32.1% in the control group (p=0.002, OR: 2.87 CI: 95%; 1.5-5.6). Meanwhile, there was no significant difference in IgA positive cases between the two groups (42.5% and 48.7% in the case and control groups, respectively) (p=0.44; OR: 0.78 95% CI; 0.41-1.48). The study showed 74.2% of cases in the case group and 45.2% in the control group were positive for both IgG and IgA (p=0.01; OR: 3.5 95% CI; 1.3-9.5). No significant differences were found between two groups in terms of relation between H. pylori related antibodies level and heart disease classic risk factors (smoking, hypertension,…), sex, and age, but between dyslipidemia and H. pylori related antibodies was significant differences in case group (p=0.05). Conclusion: According to the results, it seems there is a relation between H. pylori infection and myocardial infarction. Also, between dislipidemia and H. Pylori antibodies in case group were significant difference. Therefore, H. pylori can be a new risk factor for atherosclerosis or can be exacerbate effect of other risk factors

  19. Rapid improvement of Henoch-Schonlein purpura associated with the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Turgay Ulas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are one of the most common bacterial infections, seen in humans, worldwide and their possible relationships to different diseases are a focus of attention nowadays. H. pylori may cause some extra intestinal manifestations some of which are dermatological conditions, including Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP, chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis. We describe a 49-year-old man who presented with HSP triggered by gastric H. pylori infection. Treatment of H. Pylori infection was accompanied by prompt resolution of the gastrointestinal manifestations and purpuric rashes. These findings suggest a causative role for H. pylori in the occurrence of HSP.

  20. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in maintenance hemodialysis patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasri, Hamid; Asl, Mohammad Kazem Hosseini

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection among stable chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients having non ulcer dyspepsia. The study was carried out on 80 patients consisting of 40 patients with dyspepsia and 40 consecutive control subjects without renal disease and dyspepsic symptoms. Mean age of patients were 56 +- 14 and 47 +- 15 respectively. This study showed no significant difference of H. pylori infection between the two groups. Tissue examination of gastric antrum showed higher localization of H. pylori in HD patients in contrast to controls. This finding has not been reported before and needs further confirmation and evaluation for its significance. (author)

  1. Update on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection. Position paper from the Catalan Society of Digestology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Delgado, Jordi; García-Iglesias, Pilar; Titó, Llúcia; Puig, Ignasi; Planella, Montse; Gené, Emili; Saló, Joan; Martínez-Cerezo, Francesc; Molina-Infante, Javier; Gisbert, Javier P; Calvet, Xavier

    2018-04-01

    More than 30 years after its discovery, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection remains the most common cause of gastric and duodenal diseases. H. pylori is the leading cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric MALT lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Several consensuses have recently been published on the management of H. pylori infection. The general guidelines of the Spanish consensus, the Toronto Consensus and the Maastricht V Consensus of 2016 are similar but concrete recommendations can vary significantly. In addition, the recommendations of some of these consensuses are decidedly complex. This position paper from the Catalan Society of Digestology is an update of evidence-based recommendations on the management and treatment of H. pylori infection. The aim of this document is to review this information in order to make recommendations for routine clinical practice that are simple, specific and easily applied to our setting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Lactoferrin Adsorbed onto Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals Controlling - In Vivo - the Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgione, Andrea; Nocerino, Nunzia; Iannaccone, Marco; Roperto, Sante; Capuano, Federico; Roveri, Norberto; Lelli, Marco; Crasto, Antonio; Calogero, Armando; Pilloni, Argenia Paola; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Background The resistance of Helicobacter pylori to the antibiotic therapy poses the problem to discover new therapeutic approaches. Recently it has been stated that antibacterial, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant properties of lactoferrin are increased when this protein is surface-linked to biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. Objective Based on these knowledge, the aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an alternative therapy against Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods Antibacterial and antinflammatory properties, humoral antibody induction, histopathological analysis and absence of side effects were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Results The tests carried out have been demonstrated better performance of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles combined with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei compared to both lactoferrin and probiotic alone or pooled. Conclusion These findings indicate the effectiveness and safety of our proposed therapy as alternative treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:27384186

  3. MGMT and MLH1 methylation in Helicobacter pylori-infected children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Marisa C; Santos, Juliana C; Maniezzo, Nathália; Ladeira, Marcelo S; da Silva, Artur L C; Scaletsky, Isabel C A; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2013-05-28

    To evaluate the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and MLH1 and MGMT methylation and its relationship with microsatellite instability (MSI). The methylation status of the MLH1 and MGMT promoter region was analysed by methylation specific methylation-polymerase chain reaction (MSP-PCR) in gastric biopsy samples from uninfected or H. pylori-infected children (n = 50), from adults with chronic gastritis (n = 97) and from adults with gastric cancer (n = 92). MLH1 and MGMT mRNA expression were measured by real-time PCR and normalised to a constitutive gene (β actin). MSI analysis was performed by screening MSI markers at 4 loci (Bat-25, Bat-26, D17S250 and D2S123) with PCR; PCR products were analysed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by silver staining. Statistical analyses were performed with either the χ(2) test with Yates continuity correction or Fisher's exact test, and statistical significance for expression analysis was assessed using an unpaired Student's t-test. Methylation was not detected in the promoter regions of MLH1 and MGMT in gastric biopsy samples from children, regardless of H. pylori infection status. The MGMT promoter was methylated in 51% of chronic gastritis adult patients and was associated with H. pylori infection (P MLH1 methylation frequencies among H. pylori-infected and non-infected chronic gastritis adult patients were 13% and 7%, respectively. We observed methylation of the MLH1 promoter (39%) and increased MSI levels (68%) in samples from gastric cancer patients in comparison to samples from H. pylori-infected adult chronic gastritis patients (P MLH1 and MGMT mRNA were significantly reduced in chronic gastritis samples that were also hypermethylated (P MLH1 methylation did not occur in earlier-stage H. pylori infections and thus might depend on the duration of infection.

  4. Role of dental plaque, saliva and periodontal disease in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Pradeep S; Kamath, Kavitha P; Anil, Sukumaran

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. Although H. pylori may be detected in the stomach of approximately half of the world's population, the mechanisms of transmission of the microorganism from individual to individual are not yet clear. Transmission of H. pylori could occur through iatrogenic, fecal-oral, and oral-oral routes, and through food and water. The microorganism may be transmitted orally and has been detected in dental plaque and saliva. However, the role of the oral cavity in the transmission and recurrence of H. pylori infection has been the subject of debate. A large number of studies investigating the role of oral hygiene and periodontal disease in H. pylori infection have varied significantly in terms of their methodology and sample population, resulting in a wide variation in the reported results. Nevertheless, recent studies have not only shown that the microorganism can be detected fairly consistently from the oral cavity but also demonstrated that the chances of recurrence of H. pylori infection is more likely among patients who harbor the organism in the oral cavity. Furthermore, initial results from clinical trials have shown that H. pylori-positive dyspeptic patients may benefit from periodontal therapy. This paper attempts to review the current body of evidence regarding the role of dental plaque, saliva, and periodontal disease in H. pylori infection.

  5. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen test: a reliable non-invasive test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, O. J.; Bosman, D. K.; van't Hoff, B. W.; Taminiau, J. A.; ten Kate, F. J.; van der Ende, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen (HpSA) test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective cohort study in an academic medical centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 106 consecutive children who underwent gastroscopy were

  7. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and adult height

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moayyedi, Paul; Forman, David; Duffett, Sara; Mason, Su; Brown, Julia; Crocombe, Will; Feltbower, Richard; Axon, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: A cross-sectional survey was performed to evaluate the association between H. pylori and adult height. Methods: H. pylori infection was assessed using a 13 C-urea breath test and height measured by a research nurse using a stadiometer in participants between the ages of 40-49 years. Results: Height was measured in 2932/3682 participants that attended and were evaluable. H. pylori infected women were 1.4 cm shorter than uninfected women (95% confidence interval, CI=0.7-2.1 cm) and this statistically significant difference persisted after adjusting for age, ethnicity, childhood and present socio-economic status (H. pylori positives 0.79 cm shorter; 95%CI: 0.05-1.52 cm). H. pylori positive men were 0.7 cm shorter than uninfected men but this did not reach statistical significance (95% CI: -0.1-1.5 cm). Conclusion: Although H. pylori infection is associated with reduced adult height in women, this maybe due to residual confounding

  8. High prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Malaysian Parkinson's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisah WY

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available WY Nafisah,1 A Hamdi Najman,1 R Hamizah,1 S Azmin,1 R Rabani,1 SA Shah,2 MI Norlinah11Department of Medicine, 2Department of Community Health, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaBackground: Studies have reported a higher prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in Parkinson's disease.Objectives: To determine the frequency of H. pylori in patients with Parkinson's disease compared to controls and its effect on symptom severity and quality of life.Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study involving 29 Parkinson's disease patients and 23 controls. The 13C-urea breath test was used to diagnose H. pylori. Symptom severity and quality of life were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS and 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39, respectively.Results: The frequency of H. pylori infection was 48.3% in the Parkinson's disease group and 21.7% in controls (P=0.048. This became more significant (P=0.012 when we excluded relatives of H. pylori-positive patients from the control group. There was no association between Hoehn and Yahr stages, UPDRS and PDQ-39 scores, and H. pylori.Conclusion: H. pylori infection is more prevalent in the Malaysian Parkinson's disease population compared to controls (48.3% versus 21.7%. However, symptom severity and quality of life was not related to H. pylori infection.Keywords: Parkinson's disease, Helicobacter pylori, prevalence, 13C-urea breath test

  9. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in advanced gastric carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irami Araújo-Filho

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUD: There is substantial evidence that infection with Helicobacter pylori plays a role in the development of gastric cancer and that it is rarely found in gastric biopsy of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. On advanced gastric tumors, the bacteria can be lost from the stomach. AIMS: To analyze the hypothesis that the prevalence of H.pylori in operated advanced gastric carcinomas and adjacent non-tumor tissues is high, comparing intestinal and diffuse tumors according to Lauren's classification METHODS: A prospective controlled study enrolled 56 patients from "Hospital Universitário", Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil, with advanced gastric cancer, treated from February 2000 to March 2003. Immediately after partial gastrectomy, the resected stomach was opened and several mucosal biopsy samples were taken from the gastric tumor and from the adjacent mucosa within 4 cm distance from the tumor margin. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Lauren's classification for gastric cancer was used, to analyse the prevalence of H. pylori in intestinal or diffuse carcinomas assessed by the urease rapid test, IgG by ELISA and Giemsa staining. H. pylori infected patients were treated with omeprazole, clarithromycin and amoxicillin for 7 days. Follow-up endoscopy and serology were performed 6 months after treatment to determine successful eradication of H. pylori in non-tumor tissue. Thereafter, follow-up endoscopies were scheduled annually. Chi-square and MacNemar tests with 0.05 significance were used. RESULTS: Thirty-four tumors (60.7% were intestinal-type and 22 (39.3% diffuse type carcinomas. In adjacent non-tumor gastric mucosa, chronic gastritis were found in 53 cases (94.6% and atrophic mucosa in 36 patients (64.3%. All the patients with atrophic mucosa were H. pylori positive. When examined by Giemsa and urease test, H. pylori positive rate in tumor tissue of intestinal type carcinomas was

  10. Treatment of children with (Helicobacter pylori) infection and malabsorption syndromes with probiotics comparison with conventional methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, P F [CDU Padre Pio, Cotonou (Benin); De Maio, G; Andriulli, A [Ospedale CSS, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy); Ghoos, Y [Lab. Digestie Absorptie, Leuven (Belgium)

    2000-07-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is very high in the developing world where primary infection is acquired in early infancy. It may play a role as aggravating factor of malnutrition. This prevalence is decreasing in industrialised countries. In more cases symptomatology include recurrent abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea. Endoscopy in children is not always available in developing countries. The non-invasive {sup 13}CO{sub 2} Urea Breath Test is particularly indicated in these cases and has been validated as a reliable diagnostic and follow-up tool. The main problem in some countries is to find the good antibiotics without resistance. In this project the authors aim at long-term studying the relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection and nutritional status in young children of developing countries. The conditions of infection as well as absorption and pre- and post treatment period will be monitored by {sup 13}CO{sub 2} Urea Breath Tests. (author)

  11. Treatment of children with (Helicobacter pylori) infection and malabsorption syndromes with probiotics comparison with conventional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, P.F.; De Maio, G.; Andriulli, A.; Ghoos, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is very high in the developing world where primary infection is acquired in early infancy. It may play a role as aggravating factor of malnutrition. This prevalence is decreasing in industrialised countries. In more cases symptomatology include recurrent abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea. Endoscopy in children is not always available in developing countries. The non-invasive 13 CO 2 Urea Breath Test is particularly indicated in these cases and has been validated as a reliable diagnostic and follow-up tool. The main problem in some countries is to find the good antibiotics without resistance. In this project the authors aim at long-term studying the relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection and nutritional status in young children of developing countries. The conditions of infection as well as absorption and pre- and post treatment period will be monitored by 13 CO 2 Urea Breath Tests. (author)

  12. Lymphocytic gastritis is not associated with active Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jennifer A; Roberts, Cory A; Lager, Donna J; Putcha, Rajesh V; Jain, Rajeev; Lewin, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG), characterized by marked intra-epithelial lymphocytosis in the gastric mucosa, has been frequently associated with both celiac disease (CD) and H. pylori gastritis. The aim of this study was to review and correlate the morphology of LG with the presence of CD and H. pylori. Gastric biopsies diagnosed with LG from 1/1/2006 to 8/1/2013 at our institution and corresponding small bowel biopsies, when available, were reviewed for verification of the diagnosis and to assess for the presence of H. pylori and CD. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for H. pylori was performed on all gastric biopsies. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were obtained from the medical record. Fifty-four of the 56 cases that met inclusion criteria demonstrated significant intra-epithelial lymphocytosis as the predominant histologic abnormality; however, none were associated with H. pylori infection by IHC staining. Two cases that also showed a prominent intra-epithelial and lamina propria neutrophilic infiltrate were both positive for H. pylori and were excluded from further study. Of the 36 small bowel biopsies available, 19 (53%) showed changes in CD. LG is not a distinct clinicopathologic entity, but a morphologic pattern of gastric injury that can be secondary to a variety of underlying etiologies. When restricted to cases with lymphocytosis alone, LG is strongly associated with CD and not with active H. pylori infection. However, cases that also show significant neutrophilic infiltrate should be regarded as "active chronic gastritis" and are often associated with H. pylori infection. A morphologic diagnosis of LG should prompt clinical and serologic workup to exclude underlying CD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of eating habits in dyspeptic patients with or without Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Mohsen; Karbasi, Ashraf; Khedmat, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection varies in different societies and geographical locations. This is attributed to socioeconomic status, life style, family density and other factors. There is also a possibility of an association between eating habits and the prevalence of H. pylori infection. In this study, we examine the association between H. pylori infection and particular eating habits such as sharing plates, glasses and spoons. This cross-sectional study was performed via a questionnaire-based evaluation of all patients with dyspepsia who underwent endoscopic assessment. Data including demographic information, endoscopic findings, H. pylori status and sharing of dishes within families were recorded. Individuals with a history of 3-day antibiotic treatment in the past month, or use of proton pump inhibitors in the past two weeks, or regular use of H2-blockers during the past week were excluded. The H. pylori status was determined using the rapid urease test. Of the 225 participants who had filled in the questionnaire, 204 were eligible; 92 were male (45.1%) and 112 female (54.9%) with 22% younger than 30 years of age, 49% between 30 and 50 years and 29% older than 50. In families where common dishes were used, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher. (77% vs. 53%, p = 0.001) Factors such as age, sex, and education proved to be irrelevant. The results suggest a strong link between H. pylori infection and eating habits, thereby raising the possibility that modification of these habits might limit H. pylori infection.

  14. Relationship of interleukin-1B gene promoter region polymorphism with Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Ivy Bastos; Vianna, Júlia Silveira; Halicki, Priscila Cristina Bartolomeu; Lara, Caroline; Tadiotto, Thássia Fernanda; da Silva Maciel, João Batista; Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; von Groll, Andrea; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida

    2015-09-29

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. The severity of damage is determined by the interplay between environmental/behavioral factors, bacterial pathogenicity genes and host genetic polymorphisms that can influence the secretion levels of inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, this study aimed to identify polymorphisms in the IL-1B and IL-1RN genes and their associations with H. pylori infection, cagA gene of H. pylori, and gastroduodenal diseases. Gastric biopsy samples from 151 patients infected with H. pylori and 76 uninfected individuals were analyzed. H. pylori infection was diagnosed by histology and PCR. Polymorphisms at positions -511, -31 and +3954 of the IL-1B gene were detected by PCR-RFLP, and an analysis of the VNTR polymorphism of the IL-1RN gene was performed by PCR. It was observed that the presence of the T/T genotype at position -511 and the C/C genotype at position -31 were associated with H. pylori infection and with an increased risk of gastritis in H. pylori-positive patients. Additionally, strains from patients H. pylori-positive carrying the cagA gene was significantly related with the T/T genotype at position -511 of IL-1B.  No association of polymorphisms at position +3954 of IL-1B and in the IL-1RN with H. pylori infection and with risk of severe gastric diseases was found. We demonstrated that polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL-1B gene (at positions -511 and -31) are associated with an enhanced risk of H. pylori infection as well as gastritis in H. pylori-positive patients.

  15. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Batool M Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    Background : Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a common condition, affecting 25%-40% of the population. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CagA+ H. pylori and endoscopically proven gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Patients and Methods: The study group included 60 hospital patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease between 2007 and 2009 ...

  16. Histology of chronic gastritis with and without duodenitis in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Phull, P S; Price, A B; Stephens, J; Rathbone, B J; Jacyna, M R

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To compare the histological characteristics of Helicobacter pylori positive chronic gastritis in patients with and without associated duodenitis. METHODS: Gastric mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained from patients undergoing endoscopy for dyspepsia. Severity of gastritis and density of H pylori infection were graded according to the Sydney system. RESULTS: Of the 69 patients studied, 15 had normal histology, 22 had chronic gastritis only (77.3% H pylori positive), 21 had duodenitis (90...

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with calcular cholecystitis: a hospital based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Haider, I.Z.; Ahmad, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori, a gram negative bacillus has been recognised as a public health problem and approximately half of the world population has H. pylori infection causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies. Objective of this study was to determine the frequency of H. pylori infection in patients of chronic calcular cholecystitis. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at Liaquat University Hospital, Hyderabad, Pakistan from April 2010 to September 2010. All patients with history of gallstone presented with acute abdominal pain, dyspepsia, bloating and epigastric discomfort and diagnosed as calcular cholecystitis were further evaluated for the detection of H. pylori by serology and histopathology. Frequency and percentage of H. pylori infection in patients with calcular cholecystitis was calculated. Result: Total 100 patients of cholelithiasis underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy were recruited. The pain in upper right part of the abdomen was observed in all 100 patients, fever in 75%, nausea and vomiting in 68%, loss of appetite in 45%, feeling of tiredness or weakness in 22%, headache in 38%, chills in 52%, backache in 58%, pain under the right shoulder in 45%, heartburn in 67%, belching in 54%, indigestion in 80%, dyspepsia in 90%, bloating in 88%, and epigastric discomfort in 85% patients. Eighty-two percent patients had family history of gallstones. The mean age of overall study population was 48.72 +- 8.78 years and mean age of H. pylori infected calcular cholecystitis patients was 47.98 +- 5.43 years in male and 48.76 +- 6.68 years in females. The H. pylori infection was identified in 55% patients with calcular cholecystitis, of which 32.7% were males and 67.3% were females (p=0.03, statistically significant). Majority of females (60%) had =40 U/ml antibody titre (p=0.917, non-significant). Conclusion: A possible relationship was identified between Helicobacter pylori and calcular

  18. A comparative study of clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori has been isolated from 10%-20% of human chronic cholecystitis specimens but the characteristics of "Helicobacter pylori positive cholecystitis" remains unclear. This study aims to compare the clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa. METHODS: Three hundred and twenty-six chronic cholecystitis patients were divided into two groups according to whether Helicobacter pylori could be detected by culture, staining or PCR for Helicobacter 16s rRNA gene in gallbladder mucosa. Positive samples were sequenced for Helicobacter pylori-specific identification. Clinical parameters as well as pathological characteristics including some premalignant lesions and the expression levels of iNOS and ROS in gallbladder were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa was detected in 20.55% of cholecystitis patients. These patients had a higher prevalence of acid regurgitation symptoms (p = 0.001, more histories of chronic gastritis (p = 0.005, gastric ulcer (p = 0.042, duodenal ulcer (p = 0.026 and higher presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach as compared to patients without Helicobacter pylori infection in the gallbladder mucosa. Helicobacter pylori 16s rRNA in gallbladder and gastric-duodenal mucosa from the same individual patient had identical sequences. Also, higher incidences of adenomyomatosis (p = 0.012, metaplasia (p = 0.022 and higher enhanced expressions of iNOS and ROS were detected in Helicobacter pylori infected gallbladder mucosa (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori existed in stomach. Helicobacter pylori is also correlated with gallbladder premalignant lesions including metaplasia and adenomyomatosis. The potential mechanism might be related with higher ROS

  19. Treatment of children with Helicobacter pylori infection and malabsorption syndromes with probiotics: Comparison with conventional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoos, Y.; Brunser, O.; Lawson, F.; Muzeke, A.; Ndjaye, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    It is stated that in developing countries a high rate of Helicobacter pylori infection among newborns and young children occurs. It is further assumed that this incidence may lead to inhibition of defense mechanism (inhibition of acid secretion) against bacteria, per orally ingested. This may result in excessive colonisation of the small intestine by bacteria. This situation may become a major cause for chronic malnutrition and diarrhoea syndrome with failure to thrive. This project aims at determining the occurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection in children at young age. It is aimed also at tracing the relationship between the Helicobacter pylori infection and the state of undernourishment. Finally it is aimed at comparing the usefulness of pre-/probiotics as anti-infection treatment. The methods used to demonstrate above mentioned parameters are based on stable isotopes, 13 CO 2 and H 2 breath tests mainly. To assess nutritional status and progress in growth conventional anthropometric techniques will be used, complementary to the results obtained by stable isotopes. It is put forward that the use of pre-/probiotics, instead of antibiotics, will suppress upper gastrointestinal infection and restore the intestinal cell capacity to assimilate all food ingredients. (author)

  20. Treatment of children with Helicobacter pylori infection and malabsorption syndromes with probiotics: Comparison with conventional methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoos, Y [UZ Gasthuisberg, Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology, Leuven (Belgium); Brunser, O [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, Santiago (Chile); Lawson, F [Clinique Padre Pio, Cotonou (Benin); Muzeke, A [Faculte de Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa (Congo); Ndjaye, M F [Cercle Senegalais Gastroenterologie, Dakar (Senegal)

    2000-07-01

    It is stated that in developing countries a high rate of Helicobacter pylori infection among newborns and young children occurs. It is further assumed that this incidence may lead to inhibition of defense mechanism (inhibition of acid secretion) against bacteria, per orally ingested. This may result in excessive colonisation of the small intestine by bacteria. This situation may become a major cause for chronic malnutrition and diarrhoea syndrome with failure to thrive. This project aims at determining the occurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection in children at young age. It is aimed also at tracing the relationship between the Helicobacter pylori infection and the state of undernourishment. Finally it is aimed at comparing the usefulness of pre-/probiotics as anti-infection treatment. The methods used to demonstrate above mentioned parameters are based on stable isotopes, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} breath tests mainly. To assess nutritional status and progress in growth conventional anthropometric techniques will be used, complementary to the results obtained by stable isotopes. It is put forward that the use of pre-/probiotics, instead of antibiotics, will suppress upper gastrointestinal infection and restore the intestinal cell capacity to assimilate all food ingredients. (author)

  1. Metabolic Interaction of Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gut Microbiota

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    Yao-Jong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As a barrier, gut commensal microbiota can protect against potential pathogenic microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. Crosstalk between gut microbes and immune cells promotes human intestinal homeostasis. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota has been implicated in the development of many human metabolic disorders like obesity, hepatic steatohepatitis, and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes (T2D. Certain microbes, such as butyrate-producing bacteria, are lower in T2D patients. The transfer of intestinal microbiota from lean donors increases insulin sensitivity in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but the exact pathogenesis remains unclear. H. pylori in the human stomach cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancers. H. pylori infection also induces insulin resistance and has been defined as a predisposing factor to T2D development. Gastric and fecal microbiota may have been changed in H. pylori-infected persons and mice to promote gastric inflammation and specific diseases. However, the interaction of H. pylori and gut microbiota in regulating host metabolism also remains unknown. Further studies aim to identify the H. pylori-microbiota-host metabolism axis and to test if H. pylori eradication or modification of gut microbiota can improve the control of human metabolic disorders.

  2. Investigation of the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection using the {sup 14}C-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Aydogan, Fusun; Motor, Vicdan Koksaldi; Ilhan, Ozgur; Daglioglu, Mutlu Cihan; Coskun, Mesut; Parlakfikirer, Nihan; Keskin, Ugurcan, E-mail: drayhant@hotmail.com [Medical Faculty, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: to investigate the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection by evaluating for the presence of H. pylori infection in patients with glaucoma using the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT). Methods: Using 14C-UBT, H. pylori infection positivity was compared between a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and a control group with normal intraocular pressure and a normal optic disc or normal perimetry. Results: the 14C-UBT was positive in 18 (51.42%) out of 35 patients in the glaucoma group and in 15 (42.85%) out of 35 patients in the control group. H. pylori infection positivity rates were similar between the glaucoma and control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: according to the 14C-UBT, there is no association between primary open-angle glaucoma and H. pylori infection. (author)

  3. Investigation of the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection using the 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Aydogan, Fusun; Motor, Vicdan Koksaldi; Ilhan, Ozgur; Daglioglu, Mutlu Cihan; Coskun, Mesut; Parlakfikirer, Nihan; Keskin, Ugurcan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection by evaluating for the presence of H. pylori infection in patients with glaucoma using the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT). Methods: Using 14C-UBT, H. pylori infection positivity was compared between a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and a control group with normal intraocular pressure and a normal optic disc or normal perimetry. Results: the 14C-UBT was positive in 18 (51.42%) out of 35 patients in the glaucoma group and in 15 (42.85%) out of 35 patients in the control group. H. pylori infection positivity rates were similar between the glaucoma and control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: according to the 14C-UBT, there is no association between primary open-angle glaucoma and H. pylori infection. (author)

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with failure to thrive: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu NC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nan-Chang Chiu,1,2,* Chien-Yu Lin,3,* Hsin Chi,1 Chun-Yan Yeung,1,2 Wei-Hsin Ting,1 Wai-Tao Chan,1 Chuen-Bin Jiang,1 Sung-Tse Li,3,4 Chao-Hsu Lin,3 Hung-Chang Lee1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, MacKay Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Medicine, MacKay Junior College of Medicine, Nursing and Management, Taipei, 3Department of Pediatrics, Hsinchu MacKay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu City, 4Department of Statistics and Information Science, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The long-term impact of Helicobacter pylori infection is complex, and concerns about the need for eradication exist. We conducted this case control study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and failure to thrive (FTT.Patients and methods: From January 2009 to December 2011, 53 children with FTT group and matched children with the same sex and age and similar socioeconomic status without FTT (control group were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered to the parents/guardian, and a 13C-urea breath test was performed to detect H. pylori infection.Results: We found that the total prevalence of H. pylori infection was 29.2% and that there was no association between FTT and H. pylori infection (FTT group: 32%; control group: 26.4%; P=0.67. Short stature was more common in the FTT group and abdominal pain in the control group (FTT group: 37.7%; control group: 11.3%; P=0.003. In a comparison between the H. pylori-positive and -negative groups, abdominal pain (87.1% vs 64%; P=0.032 and the frequency of endoscopy (74.2% vs 32%; P<0.001 were significantly more common in the H. pylori-positive group.Conclusion: We found that children with H. pylori infection are at an increased risk for abdominal pain and that FTT is not associated with H. pylori infection. The decision for eradication should be evaluated carefully and individualized. Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, 13C-urea breath test, failure

  5. Agreement Between Serology and Histology for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, S.; Fatima, S.; Raheem, A.; Khan, A. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the percentage agreement between serology and histology for detection of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology and Microbiology, The Aga Khan University and Hospital, Karachi, from January to December 2009. Methodology: Fifty subjects were selected by non-probability purposive sampling from laboratory data who had serological testing of H. pylori IgG antibody, prior to histological evaluation of endoscopic gastric or/and duodenal biopsies. Serological Quantification of H. pylori IgG was carried out with HpG screen ELISA kit (Genesis Diagnostics, UK), using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for detection of IgG antibodies against H. pylori. Manufacturer's recommended cutoff value was used and results were considered positive when greater than 7 U/ml. For histological diagnosis, an expert histopathologist characterized the presence of spiral bacteria in the mucosal layer or the surface of epithelial cells on microscopic examination, as a positive test. Results: An agreement of 0.72 was found by Kappa statistics between serology and histopathology results and a good diagnostic accuracy (86%) of serological testing was observed for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Conclusion: A substantial agreement was found between serology and histopathology results to detect the H. pylori infection. Laboratory-based serologic testing using ELISA technology to detect IgG antibodies is inexpensive, noninvasive and convenient method to detect the H. pylori infection in primary care setting. (author)

  6. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

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    António M. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  7. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylori infection and other risk factors in patients with benign peptic ulcer disease

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    Depender Kumar Timshina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess and compare the risk factors in patients with benign gastric and duodenal ulcers and to correlate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in benign peptic ulcer disease. Methods: A total of 30 consecutive patients with peptic ulcer disease were included in this study after upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Their clinical profile and endoscopic findings were noted. Antral biopsies were subjected to histopathological examination and urease test for detection of H. pylori. Results were correlated. The study was cleared by the Institute Research Council and the Ethics committee. Results: The male: female ratio was 11:4. Overall, H. pylori infection was prevalent in 93.3% of the patients. Patients who took spicy food had a significantly higher rate of H. pylori positivity (P=0.04. Smoking, alcohol intake and NSAIDs did not affect H. pylori status in patients. There was no significant association between the site of the ulcer and H. pylori infection. Conclusions: Based on our observations we conclude that prevalence of H. pylori infection is similar in duodenal and gastric ulcers and intake of spicy food is a significant risk factor.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection is an independent risk factor of early and advanced colorectal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Jun; Kim, Eun Ran; Chang, Dong Kyung; Kim, Young-Ho; Baek, Sun-Young; Kim, Kyunga; Hong, Sung Noh

    2017-06-01

    The role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in the development of colorectal neoplasm remains controversial. We examined the association between H. pylori infection and colorectal neoplasm in a large sample of healthy participants who underwent screening colonoscopy. A cross-sectional study of 8916 men, who participated in a regular health-screening examination that included an H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin G antibody test and colonoscopy, was conducted to evaluate the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasm. Multivariable analyses adjusted for age, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol intake, regular exercise, regular aspirin use, and family history of colorectal cancer showed that the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) for any adenoma and advanced neoplasm was 1.32 (1.07-1.61) and 1.90 (1.05-3.56) in participants with H. pylori infection and without H. pylori infection, respectively. The association persisted after further adjustment for inflammatory markers or metabolic variables including fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Regarding the location, a positive association was confined to cases with proximal adenomas and was observed similarly in all the evaluated subgroups. In a large-scale study, carefully controlled for confounding factors, involving asymptomatic participants without a history of colonoscopy, H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the risk of any colorectal adenoma and advanced colorectal neoplasm. Prospective studies are necessary to determine whether H. pylori eradication can reduce this risk. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamichael, Konstantinos; Konstantopoulos, Panagiotis; Mantzaris, Gerassimos J

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most widely spread infectious diseases in humans. It can cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies and has been associated with extra-gastric disorders. H. pylori elicit a chronic systemic inflammatory response which, under certain conditions, may trigger autoimmune reactions and may be implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, it is thought to result from complex interactions between environmental factors and microbiota in the gut of individuals who are genetically susceptible. Several bacterial and viral agents have been implicated in the aetiology of IBD. In theory, H. pylori infection could be involved in the pathogenesis of IBD by inducing alterations in gastric and/or intestinal permeability or by causing immunological derangements resulting in absorption of antigenic material and autoimmunity via various immunological pathways. Similar mechanisms may also be responsible for the co-existence of IBD with other autoimmune diseases and/or extra-intestinal manifestations. However, the epidemiological data fail to support this association. In fact, various studies indicate that the prevalence of H. pylori infection is low in patients with IBD, suggesting a protective role for this infection in the development of IBD. In this report, we aim to shed light on proposed mechanisms and confounding factors underlying the potential link between H. pylori infection and IBD. PMID:24914359

  10. Cationic amino acid transporter 2 enhances innate immunity during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Barry

    Full Text Available Once acquired, Helicobacter pylori infection is lifelong due to an inadequate innate and adaptive immune response. Our previous studies indicate that interactions among the various pathways of arginine metabolism in the host are critical determinants of outcomes following infection. Cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2 is essential for transport of L-arginine (L-Arg into monocytic immune cells during H. pylori infection. Once within the cell, this amino acid is utilized by opposing pathways that lead to elaboration of either bactericidal nitric oxide (NO produced from inducible NO synthase (iNOS, or hydrogen peroxide, which causes macrophage apoptosis, via arginase and the polyamine pathway. Because of its central role in controlling L-Arg availability in macrophages, we investigated the importance of CAT2 in vivo during H. pylori infection. CAT2(-/- mice infected for 4 months exhibited decreased gastritis and increased levels of colonization compared to wild type mice. We observed suppression of gastric macrophage levels, macrophage expression of iNOS, dendritic cell activation, and expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in CAT2(-/- mice suggesting that CAT2 is involved in enhancing the innate immune response. In addition, cytokine expression in CAT2(-/- mice was altered from an antimicrobial Th1 response to a Th2 response, indicating that the transporter has downstream effects on adaptive immunity as well. These findings demonstrate that CAT2 is an important regulator of the immune response during H. pylori infection.

  11. Inflammation, Immunity, and Vaccines for Helicobacter pylori Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walduck, Anna; Andersen, Leif P; Raghavan, Sukanya

    2015-01-01

    studies that contribute with new insights in the host response to H. pylori infection. Also, the adaptive immune response to H. pylori and particularly the role of IL-22 have been addressed in some studies. These advances may improve vaccine development where new strategies have been published. Two major...... studies analyzed H. pylori genomes of 39 worldwide strains and looked at the protein profiles. In addition, multi-epitope vaccines for therapeutic use have been investigated. Studies on different adjuvants and delivery systems have also given us new insights. This review presents articles from the last...... year that reveal detailed insight into immunity and regulation of inflammation, the contribution of immune cells to the development of gastric cancer, and understanding mechanisms of vaccine-induced protection....

  12. 14C-urea breath test in the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artiko, V.M.; Obradovic, V.B.; Petrovic, N.S.; Davidovic, B.M.; Grujic-Adanja, G.S.; Nastic-Miric, D.R.; Milosavljevic, T.N.

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is supposed to be one of the major causes of digestive and other diseases. Among a lot of invasive and non-invasive methods for its detection, none is ideal. The aim is an assessment of the Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach using breath test and comparison to other diagnostic methods, as well as following up the effects of therapy. In 17 patients with digestive discomfort, breath test, rapid urease test and histology were performed, while in 47 patients with proven HP infection the effect of therapy was followed up using breath test and clinical findings. Breath test was performed after per oral administration of the capsule of 14 C urea (37 kBq). Findings of the breath and urease tests were in accordance in 14/17 patients (83%) while breath test and histology in 16/17 patients (94%). During follow-up of the therapeutic effects, breath test and clinical findings were in accordance in 43/47 patients (98%). Breath test can be useful in diagnosis but is a method of choice in following up the patients after therapy for H. pylori infection, because it is non-invasive, fast and precise. (author)

  13. Treatment of children with Helicobacter pylori infection and malabsorption syndrome with probiotics: Comparison with conventional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel Ndiaye, M.

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infection in the world. In Senegal prevalence rates is high as well in symptomatic patients (85,8%) as in general population (82%). Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in earlier age and leads to chronic infection (80% of children under 5 years old are infected in Senegal). On the other hand, malnutrition is common in children under 5 years old in Senegal (25%). H. pylori can cause malnutrition in a variety of ways including decreased food intake due to dyspepsia, defective digestion/absorption, diarrhea and may impact on the growth of children. H. pylori infection is a deep public health problem because non-invasive diagnosis tests are not available in routine practice and mainly because there are many difficulties in its treatment: no availability of drug (Clarithromycine); too much high cost of classic and effective therapeutic strategy ( three times minimal salary); high rate of resistance to antibiotics: 60-95% to Metronidazole, 50-60% to Tetracyclines, 30-40% to Macrolides as Azithromycine and Roxithromycine. So, the main problem in Senegal is to find the good, available and cheep treatment without resistance. Probiotics have been considered as a possible tool for this purpose

  14. Treatment of children with Helicobacter pylori infection and malabsorption syndrome with probiotics: Comparison with conventional methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel Ndiaye, M [Institute Cercle Senegalais de Gastro-Enterlogie, Dakar (Senegal)

    2000-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infection in the world. In Senegal prevalence rates is high as well in symptomatic patients (85,8%) as in general population (82%). Helicobacter pylori infection occurs in earlier age and leads to chronic infection (80% of children under 5 years old are infected in Senegal). On the other hand, malnutrition is common in children under 5 years old in Senegal (25%). H. pylori can cause malnutrition in a variety of ways including decreased food intake due to dyspepsia, defective digestion/absorption, diarrhea and may impact on the growth of children. H. pylori infection is a deep public health problem because non-invasive diagnosis tests are not available in routine practice and mainly because there are many difficulties in its treatment: no availability of drug (Clarithromycine); too much high cost of classic and effective therapeutic strategy ( three times minimal salary); high rate of resistance to antibiotics: 60-95% to Metronidazole, 50-60% to Tetracyclines, 30-40% to Macrolides as Azithromycine and Roxithromycine. So, the main problem in Senegal is to find the good, available and cheep treatment without resistance. Probiotics have been considered as a possible tool for this purpose.

  15. Concurrent overexpression of serum p53 mutation related with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo-Peñuelas Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aims In the province of Cadiz (Spain, the adjusted mortality rate for gastric cancer in the coastal town of Barbate is 10/100.000 inhabitants, whereas in the inland town of Ubrique, the rate is twice as high. The rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection (H. pylori antibodies in the normal population was 54% in Ubrique, but only 32% in Barbate. In the two decades since its original discovery, p53 has found a singularly prominent place in our understanding of human gastric cancer and H. pylori cause accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the mucosa compartment. This study was designed to compare serum levels of p53 in a population characterized by high mortality due to stomach cancer and a high prevalence of H. pylori infection and another population in which mortality from this cause and the prevalence of H. pylori infection are low. Materials and methods 319 subjects from the low mortality population and 308 from the high mortality population were studied, as were 71 patients with stomach cancer. We measured serum immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori and serum mutant p53 protein and ceruloplasmin. Results The difference between the two populations in the prevalence of H. pylori infection was significant (p Conclusions There is a significant association between infection with H. pylori, elevated titers of H. pylori antibodies, and positivity for serum mutant p53 protein. Such information can significantly increase our basic knowledge in molecular pathology of gastric cancer and protection against H. pylori infection.

  16. Systematic review with meta-analysis: the worldwide prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, M; Ebrahimtabar, F; Zamani, V; Miller, W H; Alizadeh-Navaei, R; Shokri-Shirvani, J; Derakhshan, M H

    2018-04-01

    The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection is poorly understood. To establish the reported regional and national prevalence of H. pylori infection, stratified by age and gender. All relevant English publications from 2000 to 2017 cited by PubMed and Scopus were retrieved using comprehensive combinations of keywords. The overall prevalence of H. pylori was estimated using both random effect and fixed effect meta-analyses, and presented as prevalence rate (% and 95% CI). The analyses were extended by separation into gender and age groups. A total of 14 056 records were obtained initially. After applying exclusion criteria in several steps, 183 studies were selected. Analysis of 410 879 participants from 73 countries in six continents revealed an overall prevalence of 44.3% (95% CI: 40.9-47.7) worldwide. This rate ranged from 50.8% (95% CI: 46.8-54.7) in developing countries compared with 34.7% (95% CI: 30.2-39.3) in developed countries. The global H. pylori infection rate was 42.7% (95% CI: 39-46.5) in females compared to 46.3% (95% CI: 42.1-50.5) in males. The prevalence in adults (≥18 years) was significantly higher than in children (48.6% [95% CI: 43.8-53.5] vs 32.6% [95% CI: 28.4-36.8], respectively). There was a statistically nonsignificant decrease in the prevalence in 2009-2016 compared with the 2000-2009 period. The observed differences between countries appear to be due to economic and social conditions. H. pylori infection can be a benchmark for the socioeconomic and health status of a country. Further studies are suggested to investigate the natural history of the acquisition of H. pylori infection from childhood into adult life. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Novel sonographic clues for diagnosis of antral gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, Emin; Ucan, Berna; Colak, Bayram; Cinar, Hasibe Gokçe

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether transabdominal sonography may have a predictive role for detection of antral gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in the antrum. A total of 108 patients and 54 control participants were allocated into 3 groups: group 1, controls without any symptoms or findings of antral gastritis and H pylori infection; group 2, patients with symptoms and endoscopic findings consistent with gastritis in the absence of documented H pylori infection; and group 3, patients with symptoms and endoscopic findings consistent with gastritis and documented H pylori infection. These groups were compared in terms of demographics, antral wall thickness, mucosal layer (together with muscularis mucosa) thickness, and mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio. The groups had no statistically significant differences with respect to age, sex, body mass index, and smoking habits. However, it turned out that both antral walls and muscularis mucosa layers were thicker and the mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio was higher in groups 2 and 3 compared to group 1 (P > .001). In addition, group 3 had statistically significantly thicker antral walls and muscularis mucosa layers and a significantly increased mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio than group 2 (P gastritis caused by H pylori infection is associated with characteristic features such as thickening of antral walls and mucosal layers on sonography. These novel clues may be useful in the diagnosis of gastritis, and unnecessary interventions and measures can be avoided in some cases. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. Peptic Ulcer Disease and Helicobacter pylori Infection in Different Siberian Ethnicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Vladislav V; Kasparov, Edward V; Tonkikh, Julia L; Shtygasheva, Olga V; Butorin, Nikolay N; Amelchugova, Olga S; Vasyutin, Alexander V; Bronnikova, Elena P; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    The high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in eastern Siberia is consistently established. In the same geographic area, however, fragmentary information is available on the epidemiology of the peptic ulcer disease (PUD). To assess the prevalence of H. pylori infection (including CagA status) and PUD in different eastern Siberian ethnicities. An endoscopy population of 3149 eastern Siberian dyspeptic patients was considered [1727 Europoids and 1422 Mongoloids (Evenks = 792; Khakases = 630)]. H. pylori status was assessed by urease test and/or serum anti-H. pylori IgG and/or histology. CagA status was serologically assessed (anti-CagA antibodies). All the Siberian ethnicities featured high rates of H. pylori infection (Europoids = 87.1%, Evenks = 88.6%, Khakases = 85.4%). Among the 1504 H. pylori-positive Europoids, the prevalence of CagA-positive status (68.7%) was significantly higher than that featured by the 1240 H. pylori-positive Mongoloid ethnicities (46.9%; p Peptic ulcer disease significantly prevailed among Europoids (prevalence among Europoid Evenks and Khakases: 8.9% and 8.3%, respectively; prevalence among Mongoloid Evenks and Khakases = 1.0% and 4.4%, respectively). eastern Siberian populations feature consistent high rates of H. pylori infection, but different prevalence of peptic ulcer disease. In particular, Europoids featured a prevalence of both CagA-positive status and peptic ulcer disease significantly higher than that of the Mongoloid ethnicities. These results suggest that both environmental factors (coexisting with the H. pylori infection) and host-related variables modulate the clinicopathological expression of the H. pylori -associated gastric diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection: approach of primary care physicians in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shah Hasnain

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and practices of primary care physicians in diagnosis and management of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in developing country. Methods This convenient sample based, cross sectional study was conducted in primary care physicians of Karachi, Pakistan from March 2008 to August 2008 through a pretested self-designed questionnaire, which contained 11 items pertaining to H. pylori route of transmission, diagnosis, indication for testing, treatment options, follow up and source of information. Results Out of 509 primary care physicians, 451 consented to participate with the response rate of 88.6%. Responses of 426 primary care physicians were analyzed after excluding 19 physicians. 78% of the physicians thought that contaminated water was the source of spread of infection, dyspepsia was the most frequent indication for investigating H. pylori infection (67% of the physicians, while 43% physicians were of the view that serology was the most appropriate test to diagnose active H. pylori infection. 77% of physicians thought that gastric ulcer was the most compelling indication for treatment, 61% physicians preferred Clarithromycin based triple therapy for 7–14 days. 57% of the physicians would confirm H. pylori eradication after treatment in selected patients and 47% physicians preferred serological testing for follow-up. In case of treatment failure, only 36% of the physicians were in favor of gastroenterologist referral. Conclusion The primary care physicians in this study lacked in knowledge regarding management of H. pylori infection. Internationally published guidelines and World gastroenterology organization (WGO practice guideline on H. pylori for developing countries have little impact on current practices of primary care physicians. We recommend more teaching programs, continuous medical education activities regarding H. pylori infection.

  20. Natural History of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Mexican Schoolchildren: Incidence and Spontaneous Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Ximena; Vilchis, Jenny; Mera, Robertino; Trejo-Valdivia, Belem; Goodman, Karen J.; Mendoza, Maria-Eugenia; Navarro, Fabiola; Roque, Victoria; Moran, Segundo; Torres, Javier; Correa, Pelayo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to estimate the incidence and spontaneous clearance rate of Helicobacter pylori infection and the effect of some variables on these outcomes in schoolchildren. Methods From May 2005 to December 2010, 718 schoolchildren enrolled in 3 public boarding schools in Mexico City participated in the follow-up. At the beginning of the study and every 6 months thereafter, breath samples were taken to detect H pylori infection; blood samples and anthropometric measurements were taken to evaluate nutritional status. Data on sociodemographic characteristics were collected. Results The prevalence of H pylori infection was 38%. The incidence rate was 6.36%/year. Schoolchildren with anemia or iron deficiency at the beginning of the study (who received iron supplements) showed a higher infection acquisition rate than those with normal iron nutritional status, hazard ratio (HR) 12.52 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.01%–39.12%), P <0.001 and HR 2.05 (95% CI 1.09%–3.87%), P = 0.027, respectively. The spontaneous clearance rate of the infection was 4.74%/year. The spontaneous clearance rate was higher in children who had iron deficiency (who received iron supplements), HR 5.02 (95% CI 1.33%–18.99%), P = 0.017, compared with those with normal nutritional iron status. It was lower in schoolchildren with ≥2 siblings compared with schoolchildren with 1 or no siblings, HR 0.23 (95% CI 0.08%–0.63%), P = 0.004. Conclusions H pylori infection status is dynamic in schoolchildren. Variables related to health status and infection transmission, such as iron status and number of siblings, are important for the incidence and spontaneous clearance of H pylori infection. PMID:22227999

  1. Potential Association of IL1B Polymorphism With Iron Deficiency Risk in Childhood Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Ta; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2018-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection occurs predominantly in childhood. Host immune response gene polymorphism is reported to affect the susceptibility to H pylori infection and the outcome of H pylori-related gastric cancer. Not all H pylori-infected patients, however, exhibit iron deficiency (ID). The relationship between host genetic polymorphisms and ID mediated by H pylori infection is not well understood. Subjects (n = 644) from the general population of age 10 to 18 years were divided into 2 groups based on serology testing for anti-H pylori IgG: seropositive study group; and seronegative control group. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in IL1B (rs1143627 and rs16944), IL8 (rs4073), IL10 (rs1800896), and ABO (rs505922), were genotyped and the iron status of the 2 groups was compared. The seroprevalence rate for H pylori was 10.7% in this study. Infected subjects were significantly older and had lower serum iron levels than uninfected subjects (P = 0.0195 and 0.0059, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed a significantly higher frequency of the T allele of rs505922 (odds ratio [OR] = 6.128; P < 0.001) and lower frequency of the T allele of rs1143627 (OR = 0.846; P = 0.014) in seropositive subjects. Among 59 seropositive subjects, the T allele frequency of rs1143627 was significantly higher in those with ID (OR = 3.156; P = 0.043), compared with those without ID. ABO (rs505922) and IL1B (rs1143627) may affect H pylori infection susceptibility, and IL1B (rs1143627) may also influence ID risk in infected children.

  2. Treatment of helicobacter pylori infection; a controlled randomized comparative clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Usmanghani, K.; Mohiuddin, E.; Akram, M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces chronic inflammation of the underlying gastric mucosa and is strongly linked to the development of duodenal and gastric carcinoma. A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Pylorex, a herbal formulation, for treatment of H. pylori infection as compared to triple allopathic therapy (Omeprazole, Amoxicillin, Metronidazole). The therapeutic evaluations of these medicines were conducted on 97 clinically and immunologically diagnosed cases of H. pylori infection. H. pylori was eradicated in 16 (32.6%) out of 49 patients by the use of triple allopathic therapy (Control drugs), and in 9 (18.7%) out of 48 patients by the use of Pylorex (Test drug). Pylorex possesses a therapeutic value for the treatment of H. pylori associated symptoms but the eradication rate is superior in triple allopathic therapy. (author)

  3. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on chronic periodontitis by the change of microecology and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhekai; Zhang, Yu; Li, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuedi; Kang, Wenyan; Han, Yingnan; Geng, Xiwen; Ge, Shaohua; Sun, Yundong

    2016-10-11

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a pathogen inducing peptic disease, is recently found to be binding to the progress of periodontitis. Most previous studies are case-controlled, and they investigate the risk of H. pylori infection in disease the development of while few studies evaluate the correlation between H. pylori and periodontal pathogens. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between H. pylori infection with periodontal parameters, periodontal pathogens and inflammation. The results indicated that patients with H. pylori showed significantly higher probing depth and attachment loss than those without (p periodontitis-related molecules Wnt5a, interleukin 8 (IL-8), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) significantly increased (p periodontal pathogens and aggravate the progress of chronic periodontitis.

  4. Study on Urea Breath Test (UBT) a tool for helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolekar, R.V.; Bhade, S.P.D.; Reddy, Priyanka; Singh, Rajvir; Gadgil, Anita; Bhandarkar, Prashant; Roy, N.; Patil, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori commonly called as H. pylori resides in the gastric epithelial mucosa and induces an inflammatory response leading to gastritis, peptic nicer disease and gastric malignancies. Detection and eradication of H.pylori infection is thus an important measure to prevent these. H.pylori has a worldwide prevalence rate of about 50%, with a higher prevalence in developing countries. Urea breath test, an outpatient noninvasive technique achieves up to 95% sensitivity and specificity at half the cost compared to histology, in detecting H. Pylori infection. Indian studies on the use of UBT and its standard protocol are sparse. The present paper discusses the application of Carbon-14 Urea breath test for the diagnosis of H pylori bacterial infection in 261 adult patients

  5. Helicobacter pylori Infection in the general population: A Middle Eastern perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedmat, Hossein; Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Agah, Shahram; Taheri, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection is probably the most important factor that has been associated with the development of gastric cancers in human populations. However, there are no reliable data on the prevalence of this infection in the Middle East. In this article, based on a comprehensive literature review, we aimed to evaluate the situation in this region. The literature has been searched for the incidence and prevalence of H.pylori infection by Pubmed and Google Scholar. Search was repeated for each of the Middle Eastern countries, and to empower the method, citations of each found article were searched for the related studies. Seventy seven reports from the countries of the Middle East region had been reviewed and they all indicated a high rate of infection either in the general population or in the dyspeptic patients, the rate seemed to be higher in patients with dyspepsia, in patients with histologically confirmed gastritis and in patients of older age groups.

  6. Association of mast cells with helicobacter pylori infection in the antral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SR KC

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate consisting of neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Helicobacter pylori lead to mast cell degranulation and release of active chemical compounds in in-vitro conditions. The objective of this study was to find out the association of mast cell density and Helicobacter pylori in the antral mucosa of the stomach. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 endoscopic biopsies were included in the study. In addition to routine Hematoxylin and Eosin stained slides, Giemsa stain was done in each case for the evaluation of Helicobacter pylori and mast cell density in the gastric mucosa. Results: Out of 150 gastric biopsies with histopathological diagnosis of chronic gastritis, 36 cases (24% were positive for Helicobacter pylori. In the antral mucosa, mast cell density was significantly higher in the Helicobacter pylori-positive group than in the Helicobacter pylori-negative group (P<0.01. Conclusion: Mast cells may play a role in the development of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. Keywords: Gastritis; Mast Cell; Helicobacter pylori DOI: 10.3126/jpn.v1i1.4448 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2011 Vol.1, 34-36

  7. The role of environmental tobacco exposure and Helicobacter pylori infection in the risk of chronic tonsillitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li’e

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a chronic infectious pathogen with high prevalence. This study investigated the interaction between environmental tobacco exposure and H. pylori infection on the incidence of chronic tonsillitis in Chinese children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study performed in an outpatient clinic in China. METHODS: Pediatric patients with chronic tonsillitis were enrolled. H. pylori infection was determined according to the presence of H. pylori CagA IgG antibodies. Serum cotinine levels and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS exposure were determined for all participants. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in H. pylori infection between the children with chronic tonsillitis and children free of disease, but there was a significant difference in ETS between the two groups (P = 0.011. We next studied the association between ETS and chronic tonsillitis based on H. pylori infection status. In the patients with H. pylori infection, there was a significant difference in ETS distribution between the chronic tonsillitis and control groups (P = 0.022. Taking the participants without ETS as the reference, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that those with high ETS had higher susceptibility to chronic tonsillitis (adjusted OR = 2.33; 95% CI: 1.67-3.25; adjusted P < 0.001. However, among those without H. pylori infection, ETS did not predispose towards chronic tonsillitis. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that tobacco exposure should be a putative mediator risk factor to chronic tonsillitis among children with H. pylori infection.

  8. FLOW MEDIATED DILATION AND CAROTID INTIMA MEDIA THICKNESS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC GASTRITIS ASSOCIATED WITH HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judaki, Arezo; Norozi, Siros; Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza Hafezi; Ghavam, Samira Mis; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Rahmani, Asghar

    2017-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is one of the early stages of vascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial dysfunction markers in patients with chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. By a cross sectional study, basic and clinical information of 120 participants (40 patients with positive H. pylori infection, 40 patients with negative H. pylori infection and 40 healthy people) were analyzed. Carotid intima media thickness and flow-mediated dilation levels were measured in all patients and controls. Soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were measured with Elisa for all subjects. IgG level was assessed in chronic gastritis patients. The flow-mediated dilation level in patients with positive H. pylori infection (0.17%±0.09) was significantly lower than those with negative H. pylori infection (0.21% ±0.10, Pgastritis. The levels of flow-mediated dilation, carotid intima media thickness and sICAM-1 were higher among patients with positive H. pylori infection. Patients with chronic gastritis associated with H. pylori infection are at risk of endothelial dysfunction due to flow-mediated dilation and carotid intima media thickness abnormalities and increased level of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1.

  9. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections: Mitigating factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic spiral or motile rod that infects about half the world's population with a very high prevalence in the developing world. It is an important aetiological factor in the development of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric atrophy and B cell mucosa associated lymphoid tissue ...

  10. Virulence factors and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talebibezminabadi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative, spiral shaped bacterium that colonizes the epithelial mucosa of the human stomach of more than 50% of the worlds population. Colonization typically occurs during early childhood, and if left untreated it usually lasts for life. The long-term persistence of H.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repai...

  12. [The influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the occurance of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with renal insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolić, Radojica; Jovanović, Aleksandar; Perić, Vladan; Trajković, Goran; Zivić, Ziva; Stolić, Dragica; Lazarević, Tatjana; Sovtić, Sasa

    2007-12-01

    Gastric acid is a key factor in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease. A plausible mechanism by which the Helicobacter pylori infection might protect against reflux disease is by its propensity to produce atrophic gastritis. The aim of the study was to establish the influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with different stages of renal insufficiency. The examination was organized as a prospective, clinical study and involved 68 patients--33 patients with preterminal stage of renal failure and 35 patients with terminal renal insufficiency. Due to dyspeptic difficulties, in all the patients there was preformed upper esophagogastroscopy and Helicobacter pylori infection was found by ureasa test. The patients with preterminal renal insufficiency were significantly younger than patients with terminal renal failure (53.4 +/- 11.1 vs. 65.4 +/- 12.3 years; p = 0.014). There was found a statistically significant difference between the groups in Helicobacter pylori infection (p = 0.03), hiatal hernia (p = 0.008), gastroesophageal reflux disease (p = 0.007), and duodenal ulcer (p = 0.002). Using the multiple non-parametric correlative analysis there was confirmed a negative correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (Kendal tauB = -0.523; p = 0.003) and hiatal hernia (Kendal tauB = 0.403; p = 0.021), while there was found a positive correlation between gastro-esophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia (Kendal tauB = 0.350; p = 0.044). Helicobacter pylori infection is a significant protective parameter of the incidence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease in patients with both pre-terminal and terminal renal insufficiency.

  13. The influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with renal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolić Radojica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. Gastric acid is a key factor in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease. A plausible mechanism by which the Helicobacter pylori infection might protect against reflux disease is by its propensity to produce atrophic gastritis. The aim of the study was to establish the influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with different stages of renal insufficiency. Methods. The examination was organized as a prospective, clinical study and involved 68 patients − 33 patients with preterminal stage of renal failure and 35 patients with terminal renal insufficiency. Due to dyspeptic difficulties, in all the patients there was preformed upper esophagogastroscopy and Helicobacter pylori infection was found by ureasa test. Results. The patients with preterminal renal insufficiency were significantly younger than patients with terminal renal failure (53.4±11.1 vs. 65.4±12.3 years; p = 0.014. There was found a statistically significant difference between the groups in Helicobacter pylori infection (p = 0.03, hiatal hernia (p = 0.008, gastroesophageal reflux disease (p = 0.007, and duodenal ulcer (p = 0.002. Using the multiple non-parametric correlative analysis there was confirmed a negative correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (Kendal τB = -0.523; p = 0.003 and hiatal hernia (Kendal τB = 0.403; p = 0.021, while there was found a positive correlation between gastro-esophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia (Kendal τB = 0.350; p = 0.044. Conclusion. Helicobacter pylori infection is a significant protective parameter of the incidence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease in patients with both pre-terminal and terminal renal insufficiency.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency in teenage females in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Alan G; Scragg, Robert; Schaaf, David; Metcalf, Patricia; Grant, Cameron C

    2010-04-30

    Iron deficiency is an important problem in New Zealand children and young adults. Iron deficiency and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection are each more common in Māori and Pacific Island ethnic groups. This study seeks to determine if H. pylori infection is associated with iron deficiency. 792 female students from 7 Auckland high schools (median age 16 years) had H. pylori serology and tests for iron deficiency assessed by a combination of serum ferritin, iron saturation and mean cell volume. The prevalence of positive H. pylori serology was highest for Pacific Island students (49.0%; CI 38.0-60.0), intermediate for Māori (26.7%; CI 16.9-36.4) and Asian (24.7%; CI 12.6-36.7) and lowest for European (13.7%; 6.0-21.4) piron saturation (p=0.013), but not of ferritin (p=0.068), haemoglobin (p=0.08) or mean cell volume (p=0.16), compared to those with negative serology. Positive H. pylori serology was associated with increased risk of iron deficiency (RR 1.20; CI 1.08-1.34), but not anaemia (RR 1.01; CI 0.87-1.18), after adjusting for age, ethnicity and school SES decile. This study indicates that H. pylori infection is associated with iron deficiency in adolescent females. There are significant differences in H. pylori serology amongst different ethnic groups in New Zealand.

  15. Prevalence of helicobacter pylori infection in school going children of Bhara Kahu area, Islamabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, T.; Bilal, R.; Khanum, A.

    2009-07-01

    Most Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infected individuals remain asymptomatic, but the presence of H. pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. Despite the fact of high prevalence of H. pylori infection around the world, data about its prevalence in children in Pakistan is scanty. Our study was the first epidemiologic study in Pakistan designed to assess H. pylori prevalence in a school based population of children without gastrointestinal symptoms. The children were enrolled from three schools in the suburbs of Islamabad and their anthropometric data were noted. The non-invasive urea breath test was applied to find the prevalence of H. pylori infection. Overall, 72.3% of apparently healthy children were harboring the H. pylori bacterium and the prevalence was 69% in 3-6 years, 71% in 7-8 years, 79% in 9-10 years, 76% in 11-12 years and 55% in 13-16 years of age. The prevalence decreased in the higher age group significantly, while gender was not a risk factor for acquiring this infection as the prevalence of infection was not significantly different in males and females (74.0% vs. 70.3%, p=0.41). The lower prevalence in higher age group might be explained by change in degree of contact, Increasing antibody production with increasing age or improvement in sanitary habits of children as compared to younger children. (author)

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection amongst Arab Israeli women with hyperemesis gravidarum--a prospective, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltin, Doron; Perets, Tsachi Tsadok; Elheiga, Sami Abu; Sharony, Asher; Niv, Yaron; Shamaly, Hussein; Dickman, Ram

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been associated with hyperemesis gravidarum in some geographical regions. The prevalence of H. pylori in Arab Israeli women in the Upper Galilee and its association with hyperemesis gravidarum has not been studied previously. We aimed to examine if hyperemesis gravidarum is associated with H. pylori in this population. Subjects with hyperemesis gravidarum carrying a singleton fetus were recruited prospectively. Women with an uncomplicated pregnancy served as controls. All patients underwent (13)C-urea breath testing to assess for H. pylori infection. A total of 72 subjects, including 24 patients with hyperemesis gravidarum and 48 controls, aged 28.8±5.3 years, were included. H. pylori infection was identified in 75.0% (18/24) of cases and 60.4% (29/48) of controls (p=not significant). H. pylori infection did not correlate with age, fetal sex, or the number of previous pregnancies (p=not significant). H. pylori does not seem to increase the likelihood of hyperemesis gravidarum in Arab Israeli women. However, given the high background prevalence of H. pylori in this population, a larger study is required to corroborate these findings. (MOH20110066). Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of risk factors of helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul S Mhaskar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer. There have been no studies addressing environmental and dietary risk factors in western India. We conducted a case control study enrolling peptic ulcer patients in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: Risk factors for peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection were assessed in a participant interview. H. pylori status was assessed from stool by monoclonal antigen detection. Results: We enrolled 190 peptic ulcer, 35 stomach cancer patients, and 125 controls. Fifty-one percent (180/350 of the participants were infected with H. pylori. Lower socioeconomic status (SES [odds ratio (OR: 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.02-1.39], meat consumption (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.30-4.23, smoking (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24-4.02, eating restaurant food (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.39-10.23, and drinking nonfiltered or nonboiled water (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.23 were risk factors for H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03-2.89, meat (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.75, fish (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02-1.89 consumption, and a family history of ulcer (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08-1.60 were risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers (OR: 0.20, 95% CI: 0.10-0.37 and parasite infestation (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24-0.80 were protective against H. pylori infection. Conclusion: H. pylori infection is associated with peptic ulcer. Lower SES, consumption of restaurant food, meat, nonfiltered water, and smoking are risk factors for H. pylori. Consumption of meat, fish, and a family history of peptic ulcer are risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers and concurrent parasite infestation appear to be protective against H. pylori.

  18. Assessment of Risk Factors of Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaskar, Rahul S; Ricardo, Izurieta; Azliyati, Azizan; Laxminarayan, Rajaram; Amol, Bapaye; Santosh, Walujkar; Boo, Kwa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer. There have been no studies addressing environmental and dietary risk factors in western India. We conducted a case control study enrolling peptic ulcer patients in Pune, India. Materials and Methods: Risk factors for peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection were assessed in a participant interview. H. pylori status was assessed from stool by monoclonal antigen detection. Results: We enrolled 190 peptic ulcer, 35 stomach cancer patients, and 125 controls. Fifty-one percent (180/350) of the participants were infected with H. pylori. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) [odds ratio (OR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.39], meat consumption (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.30–4.23), smoking (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24–4.02), eating restaurant food (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.39–10.23), and drinking nonfiltered or nonboiled water (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.23) were risk factors for H. pylori infection. H. pylori infection (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03–2.89), meat (OR: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.75), fish (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.02–1.89) consumption, and a family history of ulcer (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08–1.60) were risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers (OR: 0.20, 95% CI: 0.10–0.37) and parasite infestation (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24–0.80) were protective against H. pylori infection. Conclusion: H. pylori infection is associated with peptic ulcer. Lower SES, consumption of restaurant food, meat, nonfiltered water, and smoking are risk factors for H. pylori. Consumption of meat, fish, and a family history of peptic ulcer are risk factors for peptic ulcer. Consumption of chili peppers and concurrent parasite infestation appear to be protective against H. pylori. PMID:23853433

  19. Diagnostic Performance of Magnifying Endoscopy for Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing Qi

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection using magnifying endoscopy offers advantages over conventional invasive and noninvasive tests.This meta-analysis aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of magnifying endoscopy in the prediction of H. pylori infection.A literature search of the PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, Science Direct and the Cochrane Library databases was performed. A random-effects model was used to calculate the diagnostic efficiency of magnifying endoscopy for H. pylori infection. A summary receiver operator characteristic curve was plotted, and the area under the curve (AUC was calculated.A total of 18 studies involving 1897 patients were included. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of magnifying endoscopy to predict H. pylori infection were 0.89 [95% confidence interval (CI 0.87-0.91] and 0.82 (95%CI 0.79-0.85, respectively, with an AUC of 0.9461. When targeting the gastric antrum, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.82 (95%CI 0.78-0.86 and 0.72 (95%CI 0.66-0.78, respectively. When targeting the gastric corpus, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.92 (95%CI 0.90-0.94 and 0.86 (95%CI 0.82-0.88, respectively. The pooled sensitivity and specificity using magnifying white light endoscopy were 0.90 (95%CI 0.87-0.91 and 0.81 (95%CI 0.77-0.84, respectively. The pooled sensitivity and specificity using magnifying chromoendoscopy were 0.87 (95%CI 0.83-0.91 and 0.85 (95%CI 0.80-0.88, respectively. The "pit plus vascular pattern" classification in the gastric corpus observed by magnifying endoscopy was able to accurately predict the status of H. pylori infection, as indicated by a pooled sensitivity and specificity of 0.96 (95%CI 0.94-0.97 and 0.91 (95%CI 0.87-0.93, respectively, with an AUC of 0.9872.Magnifying endoscopy was able to accurately predict the status of H. pylori infection, either in magnifying white light endoscopy or magnifying chromoendoscopy mode. The "pit plus vascular pattern

  20. Almagate interference in breath test results for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Carles Pons

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection by Helicobacter pylori is common and affects both genders at any age. The 13C-urea breath test is a widely used test for the diagnosis of this infection. However, multiple drugs used for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection symptoms have interactions with this breath test that generate false negative results. This observational study was to assess the potential interaction between almagate and the breath test. Methods: Thirty subjects on almagate therapy who underwent a breath test were included. If the result was negative, almagate was withdrawn for a month and the breath test was then repeated. Results: In general, 51.9 % of assessed subjects had a negative result after the first test, and 100 % of these also had a negative result after the second test. Conclusions: It was concluded that the use of almagate does not interfere in breath test results. These results provide a drug therapy option for the treatment of symptoms associated with Helicobacter pylori infection during the diagnostic process.

  1. Frequency of helicobacter pylori infection using /sup 13/C-UBT in asymptomatic individuals of Barakaho, Islamabad, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheed, F.; Ahmad, T.; Bilal, R.

    2011-01-01

    High frequency of Helicobacter (H.) pylori infection has been reported in Pakistan mainly for dyspeptic patients, while the published data is inadequate regarding asymptomatic population. The non-invasive /sup 13/C urea breath test (UBT) was used to determine the frequency of H. pylori infection in 516 asymptomatic individuals and to find out its association with gender and age. Overall prevalence was 74.4% (384/516) while 63.5% (113/178) children were positive for 13C-UBT and the percentage increased with age in both the genders with significantly higher prevalence in adolescents (p=0.003) and adults (p < 0.001). Moreover, there was non-significant difference between the prevalence of H. pylori infection in males and females in all age categories. The reported high frequency of H. pylori infection warrants further studies to identify epidemiological and environmental risk factors. (author)

  2. The diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in Arctic regions with a high prevalence of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMAHON, B J; Bruce, M G; Koch, A

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer and is also associated with chronic gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Guidelines have been developed in the United States and Europe (areas with low prevalence) for the di......Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer and is also associated with chronic gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and adenocarcinoma of the stomach. Guidelines have been developed in the United States and Europe (areas with low prevalence...

  3. First case of Helicobacter pylori infection resistant to seven antibiotics in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Talebi Bezmin Abadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection with common antibiotics is typically recommended for several digestive conditions, including peptic ulcers. However, reports of resistant H. pylori isolates are increasing, and unfortunately, these do not respond to currently available therapeutic regimens. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman with two peptic ulcers in the duodenal antrum. An H. pylori strain was isolated, and tested for antibiotic resistance using agar dilution and disk diffusion. The isolated strain was found to be resistant to all seven antibiotics that were tested. Therefore, constant monitoring for antibiotic resistance should be performed prior to initiating antibiotic therapy.

  4. Confirmation of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, C.M.; Bhasin, D.K.; Sharma, B.C.; Roy, P.; Vaiphei, K.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the 14 C-urea breath test (UBT). 14 C-UBT is being used as a highly reliable test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. There is paucity of reports on the utility of this test to confirm the H. pylori eradication after its treatment. The study was conducted to determine the utility of 14 C-UBT in confirming the eradication of H. pylori

  5. Development of a magnetic system for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Erica L.; Carvalho, Juliana F.; Pontes, Thales R.F.; Oliveira, Elquio E.; Francelino, Barbara L.; Medeiros, Aldo C.; Egito, E. Socrates T. do; Araujo, Jose H.; Carrico, Artur S.

    2009-01-01

    We report a study to develop a magnetic system for local delivery of amoxicillin. Magnetite microparticles produced by coprecipitation were coated with a solution of amoxicillin and Eudragit S100 by spray drying. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry revealed that the particles were superparamagnetic, with an average diameter of 17.2 μm, and an initial susceptibility controllable by the magnetite content in the suspension feeding the sprayer. Our results suggest a possible way to treat Helicobacter pylori infections, using an oral drug delivery system, and open prospects to coat magnetic microparticles by spray drying for biomedical applications.

  6. Development of a magnetic system for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Erica L.; Carvalho, Juliana F.; Pontes, Thales R.F.; Oliveira, Elquio E. [Departamento de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Rua Gal Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias s.n, Petropolis, 59010-180 Natal-RN (Brazil); Francelino, Barbara L.; Medeiros, Aldo C. [Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Rua Gal Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias s.n, Petropolis, 59010-180 Natal-RN (Brazil); Egito, E. Socrates T. do [Departamento de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Rua Gal Gustavo Cordeiro de Farias s.n, Petropolis, 59010-180 Natal-RN (Brazil); Araujo, Jose H. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitario, 59078-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Carrico, Artur S. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitario, 59078-970 Natal-RN (Brazil)], E-mail: ascarrico@dfte.ufrn.br

    2009-05-15

    We report a study to develop a magnetic system for local delivery of amoxicillin. Magnetite microparticles produced by coprecipitation were coated with a solution of amoxicillin and Eudragit S100 by spray drying. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry revealed that the particles were superparamagnetic, with an average diameter of 17.2 {mu}m, and an initial susceptibility controllable by the magnetite content in the suspension feeding the sprayer. Our results suggest a possible way to treat Helicobacter pylori infections, using an oral drug delivery system, and open prospects to coat magnetic microparticles by spray drying for biomedical applications.

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection, serum pepsinogens, and pediatric abdominal pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Eias; Naamna, Medhat; Mawassy, Kadri; Beer-Davidson, Gany; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-08-01

    The significance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains poorly recognized. We examined associations of H. pylori infection and serum pepsinogens (PGs), as non-invasive markers of gastritis, with pediatric abdominal pain. A case-control study was conducted among 99 children aged 5-17 years admitted to one hospital for abdominal pain (cases) without an apparent organic reason. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, sera were tested and compared with 179 controls for anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and PGI and PGII levels. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounders. H. pylori IgG sero-positivity was 34.3 and 36.3% in cases and controls, respectively, P = 0.7. H. pylori-infected children had higher median PGI and PGII levels and a lower PGI/PGII ratio than uninfected children. Cases infected with H. pylori had a higher median PGII level (P < 0.001) and lower PGI/PGII ratio (P = 0.036) than controls infected with H. pylori. The percentage of cases with PGII ≥7.5 μg/L, as indication for antral inflammation, was higher than in controls: 58.6 versus 44.7%, P = 0.027. Children with PGII levels ≥7.5 μg/L had increased risk for abdominal pain: adjusted prevalence ratio 1.73 [95% confidence intervals 1.02, 2.93], P = 0.039. Children with increased serum PGII levels, as an indication of gastritis, are more likely to have abdominal pain. Serum PGs can be a useful non-invasive marker for gastritis, in evaluating children with severe abdominal pain with no apparent organic reason. What is Known: • The significance of Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains debated. • Serum pepsinogens (PGs), non-invasive markers of gastric inflammation, were rarely utilized in assessing the association between H. pylori in pediatric abdominal pain of unknown origin. What is New: • High serum PGII level, as an indication of gastritis, rather than H. pylori

  8. Effect of sucralfate on antibiotic therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Koichiro; Murakami, Kazunari; Sato, Ryugo; Kashimura, Koji; Miura, Masahiro; Ootsu, Satoshi; Miyajima, Hajime; Nasu, Masaru; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio

    2004-12-01

    It has been documented that sucralfate, a basic aluminum salt, enhances the efficacies of antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori, resulting in eradication rates comparable to those associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate sucralfate's ability to complement antibiotic treatment of H. pylori infection in vivo. Four weeks following induced H. pylori infection, clarithromycin (CAM) and amoxicillin (AMPC) were administered orally to C57BL/6 mice for 5 days, both with and without sucralfate or lansoprazole. When sucralfate was concurrently given with CAM and AMPC at the maximum noninhibitory doses for the treatment of H. pylori infection, the bacterial clearance rates were comparable to those achieved by treatment with lansoprazole plus those antibiotics. The results of pharmacokinetic studies showed that lansoprazole delayed gastric clearance and accelerated the absorption of CAM, whereas sucralfate suppressed both gastric clearance and absorption. AMPC was undetectable in all samples. Scanning electron microscopy with a microscope to which a energy dispersive spectrometer was attached revealed that aluminum-containing aggregated substances coated the mucosa surrounding H. pylori in mice receiving sucralfate plus antibiotics, whereas the gastric surface and pits where H. pylori had attached were clearly visible in mice receiving lansoprazole plus antibiotics. The addition of sucralfate to the antibiotic suspension resulted in a more viscous mixture that bound to the H. pylori-infected mucosa and that inhibited the loss of CAM bioavailability in the acidic environment. Sucralfate delays gastric clearance of CAM and physically captures H. pylori through the creation of an adherent mucus, which leads to bacterial clearance.

  9. Association between TNF-α and IL-1β genotypes vs Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Jing-Wen; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Hosono, Akihiro; Ando, Ryosuke; Tokudome, Shinkan; Soeripto; Triningsih, FX Ediati; Triono, Tegu; Sumoharjo, Suwignyo; Achwan, EY Wenny Astuti; Gunawan, Stephanus; Li, Yu-Min

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and host genetic background of healthy populations in Indonesia. METHODS: In March 2007, epidemiological studies were undertaken on the general population of a city in Indonesia (Mataram, Lombok). The participants included 107 men and 187 women, whose ages ranged from 6 to 74 years old, with an average age of 34.0 (± 14.4) (± SD). The H. pylori of subject by UBT method determination, and through the polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers (PCR-CTPP) method parsing the single nucleotide polymorphism of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-4, IL-1β, CD14, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and tyrosine-protein phosphates non-receptor type 11 (PTPN11) genotypes. The experimental data were analyzed by the statistical software SAS. RESULTS: The H. pylori infection rates in the healthy Indonesian population studied were 8.4% for men and 12.8% for women; no obvious differences were noted for H. pylori infection rates by sex or age. TC genotypes of IL-4, TC and CC genotypes of TNF-α, and GA genotypes of PTPN11, were higher in frequency. Both CC and TC genotype of TNF-α T-1031C loci featured higher expressions in the healthy Indonesian population Indonesia studied of (OR = 1.99; 95%CI: 0.67-5.89) and (OR = 1.66; 95%CI: 0.73-3.76), respectively. C allele of IL-1β T-31C gene locus was at a higher risk (OR = 1.11; 95%CI: 0.70-1.73) of H. pylori infection, but no statistical significance was found in our study. CONCLUSION: We reveal that the association between the TNF-α and IL-1β genotypes may be the susceptibility of H. pylori in the studied population. PMID:24379597

  10. Analysis of the microflora in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Cynthia; Osaki, Takako; Hanawa, Tomoko; Yonezawa, Hideo; Kurata, Satoshi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2010-05-01

    Mongolian gerbils are frequently used to study Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and its consequences. The presence of some gastric flora with a suppressive effect on H. pylori suggests inhibitory microflora against H. pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to analyze the microflora in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils with H. pylori infection. H. pylori ureA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the fecal samples of infected Mongolian gerbils. H. pylori was isolated from the gastric mucosa of the gerbils by microaerophilic cultivation. Gastric microflora were isolated by aerobic and anaerobic culture, and the identification of gastric bacterial species was performed by API20E and API20A. Oral administration of H. pylori TK1402 induced colonization and gastric inflammation of the stomach of the Mongolian gerbils. According to the frequency of detection of H. pylori ureA in fecal samples, the gerbils were divided into three groups (frequently detected, moderately detected and infrequently detected). According to the analysis of the gastric microflora in the frequently and infrequently detected groups, Lactobacillus spp. and Eubacterium limosum were isolated from the former and latter group, respectively. Some gastric flora, such as Lactobacillus spp., may inhibit colonization by H. pylori.

  11. Medicinal plants in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Maliheh; Shams-Ardakani, Mohammadreza; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2015-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a small, spiral, Gram-negative bacillus that plays a role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases ranging from asymptomatic gastritis to gastric cancer. Schedule compliance, antibiotic drug resistance, and side-effects of triple or quadruple therapy have led to research for novel candidates from plants. The purpose of this paper is to review the most potent medicinal plants of recently published literature with anti-H. pylori activity. For centuries, herbals have been used by traditional healers around the world to treat various gastrointestinal tract disorders such as dyspepsia, gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease. The mechanism of action by which these botanicals exert their therapeutic properties has not been completely and clearly elucidated. Anti-H. pylori properties may be one of the possible mechanisms by which gastroprotective herbs treat gastrointestinal tract disorders. Electronic databases such as PubMed, Google scholar, EBSCO, and local databases were explored for medicinal plants with anti-H. pylori properties between 1984 and 2013 using key words "medicinal plants" and "Helicobacter pylori" or "anti-Helicobacter pylori". A total of 43 medicinal plant species belonging to 27 families including Amaryllidaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, Asclepiadoideae, Asteraceae, Bignoniaceae, Clusiaceae, Chancapiedra, Combretaceae, Cyperaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Geraniaceae, Lamiaceae, Lauraceae, Lythraceae, Menispermaceae, Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, Oleaceae, Papaveraceae, Plumbaginaceae, Poaceae, Ranunculaceae, Rosaceae, and Theaceae were studied as herbs with potent anti-H. pylori effects. Traditional folk medicinal use of some of these plants to treat gastric infections is substantiated by the antibacterial activity of their extracts against H. pylori.

  12. Asymptomatic gastric heterotopia in the rectum with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatek, Jarosław; Wronecki, Lech; Ciechanek, Roman; Szumiło, Justyna

    2015-12-01

    Gastric heterotopia is very rare in the rectum - less than 50 cases have been reported so far. Only in six of them Helicobacter pylori has been observed in heterotopic mucosa. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman with asymptomatic gastric heterotopia in the rectum, incidentally revealed during colonoscopy as a small, sessile polyp. The presence of H. pylori was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. This finding supports the opinion that H. pylori may pass along the gastrointestinal tract in a viable form and that the fecal-oral route of transmission is possible.

  13. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and autoimmune thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekry, Osama A; Abd Elwahid, Hassan A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) can be associated with an increased prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroiditis observed in this disease. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between H. pylori infection and T1DM and to identify of the interconnection between H. pylori infection and autoimmune thyroiditis in patients with T1DM. A case-control design was used. The study group included 60 children and adolescents with T1DM who were selected from the pediatric outpatient clinic of Suez Canal University Hospital by a systematic random sampling method. The control group included 60 healthy children and adolescents matched for age and sex and selected from among relatives (brothers or cousins) of the patients with T1DM. The study participants were subjected to several investigations including estimation of levels of HbA1c, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T3, T4, anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO). The mean age of the patients with T1DM was 12.53±2.35 years, whereas that of the control group was 12.30±1.98 years, with no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The patients with diabetes had significantly higher levels of H. pylori IgG, TSH, anti-TPO, and anti-Tg (20.43±14.84  μ/ml, 4.03±1.53 mIu/l, 14.98 ±5.04 Iu/ml, and 5.66±3.37 Iu/ml, respectively) and significantly lower levels of T3 and T4 (120±15.86 μg/dl and 4.93±0.93 μg/dl, respectively) compared with the control group. In addition, the seroprevalence rate of H. pylori, anti-Tg, and anti-TPO was significantly higher in diabetic patients, and the duration of diabetes was significantly longer in H. pylori-positive patients with higher levels of HbA1c, insulin requirement, TSH, anti-TPO, and anti-Tg. The association between H. pylori infection and autoimmune thyroiditis in patients with T1DM was revealed in this study. Hence, screening and treatment of

  14. Using Nuclear Techniques to Detect Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is present in all countries the world over. More than 50% of the world’s population harbour H. pylori in their upper gastrointestinal tract. It can negatively influence nutrition by affecting the uptake of iron and zinc and by increasing susceptibility to diarrhoeal disease. Beyond that, H. pylori is also a major cause of stomach diseases like chronic gastritis, and elevates the risk of developing stomach cancer. The carbon-13 urea breath test is a quick and non-invasive diagnostic test to detect the presence of H. pylori. The patient drinks urea labelled with stable carbon isotopes ( 13 C) that is dissolved in orange juice or citric acid to make sure it coats the entire surface of the stomach, thereby improving the test’s accuracy. If H. pylori is present, it metabolizes the urea and, after 30 minutes, produces carbon dioxide labelled with the stable carbon isotope ( 13 CO 2 ), which can be detected in the breath analysis

  15. Reflux oesophagitis and Helicobacter pylori infection in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, R.; Pitt, M. A.; Banerjee, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric malignancies. Little attention has been paid to the possibility that it may also have a role in the pathogenesis of reflux oesophagitis. This is especially true in elderly patients who have life-long infection and provide an ideal group to study the mucosal changes associated with the organism. The aim of this study was to determine if H pylori is associated with reflux oesophagitis in elderly patients. Consecutive gastroscopy patients were recruited. Multiple biopsies were taken from oesophagus, stomach, antrum and duodenum for histology and rapid urease tests. Patients also had IgG ELISA antibodies and 13C-urea breath tests performed. Patients with macroscopic or microscopic evidence of reflux oesophagitis were compared to patients with macroscopically normal upper gastrointestinal tracts and no microscopic evidence of reflux. A total of 114 patients were recruited, average age 78.9 years (+/- 5.4). There were 37 refluxers and 33 non-refluxers. We found no evidence for an association between the presence of H pylori and reflux oesophagitis in elderly patients. The high prevalence of H pylori in patients with reflux oesophagitis can be explained by the presence of incidental gastritis. PMID:8733530

  16. The influence of metronidazole resistance on the efficacy of ranitidine bismuth citrate triple therapy regimens for Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wouden, EJ; Thijs, JC; Van Zwet, AA; Kooy, A; Kleibeuker, JH

    Aim: To assess the influence of metronidazole resistance on the efficacy of ranitidine bismuth citrate-based triple therapy regimens in two consecutive studies. Methods: In the first study, patients with a culture-proven Helicobacter pylori infection were treated with ranitidine bismuth citrate 400

  17. First detected Helicobacter pylori infection in infancy modifies the association between diarrheal disease and childhood growth in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganath, Devan; Saito, Mayuko; Gilman, Robert H; Queiroz, Dulciene M M; Rocha, Gifone A; Cama, Vitaliano; Cabrera, Lilia; Kelleher, Dermot; Windle, Henry J; Crabtree, Jean E; Checkley, William

    2014-08-01

    In endemic settings, Helicobacter pylori infection can occur shortly after birth and may be associated with a reduction in childhood growth. This study investigated what factors promote earlier age of first H. pylori infection and evaluated the role of H. pylori infection in infancy (6-11 months) versus early childhood (12-23 months) on height. We included 183 children near birth from a peri-urban shanty town outside of Lima, Peru. Field-workers collected data on socioeconomic status (SES), daily diarrheal and breast-feeding history, antibiotic use, anthropometrics, and H. pylori status via carbon 13-labeled urea breath test up to 24 months after birth. We used a proportional hazards model to assess risk factors for earlier age at first detected infection and linear mixed-effects models to evaluate the association of first detected H. pylori infection during infancy on attained height. One hundred and forty (77%) were infected before 12 months of age. Lower SES was associated with earlier age at first detected H. pylori infection (low vs middle-to-high SES Hazard ratio (HR) 1.59, 95% CI 1.16, 2.19; p = .004), and greater exclusive breast-feeding was associated with reduced likelihood (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.40, 0.98, p = .04). H. pylori infection in infancy was not independently associated with growth deficits (p = .58). However, children who had their first detected H. pylori infection in infancy (6-11 months) versus early childhood (12-23 months) and who had an average number of diarrhea episodes per year (3.4) were significantly shorter at 24 months (-0.37 cm, 95% CI, -0.60, -0.15 cm; p = .001). Lower SES was associated with a higher risk of first detected H. pylori infection during infancy, which in turn augmented the adverse association of diarrheal disease on linear growth. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Comparison of different stains in imprint cytology with the conventional diagnostic tools in detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Shashikant Adlekha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is one of the most common causes of gastrointestinal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early diagnosis of infection is imperative for the cure of distressing symptoms and prevention of complications. Objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate imprint cytology of gastric biopsy specimens as a rapid and cost-effective diagnostic tool and its comparison with conventional diagnostic tests. Materials and Methods: Antral biopsies were collected from 130 patients and evaluated for H. pylori infection by imprint cytology and histopathological examination by different stains and rapid urease test (RUT. Histopathological features of gastric biopsy specimens were also assessed. Results: A total of 118 patients showed H. pylori infection by two or more methods. Giemsa histology showed highest sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and Youden′s Index (YI. Among imprint cytology stain methods, toluidine blue showed highest sensitivity and highest YI was obtained for PAP stain. Conclusion: Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with gastric mucosa changes like chronic active gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, ulceration and carcinoma. Imprint cytology has high sensitivity and comparable predictive values to conventional diagnostic tools-histopathological examination and RUT in the detection of H. pylori infection.

  19. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

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    Mahdi, Batool M

    2011-03-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a common condition, affecting 25%-40% of the population. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and reflux esophagitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between CagA+ H. pylori and endoscopically proven gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The study group included 60 hospital patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease between 2007 and 2009 as compared with 30 healthy patients from a control group that was age and sex matched. Helicobacter pylori CagA+ was identified by an immunological test (Immunochromatography test) (ACON, USA). Helicobacter pyloriCagA+ was present in 42/60 (70%) of the patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and in 11/30 (36.6%) patients in the control group (p=0.002). The Odds ratio = 0.8004 with 95% Confidence Interval = from 0.3188 to 2.0094. The relative risk=1.35 that indicates an association between Helicobacter pylori and disease. The presence of Helicobacter pylori is significantly increased in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease as compared with the control group.

  20. Helicobacter pylori genetic diversification in the Mongolian gerbil model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Amber C; Loh, John T; Chopra, Abha; Leary, Shay; Lin, Aung Soe; McDonnell, Wyatt J; Dixon, Beverly R E A; Noto, Jennifer M; Israel, Dawn A; Peek, Richard M; Mallal, Simon; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2018-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori requires genetic agility to infect new hosts and establish long-term colonization of changing gastric environments. In this study, we analyzed H. pylori genetic adaptation in the Mongolian gerbil model. This model is of particular interest because H. pylori -infected gerbils develop a high level of gastric inflammation and often develop gastric adenocarcinoma or gastric ulceration. We analyzed the whole genome sequences of H. pylori strains cultured from experimentally infected gerbils, in comparison to the genome sequence of the input strain. The mean annualized single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rate per site was 1.5e -5 , which is similar to the rates detected previously in H. pylori- infected humans. Many of the mutations occurred within or upstream of genes associated with iron-related functions ( fur , tonB1 , fecA2 , fecA3 , and frpB3 ) or encoding outer membrane proteins ( alpA, oipA, fecA2, fecA3, frpB3 and cagY ). Most of the SNPs within coding regions (86%) were non-synonymous mutations. Several deletion or insertion mutations led to disruption of open reading frames, suggesting that the corresponding gene products are not required or are deleterious during chronic H. pylori colonization of the gerbil stomach. Five variants (three SNPs and two deletions) were detected in isolates from multiple animals, which suggests that these mutations conferred a selective advantage. One of the mutations (FurR88H) detected in isolates from multiple animals was previously shown to confer increased resistance to oxidative stress, and we now show that this SNP also confers a survival advantage when H. pylori is co-cultured with neutrophils. Collectively, these analyses allow the identification of mutations that are positively selected during H. pylori colonization of the gerbil model.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection, atrophic gastritis, and pancreatic cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Chen, Yue-Tong; Wang, Rui; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: To investigate the associations of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and atrophic gastritis (AG) with pancreatic cancer risk. Methods: A literature search in PubMed was performed up to July 2017. Only prospective cohort and nested case–control studies enrolling cancer-free participants were eligible. Incident pancreatic cancer cases were ascertained during the follow-up. The risks of pancreatic cancer were compared between persons infected and noninfected with Hp, or between those with and without AG status at baseline. Odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios were combined. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed, and publication bias was estimated. Results: Three cohort studies and 6 nested case–control studies, including 65,155 observations, were analyzed. The meta-analyses did not confirm the association between pancreatic cancer risk and Hp infection (OR = 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81–1.47) or AG status (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.80–1.72). However, particular subpopulations potentially had increased risks of pancreatic cancer. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-negative strains of Hp might be a causative factor of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.05–1.62), but a sensitivity analysis by leave-one-out method did not fully warrant it (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.93–1.56). In 1 nested case–control study, AG at stomach corpus in Hp-negative subpopulation might have increased risk of pancreatic cancer, but with a poor test power = 0.56. Publication biases were nonsignificant in the present meta-analysis. Conclusion: Based on current prospective epidemiologic studies, the linkage of pancreatic cancer to Hp infection or AG status was not warranted on the whole. Nevertheless, prospective studies only focusing on those specific subpopulations are further required to obtain better power. PMID:28816977

  2. The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and the risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia may differ according to age and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunsung; Park, Jae Jun; Park, Yoo Mi; Baik, Su Jung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jung, Da Hyun; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin

    2018-03-29

    The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) remains controversial. This study aimed to clarify the association between H. pylori infection and ACN according to age groups. We retrospectively analyzed the association between H. pylori infection and ACN in patients aged Helicobacter pylori positivity was determined by the results of serum anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G or rapid urease test, if the anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G was in the borderline range. Among the 19 337 patients who were included, 56.2% and 3.4% were positive for H. pylori and ACN, respectively. Helicobacter pylori infection independently increased the risk of ACN in patients aged pylori infection and ACN was affected by smoking history. When stratified by age and smoking history, H. pylori infection conferred an increased risk of ACN in patients aged pylori infection and a history of smoking than in those without (69.3% vs 54.4%, respectively; P = .031). Helicobacter pylori infection confers an increased risk of ACN, but the association may differ according to age and smoking history. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. BLEEDING PEPTIC ULCER, NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION – A PROSPECTIVE, CONTROLLED, RANDOMIZED STUDY

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    Pavel Skok

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The explanation of peptic ulcer etiology has changed significantly in the past decade after the clarification of the significance of Helicobacter pylori infection.Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with hemorrhaging peptic ulcer and patients with peptic ulcer without complications.Study ethics. The study was approved in 1998 by the Medical Ethics Committee of the Republic of Slovenia (No. 90/09/98.Type of study. Prospective, controlled and randomized study, carried out between 1998–2000.Patients and methods. The study included 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av.age 57.5 years, SD ± 17.1, range 22– 80 in which endoscopy confirmed hemorrhage from peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and Helicobacter pylori infection. In all cases endoscopic hemostasis was performed: injection sclerotherapy with diluted adrenalin 1:10,000 and 1% polidocanol or argon plasma coagulation. The control group was made up of 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av.age 56.8 years, SD ± 16.8, range 19–80 with peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and Helicobacter pylori infection. Infection was confirmed by a rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa. In all cases the recommended drug combinations were used in the treatment of the infection: a proton pump inhibitor, omeprazol (4 weeks, and combination of antibiotics, claritromycin and metronidazole or with regard to the antibiogram (1 week. The therapeutic success was ascertained endoscopically four weeks after inclusion in the study. Infection eradication was confirmed by the rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa.Results. Four weeks after inclusion in the study the success of infection eradication was 92.5% in the study group, in the control group it was 91.3% (p > 0.05. In 6 patients (7.5%, 6/ 80 from the study group and in 7 (8.8%, 7/80 from the control group we introduced a replacement treatment

  4. A win for the patient: Direct patient notification improves treatment rates of active Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaratnam, Sriharan; Yeoh, Joey; Hsiang, John; Patrick, Alasdair B

    2014-01-01

    Current international guidelines recommend the commencement of effective eradication therapy as soon as active Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is confirmed. At our institution, all positive Campylobacter-like Organism (CLO) test results were automatically communicated to general practitioners (GPs) via a standardised letter, which also advised the commencement of eradication therapy. Despite this endeavour, a clinical audit conducted in 2011 demonstrated that only 66 per cent of confirmed H. pylori-positive South Auckland patients received eradication treatment and only 83 per cent of these patients received treatment within one month. Improve the timely initiation of H. pylori eradication therapy through direct patient notification. A prospective clinical audit of 109 consecutive outpatients with a positive CLO test identified at gastroscopy. In addition to standard general practitioner notification, patients were also directly notified of their positive CLO test result via a standardised letter, which provided information about H. pylori and its disease associations as well as advising patients to seek consultation with their GP to commence eradication therapy. Dispensing data was examined using Test Safe electronic records to determine the total uptake and timing of treatment compared to data from a preliminary 2011 audit. Ninety-five per cent of H. pylori-positive patients received standard triple therapy; therefore, treatment of active H. pylori infection was significantly higher when patients were directly notified in addition to standard GP notification, when compared to GP notification alone (95 per cent vs 66 per cent, paudit in 2011 (100 per cent vs. 83 per cent, pstrategy that significantly improves the timely initiation of eradication therapy for active H. pylori infection. This has since been integrated into standard practice at our District Health Board (DHB).

  5. Trends in gastric cancer mortality and in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Samantha; Ferro, Ana; Bastos, Ana; Castro, Clara; Lunet, Nuno; Peleteiro, Bárbara

    2016-07-01

    Portugal has the highest gastric cancer mortality rates in Western Europe, along with high prevalences of Helicobacter pylori infection. Monitoring their trends is essential to predict the burden of this cancer. We aimed to quantify time trends in gastric cancer mortality in Portugal and in each administrative region, and to compute short-term predictions, as well as to describe the prevalence of H. pylori infection, through a systematic review. Joinpoint analyses were used to identify significant changes in sex-specific trends in gastric cancer age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) and to estimate annual percent changes (APC). The most recent trends were considered to compute estimates up to 2020 by adjusting Poisson regression models. We searched PubMed and IndexRMP to identify studies carried out in Portugal reporting the prevalence of H. pylori. Gastric cancer mortality has been decreasing in Portugal since 1971 in men (from ASMR=55.3/100 000; APC=-2.4, 95% confidence interval: -2.5 to -2.3) and since 1970 in women (from ASMR=28.0/100 000; APC=-2.8, 95% confidence interval: -2.9 to -2.7), although large regional differences were observed. Predicted ASMR for 2015 and 2020 were 18.8/100 000 and 16.7/100 000 for men and 8.5/100 000 and 7.4/100 000 for women, respectively. The prevalence of H. pylori varied from almost 5% at 0.5-2 years to just over 90% at 70 years or more. No consistent variation was observed since the 1990s. The downward trends in mortality rates are expected to remain in the next decades. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection across age groups and studies from different periods shows a large potential for decrease in the burden of gastric cancer in Portugal.

  6. Nodular Gastritis and Pathologic Findings in Children and Young Adults with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hong; Noh, Tae-Woong; Baek, Seoung-Yon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the pathologic characteristics of nodular gastritis in children and young adults infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Materials and Methods A total of 328 patients were enrolled in this study, and the diagnosis of H. pylori infection was done with gastroduodenal endoscopy concomitant with a CLO™ test and pathologic analysis of the biopsy specimens. Diagnoses of normal, superficial gastritis, nodular gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease were made from the gastroduodenal endoscopic findings. The density of H. pylori organisms in the gastric mucosa was rated as normal, mild, moderate, or marked. The pathologic findings of nodular gastritis were based on the histopathologic findings of inflammation, immune activity, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Each of these findings was scored as either normal (0), mild (1), moderate (2), or marked (3) according to the updated Sydney system and using visual analog scales. The gastritis score was the sum of the four histopathologic scores. Results In this study, nodular gastritis (50.6%) was most common, and mild density (51.5%) H. pylori infection was also common upon microscopic examination. Intestinal metaplasia occurred in 9 patients (2.7%). Conclusion Logistic regression revealed a significant increase in the incidence of nodular gastritis with gastritis score (p = 0.008), but not an association with sex, age, or H. pylori density. Gastritis score was the only significant factor influencing the occurrence of nodular gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia, which was originally thought to be a pre-malignant lesion, occurred in 2.7% of the patients with H. pylori infection. PMID:17461522

  7. Treatment of children with Helicobacter pylori infection and malabsorption syndrome with probiotics: Comparison with conventional method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndiaye, M F; Mbengue, M; Mbaye, P S; Diouf, S [Societe Senegalaise de Gasto-enterologie et d' hepatologie, Dakar (Senegal); Ghoos, Y [Labo. Digestie Absorptie, Leuven (Belgium); Brunser, O [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infection (82 %) in Senegal where malnutrition is common in children (25 %). Our aims were to definite prevalence of H. pylori, to determine the relationship between Hp infection and undernourishment and to verify the efficiency of treatment with probiotic. In some studies a positive effect of Saccharomyces boulardii has been demonstrated against H. pylori. We have included healthy children 7 to 10 years of age. 108 out of 129 (84%) were H. pylori-positive by breath-test. Two groups were randomised. Group A was treated with ten days' standard triple therapy (Omeprazole 1 mg Kg/day in single day gift, Amoxycillin 50 mg/kg/two times per day and Clarithromycin 250 mg two times per day). Group B received probiotic (250 mg of Saccharomyces boulardii with 5g Inulin three times per day) for 3 months. Evaluation of treatment was done one month after the end of therapy. Seventy one children out of 110 (64.5%) had digestive symptoms in their medical history. The main signs were recurrent abdominal pain in 64 cases. BMI were less than 18.50 in all the children with H. pylori infection without other nutritional abnormaly. Eight children were eradicated after treatment seven in the group under conventional treatment (58%) and one in the group under probiotics (6%). We concluded that prevalence of H. pylori infection is very high in young children as of the 7 years' age in urban as in rural environments. Symptoms are not specific. No significant difference in the nutritional state is observed between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative children. Treatment by probiotics does not seem to give efficient results for eradication of H. pylori. (author)

  8. Rare Helicobacter pylori Infection May Explain Low Stomach Cancer Incidence: Ecological Observations in Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Mulyadi, I Ketut; Moestikaningsih; Oka, Tjok Gede; Soeripto; Triningsih, Fx Ediati; Triyono, Teguh; Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Hosono, Akihiro; Suzuki, Sadao; Tokudome, Shinkan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence rate of stomach cancer in Bali, Indonesia, is estimated to be strikingly lower than that in Japan. We conducted an on-site ecological study to investigate the association between the stomach cancer incidence and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Recruiting 291 healthy persons (136 men and 155 women) from the general population in Bali, Indonesia, we conducted a urea breath test (UBT) to examine H. pylori infection, along with a pepsinogen test to detect chronic atrophic gastritis and urine analysis to estimate sodium and potassium excretion. UBT positivities were 9% (2-15, 95% confidence interval) for men and 7% (1-12) for women, and positive cases for H. pylori IgG antibodies were 1% (0-3) for men and 3% (0-5) for women, significantly lower than the respective values in Japan. Positive pepsinogen tests in Bali were 0% (0-0) for men and 1% (0-4) for women, also significantly lower than the Japanese figures. Computed values for daily salt excretion were 13.3±4.1 g (mean ± SD) for men and 11.1±3.1 g for women, as high as corresponding Japanese consumption values. Moreover, the estimated potassium excretion was 3.2±0.7 g for men and 2.8±0.6 g for women in Bali, significantly higher than the figures in Japan. There were no associations across genetic polymorphisms of IL-beta, TNF-alpha, and PTPN11 with UBT positivity. The low incidence of stomach cancer in Bali may thus mainly be due to the rare H. pylori infection. Namely, the bacterium infection seems to be a critical factor for gastric cancer rather than host or other environmental factors.

  9. Association of Helicobacter Pylori Infection with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Iranian Adolescents: the CASPIAN III Study

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    Enayat Kalantar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: At least half the world’s population is colonized the stomach by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori which are a key constituent of the human microbiome. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of cardiometabolic risk factors with H. pylori infection in Iranian adolescents. Materials and Methods: The current study was conducted along with the third survey of a national school-based surveillance system in Iran, entitled "Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and Prevention of Adult Non-communicable Disease" (CASPIAN study. Detailed questionnaires on demographic, socioeconomic, dietary, and health-related information of the participants were filled by one of the parents under supervision of trained health-care workers. Trained healthcare professionals measured anthropometric indices, blood pressures according to standard protocols. Fasting venous blood was examined for fasting blood sugar and lipid profile. Results: Overall 882 serum samples were suitable for testing. H. pylori antibody was found in 643 serum samples (72.9%. Among cardiometabolic risk factors, only the mean weight of participants was different between two groups (44.6±11.8 in H. pylori positive and 42.8±11.3 in H. pylori negative group; p=0.04. Overall, 5.1% of adolescents with positive H. pylori tests were overweight or obese, while 1.7% of negative ones were so (p=0.02. In the multivariate regression model, H. pyloriseropositivity increased the risk of overweight (OR, 3.3; 95%CI, 1.2-9.3; p= 0.03. In the multivariate model, association of other cardiometabolic risk factors with H. pylori infection was not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: Results of present study showed that H. pylori infection was associated with excess weight in adolescents. H. pylori eradication may be decrease the risk of obesity.

  10. The occupational risk of Helicobacter pylori infection among gastroenterologists and their assistants

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    Costa José

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori is a widely spread bacterium that mainly inhabits the gastric mucosa and can lead to serious illnesses such as peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma and gastric MALT lymphoma. The oral-oral route seems to be the main transmission route. The fact that endoscopes are contaminated after being used to perform a gastroscopy leads one to question whether gastroenterologists and endoscopy nurses and assistants run a higher risk of infection. Methods A systematic search for literature was conducted in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and further publications were found in reference lists of relevant articles. Epidemiological studies on the occupational exposure of endoscopy personnel were collected and their quality was assessed. Pooled effect estimates were identified in a meta-analysis. Results Of the 24 studies included in the analysis, 15 were considered to be methodologically good. Of these 15 studies, eight single studies showed a statistically significant increased risk of infection for gastroenterologists, and five for their assistants. Meta-analysis across all methodologically good studies found a statistically significant risk of 1.6 (95%CI 1.3-2.0 for doctors. The pooled effect estimates also indicated a statistically significant risk of Helicobacter pylori infection (RR 1.4; 95%CI 1.1-1.8 for assistants too. When studies are stratified by medical and non-medical control groups, statistically significant risks can only be recognised in the comparison with non-medical controls. Conclusions In summary, our results demonstrated an increased risk of Helicobacter pylori infection among gastroenterological personnel. However, the choice of control group is important for making a valid assessment of occupational exposure risks.

  11. Comparison of Salivary and Serum Enzyme Immunoassays for the Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    John M Embil

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori has been established as an important risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease, gastritis and gastric cancer. The diagnosis of H pylori infection can be established by invasive or noninvasive techniques. Two noninvasive enzyme immunoassays (EIAs for antibody detection – HeliSal and Pylori Stat – were compared with histology. Both assays detect immunoglobulin (Ig G directed against purified H pylori antigen. The test populations consisted of 104 consecutive patients scheduled for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Of these patients, 97 (93% had symptoms compatible with peptic ulcer disease. Saliva and serum were collected simultaneously at the time of endoscopy. Salivary EIA had a sensitivity of 66%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 67% and negative predictive value of 66% compared with the serum EIA, where the results were 98%, 48%, 64% and 96%, respectively. Although the salivary EIA is an appealing noninvasive test, it was not a sensitive and specific assay. The serum EIA also lacked specificity, but was highly sensitive with a good negative predictive value. Although a negative serum EIA rules out H pylori infection, a positive result must be interpreted in the clinical context and confirmed with a more specific measure.

  12. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of non invasive tests for helicobacter pylori infection in children

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    Hafeez, A.; Haseeb, H.A.H.; Bilal, R.; Latif, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To compare urea breath and stool antigen in children, with histological diagnosis for Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. Children between 3 and 15 years of age reporting in pediatric outpatient department with upper gastrointestinal symptoms were included. All the participating children underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and 3 tests namely: histopathological identification of H. pylori (the traditional gold standard), urea breath test and stool antigen test were carried out on each child. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values were calculated for each noninvasive test used in the study. A total of 54 patients completed the study with a mean age of 8.2 years. On histological examination, 72% (39) were positive for H. pylori infection. On gross endoscopic examination, only 9 patients had signs of gastritis as compared to 39 histological positives. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value of stool antigen test were: 77%, 73% and 89% respectively whereas the same for urea breath test were: 79%, 80% and 91% respectively. Both the noninvasive tests were found to be sensitive and specific as compared with histological identification, for the diagnosis of H. pylori in our pediatric population. The accuracy of urea breath test was better than the stool antigen test but later was easier to perform and could fulfill the criteria for a rapid bedside diagnostic test. (author)

  13. The influence of duodeno-gastric reflux on frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection at patients with ulcer gastric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J.

    1996-01-01

    To estimate the correlation between frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and intensity of duodeno-gastric reflux it was analysed 61 species with ulcer gastric. Bacterial infection was diagnosed by the breath test with 14 C-labelled urea, whereas presence and intensity of the reflux was found with dynamic scintigraphy with 99 Tm MBrIDA support. The H. pylori infection was present at 42 (68.9%) patients. The presence of throwing back the duodenal liquid was found at 32 (52.5%) diagnosed patients. At 19 (31.2%) of them the reflux has intensity of 1%, at 11 (18%)-2 o and 2 (3.3%)-3 o .The investigations which were carried out, showed that at patients with ulcer gastric disease, duodeno-gastric reflux is an agent which slows down H. pylori infection, however it is easily seen not earlier than at 2 o of its intensity. (author)

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer and early gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chuan; Yamada, Nobutaka; Wu, Yun-Lin; Wen, Min; Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Matsukura, Norio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histological features of gastric mucosa, including Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer and endoscopically found superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer.

  15. A cross-sectional survey of dental caries, oral hygiene, and Helicobacter pylori infection in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Yue, Ji; Han, Shufang; Deng, Tianzheng; Fu, Chongjian; Zhu, Guoxiong; Chen, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We explored the epidemiological risk factors for dental caries to help explain differences in the prevalence of adult dental caries. We examined 841 people for the presence of Helicobacter pylori in their dental plaque and for dental caries. Of the 841 subjects, 574 (68.25%) were infected with H pylori, and 516 (61.36%) were diagnosed with dental caries. Among the 574 subjects with H pylori, the prevalence of dental caries was 73.52% (422/574), while the prevalence among the 267 cases without H pylori was 35.21% (94/267). A correlation existed between the presence of H pylori and the occurrence of dental caries (χ(2) = 112.8, P pylori had a higher mean dental plaque index than those without. In conclusion, H pylori infection in the oral cavity is associated with dental caries and poor dental hygiene.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and extragastric disorders in children: A critical update

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    Pacifico, Lucia; Osborn, John F; Tromba, Valeria; Romaggioli, Sara; Bascetta, Stefano; Chiesa, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a highly prevalent, serious and chronic infection that has been associated causally with a diverse spectrum of extragastric disorders including iron deficiency anemia, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, growth retardation, and diabetes mellitus. The inverse relation of H. pylori prevalence and the increase in allergies, as reported from epidemiological studies, has stimulated research for elucidating potential underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Although H. pylori is most frequently acquired during childhood in both developed and developing countries, clinicians are less familiar with the pediatric literature in the field. A better understanding of the H. pylori disease spectrum in childhood should lead to clearer recommendations about testing for and treating H. pylori infection in children who are more likely to develop clinical sequelae. A further clinical challenge is whether the progressive decrease of H. pylori in the last decades, abetted by modern clinical practices, may have other health consequences. PMID:24587617

  17. A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings

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    Blashenkov, N. M.; Sheshenya, E. S.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Sachenko, V. D.; Gall, L. N.; Zarutskii, I. V.; Gall, N. R.

    2013-05-01

    A specialized isotope mass spectrometer for noninvasive diagnostics of Helicobacter pylori infection in human beings based on the carbon-13 isotope breath test has been designed and constructed. Important stages of the work included (i) calculating a low-aberration mass analyzer, (ii) manufacturing and testing special gas inlet system, and (iii) creating a small-size collector of ions. The proposed instrument ensures 13C/12C isotopic ratio measurement to within 1.7‰ (pro mille) accuracy, which corresponds to requirements for a diagnostic tool. Preliminary medical testing showed that the mass spectrometer is applicable to practical diagnostics. The instrument is also capable of measuring isotopic ratios of other light elements, including N, O, B (for BF2+ ions), Ar, Cl, and S.

  18. Is Helicobacter pylori Infection the Primary Cause of Duodenal Ulceration or a Secondary Factor? A Review of the Evidence

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    Vikram Kate

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori has a role in the multifactorial etiology of peptic ulcer disease. A link between H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer disease is now established. Other contributing factors and their interaction with the organism may initiate the ulcerative process. The fact that eradication of H. pylori infection leads to a long-term cure in the majority of duodenal ulcer patients and the fact that the prevalence of infection is higher in ulcer patients than in the normal population are cogent arguments in favor of it being the primary cause of the ulceration. Against this concept there are issues that need explanation such as the reason why only a minority of infected persons develop duodenal ulceration when infection with H. pylori is widespread. There is evidence that H. pylori infection has been prevalent for several centuries, yet duodenal ulceration became common at the beginning of the twentieth century. The prevalence of duodenal ulceration is not higher in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This paper debate puts forth the point of view of two groups of workers in this field whether H. pylori infection is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer disease or a secondary factor.

  19. [Changing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the 9th district of Budapest. A retrospective endoscopic study, 1997-2012].

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    Buzás, György Miklós; Lotz, Gábor; Schneider, Ferenc; Józan, Jolán

    2013-06-09

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in developed countries is decreasing. The time-frame of this process is largely unknown. The aim of the authors was to evaluate the changes in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in their endoscopic centre. This retrospective study included 4647 patients examined between 1997 and 2012. Helicobacter pylori was determined from antral and corpus biopsies by the modified Giemsa stain and rapid urease test. The prevalence of the infection was calculated yearly for the period studied, for age decades from 18 to 85 years, birth cohorts of 10 years from 1920 to 1994 and according to diagnosis. The overall prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was 54.7%, which decreased from 71.3% in 1997 to 32.76% in 2011. Functional dyspepsia was found in 37.9%, duodenal ulcer in 25.3%, gastric ulcer in 3.8% and reflux disease in 24.2% of the patients. The mean prevalence of infection was 62.5% in birth cohorts of 10 years between 1920 and 1959, 57.4% in those between 1960 and 1969, and decreased to 39.0% and 26.7% in birth cohorts between 1970 and 1979) and between 1980 and 1989, respectively. According to age cohorts, the prevalence was 21.8% 34.9%, 46.5%, 63.7%, 63.2% and 59.2% in patients aged 18-19 years, 20-29 years, 30-39 years, 40-49 years, 50-59 years and 60-69 years, respectively. The proportion of H. pylori positive duodenal ulcers decreased from 95.9% in 1998 to 59.1% in 2011 (p = 0.001). The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in the 9th district of Budapest is decreasing, especially in cohorts born in the late 1960s and 1970s, nearly 1.5 decades before the discovery of the bacterium.

  20. Randomised controlled trial of effects of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on heartburn and gastro-oesophageal reflux: Bristol helicobacter project

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    Harvey, Richard F; Lane, J Athene; Murray, Liam J; Harvey, Ian M; Donovan, Jenny L; Nair, Prakash

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on heartburn and gastro-oesophageal reflux. Design Cross sectional study, followed by a randomised placebo controlled trial. Setting Seven general practices in Bristol, England. Participants 10 537 people, aged 20-59 years, with and without H pylori infection (determined by the 13C-urea breath test). Main outcome measures Prevalence of heartburn and gastro-oesophageal acid reflux at baseline and two years after treatment to eradicate H pylori infection. Results At baseline, H pylori infection was associated with increased prevalence of heartburn (odds ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.23) but not reflux (1.05, 0.97 to 1.14). In participants with H pylori infection, active treatment had no effect on the overall prevalence of heartburn (0.99, 0.88 to 1.12) or reflux (1.04, 0.91 to 1.19) and did not improve pre-existing symptoms of heartburn or reflux. Conclusions H pylori infection is associated with a slightly increased prevalence of heartburn but not reflux. Treatment to eradicate H pylori has no net benefit in patients with heartburn or gastro-oesophageal reflux. PMID:15126313

  1. ESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE, PEPTIC ULCER AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION – A PROSPECTIVE, CONTROLLED STUDY

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    Pavel Skok

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. A possible association of esophageal reflux disease with peptic ulcer, Helicobacter pylori infection or the results of eradication, has not been elucidated. It is an alarming fact that in developed countries the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma, which is associated with reflux disease, is increasing.Aim. The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of esophageal reflux disease after eradication of H. pylori infection in patients with hemorrhaging and nonhemorrhaging peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum.Patients and methods. Study was approved in 1998 by the Slovenian Medical Ethics Committee (No. 90/09/98. Prospective, controlled and randomized, carried out between 1998– 2000.The study included 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av. age 57.5 years, SD ± 17.1, range 22–80 years in which endoscopy confirmed hemorrhage from peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and HP infection. The control group was made up of 80 patients (50 male and 30 female, av. age 56.8 years, SD ± 16.8, range 19–80 years with peptic ulcer of stomach or duodenum and H.pylori infection in the same period of time. In all cases the recommended drug combinations were used in the treatment of the infection: a proton pump inhibitor, omeprazol (4 weeks, and combination of antibiotics, claritromycin and metronidazole or with regard to the antibiogram (1 week. The therapeutic success was ascertained endoscopically four weeks after inclusion in the study. Infection eradication was confirmed by the rapid urease test and histologic investigation of the gastric mucosa. One year later, in the course of follow-up, in patients with endoscopic investigations, 24-hour pH-metry or fiberoptic spectrophotometric bilirubin determination, bilimetry, we tried to establish signs of esophageal reflux disease.Results. Four weeks after inclusion in the study the success of infection eradication was 92.5% in the study group while in the control group reached 91.25%, p > 0

  2. Data on gut metagenomes of the patients with Helicobacter pylori infection before and after the antibiotic therapy

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    Oksana E. Glushchenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic therapy can lead to the disruption of gut microbiota community with possible negative outcomes for human health. One of the diseases for which the treatment scheme commonly included antibiotic intake is Helicobacter pylori infection. The changes in taxonomic and functional composition of microbiota in patients can be assessed using “shotgun” metagenomic sequencing. Ten stool samples were collected from 4 patients with Helicobacter pylori infection before and directly after the H. pylori eradication course. Additionally, for two of the subjects, the samples were collected 1 month after the end of the treatment. The samples were subject to “shotgun” (whole-genome metagenomic sequencing using Illumina HiSeq platform. The reads are deposited in the ENA (project ID: PRJEB18265.

  3. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with metabolic parameters and dietary habits among medical undergraduate students in southeastern of Iran

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    Omid Eslami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, there is still inconclusive evidence on the extra-gastric manifestations of Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection. This study aimed to determine whether there is an association between H.pylori infection with metabolic syndrome and dietary habits among medical undergraduate students in south-eastern of Iran, Zahedan. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done among 363 undergraduate students in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences during spring 2014. All subjects completed a questionnaire including demographic factors and dietary habits. Serum H. pylori-specific IgG antibodies, total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, and fasting blood sugar (FBS levels were measured after an overnight fast. Results: The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was 45.7%. H. pylori-positive subjects had lower mean levels of TC and TG and higher levels of HDL-C compared to H. pylori-negative subjects. In addition, lower levels of LDL-C (P = 0.044 and FBS (P = 0.05 were observed among subjects with positive H pylori infection. Only rare consumption of raw vegetables (odds ratio [OR] =3.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.37–5.24 as well as higher levels of FBS (OR = 1.031, 95% CI = 1.001–1.99 were significantly associated with higher odds of H. pylori infection in both the univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: In a small population of young students in southeastern of Iran, H. pylori infection was associated with low consumption of raw vegetables and higher serum blood glucose.

  4. High Serum Pepsinogen I and beta Helicobacter pylori Infection Are Risk Factors for Aspirin-Induced Gastroduodenal Injury.

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    Shan, Jing; Lei, Hongjun; Shi, Wei; Sun, Xiaobin; Tang, Yu; Ren, Chunrong

    2018-01-01

    Whether gastric hyperchlorhydria and Helicobacter pylori infection contribute to aspirin-induced gastroduodenal injury still lacks evidence. Because serum pepsinogens (PGs) and gastrin-17 (G17) can reflect gastric acid secretion, this study intended to elucidate whether serum PGs, serum G17, and H. pylori infection are associated with aspirin-induced gastrointestinal injury. A total of 60 patients taking low-dose aspirin for more than 1 month were enrolled in this study. Serum PG I, PG II, and G17 were determined using ELISA. A 14C-urea breath test was used for the detection of an H. pylori infection. The modified Lanza score was used to evaluate the degree of gastroduodenal injury under endoscopy. The median serum PG I level was significantly higher in the intensive gastroduodenal injury (IGI) group compared to that in the mild gastroduodenal injury group (155.0 vs. 116.6 ng/mL, p = 0.006). The H. pylori infection rate was significantly higher in the IGI group (73 vs. 40%, p = 0.037). Receiver operator characteristic curves analysis revealed that the cutoff value of PG I was 123 ng/mL, with 80% sensitivity and 61.4% specificity. H. pylori infection combined with PG I at >123 ng/mL had an OR (95% CI) of 15.8 (2.4 ± 104.5) for the prediction of aspirin-induced gastroduodenal injury. Key Messages: Serum PG I and H. pylori infection could be used to identify potential high-risk aspirin-induced gastroduodenal injury patients. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among patients referred for endoscopy: Gender and ethnic differences in Kedah, Malaysia

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    Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, according to ethnicity and gender among the people of Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia who undergo endoscopy. Methods: To study the epidemiology of H. pylori infection in Kedah, Malaysia population, we assessed the database of hospital admissions of the patients referred to the Endoscopy Unit at Sungai Petani Hospital for oesophagogastro-duodenoscopy (OGD between January 2000 and December 2007. For statistical analysis, the Fisher’s exact test (2- tailed test was used. H. pylori infection rate was determined in 1 965 consecutive patients. Results: Out of 1 965 patients, 597 (30.4% were positive and 1368 (69.6% were negative for H. pylori infections. Generally, the prevalence rate among males (51.9%; 398/767 was significantly higher (P<0.05 than for females (33.1%; 199/601. In terms of ethnics, the overall prevalence showed H. pylori infection was commonly found among Indians and Chinese with prevalence rate of 35.6% (194/545 and 28.6% (100/350 respectively. These figures are significantly higher (P< 0.05 than the 28.5% (300/1051 for Malays. The prevalence rates for Malay males was lower (P<0.05 than those of Chinese and Indians. Conclusions: In conclusion, there is a significant difference in H. pylori infection prevalence rates among ethnic groups (highest in Indians, then Chinese and unusually low in Malays and gender groups (highest in males in Kedah, Malaysia.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection according to ABO blood group among blood donors in Kosovo

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    Bukurije Zhubi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies have reported a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among healthy and non-healthy persons in different places. The Aim of the study is to investigate the seroprevalence of H. pylori infection among Kosovo’s Blood donor associated with ABO/Rhesus blood group.Methods: 671 blood donors are tested for H. pylori antibodies and results are classifi ed by way of donation, age, gender, blood groups and education level. Serum antibodies are analyzed by Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay test for H. pylori IgG with Biomerieux HPY-VIDAS.Results: The frequency of IgG antibody for H. pylori among healthy blood donors is 56.9%, there is not found any difference between voluntary and non-voluntary blood donors (57.4% respectively 56.3%(OR=1.05; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.43; p=0.8. H pylori IgG antibodies positive are detected in 57.0 % ( 126 of 221 of women, compared with 56.9 % ( 256 of 450 of men(OR=0.99; 95% CI 0.72 to 1.38; p=0.96. Serpositive donors are older than seronegative ones (31.9 years, respectively 29.5 years, p=0.02. Mean value of IgG antibody of H. pylori is 3.61 with no significant difference between males and females (3.72 respectively 3.44; p=0.2. The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection is similar among blood groups: O (57.4%, A (56.2%, B (59.6%, AB (51.4%, RhD positive (56.7% and RhD negative (58.3%.Conclusions: The seropositivity of H. pylori is moderately higher in the non voluntary and familiar blood donors among the total Kosovo blood donors. There is not found a significant relationship between infection with H. pylori and ABO/Rhesus blood group among blood donors.

  7. Associations among Gastric Juice pH, Atrophic Gastritis, Intestinal Metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

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    Sung, Jihee; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Jongchan; Hwang, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Jung Wha; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2018-03-15

    Gastric juice plays a crucial role in the physiology of the stomach. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations among the pH of gastric juice, atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), pepsinogen, and Helicobacter pylori infection. Gastric biopsies and juice were collected from 46 subjects who underwent endoscopies at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. H. pylori , AG and IM were evaluated, and pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured. The mean pH of gastric juice was higher in the H. pylori -positive group (n=17) than that in the H. pylori -negative group (n=29) (4.54 vs 2.46, p=0.002). When patients were divided into pH <3 (n=28) and pH ≥3 (n=18) groups, H. pylori was lower in the pH <3 group (21.4%) than in the pH ≥3 group (61.1%) (p=0.007). The pH ≥3 group demonstrated AG and IM more frequently than the pH <3 group in the body (p=0.047 and p=0.051, respectively) but not in the antrum. There were no differences in pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and IL-1β levels between the two groups. There is a relationship between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric juice pH ≥3, which may originate from AG and IM in the body.

  8. Associations among Gastric Juice pH, Atrophic Gastritis, Intestinal Metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Sung, Jihee; Lee, Jongchan; Hwang, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Jung Wha; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastric juice plays a crucial role in the physiology of the stomach. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations among the pH of gastric juice, atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), pepsinogen, and Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods Gastric biopsies and juice were collected from 46 subjects who underwent endoscopies at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. H. pylori, AG and IM were evaluated, and pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured. Results The mean pH of gastric juice was higher in the H. pylori-positive group (n=17) than that in the H. pylori-negative group (n=29) (4.54 vs 2.46, p=0.002). When patients were divided into pH <3 (n=28) and pH ≥3 (n=18) groups, H. pylori was lower in the pH <3 group (21.4%) than in the pH ≥3 group (61.1%) (p=0.007). The pH ≥3 group demonstrated AG and IM more frequently than the pH <3 group in the body (p=0.047 and p=0.051, respectively) but not in the antrum. There were no differences in pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio, and IL-1β levels between the two groups. Conclusions There is a relationship between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric juice pH ≥3, which may originate from AG and IM in the body. PMID:28918609

  9. Predictive computational modeling of the mucosal immune responses during Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Adria Carbo

    Full Text Available T helper (Th cells play a major role in the immune response and pathology at the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection. There is a limited mechanistic understanding regarding the contributions of CD4+ T cell subsets to gastritis development during H. pylori colonization. We used two computational approaches: ordinary differential equation (ODE-based and agent-based modeling (ABM to study the mechanisms underlying cellular immune responses to H. pylori and how CD4+ T cell subsets influenced initiation, progression and outcome of disease. To calibrate the model, in vivo experimentation was performed by infecting C57BL/6 mice intragastrically with H. pylori and assaying immune cell subsets in the stomach and gastric lymph nodes (GLN on days 0, 7, 14, 30 and 60 post-infection. Our computational model reproduced the dynamics of effector and regulatory pathways in the gastric lamina propria (LP in silico. Simulation results show the induction of a Th17 response and a dominant Th1 response, together with a regulatory response characterized by high levels of mucosal Treg cells. We also investigated the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ activation on the modulation of host responses to H. pylori by using loss-of-function approaches. Specifically, in silico results showed a predominance of Th1 and Th17 cells in the stomach of the cell-specific PPARγ knockout system when compared to the wild-type simulation. Spatio-temporal, object-oriented ABM approaches suggested similar dynamics in induction of host responses showing analogous T cell distributions to ODE modeling and facilitated tracking lesion formation. In addition, sensitivity analysis predicted a crucial contribution of Th1 and Th17 effector responses as mediators of histopathological changes in the gastric mucosa during chronic stages of infection, which were experimentally validated in mice. These integrated immunoinformatics approaches

  10. dupA as a risk determinant in Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Douraghi, Masoumeh; Mohammadi, Marjan; Oghalaie, Akbar; Abdirad, Afshin; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini, Mahmoud Eshagh; Zeraati, Hojat; Ghasemi, Amir; Esmaieli, Maryam; Mohajerani, Nazanin

    2008-05-01

    The Helicobacter pylori duodenal ulcer promoting (dupA) gene has been previously described as a risk marker for duodenal ulcer (DU) development and a protective factor against gastric cancer (GC). Recent studies which have assessed the application of dupA in the prediction of clinical outcomes have been controversial. In the current study, the association of dupA with the clinical outcomes and histopathological changes following H. pylori infection was evaluated in Iranian patients. A total of 157 H. pylori-infected patients with DU (n=30), gastric ulcer (n=23), gastritis (n=68) or GC (n=36) were assessed. The presence of jhp0917 and jhp0918 genes was determined by gene specific PCR. Gastric histopathological changes were recorded according to the updated Sydney system. Seventy-eight (49.7 %) and 71 (45.2 %) of the 157 tested strains, respectively, were positive and negative for both genes. The remaining 8 (5.09 %) of the 157 strains were jhp0917-positive/jhp0918-negative. Univariate analysis showed inverse associations between dupA and histological features including dysplasia as the penultimate stage of GC and lymphoid follicles as a consequence of relatively long-standing H. pylori-associated gastritis. The degrees of nucleotide sequence identity of Iranian strains to Colombian, Brazilian and Indian strains ranged from 86.1 to 100 % for the aligned regions of jhp0917, from 88 to 98.8 % for jhp0918 and from 93.4 to 99.5 % for the partial sequences of the dupA gene. Despite the fact that possession of the dupA gene showed no association with any disease category in our population as reported in several other countries, association of dupA-negative strains of H. pylori with pre-malignant lesions calls for additional studies to evaluate the role of this gene as a protective marker against GC.

  11. Seroepidemiology of the Helicobacter pylori infection among people of Pishva city of Varamin

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    Maryam Abdi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The epidemiologic pattern of Helicobacter pylori infection is differed between developed countries and developing countries, and also it is depend on the total standard of living in each region. At the present study, the seroprevalence of H.pylori infection and effectiveness of underlying factors in prevalence of this infection among residents of Pishva city of Varamin was evaluated. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted after completion the questionnaire. The peripheral blood of 314 people without any confirmed gastric problem were collected. Then, the titer of total IgG and IgG anti CagA of H. pylori was evaluated by ELISA method. Consequently, the correlation between serologic data and different factors were analyzed by SPSS statistical software. Results: The existence of total IgG was detected in 164 (55.2% of 314 patients and was negative in 130 people (41.4%.Also, the IgG anti CagA were positive in 46 (29.1%, it was negative in 105 people (66.5% and the rested were in borderline. There was statistical meaningful correlation between positive result of serology test of IgG anti CagA to  some risk factors such as age, the number of the member of family, the educational status and occupation, the consumption of can, heart diseases, the rate of cholesterol, the history of gastrointestinal symptoms,  heartburn and reflux (P <0.05 . Conclusions: With regard to high prevalence of H. pylori in this area (55.2% and its presumptive effect in infected people, the necessary of hygiene education and precise control of infection is suggested.

  12. Frequency of virulence factors in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with gastritis.

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    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Bagheri, Nader; Zamanzad, Behnam; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-03-01

    The outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been related to specific virulence-associated bacterial genotypes. The vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), cagA gene, oipA and babA2 gene are important virulence factor involving gastric diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between virulence factors of H. pylori and histopathological findings. Gastroduodenoscopy was performed in 436 dyspeptic patients. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, virulence factors and for histopathological assessment. The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect virulence factors of H. pylori using specific primers. vacA genotypes in patients infected with H. pylori were associated with cagA, iceA1 and iceA2. In the patients with H. pylori infection there was a significant relationship between cagA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and chronic inflammation (P = 0.013) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.034). Neutrophil infiltration was found to be more severe in the s1 group than in the s2 group (P = 0.042). Also was a significant relationship between oipA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.018). No significant relationships were observed between other vacA genotypes and histopathological parameters. H. pylori strains showing cagA, vacA s1 and oipA positivity are associated with more severe gastritis in some histological features but virulence factors of H. pylori do not appear to determine the overall pattern of gastritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anti-Bacterial Properties of Herbs against Helicobacter Pylori Infection: A Review

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    Hedieh Yousef-Nezhad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that lives in human stomach. This bacterium is the most important cause of chronic gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. The therapies include the use of antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor, but unfortunately, these therapeutic methods are not always responsive due to resistance to antibiotics. In recent years, use of alternative treatment, including medicinal herbs was shown to have anti-H. Pylori properties. So, in this review, anti-H. Pylori features of herbals were investigated including ginger, garlic, cranberry, curcumin, green tea and broccoli sprouts derived through the search in Google Scholar search engine, and PubMed scientific database using English keywords such as Helicobacter pylori, anti-H. pylori, ginger, garlic, cranberry, curcumin, broccoli and green tea, between 1984 -2016. Results showed that ginger, garlic, cranberry, curcumin, broccoli and green tea have antibacterial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential properties, and because of their role in protecting the stomach against H. pylori infection, it seems, they can be an appropriate treatment option for patients with this infection.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection-induced H3Ser10 phosphorylation in stepwise gastric carcinogenesis and its clinical implications.

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    Yang, Tao-Tao; Cao, Na; Zhang, Hai-Hui; Wei, Jian-Bo; Song, Xiao-Xia; Yi, Dong-Min; Chao, Shuai-Heng; Zhang, Li-Da; Kong, Ling-Fei; Han, Shuang-Yin; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Ding, Song-Ze

    2018-04-15

    Our previous works have demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection can alter histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation status in gastric epithelial cells. However, whether Helicobacter pylori-induced histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation participates in gastric carcinogenesis is unknown. We investigate the expression of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation in various stages of gastric disease and explore its clinical implication. Stomach biopsy samples from 129 patients were collected and stained with histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation, Ki67, and Helicobacter pylori by immunohistochemistry staining, expressed as labeling index. They were categorized into nonatrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and intestinal-type gastric cancer groups. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by either 13 C-urea breath test or immunohistochemistry staining. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients, labeling index of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation was gradually increased in nonatrophic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia groups, peaked at low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and declined in high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and gastric cancer groups. In Helicobacter pylori-infected patients, labeling index of histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation followed the similar pattern as above, with increased expression over the corresponding Helicobacter pylori-negative controls except in nonatrophic gastritis patient whose labeling index was decreased when compared with Helicobacter pylori-negative control. Labeling index of Ki67 in Helicobacter pylori-negative groups was higher in gastric cancer than chronic atrophic gastritis and low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia groups, and higher in intestinal metaplasia group compared with chronic atrophic gastritis group. In Helicobacter pylori-positive groups, Ki67 labeling index was increased

  15. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the Approach to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents – an Evidence-Based Evaluation

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    Nicola L Jones

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H pylori infection; H pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two

  16. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the approach to Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents--an evidence-based evaluation.

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    Bourke, Billy; Ceponis, Peter; Chiba, Naoki; Czinn, Steve; Ferraro, Richard; Fischbach, Lori; Gold, Ben; Hyunh, Hien; Jacobson, Kevan; Jones, Nicola L; Koletzko, Sibylle; Lebel, Sylvie; Moayyedi, Paul; Ridell, Robert; Sherman, Philip; van Zanten, Sander; Beck, Ivan; Best, Linda; Boland, Margaret; Bursey, Ford; Chaun, Hugh; Cooper, Geraldine; Craig, Brian; Creuzenet, Carole; Critch, Jeffrey; Govender, Krishnasamy; Hassall, Eric; Kaplan, Alan; Keelan, Monica; Noad, Garth; Robertson, Marli; Smith, Lesley; Stein, Markus; Taylor, Diane; Walters, Thomas; Persaud, Robin; Whitaker, Scott; Woodland, Robert

    2005-07-01

    As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H. pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H. pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H. pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H. pylori infection; H. pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H. pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H. pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H. pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H. pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H. pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H. pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two antibiotics

  17. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

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    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7{+-}12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1{+-}25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive ({>=}50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62{+-}66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3{+-}157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection.

  18. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7±12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1±25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive (≥50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62±66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3±157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection

  19. Gene expression profiling in gastric mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-infected and uninfected patients undergoing chronic superficial gastritis.

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    Ze-Min Yang

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection reprograms host gene expression and influences various cellular processes, which have been investigated by cDNA microarray using in vitro culture cells and in vivo gastric biopsies from patients of the Chronic Abdominal Complaint. To further explore the effects of H. pylori infection on host gene expression, we have collected the gastric antral mucosa samples from 6 untreated patients with gastroscopic and pathologic confirmation of chronic superficial gastritis. Among them three patients were infected by H. pylori and the other three patients were not. These samples were analyzed by a microarray chip which contains 14,112 cloned cDNAs, and microarray data were analyzed via BRB ArrayTools software and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA website. The results showed 34 genes of 38 differentially expressed genes regulated by H. pylori infection had been annotated. The annotated genes were involved in protein metabolism, inflammatory and immunological reaction, signal transduction, gene transcription, trace element metabolism, and so on. The 82% of these genes (28/34 were categorized in three molecular interaction networks involved in gene expression, cancer progress, antigen presentation and inflammatory response. The expression data of the array hybridization was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR assays. Taken together, these data indicated that H. pylori infection could alter cellular gene expression processes, escape host defense mechanism, increase inflammatory and immune responses, activate NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, disturb metal ion homeostasis, and induce carcinogenesis. All of these might help to explain H. pylori pathogenic mechanism and the gastroduodenal pathogenesis induced by H. pylori infection.

  20. Immune Reactions Against Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: Specific Pathogenesis of Gastric Ulcer from Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Kiyoshi Ayada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a definite causative factor for gastric ulcers (GUs. In the present study we detected a specific antigen of gastric epithelial cells (HGC-27 using cell ELISA, which was recognized by the sera of GU patients (n=20 but not in patients with chronic gastritis (CG; n=20 or in healthy volunteers (HC; n=10. This antigen was over-expressed by a stressful (heat-stressed environment, and was identified as elongation factor 2 kinase (EF-2K by western blotting. The GU patients' lymphocytes stimulated by H. pylori specifically disrupted heat-stressed HGC-27 cells in a cytotoxic assay. In flow cytometry, the effector cells (lymphocytes from GU patients were significantly differentiated to T helper type 1 lymphocyte (Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL as opposed to those from CG patients. The target cells (HGC-27 expressed EF-2K and MHC-class I together with costimulatory molecules from heat stress. This antigen specific immune mechanism could have a prominent role in the pathogenesis of GU.

  1. Role of adjuvant therapy in the treatment of helicobacter pylori infection in children

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    Gerasymenko O.N.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to study the effect of combined probiotic containing Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium infantis, Enterococcus faecium, on H.pylori eradication efficacy in the treatment of children with chronic H.pylori- associated gastroduodenitis in the scheme of "triple" therapy of H.pylori eradication. Determination of total serum Ig M , A, G protein to Ag SagA H. pylori, breathing "Helik" test, rapid urease "Helpil" test ; that of concentration of serum sCD14 was conducted. The study group included 20 children who received standard "triple" eradication therapy for 7 days and 1 caps. of probiotic 3 times a day for 4 weeks, control group (20 children – who received only standard eradication therapy. It is shown that combined use of probiotics in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection enhances effectiveness of eradication of H.pylori. In the basis of action of probiotic strains of the drug is an anti-inflammatory effect mediated by the impact on non-specific mechanisms of innate immunity, provided by molecular mechanism responsible for induction of sCD14 synthesis.

  2. The Prevalence of Mixed Helicobacter pylori Infections in Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Subjects in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Khandoker Mohammad K; Hossain, Md Enayet; Sultana, Jinath; Sarker, Shafiqul A; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Rahman, Motiur; Nahar, Shamsun

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly genetically diverse bacterial species, which can persist in the gastric environment for decades. Recent studies have shown that single infections predominate in developed countries, whereas mixed infections are more prevalent in developing countries. Mixed infections of this bacterium may be important for adaptation to the hostile gastric environment and may facilitate dyspeptic symptoms. To calculate the prevalence of mixed infections in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects, 2010 H. pylori isolates collected from 83 symptomatic and 91 asymptomatic subjects from Dhaka, Bangladesh, were analyzed by (i) random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting (RAPD) and (ii) multiplex PCR amplification for cagA and vacA virulence gene alleles. The overall prevalence of mixed H. pylori infection was 60.15% (77/128), indicating substantial co-colonization in this population. We additionally found that symptomatic subjects (53%) had a significantly higher rate of mixed infection than asymptomatic individuals (36.3%) (p = .016) and that the prevalence of the cagA and vacA and vacA m1/s1 and vacA m2/s1 alleles were higher in subjects with mixed infection. Our findings suggest that an increased diversity of the H. pylori strains in the gastric environment may contribute to the development of disease symptoms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection and dementia: can actual data reinforce the hypothesis of a causal association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, A; Fagoonee, S; De Angelis, C; Altruda, F; Pellicano, R

    2014-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is involved in the development of several gastroduodenal diseases. Since the latest decade, several studies have reported on the link between chronic H. pylori infection and a variety of extragastric manifestations, including dementia. To identify the publications on the association between H. pylori and dementia, a MEDLINE search was conducted. Although case-control studies reported controversial data, a recent longitudinal population-based cohort study found that after 20 years of follow-up, 28.9% of H. pylori-positive versus 21.1% of H. pylori-negative subjects developed dementia. After correction for confounding factors, the infection was significantly associated with higher risk of developing dementia (P=0.04). Moreover, in another study evaluating the effect of H. pylori eradication on the progression of dementia in Alzheimer's disease patients with peptic ulcer, the cure of the bacterium was associated with a decreased risk of dementia progression compared to persistent infection. To date, defining H. pylori as a target for prevention or treatment of dementia remains a topic with much controversy but of essence, as any relationship would reduce, due to the cost-effectiveness of the therapy, a burden on the National Health Care budget. The need for extensive studies with appropriate epidemiological and clinical approaches is crucial to investigate a potential causal relationship.

  4. Emerging Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Histopathologic Perspectives.

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    Emara, Mohamed H; Elhawari, Soha A; Yousef, Salem; Radwan, Mohamed I; Abdel-Aziz, Hesham R

    2016-02-01

    There is growing evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that emphasizes the efficacy of probiotics in the management of Helicobacter (H) pylori infection; it increased the eradication rate, improved patient clinical manifestations and lowered treatment associated side effects. In this review we documented the potential ability of probiotics to ameliorate H. pylori induced histological features. We searched the available literature for full length articles focusing the role of probiotics on H. pylori induced gastritis from histologic perspectives. Probiotics lowered H. pylori density at the luminal side of epithelium, improved histological inflammatory and activity scores both in the gastric corpus and antrum. This effect persists for long period of time after discontinuation of probiotic supplementation and this is probably through an immune mechanism. The current evidence support the promising role of probiotics in improving H. pylori induced histopathological features both in gastric antrum and corpus and for long periods of time. Because increased density of H. pylori on the gastric mucosa is linked to more severe gastritis and increased incidence of peptic ulcers, we can infer that a reduction of the density might help to decrease the risk of developing pathologies, probably the progression toward atrophic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. These effects together with improving the H. pylori eradication rates and amelioration of treatment related side effects might open the door for probiotics to be added to H. pylori eradication regimens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Insulin Resistance in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Population

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    Jamshid Vafaeimanesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (HP is a common worldwide infection with known gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal complications. One of the gastrointestinal side effects posed for this organism is its role in diabetes and increased insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between HP and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetic patients and nondiabetics. This cross-sectional study was carried out from May to December 2013 on 211 diabetic patients referred to diabetes clinic of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Qom and 218 patients without diabetes. HP was evaluated using serology method and insulin resistance was calculated using HOMA-IR. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 55.8% and 44.2% in diabetics and nondiabetics (P=0.001. The study population was divided into two HP positive and negative groups. Among nondiabetics, insulin resistance degree was 3.01±2.12 and 2.74±2.18 in HP+ and HP− patients, respectively P=0.704. Oppositely, insulin resistance was significantly higher in diabetic HP+ patients rather than seronegative ones (4.484±2.781 versus 3.160±2.327, P=0.013. In diabetic patients, in addition to higher prevalence of HP, it causes a higher degree of insulin resistance.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in Helicobacter pylori infection: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Li Yumin; Yang Kehu; Ma Bin; Guan Quanlin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Lijuan

    2010-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and iron deficiency anemia are prevalent in disadvantaged populations worldwide. The benefit of H. pylori eradiation for iron deficiency anemia has been extensively studied, but data are still equivocal. A search in The Cochrane Library, PUBMED, EMBASE, EBM Review databases, Science Citation Index Expanded, and CMB (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database) was performed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing anti-H. pylori plus oral iron to oral iron alone for the iron deficiency patients in whom H. pylori was positive were selected for meta-analysis. Reviev Manager 5.0 software was used for the performance of meta-analysis. Sixteen randomized controlled trials totaling 956 patients were included. The meta-analysis showed that the difference from baseline to endpoint of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron (SI), and serum ferritin (SF) was statistically significantly different between anti-H. pylori treatment plus oral iron and oral iron alone (SMD, Hb 1.48; 95% CI, 0.96, 2.00; p infection could be effective in improving anemia and iron statue in IDA patients infected by H. pylori, particularly in patients with moderate or severe anemia.

  7. Will Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Childhood Alter the Risk of Developing Gastric Cancer?

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    Billy Bourke

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a group 1 carcinogen for gastric cancer. It is estimated that there is between a two- and sixfold increase in the risk of developing gastric cancer among infected patients. Among different populations, the risk of H pylori-infected individuals developing gastric cancer varies greatly. However, on a worldwide scale, gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. Therefore, H pylori eradication could help prevent up to three to four million gastric cancer deaths per year. H pylori is usually acquired in childhood. Because infected children have not harboured the organism for long enough to have developed precancerous lesions, childhood is theoretically an attractive time for H pylori eradication and, thus, could help prevent gastric cancer later in life. However, as H pylori prevalence and the incidence of gastric cancer are falling rapidly in developed nations, widespread population screening programs aimed at the eradication of H pylori in these countries would be enormously expensive. Therefore, except in groups with a high risk for development of gastric cancer (eg, Japanese or those with a strong positive family history of gastric cancer, a population-based test-and-treat policy is not justified.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection in women with Hashimoto thyroiditis: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmuely, Haim; Shimon, Ilan; Gitter, Limor Azulay

    2016-07-01

    An association between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection as environmental risk factors for Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has been reported. We investigated this hypothesis in women in which HT is more common. Serum immunoglobulin G antibodies against H pylori (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), CagA protein (Western blot assay), circulating antibodies to thyroid antigens, mainly thyroperoxidase (TPOAbs) and thyroglobulin (TgAbs), were tested in 101 females with HT and 111 non-HT control women without a history of autoimmune disease. Thyroid function, socioeconomic status at childhood, and family history of thyroid malfunction were also studied. Forty-seven HT women (46.5%) tested seropositive for H pylori versus 48 controls (43.2%; P = 0.63). The prevalence of anti-CagA antibodies was 21.3% in HT-infected patients and 31.2% in infected controls (P = 0.352). Women with HT were older than the controls at a significance level of 0.03, and higher prevalence of hypothyroidism (69% vs 13.5%, respectively) and family history of thyroid malfunction (59% vs 34%, respectively) (P thyroid malfunction was independently associated with an increased risk of HT (odds ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 1.86-6.18, P thyroid malfunction is a risk factor for HT.

  9. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabakaran, K.; Fernandes, V.; McDonald, J.

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  10. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on growth trajectories in young Ethiopian children: a longitudinal study

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    Bineyam Taye

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: These findings add to the growing body of evidence supporting that H. pylori infection is inversely associated with childhood growth trajectory, after controlling for a range of factors associated with reduced growth and H. pylori status. Further follow-up will be important to confirm possible catch-up in height trajectory among H. pylori-infected children as they grow older.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection as a cause of gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer and nonulcer dyspepsia: a systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J; Sherman, P M

    1994-01-15

    To evaluate current evidence for a causal relation between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer and nonulcer dyspepsia. A MEDLINE search for articles published in English between January 1983 and December 1992 with the use of MeSH terms Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, dyspepsia and clinical trial; abstracts were excluded. Six journals and Current Contents were searched manually for pertinent articles published in that time frame. Original studies with at least 25 patients, case reports and reviews that examined the relation between H. pylori and the four gastrointestinal disorders; 350 articles were on gastritis, 122 on duodenal ulcer, 44 on gastric cancer and 96 on nonulcer dyspepsia. The quality of the studies was rated independently on a four-point scale. The strength of the evidence was assessed using a six-point scale for each of the eight established guidelines for determining a causal relation. There was conclusive evidence of a causal relation between H. pylori infection and histologic gastritis. Koch's postulates for the identification of a microorganism as the causative agent of a disease were fulfilled for H. pylori as a causative agent of gastritis. There was strong evidence that H. pylori is the main cause of duodenal ulcers not induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but all of Koch's postulates were not fulfilled. There was moderate epidemiologic evidence of an association between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. There was a lack of convincing evidence of a causal association between H. pylori and nonulcer dyspepsia. The evidence supports a strong causal relation between H. pylori infection and gastritis and duodenal ulcer and a moderate relation between such infection and gastric cancer. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of H. pylori in these disorders. Thus far, there is no evidence of a causal relation between H. pylori and nonulcer

  12. General prevalence of helicobacter pylori infection in dyspeptic population of islamabad, pakistan

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    Qureshi, T.Z.; Saleem, K.; Zafar, S.

    2008-01-01

    analysis using Mass Spectrometer. Water drinking habits of patients were recorded to assess the possible role of drinking water in bacterial transmission to human stomachs. Analysis of data obtained by mass spectrometry showed an overall prevalence of 66.5%. Majority of our subjects used unboiled water. Therefore, use of unboiled drinking water could be the most possible cause of this infection. Chronic antral gastritis was the predominant endoscopic pathology seen in infective patients. We therefore, conclude that prevalence of H.pylori infection is high in Islamabad region mainly due to the use of contaminated drinking water. (author)

  13. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

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    LI Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo study the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBC. MethodsA total of 235 patients with HBC who were admitted to our hospitals from October 2008 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. The infection rate of H. pylori in those patients was calculated. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices and 97 patients with portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG, the infection rate of H. pylori was compared between those with different degrees of esophagogastric varices or PHG. In the 32 patients whose blood ammonia was determined, the level of blood ammonia was compared between H. pylori-positive and -negative groups. Between-group comparison of continuous data was performed by t test and analysis of variance, and between-group comparison of categorical data was performed by χ2 test. ResultsThe infection rate of H. pylori in the 235 patients with HBC was 80.85% (190/235. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices, who had tortuous serpentine uplift or bead-like changes of esophageal varices and tumor-like changes (with or without gastric erosion of gastric varices visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild, moderate, and severe varices (50.55% (46/91 vs 43.59% (17/39 vs 76% (19/25, χ2=6.913, P<0.05. In the 97 patients with PHG, who had snake skin-like changes, cherry red spots, scarlet rash, and erosion bleeding of gastric mucosa visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild and severe PHG (43.33% (26/60 vs 67.57% (25/37, χ2=5.391, P<005.In patients whose blood ammonia was determined, patients in H. pylori-positive group had a significantly higher average concentration of blood ammonia than those in H. pylori-negative group (62.76±13.43 vs 47.20±12.51 μmol/L, t= 3.39, P<0

  14. Relation between ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori infection in symptomatic patients

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    Jaff MS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Salih Jaff Pathology Department, College of Medicine, Hawler Medical University (formerly Salahuddin University, Erbil, Kurdistan Region, Iraq Abstract: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated higher frequencies of the O blood group and the nonsecretor phenotype of ABH antigens among patients suffering from peptic ulcers. Since Helicobacter pylori has been established as the main etiological factor in this disease, controversies about the associations of the ABO and Lewis blood group phenotypes and secretor and nonsecretor phenotypes in relation to susceptibility towards infection by this bacillus have been presented. The aim of this study was to verify the frequencies of ABO and Rhesus (Rh blood groups in H. pylori seropositive symptomatic patients. The study included (n = 1108 patients with dyspepsia symptoms referred from an outpatient clinic in Erbil city for investigation. Age, sex, and residency were recorded as a routine laboratory framework. Patients underwent SD Bioline (Standard Diagnostics Inc, Kyonggi-do, South Korea and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serologic tests for H. pylori. ABO blood group phenotypes were determined by a standard hemagglutination test. Results showed that 64.8% of patients (n = 718/1108 were seropositive for H. pylori infection, and (35.2% (n = 390/1108 were seronegative. Of the seropositive patients, 40.8% (n = 293/718 were male and 59.2% (n = 425/718 were female; while of the seronegative patients, 46.7% (n = 182/390 were male and 53.3% (n = 208/390 were female. The mean age for seropositives and seronegatives was (38.0 ± 14.6 years and (37.6 ± 15.7 years respectively. The frequency of the ABO and Rh-positive (Rh+ blood groups among seropositive patients was (A = 32.0%, B = 19.5%, AB = 6.7%, O = 41.8%, and Rh+ = 92.5% and was (A = 32.3%, B = 28.2%, AB = 8.0%, O = 31.5%, and Rh+ = 92.5% in seronegatives. The results of this study suggest that ABO blood groups, age, and gender influence

  15. IL10 single nucleotide polymorphisms are related to upregulation of constitutive IL-10 production and susceptibility to Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Assis, Shirleide; Marques, Cintia Rodrigues; Silva, Thiago Magalhães; Costa, Ryan Santos; Alcantara-Neves, Neuza Maria; Barreto, Mauricio Lima; Barnes, Kathleen Carole; Figueiredo, Camila Alexandrina

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, likely due to the extensive inflammation in the stomach mucosa caused by these bacteria. Many studies have reported an association between IL10 polymorphisms, the risk of gastric cancer, and IL-10 production. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between IL10 genetic variants, Helicobacter pylori infection, and IL-10 production by peripheral blood leukocytes in children. We genotyped a total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL10 in 1259 children aged 4-11 years living in a poor urban area in Salvador, Brazil, using TaqMan probe based, 5' nuclease assay minor groove binder chemistry. Association tests were performed by logistic regression for Helicobacter pylori infection and linear regression for IL-10 spontaneous production (whole-blood cultures) including sex, age, and principal components for informative ancestry markers as covariates, using PLINK. Our results shown that IL10 single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1800896 (OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.11-2.39), rs3024491 (OR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.14-2.57), rs1878672 (OR = 1.79; 95% CI = 1.19-2.68), and rs3024496 (OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.05-2.08) were positively associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with spontaneous production of IL-10 in culture, of which three (rs1800896 and rs1878672, p = .04; rs3024491, p = .01) were strongly associated with infection by Helicobacter pylori. Our results indicate that IL10 variants rs1800896, rs3024491, rs1878672, and rs3024496 are more consistently associated with the presence of anti-H. pylori IgG by inducing increased production of IL-10. Further studies are underway to elucidate the role of additional genetic variants and to investigate their impact on the occurrence of gastric cancer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The association of pagophagia with Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

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    Asma, Suheyl; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan; Serin, Ender

    2009-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between pagophagia (compulsive ice eating) and H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. We identified H. pylori infection using the (13)C-urea breath test in 45 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (group 1) and 55 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia (group 2). Subgroups for testing oral intestinal iron absorption were randomly assigned from both groups. These subgroups consisted of (a) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, (b) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia, (c) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, pagophagia, and H. pylori infection before the eradication of H. pylori and (d) subgroup c after eradication therapy. There was no difference in the rate of H. pylori infection in the iron-deficiency anemia groups, with or without pagophagia. Furthermore, oral intestinal iron absorption was not influenced by pagophagia and/or H. pylori infection. Pagophagia did not increase the risk of H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Pagophagia and H. pylori infection do not synergistically affect the development of intestinal iron absorption abnormalities.

  17. Oral Immunization with a Multivalent Epitope-Based Vaccine, Based on NAP, Urease, HSP60, and HpaA, Provides Therapeutic Effect on H. pylori Infection in Mongolian gerbils

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    Le Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Epitope-based vaccine is a promising strategy for therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection. A multivalent subunit vaccine containing various antigens from H. pylori is superior to a univalent subunit vaccine. However, whether a multivalent epitope-based vaccine is superior to a univalent epitope-based vaccine in therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori, remains unclear. In this study, a multivalent epitope-based vaccine named CWAE against H. pylori urease, neutrophil-activating protein (NAP, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60 and H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA was constructed based on mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, Th1-type adjuvant NAP, multiple copies of selected B and Th cell epitopes (UreA27–53, UreA183–203, HpaA132–141, and HSP60189–203, and also the epitope-rich regions of urease B subunit (UreB158–251 and UreB321–385 predicted by bioinformatics. Immunological properties of CWAE vaccine were characterized in BALB/c mice model. Its therapeutic effect was evaluated in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbil model by comparing with a univalent epitope-based vaccine CTB-UE against H. pylori urease that was constructed in our previous studies. Both CWAE and CTB-UE could induce similar levels of specific antibodies against H. pylori urease, and had similar inhibition effect of H. pylori urease activity. However, only CWAE could induce high levels of specific antibodies to NAP, HSP60, HpaA, and also the synthetic peptides epitopes (UreB158–172, UreB181–195, UreB211–225, UreB349–363, HpaA132–141, and HSP60189–203. In addition, oral therapeutic immunization with CWAE significantly reduced the number of H. pylori colonies in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils, compared with oral immunization using CTB-UE or H. pylori urease. The protection of CWAE was associated with higher levels of mixed CD4+ T cell (Th cell response, IgG, and secretory IgA (sIgA antibodies to H. pylori. These results indic

  18. Oral Immunization with a Multivalent Epitope-Based Vaccine, Based on NAP, Urease, HSP60, and HpaA, Provides Therapeutic Effect on H. pylori Infection in Mongolian gerbils.

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    Guo, Le; Yang, Hua; Tang, Feng; Yin, Runting; Liu, Hongpeng; Gong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Ying; Xu, Guangxian; Liu, Kunmei

    2017-01-01

    Epitope-based vaccine is a promising strategy for therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection. A multivalent subunit vaccine containing various antigens from H. pylori is superior to a univalent subunit vaccine. However, whether a multivalent epitope-based vaccine is superior to a univalent epitope-based vaccine in therapeutic vaccination against H. pylori , remains unclear. In this study, a multivalent epitope-based vaccine named CWAE against H. pylori urease, neutrophil-activating protein (NAP), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and H. pylori adhesin A (HpaA) was constructed based on mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Th1-type adjuvant NAP, multiple copies of selected B and Th cell epitopes (UreA 27-53 , UreA 183-203 , HpaA 132-141 , and HSP60 189-203 ), and also the epitope-rich regions of urease B subunit (UreB 158-251 and UreB 321-385 ) predicted by bioinformatics. Immunological properties of CWAE vaccine were characterized in BALB/c mice model. Its therapeutic effect was evaluated in H. pylori -infected Mongolian gerbil model by comparing with a univalent epitope-based vaccine CTB-UE against H. pylori urease that was constructed in our previous studies. Both CWAE and CTB-UE could induce similar levels of specific antibodies against H. pylori urease, and had similar inhibition effect of H. pylori urease activity. However, only CWAE could induce high levels of specific antibodies to NAP, HSP60, HpaA, and also the synthetic peptides epitopes (UreB 158-172 , UreB 181-195 , UreB 211-225 , UreB 349-363 , HpaA 132-141 , and HSP60 189-203 ). In addition, oral therapeutic immunization with CWAE significantly reduced the number of H. pylori colonies in the stomach of Mongolian gerbils, compared with oral immunization using CTB-UE or H. pylori urease. The protection of CWAE was associated with higher levels of mixed CD4 + T cell (Th cell) response, IgG, and secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies to H. pylori . These results indic ate

  19. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: a distinct entity unrelated to Helicobacter pylori infection.

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    Genta, R M; Sonnenberg, A

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis is diagnosed when no organisms are detected in a gastric mucosa with typical features of Helicobacter gastritis (Hp-gastritis). If Helicobacter-negative gastritis consisted mostly of 'missed' Helicobacter infections, its prevalence should represent a constant percentage of these infections in a population, and their clinico-epidemiological features would overlap. To compare the epidemiologic patterns of Hp-positive and Hp-negative gastritis. From a pathology database, we extracted demographic, clinical and histopathological data from patients with gastric biopsies (1.2008-12.2013). We allocated patients to high (≥12%) and low (≤6%) H. pylori prevalence regions defined by ZIP code-based data. The prevalence of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis by sex, age and state were expressed as a per cent of the total study population stratified accordingly. Of 895 323 patients, 10.6% had Hp-gastritis and 1.5% Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Hp-gastritis, but not Helicobacter-negative gastritis, was more common in males than females (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.16-1.19). While Hp-gastritis was more prevalent in high than in low-prevalence areas (OR 3.65, 95% CI: 3.57-3.74), Helicobacter-negative gastritis was only minimally affected by the underlying H. pylori prevalence (1.7% vs. 1.5%). The age-specific prevalence of Hp-gastritis peaked in the 4th to 5th decades; Helicobacter-negative gastritis exhibited a low and relatively flat pattern. The geographic distribution of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis showed no significant correlation. Intestinal metaplasia was found in 13.0% of patients with Hp-gastritis and in 6.1% of those with Helicobacter-negative gastritis (OR 0.43, 95% CI: 0.40-0.47). These data suggest that Helicobacter-negative gastritis is, in the vast majority of cases, a nosologically and epidemiologically distinct entity that deserves further investigation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Helicobacter pylori Infection is a Significant Factor Risk for Hyperhomocysteinemia in the Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

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    Soudabeh Fallah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This work aimed to determine whether seropositivity to Helicobacter pylori infection was an independent risk factor for hyperhomocysteinemia patients with cardiovascular disease. The H. pylori IgG, IgA and homocystein levels in 96 patients with cardiovascular disease and 64 participants free of cardiovascular disease as control subjects were determined by ELISA assay. The results showed that seropositivity to H. pylori IgG and IgA levels of coronary artery disease (CADpatients was significantly higher than the controls and CAD patients with H. pylori IgG and IgA negative antibodies. A significant correlation was found between the seropositivity to H. pylori IgG and homocysteine levels of CAD patients in comparison with the controls and CAD patients with seronegativity to H. pylori IgG and IgA (r=0.233, P= 0.019 . The involvement of H. pylori infection in atherosclerosis process was based on the chronic inflammation, which might facilitate the CAD-related pathologies. The effect of the presence of H. pylori infection on homocysteine levels elevation in the CAD patients (as a risk factor independent of other traditional factors was remarkable.

  1. The effect on serum myeloperoxidase activity and oxidative status of eradication treatment in patients Helicobacter pylori infected.

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    Nazligul, Yaşar; Aslan, Mehmet; Horoz, Mehmet; Celik, Yilmaz; Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur; Celik, Hakim; Erel, Ozcan

    2011-06-01

    Myeloperoxidase activity has been investigated after eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in infected patients in previous studies but the results are controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate effect on serum myeloperoxidase activity and oxidative status of eradication treatment in H. pylori-infected patients. Gastric biopsy specimens were obtained from 30 H. pylori infected patients. Serum myeloperoxidase activity was measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. Oxidative status was determined using total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) measurement and calculation of oxidative stress index (OSI). After 2 weeks of the eradication treatment, serum myeloperoxidase activity, TOS and OSI values were significantly lower (all; p<0.001), while TAC was significantly higher (p<0.001). Our results indicate that eradication treatment in H. pylori-infected patients may affect both oxidative stress and myeloperoxidase activity which is an important biomarker in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sensitivity is not an intrinsic property of a diagnostic test: empirical evidence from histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Carrilho Carla

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to provide empirical evidence of how spectrum effects can affect the sensitivity of histological assessment of Helicobacter pylori infection, which may contribute to explain the heterogeneity in prevalence estimates across populations with expectedly similar prevalence. Methods Cross-sectional evaluation of dyspeptic subjects undergoing upper digestive endoscopy, including collection of biopsy specimens from the greater curvature of the antrum for assessment of H. pylori infection by histopathological study and polymerase chain reaction (PCR, from Portugal (n = 106 and Mozambique (n = 102 following the same standardized protocol. Results In the Portuguese sample the prevalence of infection was 95.3% by histological assessment and 98.1% by PCR. In the Mozambican sample the prevalence was 63.7% and 93.1%, respectively. Among those classified as infected by PCR, the sensitivity of histological assessment was 96.2% among the Portuguese and 66.3% among the Mozambican. Among those testing positive by both methods, 5.0% of the Portuguese and 20.6% of the Mozambican had mild density of colonization. Conclusions This study shows a lower sensitivity of histological assessment of H. pylori infection in Mozambican dyspeptic patients compared to the Portuguese, which may be explained by differences in the density of colonization, and may contribute to explain the heterogeneity in prevalence estimates across African settings.

  3. Recurrence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Bolivian children and adults after a population-based "screen and treat" strategy.

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    Sivapalasingam, Sumathi; Rajasingham, Anu; Macy, Jonathan T; Friedman, Cindy R; Hoekstra, Robert M; Ayers, Tracy; Gold, Benjamin; Quick, Robert E

    2014-10-01

    Strategies to prevent gastric cancer by decreasing Helicobacter pylori infections in high-prevalence, low-income countries could include a population-based "screen and treat" eradication program. We tested residents of two rural villages for H. pylori infection using urea breath test (UBT), treated infected persons using directly observed therapy (DOT), retested for cure, and retested after 1 year later for H. pylori infection. We tested 1,065 (92%) of 1153 residents from two villages in rural Bolivia. Baseline H. pylori prevalence was 80% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78-84). Age-specific cure rates were similar (≥92%) after DOT. Among those cured, 12% (95% CI: 8-15) had recurrent infection. Age-specific annual H. pylori recurrence rates for combined villages were 20% (95% CI: 10-29) in persons pylori recurrence rates following a population-based screen and treat program; this H. pylori eradication strategy may not be feasible in high-prevalence, low-income settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Periodontal disease and Helicobacter pylori infection: a community-based study using serology and rapid urease test.

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    Nisha, Krishnavilasom J; Nandakumar, Krishnankutty; Shenoy, Kottacherry T; Janam, Presanthila

    2016-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the prevalence of periodontal disease and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and their associations within a predefined Indian population. A community-based cross-sectional study of 500 selected individuals using a questionnaire, oral examination, rapid urease testing of dental plaque, and serological examination for immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori was carried out. Periodontal disease and H. pylori infection were prevalent in more than 50% of the population. Age, smoking, and diabetic status of the individuals were risk factors for periodontal disease after multivariate analysis, and a lack of proper sewage and waste disposal facilities were found to increase the risk of H. pylori infection. Although there was no association between periodontal disease and H. pylori seropositivity in the community, a highly-significant association was found between periodontal disease and colonization of H. pylori in dental plaque. Because periodontal disease is associated with the increased colonization of H. pylori, new treatment modalities, such as plaque control measures, should be employed for the complete management of H. pylori-associated gastric disease. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by the probiotic strains Lactobacillus johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius ssp. salicinius AP-32.

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    Hsieh, Pei-Shan; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Teh, Su-Fen; Ou, Chung-Mou; King, V An-Erl

    2012-12-01

    The current therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection includes antimicrobial agents and proton pump inhibitors. We have examined the ability of Lactobacillus spp. to inhibit H. pylori infection. Probiotic strains isolated from samples of adult feces, infant feces, breast milk, and vaginal swab collected from healthy volunteers in Taiwan and commercially available strains were screened for antagonism toward H. pylori. Inhibition liquid culture assay was used to screen potential anti-H. pylori activity. Then, we performed agar plate inhibition assay, and assays to determine the capacity of probiotics for adhesion, and inhibition and killing of H. pylori, and measured the levels of IL-8 and IL-10. Using animal models, we studied regulation of gastric acid and histopathological changes accompanying anti-H. pylori activity. We found that six of the tested strains suppressed urease activity of H. pylori: Lactobacillus acidophilus TYCA08, L. acidophilus TYCA15, L. johnsonii MH-68, and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 were more effective than the others. In vivo, L. johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 alone or in combination, reduced the H. pylori load in the gastric mucosa, and also reduced inflammatory chemokine expression and lymphocyte infiltration. Lactobacillus johnsonii MH-68 and L. salivarius subsp. salicinius AP-32 effectively suppress H. pylori viability, and when used as probiotics, they may help decrease the occurrence of gastritis, and even reduce the risk of H. pylori infection. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Investigation on psychological status and its relationship with Helicobacter pylori infection in servicemen from a Chinese army unit

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    Shu-jun LI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To understand the mental health status of officers and soldiers (OSs in a Chinese army unit, and analyze its relationship with Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection. Methods  Cross sectional extraction of 1293 male soldiers from a certain unit of Chinese army in September 2015, aged 17-37 years old, average age 20.5±3.2. Using the symptom self rating scale (SCL-90 to conduct a psychological evaluation, comparison between the evaluation results and the Chinese military norm was conducted to understand the mental health status of OSs in the unit. 13C-urea breath test was used to detect H.pylori infection, and the relationship between the positivity rate of various factors, the SCL-90 score and H.pylori infection were analyzed. Ninety OSs who had desire to eradicate H.pylori serves as the experimental group, and 90 H.pylori-infected OSs as control group. The experimental group received quadruple-drug eradication therapy, control group received no drug treatment. SCL-90 scores before and after the treatment were compared, and SCL-90 scores after treatment in the experimental group and those in the control group were also compared for analyzing the relationship between the OSs psychological status and H.pylori infection. Results  The SCL-90 score of the OSs was lower than the norm of Chinese army, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. The psychological screening positive rate was higher in H.pylori-positive OSs than H.pylori-negative those and the positive rates of psychological screening factors somatization, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility and paranoid were higher in H.pylori-positive OSs than in H.Pylorinegative those, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. After the eradication of H.pylori in the experimental group these factor scores were lower than those before eradication. Compared with control group SCL-90 scores, soldiers somatization, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety

  7. Changes in gastric microbiota induced by Helicobacter pylori infection and preventive effects of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 against such infection.

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    Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Xie, Qiong; Huang, Renhui; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogen linked to gastric ulcers and stomach cancer. Gastric microbiota might play an essential role in the pathogenesis of these stomach diseases. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a probiotic candidate Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 as a protective agent against the gastric mucosal inflammation and alteration of gastric microbiota induced by H. pylori infection in a mouse model. Prior to infection, mice were pretreated with or without 400 µL of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 at a concentration of 10(9) cfu/mL per mouse. At 6 wk postinfection, gastric mucosal immune response and alteration in gastric microbiota mice were examined by quantitative real-time PCR and high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, respectively. The results showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented increase in inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IFN-γ) and inflammatory cell infiltration in gastric lamina propria induced by H. pylori infection. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinate analysis showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented the alteration in gastric microbiota post-H. pylori infection. Linear discriminant analysis coupled with effect size identified 22 bacterial taxa (e.g., Pasteurellaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, Halomonadaceae, Helicobacteraceae, and Spirochaetaceae) that overgrew in the gastric microbiota of H. pylori-infected mice, and most of them belonged to the Proteobacteria phylum. Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented this alteration; only 6 taxa (e.g., Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae), mainly from the taxa of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were dominant in the gastric microbiota of the L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreated mice. Administration of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 for 3 wk led to increase in several bacterial taxa (e.g., Rikenella, Staphylococcus, Bifidobacterium), although a nonsignificant alteration was found in the gastric microbiota

  8. Impact of Anti-Helicobacter Therapy of H.pylori-Infected Parents on H.pylori Reinfection Rate in Children after Successful Eradication

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    O.P. Volosovets

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data about the rate of H.pylori reinfection during 12 months after anti-helicobacter therapy among the children after successful eradication. It was shown that H.pylori reinfection rate was lower in children after successful eradication who were living after the treatment with parents non-infectead with H.pylori than among children who were living with H.pylori-infected parents. It was demonstrated that simultaneous anti-helicobacter therapy in H.pylori-infected parents of children with with chronic gastroduodenal diseases associated with H.pylori decreased H.pylori reinfection rate in children with successful eradication.

  9. Contemporary migration patterns in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection: A systematic review.

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    Morais, Samantha; Costa, Ana Rute; Ferro, Ana; Lunet, Nuno; Peleteiro, Bárbara

    2017-06-01

    A rapid growth in the number of international migrants over the past years has occurred with most traveling to more affluent settings. As Helicobacter pylori infects over half of the adult population and its prevalence is higher in developing countries, understanding the prevalence of infection in migrants can provide insight into future trends in the burden and management of infection. We aimed to describe the prevalence of H. pylori among migrants through a systematic literature review. We searched PubMed ® from inception to September 2015 to identify studies reporting the prevalence of H. pylori in international migrants according to country of birth for first-generation, and country of birth and parents' nationality for successive generations. Comparable data from origin and destination populations were obtained from the same studies or, when not present, from a previous systematic review on H. pylori worldwide. A total of 28 eligible studies were identified with data for 29 origin and 12 destination countries. Two studies that evaluated refugees presented prevalences of infection higher than both the origin and destination countries. Otherwise, the prevalences among migrants were generally similar or below that of the origin and higher than the destination. Second- or more generation had lower prevalences compared to first-generation migrants. Our study findings are consistent with what would be expected based on the prevalence of H. pylori worldwide. The results of this review show that migrants are particularly at risk of infection and help to identify gaps in the knowledge of migrants' prevalence of infection globally. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. B-Cell and T-Cell Immune Responses to Experimental Helicobacter pylori Infection in Humans

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    Nurgalieva, Zhannat Z.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Zheng, Carl Q.; Elliott, Susan N.; Ernst, Peter B.; Osato, Michael; Estes, Mary K.; Graham, David Y.

    2005-01-01

    The acute antibody and T-cell immune response to Helicobacter pylori infection in humans has not been studied systematically. Serum from H. pylori-naive volunteers challenged with H. pylori and cured after 4 or 12 weeks was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for anti-H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgA established using bacterial lysates from homologous (the infecting strain) and heterologous H. pylori. Proteins recognized by IgM antibody were identified by mass spectrometry of immunoreactive bands separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Mucosal T-cell subsets (CD4, CD8, CD3, and CD30 cells) were assessed by immunohistochemistry. All 18 infected volunteers developed H. pylori-specific IgM responses to both homologous or heterologous H. pylori antigens. H. pylori antigens reacted with IgM antibody at 4 weeks postinfection. IgM Western blotting showed immunoreactivity of postinfection serum samples to multiple H. pylori proteins with molecular weights ranging between 9,000 (9K) to 150K with homologous strains but only a 70K band using heterologous antigens. Two-dimensional electrophoresis demonstrated that production of H. pylori-specific IgM antibodies was elicited by H. pylori flagellins A and B, urease B, ABC transporter binding protein, heat shock protein 70 (DnaK), and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase. Mucosal CD3, CD4, and CD8 T-cell numbers increased following infection. IgM antibody responses were detected to a range of homologous H. pylori antigens 2 to 4 weeks postchallenge. The majority of H. pylori proteins were those involved in motility and colonization and may represent targets for vaccine development. PMID:15845507

  11. Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas and Helicobacter pylori infection: A Colombian perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sally Yepes; Maria Mercedes Torres; Carlos Saavedra; Rafael Andrade

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To assess the significance of chromosome translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21),B-cell lymphoma 10 (BCL-10)protein and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection in gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in Colombia.METHODS:Fifty cases of gastric MALT lymphoma and their respective post-treatment follow-up biopsies were examined to assess the presence of the translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21) as identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization; to detect protein expression patterns of BCL10 using immunohistochemistry; and for evaluation of tumor histology to determine the correlation of these factors and resistance to H.pylori eradication.RESULTS:Infection with H.pylori was confirmed in all cases of gastric MALT lymphoma in association with chronic gastritis.Bacterial eradication led to tumor regression in 66% of cases.The translocation t(11;18)(q21;q21) was not present in any of these cases,nor was there evidence of tumor transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.Thirty-four percent of the patients showed resistance to tumor regression,and within this group,7 cases,representing 14% of all those analyzed,were considered to be t(11;18)(q21;q21)-positive gastric MALT lymphomas.Protein expression of BCL10 in the nucleus was associated with the presence of translocation and treatment resistance.Cases that were considered unresponsive to therapy were histologically characterized by the presence of homogeneous tumor cells and a lack of plasmacytic differentiation.Responder cases exhibited higher cellular heterogeneity and a greater frequency of plasma cells.CONCLUSION:Both t(11;18)(q21;q21)-positive MALT lymphoma cases and those with nuclear BCL10 expression are considered resistant to H,pylori eradication.It is suggested that chronic antigenic stimulation is not a dominant event in resistant cases.

  12. The overmethylated genes in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric mucosa are demethylated in gastric cancers

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    Choi Sang-Wook

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transitional-CpG sites between weakly methylated genes and densely methylated retroelements are overmethylated in the gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and they are undermethylated in the gastric cancers depending on the level of loss of heterozygosity (LOH events. This study delineated the transitional-CpG methylation patterns of CpG-island-containing and -lacking genes in view of the retroelements. Methods The transitional-CpG sites of eight CpG-island-containing genes and six CpG-island-lacking genes were semi-quantitatively examined by performing radioisotope-labelling methylation-specific PCR under stringent conditions. The level of LOH in the gastric cancers was estimated using the 40 microsatellite markers on eight cancer-associated chromosomes. Each gene was scored as overmethylated or undermethylated based on an intermediate level of transitional-CpG methylation common in the H. pylori-negative gastric mucosa. Results The eight CpG-island genes examined were overmethylated depending on the proximity to the nearest retroelement in the H. pylori-positive gastric mucosa. The six CpG-island-lacking genes were similarly methylated in the H. pylori-positive and -negative gastric mucosa. In the gastric cancers, long transitional-CpG segments of the CpG-island genes distant from the retroelements remained overmethylated, whereas the overmethylation of short transitional-CpG segments close to the retroelements was not significant. Both the CpG-island-containing and -lacking genes tended to be decreasingly methylated in a LOH-level-dependent manner. Conclusions The overmethylated genes under the influence of retroelement methylation in the H. pylori-infected stomach are demethylated in the gastric cancers influenced by LOH.

  13. Serological response to Helicobacter pylori infection among Latin American populations with contrasting risks of gastric cancer

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    Camargo, M. Constanza; Beltran, Mauricio; Conde-Glez, Carlos; Harris, Paul R.; Michel, Angelika; Waterboer, Tim; Flórez, Astrid Carolina; Torres, Javier; Ferreccio, Catterina; Sampson, Joshua N.; Pawlita, Michael; Rabkin, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a rare outcome of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Serologic profiles may reveal bacterial, environmental and/or host factors associated with cancer risk. We therefore compared specific anti-H. pylori antibodies among populations with at least 2-fold differences in gastric cancer mortality from Mexico, Colombia and Chile. Our study included 1,776 adults (mean age 42 years) from three nationally representative surveys, equally divided between residents of high- and low-risk areas. Antibodies to 15 immunogenic H. pylori antigens were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex assays; results were summarized to identify overall H. pylori seropositivity. We used logistic regression to model associations between antibody seroreactivity and regional cancer risk (high vs. low), adjusting for country, age and sex. Both risk areas had similar H. pylori seroprevalence. Residents in high- and low-risk areas were seroreactive to a similar number of antigens (means 8.2 vs. 7.9, respectively; adjusted-odds ratio, OR: 1.02, p=0.05). Seroreactivities to Catalase and the known virulence proteins CagA and VacA were each significantly (p<0.05) associated with residence in high-risk areas, but ORs were moderate (1.26, 1.42, and 1.41, respectively) and their discriminatory power was low (ROC area under curve <0.6). The association of Catalase was independent from effects of either CagA or VacA. Sensitivity analyses for antibody associations restricted to H. pylori-seropositive individuals generally replicated significant associations. Our findings suggest that humoral responses to H. pylori are insufficient to distinguish high and low gastric cancer risk in Latin America. Factors determining population variation of gastric cancer burden remain to be identified. PMID:26178251

  14. Clarithromycin vs. Gemifloxacin in Quadruple Therapy Regimens for Empiric Primary Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Masoodi, Mohsen; Talebi-Taher, Mahshid; Tabatabaie, Khadijeh; Khaleghi, Siamak; Faghihi, Amir-Hossein; Agah, Shahram; Asadi, Reyhaneh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection plays a crucial role in the treatment of peptic ulcer. Clarithromycin resistance is a major cause of treatment failure. This randomized clinical trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a clarithromycin versus gemifloxacin containing quadruple therapy regimen in eradication of H.pylori infection. METHODS In this randomized double blind clinical trial (RCT 2012102011054N2), a total of 120 patients were randomized to two groups of 60 patients each. Patients with proven H.pylori infection were consecutively assigned into two groups to receive OBAG or OBAC in gastroenterology clinic in Rasoul-e- Akram General Hospital in Tehran, Iran. The patients in the OBAG group received omeprazole (20 mg) twice daily, bismuth subcitrate (240 mg) twice daily, amoxicillin (1 gr) twice daily, and gemifloxacin (320 mg) once daily, and those in the OBAC group received omeprazole (20 mg) twice daily, 240 mg of bismuth subcitrate twice daily, amoxicillin (1 gr) twice daily, and clarithromycin (500 mg) twice daily for 10 days. RESULTS Five patients from each group were excluded from the study because of poor compliance, so 110 patients completed the study. The intention-to-treat eradication rate was 61.6% and 66.6% for the OBAC and OBAG groups, respectively. According to the per protocol analysis, the success rates of eradication of H.pylori infection were 67.2% and 72.7% for OBAC and OBAG groups, respectively (p=0.568). CONCLUSION The results of this study suggest that gemifloxacin containing regimen is at least as effective as clarithromycin regimen; hence, this new treatment could be considered as an alternative for the patients who cannot tolerate clarithromycin. PMID:26106468

  15. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF UREA BREATH TEST FOR HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN CHILDREN WITH DYSPEPSIA IN COMPARISON TO HISTOPATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser HONAR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - Helicobacter pylori infection is the gram negative bacillus with the close association with chronic antral gastritis. Objective - In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of urea breath test (UBT with carbon isotope 13 in comparison with histopathology of gastric antrum for detection of H. pylori infection in children with dyspepsia. Methods - This cross-sectional study was performed at specialized laboratory of Shiraz Gastroenterohepatology Research Center and Nemazee Hospital, Iran, during a 12-months period. This study investigated the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of UBT in comparison with biopsy-based tests. We included a consecutive selection of 60 children who fulfilled Rome III criteria for dyspepsia. All children were referred for performing UBT with carbon isotope 13 (C13 as well as endoscopy. Biopsies were taken from antrum of stomach and duodenum. The pathologic diagnosis was considered as the standard test. Results - The mean age of the participants was 10.1±2.6 (range 7-17 years. From our total 60 patients, 28 (46.7% had positive UBT results and 32 (53.3% had negative UBT results. Pathologic report of 16 (57.1% out of 28 patients who had positive UBT were positive for H. pylori and 12 (42.9% ones were negative. Sensitivity and specificity of C13-UBT for detection of H. pylori infection were 76.2% and 69.2% respectively. Conclusion - Sensitivity and specificity of C13-UBT for detection of H. pylori infection were 76.2% and 69.2% respectively. Another multicenter study from our country is recommended.

  16. Changes in plasma ghrelin and leptin levels in patients with peptic ulcer and gastritis following eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Chika; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Moritani, Isao; Tanaka, Junichiro; Oya, Yumi; Inoue, Hidekazu; Tameda, Masahiko; Shiraki, Katsuya; Ito, Masaaki; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Takase, Kojiro

    2016-10-04

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and eradication therapy have been known to influence gastric ghrelin and leptin secretion, which may lead to weight gain. However, the exact relationship between plasma ghrelin/leptin levels and H. pylori infection has remained controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate plasma ghrelin and leptin levels in H. pylori-positive and -negative patients, to compare the two levels of the hormones before and after H. pylori eradication, and to examine the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and active ghrelin or leptin levels, as well as that between atrophic pattern and active ghrelin or leptin levels. Seventy-two H. pylori-positive patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 46 diagnosed as having peptic ulcer and 26 as atrophic gastritis, were enrolled. Control samples were obtained from 15 healthy H. pylori-negative volunteers. The extent of atrophic change of the gastric mucosa was assessed endoscopically. Body weight was measured and blood was collected before and 12 weeks after H. pylori eradication therapy. Blood samples were taken between 8 and 10 AM after an overnight fast. Plasma ghrelin levels were significantly lower in H. pylori-positive patients than in H. pylori-negative patients. In particular, plasma active ghrelin levels were significantly lower in patients with gastritis compared with patients with peptic ulcer. Plasma ghrelin levels decreased after H. pylori eradication in both peptic ulcer and gastritis patients, while plasma leptin levels increased only in peptic ulcer patients. Plasma leptin levels and BMI were positively correlated, and active ghrelin levels and atrophic pattern were weakly negatively correlated in peptic ulcer patients. H. pylori infection and eradication therapy may affect circulating ghrelin/leptin levels. This finding suggests a relationship between gastric mucosal injury induced by H. pylori infection and changes in plasma ghrelin and leptin levels.

  17. High Seroprevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Inmates: A Case Control Study in a Northern Mexican City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Saenz-Soto, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection in inmates has not been previously studied. Therefore, we determine the seroepidemiology of H. pylori infection in inmates. Methods Through a case-control study, inmates from a state correctional facility in Durango, Mexico and subjects without incarceration of the same city were examined for the presence of anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, incarceration, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the inmates was also investigated. Results Antibodies to H. pylori were found in 140 (83.3%) of 168 inmates and in 101 (60.1%) of 168 controls. Seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies was significantly higher in inmates than in controls (OR = 3.32; 95% CI: 1.93 - 5.71; P = 0.000002). The seroprevalence of H. pylori infection was not influenced by gender, age, or socioeconomic status of inmates. Seropositivity to H. pylori was found in 3 of 3 inmates with peptic ulcer and in 1 of 2 inmates with gastritis. The seroprevalence of H. pylori exposure was high regardless the jail section, duration (years) in incarceration and number of incarcerations. Multivariate analysis revealed that H. pylori exposure was positively associated with having tattoos (OR = 3.34; 95% CI: 1.14 - 9.70; P = 0.02), and negatively associated with drug abuse (OR = 0.28; 95% CI: 0.11 - 0.70; P = 0.007). Conclusions Seroprevalence of H. pylori exposure in inmates is higher than those found in non-incarcerated people and other populations in the region. Results indicate that inmates may represent a new risk group for H. pylori exposure. Results warrant for further research on the potential role of incarceration and behavioral features of inmates for H. pylori infection. PMID:27785257

  18. [Iron status with particular consideration of soluble transferrin receptors in children and youth with gastritis, with or without Helicobacter pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzwa, Grazyna; Augustyńska, Beata; Czerwionka-Szaflarska, Mieczysława; Tyrakowski, Tomasz

    2006-09-01

    Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in chronic gastritis and gastric and/or duodenal ulcers is well known. Simultaneously there are some articles in literature considering H. pylori as a cause of extra-gastrointestinal illnesses such as atopic dermatitis, chronic urticaria or acne rosacea, hypotrophy, Schoenlein-Henoch disease, atherosclerosis or hypochromic anaemia. The aim of the study. was to asses iron status in aspect of plasmatic transferrin receptors concentration among children and youth with chronic gastritis with or without Helicobacter pylori infection. Forty one patients were included as a study group. Range of age was 9-18 years. All patients were diagnosed due to chronic abdominal pains. There were 13 males and 28 females. Blood was collected from every patient for blood cell count, iron, transferrin and transferrin receptors concentration (sTfR) assessment before endoscopy of upper gastrointestinal tract. Concentration of sTfR was higher than age norm among 29 (71%) of patients. Among patients with higher level of sTfR 20 (69%) had normal haemoglobin concentration and in this group 10 patients had H. pylori infection. During analysis of 12 patients with nornal level of sTfR normal haemoglobin concentration was found and among five of them H. pylori infection was stated. Among 21 patients without H. pylori infection 14 had normal level of sTfR and 7 had higher level of sTfR which means that 33% had hidden iron deficiency (involuntary of normal Hb concentrations). Among 15 of 20 patients with H. pylori infection level of sTfR was higher which means that 75% patients with infection had hidden iron deficiency (involuntary of normal Hb concentrations). Level of plasmatic transferrin receptors can be good and sensitive indicator of iron deficiency and can be helpful in differential diagnosis of hypochromic anaemia and anaemia caused by chronic illness including chronic gastritis with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  19. Effect of depression on Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastric cancer and its correlation with oncogene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Rong Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of depression on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in patients with gastric cancer and its correlation with oncogene expression. Methods: A total of 82 patients who accepted radical operation for gastric cancer in Zigong Third People's Hospital between March 2015 and February 2017 were selected as the research subjects and divided into depression group and non-depression group according to the preoperative HAMD scores, and helicobacter pylori infection as well as the mRNA expression of proliferation genes and invasion genes in gastric cancer lesions was detected. Results: The positive rate of H. pylori in gastric cancer lesions of depression group was significantly higher than that of non-depression group; LOXL2, RAB1A, UHRF1, Slug and ADAM8 mRNA expression in gastric cancer lesions of depression group were significantly higher than those of non-depression group while MTS1, NOX, E-cadherin and TIMP1 mRNA expression were significantly lower than those of non-depression group; LOXL2, RAB1A, UHRF1, Slug and ADAM8 mRNA expression in H. pylori-positive gastric cancer lesions of depression group were significantly higher than those in H. pylori-negative gastric cancer lesions of depression group while MTS1, NOX, E-cadherin and TIMP1 mRNA expression were significantly lower than those in H. pylori-negative gastric cancer lesions of depression group. Conclusion: Depression can increase the H. pylori infection rate and promote the proliferation and invasion of cancer cells in gastric cancer lesions.

  20. Typical and atypical symptoms of gastro esophageal reflux disease: Does Helicobacter pylori infection matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Laurino; Ciccaglione, Antonio Francesco; Marzio, Leonardo

    2015-11-06

    To analyze whether the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection could affect the quality of symptoms in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. one hundred and forty-four consecutive patients referred to our Unit for suspected GERD were recruited for the study. All patients underwent esophageal pH-metric recording. For those with a positive test, C13 urea breath test was then performed to assess the H. pylori status. GERD patients were stratified according to the quality of their symptoms and classified as typical, if affected by heartburn and regurgitation, and atypical if complaining of chest pain, respiratory and ears, nose, and throat features. H. pylori-negative patients were also asked whether they had a previous diagnosis of H. pylori infection. If a positive response was given, on the basis of the time period after successful eradication, patients were considered as "eradicated" (E) if H. pylori eradication occurred more than six months earlier or "recently eradicated" if the therapy had been administered within the last six months. Patients without history of infection were identified as "negative" (N). χ (2) test was performed by combining the clinical aspects with the H. pylori status. one hundred and twenty-nine of the 144 patients, including 44 H. pylori-positive and 85 H. pylori-negative (41 negative, 21 recently eradicated, 23 eradicated more than 6 mo before), were eligible for the analysis. No difference has been found between H. pylori status and either the number of reflux episodes (138 ± 23 vs 146 ± 36, respectively, P = 0.2, not significant) or the percentage of time with pH values < 4 (6.8 ± 1.2 vs 7.4 ± 2.1, respectively, P = 0.3, not significant). The distribution of symptoms was as follows: 13 typical (30%) and 31 atypical (70%) among the 44 H. pylori-positive cases; 44 typical (52%) and 41 atypical (48%) among the 85 H. pylori-negative cases, (P = 0.017 vs H. pylori+; OR = 2.55, 95%CI: 1.17-5.55). Furthermore

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of helicobacter pylori infection among Pakistani population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasheed, F.; Ahmad, T.; Bilal, B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Prevalence of H. pylori infection is higher in developing countries including Pakistan. The basic purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infection and determination of possible risk factors. Methodology: A prospective epidemiologic survey of H. pylori infection was accomplished in 2008 and 2009 involving 516 asymptomatic individuals of Barakaho, Islamabad, Pakistan. Data 13 were obtained by questionnaire and H. pylori positivity was checked by C UBT. Results: A total of 516 individuals participated in the study of which 384 (74.4%) were positive for H. pylori infection. The prevalence was 73.5% in males and 75.4% in females (p = 0.622) and increased with increasing age (p < 0.001). Presence of household animals (p = 0.004) and more family members (p H. pylori prevalence while no association was seen with other risk factors such as education level, drinking water source, number of rooms in house and monthly family income. Conclusions: High prevalence of H. pylori infection in Pakistani population is comparable to the data of developing countries. H. pylori household animals and more family member. (author)

  2. 18F-FDG uptake in the stomach on screening PET/CT: value for predicting Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic atrophic gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Ogura, Mayumi; Suzawa, Naohisa; Horiki, Noriyuki; Katsurahara, Masaki; Ogura, Toru; Sakuma, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the value of 18 F-FDG uptake on screening PET/CT images for the prediction of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and chronic atrophic gastritis. Among subjects who underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT for cancer screening from April 2005 to November 2015, PET/CT images were analyzed in 88 subjects who had gastrointestinal fiberscopy within 6 months. The volumes of interest (VOIs) were placed in the fornix, corpus and antrum of the stomach to determine maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and mean SUV (SUVmean). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the diagnostic performance of SUV indicators in predicting H. pylori infection and chronic atrophic gastritis. SUV indicators of the stomach were significantly higher in subjects with H. pylori infection than those without (from P < 0.001 to P < 0.05). ROC analysis revealed that SUVmean had the highest performance in predicting H. pylori infection (AUC 0.807) and chronic atrophic gastritis (AUC 0.784). SUVmean exhibited the sensitivity of 86.5 % and the specificity of 70.6 % in predicting H. pylori infection, and the sensitivity of 75.0 % and 78.6 % in predicting chronic atrophic gastritis. Assessment of 18 F-FDG uptake in the stomach reflecting active inflammation is useful in predicting patients with H. pylori infection and subsequent chronic atrophic gastritis which is closely associated with the risk of gastric neoplasms

  3. Treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with rabeprazole in primary and secondary care : does Helicobacter pylori infection affect proton pump inhibitor effectiveness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, NJ; de Boer, WA; Geldof, H; Hazelhoff, B; Bergmans, P; Tytgat, GNJ; Smout, AJPM

    2004-01-01

    Background: The presence of the gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori influences acid suppression by proton pump inhibitors and treatment outcome in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Aim: To determine the influence of H. pylori infection on effectiveness of rabeprazole in primary and

  4. Treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with rabeprazole in primary and secondary care: does Helicobacter pylori infection affect proton pump inhibitor effectiveness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, N. J.; Boer, W. A.; Geldof, H.; Hazelhoff, B.; Bergmans, P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of the gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori influences acid suppression by proton pump inhibitors and treatment outcome in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. AIM: To determine the influence of H. pylori infection on effectiveness of rabeprazole in primary and

  5. Does Helicobacter pylori infection influence response rate or speed of symptom control in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with rabeprazole?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Wink; de Wit, Niek; Geldof, Han; Hazelhoff, Bernard; Bergmans, Paul; Smout, André; Tytgat, Guido

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The findings of several studies suggest that proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) suppress gastric acid more effectively in Helicobacter pylori-infected (Hp +) than in non-infected (Hp -) patients, but there has been no evaluation of the short-term clinical response. MATERIAL AND METHODS:

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection induces genetic instability of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; Figueiredo, Ceu; Touati, Eliette

    2009-01-01

    of genetic instabilities in the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were examined. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We observed the effects of H. pylori infection on a gastric cell line (AGS), on C57BL/6 mice, and on individuals with chronic gastritis. In AGS cells, the effect of H. pylori infection on base excision...... cells and chronic gastritis tissue were determined by PCR, single-stranded conformation polymorphism, and sequencing. H. pylori vacA and cagA genotyping was determined by multiplex PCR and reverse hybridization. RESULTS: Following H. pylori infection, the activity and expression of base excision repair...... and MMR are down-regulated both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, H. pylori induces genomic instability in nuclear CA repeats in mice and in mtDNA of AGS cells and chronic gastritis tissue, and this effect in mtDNA is associated with bacterial virulence. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that H. pylori...

  7. Induction of CD69 expression by cagPAI-positive Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Mori; Chie Ishikawa; Masachika Senba

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and elucidate the molecular mech-anism that regulates inducible expression of CD69 by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection.METHODS: The expression levels of CD69 in a T-cell line, Jurkat, primary human peripheral blood mononu-clear cells (PBMCs), and CD4+T cells, were assessed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. Activation of CD69 promoter was detected by reporter gene. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in Jurkat cells infected with H. pylori was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The role of NF-κB signaling in H. pylori -induced CD69 expression was analyzed using inhibitors of NF-κB and dominant-negative mutants. The isogenic mutants with disrupted cag pathogenicity island ( cagPAI) and virD4 were used to elucidate the role of cagPAI-encoding type Ⅳ secretion system and CagA in CD69 expression.RESULTS: CD69 staining was detected in mucosal lymphocytes and macrophages in specimens of pa-tients with H. pylori -positive gastritis. Although cagPAI-positive H. pylori and an isogenic mutant of virD4 induced CD69 expression, an isogenic mutant of cag-PAI failed to induce this in Jurkat cells. H. pylori also induced CD69 expression in PBMCs and CD4+T cells. The activation of the CD69 promoter by H. pylori was mediated through NF-κB. Transfection of dominant-negative mutants of IκBs, IκB kinases, and NF-κB-inducing kinase inhibited H. pylori -induced CD69 activation. Inhibitors of NF-κB suppressed H. pylori -induced CD69 mRNA expression.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that H. pylori in-duces CD69 expression through the activation of NF-κB. cagPAI might be relevant in the induction of CD69 expression in T cells. CD69 in T cells may play a role in H. pylori -induced gastritis.

  8. [Drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: a network Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Q Y; Yu, R B; Shi, R H

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and the risk of adverse effect of drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter ( H .) pylori infection. Methods: Literature retrieval was conducted by using major databases. Related papers published up to June 2015 were considered eligible if they were randomized control trials comparing different pharmacological formulations for H. pylori infection and used in a network Meta-analysis and a single rate Meta-analysis to evaluate the relative and absolute rates of H. pylori eradication and the risk of adverse effect. The Jadad score was used to evaluate the methodological quality. Funnel plot was constructed to evaluate the risk of publication bias. Begg's rank correlation test or Egger's regression intercept test was done for the asymmetry of funnel plot. Results: Twenty randomized control trials for the treatment of 6 753 initial treated patients with H. pylori infection were included. Drug susceptibility test guided therapy was significantly superior to concomitant therapy, hybrid therapy, sequential therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy. The culture-based therapy had the highest likelihood of improving clinical efficacy, with lowest risk of adverse effect. Concomitant therapy had the highest probability of causing adverse effect despite its effectiveness. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy were associated with lower risk of adverse effect and higher effectiveness. Conclusion: Drug susceptibility test guided therapy showed superiority to other 4 interventions for H. pylori eradication mentioned above. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy might be applied in the settings where the culture-based strategy is not available.

  9. Up-regulated Th17 cell function is associated with increased peptic ulcer disease in Helicobacter pylori-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Razavi, Alireza; Pourgheysari, Batoul; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Pirayesh, Ashkan; Shafigh, Mohammedhadi; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Fereidani, Rana; Tahmasbi, Kamran; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2018-06-01

    During Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection CD4 + T cells in the gastric lamina propria are hyporesponsive and polarized by Th1/Th17 cell responses controlled by Treg cells. The objective of this study was to determine the number of Th17 cells in gastric mucosa of patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer and determined the relationship between main virulence factor of H. pylori and Th17 cells. A total of 89 H. pylori-infected gastritis patients, 63 H. pylori-infected peptic ulcer patients and 48 H. pylori-negative non-ulcer dysplasia patients were enrolled in this study. The number of Th17 was determined by immunohistochemistry. IL-8 and IL-17A expressions were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Also, the grade of chronic and active inflammation was investigated for involvement according to the density of neutrophils and mononuclear in gastric mucosal crypts, from one to all crypts. The number of Th17 cells and the expression of IL-8 and IL-17A in infected patients were significantly higher than uninfected subjects. The number of Th17 cells and the expression of IL-8 and IL-17A in infected patients with peptic ulcer were significantly higher than patients with gastritis. Additionally, the numbers of Th17 cells as well as the expression of IL-8 and IL-17A were positively correlated with the degree of H. pylori density in infected patients with peptic ulcer, while this correlation was negative in infected patients with gastritis. The numbers of Th17 cells as well as the expression of IL-8 and IL-17A were positively correlated with the degree of chronic inflammation. The predominant Th17 cell responses may play a role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcers disease in infected patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Serum TNF-α, IL-8, VEGF Levels in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Their Association with Degree of Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontar A Siregar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to investigate the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-8, VEGF in Helicobacter pylori infection, and their association with the degrees of gastritis histopathology. Methods: a cross-sectional study was done on 80 consecutive gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and Permata Bunda Hospital, Medan, Indonesia from July-December 2014. The Rapid Urease test was used for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. The severity of chronic inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia were assessed. Serum samples were obtained to determine circulating TNF-α, IL-8, and VEGF. Univariate and bivariate analysis (chi square, fisher’s exact, and mann-whitney test were done using SPSS version-22. Results: there were 41.25% of 80 patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. Serum TNF-α and VEGF levels in the infected group were significantly higher compared to H. pylori negative, but there were no significant differences between serum levels of IL-8 in H. pylori positive and negative. There were significant associations between serum level of TNF-α and IL-8 with degree of chronic inflammation, and also between serum level of IL-8 and degree of neutrophil infiltration. There were significant associations between serum level of VEGF and degree of atrophy, and also between serum level of VEGF and degree of intestinal metaplasia. Conclusion: High levels of TNF-α were associated with severe degree of chronic inflammation, high levels of IL-8 associated with severe degree of chronic inflammation and neutrophil infiltration, and high levels of VEGF associated with severe degree of premalignant gastric lesion. Key words: cytokine, neoangiogenesis, Helicobacter pylori, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia.

  11. Eradication rate of Helicobacter Pylori infection is directly influenced by adherence to therapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotilea, Kallirroi; Mekhael, Joyce; Salame, Assaad; Mahler, Tania; Miendje-Deyi, Veronique Yvette; Cadranel, Samy; Bontems, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Current commonly accepted strategies to eradicate Helicobacter pylori in children are a 10-day sequential treatment or a triple therapy for 7-14 days. To avoid further expensive and possibly risky investigations as well as induction of secondary antimicrobial resistance, a success rate of elimination strategies over 90% in a per-protocol analysis is the target goal but rates observed in clinical trials are lower. Antimicrobial resistance is a well-recognized risk factor for treatment failure; therefore, only a treatment tailored to susceptibility testing should be recommended. Adherence to therapy is also a risk factor for treatment failure but that has been poorly studied. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of adherence to therapy on the elimination rates obtained with different treatment regimens. Cohort study analysis of children, aged 2-17 years, treated for Helicobacter pylori infection between October 2011 and December 2013. As a routine clinical practice, children infected with a strain susceptible to clarithromycin and to metronidazole received either a sequential regimen or a 10-day triple therapy while children infected with a strain resistant to clarithromycin or metronidazole received a 10-day triple regimen tailored to antimicrobial susceptibility. The eradication rate was assessed by a negative 13 C-urea breath test performed at least 8 weeks after the end of the treatment and adherence evaluated using a diary. One hundred forty-five children (67 girls/78 boys, median age 9.7 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 118 being infected with a strain susceptible to both clarithromycin and metronidazole, 10 with a clarithromycin resistant, and 17 with a metronidazole resistant strain. A sequential regimen was prescribed in 44, a triple therapy containing clarithromycin in 84 and containing metronidazole in 17. Follow-up data were available for 130/145 and clearance of the infection observed in 105 of them. A concordance of more than

  12. Decrease in PSCA expression caused by Helicobacter pylori infection may promote progression to severe gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Osamu; Tanikawa, Chizu; Yamamoto, Ryuta; Watanabe, Hidenobu; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Sakitani, Kosuke; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Kubo, Michiaki; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Koike, Kazuhiko; Seto, Yasuyuki; Matsuda, Koichi

    2018-01-01

    SNP rs2294008 in Prostate Stem Cell Antigen (PSCA) and decreased PSCA expression are associated with gastric cancer. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of rs2294008 and PSCA expression in the gastritis-gastric cancer carcinogenic pathway. We conducted a case-control association study of H. pylori-infected gastritis and gastric cancer. rs2294008 was associated with the progression to chronic active gastritis (P = 9.4 × 10–5; odds ratio = 3.88, TT + TC vs CC genotype), but not with H. pylori infection per se nor with the progression from active gastritis to gastric cancer. We also assessed the association of rs2294008 with PSCA mRNA expression in the gastric mucosa at various disease stages and found that rs2294008 was associated with PSCA expression (P = 1.3 × 10–12). H. pylori infection (P = 5.1 × 10–8) and eradication therapy (P gastritis compared with mild gastritis only among T allele carriers. Our findings revealed the regulation of PSCA expression by host genetic variation and bacterial infection might contribute to gastritis progression after H. pylori infection. PMID:29423095

  13. Salivary IgG assay to detect Helicobacter pylori infection in an Indian adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramya Thirumala Krishnaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: EIAgen H. pylori IgG assay is a noninvasive, moderately accurate, and sensitive method for the detection of H. pylori infection in saliva. Salivary anti H. pylori IgG test prior to endoscopy is a useful screening test for seroepidemiological studies.

  14. Implications of Antibiotic Resistance in the Management of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Canadian Helicobacter Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RH Hunt

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Eradication of Helicobacter pylori from the gastric and duodenal mucosa is an important clinical goal in the treatment of infected patients with peptic ulcer disease and other H pylori-associated conditions. Although several oral drug combination regimens are associated with eradication rates of approximately 85% in controlled trials, the success rate in patients infected with a resistant strain of H pylori is closer to 75%. Resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin, which are common components of combination treatment regimens, is of greatest concern. Reported rates of H pylori resistance to various antibiotics vary considerably. In Canada, the data documenting H pylori susceptibility are limited but suggest that resistance to these antibiotics varies geographically and within specific treatment groups. Although susceptibility testing is not a prerequisite for initial treatment of individual patients infected with H pylori, formal efforts to identify and monitor both the causes and prevalence of antibiotic resistance across Canada are a much needed step in the ongoing management of this important infection. Recommended treatment regimens may be useful, even for treating apparently resistant H pylori strains. However, it is important to understand the mechanisms of the development of resistant strains to manage patients with treatment failure better.

  15. Impact of Maternal Helicobacter pylori Infection on Trace Elements (Copper, Iron and Zinc and Pregnancy Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel I Akubugwo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: H. pylori infection has been suggested to interfere with micronutrient metabolism and influence pregnancy outcomes. Objectives: This study therefore seeks to document the prevalence of H. pylori seroposivity among pregnant women and to determine its impact on some trace element status and pregnancy outcomes. Materials and methods: Three hundred and forty nine consenting pregnant women aged 15-40 years (mean; 27. 04 ± 4. 75 years and gestational age ≤ 25 weeks (mean 21.77 ± 3.14 wks attending antenatal clinic at Federal Medical Centre, Abakaliki, between July 2007 and September 2008 participated in the study. H. Pylori antibody (IgG was determined by a new generation ELISA method. Plasma copper, iron and zinc were analysed using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (Bulk Scientific AVG 210 Model while haemoglobin and albumin were analysed using standard haematological and biochemical techniques. Both maternal sociodemographic and anthropometric parameters were recorded at recruitment. The women were followed-up till delivery after which neonatal anthropometrics and other birth outcomes were recorded. Results: H. pylori seroprevalence of 24.1% (84/349 was recorded with higher prevalence in multiparous and older women. H. pylori infected women had significantly higher BMI (29.00 ± 3.89 vs. 26.86 ± 4.10, p = 0.020 and lower (p > 0.05 plasma levels of Cu, Fe, Zn, albumin, and haemoglobin when compared to non-infected women. Also H. pylori infected women had significantly (p < 0.05 higher rates of convulsion and concomitant illnesses than their non-infected counterparts, although there was no difference in the two groups for other pregnancy outcomes. Conclusion: H. pylori infection during pregnancy seems to interfere with trace element metabolism and contribute significantly to increased maternal morbidity. Prior to confirmation of these findings in a well controlled randomised trial, it is suggested that pregnant women be

  16. Prevalence of Coinfection with Gastric Non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) Species in Helicobacter pylori-infected Patients Suffering from Gastric Disease in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; He, Lihua; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Gong, Yanan; Flahou, Bram; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    The Helicobacter heilmannii sensu lato (H. heilmannii s.l.) group consists of long, spiral-shaped bacteria naturally colonizing the stomach of animals. Moreover, bacteria belonging to this group have been observed in 0.2-6% of human gastric biopsy specimens, and associations have been made with the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric MALT lymphoma in humans. To gain insight into the prevalence of H. heilmannii s.l. infections in patients suffering from gastric disease in China, H. heilmannii s.l. species-specific PCRs were performed on DNA extracts from rapid urease test (RUT)-positive gastric biopsies from 1517 patients followed by nucleotide sequencing. At the same time, Helicobacter pylori cultivation and specific PCR was performed to assess H. pylori infection in these patients. In total, H. heilmannii s.l. infection was detected in 11.87% (178/1499) of H. pylori-positive patients. The prevalence of H. suis, H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.), and H. salomonis in the patients was 6.94%, 2.20%, 0.13%, 0.07%, and 2.54%, respectively. Results revealed that all patients with H. heilmannii s.l. infection were co-infected with H. pylori, and some patients were co-infected with more than two different Helicobacter species. Helicobacter heilmannii s.l. infections are fairly common in Chinese patients. This should be kept in mind when diagnosing the cause of gastric pathologies in patients. Helicobacter suis was shown to be by far the most prevalent H. heilmannii s.l.species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Prevalence of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Distribution of Helicobacter pylori Infection, Atrophy, Dysplasia, and Cancer in Its Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmez, Sehmus; Aslan, Mehmet; Erten, Remzi; Sayar, Suleyman; Bayram, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) is frequently encountered and is considered a precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. In the Van region of Turkey, gastric adenocarcinoma incidence is high but the prevalence of gastric IM is not known. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a main factor leading to atrophy, IM, and cancer development in the stomach. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of IM and its subtypes and the prevalence of H. pylori infection, atrophy, dysplasia, and cancer in gastric IM subtypes. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted on 560 IM among the 4050 consecutive patients who were undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with biopsy between June 2010 and October 2014. Clinical records and endoscopic and histopathologic reports of patients with IM were analyzed. Results. The prevalence of gastric IM was 13.8%. The prevalence of incomplete IM was statistically significantly higher than complete IM. Type III IM was the most frequent subtype. Conclusions. Gastric IM is a common finding in patients undergoing EGD with biopsy in this region. High prevalence of incomplete type IM, especially type III, can be associated with the high prevalence of gastric cancer in our region.

  18. The Prevalence of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Distribution of Helicobacter pylori Infection, Atrophy, Dysplasia, and Cancer in Its Subtypes

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    Sehmus Olmez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM is frequently encountered and is considered a precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. In the Van region of Turkey, gastric adenocarcinoma incidence is high but the prevalence of gastric IM is not known. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is a main factor leading to atrophy, IM, and cancer development in the stomach. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of IM and its subtypes and the prevalence of H. pylori infection, atrophy, dysplasia, and cancer in gastric IM subtypes. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted on 560 IM among the 4050 consecutive patients who were undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD with biopsy between June 2010 and October 2014. Clinical records and endoscopic and histopathologic reports of patients with IM were analyzed. Results. The prevalence of gastric IM was 13.8%. The prevalence of incomplete IM was statistically significantly higher than complete IM. Type III IM was the most frequent subtype. Conclusions. Gastric IM is a common finding in patients undergoing EGD with biopsy in this region. High prevalence of incomplete type IM, especially type III, can be associated with the high prevalence of gastric cancer in our region.

  19. An inverse relationship between CagA+ strains of Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of erosive GERD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somi, Mohammad H.; Fattahi, E.; Fouladi, Rohollah F.; Karimi, M.; Bonyadi, R.; Baballou, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is investigating the association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and its cytogenetic-associated gene A (cag A) strain with reflux esophagitis. In a case-control setting (May 2005-2006), patients with reflux esophagitis (case group) were compared with age and gender matched people suffering from symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease with normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings (control group) in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The rates of H. pylori and its cagA positive infections were separately compared between the 2 groups and the subgroups with different severity of reflux esophagitis. Ninety-two and 93 patients were enrolled in the case and control groups. The rate of H.pylori infection was significantly lower in case group (81.5%versus 87.10%, p=0.29, odd ratio 0.654, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.293 to 1.495). The CagA positive infections were found significantly more frequent in the control group (59.1% versus 40.2%, p=0.01, odd ratio 0.465, 95% CI 0.258 to 0.836). There was no significant difference between the severity subgroups of the disease for H. pylori (p=0.30) or cagA positive infection rates (p=0.40). The cagA positive strains might have a protective effect against reflux esophagitis. (author)

  20. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection and long-term proton pump inhibitor use on enterochromaffin-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektaş, Mehmet; Saraç, Nurşen; Çetinkaya, Hülya; Törüner, Murat; Erdemli, Esra; Keskin, Onur; Soykan, İrfan; Oktay, Esen Ismet; Korkut, Esin; Üstün, Yusuf; Bahar, Kadir

    2012-01-01

    Background Excessive release of gastrin leads to hypertrophy and hyperplasia of enterochromaffin-like cells (ECL) and prolonged stimulation of these cells causes functional impairment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and long-term proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use on ECL cells. Methods Fifteen patients who underwent endoscopy because of dyspeptic symptoms were enrolled in the present study. Biopsies were taken from corpus and antrum and existence of H. pylori was investigated with culture, cytology and CLOtest. The patients were divided into 3 groups. Group-A: H. pylori-negative, never treated previously with PPI; Group-B: H. pylori-positive, never treated previously with PPI; and group-C: H. pylori-negative and continuously treated with PPI for more than 6 months before the subject recruitment period. The features of ECL cell in oxyntic glands were examined with electron microscopy on biopsy specimens. Results ECL cells were completely normal in Group A. In group B, moderate hyperplasia and vacuolization was seen in ECL cells. In group C, ECL cell hyperplasia was observed and vacuoles with greater amounts of granules in enlarged vesicles were found more intensely in cytoplasm. Conclusion The use of PPI for a long period of time and presence of H. pylori infection are risk factors for ECL hyperplasia. PMID:24714139

  1. Can the C-14 urea breath test reflect the extent and degree of ongoing helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lee, Seung Ok; Lee, Soo Taik; Jeong, Myung Ja

    2001-01-01

    The C-14 urea breath test (C-14 UBT) is the most specific noninvasive method to detect Helicobacter (H) pylori infection. We investigated if the C-14 UBT can reflect the presence and degree of H. pylori detected by gastroduodenoscopic biopsies (GBx). One hundred fifty patients (M:F=83:67,age 48.6±11.2 yrs) underwent C-14 UBT, rapid urease test (CLO test) and GBx on the same day. For the C-14 UBT, a single breath sample was collected at 10 minutes after ingestion of C-14 urea (137 KBq) capsule and counting was done in a liquid scintillation counter for 1 minute, and the results were classified as positive (≥200 dpm), intermediate ( 50 ∼ 199 dpm) or negative ( < 50 dpm). The results of CLO tests were classified as positive or negative according to color change. The results of GBx on giemsa stain were graded 0 (normal) to 4(diffuse) according to the distribution of H. pylori by the Wyatt method. We compared C-14 UBT results with GBx grade as a gold standard. In the assessment of the presence of H. pylori infection, the C-14 UBT global performance yielded sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of 92.5%, 88.4%, 97.1%, 88.4% and 91.3%, respectively. However, the CLO test had sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of 83.2%, 81.4%, 91.8%, 81.4% and 82.7%, respectively. The quantitative values of the C-14 UBT were 45 ± 27 dpm in grade 0, 707 ±584 dpm in grade 1, 1558±584 dpm in grade 2, 1851±604 dpm in grade 3, and 2719 ± 892 dpm in grade 4. A significant correlation (r=0.848, p<0.01) was found between C-14 UBT and the grade of distribution of H. pylori infection on GBx with giemsa stain. We conclude that the C-14 UBT is a highly accurate, simple and noninvasive method for the diagnosis of ongoing H. pylori infection and reflects the degree of bacterial distribution

  2. Prevalence of Chronic Gastritis or Helicobacter pylori Infection in Adolescent Sleeve Gastrectomy Patients Does Not Correlate with Symptoms or Surgical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Ashanti L; Koeck, Emily S; Hamrick, Miller C; Qureshi, Faisal G; Nadler, Evan P

    2015-08-01

    In adults undergoing gastric bypass surgery, it is routine practice to perform pre-operative testing for Helicobacter pylori infection. Evidence suggests that infection impairs anastomotic healing and contributes to complications. There currently are no data for adolescents undergoing bariatric procedures. Despite few patients with pre-operative symptoms, we noted occasional patients with H. pylori detected after sleeve gastrectomy. We reviewed our experience with our adolescent sleeve gastrectomy cohort to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection, its predictive factors, and association with outcomes. We hypothesized that H. pylori infection would be associated with pre-operative symptoms, but not surgical outcomes. All patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy at our hospital were included. We conducted a chart review to determine pre- or post-operative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease GERD or gastritis, operative complications, and long-term anti-reflux therapy after surgery. Pathology reports were reviewed for evidence of gastritis and H. pylori infection. 78 adolescents had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy from January 2010 through July 2014. The prevalence of chronic gastritis was 44.9% (35/78) and 11.4% of those patients had H. pylori (4/35). Only one patient with H. pylori had pre-operative symptoms, and only 25.7% (9/35) of patients with pathology-proven gastritis had symptoms. One staple line leak occurred but this patient did not have H. pylori or gastritis. Mean patient follow-up was 10 (3-26) mos. There is a moderate prevalence of gastritis among adolescents undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, but only a small number of these patients had H. pylori infection. Neither the presence of chronic gastritis nor H. pylori infection correlated with symptoms or outcomes. Thus, in the absence of predictive symptomology or adverse outcome in those who are infected, we advocate for continued routine pathologic evaluation without the required need for pre

  3. Turnover of carbon in the 13C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Vladimir E.; Andreazzi, Mariana; Cury, Caio S.; Bassetto Junior, Carlos A.Z.; Rodrigues, Maria A.M.; Ducatti, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of 13 C-urea breath test ( 13 C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of 13 C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the 13 C in the 13 C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio 13 C/ 12 C in expired CO 2 from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to 13 C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  4. Trends in the eradication rates of Helicobacter pylori infection for eleven years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jai Hoon; Baik, Gwang Ho; Sohn, Kyoung Min; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Yeon Soo; Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Jin Bong; Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Jin Bae; Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Hak Yang; Baik, Il Hyun; Jang, Hyun Joo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the trends in the eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) over the past 11 years in a single center. METHODS: This retrospective study covered the period from January 2000 to December 2010. We evaluated 5746 patients diagnosed with gastric ulcers (GU), duodenal ulcers (DU), GU + DU, or nonpeptic ulcers associated with an H. pylori infection. We treated them annually with the 2 wk standard first-line triple regimen, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) + amoxicilin + clarithromycin (PAC; PPI, clarithromycin 500 mg, and amoxicillin 1 g, all twice a day). The follow-up test was performed at least 4 wk after the completion of the 2 wk standard H. pylori eradication using the PAC regimen. We also assessed the eradication rates of 1 wk second-line therapy with a quadruple standard regimen (PPI b.i.d., tripotassium dicitrate bismuthate 300 mg q.i.d., metronidazole 500 mg t.i.d., and tetracycline 500 mg q.i.d.) after the failure of the first-line therapy. Statistical analysis was performed with 95%CI for the differences in the annual eradication rates. RESULTS: A total of 5746 patients [2333 males (58.8%), 1636 females (41.2%); mean age of males vs females 51.31 ± 13.1 years vs 52.76 ± 13.6 years, P < 0.05, total mean age 51.9 ± 13.3 years (mean ± SD)] were investigated. Among these patients, 1674 patients were excluded: 35 patients refused treatment; 18 patients ceased H. pylori eradication due to side effects; 1211 patients had inappropriate indications for H. pylori eradication, having undergone stomach cancer operation or chemotherapy; and 410 patients did not undergo the follow-up. We also excluded 103 patients who wanted to stop eradication treatment after only 1 wk due to poor compliance or the side effects mentioned above. Finally, we evaluated the annual eradication success rates in a total of 3969 patients who received 2 wk first-line PAC therapy. The endoscopic and clinical findings in patients who received the 2 wk PAC were as follows

  5. [Gastric cancer risk estimate in patients with chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in a clinical setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arismendi-Morillo, G; Hernández, I; Mengual, E; Abreu, N; Molero, N; Fuenmayor, A; Romero, G; Lizarzábal, M

    2013-01-01

    Severity of chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection (CGAHpI) could play a role in evaluating the potential risk to develop gastric cancer. Our aim was to estimate the risk for gastric cancer in a clinical setting, according to histopathologic criteria, by applying the gastric cancer risk index (GCRI) METHODS: Histopathologic study of the gastric biopsies (corpus-antrum) from consecutive adult patients that underwent gastroesophageal duodenoscopy was carried out, and the GCRI was applied in patients presenting with CGAHpI. One hundred eleven patients (77% female) with a mean age of 38.6±13.1 years were included. Active Helicobacter pylori infection (aHpi) was diagnosed in 77 cases (69.40%). In 45% of the cases with aHpi, pangastritis (23%) or corpus-predominant gastritis (22%) was diagnosed. Nine cases were diagnosed with intestinal metaplasia (8%), 7 of which (77.70%) were in the aHpi group. Twenty one percent of the patients with aHpi had a GCRI of 2 (18.10%) or 3 (2.50%) points (high risk index), while 79.10% accumulated a GCRI of 0 or 1 points (low risk index). Of the patients with no aHpi, none of them had 3 points (p=0.001). Of the 18 patients that accumulated 2 or 3 points, 6 (33.30%) presented with intestinal metaplasia (all with pangastritis and corpus-predominant gastritis), of which 4 cases (66.60%) had aHpi. The estimated gastric cancer risk in patients with CGAHpI in the clinical setting studied was relatively low and 5% of the patients had a histopathologic phenotype associated with an elevated risk for developing gastric cancer. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases in Vietnam: a cross-sectional, hospital-based study

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    Okimoto Tadayoshi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of H. pylori infection in Vietnam is reportedly high, but the spectrum of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases has not been systematically investigated. Moreover, despite the similarities of ethnicity and diet, the age-standardized incidence rate of gastric cancer in the northern city of Hanoi is higher than that in the southern city of Ho Chi Minh, but the reason for this phenomenon is unknown. The virulence of Vietnamese H. pylori has also not been investigated in detail. Methods Individuals undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy were randomly recruited. H. pylori infection status was determined based on the combined results of culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urine test and serum ELISA. Peptic ulcer (PU and gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed by endoscopy, and chronic gastritis was determined histologically. H. pylori virulence factors were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Results Among the examined patients, 65.6% were infected with H. pylori. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in those over 40 years of age than in those aged ≤40. Chronic gastritis was present in all H. pylori-infected individuals, 83.1% of whom had active gastritis, and 85.3% and 14.7% had atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. PU was present in 21% of infected patients, whereas its incidence was very low in non-infected individuals. The prevalence of PU was significantly higher in Hanoi than in Ho Chi Minh. The prevalence of vacA m1, which has been identified as an independent risk factor for PU in Vietnam, was significantly higher among H. pylori isolates from Hanoi than among those from Ho Chi Minh. Conclusions H. pylori infection is common in Vietnam and is strongly associated with PU, active gastritis, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. vacA m1 is associated with an increased risk for PU and might contribute to the difference in the prevalence of PU and gastric cancer between

  7. Serological study of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

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    Farnaz Sohrabvand

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed no significant difference in serologic examination re-sults in PCOS versus non PCOS patients. The finding of high prevalence of H.Pylori IgG and IgA positive levels in both PCOS and non PCOS patients can be probably re-lated to the high prevalence of H.Pylori infection or exposure in Iranian population and therefore suggest an issue for further investigation.

  8. Further evidence of ethnic and gender differences for Helicobacter pylori infection among endoscoped patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, S; Uyub, A M; Azlan, A A

    2008-12-01

    HeIicobacter pylori infection rate was determined in 697 consecutive patients with ulcer, gastritis, duodenitis and non-ulcer dyspepsia by endoscopy at a Malaysian hospital in 1999-2002. Biopsies of the gastric antrum and body were subjected to the urease test, Gram staining of impression smears and culture examination. Infection was defined as a positive result in at least one test. The infection rates were 32.1, 10.4, 20.0 and 16.2% in ulcer, gastritis, duodenitis and non-ulcer dyspepsia patients, respectively. Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was 14.6%, with the rate among the Indian (21.7%), Chinese (19.2%) and Bangladeshi foreign worker (23.1%) groups significantly higher (Pdifferences (Pgender, the prevalence rates of Malay males and females were also significantly lower (Pdifference in H. pylori infection prevalence rates among ethnic groups (highest in Indians, then Chinese and unusually low in Malays) and gender groups (highest in males) in Malaysia.

  9. Diagnostic Methods of Helicobacter pylori Infection for Epidemiological Studies: Critical Importance of Indirect Test Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Among the methods developed to detect H. pylori infection, determining the gold standard remains debatable, especially for epidemiological studies. Due to the decreasing sensitivity of direct diagnostic tests (histopathology and/or immunohistochemistry [IHC], rapid urease test [RUT], and culture), several indirect tests, including antibody-based tests (serology and urine test), urea breath test (UBT), and stool antigen test (SAT) have been developed to diagnose H. pylori infection. Among the indirect tests, UBT and SAT became the best methods to determine active infection. While antibody-based tests, especially serology, are widely available and relatively sensitive, their specificity is low. Guidelines indicated that no single test can be considered as the gold standard for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and that one should consider the method's advantages and disadvantages. Based on four epidemiological studies, culture and RUT present a sensitivity of 74.2-90.8% and 83.3-86.9% and a specificity of 97.7-98.8% and 95.1-97.2%, respectively, when using IHC as a gold standard. The sensitivity of serology is quite high, but that of the urine test was lower compared with that of the other methods. Thus, indirect test validation is important although some commercial kits propose universal cut-off values.

  10. VacA and CagA Status as Biomarker of Two Opposite End Outcomes of Helicobacter pylori Infection (Gastric Cancer and Duodenal Ulcer) in a Moroccan Population

    OpenAIRE

    El Khadir, Mounia; Alaoui Boukhris, Samia; Benajah, Dafr-Allah; El Rhazi, Karima; Ibrahimi, Sidi Adil; El Abkari, Mohamed; Harmouch, Taoufiq; Nejjari, Chakib; Mahmoud, Mustapha; Benlemlih, Mohamed; Bennani, Bahia

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces inflammation of the gastric mucosa, which may progress to precancerous lesions leading to gastric cancer. Pathological determinism is associated to some virulence genes of the bacterium, notably the vacA and cagA genes. The present study aimed to determine the H. pylori genotypes distribution and their association with sex, age and gastric diseases in a Moroccan population. Gastric biopsy was taken from 1079 consenting patients. The specimens ...

  11. Current knowledge on alleviating Helicobacter pylori infections through the use of some commonly known natural products: bench to bedside

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    Malliga Raman Murali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium, has been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization and recognized as the causative agent for peptic ulcers, duodenal ulcer, gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas, and gastric cancer. Owing to their alarming rate of drug resistance, eradication of H. pylori remains a global challenge. Triple therapy consisting of a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and either amoxicillin or metronidazole, is generally the recommended standard for the treatment of H. pylori infection. Complementary and alternative medicines have a long history in the treatment of gastrointestinal ailments and various compounds has been tested for anti-H. pylori activity both in vitro and in vivo; however, their successful use in human clinical trials is sporadic. Hence, the aim of this review is to analyze the role of some well-known natural products that have been tested in clinical trials in preventing, altering, or treating H. pylori infections. Whereas some in vitro and in vivo studies in the literature have demonstrated the successful use of a few potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections, others indicate a need to consider natural products, with or without triple therapy, as a useful alternative in treating H. pylori-related infections. Thus, the reported mechanisms include killing of H. pylori urease inhibition, induction of bacterial cell damage, and immunomodulatory effect on the host immune system. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the successful use of some potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections. Nevertheless, the routine prescription of potential complementary and alternative medicines continues to be restrained, and evidence on the safety and efficacy of the active compounds remains a subject of ongoing debate.

  12. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic atrophic gastritis: Meta-analyses according to type of disease definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Melanie N; Brenner, Hermann

    2008-08-15

    Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). A large variety of definitions of CAG have been used in epidemiologic studies in the past. The aim of this work was to systematically review and summarize estimates of the association between H. pylori infection and CAG according to the various definitions of CAG. Articles on the association between H. pylori infection and CAG published until July 2007 were identified. Separate meta-analyses were carried out for studies defining CAG based on gastroscopy with biopsy, serum pepsinogen I (PG I) only, the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio (PG I/PG II ratio) only, or a combination of PG I and the PG I/PG II ratio. Numbers of identified studies and summary odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals) were as follows: gastroscopy with biopsy: n = 34, OR = 6.4 (4.0-10.1); PG I only: n = 13, OR = 0.9 (0.7-1.2); PG I/PG II ratio: n = 8, OR = 7.2 (3.1-16.8); combination of PG I and the PG I/PG II ratio: n = 20, OR = 5.7 (4.4-7.5). Studies with CAG definitions based on gastroscopy with biopsy or the PG I/PG II ratio (alone or in combination with PG I) yield similarly strong associations of H. pylori with CAG. The association is missed entirely in studies where CAG is defined by PG I only. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Defining the Roles of IFN-γ and IL-17A in Inflammation and Protection against Helicobacter pylori Infection.

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    Louise Sjökvist Ottsjö

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells have been shown to be essential for vaccine-induced protection against Helicobacter pylori infection. However, the effector mechanisms leading to reductions in the gastric bacterial loads of vaccinated mice remain unclear. We have investigated the function of IFN-γ and IL-17A for vaccine-induced protection and inflammation (gastritis using IFN-γ-gene-knockout (IFN-γ-/- mice, after sublingual or intragastric immunization with H. pylori lysate antigens and cholera toxin. Bacteria were enumerated in the stomachs of mice and related to the gastritis score and cellular immune responses. We report that sublingually and intragastrically immunized IFN-γ-/- mice had significantly reduced bacterial loads similar to immunized wild-type mice compared to respective unimmunized infection controls. The reduction in bacterial loads in sublingually and intragastrically immunized IFN-γ-/- mice was associated with significantly higher levels of IL-17A in stomach extracts and lower gastritis scores compared with immunized wild-type mice. To study the role of IL-17A for vaccine-induced protection in sublingually immunized IFN-γ-/- mice, IL-17A was neutralized in vivo at the time of infection. Remarkably, the neutralization of IL-17A in sublingually immunized IFN-γ-/- mice completely abolished protection against H. pylori infection and the mild gastritis. In summary, our results suggest that IFN-γ responses in the stomach of sublingually immunized mice promote vaccine-induced gastritis, after infection with H. pylori but that IL-17A primarily functions to reduce the bacterial load.

  14. The influence of cytokine gene polymorphisms on the risk of developing gastric cancer in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubljar, David; Jeverica, Samo; Jukic, Tomislav; Skvarc, Miha; Pintar, Tadeja; Tepes, Bojan; Kavalar, Rajko; Stabuc, Borut; Peterlin, Borut; Ihan, Alojz

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastric cancer. The disease progression is influenced by the host inflammatory responses, and cytokine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may have a role in the course of the disease. The aim of our study was to investigate proinflammatory cytokine polymorphisms, previously associated with the development of gastric cancer, in a Slovenian population. In total 318 patients and controls were selected for the study and divided into three groups: (i) patients with gastric cancer (n = 58), (ii) patients with chronic gastritis (n = 60) and (iii) healthy control group (n = 200). H. pylori infection in patient groups was determined by serology, histology and culture. Four proinflammatory gene polymorphisms were determined (IL-1β, IL-1ra, TNF-α, TLR-4) in all subjects. We found a statistically significant difference between males and females for the groups (p = 0.025). Odds ratio (OR) for gastric cancer risk for females was 0.557 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.233–1.329) and for chronic gastritis 2.073 (95% CI: 1.005–4.277). IL-1B-511*T/T homozygous allele for cancer group had OR = 2.349 (95% CI: 0.583–9.462), heterozygous IL-1B-511*T had OR = 1.470 (95% CI: 0.583–3.709) and heterozygotes in TNF-A-308 genotype for chronic gastritis had OR = 1.402 (95% CI: 0.626–3.139). Other alleles had OR less than 1. We could not prove association between gastric cancer and chronic gastritis due to H. pylori in any cytokine SNPs studied in Slovenian population. Other SNPs might be responsible besides infection with H. pylori for the progression from atrophy to neoplastic transformation

  15. Lactobacillus reuteri strain combination in Helicobacter pylori infection: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, Ruggiero; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Demichina, Antonella; Maurogiovanni, Giovanni; Principi, Beatrice; Scaccianoce, Giuseppe; Ierardi, Enzo; Russo, Francesco; Riezzo, Giuseppe; Di Leo, Alfredo; Cavallo, Luciano; Francavilla, Antonio; Versalovic, James

    2014-01-01

    The goals of this study were to investigate the role of a new probiotic preparation (Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475) in Helicobacter pylori infection. Specific probiotic strains play a role in H. pylori infection for their ability to decrease bacterial load and gastritis, prevent antibiotic-associated side effects, and increase the eradication rate. This is a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study in a tertiary care setting. A total of 100 H. pylori-positive naive patients received either L. reuteri combination (2×10 Colony Forming Units) or placebo during a 3-phase study (pre-eradication, eradication, and follow-up). All underwent C urea breath test (C-UBT), blood assessments of gastrin-17 (G17), endoscopy, and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. Eradication was confirmed by C-UBT 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Fifty patients were allocated in each group. During pre-eradication period, C-UBT δ decreased by 13% in L. reuteri combination as compared with a 4% increase in placebo (-13.2±34% vs. 4.3±27%; Preuteri combination (6.8±2.9 vs. 4±3.1; Preuteri combination as compared with placebo-reported side effects (40.9% vs. 62.8%; Preuteri combination (28% vs. 12%; Preuteri combination and 65.9% in placebo (P=NS). L. reuteri combination increased eradication rate by 9.1% (odds ratio: 1.5). L. reuteri combination alone is able to exert an inhibitory effect on H. pylori growth, and when administered with eradication therapy, it determines a significant reduction in antibiotic-associated side effects. Moreover, L. reuteri combination was able to decrease serum G17 levels and to (not significantly) increase the H. pylori-eradication rate.

  16. An updated systematic review and meta-analysis on the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Lauren; Jaraisy, Ameen; Haj, Saeda; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-02-01

    We conducted an updated systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the prevalence of depleted iron stores among persons infected with Helicobacter pylori compared to uninfected ones. We also assessed the impact of anti-H. pylori eradication therapy plus iron therapy on ferritin and hemoglobin levels compared to iron therapy alone. A literature search was conducted using the databases Medline, the Cochrane Library, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, and the Science Citation Index Expanded. Observational studies with methodological quality score of 13 (median score) and above, on a scale of 0-16, and all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for the meta-analyses. Pooled point estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using the random effects model. Compared to uninfected persons, H. pylori-infected individuals showed increased likelihood of iron deficiency anemia (14 observational studies); pooled OR 1.72 (95% CI 1.23-2.42); iron deficiency (pooled OR 1.33; 95% CI 1.15-1.54; 30 studies); and anemia (pooled OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.00-1.32; 23 studies). Meta-analyses of seven RCTs showed increased ferritin, standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.53 (95% 0.21-0.85), but not hemoglobin, SMD 0.36 (95% -0.07 to 0.78), Pv=.1, following anti-H. pylori eradication therapy plus iron therapy as compared with iron therapy alone. Significant heterogeneity was found among studies, as well as evidence of publication bias. Current evidence indicates increased likelihood of depleted iron stores in relation to H. pylori infection. H. pylori eradication therapy, added to iron therapy, might be beneficial in increasing ferritin and hemoglobin levels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Consensus on the clinical management, screening-to-treat, and surveillance of Helicobacter pylori infection to improve gastric cancer control on a nationwide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lo, Jing-Chuan; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Liou, Jyh-Ming; Wu, Chun-Ying; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Lee, Yi-Chia; Hsu, Ping-I; Chang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2017-06-01

    Previous international consensus statements provided general policies for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there are geographic differences in the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of H. pylori, and in the availability of medications and endoscopy. Thus, nationwide or regional consensus statements are needed to improve control of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. This consensus statement for management of H. pylori in Taiwan has three major sections: (1) optimal diagnosis and indications; (2) current treatment strategies; and (3) screening-to-treat and surveillance for control of gastric cancer. The literature review emphasized recent data for development of draft statements and determination of levels of evidence. Twenty-five Taiwan experts conducted a consensus conference, by a modified Delphi process, to modify the draft statements. Consensus, defined as an agreement of least 80% of the experts, and recommendation grade were determined by anonymous voting. There were 24 consensus statements. Section 1 has seven statements on recommendations for the diagnosis and indications for treatment of H. pylori infection. Section 2 has 10 statements that provide an updated treatment algorithm for first-line, second-line, and third-line regimens. Section 3 has seven statements regarding H. pylori eradication for reducing the risk of gastric cancer, with a cost-benefit analysis. After H. pylori eradication, the consensus highlights the use of endoscopic surveillance and/or chemoprevention to further reduce the burden of gastric cancer. This consensus statement has updated recommendations for improving the clinical management of H. pylori infection in areas such as Taiwan, which have high prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Helicobacter Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. "VALIDATION OF 13C-UREA BREATH TEST WITH NON DISPERSIVE ISOTOPE SELECTIVE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION: A SURVEY IN IRANIAN POPULATION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Davood Beiki

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The urea breath test (UBT which is carried out with 13C or 14C labeled urea is one of the most important non invasive methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection. Application of 13C-UBT is becoming increasingly popular because of its non radioactive nature which makes it suitable for diagnostic purposes in children and women of child bearing ages. While isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS is generally used to detect 13C in expired breath, this instrument is expensive and recently non dispersive isotope selective infrared (NDIR spectroscopy which is a lower cost technique has been employed as a reliable counterpart for IRMS in small clinics. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of NDIR spectroscopy technique in Iranian population in comparison with histological examination, rapid urease test and 14C-urea breath test as gold standard. Seventy six patients with dyspepsia were underwent 13CUBT for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Good agreements were found between the 13C-UBT and gold standard methods. The 13C-UBT showed 100% sensitivity, 97.3% specificity, 97.56% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value and 98.65% accuracy. On the basis of these results it could be concluded that 13C-UBT performed with NDIR spectroscopy is a reliable, accurate and non invasive diagnostic tool for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the Iranian population.

  19. Features of Immune Response to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children with Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Kalichevska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The course of bronchial asthma in children is often accompanied by gastrointestinal (GI diseases associated with H.pylori infection. The presence of H.pylori leads to the activation and maintenance of inflammatory process with release of cytokines and mediators of inflammation and subsequent systemic effects. Objective: to study the peculiarities of interferon gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin (IL-4, -5 and -13 production as markers of allergic inflammation severity in children with bronchial asthma infected with H.pylori. Materials and methods. There were examined 120 children with bronchial asthma aged 6 to 18 years. Identification of H.pylori was carried out with the help of brea­thing Helic-test (LLC AMA, Russia. Serum concentrations of IFN-γ and IL‑4, -5 and -13 were determined by enzyme-linked immunoassay (Diaclone test-kits, France before and 7 days after the end of treatment for GI pathology. Statistical processing was performed using the methods of variation statistics implemented in the software package Statistica 6.1. Results. 78 children with bronchial asthma were diagnosed with GI disease, including 37 cases associated with H.pylori infection. To study the influence of H.pylori on the course of bronchial asthma, children were divided into 3 groups: I group — 37 children with bronchial asthma and GI pathology, infected with H.pylori, II — 41 H.pylori-negative children with bronchial asthma and GI pathology, III — 42 H.pylori-negative children with bronchial asthma without GI disorders. Duration of bronchial asthma in group I was 7.80 ± 0.17 years, in II — 5.90 ± 0.26 years, in group III — 3.90 ± 0.48 years (p < 0.05. The presence of H.pylori infection in children with bronchial asthma was accompanied by lower concentrations of IFN-γ compared to children of group II (8.47 ± 0.14 pg/ml and 9.69 ± 0.32 pg/ml, respectively, p < 0.05. The level of IL‑13 in the blood serum was

  20. Comparative analysis of gastric bacterial microbiota in Mongolian gerbils after long-term infection with Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Takako; Matsuki, Takahiro; Asahara, Takashi; Zaman, Cynthia; Hanawa, Tomoko; Yonezawa, Hideo; Kurata, Satoshi; Woo, Timothy Derg-hoong; Nomoto, Koji; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative (qt) real time PCR using 16SrDNA primers is useful for determination of the bacterial composition of the gastric microbiota in Mongolian gerbils. The aim of this study was to determine the change in the gastric microbiota after long-term infection with Helicobacter pylori. One year after inoculation with H. pylori, five gerbils were determined as H. pylori-positive and 6 gerbils H. pylori-negative by culture and real time qt PCR methods. The gastric microbiota of each group of gerbils was also compared with that of 6 gerbils uninfected with H. pylori. DNA from the Atopobium cluster, Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Enterococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. were detected in the gastric mucus of both infected and uninfected gerbils. In contrast, Eubacterium cylindroides group and Prevotella spp. were detected only in H. pylori-negative gerbils. The numbers of C. leptum subgroup, C. coccoides group and Bifidobacterium spp. in gastric mucus of H. pylori-negative Mongolian gerbils were significantly lower than those in non-infected gerbils. The results obtained suggest that the composition of gastric indigenous microbiota in Mongolian gerbils may be disturbed by long-term infection with H. pylori, and that these changes may in fact inhibit H. pylori infection.

  1. Helicobacter Pylori infection of the gallbladder and the risk of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Li; Pan, Jiaqi; Zhou, Boyan; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming; Chen, Weixing; Shen, Zhe

    2018-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is coexisted with various diseases, including chronic gastritis, ulcer, and gastric cancer. Besides, chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis are extremely widespread over the world, which are considered as high health-care cost burdens of digestive diseases. Epidemiologic evidence on Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder increasing the risk of biliary diseases has been contradictory. Conduct a meta-analysis of overall studies and investigate an association between Helicobacter pylori infection of the gallbladder with chronic cholecystitis/cholelithiasis. We used PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases to identify all published studies before August 2017. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using the random effects model. Heterogeneity, sensitivity, and stratified analyses were also performed. Eighteen studies involving 1544 participants and 1061 biliary cases with chronic cholecystitis/cholelithiasis were included. Helicobacter pylori infection of the gallbladder was significantly associated with an increased risk of chronic cholecystitis and cholecystitis (OR = 3.022; 95% CI, 1.897-4.815; I 2  = 20.1%). In addition, country-based subgroup analysis also showed a positive association between Helicobacter pylori positivity and chronic cholecystitis/cholelithiasis risk. The ORs (95% CIs) for Asian and non-Asian region studies were 3.75 (1.83-7.71) and 2.25 (1.29-3.89), respectively. This meta-analysis suggests that infection of the gallbladder with Helicobacter pylori is closely related to an increased risk of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The corpus-predominant gastritis index can be an early and reversible marker to identify the gastric cancer risk of Helicobacter pylori-infected nonulcer dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Ching; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Chang, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2017-08-01

    Corpus-predominant gastritis index (CGI) is an early histological marker to identify Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer relatives at risk of cancer. This study validated whether CGI is more prevalent in H. pylori-infected nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) subjects than in duodenal ulcer (DU) controls and whether it is reversible after H. pylori eradication or is correlated with noninvasive biomarkers. In this longitudinal cohort study, 573 H. pylori-infected subjects were enrolled, including 349 NUD and 224 DU. Gastric specimens were provided to assess CGI, spasmolyic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), and Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia assessment (OLGIM). Serum pepsinogen I and II levels were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CGI subjected were followed up at least 1 year after H. pylori eradication. NUD subjects had higher prevalence rates of CGI (47.0% vs 29.9%, Pgastritis and intestinal metaplasia. NUD subjects with CGI had higher risk of SPEM (OR 2.86, P<.001) and lower serum pepsinogen I/II ratios (P<.001) than those without CGI. Serum pepsinogen I/II ratios <9 could predict CGI modestly (AUROC 0.69, 95% CI: 0.63-0.74). CGI was regressed after eradication (P<.001). CGI was more prevalent in H. pylori-infected NUD subjects than in controls, was correlated with SPEM, and may serve as a marker earlier than OLGIM to indicate risk of gastric cancer. Moreover, CGI could be regressed after eradication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Time trends in upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobacter pylori infection in a multiracial Asian population--a 20-year experience over three time periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, A H-R; Lim, Y-Y; Liew, W-C; Goh, K-L

    2016-04-01

    Marked epidemiological changes in upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobacter pylori infection have taken place in the Asian Pacific region. In particular, differences with respect to race in the multiracial Asian population in Malaysia have been important and interesting. A time trend study of upper gastrointestinal disease and H. pylori infection in three time periods: 1989-1990, 1999-2000 and 2009-2010 spanning a period of 20 years was carried out. Consecutive first time gastroscopies carried out on patients attending the University of Malaya Medical Center were studied. Diagnoses and H. pylori infection status were carefully recorded. A steady decline in prevalence of duodenal ulcer (DU) and gastric ulcer (GU) from 21.1% to 9.5% to 5.0% and from 11.9% to 9.4% to 9.9% while an increase in erosive oesophagitis (EO) from 2.0% to 8.4% to 9.5% (chi-square for trend; P Chinese and Indians but the difference over time was most marked in Malays. There was a steady decline in the proportion of patients with gastric and oesophageal cancers. Peptic ulcers have declined significantly over a 20-year period together with a decline in H. pylori infection. In contrast, a steady increase in erosive oesophagitis was observed. Gastric and oesophageal squamous cell cancers have declined to low levels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children: Nutritional Status and Associations with Serum Leptin, Ghrelin, and IGF-1 Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Gulin; Ozkan, Tanju Basarir; Ozgur, Taner; Altay, Derya; Cavun, Sinan; Goral, Guher

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcers, malignancy and lymphoma, and extra-gastrointestinal conditions. H. pylori infection is negatively associated with children's growth. Chronic inflammation of the stomach that results in the loss of appetite and, dysregulation of neuroendocrine hormones such as leptin, and ghrelin are the probable reasons of this negative association. The objective of this study is to determine the serum levels of leptin, ghrelin, and IGF-1 in H. pylori-infected children and their relations with growth. A hundred and sixty-one school children aged between 6 and 14 years were selected randomly from five primary schools representing a cross section of population. Demographic and sociocultural characteristics, and anthropometric measurements were recorded. Serum H. pylori IgG, insulin-like growth factor-1, leptin, and ghrelin levels were measured in all children. The children were grouped according to the nutritional status and Helicobacter pylori seropositivity. Nutritional indices were compared among groups in association with serum leptin, ghrelin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. H. pylori IgG positivity was found in 34.2%, and 14.9% of children were malnourished. H. pylori seropositivity was significantly higher in older ages (10.32 ± 2.26 vs 9.53 ± 2.36 years, p = .036), and body weight and height Z scores were significantly lower in H. pylori-seropositive children (-0.33 ± 1.08 vs 0.04 ± 1.26, p = .044 and 0.13 ± 0.92 vs 0.23 ± 0.91, p = .018 respectively). H. pylori seropositivity was found to be an independent risk factor for shorter body height (p = .01). Serum leptin, ghrelin, and IGF-1 levels were not associated with H. pylori IgG seropositivity (0.35 vs 0.55 ng/mL, p = .3; 3267.4 ± 753.0 vs 2808.3 ± 911.4 pg/mL, p = .06; 470 ± 176 vs 521 ± 179 ng/mL, p = .32, respectively). Children infected with H. pylori are prone to short stature. This effect seems to be

  5. Nutritional Habits in Management of Shigellosis in Children with Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Yu. Kurlan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ways of improving of diet management in children with Shigellosis infected with H. pylori were determined. The study involved 29 children with H. pylori infection aged from 1 to 10, who were hospitalized in the Regional Children’s Infectious Diseases Hospital (Kharkiv and had a diagnosis of Shigellosis sonnei of moderate severity. The children were divided into two groups depending on the feeding mode. The first group was represented by 13 children, who were undergone standard treatment. The second group included 16 children who had two days prolonged gradual increase in the volume of food at each feeding, and decreased number of feedings per day. Children of the second group received aluminum phosphate from the first day and after discharge they were advised to keep on the regime of feeding «more frequently, but in small portions». A longer duration of the symptoms of bowel dysfunction and vomiting, pain in periumbilical area, bloating, changes in fecal examination in the form of the presence of undigested food in children of the first group were revealed. Patients of the second group regained their weight in much shorter period. Rational diet therapy makes it possible to prevent recrudescence of shi­gellosis in children at early stages of recovery. Studies have shown that early detection of H. pylori infection in children with shigellosis as well as timely correction of feeding have a positive effect on recovery of functional activity of digestive processes, faster normalization of clinical and laboratory parameters of patients, contribute to regression of clinical symptoms of the underlying disease.

  6. Treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of Parkinson's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H H; Qiu, J; Friis, S

    2012-01-01

    It has been speculated that gastrointestinal infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP) contributes to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We used nationwide Danish registers to investigate this hypothesis.......It has been speculated that gastrointestinal infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP) contributes to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We used nationwide Danish registers to investigate this hypothesis....

  7. Comparison of Salivary Anti Helicobacter pylori IgG with Serum IgG and Bacteriological Tests in Detecting Helicobacter pylori Infections

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    H Ghasemian safaei

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for detecting anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori specific IgG antibodies in specimens of oral fluid and serum with bacteriological tests. Methods: Antral biopsy specimens, as well as serum and oral fluid samples were collected from 97 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The presence or absence of current H. pylori infection was determined by culture, histology and urease detection. Anti-H. pylori specific IgG was detected in serum and oral fluid, using an established lab-made, and a commercial ELISA kit. The obtained data were compared with results of bacteriological tests. Results: In all, 62 (64% of 97 patients were positive for H. pylori by one or more of the gold standard tests (culture, histology and urease detection. Lab-made enzyme-linked immunoassay of oral fluid had a sensitivity and specificity of 92% and 83% respectively. A sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 83%, respectively, was obtained with the commercial kit. Lab-made enzyme-linked immunoassay of serum samples had a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 88%, respectively. A sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 86% was obtained with the commercial kit. Conclusion: Detection of anti-H. pylori specific IgG in oral fluid by ELISA is comparable in sensitivity and specificity with serum based methods. Oral fluid based ELISA could provide a reliable, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Saliva testing may have a role in epidemiological studies. Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, ELISA, Oral fluid

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection and low dietary iron alter behavior, induce iron deficiency anemia, and modulate hippocampal gene expression in female C57BL/6 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Monika; Amaya, Aldo; Bodi, Caroline; Ge, Zhongming; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Ennis, Kathleen; Wang, Timothy C.; Georgieff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori), a bacterial pathogen, is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is a strong risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Environmental conditions, such as poor dietary iron resulting in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), enhance H.pylori virulence and increases risk for gastric cancer. IDA affects billions of people worldwide, and there is considerable overlap between regions of high IDA and high H.pylori prevalence. The primary aims of our study were to evaluate the effect of H.pylori infection on behavior, iron metabolism, red blood cell indices, and behavioral outcomes following comorbid H. pylori infection and dietary iron deficiency in a mouse model. C57BL/6 female mice (n = 40) were used; half were placed on a moderately iron deficient (ID) diet immediately post-weaning, and the other half were maintained on an iron replete (IR) diet. Half were dosed with H.pylori SS1 at 5 weeks of age, and the remaining mice were sham-dosed. There were 4 study groups: a control group (-Hp, IR diet) as well as 3 experimental groups (-Hp, ID diet; +Hp, IR diet; +Hp,ID diet). All mice were tested in an open field apparatus at 8 weeks postinfection. Independent of dietary iron status, H.pylori -infected mice performed fewer exploratory behaviors in the open field chamber than uninfected mice (pmice on an ID diet (both pmice compared to all other study groups. H.pylori infection caused IDA in mice maintained on a marginal iron diet. The mouse model developed in this study is a useful model to study the neurologic, behavioral, and hematologic impact of the common human co-morbidity of H. pylori infection and IDA. PMID:28355210

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in a Minor Ethnic Group of Vietnam: A Multiethnic, Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Tran Thanh; Tuan, Vo Phuoc; Dung, Ho Dang Quy; Tung, Pham Huu; Tri, Tran Dinh; Thuan, Ngo Phuong Minh; Tam, Le Quang; Nam, Bui Chi; Giang, Do Anh; Hoan, Phan Quoc; Uchida, Tomohisa; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Khien, Vu Van; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2018-03-01

    The Helicobacter pylori -induced burden of gastric cancer varies based on geographical regions and ethnic grouping. Vietnam is a multiethnic country with the highest incidence of gastric cancer in Southeast Asia, but previous studies focused only on the Kinh ethnic group. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted using 494 volunteers (18-78 years old), from 13 ethnic groups in Daklak and Lao Cai provinces, Vietnam. H. pylori status was determined by multiple tests (rapid urease test, culture, histology, and serology). cagA and vacA genotypes were determined by PCR-based sequencing. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 38.1%. Multivariate analysis showed that variations in geographical region, age, and ethnicity were independent factors associated with the risk of H. pylori acquisition. Therefore, multicenter, multiethnic, population based study is essential to assess the H. pylori prevalence and its burden in the general population. Only the E De ethnicity carried strains with Western-type CagA (82%) and exhibited significantly lower gastric mucosal inflammation compared to other ethnic groups. However, the histological scores of Western-type CagA and East-Asian-type CagA within the E De group showed no significant differences. Thus, in addition to bacterial virulence factors, host factors are likely to be important determinants for gastric mucosal inflammation and contribute to the Asian enigma.

  10. Turnover of carbon in the {sup 13}C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Vladimir E.; Andreazzi, Mariana; Cury, Caio S.; Bassetto Junior, Carlos A.Z.; Rodrigues, Maria A.M.; Ducatti, Carlos, E-mail: vladimir@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: ducatti@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: mariana.andreazazi@gmail.com, E-mail: caiocury@hotmail.com, E-mail: juniorbassett@hotmail.com, E-mail: mariar@fmb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of {sup 13}C-urea breath test ({sup 13}C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of {sup 13}C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the {sup 13}C in the {sup 13}C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C in expired CO{sub 2} from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to {sup 13}C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  11. Bacterial microbiota profiling in gastritis without Helicobacter pylori infection or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xing Li

    Full Text Available Recent 16S ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA molecular profiling of the stomach mucosa revealed a surprising complexity of microbiota. Helicobacter pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use are two main contributors to gastritis and peptic ulcer. However, little is known about the association between other members of the stomach microbiota and gastric diseases. In this study, cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA was used to profile the stomach microbiota from normal and gastritis patients. One hundred and thirty three phylotypes from eight bacterial phyla were identified. The stomach microbiota was found to be closely adhered to the mucosa. Eleven Streptococcus phylotypes were successfully cultivated from the biopsies. One to two genera represented a majority of clones within any of the identified phyla. We further developed two real-time quantitative PCR assays to quantify the relative abundance of the Firmicutes phylum and the Streptococcus genus. Significantly higher abundance of the Firmicutes phylum and the Streptococcus genus within the Firmicutes phylum was observed in patients with antral gastritis, compared with normal controls. This study suggests that the genus taxon level can largely represent much higher taxa such as the phylum. The clinical relevance and the mechanism underlying the altered microbiota composition in gastritis require further functional studies.

  12. Association of TNF-α but not IL-1β levels with the presence of Helicobacter pylori infection increased the risk of peptic ulcer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourani, Mehdi; Habibzadeh, Maryam; Karkhah, Ahmad; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad; Barari, Ladan; Nouri, Hamid Reza

    2018-02-15

    Peptic ulcer is a lesion in the mucosa of the digestive tract affecting many people all around the world. Recent investigations have indicated that produced inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in response to gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori play an important role in the development of peptic ulcer. With regard to the significance of these cytokines in peptic ulcer development and the high prevalence of this disease in the developing countries, this study aimed to investigate the association of TNF-α and IL-1β with peptic ulcer in the presence of H. pylori. This case-control study enrolled 61 patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) as cases and 59 people without peptic ulcer (NPUD) as controls. Blood samples and endoscopic biopsies were collected. H. pylori infection was confirmed by using rapid urease test (RUT), specific IgG measurement and histopathological examination. Then, IL-1β and TNF-α levels were evaluated using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The seropositivity of H. pylori was 62.5% in the studied population, while by considering RUT and histopathological examination along with specific-IgG antibody, H. pylori infection decreased to 56.7%. In addition, H. pylori infection was significantly (OR = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.17-0.82; P = .02) associated with peptic ulcer development. The TNF-α level in PUD and infected H. pylori subjects was significantly higher than that of control and un-infected H. pylori individuals. However, no significant difference of IL1β level was observed between PUD and control groups as well as between H. pylori infected and un-infected individuals. Interestingly, IL-1β level in PUD patients without H. pylori infection was significantly higher than infected ones. Moreover, a significant correlation between specific-IgG antibody with TNF-α level was observed. Taken together, our results showed that increased level of TNF-α could probably play pivotal role in pathogenesis of peptic ulcer

  13. Serodiagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to the established role of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in gastritis and duodenal ulcer in general, conflicting results have been reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The seroprevalence during early HIV...

  14. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  15. Protective effect of Korean Red Ginseng extract against Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyung Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation includes induction of inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL-8 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, which are mediated by oxidant-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB. High levels of lipid peroxide (LPO and increased activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO, a biomarker of neutrophil infiltration, are observed in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa. Panax ginseng Meyer, a Korean herb medicine, is widely used in Asian countries for its biological activities including anti-inflammatory efficacy. The present study aims to investigate whether Korean Red Ginseng extract (RGE inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation in Mongolian gerbils. One wk after intragastric inoculation with H. pylori, Mongolian gerbils were fed with either the control diet or the diet containing RGE (200 mg RGE/gerbil for 6 wk. The following were determined in gastric mucosa: the number of viable H. pylori in stomach; MPO activity; LPO level; mRNA and protein levels of keratinocyte chemoattractant factor (KC, a rodent IL-8 homolog, IL-1β, and iNOS; protein level of phospho-IκBα (which reflects the activation of NF-κB; and histology. As a result, RGE suppressed H. pylori-induced mRNA and protein levels of KC, IL-1β, and iNOS in gastric mucosa. RGE also inhibited H. pylori-induced phosphorylation of IκBα and increases in LPO level and MPO activity of gastric mucosa. RGE did not affect viable H. pylori colonization in the stomach, but improved the histological grade of infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, intestinal metaplasia, and hyperplasia. In conclusion, RGE inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by suppressing induction of inflammatory mediators (KC, IL-1β, iNOS, MPO activity, and LPO level in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa.

  16. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection favourably affects altered gastric mucosal MMP-9 levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kubben, F.J.G.M.; Sier, C.F.M.; Schram, M.; Witte, T.A.M.C.; Veenendaal, R.A.; Duijn, W. van; Verheijen, J.H.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Lamers, C.B.H.W.; Verspaget, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori gastritis is recognized as an important pathogenetic factor in peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinogenesis, and is accompanied by strongly enhanced gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) levels. Aim: This study was performed to investigate whether H.

  17. Immune Responses to "Helicobacter pylori" Infection in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douraghi, Masoumeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Rostami, Mahmoud Nateghi; Nikmanesh, Bahram

    2012-01-01

    Infection with "Helicobacter pylori" was assessed through serum "H. pylori" IgG antibody in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). The sero-status of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) was determined as a risk determinant for severe "H. pylori"-associated diseases. In total, 210 children with ID were included…

  18. CagA+ Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer risk in the EPIC-EURGAST study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palli, D.; Masala, G.; Giudice, G. Del; Plebani, M.; Basso, D.; Berti, D.; Numans, M.E.; Ceroti, M.; Peeters, P.H.; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B.; Buchner, F.L.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Krogh, V.; Saieva, C.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Nyren, O.; Siman, H.; Berglund, G.; Hallmans, G.; Sanchez, M.J.; Larrañaga, N.; Barricarte, A.; Navarro, C; Quiros, J.R.; Key, T.; Allen, N.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K.T.; Boeing, H.; Weikert, C.; Linseisen, J.; Nagel, G.; Overvad, K.; Thomsen, R.W.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Trichoupoulou, A.; Trichopoulos, D.; Arvaniti, A.; Pera, G.; Kaaks, R.; Jenab, M.; Ferrari, P.; Nesi, G.; Carneiro, F.; Riboli, E.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), atrophic gastritis, dietary and life-style factors have been associated with gastric cancer (GC). These factors have been evaluated in a large case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition carried out in 9 countries,

  19. Comparison of the Quantitative Values of C-14 and C-13 UBT to Reflect the Presence and Degree of Ongoing Helicobacter pylori Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee

    2008-01-01

    A urea breath test (UBT) using C-14 or C-13 has been developed for identifying Helicobacter (H) pylori infection on the basis of urease production with release of labeled CO 2 . We investigated if the C-14 and C-13 UBT have the difference to reflect the presence and degree of H. pylori infection detected by gastroduodenoscopic biopsies (GBx) in the same patients. Thirty eight patients (M:F=28:10, age 53.4±13.0 yrs) with upper gastrointestinal symptoms such as indigestion, gastric fullness or pain consecutively underwent C-14 UBT, GBx and C-13 UBT within one week before medications. For the C-14 UBT, a single breath sample was collected at 10 minutes after ingestion of C-14 urea (37 KBq) capsule and counting was done in a liquid scintillation counter for 1 minute, and the results were classified as positive (≥200 dpm), intermediate (50∼199 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm). For the C-13 UBT, the results were classified as positive (≥2.5) or negative (<2.5). The results of GBx with Giemsa stain were graded 0 (normal) to 4 (diffuse) according to the distribution of H. pylori by the Wyatt method. We compared C-14 UBT and C-13 UBT results with GBx grade as a gold standard. The prevalence of H. pylori infection by GBx with Giemsa stain was 25/38 (65.8%). In the assessment of the presence of H. pylori infection, the C-14 UBT global performance yielded sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of 92.0%, 92.3%, 95.8%, 91.7% and 92.1%, respectively. However, the C-13 UBT had sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of 96.0%, 84.6%, 92.3%, 91.7% and 92.1%, respectively. The more significant correlation in C-14 than C-13 UBT (r=0.948 vs r=0.819, p<0.001) was found between the value of UBT and the grade of distribution of H. pylori infection. We conclude that the diagnostic performance between C-14 and C-13 UBT to detect H. pylori infection is not significantly different, but the value of C-14 UBT more

  20. Comparison of the Quantitative Values of C-14 and C-13 UBT to Reflect the Presence and Degree of Ongoing Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seok Tae; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    A urea breath test (UBT) using C-14 or C-13 has been developed for identifying Helicobacter (H) pylori infection on the basis of urease production with release of labeled CO{sub 2}. We investigated if the C-14 and C-13 UBT have the difference to reflect the presence and degree of H. pylori infection detected by gastroduodenoscopic biopsies (GBx) in the same patients. Thirty eight patients (M:F=28:10, age 53.4{+-}13.0 yrs) with upper gastrointestinal symptoms such as indigestion, gastric fullness or pain consecutively underwent C-14 UBT, GBx and C-13 UBT within one week before medications. For the C-14 UBT, a single breath sample was collected at 10 minutes after ingestion of C-14 urea (37 KBq) capsule and counting was done in a liquid scintillation counter for 1 minute, and the results were classified as positive ({>=}200 dpm), intermediate (50{approx}199 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm). For the C-13 UBT, the results were classified as positive ({>=}2.5) or negative (<2.5). The results of GBx with Giemsa stain were graded 0 (normal) to 4 (diffuse) according to the distribution of H. pylori by the Wyatt method. We compared C-14 UBT and C-13 UBT results with GBx grade as a gold standard. The prevalence of H. pylori infection by GBx with Giemsa stain was 25/38 (65.8%). In the assessment of the presence of H. pylori infection, the C-14 UBT global performance yielded sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of 92.0%, 92.3%, 95.8%, 91.7% and 92.1%, respectively. However, the C-13 UBT had sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of 96.0%, 84.6%, 92.3%, 91.7% and 92.1%, respectively. The more significant correlation in C-14 than C-13 UBT (r=0.948 vs r=0.819, p<0.001) was found between the value of UBT and the grade of distribution of H. pylori infection. We conclude that the diagnostic performance between C-14 and C-13 UBT to detect H. pylori infection is not significantly different, but the value of C-14 UBT

  1. Positive Result by Serology Indicates Active Helicobacter pylori Infection in Patients with Atrophic Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkola, Arto; Rautelin, Hilpi; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Sipponen, Pentti; Färkkilä, Martti; Haapiainen, Reijo; Kosunen, Timo U.

    1998-01-01

    Patients with atrophic corpus gastritis and elevated Helicobacter pylori antibody titers but 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) and histology results negative for H. pylori were randomized into eradication therapy or follow-up only. Antibody levels decreased significantly in six out of seven patients in the eradication group, while in the follow-up group, the titers declined in only one out of eight patients. In patients with atrophic corpus gastritis, positive serology results may indicate an on...

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection amongst Arab Israeli women with hyperemesis gravidarum—a prospective, controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Doron Boltin; Tsachi Tsadok Perets; Sami Abu Elheiga; Asher Sharony; Yaron Niv; Hussein Shamaly; Ram Dickman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori has been associated with hyperemesis gravidarum in some geographical regions. The prevalence of H. pylori in Arab Israeli women in the Upper Galilee and its association with hyperemesis gravidarum has not been studied previously. We aimed to examine if hyperemesis gravidarum is associated with H. pylori in this population. Methods: Subjects with hyperemesis gravidarum carrying a singleton fetus were recruited prospectively. Women with an uncomplicated pregnan...

  3. Induction of premalignant host responses by cathepsin x/z-deficiency in Helicobacter pylori-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Krueger

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori are responsible for the induction of chronic gastric inflammation progressing to atrophy, metaplasia, and gastric cancer. The overexpression of Cathepsin X/Z (Ctsz in H. pylori-infected mucosa and gastric cancer is mediated predominantly by an augmented migration of ctsz(-/-positive macrophages and the up-regulation of Ctsz in tumor epithelium. To explore the Ctsz-function in the context of chronic inflammation and the development of preneoplastic lesions, we used Ctsz-deficient mice in a H. pylori gastritis model. Ctsz (-/- and wild-type (wt mice were infected with H. pylori strain SS1. The mice were sacrificed at 24, 36, and 50 weeks post infection (wpi. The stomach was removed, and gastric strips were snap-frozen or embedded and stained with H&E. Tissue sections were scored for epithelial lesions and inflammation. Ki-67 and F4/80 immunostaining were used to measure epithelial cell proliferation and macrophage infiltration, respectively. The upregulation of compensating cathepsins and cytokines were confirmed by Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. SS1-infected wt and ctsz (-/- mice showed strong inflammation, foveolar hyperplasia, atrophy, and cystically-dilated glands. However, at 50 wpi, ctsz (-/- mice developed significantly more severe spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM, showed enhanced epithelial proliferation, and higher levels of infiltrating macrophages. Induction of cytokines was higher and significantly prolonged in ctsz (-/- mice compared to wt. Ctsz deficiency supports H. pylori-dependent development of chronic gastritis up to metaplasia, indicating a protective, but not proteolytic, function of Ctsz in inflammatory gastric disease.

  4. Management of Helicobacter pylori infection--a Working Party Report of the Malaysian Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, K L; Mahendra Raj, S; Parasakthi, N; Kew, S T; Kandasami, P; Mazlam, Z

    1998-09-01

    The Working Party Report on the Management of Helicobacter pylori serves as a clinical practice guideline for Malaysian doctors. H. pylori is not uncommon in the Malaysian population. Marked racial differences and the consistently low prevalence rates amongst Malays are noted. The working party recommends that if endoscopy is to be performed, a rapid urease test should be used for diagnosis. Where suspicion of the infection is strong and the urease test is negative, histology should be performed on gastric biopsies. Culture should be used to monitor resistance patterns to antibiotics and regional laboratories should assume this responsibility. The urea breath tests are highly accurate tests for diagnosis of H. pylori but is as yet not widely available in Malaysia. The working party strongly recommends that all peptic ulcer patients infected with H. pylori whether active, in remission and complicated ulcers should be treated for the infection. Patients with low-grade gastric mucosal lymphoid tissue lymphoma should also be treated for H. pylori infection. It is considered advisable that patients on long term nonsteroidal antinflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment with a history of peptic ulcers or dyspepsia and patients following resection of early gastric cancer or those with a family history of gastric cancer should also be tested and treated for H. pylori. The working party recommends, as first line treatment a 7-day combination therapy of a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin and metronidazole or amoxicillin. High metronidazole resistance rates locally may adversely affect regimens containing the antibiotic. It should also be noted that regimens that yield lower eradication rates may result in higher long term expenditure.

  5. A study on the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on p53 expression in gastric cancer and gastritis tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Barik A; Gucin, Zuhal; Bayyurt, Nizamettin

    2013-09-16

    Helicobacter pylori cause damage to gastric epithelial cells and alterations in the p53 gene that lead to cancer development. This study aimed to determine the correlation of p53 expression with H. pylori using immunohistochemistry, RFLP-PCR, and histopathology. Gastric biopsy samples from gastric cancer (GC) (n = 54) and gastritis (n = 31) patients were examined for histopathological changes and expression of p53 protein by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical analysis of p53 protein expression in H. pylori-positive GC sections showed an average of 44.3% positive cells in tumors and 6.9% in normal tissues, as compared to 16.4% and 4.4% in H. pylori-negative sections. P53 expression showed significant association with H. pylori (P = 0.005), invasion depth (P = 0.029) and inflammation reaction (P = 0.008). In gastritis sections, no difference in the average p53 staining in H. pylori-positive or -negative sections was seen. PCR-RFLP results also showed no difference in genotype frequencies of p53 in H. pylori-positive or -negative gastritis sections. Histopathology study of H. pylori-positive GC sections showed that 97.2% were the intestinal type and 2.8% the diffuse type, while in H. pylori-negative sections 35.2% were the intestinal type and 64.8% the diffuse type. Biopsy sections from H. pylori-positive gastritis patients revealed more severe inflammation than those of H. pylori-negative patients. Our results show that H. pylori infection affects p53 expression in GC. The average p53 expression was significantly higher in tumor than in normal tissues. In gastritis sections p53 expression was significantly associated with H. pylori.

  6. Prevalence of cagA and vacA among Helicobacter pylori-infected patients in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Kiani, Faezeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Soroush, Setareh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Delpisheh, Ali; Emaneini, Mohammad; Bogdanović, Lidija; Varzi, Ali Mohammad; Zarrilli, Raffaele; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2015-07-30

    The varieties of infections caused by Helicobacter pylori may be due to differences in bacterial genotypes and virulence factors as well as environmental and host-related factors. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients in Iran and analyze their relevance to the disease status between two clinical groups via a meta-analysis method. Different databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus, SID, Magiran, Science Direct, and Medlib were investigated, and 23 relevant articles from the period between 2001 and 2012 were finally analyzed. The relevant data obtained from these papers were analyzed by a random-effects model. Data were analyzed using R software and STATA. The prevalence of cagA and vacA genes among H. pylori-infected patients was 70% (95% CI, 64-75) and 41% (95% CI, 24.3-57.7), respectively. The prevalence of duodenal ulcers, peptic ulcers, and gastritis among cagA+ individuals was 53% (95% CI, 20-86), 65% (95% CI, 34-97), and 71% (95% CI, 59-84), respectively. Odds ratio (OR) between cagA-positive compared with cagA-negative patients showed a 1.89 (95% CI, 1.38-2.57) risk of ulcers. In conclusion, the frequency of cagA gene among H. pylori strains is elevated in Iran and it seems to be more frequently associated with gastritis. Therefore, any information about cagA and vacA prevalence among different H. pylori-infected clinical groups in the country can help public health authorities to plan preventive policies to reduce the prevalence of diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  7. Comparison of three stool antigen assays with the 13C- urea breath test for the primary diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and monitoring treatment outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooton, Carmel

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The urea breath test (UBT) is the gold-standard non-invasive test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, however, the lack of availability of the UBT due to the high cost of the test, and in particular the need for expensive analytical instrumentation, limits the usefulness of this method. Stool antigen assays may offer an alternative non-invasive method for the diagnosis of infection. OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of three stool antigen assays (HpSA, IDEIA HpStAR, and ImmunoCard STAT) against the UBT for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for monitoring treatment outcome. METHODS: A total of 102 patients attending two gastroenterology day-case clinics for the investigation of dyspepsia were included. Each patient provided breath and stool samples for analysis. Patients who tested positive for H. pylori by the validated UBT were prescribed triple therapy and invited to return for repeat breath and stool sample analysis 6 weeks post-treatment. RESULTS: Of the 102 patients tested, 48 were diagnosed with H. pylori infection by the UBT. The HpSA assay interpreted 38 of these as positive (79% sensitive). Of the 54 UBT-negative patients the HpSA assay interpreted all 54 as negative (100% specific). The IDEIA HpStAR assay correctly identified 44 patients as positive (92% sensitive) and 50 as negative (92.5% specific). The ImmunoCard STAT assay interpreted 38 patients as positive (79% sensitive) and 52 as negative (96.3% specific). CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that the IDEIA HpStAR stool antigen kit is the most accurate assay of the three assays evaluated, and possibly represents a viable alternative to the UBT for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for monitoring treatment outcome.

  8. Lanthanum Deposition in the Stomach in the Absence of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Urata, Haruo; Tanaka, Takehiro; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2018-03-15

    In this case report, we describe two patients who showed a diffusely whitish mucosa in the posterior wall and the lesser curvature of the gastric body. The patients were serologically- and histopathologically-negative for Helicobacter pylori. Random biopsy specimens from the stomach revealed no regenerative changes, intestinal metaplasia, and/or foveolar hyperplasia in either of the patients. Although lanthanum deposition in the gastric mucosa has been reported to occur in close association with H. pylori-associated gastritis, our patients tested negative for H. pylori. These cases suggest that lanthanum deposition presents as whitish lesions in the gastric body in H. pylori-negative patients.

  9. The clinical value of 14C-urea breath test for diagnosis of helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuwen; Zhang Yongxian; Zhang Jinming; Ding Yong; Shao Mingzhe; Liu Zilai; Tian Jiahe

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a rapid microdose 14 C-urea breath test ( 14 C-UBT) with a simplified protocol for detecting the infection of helicobacter pylori (HP). 244 fasting patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms undergo the 14 C-UBT and 124 cases appear positive. 89 patients of those undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and confirmed as HP infection. The sensitivity and specificity of the 14 C-UBT is 100% when compared with the endoscopy. The test has good diagnostic accuracy with minimal radiation exposure and low cost. Thus, the test is reliable, safe, convenient and cost-effective to clinical use

  10. The Efficacy of Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Primary Prevention of NSAID-induced Gastropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Tkach

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of clarifying the efficacy of eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection in primary prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy, we have examined 39 Hp-positive patients, in whom we planned to administer non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs for various arthritis. In group I, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prescribed after anti-helicobacter therapy, in group II eradication was not carried out, and the patients immediately received diclofenac. In both groups the incidence of peptic ulcers has been compared in 1 month after receiving diclofenac. In group I, peptic ulcers occurred in 2 patients (10.5 %, in group II — in 5 patients (26.3 %, ie in the group of eradication therapy they occurred significantly less frequently (χ2 = 0.5221. It is concluded that eradication of Hp-infection can be considered as an effective strategy for primary prevention of NSAID-induced gastropathy.

  11. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome in Patients with Bleeding Peptic Ulcers and Helicobacter pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT), with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed 13C-urea breath test (UBT) or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity. PMID:25101293

  12. Oxidative Stress Resulting From Helicobacter pylori Infection Contributes to Gastric CarcinogenesisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay D. Butcher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium that infects the stomach and can lead to, among other disorders, the development of gastric cancer. The inability of the host to clear the infection results in a chronic inflammatory state with continued oxidative stress within the tissue. Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species produced by the immune and epithelial cells damage the host cells and can result in DNA damage. H pylori has evolved to evoke this damaging response while blunting the host’s efforts to kill the bacteria. This long-lasting state with inflammation and oxidative stress can result in gastric carcinogenesis. Continued efforts to better understand the bacterium and the host response will serve to prevent or provide improved early diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer. Keywords: AP Endonuclease, DNA Damage, H pylori, Gastric Cancer, Oxidative Stress

  13. Helicobacter pylori Infection Causes Characteristic DNA Damage Patterns in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Koeppel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major risk factor for gastric cancer. Since the bacterium exerts multiple genotoxic effects, we examined the circumstances of DNA damage accumulation and identified regions within the host genome with high susceptibility to H. pylori-induced damage. Infection impaired several DNA repair factors, the extent of which depends on a functional cagPAI. This leads to accumulation of a unique DNA damage pattern, preferentially in transcribed regions and proximal to telomeres, in both gastric cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells. The observed pattern correlates with focal amplifications in adenocarcinomas of the stomach and partly overlaps with known cancer genes. We thus demonstrate an impact of a bacterial infection directed toward specific host genomic regions and describe underlying characteristics that make such regions more likely to acquire heritable changes during infection, which could contribute to cellular transformation.

  14. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome in Patients with Bleeding Peptic Ulcers and Helicobacter pylori Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Chun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal (UGI bleeding is the most frequently encountered complication of peptic ulcer disease. Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID administration are two independent risk factors for UGI bleeding. Therefore, testing for and diagnosing Hp infection are essential for every patient with UGI hemorrhage. The presence of the infection is usually underestimated in cases of bleeding peptic ulcers. A rapid urease test (RUT, with or without histology, is usually the first test performed during endoscopy. If the initial diagnostic test is negative, a delayed 13C-urea breath test (UBT or serology should be performed. Once an infection is diagnosed, antibiotic treatment is advocated. Sufficient evidence supports the concept that Hp infection eradication can heal the ulcer and reduce the likelihood of rebleeding. With increased awareness of the effects of Hp infection, the etiologies of bleeding peptic ulcers have shifted to NSAID use, old age, and disease comorbidity.

  15. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection Angiogénesis gástrica e infección por Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and low dietary iron alter behavior, induce iron deficiency anemia, and modulate hippocampal gene expression in female C57BL/6 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Burns

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori, a bacterial pathogen, is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is a strong risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Environmental conditions, such as poor dietary iron resulting in iron deficiency anemia (IDA, enhance H.pylori virulence and increases risk for gastric cancer. IDA affects billions of people worldwide, and there is considerable overlap between regions of high IDA and high H.pylori prevalence. The primary aims of our study were to evaluate the effect of H.pylori infection on behavior, iron metabolism, red blood cell indices, and behavioral outcomes following comorbid H. pylori infection and dietary iron deficiency in a mouse model. C57BL/6 female mice (n = 40 were used; half were placed on a moderately iron deficient (ID diet immediately post-weaning, and the other half were maintained on an iron replete (IR diet. Half were dosed with H.pylori SS1 at 5 weeks of age, and the remaining mice were sham-dosed. There were 4 study groups: a control group (-Hp, IR diet as well as 3 experimental groups (-Hp, ID diet; +Hp, IR diet; +Hp,ID diet. All mice were tested in an open field apparatus at 8 weeks postinfection. Independent of dietary iron status, H.pylori -infected mice performed fewer exploratory behaviors in the open field chamber than uninfected mice (p<0.001. Hippocampal gene expression of myelination markers and dopamine receptor 1 was significantly downregulated in mice on an ID diet (both p<0.05, independent of infection status. At 12 months postinfection, hematocrit (Hct and hemoglobin (Hgb concentration were significantly lower in +Hp, ID diet mice compared to all other study groups. H.pylori infection caused IDA in mice maintained on a marginal iron diet. The mouse model developed in this study is a useful model to study the neurologic, behavioral, and hematologic impact of the common human co-morbidity of H. pylori infection and IDA.

  17. Is there an oxidative stress in children with Helicobacter Pylori Infection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, D.; Kose, K.; Patiroglu, Tahir E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the status of oxidative stress in children with Helicobacter Pylori (HP) infection and their relationship with inflammatory parameters. At the Pediatric Gastroenterology Department of Erciyes University, Kayseri, Turkey, between January 2004 to August 2005, 39 children undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were investigated for malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in gastric tissue and erythrocytes and presence of HP infection by means of histology. There is an increase of the oxidative stress parameter, MDA, in gastric tissue, but not in erythrocytes in HP (+) and HP (-) patients. The antioxidant enzyme, SOD, levels both in gastric tissue and erythrocyte were not different between HP (+) and HP (-) patients. In 8 HP infected children after treatment with an anti-HP regimen, no change was observed except for tissue SOD activity which is increased after therapy. No correlation was observed between histological findings and tissue and erythrocyte MDA levels and SOD activities. Oxiadtive stress has some role in tissue damage in HP infection in children. (author)

  18. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric carcinogenesis: Current knowledge and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokic-Milutinovic, Aleksandra; Alempijevic, Tamara; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The outcome of the infection depends on environmental factors and bacterial and host characteristics. Gastric carcinogenesis is a multistep process that is reversible in the early phase of mucosal damage, but the exact point of no return has not been identified. Therefore, two main therapeutic strategies could reduce gastric cancer incidence: (1) eradication of the already present infection; and (2) immunization (prior to or during the course of the infection). The success of a gastric cancer prevention strategy depends on timing because the prevention strategy must be introduced before the point of no return in gastric carcinogenesis. Although the exact point of no return has not been identified, infection should be eradicated before severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa develops. Eradication therapy rates remain suboptimal due to increasing H. pylori resistance to antibiotics and patient noncompliance. Vaccination against H. pylori would reduce the cost of eradication therapies and lower gastric cancer incidence. A vaccine against H. pylori is still a research challenge. An effective vaccine should have an adequate route of delivery, appropriate bacterial antigens and effective and safe adjuvants. Future research should focus on the development of rescue eradication therapy protocols until an efficacious vaccine against the bacterium becomes available. PMID:26556993

  19. Evidence of helicobacter pylori infection in dental plaque and gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiq, M.; Haseeb-ur-Rehman; Mahmood, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque of individuals suffering from H. pylori associated gastric disease. Patients and Methods: Patients presenting with symptoms/signs of chronic gastritis were included in the study. Specimens of dental plaque and gastric biopsy were collected from all the patients. The dental plaque specimen was processed for helicourease test and the gastric biopsy specimens were processed both for the helicourease test and histopathology. Results: Out of all patients studied (n=52), 32 (61.53%) were positive for helicourease test with gastric biopsy while 48 (92.30%) were positive with dental plaque. The histopathology of gastric biopsy showed H. pylori associated chronic active gastritis in 42 (80.76%) patients. Eight (15.38%) patients showed chronic active gastritis which was not associated with H. pylori while in 2 (3.84%) patients the gastric biopsy specimen was unremarkable. Conclusion: Majority of the patients have possible H. pylori colonization in dental plaque while about two-thirds have H. pylori associated chronic active gastritis. Oral cavity may be the first place for colonization and then the infection involves the gastric mucosa. (author)

  20. The relationship between recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and periodontal disease and Helicobacter Pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülseren, D; Karaduman, A; Kutsal, D; Nohutcu, R M

    2016-11-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disease with unknown etiology. This cross-sectional study aimed to test the hypothesis that Helicobacter pylori and periodontal disease might play an etiological role in RAS. Dental plaque samples obtained from 38 patients with RAS and 43 healthy individuals via periodontal examinations were examined for H. pylori colonization. H. pylori was identified using the rapid urease test (RUT). The periodontal status of the patients and controls was based on the following periodontal parameters: periodontal pocket depth (PPD), the plaque index (PI), the gingival index (GI), and clinical attachment loss (CAL). RUT results were positive in 34 (89.5 %) of the 38 patients and 24 (55.8 %) of the 43 controls (P = 0.002). There were not any significant differences in mean PPD, PI, GI, or CAL between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). Mean PPD, PI, GI, and CAL were higher in the RUT-positive RAS patients than in the RUT-negative patients (P > 0.05, for all). The present findings show that H. pylori might have played an etiological role in RAS and might have caused periodontal disease, but RAS was not associated with any of the periodontal parameters examined in this study. The present study indicates that H. pylori plays a role in the development of RAS, but periodontal diseases have no effect on it. Eradicating H. pylori might be useful to prevent RAS.

  1. Celiac disease and Helicobacter pylori infection in children: Is there any Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Manish; Puri, Amarender Singh; Sachdeva, Sanjeev; Singh, Jatinderpal; Kumar, Ajay; Saran, Ravindra K

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection can influence the inflammatory and immune responses in the gut and may therefore play a role in the development of gluten-related enteropathy in genetically susceptible individuals. Our objective was to assess the relationship between celiac disease and HP infection in children. Children (1-18 years) diagnosed as celiac disease (CD) (n = 324) with submission of gastric and duodenal biopsies and duodenal histology having Marsh grade III features were eligible for the study. Non-celiac patients referred for endoscopy were selected as controls. We studied proportion of HP prevalence in children with confirmed CD as compared with HP prevalence in reference group comprising non-celiac children referred for endoscopy. We also evaluated predictors of HP infection in children with celiac disease. Of the 324 participants with CD, gastric HP was seen in 37 (11.4%) patients. The prevalence of HP in patients without CD (50%, P Celiac disease and gastric HP infection have inverse relationship that raises the question whether development of HP infection confers protection against CD. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Delayed gastric emptying and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao Chiahung; Hsu Yuehhan; Wang Shyhjen

    1995-01-01

    Forty patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) were enrolled in this study. Twelve of the 40 patients had upper gastrointestinal symptoms or signs (GI Sx). Twenty of the 40 patients had been receiving regular haemodialysis (HD) for at least 1 year prior to the study. Radionuclide-labelled solid metals were used to calculate gastric emptying times (GETs). The carbon-14 urea breath test ( 14 C4-UBT) was used to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. Among the 40 patients, 35 (88%) had an abnormal HP infection. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of abnormal GET among patients with HP infection and patients without HP infection. There were also no significant differences in the incidence of HP infection among patients with abnormal and normal GETs. In addition, the incidences of abnormal GET in patients with and without upper GI Sx were 83% and 89% respectively. The incidences of HP infection in patients with and without upper GI Sx were 58% and 54%, respectively. The incidences of abnormal GET in HD and non-HD patients were 95% and 80%, respectively. The incidences of HP infection in HD and non-HD patients were 45% and 65%, respectively. The differences in the incidences of abnormal GET and HP infection among HD and non-HD patients, as well as among patients with and without upper GI Sx, were not statistically significant. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of Second-Line Quadruple Therapies with or without Bismuth for Helicobacter pylori Infection

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    Guang-Hong Jheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bismuth-based quadruple regimen has been applied in Helicobacter pylori rescue therapy worldwide. The non-bismuth-based quadruple therapy or “concomitant therapy” is an alternative option in first-line eradication but has not been used in second-line therapy. Discovering a valid regimen for rescue therapy in bismuth-unavailable countries is important. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare the efficacies of the standard quadruple therapy and a modified concomitant regimen. One hundred and twenty-four patients were randomly assigned into two groups: RBTM (rabeprozole 20 mg bid., bismuth subcitrate 120 mg qid, tetracycline 500 mg qid, and metronidazole 250 mg qid and RATM (rabeprozole 20 mg bid., amoxicillin 1 g bid., tetracycline 500 mg qid, and metronidazole 250 mg qid for 10 days. The eradication rate of the RBTM and RATM regimen was 92.1% and 90.2%, respectively, in intention-to-treat analysis. Patients in both groups had good compliance (~96%. The overall incidence of adverse events was higher in the RATM group (42.6% versus 22.2%, P=0.02, but only seven patients (11.5% experienced grades 2-3 events. In conclusion, both regimens had good efficacy, compliance, and acceptable side effects. The 10-day RATM treatment could be an alternative rescue therapy in bismuth-unavailable countries.

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection: An overview of bacterial virulence factors and pathogenesis

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    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and disease outcomes are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial virulence factors, host, and environmental factors. After H. pylori enters the host stomach, four steps are critical for bacteria to establish successful colonization, persistent infection, and disease pathogenesis: (1 Survival in the acidic stomach; (2 movement toward epithelium cells by flagella-mediated motility; (3 attachment to host cells by adhesins/receptors interaction; (4 causing tissue damage by toxin release. Over the past 20 years, the understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis has been improved by studies focusing on the host and bacterial factors through epidemiology researches and molecular mechanism investigations. These include studies identifying the roles of novel virulence factors and their association with different disease outcomes, especially the bacterial adhesins, cag pathogenicity island, and vacuolating cytotoxin. Recently, the development of large-scale screening methods, including proteomic, and transcriptomic tools, has been used to determine the complex gene regulatory networks in H. pylori. In addition, a more available complete genomic database of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases worldwide is helpful to characterize this bacterium. This review highlights the key findings of H. pylori virulence factors reported over the past 20 years.

  5. Higher serum levels of rheumatoid factor and anti-nuclear antibodies in helicobacter pylori-infected peptic ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Nemati, Maryam; Rezayati, Mohammad Taghi; Nabizadeh, Mansooreh; Ebrahimi, Medhi

    2013-07-01

    H. pylori infection has been associated with some autoimmune disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum concentrations of rheumatoid factor and anti-nuclear antibodies in H. pylori-infected peptic ulcer patients, H. pylori-infected asymptomatic carriers and a healthy control group. A Total of 100 H. pylori-infected peptic ulcer patients, 65 asymptomatic carriers and 30 healthy H. pylori-negative subjects (as a control group) were enrolled into study. Serum samples of participants tested for the levels of rheumatoid factor and anti-nuclear antibodies by use of ELISA. The mean serum levels of rheumatoid factor and anti-nuclear antibodies in peptic ulcer group was significantly higher in comparison to the control group (ppeptic ulcer patients and asymptomatic carriers groups regarding the mean serum levels of rheumatoid factor and anti-nuclear antibodies. The mean serum levels of rheumatoid factor in men with peptic ulcer was significantly higher compared to the group of healthy men (ppeptic ulcer patients or asymptomatic carriers groups, the mean serum levels of rheumatoid factor was higher than that in healthy women, but the differences were not statistically significant. Also, no significant differences were observed between men and women with peptic ulcer, asymptomatic carriers control groups based on the serum levels of anti-nuclear antibodies. The results showed higher serum levels of rheumatoid factor and anti-nuclear antibodies in H. pylori-infected patients with peptic ulcer disease which represent the H. pylori-related immune disturbance in these patients. Additional follow-up studies are necessary to clarify the clinical significance of these autoantibodies in patients with H. pylori infection.

  6. The dynamics of heat shock system activation in Monomac-6 cells upon Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzchalski, P; Jastrzebska, M; Link-Lenczowski, P; Leja-Szpak, A; Bonior, J; Jaworek, J; Okon, K; Wojcik, P

    2014-12-01

    Immune system cells, particularly phagocytes, are exposed to direct contact with pathogens. Because of its nature - elimination of pathogenes - their cytoprotective systems supposed to be quick and forceful. Physiological consequence of phagocytosis for the phagocyte is the apoptotic death to prevent the eventual survival of bacteria as intracellular parasites. However, in some cases, defense systems used by the bacteria force the immune cells to prolong the contact with the pathogen for its effective elimination. Experiments were performed on Monomac-6 cells exposed to live CagA, VacA expressing Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) over different period of time. Total cellular RNA, cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins were isolated for polymerase chain reaction, Western-blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, respectively. We found that Monomac-6 cells infection with H. pylori resulted in the translocation of the entire cellular content of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) into the cytoplasm, where its presence could protect cell against toxic products of engulfed bacteria and premature apoptosis. At the same time the nuclear translocation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) and activation of HSP70 gene transcription was noticed. Action of HSP70 might to postpone monocyte apoptosis through protecting cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins from damaging effect of bacterial products, what could be the defending mechanism against the toxic stress caused by engulfed bacteria and provide the immune cell with the sufficient amount of time required for neutralization of the bacteria from phagosomes, even at the expense of temporary lack of the protection of nuclear proteins.

  7. Antibiotic susceptibility, heteroresistance, and updated treatment strategies in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascellino, Maria Teresa; Porowska, Barbara; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Oliva, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the problem of antibiotic resistance, heteroresistance, the utility of cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests in Helicobacter pylori ( Hp ) eradication, as well as the updated treatment strategies for this infection. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world, especially for metronidazole and clarithromycin, because of their heavy use in some geographical areas. Heteroresistance (simultaneous presence of both susceptible and resistant strains in different sites of a single stomach) is another important issue, as an isolate could be mistakenly considered susceptible if a single biopsy is used for antimicrobial tests. We also examined literature data regarding eradication success rates of culture-guided and empiric therapies. The empiric therapy and the one based on susceptibility testing, in Hp eradication, may depend on several factors such as concomitant diseases, the number of previous antibiotic treatments, differences in bacterial virulence in individuals with positive or negative cultures, together with local antibiotic resistance patterns in real-world settings. Updated treatment strategies in Hp infection presented in the guidelines of the Toronto Consensus Group (2016) are reported. These suggest to prolong eradication therapy up to 14 days, replacing the old triple therapy with a quadruple therapy based on proton pump inhibitor (PPI), bismuth, metronidazole, and tetracycline for most of the patients, or as an alternative quadruple therapy without bismuth, based on the use of PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and clarithromycin. The new drug vonoprazan, a first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker recently approved in Japan, is also considered to be a promising solution for Hp eradication, even for clarithromycin-resistant strains. Furthermore, there is growing interest in finding new therapeutic strategies, such as the development of vaccines or the use of natural resources, including

  8. Nodular gastritis: an endoscopic indicator of Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazigh Mrad, Sonia; Abidi, Kamel; Brini, Ines; Boukthir, Samir; Sammoud, Azza

    2012-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is a common and universally distributed bacterial infection. It is predominantly acquired in childhood. To assess the relationship between endoscopic nodular gastritis and Hp infection. A retrospective study was conducted in children who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for chronic abdominal pain. All children who had five gastric biopsies for histologic analysis, urease test and Hp culture were included in the study. The Sensitivity and sensibility of nodular gastritis were determined and different parameters were studied according the presence or not of nodular gastritis(age, gender, Hp status, gastritis score and lymphoid follicles). 49 children, mean age 6.9 ± 3 years (range 1-12 years) were eligible for the analysis. Hp Infection was diagnosed in 35 out of the 49 children (71.5 %). Nodular gastritis was recorded in 16 out of 49 children and in 14 infected children and 2 out of 14 non infected children (p=0.07), 40% sensitivity, 85.7% specificity, 87.5% positive predictive value, and 36,4% negative predictive value. The parameters associated significantly to the presence of nodular gastritis were older age: (p=0.04), Hp infection: (p=0.01), chronic gastritis: (p=0.05), active gastritis: (p=0.02), follicular gastritis: (p=0.005), higher gastritis score: (p=0.005). Completely normal gastric mucosal histology was never found in infected children with antral nodularity. Among all infected children, the gastritis score was significantly higher when there was a nodular gastritis and follicular gastritis was significantly associated to nodular gastritis. The endoscopic pattern of antral nodularity identifies children with Hp infection, and active chronic follicular gastritis.

  9. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Saccharomyces boulardii supplementation and eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajewska, H; Horvath, A; Kołodziej, M

    2015-06-01

    Unsatisfactory Helicobacter pylori eradication rates and therapy-associated side effects remain a problem. To update our 2010 meta-analysis on the effects of Saccharomyces boulardii as supplementation to a standard eradication regimen on H. pylori eradication rates and therapy-associated side effects. The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched from July 2010 (end date of last search) to February 2015, with no language restrictions, for randomised controlled trials (RCTs); additional references were obtained from reviewed articles. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines. Eleven RCTs (2200 participants, among them 330 children) met the inclusion criteria. Of the 853 patients in the S. boulardii group, 679 (80%, 95% CI 77-82) experienced eradication compared with 608 of the 855 patients (71%, 95% CI 68-74) in the control group [relative risk (RR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.17; moderate quality evidence]. S. boulardii compared with control reduced the risk of overall H. pylori therapy-related adverse effects (RR 0.44, 95% CI 0.31-0.64; moderate quality evidence), particularly of diarrhoea (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.42-0.62; high quality evidence) and nausea [RR 0.6, 95% CI 0.44-0.83 (moderate quality of evidence)]. In the populations studied, the effectiveness of standard triple therapy was unsatisfactory. The addition of S. boulardii significantly increased the eradication rate, but it was still below the desired level of success. Saccharomyces boulardii significantly decreased some therapy-related side effects. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Insights into the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in preeclampsia: from the bench to the bedside.

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    Chiara eTersigni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is defined as a hypertensive and coagulative disorder affecting about 2–8% of all pregnancies and it is one of the main causes of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite the great amount of studies run in this field, little is known about the precise pathogenic mechanisms behind PE. While endothelial and trophoblast dysfunctions, exaggerated inflammatory response and hypercoagulative state have been shown to play a key role in the occurrence of PE, the primary trigger is still unknown. One of the hypotheses is that some infectious agents may represent a trigger for PE onset. Consistently, higher seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori (HP infection, a Gram-negative bacterium with a specific tropism for human gastric mucosa, has been shown in women with PE. Even tighter association has been found between PE and infection with CagA (Cytotoxin-associated gene-A -positive strains of HP. Recent in vitro studies have shown that anti-CagA antibodies cross-react with human trophoblast cells and determine a functional impairment in terms of cell invasiveness, thus, providing the first pathogenic model of HP infection-mediated placental damage. Since in the early process of implantation and placental development, trophoblast invasion of maternal decidua is a crucial step, the proposed autoimmune mechanism induced by HP infection, negatively interfering with the fetal side of the early developing placenta, may represent a mechanism explaining the higher seropositivity for HP infection among PE women. However, the contribution of HP infection to the pathogenesis of PE or to the worsening of its clinical presentation needs to be further investigated as well as the possible impact of pre-pregnacy screening and eradication of HP infection on the incidence of the syndrome.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection and metabolic parameters: Is there an association in elderly population?

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    Narges Sotuneh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between Helicobacter pylori (HP, as one of the most prevalent infections, and serum glucose level was inconsistent with previous studies. Moreover, there are contradictory reports about the relationship between HP infection and lipid profile. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between HP infection with glycemic and lipid profiles in elderly people. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1,300 subjects over 60 years in Amirkola Health and Ageing Project. After using a standard questionnaire, the venous sampling was done to determine FBS, triglyceride (TG, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL and IgG anti-HP after a 12-h overnight fast. The information about the individuals was analyzed using SPSS-17. The P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The prevalence of HP infection in diabetic and nondiabetic subjects was 77.5% and 75.7%, respectively, which had no statistically significant difference. Also, there was no significant difference between the serum lipid level including TG, LDL and HDL cholesterol with levels of anti-HP antibodies. The rate of HP infection in patients with hypertension was 75% and 78.3% in healthy patients, in which the difference was not statistically significant. In terms of body mass index (BMI, the prevalence of infection in the group with normal BMI was 77.3% and for the overweight and obese elderly population, it was 74.7%, and 77.5%, respectively (P = 0.445. Conclusions: The findings revealed that in a large population of elderly in the northern part of Iran, HP infection is not associated with BMI, serum glucose and lipid profile as well as blood pressure.

  12. Antibiotic susceptibility, heteroresistance, and updated treatment strategies in Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Mascellino MT

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Maria Teresa Mascellino,1 Barbara Porowska,2 Massimiliano De Angelis,1 Alessandra Oliva1 1Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, 2Department of Cardio-Thoracic, Vascular, General Surgery and of Organ Transplants, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy Abstract: In this review, we discuss the problem of antibiotic resistance, heteroresistance, the utility of cultures and antibiotic susceptibility tests in Helicobacter pylori (Hp eradication, as well as the updated treatment strategies for this infection. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing all over the world, especially for metronidazole and clarithromycin, because of their heavy use in some geographical areas. Heteroresistance (simultaneous presence of both susceptible and resistant strains in different sites of a single stomach is another important issue, as an isolate could be mistakenly considered susceptible if a single biopsy is used for antimicrobial tests. We also examined literature data regarding eradication success rates of culture-guided and empiric therapies. The empiric therapy and the one based on susceptibility testing, in Hp eradication, may depend on several factors such as concomitant diseases, the number of previous antibiotic treatments, differences in bacterial virulence in individuals with positive or negative cultures, together with local antibiotic resistance patterns in real-world settings. Updated treatment strategies in Hp infection presented in the guidelines of the Toronto Consensus Group (2016 are reported. These suggest to prolong eradication therapy up to 14 days, replacing the old triple therapy with a quadruple therapy based on proton pump inhibitor (PPI, bismuth, metronidazole, and tetracycline for most of the patients, or as an alternative quadruple therapy without bismuth, based on the use of PPI, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and clarithromycin. The new drug vonoprazan, a first-in-class potassium-competitive acid blocker recently

  13. Downregulated regulatory T cell function is associated with increased peptic ulcer in Helicobacter pylori-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Elahi, Shokrollah; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Shafigh, Mohammedhadi; Rashidii, Reza; Sarafnejad, Abdulfatah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Faridani, Rana; Tahmasbi, Kamran; Kheiri, Soleiman; Razavi, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) chronically colonizes gastric/duodenal mucosa and induces gastroduodenal disease such as gastritis and peptic ulcer and induces vigorous innate and specific immune responses; however, the infection is not removed, a state of chronic active gastritis persists for life if untreated. The objective of this study was to determine the number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in gastric mucosa of patients with gastritis and peptic ulcer and determined the relationship between main virulence factor of H. pylori and Tregs. A total of 89 patients with gastritis, 63 patients with peptic ulcer and 40 healthy, H. pylori-negative subjects were enrolled in this study. Expression of CD4 and Foxp3 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, bacterial virulence factors and histopathological assessments. TGF-β1, IL-10 and FOXP3 expressions were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The numbers of CD4 + and Foxp3 + T cells as well as the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1, FOXP3, INF-γ and IL-17A in infected patients were significantly higher than the ones in uninfected patients. Also, the number of CD4 + T cells was independent on the vacuolating cytotoxin A (vacA) and outer inflammatory protein A (oipA), but it was positively correlated with cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). Instead, the number of Foxp3 + T cells was dependent on the vacA and oipA, but it was independent on cagA. The number of Foxp3 + T cells and the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1 and FOXP3 in infected patients with gastritis were significantly higher than the ones in infected patients with peptic ulcer. Moreover, the number of CD4 + T cells and the expression of IL-17A and INF-γ was the lowest in the gastritis patients, however, increased progressively in the peptic ulcer patients. Additionally, the numbers of CD4 + and Foxp3 + T cells as well as the expression of IL-10, TGF-β1, FOXP3 and INF-γ were positively

  14. Slovenian society for gastroenterology and hepatology guidelines on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Bojan Tepeš

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori (Hp is the most common infecion in the world. Half of the world population is infected. The prevalence of infection is declining in the developed world and also in Slovenia, because of better sanitation and eradication therapies. The prevalence of infection with Hp in Slovenia is 25.1 %. Only 20 % of the infected will develop a duodenal or gastric ulcer, ALT lymphoma or cancer in their lifetime. Hp infection is a risk factor for ulcer bleeding in patients on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and salicylates. Gastoenterologists diagnose the infection with Hp and prescribe therapy. A general practitioner can diagnose the infection by urea breath test or Hp stool test and prescribe therapy in cases of patients with a proven ulcer disease or in patients with first- degree relatives with gastric cancer. The guidelines on the management of Hp infection, published by the Slovenian Society for Gastroenterology and Hepatology (SZGH in 2010, recommend one week therapy with proton pump inhibitor (PPI bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid and amoxiclline 1000 mg bid in patients without prior therapy with clarithromycin. In the case of prior therapy with macrolides, clarithromycin must be changed for metronidazole 400 mg bid. In the case of therapeutic failure second-line therapy should last 10 days. Secondline therapy can be based on Hp culture and bacterial resistance. The other possibility is PPI bid, colloidal bismuth subcitrate 120 mg qid, oxytetracycline 250 mg qid, metronidazole 400 mg qid; sequential therapy: PI bid 10 days, amoxicillin 1000 mg bid for first 5 days, clarithromycin 500 mg bid and metronidazole 400 mg bid for second 5 days; or PPI bid, amoxicilline 1000 mg bid and levofloxacin 500 mg bid. Hp is a group I human carcinogen responsible for 65 % of all gastric cancers. National screening for Hp infection in younger population without precancerous lesions in the stomach can reduce the incidence of gastric

  15. Outcome of treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection in the carinthian region

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    Miroslav Vujasinović

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Antimicrobial resistance is the major cause for treatment failure in Helicobacter pylori(HP infection. In the majority of countries, including Slovenia, the eradication rate of primary therapy is below 80 %. So far we have not have any data about HP infection treatment in Carinthian region.Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of medical documentation of all patients treated in our institution for HP infection in 2011 and 2012. Treatment outcome was determined by urea breath test. Basic demographic data of patients, endoscopic findings and histologic diagnosis were analysed together with the treatment regimen chosen and the eradication rates achieved. Secondary resistance rates for anti- microbials were calculated in patients that had culture and sensitivity tests performed because of treatment failure.Results: Total of 324 patients were included in the analysis (60.2 % female and 39.8 % male, mean age 52.1 years: 111 patients in the year 2011 (52.3 % female and 47.7 % male, mean age 53.0 years and 213 (64.3 % female and 35.7 % male, mean age 54.1 years; 90.0 % (n = 285 of patients had endoscopic findings of chronic active gastritis, 3.1 % (n = 10 of patients had peptic ulcer disease; 27.8 % (n = 90 of patients had pre-cancerous lesions of gastric mucosa (atrophy or intestinal metaplasia present on histology.Seven-day triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI, amoxicillin and clarithromycin (PAC was prescribed in 87.7 % (n = 284 of patients as the first line treatment option, 11.7 % (n = 38 of patient received 7-day triple therapy with PPI, amoxicillin and metronidazole (PAM and 0.6 % (n = 2 of patients received 7-day triple therapy with PPI, clarithromycin and metronidazole (PCM. The eradication rate with the firstline therapy was 70.7 % intention to treat (ITT analysis and 70.9 % per protocol (PP analysis. Cumulative eradication rate for up to four lines of therapy was 89.9 % ITT analysis and 99.7 % PP analysis

  16. [Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on iron status among preschool children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Lin, Xi; Chen, Xiao-bing; Niu, Hong-bing; Xu, Neng-feng; Zhao, Zi-qing

    2003-03-01

    To explore the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and iron status using serum ferritin (SF) as a marker for total iron and to identify the related factors of iron nutritional status among preschool children. By cluster sampling, we recruited 475 preschool children aged 2 to 7 years. A structured questionnaire and diet form were sent to the parents of these children to obtain related information about the socioeconomic level and dietary intakes. After collecting blood samples, the following indexes were measured. Hp IgG antibodies were measured with a dot enzyme-linked immunoassay; hemoglobin, Hct, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), red blood cell distribution width index (RDW) with automatic Complete Blood Count; SF with an immunoradiometric assay. Stool Hp antigen and occult bleeding were measured with ELISA among individuals who were Hp seropositive. Hp status was defined as positive when both serum and stool antigen tests were positive, Hp status was defined as negative when serum antigen test was negative; 24-hour weighting and recording methods were used to dietary survey for three days in May and December 2001, respectively, dietary intakes including energy, protein and micronutrient were calculated using nursery school nutrition software and evaluated by Chinese Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). Mann-Whitney test was used to compare mean ranks of SF in Hp-positive and Hp-negative children. To obtain an adjusted estimate of the impact of Hp infection on SF, a multivariate analysis of covariance was done to evaluate the different level of SF between Hp infected and non-infected status. The relationship between iron deficiency and gender, age, socioeconomic condition, iron intake, and calcium intake was assessed by univariate analysis. An unconditional multivariate logistic regression analysis was also performed. Iron deficiency status was dichotomized and

  17. The corpus-predominant gastritis index may serve as an early marker of Helicobacter pylori-infected patients at risk of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y-C; Hsiao, W-H; Yang, H-B; Cheng, H-C; Chang, W-L; Lu, C-C; Sheu, B-S

    2013-05-01

    To eradicate Helicobacter pylori before the occurrence of precancerous changes is important to prevent gastric carcinogenesis. To validate whether the corpus-predominant gastritis index (CGI) can serve as an early marker to identify the H. pylori-infected patients at risk of gastric carcinogenesis. This study enrolled 188 subjects, including 43 noncardiac gastric cancer patients, 63 of their first-degree relatives and 82 sex- and age-matched duodenal ulcer patients as controls. All received endoscopy to provide topographic gastric specimens to test for H. pylori infection and its related histological features, translated into the operative link on gastritis assessment (OLGA), operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) stages, and the presence of CGI. Spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) was assessed by immunohistochemistry staining of trefoil factor 2. Gastric cancer patients had higher prevalence of CGI and OLGIM stage II-IV, but not OLGA stage II-IV, than the controls (P = 0.001, OR = 3.4[95% CI: 1.4-8.1] for CGI; OR = 5.0[95% CI: 2.0-12.8] for OLGIM). In patients with the combined presence of CGI and OLGIM stage II-IV, the risk of gastric cancer increased to 9.8 (P cancer patients had a higher rate of the presence of CGI, but not OLGA or OLGIM stage II-IV than the duodenal ulcer controls (P = 0.001). Of the first-degree relatives, the presence of CGI increased the risk of SPEM (P = 0.003, OR = 5.5[95% CI: 1.8-17.0]). The corpus-predominant gastritis index, which is highly correlated to SPEM, may serve as an early marker to identify the H. pylori-infected patients at a higher risk of gastric cancer. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Review article: Practical management issues for the Helicobacter pylori-infected patient at risk of gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    The public health implications of H. pylori infection are considerable in view of the universality of the infection and its attributable risk in cancer causation. Education of the population as to hygiene and nutrition are prerequisites. Total testing/screening and treatment of the infected

  19. Upregulation of Soluble HLA-G5 and HLA-G6 Isoforms in the Milder Histopathological Stages of Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Role for Subverting Immune Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, D M B Oliveira; Genre, J; Silva, T G Alves; Soares, C P; Rocha, K Borges Ferreira; Oliveira, C Nunes; Jatobá, C A Nunes; Andrade, J Marco de Leon; Moreau, P; Medeiros, A da Cunha; Donadi, E A; Crispim, J C de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The subversion mechanisms employed by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to escape from immune surveillance and to establish persistent infection are poorly understood. Growing evidence indicates that expression of HLA-G, a non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule, negatively regulates immune responses in pathological conditions, including infectious diseases. In this context, we aimed to evaluate HLA-G expression in the gastric microenvironment of individuals harbouring H. pylori and to correlate it with histological variables. Fifty-four gastric specimens from patients harbouring H. pylori infection were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using anti-HLA-G monoclonal antibody. As a result, HLA-G expression was detected in 43 of 54 specimens harbouring H. pylori. The presence of HLA-G was significantly associated with milder colonization by H. pylori (P role of HLA-G during H. pylori infection is beneficial or hazardous for patients remains to be defined. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  20. Hemoglobin, ferritin, vitamin B12 and helicobacter pylori infection: a study in patients underwent upper GI endoscopy at civil hospital karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuberi, B.F.; Asar, S.; Qadeer, R.; Baloch, I.; Saeed, M.

    2007-01-01

    To compare hemoglobin, ferritin, and vitamin B12 levels in patients undergoing upper GI endoscopy according to their Helicobacter pylori status. All patients undergoing upper GI Endoscopy were selected, while patients of active peptic ulcers, malignancy, varices, malabsorption and recent blood donation were excluded. Blood samples for CBC, serum ferritin and vitamin B12 were collected and H.pylori status was ascertained by urease test on gastric biopsy. Differences in mean values of age, ferritin, hemoglobin, MCV and vitamin B12 were done by students t-test. Significant confounding factors were identified on multivariate analysis and were further analyzed by univariate analysis. Two hundred and eighty-five subjects were studied, including 171 males and 114 females. H-pylori was positive in 214 (75.1%) patients. Significantly low levels of hemoglobin (p =0.0), ferritin (p = 0.0) and vitamin B12 (p = 0.0) were found in patients with H-pylori infection. Gender, menopause, contraception and history of peptic ulcer disease were identified as significant confounders. Significantly low levels of hemoglobin, ferritin and vitamin B12 were found in patients with H-pylori infection. (author)

  1. Comparison between the 13C-urea breath test and stool antigen test for the diagnosis of childhood Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Seiichi; Minoura, Takanori; Iinuma, Kazuie; Konno, Mutsuko; Tajiri, Hitoshi; Matsuhisa, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    As noninvasive tests for Helicobacter pylori infection, the 13 C-urea breath test (UBT) and stool antigen test have been widely used. In children, however, there are few studies reporting which test shows superior performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the 13 C-UBT and stool antigen test for their accuracy in diagnosing. H. pylori infection in children. A total of 123 Japanese children, ages 2 to 17 years (mean, 12 years) who underwent gastric biopsies for H. pylori infection were studied. The diagnoses included gastritis (n=55), gastric ulcer (n=5), duodenal ulcer (n=20), iron-deficiency anemia (n=7), and other conditions (n=36). The cutoff value of the 13 C-UBT was defined to be 3.5 per mille. The stool antigen test was performed using the H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Premier Platinum HpSA). In 16 patients who received eradication therapy, the 13 C-UBT and HpSA were repeated 2 months after treatment. Based on biopsy tests, 60 children were infected with H. pylori and 63 children were not. For the 13 C-UBT, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.1%-99.0%), 98.4% (95% CI, 91.5%-100%), and 96.4% (95% CI, 93.6%-99.9%), respectively. For the HpSA, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 983.% (95% CI, 90.8%-100%), 98.4% (95% CI, 91.2%-100%), and 98.3% (95% CI, 96.0%-100%), respectively. There were no significant differences between the performance of these two tests. In the assessment of H. pylori eradication, the results of 13 C-UBT and HpSA agreed with those of biopsy tests. The 13 C-UBT and the HpSA are equally accurate for the diagnosis of active H. pylori infection in Japanese children. (author)

  2. The NOD-like receptor signalling pathway in Helicobacter pylori infection and related gastric cancer: a case-control study and gene expression analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Castaño-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, it is well established that cancer arises in chronically inflamed tissue. A number of NOD-like receptors (NLRs form inflammasomes, intracellular multiprotein complexes critical for generating mature pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-18. As chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa is a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection, we investigated the role of genetic polymorphisms and expression of genes involved in the NLR signalling pathway in H. pylori infection and related gastric cancer (GC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-one genetic polymorphisms were genotyped in 310 ethnic Chinese (87 non-cardia GC cases and 223 controls with functional dyspepsia. In addition, gene expression of 84 molecules involved in the NLR signalling pathway was assessed in THP-1 cells challenged with two H. pylori strains, GC026 (GC and 26695 (gastritis. RESULTS: CARD8-rs11672725, NLRP3-rs10754558, NLRP3-rs4612666, NLRP12-rs199475867 and NLRX1-rs10790286 showed significant associations with GC. On multivariate analysis, CARD8-rs11672725 remained a risk factor (OR: 4.80, 95% CI: 1.39-16.58. Further, NLRP12-rs2866112 increased the risk of H. pylori infection (OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.22-3.71. Statistical analyses assessing the joint effect of H. pylori infection and the selected polymorphisms revealed strong associations with GC (CARD8, NLRP3, CASP1 and NLRP12 polymorphisms. In gene expression analyses, five genes encoding NLRs were significantly regulated in H. pylori-challenged cells (NLRC4, NLRC5, NLRP9, NLRP12 and NLRX1. Interestingly, persistent up-regulation of NFKB1 with simultaneous down-regulation of NLRP12 and NLRX1 was observed in H. pylori GC026-challenged cells. Further, NF-κB target genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and molecules involved in carcinogenesis were markedly up-regulated in H. pylori GC026-challenged cells. CONCLUSIONS: Novel associations between polymorphisms in the NLR signalling pathway (CARD8

  3. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stomach. It is the main cause of peptic ulcers, and it can also cause gastritis and stomach ... inflammation. This can lead to gastritis or a peptic ulcer. Researchers aren't sure how H. pylori spreads. ...

  4. The influence of duodeno-gastric reflux on frequency of Helicobacter pylori infection at patients with ulcer gastric; Wplyw refluksu dwunastniczo-zoladkowego na czestosc wystepowania zakazenia Helicobacter pylori u chorych z wrzodem zoladka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J. [Kliniczny Oddzial Chirurgii Ogolnej, Pracownia Medycyny Nuklearnej, Szpital Wojskowy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Wydzial Fizyki i Techniki Jadrowej AGH, Cracow (Poland)]|[Pracownia Chromatografii Gazowej, Instytut Fizyki Jadrowej, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate the correlation between frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and intensity of duodeno-gastric reflux it was analysed 61 species with ulcer gastric. Bacterial infection was diagnosed by the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea, whereas presence and intensity of the reflux was found with dynamic scintigraphy with {sup 99}Tm MBrIDA support. The H. pylori infection was present at 42 (68.9%) patients. The presence of throwing back the duodenal liquid was found at 32 (52.5%) diagnosed patients. At 19 (31.2%) of them the reflux has intensity of 1%, at 11 (18%)-2{sup o} and 2 (3.3%)-3{sup o}.The investigations which were carried out, showed that at patients with ulcer gastric disease, duodeno-gastric reflux is an agent which slows down H. pylori infection, however it is easily seen not earlier than at 2{sup o} of its intensity. (author) 33 refs, 1 tab

  5. Detection of Helicobacter pylori infection by examination of human breath odor using electronic nose Bloodhound-214ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnayder, E. P.; Moshkin, M. P.; Petrovskii, D. V.; Shevela, A. I.; Babko, A. N.; Kulikov, V. G.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim was to examine the possibility of use e-nose Bloodhound-214ST to determine presence or absence of H. pylori infection using exhalation samples of patients. Breath samples were collected twice: at baseline and after oral administration of 500 mg of urea. H. pylori status of patients was confirmed by antral biopsy. Using two approaches for the data analysis we showed the possibility to distinguish H. pylori free and infected patients.

  6. Additional corpus biopsy enhances the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in a background of gastritis with atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The best sites for biopsy-based tests to evaluate H. pylori infection in gastritis with atrophy are not well known. This study aimed to evaluate the site and sensitivity of biopsy-based tests in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Methods One hundred and sixty-four (164) uninvestigated dyspepsia patients were enrolled. Biopsy-based tests (i.e., culture, histology Giemsa stain and rapid urease test) and non-invasive tests (anti-H. pylori IgG) were performed. The gold standard of H. pylori infection was defined according to previous criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive rate and negative predictive rate of biopsy-based tests at the gastric antrum and body were calculated in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Results The prevalence rate of H. pylori infection in the 164 patients was 63.4%. Gastritis with atrophy was significantly higher at the antrum than at the body (76% vs. 31%; pgastritis with atrophy increased regardless of biopsy site (for normal, mild, moderate, and severe gastritis with atrophy, the sensitivity of histology Giemsa stain was 100%, 100%, 88%, and 66%, respectively, and 100%, 97%, 91%, and 66%, respectively, for rapid urease test). In moderate to severe antrum or body gastritis with atrophy, additional corpus biopsy resulted in increased sensitivity to 16.67% compare to single antrum biopsy. Conclusions In moderate to severe gastritis with atrophy, biopsy-based test should include the corpus for avoiding false negative results. PMID:23272897

  7. Additional corpus biopsy enhances the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in a background of gastritis with atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Hung-Chieh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The best sites for biopsy-based tests to evaluate H. pylori infection in gastritis with atrophy are not well known. This study aimed to evaluate the site and sensitivity of biopsy-based tests in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Methods One hundred and sixty-four (164 uninvestigated dyspepsia patients were enrolled. Biopsy-based tests (i.e., culture, histology Giemsa stain and rapid urease test and non-invasive tests (anti-H. pylori IgG were performed. The gold standard of H. pylori infection was defined according to previous criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive rate and negative predictive rate of biopsy-based tests at the gastric antrum and body were calculated in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Results The prevalence rate of H. pylori infection in the 164 patients was 63.4%. Gastritis with atrophy was significantly higher at the antrum than at the body (76% vs. 31%; p Conclusions In moderate to severe gastritis with atrophy, biopsy-based test should include the corpus for avoiding false negative results.

  8. Early Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Vietnamese Patients with Acute Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Trong Quach

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate H. pylori infection rate and evaluate a combined set of tests for H. pylori diagnosis in Vietnamese patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding (PUD. Methods. Consecutive patients with acute PUB were enrolled prospectively. Rapid urease test (RUT with 3 biopsies was carried out randomly. Patients without RUT or with negative RUT received urea breath test (UBT and serological and urinary H. pylori antibody tests. H. pylori was considered positive if RUT or any noninvasive test was positive. Patients were divided into group A (RUT plus noninvasive tests and group B (only noninvasive tests. Results. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 94.2% (161/171. Groups A and B had no differences in demographic characteristics, bleeding severity, endoscopic findings, and proton pump inhibitor use. H. pylori-positive rate in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (98.2% versus 86.7%, p=0.004. The positive rate of RUT was similar at each biopsy site but significantly increased if RUT results from 2 or 3 sites were combined (p<0.05. Conclusions. H. pylori infection rate in Vietnamese patients with acute PUB is high. RUT is an excellent test if at least 2 biopsies are taken.

  9. Immunologic properties and therapeutic efficacy of a multivalent epitope-based vaccine against four Helicobacter pylori adhesins (urease, Lpp20, HpaA, and CagL) in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Le; Yin, Runting; Xu, Guangxian; Gong, Xiaojuan; Chang, Zisong; Hong, Dantong; Liu, Hongpeng; Ding, Shuqin; Han, Xuebo; Li, Yuan; Tang, Feng; Liu, Kunmei

    2017-12-01

    Therapeutic vaccination is a desirable alternative for controlling Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Attachment to the gastric mucosa is the first step in establishing bacterial colonization, and adhesins, which are on the surface of H. pylori, play a pivotal role in binding to human gastric mucosa. In the present study, we constructed a multivalent epitope-based vaccine named CFAdE with seven carefully selected antigenic fragments from four H. pylori adhesins (urease, Lpp20, HpaA and CagL). The specificity, immunogenicity and ability to produce neutralizing antibodies of CFAdE were evaluated in BALB/c mice. After that, its therapeutic efficacy and protective immune mechanisms were explored in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils. The results indicated that CFAdE could induce comparatively high levels of specific antibodies against urease, Lpp20, HpaA and CagL. Additionally, oral therapeutic immunization with CFAdE plus polysaccharide adjuvant (PA) significantly decreased H. pylori colonization compared with oral immunization with urease plus PA, and the protection was correlated with IgG and sIgA antibody and antigen-specific CD4 + T cells. This study indicated that the multivalent epitope-based vaccine, which targeted multiple adhesins in adherence of H. pylori to the gastric mucosa, is more effective than the univalent vaccine targeting urease only. This multivalent epitope-based vaccine may be a promising therapeutic candidate vaccine against H. pylori infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Ins Genotype in Patients Harbouring Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Potential Risk Factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genre, J; Reginaldo, F P Santos; Andrade, J Marco de Leon; Lima, F P; da Camara, A V Coutinho; Donadi, E A; Crispim, J C

    2016-01-01

    H. pylori is a potent pathogen due to its capacity to successfully evade host defence mechanisms. Despite inducing immune responses in infected individuals, sometimes these responses fail to clear the infection and the bacterium establishes a persistent infection leading to chronic inflammation. In this context, we hypothesized that human leucocyte antigen G (HLA-G), a non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule that has the ability to regulate immune responses both in physiological and in pathological conditions, may play an important role in promoting tolerance and helping H. pylori to subvert host defence and consequently establish a chronic infection. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism in patients harbouring H. pylori infection, as well as their relationship with histological and demographic variables, to gain a better understanding of the actual role of HLA-G and its genetic polymorphisms in bacterial infection. Sixty-eight patients with clinical symptoms suggestive of H. pylori infection were enrolled to assess HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism allele and genotype frequencies. After adjustment for covariates (age and gender), the odds of having the genotype Ins/Ins, compared to Del/Del, were 3.77 times greater among HP+ cases than among controls. These findings suggest that the 14-bp Ins/Ins genotype, already associated with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases as well as some viral and parasitic infections, could confer a greater risk of developing H. pylori infection. © 2015 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  11. Association of selected human leukocyte antigen alleles (HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA–DQB1*0301 with Helicobacter pylori infection among dyspeptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyumali Sandareka Arachchi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori has been identified as a group I carcinogenic bacteria that infect the gastric mucosa leading to gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, lymphoma and gastric cancer. Pathogenesis of H. pylori depends on the virulence of the strain, host immune response and modulating factors like smoking and diet. Objective: This study aimed to assess the association of selected HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles; HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301, with the presence of H. pylori infection and disease severity among dyspeptic patients. Methods: Gastric tissue samples from 100 dyspeptic patients, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at a tertiary care hospital, were collected. Presence of HLA alleles was confirmed using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. H. pylori infection was determined using PCR and Histology. The histological interpretation was done according to the ‘Sydney classification’. Statistical analysis was done with the Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS (version 22; SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA. Results: Respective percentages of HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 were 39%, 31% and 20%. Of the 25 samples positive for H. pylori infection respectively 56% (14/25, 36% (9/25 and 12% (3/25 were positive for HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 alleles. Considering the association with H. pylori infection, only HLA-DQA1*0102 showed significant association (p=0.044. No significant association was found between the HLA alleles and the histological severity among the H. pylori infected patients. Conclusion: In conclusion, HLA-DQA1*0102 allele has a significant association with H. pylori infection while HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 shows no significant association in a Sri Lankan dyspeptic patient population.

  12. Efficacy and safety of sequential versus quadruple therapy as second-line treatment for helicobacter pylori infection-A randomized controlled trial.

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    Daniela Munteanu

    Full Text Available Quadruple therapy is recommended as second-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori eradication failure. However, high cost, multiple side effects, and low adherence rates are major drawbacks to its routine use. Our aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of sequential versus quadruple regimens as second line treatment for persistent Helicobacter pylori infection.Prospective, randomized, open label trial was conducted at a large academic, tertiary care center in Israel. Patients who previously failed a standard triple treatment eradication course were randomly assigned (1:1 to receive a 10-day sequential therapy course, or a 14-day quadruple regimen. Compliance and adverse events were evaluated by telephone questionnaires. The primary endpoint for analysis was the rate of Helicobacter pylori eradication as defined by either a negative 13C-urea breath-test, or stool antigen test, 4-16 weeks after treatment assessed under the non-inferiority hypothesis. The trial was terminated prematurely due to low recruitment rates. See S1 Checklist for CONSORT checklist.One hundred and one patients were randomized. Per modified intention-to-treat analysis, eradication rate was 49% in the sequential versus 42.5% in the quadruple regimen group (p-value for non-inferiority 0.02. Forty-two (84.0% versus 33 (64.7% patients completed treatment in the sequential and quadruple groups respectively (p 0.027. Gastrointestinal side effects were more common in the quadruple regimen group.Sequential treatment when used as a second line regimen, was non-inferior to the standard of care quadruple regimen in achieving Helicobacter pylori eradication, and was associated with better compliance and fewer adverse effects. Both treatment protocols failed to show an adequate eradication rate in the population of Southern Israel.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01481844.

  13. Randomized controlled study of a novel triple nitazoxanide (NTZ)-containing therapeutic regimen versus the traditional regimen for eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Mona Ah; Talaat, Raghda; Soliman, Samah; Elmesseri, Huda; Soliman, Shaimaa; Abd-Elsalam, Sherief

    2017-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has become more and more resistant to conventional first-line treatment regimens. So, there is a considerable interest in evaluating new antibiotic combinations and regimens. Nitazoxanide is an anti-infective drug with demonstrated activity against protozoa and anaerobic bacteria including H. pylori. This work is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a unique triple nitazoxanide-containing regimen as a treatment regimen in Egyptian patients with H. pylori infection. Two hundred and 24 patients with upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) dyspeptic symptoms in whom H. pylori -induced GIT disease was confirmed were included in the study. They have been randomized to receive either nitazoxanide 500 mg b.i.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d., and omeprazole 40 mg twice daily for 14 days or metronidazole 500 mg b.i.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d., and omeprazole 40  mg twice daily for 14 days. Laboratory evaluation for H. pylori antigen within the stool was performed 6 weeks after cessation of H. pylori treatment regimens to assess the response. The response to treatment was significantly higher in group 1 of nitazoxanide treatment regimen than group 2 of traditional treatment regimen. One hundred and six cases (94.6%) of 112 patients who completed the study in group 1 showed complete cure, while only 63 cases (60.6%) of 104 patients who completed the study in group 2 showed the same response according to per-protocol (PP) analysis (Ppylori. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02422706). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Comparison of fecal occult blood tests for colorectal cancer screening in an Alaska Native population with high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Diana; Provost, Ellen; Asay, Elvin; Roberts, Diana; Haverkamp, Donald; Perdue, David; Bruce, Michael G; Sacco, Frank; Espey, David

    2014-04-10

    Alaska Native colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates are the highest of any ethnic/racial group in the United States. CRC screening using guaiac-based fecal occult blood tests (gFOBT) are not recommended for Alaska Native people because of false-positive results associated with a high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated hemorrhagic gastritis. This study evaluated whether the newer immunochemical FOBT (iFOBT) resulted in a lower false-positive rate and higher specificity for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasia than gFOBT in a population with elevated prevalence of H. pylori infection. We used a population-based sample of 304 asymptomatic Alaska Native adults aged 40 years or older undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy (April 2008-January 2012). Specificity differed significantly (P < .001) between gFOBT (76%; 95% CI, 71%-81%) and iFOBT (92%; 95% CI, 89%-96%). Among H. pylori-positive participants (54%), specificity of iFOBT was even higher (93% vs 69%). Overall, sensitivity did not differ significantly (P = .73) between gFOBT (29%) and iFOBT (36%). Positive predictive value was 11% for gFOBT and 32% for iFOBT. The iFOBT had a significantly higher specificity than gFOBT, especially in participants with current H. pylori infection. The iFOBT represents a potential strategy for expanding CRC screening among Alaska Native and other populations with elevated prevalence of H. pylori, especially where access to screening endoscopy is limited.

  15. Chemokines and antimicrobial peptides have a cag-dependent early response to Helicobacter pylori infection in primary human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Pascale; Paris, Isabelle; Garcia, Magali; Tran, Cong Tri; Cremniter, Julie; Garnier, Martine; Faure, Jean-Pierre; Barthes, Thierry; Boneca, Ivo G; Morel, Franck; Lecron, Jean-Claude; Burucoa, Christophe; Bodet, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection systematically causes chronic gastric inflammation that can persist asymptomatically or evolve toward more severe gastroduodenal pathologies, such as ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) of H. pylori allows translocation of the virulence protein CagA and fragments of peptidoglycan into host cells, thereby inducing production of chemokines, cytokines, and antimicrobial peptides. In order to characterize the inflammatory response to H. pylori, a new experimental protocol for isolating and culturing primary human gastric epithelial cells was established using pieces of stomach from patients who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy. Isolated cells expressed markers indicating that they were mucin-secreting epithelial cells. Challenge of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori B128 underscored early dose-dependent induction of expression of mRNAs of the inflammatory mediators CXCL1 to -3, CXCL5, CXCL8, CCL20, BD2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In AGS cells, significant expression of only CXCL5 and CXCL8 was observed following infection, suggesting that these cells were less reactive than primary epithelial cells. Infection of both cellular models with H. pylori B128ΔcagM, a cag PAI mutant, resulted in weak inflammatory-mediator mRNA induction. At 24 h after infection of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori, inflammatory-mediator production was largely due to cag PAI substrate-independent virulence factors. Thus, H. pylori cag PAI substrate appears to be involved in eliciting an epithelial response during the early phases of infection. Afterwards, other virulence factors of the bacterium take over in development of the inflammatory response. Using a relevant cellular model, this study provides new information on the modulation of inflammation during H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on IL-8, IL-1beta and COX-2 expression in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartchewsky, Waldemar; Martini, Mariana Rocha; Masiero, Mariana; Squassoni, Aline Candido; Alvarez, Marisa Claudia; Ladeira, Marcelo Sady; Salvatore, Daisy; Trevisan, Miriam; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is related to gastric cancer development, and chronic inflammation is presumed to be the main cause. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of H. pylori cagA, vacA, iceA, and babA genotypes on COX-2, IL-1beta, and IL-8 expression. Of the 217 patients included in the study, 26 were uninfected, 127 had chronic gastritis and were H. pylori-positive, and 64 had gastric cancer. Bacterial genotypes were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the expression values were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. An association was found between the infection with cagA, vacA s1m1 strains and gastric cancer development. Regarding the 3' region of the cagA gene, we also found an association between the infection with cagA EPIYA-ABCCC strains and clinical outcome. Higher levels of IL-8, IL-1beta, and COX-2 were detected in gastric mucosa from infected patients with chronic gastritis, and they were also associated with the infection by cagA, vacA s1m1 strains. The IL-8 and IL-1beta levels decrease significantly from chronic gastritis to gastric cancer, while the relative expression remained unaltered when COX-2 expression was analyzed among patients with gastritis and cancer. Since inflammatory response to H. pylori infection plays an important role in cellular proliferation and gastric mucosal damage, the up-regulation of IL-1beta, IL-8, and COX-2 in patients with chronic gastritis has an important clinical implication in gastric carcinogenesis.

  17. Economic evaluation of test-and-treat and empirical treatment strategies in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection; A Markov model in an Iranian adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazdaki, Alireza; Ghiasvand, Hesam; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Naghdi, Seyran; Aryankhesal, Aidin

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause many gastrointestinal problems in developing countries such as Iran. We aimed to analyze the cost- effectiveness and cost- utility of the test-and-treat and empirical treatment strategies in managing Helicobacter pylori infection. This was a Markov based economic evaluation. Effectiveness was defined as the symptoms free numbers and QALYs in 100,000 hypothetical adults. The sensitivity analysis was based on Monte Carlo approach. In the test- and- treat strategy, if the serology is the first diagnostic test vs. histology, the cost per symptoms free number would be 291,736.1 Rials while the cost per QALYs would be 339,226.1 Rials. The cost per symptoms free number and cost per QALYs when the 13 C-UBT was used as the first diagnostic test vs. serology was 1,283,200 and 1,492,103 Rials, respectively. In the empirical strategy, if histology is used as the first diagnostic test vs. 13 CUBT, the cost per symptoms free numbers and cost per QALYs would be 793,234 and 955,698 Rials, respectively. If serology were used as the first diagnostic test vs. histology, the cost per symptoms free and QALYs would be 793,234 and 368941 Rials, respectively. There was no significant and considerable dominancy between the alternatives and the diagnostic tests.

  18. Utility of a stool antigen test to detect the incidence of helicobacter pylori infection and familial and community enviromental risk factors for this infection in pediatric age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbi, T; Dall'Oglio, L; De Angelis, P; Torroni, E; Colistro, F; Azzolina, M; Santoni, A; Di Ciommo, V; Benedetto, M

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is mainly acquired during childhood; it is recognised as a cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer and it has been classified as a group A carcinogen by World Health Organization. The exact mode of transmission is as yet, not known. Aim of our study has been to identify risk factors associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in a preschool and school population and to confirm if Hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening in epidemiological studies. We interviewed, with questionnaire, 400 children (203 male; age range 3-10 years; mean age 6 years) of 3 different schools and stool samples were collected of all children too. 35 of 400 (8%) children underwent to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of a suspect of upper gastrointestinal disease. stool were collected from 400 school children and 35 of them shown positivity of Hp antigen test. A questionnaire about presence of nausea, vomit, recurrent abdominal pain, family size, parent's occupations and education, use of antibiotics, country of birth of child and parents, personal hygiene, breast feeding, presence of the animals was completed. 35 children with positive Hp stool antigen test and a suspicious of upper gastrointestinal disease (recurrent abdominal pain, diurnal or nocturnal abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, iron deficiency) underwent to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS) that demonstrated antral gastritis and positive histology and urease rapid test. the results of this study suggest that risk factors for Hp infection are low socioeconomics factors, hygiene and living conditions and that Hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening test.

  19. Study of the use of probiotic foods as a complement of the conventional antibiotic-therapy for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and it's use as a prophylactic therapy in the reinfection by this pathogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubillaga, M.; Goldman, C.; Caro, R.; Boccio, J.; Weill, R.; Postaire, E.

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very frequent in children in developing countries. Studies on eradication regimens and its complications are not well documented. The European Helicobacter pylori Study Group strongly recommends that treatment should be with proton pump inhibitor based triple therapy, consisting of a proton pump inhibitor and two of the following: clarithromycin, a nitroimidazole (metronidazole or tinidazole) and amoxycillin in various combinations. Recent advances in probiotic research show much promise in a new product development of functional foods based on milk. Among the reported beneficial effects of consuming certain strains of cultures or their metabolites, or both are control of ulcers related to Helicobacter pylori. Kefir seems to be a potential probiotic to control Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study 2 groups of 10 children each which demonstrate to be Helicobacter pylori positive will be treated as follows: Group 1: antibiotic treatment + placebo (fluid milk) and Group 2: antibiotic treatment + kefir. The Triple Therapy consists in the combination of two antibiotics (amoxycillin and clarithromycin) with a proton pump inhibitor (Lansoprazole). In all the cases, the post-treatment control will be performed by the 13 C UBT 2 months after the end of the treatment. Once the infection is eradicated, the group who received the antibiotic-therapy with milk (placebo) as well as the group who received the antibiotic-therapy with the probiotic under study will continue with the administration of the milk and/or probiotic food during one year. During this period, the children will be submitted to post-treatment controls performed by the 13 C UBT every three months. We expect to find that the group that received the triple therapy in combination with the probiotic food (kefir) would have less recidiva rates for the Helicobacter pylori infection than the group that received the triple therapy with the placebo (fluid milk). (author)

  20. Study of the use of probiotic foods as a complement of the conventional antibiotic-therapy for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and it's use as a prophylactic therapy in the reinfection by this pathogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubillaga, M; Goldman, C; Caro, R; Boccio, J [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Weill, R [Departamento de Industrias Agrarias, Facultad de Agronomia, Universidad de Moron, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Postaire, E [Research International Center Daniel Carasso (France)

    2000-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very frequent in children in developing countries. Studies on eradication regimens and its complications are not well documented. The European Helicobacter pylori Study Group strongly recommends that treatment should be with proton pump inhibitor based triple therapy, consisting of a proton pump inhibitor and two of the following: clarithromycin, a nitroimidazole (metronidazole or tinidazole) and amoxycillin in various combinations. Recent advances in probiotic research show much promise in a new product development of functional foods based on milk. Among the reported beneficial effects of consuming certain strains of cultures or their metabolites, or both are control of ulcers related to Helicobacter pylori. Kefir seems to be a potential probiotic to control Helicobacter pylori infection. In this study 2 groups of 10 children each which demonstrate to be Helicobacter pylori positive will be treated as follows: Group 1: antibiotic treatment + placebo (fluid milk) and Group 2: antibiotic treatment + kefir. The Triple Therapy consists in the combination of two antibiotics (amoxycillin and clarithromycin) with a proton pump inhibitor (Lansoprazole). In all the cases, the post-treatment control will be performed by the {sup 13}C UBT 2 months after the end of the treatment. Once the infection is eradicated, the group who received the antibiotic-therapy with milk (placebo) as well as the group who received the antibiotic-therapy with the probiotic under study will continue with the administration of the milk and/or probiotic food during one year. During this period, the children will be submitted to post-treatment controls performed by the {sup 13}C UBT every three months. We expect to find that the group that received the triple therapy in combination with the probiotic food (kefir) would have less recidiva rates for the Helicobacter pylori infection than the group that received the triple therapy with the placebo (fluid milk). (author)

  1. Polymorphisms of the DNA methyltransferase 1 associated with reduced risks of Helicobacter pylori infection and increased risks of gastric atrophy.

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    Jing Jiang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: DNA methyltransferase-1(DNMT1 is an important enzyme in determining genomic methylation patterns in mammalian cells. We investigated the associations between SNPs in the DNMT1 gene and risks of developing H. pylori seropositivity, gastric atrophy and gastric cancer in the Chinese population. METHODS: The study consisted of 447 patients with gastric cancer; 111 patients with gastric atrophy; and 961 healthy controls. Five SNPs, rs10420321, rs16999593, rs8101866, rs8111085 and rs2288349 of the DNMT1 gene were genotyped. Anti-H.pylori IgG was detected by ELISA. Gastric atrophy was screened by the level of serum pepsinogen Ι and II and then confirmed by endoscopy and histopatholgical examinations. RESULTS: The age- and sex-adjusted OR of H. pylori seropositivity was 0.67 (95%CI: 0.51-0.87 for rs8111085 TC/CC genotypes, significantly lower than the TT genotype in healthy controls. The adjusted OR of H.pylori seropositivity was 0.68 (95%CI: 0.52-0.89 for rs10420321 AG/GG genotypes. In addition, patients carrying rs2228349 AA genotype have a significantly increased risk for H.pylori seropositivity (OR=1.67; 95%CI: 1.02-2.75. Further haplotype analyses also showed that the ATTTG and ATCTA are significantly associated with increased risks in H.pylori infection compared to the GTCCG haplotype (OR=1.38, 95%CI: 1.08-1.77; OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.09-1.80. The adjusted ORs of gastric atrophy were 1.66 (95%CI: 1.06-2.61 for rs10420321 GG genotype, and 1.67 (95%CI 1.06-2.63, P=0.03 for rs8111085 CC genotype, but no association was found between SNPs in the DNMT1 gene and risk of developing gastric cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with rs10420321 GG and rs8111085 CC genotype of the DNMT1 gene were associated with reduced risks for H.pylori infection. On the other hand, higher risks of gastric atrophy were found in the carriers with these two genotypes compared to other genotypes. Our results suggested that SNPs of DNMT1 could be used as genotypic

  2. Dyspeptic symptoms in patients with type 1 diabetes: endoscopic findings, Helicobacter pylori infection, and associations with metabolic control, mood disorders and nutritional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Mariza; Pavin, Elizabeth João; Parisi, Maria Cândida Ribeiro; Nagasako, Cristiane Kibune; Mesquita, Maria Aparecida

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate, in a group of patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes (DM1), an association of dyspepsia symptoms with: changes in the gastroduodenal mucosa, infection by Helicobacter pylori, glycemic control, and psychological and nutritional factors. A total of 32 patient with DM1 were studied (age: 38 ± 9 years; females: 25; diabetes duration: 22 ± 5 years). All patients answered a standardized questionnaire for the evaluation of gastrointestinal symptoms and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, with gastric biopsies for the evaluation of Helicobacter pylori infection. The presence of anxiety and depression was evaluated by the HAD scale. Nutritional parameters were BMI, arm and waist circumference, skinfold measurement, and body fat percentage. Upper endoscopy detected lesions in the gastric mucosa in 34.4% of the patients, with similar frequency in those with (n = 21) and without dyspepsia (n = 11). The patients with dyspepsia complaints showed greater frequency of depression (60% vs. 0%; p = 0.001), higher values for HbA1c (9.6 ± 1.7 vs. 8.2 ± 1.3%; p = 0.01) and lower values for BMI (24.3 ± 4.1 vs. 27.2 ± 2.6 kg/m2; p = 0.02), body fat percentage (26.6 ± 6.2 vs. 30.8 ± 7.7%; p = 0.04), and waist circumference (78.7 ± 8 vs. 85.8 ± 8.1 cm; p = 0.02). No association was found between the symptoms and the presence of Helicobacter pylori. Dyspepsia symptoms in patients with long-standing DM1 were associated with glycemic control and depression, and they seem to negatively influence the nutritional status of these patients.

  3. Psychological Stress Increases Risk for Peptic Ulcer, Regardless of Helicobacter pylori Infection or Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levenstein, Susan; Rosenstock, Steffen; Jacobsen, Rikke Kart

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: There is controversy over whether psychological stress contributes to development of peptic ulcers. We collected data on features of life stress and ulcer risk factors from a defined population in Denmark and compared these with findings of confirmed ulcers during the next 11......, smoking, H pylori infection, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were independent predictors of ulcer. CONCLUSIONS: In a prospective study of a population-based Danish cohort, psychological stress increased the incidence of peptic ulcer, in part by influencing health risk behaviors. Stress had......-12 years. METHODS: We collected blood samples and psychological, social, behavioral, and medical data in 1982-1983 from a population-based sample of 3379 Danish adults without a history of ulcer participating in the World Health Organization's MONICA study. A 0- to 10-point stress index scale was used...

  4. Fluorescence In Vivo Hybridization (FIVH) for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in a C57BL/6 Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fontenete, Sílvia; Leite, Marina; Cappoen, Davie

    2016-01-01

    ). Finally, the efficiency of FIVH to detect H. pylori SS1 strain in C57BL/6 infected mice was evaluated ex vivo in mucus samples, in cryosections and paraffin-embedded sections by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. RESULTS: H. pylori SS1 strain infecting C57BL/6 mice was successfully detected...... by the Cy3_HP_LNA/2OMe_PS probe in the mucus, attached to gastric epithelial cells and colonizing the gastric pits. The specificity of the probe for H. pylori was confirmed by microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: In the future this methodology can be used in combination with a confocal laser endomicroscope for in vivo......INTRODUCTION: In this study, we applied fluorescence in vivo hybridization (FIVH) using locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes targeting the bacterial rRNA gene for in vivo detection of H. pylori infecting the C57BL/6 mouse model. A previously designed Cy3_HP_LNA/2OMe_PS probe, complementary...

  5. Influence of cure of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric acidity and gastroesophageal reflux: study by 24-h pH monitoring in patients with gastric or duodenal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Takumi; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kiyota, Naomi; Tsukamoto, Reiko; Takahashi, Hajime; Ito, Dai; Nagamatsu, Ryousuke

    2005-04-01

    Whether or not the eradication of Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for reflux esophagitis (RE) is a question at issue. To find an answer, it is necessary to clarify the influence of H. pylori eradication on the mechanism of RE. The authors investigated the influence of H. pylori eradication on gastric acidity and gastroesophageal reflux in ten gastric ulcer (GU) patients and ten duodenal ulcer (DU) patients by 24-h simultaneous determination of pH in the stomach and esophagus. Though the results indicated enhanced gastric acidity in GU patients at night after H. pylori eradication, no such influence was observed in DU patients. No significant changes in gastroesophageal reflux occurred in GU or DU patients before and after H. pylori eradication. RE after H. pylori eradication occurred in only one patient, with GU. This patient had several risk factors for RE, such as obesity, male sex, and dietary habits to add to the increase in gastric acidity at night that occurred after H. pylori eradication. No increase in gastroesophageal reflux occurred in any DU patients or in the other GU patients that demonstrated enhanced gastric acidity at night after H. pylori eradication. The cure of H. pylori infection does not, by itself, cause RE in patients who have few other risk factors for RE.

  6. Polymorphisms at Locus 4p14 of Toll-Like Receptors TLR-1 and TLR-10 Confer Susceptibility to Gastric Carcinoma in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ravishankar Ram

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori -induced gastric inflammation impacts the functions of leptin- and ghrelin-producing cells in the gastroduodenum. Inflammation resulting from H. pylori sensing via Toll-like receptors (TLRs and the associated downstream signaling largely remain ambiguous. Here, we investigated the role of gut hormones, pro-inflammatory cytokines and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with TLR 4p14 in H. pylori disease in 30 subjects with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD, 40 with peptic ulcer disease (PUD and 15 with gastric cancer (GC subjects positive and negative for H. pylori infection. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokines was directly proportional to the severity of gastritis, and disease status influenced the levels of gut hormones and pro-inflammatory cytokines. TLR-1 SNPs rs4833095 and TLR-10 SNPs rs10004195 and were directly associated with H. pylori disease, and were up-regulated in the presence of H. pylori in a genotype-independent manner. We concluded that TLR-1 rs4833095 and TLR10 rs10004195 confer susceptibility to development of gastroduodenal disease, especially GC in H.pylori disease.

  7. Efficacy and Safety of the Triple Therapy Containing Ilaprazole, Levofloxacin, and Amoxicillin as First-Line Treatment in Helicobacter pylori Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jun Ahn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. To establish the efficacy and safety of ilaprazole, levofloxacin, and amoxicillin as a first-line eradication treatment for Helicobacter pylori. Methods. Patients with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer, or gastritis, as detected by esophagogastroduodenoscopy with confirmed H. pylori infection between September 2014 and November 2015, were enrolled in the study. All participants received ilaprazole (10 mg bid, levofloxacin (500 mg bid, and amoxicillin (1000 mg bid for 10 days. H. pylori eradication was confirmed by a 13C-urea breath test at 6–8 weeks after the end of treatment. Results. Of 84 patients included in the analysis, the eradication rate was 88.8% in the per protocol group (n=80. Demographic factors such as age, gender, body mass index (BMI, alcohol, smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and peptic ulcer did not affect the eradication rate. However, multivariate analysis showed that overweight patients and patients with cerebrovascular accident (CVA had a significantly lower eradication rate than patients with normal BMI and without CVA. Laboratory test results did not change significantly after treatment. A total of six (7.5% patients developed eight adverse reactions. Conclusions. A 10-day triple therapy containing ilaprazole, levofloxacin, and amoxicillin is a safe alternative first-line eradication treatment for H. pylori.

  8. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on the expressions of Bax and Bcl-2 in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartchewsky, Waldemar; Martini, Mariana R; Squassoni, Aline C; Alvarez, Marisa C; Ladeira, Marcelo S P; Salvatore, Daisy M F; Trevisan, Miriam A; Pedrazzoli, José; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of Helicobacter pylori on Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. The study included 217 patients, of which 26 were uninfected; 127 had chronic gastritis and were H. pylori-positive, and 64 had gastric cancer. Bacterial genotypes were evaluated by PCR, and the expression values were determined by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our data showed that the up-regulationary effects of H. pylori infection on the pro-apoptotic gene, Bax, were stronger than its induction of Bcl-2; this effect may increase apoptosis in patients with chronic gastritis. In patients with gastric cancer, the up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2, counteracted the pro-apoptotic effects of Bax, leading to a deregulation of apoptosis-associated gene expression, favoring cell proliferation. Thus, the disturbance in Bax and Bcl-2 balance, induced by H. pylori, might be important in gastric cancer development.

  9. ROLE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION AND LIFESTYLE HABITS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF GASTRODUODENAL DISEASES IN A POPULATION FROM THE BRAZILIAN AMAZON

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    Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira VINAGRE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Although more than half of the world's population is colonized with Helicobacter pylori, it remains unknown why this organism is able to produce severe disease in some hosts and be innocuous in others. The clinical outcome of infection is determined by several factors, including differences in the host response to bacterial stimulation, specific virulence factors of the organism and environmental influences, or a combination of these factors. Objectives This study compared the prevalence of H. pylori infection and risk factors (infection with CagA+ strains, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and inadequate eating habits between patients with different gastrointestinal disorders and associated these risk factors with the histopathological findings. Methods In a prospective study, samples were collected from 442 patients and a standardized questionnaire regarding lifestyle habits (excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and eating habits was applied. The presence of H. pylori and of the cagA gene was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Gastric biopsies were obtained for histological assessment. Results The frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, inadequate diet and infection with CagA+ H. pylori was higher among patients with peptic ulcer and adenocarcinoma when compared to those with gastritis. Gastric inflammation was more pronounced in patients infected with CagA+ strains. Conclusion We conclude that infection with CagA+ H. pylori strains, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking and inadequate eating habits increase the risk of developing peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma.

  10. Relationship between VacA Toxin and Host Cell Autophagy in Helicobacter pylori Infection of the Human Stomach: A Few Answers, Many Questions

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    Vittorio Ricci

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of about half the global population and represents the greatest risk factor for gastric malignancy. The relevance of H. pylori for gastric cancer development is equivalent to that of tobacco smoking for lung cancer. VacA toxin seems to play a pivotal role in the overall strategy of H. pylori towards achieving persistent gastric colonization. This strategy appears to involve the modulation of host cell autophagy. After an overview of autophagy and its role in infection and carcinogenesis, I critically review current knowledge about the action of VacA on host cell autophagy during H. pylori infection of the human stomach. Although VacA is a key player in modulation of H. pylori-induced autophagy, a few discrepancies in the data are also evident and many questions remain to be answered. We are thus still far from a definitive understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which VacA affects autophagy and the consequences of this toxin action on the overall pathogenic activity of H. pylori.

  11. Utility of a stool antigen test to detect the incidence of helicobacter pylori infection and familial and community enviromental risk factors for this infection in pediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sabbi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: helicobacter pylori (hp infection is mainly acquired during childhood; it is recognised as a cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer and it has been classified as a group A carcinogen by World health organization. the exact mode of transmission is as yet, not known. Aim of our study has been to identify risk factors associated with helicobacter pylori infection in a preschool and school population and to confirm if hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening in epidemiological studies. Methods: We interviewed, with questionnaire, 400 children (203 male; age range 3-10 years; mean age 6 years of 3 different schools and stool samples were collected of all children too. 35 of 400 (8% children underwent to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of a suspect of upper gastrointestinal disease. Results: stool were collected from 400 school children and 35 of them shown positivity of hp antigen test. A questionnaire about presence of nausea, vomit, recurrent abdominal pain, family size, parent’s occupations and education, use of antibiotics, country of birth of child and parents, personal hygiene, breast feeding, presence of the animals was completed. 35 children with positive hp stool antigen test and a suspicious of upper gastrointestinal disease (recurrent abdominal pain, diurnal or nocturnal abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, iron deficiency underwent to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (egdS that demonstrated antral gastritis and positive histology and urease rapid test. Conclusions: the results of this study suggest that risk factors for hp infection are low socioeconomics factors, hygiene and living conditions and that hp antigen in faeces is useful as screening test.

  12. Gastric epithelial expression of IL-12 cytokine family in Helicobacter pylori infection in human: is it head or tail of the coin?

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    Fadi Al-Sammak

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a growing interest in an expanding group of cytokines known as "IL-12 family". The so far gained knowledge about these cytokines, as crucial playmakers in mucosal immunity, has not yet been sufficiently investigated in the context of Helicobacter pylori infection. All genes encoding the monomeric components of these cytokines and their corresponding receptors were examined in gastric epithelial cell lines (AGS and MKN-28 after being infected with 4 H. pylori strains: BCM-300, P1 wild-type, and P1-derived isogenic mutants lacking cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA or virulence gene virB7 (multiplicity of infection=50. Both infected and uninfected samples were analyzed after 24h and 48h using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Gene expression analysis demonstrated a strong upregulation of IL23A (encodes p19 by infection, whereas IL23R, Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3, IL6ST, IL12A, and IL27RA were found to be expressed, but not regulated, or to a lesser extent. Transcripts of IL12RB2, IL12B, IL12RB1, and IL27A were not detected. Interestingly, P1 resulted in stronger alterations of expression than CagA mutant and BCM-300, particularly for IL23A (59.7-fold versus 32.4- and 6.7-fold, respectively in AGS after 48h, P<.05, whereas no changes were seen with VirB7 mutant. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrated epithelial-derived expression of IL-12, p19, and Ebi3 in gastric mucosa of gastritis patients using immunohistochemistry (IHC. Unlike IL-12 and Ebi3, increased immunostaining of p19 was observed in H. pylori gastritis. Herein, we highlight the potential role of gastric epithelial cells in mucosal immunity, not only because they are predominant cell type in mucosa and initial site of host-bacterial interaction, but also as a major contributor to molecules that are thought to be primarily expressed by immune cells so far. Of these molecules, p19 was the most relevant one to H

  13. Immunoproteomics of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with atrophic body gastritis, a predisposing condition for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Edith; Bernardini, Giulia; Possenti, Silvia; Renzone, Giovanni; Scaloni, Andrea; Santucci, Annalisa; Annibale, Bruno

    2011-02-01

    Atrophic body gastritis is considered an outcome of H. pylori infection at high risk for gastric cancer. Immunoproteomics has been used to detect H. pylori antigens, which may act as potential markers for neoplastic disease and may be used in specific serological tests. We used immunoproteome technology to identify H. pylori antigens, recognized by sera from patients with atrophic body gastritis. Here, we performed 2DE protein maps of H. pylori strain 10K, probed against single sera from 3 groups of H. pylori-positive patients (atrophic body gastritis; intestinal-type gastric cancer; peptic ulcer) and negative controls. Immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. A total of 155 immunoreactive spots were detected corresponding to 14.1% of total spots detected in our reference map of H. pylori strain 10K. Sera from atrophic body gastritis (40.5±2%) and gastric cancer patients (25.9±1.8%) showed a significantly higher and stronger mean immunoreactivity versus H. pylori antigens compared to peptic ulcer patients (11.2±1.3%). The average intensity of immunoreactivity of sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients was significantly stronger compared to peptic ulcer patients. Sera from atrophic body gastritis and gastric cancer patients differentially recognized 17 H. pylori spots. Immunoproteome technology may discriminate between different H. pylori-related disease phenotypes showing a serological immunorecognition pattern common to patients with gastric cancer and atrophic body gastritis, its precursor condition. This tool may be promising for developing specific serological tests to identify patients with gastritis at high risk for gastric cancer, to be evaluated in prospective investigations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Six-year follow-up after successful triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, E.J.; Thijs, JC; van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective & Design We question whether Helicobacter pylori eradication in peptic ulcer disease patients leads to a decrease in symptoms and reduced use of anti-dyspeptic drugs. Therefore, the recurrence rate of H. pylori, upper abdominal symptoms and the use of acid-suppressive drugs were determined

  15. Influence of vitamin C and E supplementation on the eradication rates of triple and quadruple eradication regimens for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Hakan; Uygun İlikhan, Sevil; Öztürk, Kadir; Üstündağ, Yücel; Kurt, Ömer; Bilici, Muammer; Köktürk, Furuzan; Uygun, Ahmet

    2015-11-01

    In our study, we aimed to assess the effect of vitamin E and C supplementation to triple and quadruple Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens. Four hundred patients with H. pylori infection were classified into four groups. Patients in group A (n=100) received amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and lansoprazole for 2 weeks. In group B, patients (n=100) received vitamins C and E for a month, in addition to amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and lansoprazole for 2 weeks. Patients in group C (n=100) received amoxicillin, clarithromycin, lansoprazole, and bismuth subcitrate for 2 weeks, whereas those in group D (n=100) received vitamins C and E for a month, in addition to amoxicillin, clarithromycin, lansoprazole, and bismuth subcitrate for 2 weeks. H. pylori eradication was assessed with the C14 urea breath test 2 months after the end of the therapy. The eradication rate was assessed using per-protocol (PP) and intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses. Three hundred forty-eight patients finished the study. The eradication of H. pylori was achieved in 63 of 84 patients (75%) by PP and 63 of 100 (63%) by ITT analysis in group A, 60 of 84 (71.4%) by PP and 60 of 100 (60%) by ITT analysis in group B, 72 of 89 (80.9 %) by PP and 72 of 100 (72%) by ITT analysis in group C, and 76 of 91 (83.5%) by PP and 76 of 100 (76%) by ITT analysis in group D. There was no remarkable change between groups A and B (p>0.05). Similar results were also found between groups D and C (p>0.05). This study revealed that supplementing vitamins C and E to either the triple or quadruple therapies did not provide an additional advantage for achieving significantly higher eradication rates for H. pylori.

  16. [Helicobacter pylori infection (13C-UBT), and its relationship with nutritional and socioeconomic factors in low income school children from Valencia, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez Valery, M C; Barón, M A; Solano, L; Nadaff, G; Boccio, J; Barrado, A

    2006-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection (Hp) is widely spread around the world, and it is considered one of the main causes of chronic gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. Recent research has shown that it can be associated with nutritional disorders, mainly with iron and other micronutrient deficiencies. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of Hp infection, and infection pattern according to age, sex, nutritional status, and socioeconomic conditions in children who attended the Unidad Educativa "Valentin Espinal" in the city of Valencia. 170 children, between 3 and 14 years of age were studied to assess Hpylori infection (13C-urea breath test), age, nutritional status according to BMI and Height for age, hemoglobin (cianometahemoglobin), serum ferritin (ELISA), socioeconomic status (Graffar-Méndez-Castellano), housing conditions, number of families and of people cohabitating in the same household, and quality of services. 78.8% of the children were infected with Hp, witch was significantly correlated with age but not gender. 25.9% of the sample had undernutrition, and 46.5% were stunted. 98.1% of the families lived in poverty, and 98% of the households showed sanitary deficiencies. A mean of 6.0 +/- 2.4 persons lived in each household (range: 2-15), and an average of 3.2 person shared bedrooms. The odds of being infected were higher in those children who were stunted. Also, socioeconomic status, mother's education level, and poor hosing conditions were significantly associated to being infected. Hpylori is highly prevalent among socially and economically deprived children, and age, overcrowding, and a low education level of the mother increases the risk of being infected.

  17. The effect of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: A parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwizer, Werner; Menne, Dieter; Schütze, Kurt; Vieth, Michael; Goergens, Reiner; Malfertheiner, Peter; Leodolter, Andreas; Fried, Michael; Fox, Mark R

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to resolve controversy regarding the effects of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy and H. pylori infection in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. A randomized, double-blind, multicentre trial was performed in patients presenting with reflux symptoms. H. pylori-positive patients were randomized to receive either antibiotics or placebo for 7 days. H. pylori-negative patient controls received placebo. All received esomeprazole 20 mg b.d. for 7 days, followed by 40 mg o.d. to complete an 8-week course, and were followed up for 32 weeks by telephone. In this study, 198/589 (34%) patients were H. pylori-positive and 113 H. pylori-negative patients served as controls. Baseline endoscopy revealed 63% Los Angeles grade 0A and 37% Los Angeles grade BCD oesophagitis with no difference between patient groups. Symptom improvement on esomeprazole was seen in 89%. H. pylori eradication was successful in 82%. H. pylori eradication had no effect on symptomatic relapse (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.74-1.8; p = 0.5). Overall, H. pylori-positive patients had a lower probability of relapse compared to H. pylori-negative controls (hazard ratio 0.6, 95% CI 0.43-0.85; p = 0.004). Relapse hazard was modulated also by oesophagitis grade (BCD vs. 0A, hazard ratio 2.1, 95% CI 1.5-3.0). Relapse of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms after a course of high dose acid suppression took longer for H. pylori-positive patients than H. pylori-negative controls; however eradication therapy had no effect on the risk of relapse; ClincialTrials.gov number, NCT00574925.

  18. Microaerophilic conditions permit to mimic in vitro events occurring during in vivo Helicobacter pylori infection and to identify Rho/Ras-associated proteins in cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Sandra; Corthésy-Theulaz, Irène; Spertini, François; Corthésy, Blaise

    2002-09-13

    Molecular dissection of the mechanisms underlying Helicobacter pylori infection suffers from the lack of in vitro systems mimicking in vivo observations. A system was developed whereby human epithelial cells (Caco-2) grown as polarized monolayers and bacteria can communicate with each other under culture conditions optimal for each partner. Caco-2 cells grown on filter supports were inserted in a vertical position into diffusion chambers equilibrated with air and 5% CO(2) at their basolateral surface (aerophilic conditions) and 5% CO(2), 5% O(2), 90% N(2) (microaerophilic conditions) in the apical compartment. Remarkably, the epithelial polarized layer was stable under these asymmetric culture conditions for at least 24 h, and the presence of Caco-2 cells was necessary to maintain H. pylori growth. In contrast to previous studies conducted with non-polarized Caco-2 cells and other cell lines kept under aerophilic conditions, we found H. pylori-dependent stimulation of cytokine secretion (MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), GRO-alpha (growth-regulated oncogene-alpha), RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)). This correlated with nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p50 and p65 subunits. Tyrosine phosphorylation of nine cellular proteins was induced or enhanced; we identified p120(RasGAP), p190(RhoGAP), p62dok (downstream of tyrosine kinases), and cortactin as H. pylori-inducible targets. Moreover, reduction of H. pylori urease expression was observed in adherent bacteria as compared with bacteria in suspension. In addition to mimicking several observations seen in the inflamed gastric mucosa, the novel in vitro system was allowed to underscore complex cellular events not seen in classical in vitro analyses of microaerophilic bacteria-epithelial cell cross-talk.

  19. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with Toll-like receptor-4 Thr399Ile polymorphism increased the risk of peptic ulcer development in North of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourani, Mehdi; Habibzadeh, Maryam; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad; Teymournejad, Omid; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah; Khafri, Soraya; Nouri, Hamid Reza

    2018-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) polymorphisms may influence host immune response against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). This study aimed to investigate whether TLR4 polymorphisms are associated with H. pylori susceptibility and risk of peptic ulcer development or not. The TLR4 + 3725 G/C polymorphism was studied using polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers (PCR-CTPP). In addition, TLR4 Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms were evaluated by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). There was no significant difference in TLR4 + 3725 G/C and Asp299Gly genotype frequencies between non-peptic ulcer (NPUD) and peptic ulcer (PUD) individuals in the context of peptic ulcer development and susceptibility to infection with H. pylori. Nevertheless, a significant association with increased risk for PUD development was observed for polymorphism TLR4 Thr399Ile [odds ratio (OR) = 4.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.35-13.26; p = 0.01]. Correspondingly, TLR4 Thr399Ile polymorphism was associated with H. pylori susceptibility (OR = 0.27; 95% CI = 0.08-0.88; p = 0.04). In addition, TLR4 Thr399Ile polymorphism increased 4.2-fold, the risk of peptic ulcer development in individuals infected by H. pylori carrying CT + TT genotype. Our results showed that TLR4 Thr399Ile polymorphism along with H. pylori infection may play critical roles in peptic ulcer development in North of Iran. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Gastric ulcer treatment: cure of Helicobacter pylori infection without subsequent acid-suppressive therapy: is it effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; van der Knoop, Bloeme

    2008-06-01

    Whether it is a requirement to continue with anti-secretory therapy following anti-Helicobacter therapy in H. pylori positive gastric ulcers is an important question. As gastric ulcers tend to heal more slowly than duodenal ulcers, may be asymptomatic or only causing mild symptoms and success at curing H. pylori with current fist line therapies is 80% at best, clinicians will likely err on the side of caution and continue acid suppressive therapy to ensure healing of gastric ulcers. This is certainly recommended when dealing with bleeding ulcers.

  1. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of Apis mellifera honey on the Helicobacter pylori infection of Wistar rats gastric mucosa

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    Thiago Yamamoto AMARAL

    Full Text Available Abstract Considering that Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium able to colonize the upper gastrointestinal tract and cause mucosal injury, not always can be effectively eradicated by the traditional approaches, there is an interest in alternative therapies until a vaccine be available. Honey is a food supplement with high carbohydrate content and antioxidant activity, as well as broad antimicrobial spectrum. After analyzing the physicochemical and in vitro antimicrobial properties of an Apis mellifera honey from the Atlantic forest of Alagoas / Brazil, the purpose of the present work was evaluate its in vivo effects against Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa of Wistar rats. First, it was verified the success of inoculation/infection of the pathogen in the gastric mucosa of the rats, through the subsequent removal of their stomachs for histological analysis (hematoxylin and eosin stain and Giemsa stain. Then, four groups of animals were treated with sterilized distilled deionized water, the Apis mellifera honey, a combination of omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, and an association of such medicines and honey (1:1. Except the control, all treatments were effective in combating infection, however, honey reduced the inflammatory process, whilst the antibiotics increase the number of eosinophils.

  2. Contribution of Helicobacter pylori infection to the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in patients on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, corticosteroids and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, M; Schneider, C; Costanzo, R; Breja, R; Röhl, F-W; Malfertheiner, P

    2018-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, low-dose aspirin, non-aspirin antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and corticosteroids increase the risk of gastroduodenal bleeding. To determine in a retrospective cohort study the contribution of Helicobacter pylori infection to the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in patients taking these drugs. Among patients with peptic ulcer disease diagnosed by endoscopy from 01/2004 to 12/2014 (N = 1719, 60% males, age 65.8 ± 14.5), 56.9% had peptic ulcer bleeding (cases) and 43.1% uncomplicated peptic ulcer disease (controls). Demographics, intake of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, non-aspirin antiplatelet agents, anticoagulants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, proton pump inhibitors and corticosteroids were documented. H. pylori status was determined by histology, rapid urease test or serology. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic regression analysis. Helicobacter pylori infection increased the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and aspirin users (OR = 2.91, 95% CI = 1.71-4.98 and OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.52-3.28, respectively), but not in patients on anticoagulants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or corticosteroid therapy. H. pylori-positive status substantially increased the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in patients on non-aspirin antiplatelet agents (OR = 4.37, 95% CI = 1.28-14.99), concomitant aspirin/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug intake (OR = 5.85, 95% CI = 1.68-20.36) and combined antiplatelet therapy (OR = 8.43, 95% CI = 1.09-65.17). After further adjustment for proton pump inhibitor intake, H. pylori infection was still a risk factor for peptic ulcer bleeding in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and aspirin users. Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk of peptic ulcer bleeding in peptic ulcer disease patients on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin and non

  3. Fourteen-day high-dose esomeprazole, amoxicillin and metronidazole as third-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Ignasi; González-Santiago, Jesús M; Molina-Infante, Javier; Barrio, Jesús; Herranz, Maria Teresa; Algaba, Alicia; Castro, Manuel; Gisbert, Javier P; Calvet, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of currently recommended third-line therapies for Helicobacter pylori is suboptimal, even that of culture-guided treatments. Resistance to multiple antibiotics is the major factor related to treatment failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a 14-day therapy using high-dose of amoxicillin, metronidazole and esomeprazole. Multicenter open-label study as a register in routine clinical practice in patients with two previous failures of eradication therapy. A triple therapy with esomeprazole 40 mg b.d., amoxicillin 1 g t.d.s and metronidazole 500 mg t.d.s for 2 weeks was administered as a third-line therapy after a first treatment including clarithromycin and a second treatment including a quinolone. Helicobacter pylori status was determined by either histology or 13 C-UBT both before and after treatment. A total of 68 patients were included in this study. An interim analysis showed that only three out of eight patients who had received metronidazole in previous eradication regimens were cured (37%, 95% CI 8-75); as a result, after this interim analysis only metronidazole-naïve patients were included. The ITT eradication rate in metronidazole-naive patients was 64% (95% CI 51-76). Adverse events occurred in 58% of patients, all of them mild-to-moderate. Two patients (3%) did not complete >90% of the treatment because of side effects. No severe adverse events occurred. Cure rates of this 14-day schedule using high-dose esomeprazole, amoxicillin and metronidazole as a third-line eradication regimen were suboptimal, especially in patients who had received metronidazole in previous failed eradication regimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Immunohistochemistry Profile of Lymphocytic Gastritis in Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection: Interplay between Infection and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Lerner

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytic gastritis (LG is associated with helicobacter pylori (Hp and celiac disease (CD. We aimed to clarify the relationship between Hp infection and CD by defining a unique histopathology profile of LG in these two diseases. Forty patients who underwent upper endoscopy were divided into four groups: eight controls, ten active CD patients without Hp, twelve CD negative with Hp, and ten active CD with Hp infection. Antral samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining for CD20, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD57, CNA42, and Ki67 for lymphoid aggregates, intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs number, density of lamina propria (LP lymphocytes, and inflammatory glandular involvement. Only IELs positive for CD3 and CD8 were increased significantly in CD patients with or without Hp infection. Hp did not contribute to the number of CD8 IELs. In complicated cases with Hp and suspicious for CD, the number of CD8+ IELs hints toward a CD rather than Hp infection.

  5. Guidelines for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection in Italy: The III Working Group Consensus Report 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagari, Rocco Maurizio; Romano, Marco; Ojetti, Veronica; Stockbrugger, Reinhold; Gullini, Sergio; Annibale, Bruno; Farinati, Fabio; Ierardi, Enzo; Maconi, Giovanni; Rugge, Massimo; Calabrese, Carlo; Di Mario, Francesco; Luzza, Francesco; Pretolani, Stefano; Savio, Antonella; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Caselli, Michele

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge on the role of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is continually evolving, and treatment is becoming more challenging due to increasing bacterial resistance. Since the management of HP infection is changing, an update of the national Italian guidelines delivered in 2007 was needed. In the III Working Group Consensus Report 2015, a panel of 17 experts from several Italian regions reviewed current evidence on different topics relating to HP infection. Four working groups examined the following topics: (1) "open questions" on HP diagnosis and treatment (focusing on dyspepsia, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or aspirin use and extra-gastric diseases); (2) non-invasive and invasive diagnostic tests; (3) treatment of HP infection; (4) role of HP in the prevention of gastric cancer. Statements and recommendations were discussed and a consensus reached in a final plenary session held in February 2015 in Bologna. Recommendations are based on the best current evidence to help physicians manage HP infection in Italy. The guidelines have been endorsed by the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Society of Digestive Endoscopy. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The fate of ingested [sup 14]C-urea in the urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munster, D J; Chapman, B A; Burt, M J; Dobbs, B R; Allardyce, R A; Bagshaw, P F; Troughton, W D; Cook, H B [Christchurch Hospital (New Zealand)

    1993-08-01

    The metabolic fate of the radioactive carbon in the [sup 14]C-urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori was investigated in 18 subjects. After ingestion of labelled urea, breath was sampled for 24 h, and urine was collected for 3 days. Subjects were designated high or low expirers on the basis of their breath counts, and this agreed well with H. pylori serologic analyses. When given 185 or 37 kBq of [sup 14]C-urea, 51% of the label was recovered from the breath of high expirers, and 7% from the breath of low expirers. The mean combined urinary and breath recovery for high expirers was 86%, and for low expirers it was 97%. It is concluded that the long-term retention of [sup 14]C from ingested [sup 14]C-urea is low. The results enable a more accurate estimation to be made of radiation exposure resulting from the [sup 14]C-urea breath test. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P.

    1991-01-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of an ENteric Immunity SImulator (ENISI)-Based Model of Immune Responses to Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Maksudul; Deng, Xinwei; Philipson, Casandra; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Bisset, Keith; Carbo, Adria; Eubank, Stephen; Hontecillas, Raquel; Hoops, Stefan; Mei, Yongguo; Abedi, Vida; Marathe, Madhav

    2015-01-01

    Agent-based models (ABM) are widely used to study immune systems, providing a procedural and interactive view of the underlying system. The interaction of components and the behavior of individual objects is described procedurally as a function of the internal states and the local interactions, which are often stochastic in nature. Such models typically have complex structures and consist of a large number of modeling parameters. Determining the key modeling parameters which govern the outcomes of the system is very challenging. Sensitivity analysis plays a vital role in quantifying the impact of modeling parameters in massively interacting systems, including large complex ABM. The high computational cost of executing simulations impedes running experiments with exhaustive parameter settings. Existing techniques of analyzing such a complex system typically focus on local sensitivity analysis, i.e. one parameter at a time, or a close "neighborhood" of particular parameter settings. However, such methods are not adequate to measure the uncertainty and sensitivity of parameters accurately because they overlook the global impacts of parameters on the system. In this article, we develop novel experimental design and analysis techniques to perform both global and local sensitivity analysis of large-scale ABMs. The proposed method can efficiently identify the most significant parameters and quantify their contributions to outcomes of the system. We demonstrate the proposed methodology for ENteric Immune SImulator (ENISI), a large-scale ABM environment, using a computational model of immune responses to Helicobacter pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa.

  9. Advantage of using a home-made ELISA kit for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection over commercially imported kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, M; Talebkhan, Y; Khalili, G; Mahboudi, F; Massarrat, S; Zamaninia, L; Oghalaei, A

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a home-made ELISA kit for detection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and comparison of its immunologic criteria with those of foreign commercial kits. A home-made IgG ELISA kit was developed using soluble antigenic fractions of Hp proteins. Confirmed sera were tested and serological criteria were evaluated through assessment of 199 serum samples. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity values of home-made kit were 92, 92 and 90.4%, respectively. These immunologic criteria for Trinity kit were 95.2, 95.2 and 95% in comparison with IBL kit (91.3, 92.2 and 88.5%), BIOHIT kit (72.4, 41.6 and 94.1%) and HelicoBlot2.1 (94.2, 93.4 and 100%). Kappa agreement assessment demonstrated that two of the imported ELISA kits had fair to moderate agreement with the home-made kit while the other one had a poor agreement value. Apart from comparable values between the home-made kit and the most efficient imported kit (Trinity) there was significant cost benefit. Therefore, we recommend the home-made kit as a suitable substitution for detection of Hp infection in the Iranian population.

  10. Advantage of using a home-made elisa kit for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection over commercially imported kits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate a home-made ELISA kit for detection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection and comparison of its immunologic criteria with those of foreign commercial kits. Methods: A home-made IgG ELISA kit was developed using soluble antigenic fractions of Hp proteins. Confirmed sera were tested and serological criteria were evaluated through assessment of 199 serum samples. Results: The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity values of home-made kit were 92, 92 and 90.4%, respectively. These immunologic criteria for Trinity kit were 95.2, 95.2 and 95% in comparison with IBL kit (91.3, 92.2 and 88.5%, BIOHIT kit (72.4, 41.6 and 94.1% and HelicoBlot2.1 (94.2, 93.4 and 100%. Kappa agreement assessment demonstrated that two of the imported ELISA kits had fair to moderate agreement with the home-made kit while the other one had a poor agreement value. Conclusions: Apart from comparable values between the home-made kit and the most efficient imported kit (Trinity there was significant cost benefit. Therefore, we recommend the home-made kit as a suitable substitution for detection of Hp infection in the Iranian population.

  11. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Louvain Medical School, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  12. Association Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Long-term Outcome in Patients with Drug-eluting Stent Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Lei-Lei; Wang, De-Zhao; Chen, Bu-Xing

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and the long-term outcome in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients with drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation and so as to explore the significance of Hp eradication therapy in preventing major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). 539 ACS patients with DES implantation from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2012 were analyzed. All the patients were divided into two groups according to the result of 13C urea breath test. 253 patients with Hp infection were put into group A (Hp+), and 286 cases without Hp infection were put into group B (Hp-). Demographic data was collected and all patients went through biochemical indicators and other routine blood examinations. We explored the correlations of Hp infection with MACE and UGIB after 3 to 5 years of follow-up using survival analysis. Survival analysis showed that Hp infection was a predictor of MACE and UGI. Sub-group analysis showed that patients with Hp eradication therapy had no relationship with MACE but had a lower rate of UGIB than those without Hp eradication therapy.

  13. [Clinical effect of triple therapy combined with Saccharomyces boulardii in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Mei; Ou-Yang, Hong-Juan; Duan, Bo-Ping; Xu, Bin; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Tang, Juan; You, Jie-Yu

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy combined with Saccharomyces boulardii in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection among children in terms of Hp eradication rate and incidence of adverse events. A prospective randomised controlled study was conducted on 240 children with a confirmed diagnosis of Hp infection. These patients were randomized into triple therapy (n=120) and probiotics groups (n=120). The triple therapy group received amoxicillin [40 mg/(kg·d), Tid], clarithromycin [15 mg/(kg·d), Bid] and omeprazole [0.7-0.8 mg/(kg·d), Qd], while the probiotics group received Saccharomyces boulardii (250 mg, Bid) in addition to triple therapy. The course of treatment was 14 days in both groups. The adverse events in subjects were recorded by their parents during treatment. Hp eradiation was evaluated by (13)C breath test at 4 weeks after treatment, and the eradication rate and incidence of adverse events were compared between the two groups. The Hp eradication rates were 75.8% (91/120) in the triple therapy group and 85% (102/120) in the probiotics group (P>0.05). Compared with the triple therapy group, the probiotics group had nonsignificantly lower incidence of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain (P>0.05) and significantly lower incidence of stomatitis, constipation and diarrhea (PSaccharomyces boulardii cannot significantly increase Hp eradication rate, but can significantly reduce the incidence of stomatitis, constipation, and diarrhea during treatment.

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and associated factors among adults in Southern Brazil: a population-based cross-sectional study

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    Halal Camila S

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection is associated with several upper gastrointestinal disorders. Local data on the epidemiology of the infection are scarce in Brazil. The purpose of this study is to measure the prevalence rate and to explore the associated factors among the adult population living in Pelotas, a southern Brazilin city. Methods This was a population-based cross-sectional study. Through a multi-stage sampling method all individuals 20 years and over living at the selected households at the urban area of the city were interviewed regarding past and current socio-economic indicators; demographic characteristics; nutritional and behavioural habits; and history of upper gastrointestinal symptoms.Hp infection was ascertained through the 13C-UBT. Due to the high prevalence, data were analysed through robust Poisson regression. All analyses took into account the family clustering of the data. Results Among 563 eligible individuals, 363 agreed to perform the 13C-UBT (refusal rate of 35.5%. Refusals were associated with female sex, consumption of mate drinking, and presence of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The prevalence rate of H. pylori infection was 63.4% (95%CI 59.3%–69.3%. In crude analyses, prevalence was associated with increasing age, non-white skin colour, lower current family income, lower education level, higher size of the family, low socio-economic conditions in childhood, higher number of siblings and attendance to day-care centres in childhood, and presence of dyspeptic symptoms. In adjusted analysis the level of education of the father was inversely associated with the infection, whereas number of siblings and attendance to day-care centre in childhood were directly associated with it. Non-white skin colour remained significantly associated with increased prevalence even after allowing for past and current socio-economic characteristics, age and sex. Compared to non-symptomatic individuals, those

  15. Frequency of γδ T Cells and Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Helicobacter Pylori-infected Patients with Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadman, Mojtaba; Rajabian, Zeinab; Ajami, Abolghasem; Hussein-Nattaj, Hadi; Rafiei, Alireza; Hosseini, Vahid; Taghvaei, Tarang; Abbasi, Ali; Tehrani, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    To clarify the effect of γδ T cells and invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells in pathophysiology of dyspeptic disorders, number of these two cells in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), peptic ulcer disease (PUD), and gastric cancer (GC) were compared.Patients with dyspepsia were divided into three groups of NUD, PUD, and GC according to their endoscopic and histopathological examinations. Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed by rapid urease test and histopathology. The number of peripheral blood CD3+TCRγδ(+) T cells and CD3+Va24Ja18+ iNKT cells were determined by flow cytometry. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was also used for identifying the TCRγδ+ cells.Forty two patients with NUD (31.6%), 44 with PUD (33.1%), and 47 with GC (35.3%) were included in the study. The frequency of CD3+TCRγδ(+) T cells in peripheral blood of patients with GC (2.71±0.25) was significantly lower than that in NUD (3.97±0.32, p<0.05) and PUD groups (3.87±0.32, p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in CD3+TCRγδ(+) T cell percentage between the NUD and PUD groups. The frequency of TCRγδ(+) lymphocytes was significantly lower in tissue samples from patients with GC (4.81±0.53) than in NUD (11.09±1.09, p<0.0001) and PUD groups (11.11±1.01, p<0.0001). Also, we could not find any significant difference in the percentage of mucosal TCRγδ+ cells between the NUD and PUD groups. The results showed no significant difference in iNKT cells percentage among the three groups of patients.The results suggest that decreasing number of γδ T cells may be related to development and progression of gastric cancer.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing before first-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with dual or triple antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Angel; Montes, Milagrosa; Ibarra, Begoña; Tamayo, Esther; Alonso, Horacio; Mendarte, Usua; Lizasoan, Jacobo; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2017-05-14

    To evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial susceptibility-guided therapy before first-line treatment for infection in patients with dual or triple antibiotic resistance. A total of 1034 patients infected by Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) during 2013-2014 were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. 157 of 1034 (15%) patients showed resistance to two (127/1034; 12%) and to three (30/1034; 3%) antibiotics. Sixty-eight patients with dual H. pylori -resistance (clarithromycin, metronidazole or levofloxacin) were treated for 10 d with triple therapies: OAL (omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and levofloxacin 500 mg b.i.d.) 43 cases, OAM (omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and metronidazole 500 mg b.i.d.) 12 cases and OAC (omeprazole 20 mg b.id., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.) 13 cases based on the antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Twelve patients showed triple H. pylori -resistance (clarithromycin, metronidazole and levofloxacin) and received for 10 d triple therapy with OAR (omeprazole 20 mg b.id., amoxicillin 1 g b.i.d., and rifabutin 150 mg b.i.d.). Eradication was confirmed by 13C-urea breath test. Adverse effects and compliance were assessed by a questionnaire. Intention-to-treat eradication rates were: OAL (97.6%), OAM (91.6%), OAC (92.3%) and OAR (58.3%). Cure rate was significantly higher in naïve patients treated with OAR-10 compared to patients who had two or three previous treatment failures (83% vs 33%). Adverse events rates for OAL, OAM, OAC and OAR were 22%, 25%, 23% and 17%, respectively, all of them mild-moderate. Antimicrobial susceptibility-guided triple therapies during 10 d for first-line treatment leads to an eradication rate superior to 90% in patients with dual antibiotic H. pylori resistance.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of presence of blood in the stomach on endoscopic diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori infection

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    S Mittal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Presence of blood in the stomach has been thought to affect the performance of diagnostic tests used in detecting Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in the stomach. This study evaluated the effect of blood on the efficacy of rapid urease test (RUT and microscopic appearance of the biopsy after staining with Giemsa stain. Materials and Methods: Patients with bleeding oesophageal varices who met the inclusion criteria were tested for H. pylori by RUT and microscopic examination of the biopsy. A repeat endoscopy, RUT and histology were done one month following initial presentation. The performance of the diagnostic tests was evaluated with and without the presence of intraluminal blood. A combined result of the two tests, RUT and histology, carried out in presence or absence of blood for the diagnosis of H. pylori, when considered together was considered as the gold standard. Results: Thirty six patients included in the study were in the ages ranging between 15-60 years (mean age = 44.14 years ±2.1. The combination of tests at both visits showed 20/36 (55.6% patients were positive for H. pylori. The decrease in H. pylori positivity in the presence of blood was significant for RUT (8.3% vs. 38.9%; P=0.005 and combined test (19.4% vs. 47.2%; P=0.02 but the decrease in positivity for histology (11.1% vs 30.6% was not significant (P=0.08. In the presence of blood, the sensitivity of RUT, histology and combined tests were 15%, 20% and 35%, respectively. In the absence of blood, the sensitivity of RUT, histology and combination of tests was 70%, 55% and 85%, respectively. Conclusion: Blood in the stomach significantly decreased the sensitivity of RUT, histology and the combination of both. Negative results of these tests in acute upper gastro intestinal (GI bleeding should therefore be interpreted carefully.

  18. Lack of association between Helicobacter pylori infection with dupA-positive strains and gastroduodenal diseases in Brazilian patients.

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    Gomes, Luciana I; Rocha, Gifone A; Rocha, Andreia M C; Soares, Taciana F; Oliveira, Celso A; Bittencourt, Paulo F S; Queiroz, Dulciene M M

    2008-04-01

    Duodenal ulcer-promoting gene (dupA) was recently described as a new putative Helicobacter pylori virulence marker associated with an increased risk for duodenal ulcer and reduced risk for gastric carcinoma in Japan and Korea. Since differences regarding the association among H. pylori markers and H. pylori-associated diseases have been demonstrated around the world, we evaluated the presence of the gene in 482 strains from Brazilian children (34 with duodenal ulcer and 97 with gastritis) and adults (126 with duodenal ulcer, 144 with gastritis and 81 with gastric carcinoma) by PCR using the described primers and an additional set of primers based on Brazilian strain sequences. The results were confirmed by sequencing. The presence of cagA was investigated by PCR and also included in the analysis. dupA was present in 445 (92.32%) and absent in 29 (6.02%) strains. All samples from children with and without duodenal ulcer were dupA-positive (p=1.0). No association was observed among the strains from adults with gastritis (92.36%), duodenal ulcer (87.30%, p=0.30) and gastric carcinoma (87.65%, p=0.31). Conversely, cagA-positve status remained independently associated with duodenal ulcer (children: odds ratios (OR)=5.58, 95% confidence intervals (CI)=1.67-18.50; adults: OR=3.33, 95% CI=2.14-5.19) and gastric carcinoma (OR=6.58, 95% CI=3.51-12.30) in multivariate analyses. The presence of dupA was significantly higher in strains from children than in those from adults (p=0.01). In conclusion, dupA is highly frequent and not associated with H. pylori-associated diseases in both Brazilian adults and children, which points to regional differences in the distribution of the gene.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection, atrophic gastritis, and pancreatic cancer risk: A meta-analysis of prospective epidemiologic studies.

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    Liu, Hong; Chen, Yue-Tong; Wang, Rui; Chen, Xin-Zu

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the associations of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and atrophic gastritis (AG) with pancreatic cancer risk. A literature search in PubMed was performed up to July 2017. Only prospective cohort and nested case-control studies enrolling cancer-free participants were eligible. Incident pancreatic cancer cases were ascertained during the follow-up. The risks of pancreatic cancer were compared between persons infected and noninfected with Hp, or between those with and without AG status at baseline. Odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios were combined. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed, and publication bias was estimated. Three cohort studies and 6 nested case-control studies, including 65,155 observations, were analyzed. The meta-analyses did not confirm the association between pancreatic cancer risk and Hp infection (OR = 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81-1.47) or AG status (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.80-1.72). However, particular subpopulations potentially had increased risks of pancreatic cancer. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-negative strains of Hp might be a causative factor of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.05-1.62), but a sensitivity analysis by leave-one-out method did not fully warrant it (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 0.93-1.56). In 1 nested case-control study, AG at stomach corpus in Hp-negative subpopulation might have increased risk of pancreatic cancer, but with a poor test power = 0.56. Publication biases were nonsignificant in the present meta-analysis. Based on current prospective epidemiologic studies, the linkage of pancreatic cancer to Hp infection or AG status was not warranted on the whole. Nevertheless, prospective studies only focusing on those specific subpopulations are further required to obtain better power.

  20. A Decrease of Histone Deacetylase 6 Expression Caused by Helicobacter Pylori Infection is Associated with Oncogenic Transformation in Gastric Cancer

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    Qing He

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 plays a role in the progression of many tumors. However, the relationship between the level of HDAC6 expression and gastric tumorigenesis is still unclear. Here, we illustrate the potential correlation between Helicobacter pylori (HP infection and the variation of HDAC6 expression in different gastric lesions, as well as the clinical significance of HDAC6 expression in gastric cancer (GC patients. Materials and Methods: Between 2011 and 2016, 364 patients with different types of gastric lesions were enrolled in Baotou City Central Hospital. Immunostaining of HDAC6 expression and HP infection were performed in the following cohort including 21 normal tissues (Normal; 40 samples with chronic superficial gastritis (CSG; 106 with chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG; 94 with intestinal metaplasia (IM; 64 with dysplasia (DYS and 39 with gastric cancer (GC. Survival analysis was performed in another 80 GC patients using the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression analyses. The level of HDAC6 expression was determined by Real-time PCR, Western blotting and IHC staining in gastric cell lines and tissues. Furthermore, the correlation between HDAC6 expression and clinicopathological features and prognosis was analyzed in the GC cohort. HP strains were lavaged into Kunming mice to investigate the effects of HP infection on the expression of different HDAC members in this mouse model. Results: Higher levels of HDAC6 expression were detected in normal and premalignant lesions than in the GC tissues (p<0.01, and decreased HDAC6 expression was associated with HP infection and TNM stage (p<0.01 and p=0.048, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that HDAC6 expression was an independent predictor of the outcome of GC patients (p=0.04. HP mediated HDAC6 expression in the cell lines and KM mice. HP infection could promote HDAC1 and HDAC4 expression as determined by Western blotting. Conclusions: HDAC6 is a

  1. Polysaccharides as Bacterial Antiadhesive Agents and "Smart" Constituents for Improved Drug Delivery Systems Against Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchicchi, Bianca; Hensel, Andreas; Goycoolea, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    The standard eradication treatment of the hostile Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) stomach infection is facing increasing alarming antibiotic resistance worldwide and calls for alternative strategies to the use of antibiotics. One new perspective in this direction is cytoprotective compounds for targeted prevention of the adhesion of the bacteria to the stomach host cell and to inhibit the bacterial cell-cell communication via quorum sensing by specific inhibitors. Bacterial adhesion of H. pylori to the host cells is mainly mediated by carbohydrate-protein interactions. Therefore, the use of polyvalent carbohydrates, (e.g. plant-derived polysaccharides), as potential antiadhesive compounds, seems to be a promising tool to prevent the initial docking of the bacterium to the stomach cells. Polysaccharides are common constituents of daily food, either as starch or as dietary fiber and often also function as excipients for galenic drug-delivery formulations. In addition, polysaccharides with defined pharmacodynamics action against bacterial outer membrane proteins can have potential as therapeutic tools in the treatment of bacterial infections. Some polysaccharides are known to possess antibacterial properties against gram-positive bacteria, others to inhibit bacterial colonization by blocking specific carbohydrate receptors involved in host-bacteria interaction. This mode of action is advocated as alternative antiadhesion therapy. Ongoing research is also seeking for polysaccharide-based nanoformulations with potential for local drug delivery at the stomach as novel H. pylori therapies. These approaches pose challenges concerned with the stability of the nanomaterials in the harsh conditions of the gastric environment and their capacity to adhere to the stomach mucosa. In a global scenario, geographical diversity and social habits, namely lifestyle and dietary factors, influence the prevalence of the H. pylori-associated diseases and their severity. In this context

  2. Úlcera péptica gastroduodenal e infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori na criança e adolescente Gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents

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    Paulo F. S. Bittencourt

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar aspectos relevantes relativos à úlcera péptica gastroduodenal e à infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori na criança e adolescente. FONTES DOS DADOS : Livros técnicos e bases de dados MEDLINE e LILACS de 1966 a 2006. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS : A úlcera péptica na criança e adolescente pode ser primária, associada à infecção pelo H. pylori, ou secundária, na qual os mecanismos etiopatogênicos dependem da doença de base. A infecção é adquirida predominantemente na infância, com taxas de prevalência que variam de 56,8 a 83,1% nas crianças que vivem nas regiões mais pobres do Brasil e de aproximadamente 10% nas crianças abaixo de 10 anos de idade nos países desenvolvidos. A infecção pode ser diagnosticada por métodos invasivos, que investigam a presença da bactéria, ou de DNA, RNA ou produtos bacterianos em fragmentos de biópsia da mucosa gástrica obtida à endoscopia; também pode ser diagnosticada através de métodos não-invasivos, que compreendem a pesquisa de anticorpos anti-H. pylori em amostras de soro, urina ou saliva, a pesquisa de antígenos da bactéria nas fezes e o teste respiratório com uréia marcada com carbono-13. O método de escolha para o diagnóstico da úlcera péptica é a endoscopia digestiva alta, com a vantagem adicional de, durante o procedimento, permitir a obtenção de fragmentos de mucosa gástrica para o diagnóstico da infecção e estudo histopatológico. CONCLUSÕES: A infecção por H. pylori é a principal causa de úlcera péptica na infância. A erradicação da bactéria com antimicrobiano é acompanhada de cura da doença, sendo, portanto, indicada em todas as crianças H. pylori-positivas com úlcera péptica em atividade, recorrente, cicatrizada ou complicada.OBJECTIVE: To show important aspects of gastroduodenal peptic ulcer and of Helicobacter pylori infection in children and adolescents. SOURCES: Technical textbooks and MEDLINE and LILACS databases including

  3. Evidence of mother-child transmission of Helicobacter pylori infection Evidência da transmissão mãe-filho da infecção por Helicobacter pylori

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    Mario Luis Escobar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low socioeconomical status is a major risk factor for natural acquisition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in developing countries. Its transmission route is unknown but studies suggest person-to-person transmission. AIM: To evaluate seropositivity of anti-H. pylori antibodies in family members of infected symptomatic index patients as compared to family members of symptomatic uninfected index patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and twelve family members of 38 patients who underwent endoscopy to exclude peptic disease were studied. Patients were deemed H. pylori infected or not infected when rapid urease test and histology were both positive or both negative. The family members underwent ELISA serology using the Cobas Core II Kit (Roche and were classified into three groups: I - 29 family members of 10 H. pylori (+ duodenal ulcer index patients; II - 57 family members of 17 H. pylori (+ index patients without duodenal ulcer; III - 26 family members of 11 H. pylori (- index patients. RESULTS: Seropositivity of group I and II (infected patients was higher than the control group, 83% vs 38%, specially in mothers, 81% vs 18%, and in siblings 76% vs 20%. Differences between fathers' seropositivity was not statistically significant in the three groups: 100% vs 86% vs 70%. Seropositivity of all family members (mother, father and siblings between infected group (I vs II was similar. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in family members of infected patients, but was similar among family members of infected patients with and without duodenal ulcer. H. pylori infection is more frequent in mothers and siblings of infected index children. A common source of infection cannot be excluded, but facts suggest that person-to-person transmission occurs, specially from mother to child.O estrato socioeconômico baixo é o maior fator de risco para a aquisição natural da infecção por Helicobacter pylori em pa

  4. Severe gastrointestinal involvement in adult-onset Henoch–Schönlein purpura associated with clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Guillermo Delgado-García

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing resistance to clarithromycin-containing triple therapy in a H. pylori-infected adult patient with HSP. Gastrointestinal bleeding remains one of the most feared manifestations of HSP. These patients may benefit from H. pylori screening, as this might positively affect their prognosis. Further studies in adults are nevertheless needed to clarify this association and its therapeutic impact.

  5. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Amber C.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M.; Peek, Richard M.; Washington, M. Kay; Algood, Holly M. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA. PMID:27620719

  6. Let-7b is involved in the inflammation and immune responses associated with Helicobacter pylori infection by targeting Toll-like receptor 4.

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    Gui-gen Teng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Toll-like receptors (TLRs are important initiators in native immune responses to microbial infections. TLR4 is up-regulated in response to H.pylori infection in gastric epithelial cells. However, the regulatory mechanisms for the expression of TLR4 in H.pylori infection have not been clearly defined. The aims of this study are to present the evidence that microRNA let-7b directly regulates TLR4 expression in human gastric epithelial cells, and subsequently influences the activation of NF-κB and the expression of the downstream genes in H.pylori infection. METHODS: The expression of let-7b was determined in gastric mucosa specimens and in two gastric epithelial cell lines using quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of TLR4 was determined by immunohistochemistry staining and RT-PCR. The potential target of let-7b was identified by luciferase reporter assay and Western blot. Let-7b mimics and inhibitors were used to examine the effects of let-7b on NF-κB activity. The expression of the downstream genes of NF-κB was also determined in cells infected with H.pylori 26695. RESULTS: Let-7b was significantly decreased in gastric mucosa specimens and in gastric epithelial cell lines (AGS, GES-1 infected with H.pylori 26695 (cagA+. Let-7b was complementary to the 3'-UTR of TLR4 mRNA and regulated TLR4 expression via post-transcriptional suppression in gastric epithelium. Infection of H.pylori induced the expression of TLR4 and activated NF-κB in AGS and GES-1 cells. Overexpression of let-7b by mimics downregulated TLR4, and subsequently attenuated NF-κB, MyD88, NF-κB1/p50, RelA/p65. The expression of IL-8, COX-2 and CyclinD1 was inhibited in H.pylori infected cells with let-7b overexpression. Both TAK-242 (TLR4 inhibitor and SN50 (NF-κB inhibitor significantly inhibited the H.pylori induced downregulation of let-7b. CONCLUSIONS: Let-7b targets at TLR4 mRNA, and regulates the activation of NF-κB and the expression of the downstream genes

  7. Bifidobacterium lactis B94 plus inulin for Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children: does it increase eradication rate and patient compliance?

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    Islek, A; Sayar, E; Yilmaz, A; Artan, R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of Bifidobacterium lactis B94 and inulin (synbiotic) treatment on eradication rate and patient compliance in subjects treated for symptomatic H. pylori infection. Patients with symptomatic H. pylori infection were divided into two groups. One group was treated with standard triple therapy (lansoprazole, amoxicillin, and clarithromycin) and B. lactis B94 (5 × 109 CFU/dose) plus inulin (900 mg) twice daily for seven days. The control group was treated with standard triple therapy and placebo. The side effects and eradication rates were evaluated at the end of the study. Ninety-three patients with H. pylori infection were treated with either synbiotic plus triple therapy (n = 47) or placebo plus triple therapy (n = 46). The infection eradication rates were not significantly different between the synbiotic and placebo groups [intent-to-treat (ITT), 80.8% and 67.3%, p = 0.13, respectively; per-protocol (PP), 86.3% and 81.5%, p = 0.55, respectively]. The drug side effects were significantly higher in the placebo group than in the synbiotic group (63% and 17%, respectively, p < 0.01). Although no intolerable adverse side effects were observed in the synbiotic group, intolerable adverse side effects were observed in 13% of the placebo group (p = 0.01). Our results suggest that twice daily 5 × 109 CFU/dose B. lactis B94 plus 900 mg inulin treatment did not have a direct positive effect on the H. pylori eradication rate. However, this treatment had significantly reduced side effects and indirectly increased eradication rates by increasing patient compliance. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  8. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis.

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    Sinem Oktem-Okullu

    Full Text Available The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1, IL-17 (Th17, and FOXP3 (Treg expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer-based models.

  9. Multiplex-PCR-Based Screening and Computational Modeling of Virulence Factors and T-Cell Mediated Immunity in Helicobacter pylori Infections for Accurate Clinical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktem-Okullu, Sinem; Tiftikci, Arzu; Saruc, Murat; Cicek, Bahattin; Vardareli, Eser; Tozun, Nurdan; Kocagoz, Tanil; Sezerman, Ugur; Yavuz, Ahmet Sinan; Sayi-Yazgan, Ayca

    2015-01-01

    The outcome of H. pylori infection is closely related with bacteria's virulence factors and host immune response. The association between T cells and H. pylori infection has been identified, but the effects of the nine major H. pylori specific virulence factors; cagA, vacA, oipA, babA, hpaA, napA, dupA, ureA, ureB on T cell response in H. pylori infected patients have not been fully elucidated. We developed a multiplex- PCR assay to detect nine H. pylori virulence genes with in a three PCR reactions. Also, the expression levels of Th1, Th17 and Treg cell specific cytokines and transcription factors were detected by using qRT-PCR assays. Furthermore, a novel expert derived model is developed to identify set of factors and rules that can distinguish the ulcer patients from gastritis patients. Within all virulence factors that we tested, we identified a correlation between the presence of napA virulence gene and ulcer disease as a first data. Additionally, a positive correlation between the H. pylori dupA virulence factor and IFN-γ, and H. pylori babA virulence factor and IL-17 was detected in gastritis and ulcer patients respectively. By using computer-based models, clinical outcomes of a patients infected with H. pylori can be predicted by screening the patient's H. pylori vacA m1/m2, ureA and cagA status and IFN-γ (Th1), IL-17 (Th17), and FOXP3 (Treg) expression levels. Herein, we report, for the first time, the relationship between H. pylori virulence factors and host immune responses for diagnostic prediction of gastric diseases using computer-based models.

  10. The Immunomodulator VacA Promotes Immune Tolerance and Persistent Helicobacter pylori Infection through Its Activities on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Djekic, Aleksandra; M?ller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    VacA is a pore-forming toxin that has long been known to induce vacuolization in gastric epithelial cells and to be linked to gastric disorders caused by H. pylori infection. Its role as a major colonization and persistence determinant of H. pylori is less well-understood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the various target cell types of VacA and its mechanism of action; specifically, we focus on the evidence showing that VacA targets myeloid cells and T-cells to directly and indirect...

  11. Are Mucosa CD4+/CD8+ T-Cells Expressions Correlated with the Endoscopic Appearance of Chronic Gastritis Related with Helicobacter pylori Infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasari, Neneng; Bayupurnama, Putut; Maduseno, Sutanto; Indrarti, Fahmi; Triwikatmani, Catharina; Harijadi, Achmad; Nurdjanah, Siti

    2016-06-01

    Local inflammatory processes in the gastric mucosa are followed by extensive immune cell infiltration, resulting in chronic active gastritis characterized by a marked infiltration of T(h)1 cytokine-producing CD4+ and CD8+T-cells Objective. To investigate the correlation between CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in gastric mucosa with endoscopic appearance in chronic gastritis with or without H.pylori infection. Prospective, cross sectional study is performed in a chronic dyspepsia population in July-November 2009 at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The update Sydney system was used to analyze the gastroscopy appearance. Biopsy specimens were stained with HE-stain and IHC-stain. Data were analyzed by t-test, Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation test. Number of 88 consecutive subjects are enrolled the study (50% male; 50% female), age 46±15 years; 25% H.pylori positive. The expression of CD4+ and CD8+ were higher in H.pylori negative subjects, but only the CD4+ was significant (P=0.011). A significant correlation was found between CD4+ and CD8+ in both subjects (r(Hp+)=0.62 and r(Hp-)=0.68; P<0.05). The expression of CD4+ and CD8+ in H.pylori positive showed a significant correlation with gastric lesions (r(CD4+)=-0.60; r(CD8+)=-0.42 ; P<0.05), only erosion showed a significant difference in both subjects. A positive correlation was found between CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration in both subjects with or without H.pylori infection, and a negative correlation was only found between gastric lesion with CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration in H.pylori subject.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiaqi; Zagai, Ulrika; Hallmans, Göran; Nyrén, Olof; Engstrand, Lars; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Duell, Eric J; Overvad, Kim; Katzke, Verena A; Kaaks, Rudolf; Jenab, Mazda; Park, Jin Young; Murillo, Raul; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Riboli, Elio; Aune, Dagfinn; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Capellá, Gabriel; Agudo, Antonio; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Martínez, Begoña; Redondo-Sanchez, Daniel; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Hm Peeters, Petra; Regnér, Sara; Lindkvist, Björn; Naccarati, Alessio; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rebours, Vinciane; Barré, Amélie; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Ye, Weimin

    2017-04-15

    The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms. © 2016 UICC.

  13. A case of cardiac cancer diagnosed after 30 Gy radiation therapy for gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma without helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuhiro; Akamatsu, Taiji; Shinji, Akihiro

    2005-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was referred to Shinshu University Hospital in April 2001 for treatment of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. He had received anti-biotic therapy in spite of no evidence of H. pylori infection in the former hospital 3 years ago, but no remarkable improvement was recognized and endoscopic findings were progressive. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed mucosal redness on the greater curvature and the anterior wall of the body. Biopsy specimens taken from the lesions showed remarkable infiltration of atypical small lymphocytes, and this lesions were diagnosed MALT lymphoma by an immunophenotypic studies. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) showed that MALT lymphoma was limited within the mucosa and submucosa. Staging work up revealed stage I. After written informed consent, he was treated by 30 Gy radiation therapy for gastric MALT lymphoma. Response assessment was performed by EGD, EUS, and biopsy specimens, and a complete remission was confirmed. After that, he was followed up with regular intervals, and EGD was performed every 6 months. He was diagnosed to have O I type cardiac cancer at 21 months after radiation therapy. He underwent proximal partial gastrectomy, and histopathological findings showed as follows: O I type, 17 x 12 mm, tub 2, SM, ly 1, v 1, n 0, PM (-), DM (-), INFγ, stage I A. No residual lesion of gastric MALT lymphoma and no dysplasia of gastric mucosa was recognized. Causal relationship between radiation therapy and carcinogenesis in this case is unclear. However, it might be suggested by the facts that cancer occurred in the radiation field where MALT lymphoma had been presented and gastric cancer was rare in the stomach without H. pylori infection. (author)

  14. Cure of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with reflux oesophagitis treated with long term omeprazole reverses gastritis without exacerbation of reflux disease: results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); N. Havu; A. Walan; M. Lamm; G.F. Nelis; E.C. Klinkenberg-Knol; P. Snel; D. Goldfain; J.J. Kolkman (Jeroen); H.P. Festen; J. Dent; P. Zeitoun

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori gastritis may progress to glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, conditions that predispose to gastric cancer. Profound suppression of gastric acid is associated with increased severity of H pylori gastritis. This prospective

  15. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carini Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  16. The 13carbon urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in subjects with atrophic gastritis: evaluation in a primary care setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, A.; van Eeden, S.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; Sabbe, L. J. M.; den Hartog, G.; Biemond, I.; Lamers, C. B. H. W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (13)Carbon urea breath testing is reliable to detect current infection with Helicobacter pylori but has been reported to be of limited value in selected patients with atrophic body gastritis or acid-lowering medication. AIM: To evaluate the accuracy of (13)carbon urea breath testing for

  17. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection; Culture, microscopy of biopsy smears, and the rapid urease test compared with the sup 14 C-urea breath test. Diagnostikk av Helicobacter pylori-infeksjon; Urease hurtigtest, mikroskopi av utstryk, og dyrking av ventrikkelbiopsi sammenlignet med sup 14 C-urea-pusteproeven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nysaeter, G; Berstad, K; Weberg, R; Berstad, A; Hardardottir, H [Haukeland Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    1992-08-01

    By employing the {sup 14}C-urea breath test as the reference methods the authors determined the specificity and sensitivity of three bioptic methods for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in 103 subjects. All biopsy specimens were obtained from the gastric antrum. For culture the specificity was 100%. Its applicability was reduced, however, by a low sensitivity (73.8%) and a delay of several days before the final result was available. Microscopy of Loeffler-stained biopsy smears yielded a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 92.9%, but the method was regarded time-consuming. The rapid urease test yielded a specificity of 98.4% and a sensitivity of 85.7%. Being quick, simple and inexpensive, the rapid urease test is well suited for routine use in gastroscopy. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Pathogenesis of Double-Dose Proton Pump Inhibitor-Resistant Non-Erosive Reflux Disease, and Mechanism of Reflux Symptoms and Gastric Acid Secretion-Suppressive Effect in the Presence or Absence of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawami, Noriyuki; Takenouchi, Nana; Umezawa, Mariko; Hoshino, Shintaro; Hanada, Yuriko; Hoshikawa, Yoshimasa; Sano, Hirohito; Hoshihara, Yoshio; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Various mechanisms have been suggested to be responsible for contributing to the occurrence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-resistant non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The aims of this study were to clarify the pathogenesis of PPI-resistant NERD. Fifty-three patients with NERD, who had persistent reflux symptoms despite taking double-dose PPI, were included in this study. After excluding eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and primary esophageal motility disorder, esophageal impedance-pH monitoring was carried out. In symptom index (SI)-positive patients, the mechanism of SI positivity and the percent time with intragastric pH >4 were investigated according to the presence or absence of Helicobacter pylori infection. One of the 53 patients had EoE, and 4 had primary esophageal motility disorder. Twenty-three and 2 patients were SI-positive for liquid and gas-only reflux respectively. Of 17 SI-positive, H. pylori-negative patients, 5 were SI-positive for acid reflux, whereas all of the H. pylori-positive patients were SI-positive for non-acid reflux. The percent time with intragastric pH >4 was significantly lower in the H. pylori-negative patients than in the H. pylori-positive patients. The pathogenesis of double-dose PPI-resistant NERD was identified in 57%. In some of H. pylori-negative patients, acid-related symptoms were observed. However, in H. pylori-positive patients, these symptoms were excluded by taking double-dose PPI. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. CURCUMIN IN COMBINATION WITH TRIPLE THERAPY REGIMES AMELIORATES OXIDATIVE STRESS AND HISTOPATHOLOGIC CHANGES IN CHRONIC GASTRITIS-ASSOCIATED HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judaki, Arezu; Rahmani, Asghar; Feizi, Jalil; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastric infection is a main cause of inflammatory changes and gastric cancers. The aim of this study was finding the effects of curcumin on oxidative stress and histological changes in chronic gastritis associated with H. pylori. In a randomized clinical trial, patients were divided into two groups: a standard triple therapy group and triple therapy with curcumin group. Endoscopic and histological examinations were measured for all patients before and after 8 weeks. Triple therapy with curcumin treatment group significantly decreased malondialdehyde markers, glutathione peroxides and increased total antioxidant capacity of the gastric mucosa at the end of study compared to baseline and triple regimen groups. In addition, the oxidative damage to DNA was significantly decreased in triple therapy with curcumin group at the end of study compared to baseline and compared to triple therapy (Pgastritis associated by H. pylori.

  20. Prevalência da infecção por Helicobacter pylori e das lesões precusoras do câncer gástrico em pacientes dispéticos Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer precursor lesions in patients with dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Bizarro Muller

    2007-06-01

    foi menor que 1. CONCLUSÃO: A prevalência da infecção por H. pylori foi alta (76% e os indivíduos infectados apresentaram probabilidade 10 vezes maior para a ocorrência de lesão da mucosa gástrica. Gastrite crônica não-atrófica apresentou prevalência de 77%, gastrite atrófica 3% e metaplasia intestinal 15%. A infecção pelo H. pylori determinou uma probabilidade 3 vezes maior para o desenvolvimento de gastrite crônica não-atrófica e não determinou risco para a ocorrência de gastrite atrófica e metaplasia intestinal, sugerindo que possivelmente outros fatores de risco, além do H. pylori, estejam envolvidos no processo da carcinogênese gástrica.BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori infection has been considered to play significant role in gastric carcinogenesis, but only a minority of people who harbor this organism will develop gastric cancer. H. pylori infection first causes chronic non atrophic gastritis. Chronic non atrophic gastritis may evolve to atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia and finally to dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. AIMS: To estimate the prevalence of H. pylori infection and the precancerous gastric lesions and their relationship, in patients with dyspeptic symptoms who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at a reference center in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. METHODS: We analyzed gastric biopsies taken from corpus and antrum of patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for H. pylori detection, between 1994 and 2003. According to Sydney system, chronic non atrophic gastritis, atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia were diagnosed by histological examination (H-E stain. The histological diagnoses were related to H. pylori infection status. RESULTS: Biopsies from 2,019 patients were included in the study. Patients mean age was 52 (±15 and 59% were female. Seventy six percent had H. pylori infection. Normal mucosa, chronic non atrophic gastritis, atrophic gastritis and intestinal

  1. Relationship between caga-positive Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of gastric cancer: a case control study in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara Coelho Meine

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Although Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a class I carcinogen, the presence of infection is not a